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Sample records for acute myeloblastic leukemia

  1. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

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    Olfa Kassar; Feten Kallel; Manel Ghorbel; Hatem. Bellaaj; Zeineb Mnif; Moez Elloumi

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patie...

  2. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

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    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  3. Analyses of karyotypic characteristics and prognosis in pediatric acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮敏

    2012-01-01

    Objective Acute myeloblastic leukemia(AML) accounts for 15 to 25 percent of childhood acute leukemias. Cytogenetic information is important for diagnosis,classification and prognosis of AML. Our aim was to analyze the relationship between karyotypic characteristics and prognosis of childhood

  4. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

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    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-02-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic leukemic cells were found within a distinct subpopulation that was less "differentiated" than the total cell population. Clonogenic leukemic cells from different patients could be divided into three phenotype groups. In the first group (7 of 20 cases), the clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of the normal multipotent colony-forming cell (Ia, MY9). These cases tended to have "undifferentiated" (FAB M1) morphology, and the total cell population generally lacked expression of "late" monocyte antigens such as MY3 and Mo2. A second group (seven cases) of clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of an "early" (day 14) colony-forming unit granulocyte-monocyte (CFU-GM), and a third group (six cases) was characteristic of a "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. The cases in these latter two groups tended to have myelomonocytic (FAB M4) morphology and to express monocyte surface antigens. These results suggest that the clonogenic cells are a distinct subpopulation in all cases of AML, and may be derived from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells at multiple points in the differentiation pathway. The results further support the possibility that selected monoclonal antibodies have the potential to purge leukemic clonogenic cells from bone marrow in some AML patients without eliminating critical normal progenitor cells.

  5. Atypical presentation of herpes zoster in a case with acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fesih Aktar; Sinan Akbayram; Necmettin Akdeniz; Sirac Aktar; Cihangir Akgn; Murat Doan; Hseyin aksen; Ahmet Faik Oner

    2013-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is often associated with painful erythematous vesicular eruptions of the skin or mucous membranes. Approximately 10% to 30% of the population will suffer from HZ during their lifetime. HZ is infrequent in healthy children. However, diminished cellular immunity seems to increase risk of reactivation because incidence increases with age and in immunocompromised states. We report a 7-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia HZ infection on the right palmar, elbow and forearm region (C7, C8 and T1 dermatomes). We want to indicate unusual localization of HZ on the acute myeloblastic leukemia child patient.

  6. Transient thrombocytosis with megathrombocytes in a case of acute myeloblastic leukemia.

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    Kotru, Mrinalini; Batra, Madhu; Gomber, Sunil; Rusia, Usha

    2009-01-01

    Thrombocytosis is commonly seen in reactive conditions and certain neoplastic states, such as chronic myeloproliferative disorders. It is rarely seen in acute leukemia. A 12-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia (FAB M2) in remission presented with pyoderma. Her hemogram revealed anemia (Hb-6.4g/dl), leucopenia (TLC - 1.2 x 109/L) and thrombocytosis (platelet count- 580 x 109/L). A peripheral blood film showed numerous abnormally large platelets with few atypical cells. The thrombocytosis subsided with the clearance of infection but atypical cells persisted. One month later, she relapsed. Cytogenetic analysis revealed variable results (trisomy 9 and deletion 3). This case has been presented because thrombocytosis is rare in AML and its appearance calls for a close follow-up.

  7. Transient thrombocytosis with megathrombocytes in a case of acute myeloblastic leukemia

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    Kotru Mrinalini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytosis is commonly seen in reactive conditions and certain neoplastic states, such as chronic myeloproliferative disorders. It is rarely seen in acute leukemia. A 12-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia (FAB M2 in remission presented with pyoderma. Her hemogram revealed anemia (Hb-6.4g/dl, leucopenia (TLC - 1.2 x 109/L and thrombocytosis (platelet count- 580 x 109/L. A peripheral blood film showed numerous abnormally large platelets with few atypical cells. The thrombocytosis subsided with the clearance of infection but atypical cells persisted. One month later, she relapsed. Cytogenetic analysis revealed variable results (trisomy 9 and deletion 3. This case has been presented because thrombocytosis is rare in AML and its appearance calls for a close follow-up.

  8. MLL rearrangements in pediatric acute lymphoblastic and myeloblastic leukemias: MLL specific and lineage specific signatures

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    te Kronnie Geertruy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of MLL rearrangements in acute leukemia results in a complex number of biological modifications that still remain largely unexplained. Armstrong et al. proposed MLL rearrangement positive ALL as a distinct subgroup, separated from acute lymphoblastic (ALL and myeloblastic leukemia (AML, with a specific gene expression profile. Here we show that MLL, from both ALL and AML origin, share a signature identified by a small set of genes suggesting a common genetic disregulation that could be at the basis of mixed lineage leukemia in both phenotypes. Methods Using Affymetrix® HG-U133 Plus 2.0 platform, gene expression data from 140 (training set + 78 (test set ALL and AML patients with (24+13 and without (116+65 MLL rearrangements have been investigated performing class comparison (SAM and class prediction (PAM analyses. Results We identified a MLL translocation-specific (379 probes signature and a phenotype-specific (622 probes signature which have been tested using unsupervised methods. A final subset of 14 genes grants the characterization of acute leukemia patients with and without MLL rearrangements. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that a small subset of genes identifies MLL-specific rearrangements and clearly separates acute leukemia samples according to lineage origin. The subset included well-known genes and newly discovered markers that identified ALL and AML subgroups, with and without MLL rearrangements.

  9. Effect of Acupressure on Nausea-Vomiting in Patients With Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia.

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    Avc, Hatice Sevil; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ovayolu, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acupressure, applied at P6 (Neiguan) acupuncture point, on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. This was a randomized controlled trial conducted on patients with myeloblastic leukemia. A total of 90 patients, who received the same chemotherapy regimen and antiemetic therapy, were included in the study as 30 patients in the control group, 30 patients in the band group, and 30 patients in the pressure group. Although acupressure was applied by placing wristbands at P6 acupuncture point of both wrists in patients of the band group for totally 4 days, acupressure was applied with the use of finger pressure in patients of the pressure group for totally 4 days. No intervention was made in patients of the control group other than the routine antiemetic therapy. The data of the study were collected by using a questionnaire and nausea-vomiting chart. Severity of nausea-vomiting was assessed by using the visual analog scale on this chart. It was determined that the acupressure band applied to the patients included in the study reduced number and severity of nausea-vomiting (P acupressure applied with pressure did not affect number and severity of nausea-vomiting (P > .05). It was found that the acupressure band was effective for reducing the chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

  10. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML - Acute... myeloblastic leukaemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemias; Acute... Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelocytic Leukemias; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemias; Acute... granulocytic leukaemia; Acute myeloblastic leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia - category; Acute... myeloid leukaemia, disease; Acute myeloid leukemia; Acute myelo

  11. Subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloblastic leukemia.

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    Srisuttiyakorn, Chutika; Reeve, Jennifer; Reddy, Swapna; Imaeda, Suguru; Lazova, Rossitza

    2014-05-01

    Subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome is a rare variant of histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome (SS). We present a 68-year-old woman with subcutaneous histiocytoid SS in association with refractory myelodysplastic syndrome transformed to acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), status post induction chemotherapy and with persistent blasts (50%) in the bone marrow and blood, accompanied with neutropenia. The patient presented to the emergency room with fever and altered mental status. Clinical examination revealed approximately 20 scattered 0.5-2 cm, pink to pink-purple non-tender firm nodules on the legs and left arm. The differential diagnosis included Sweet’s syndrome (deep), leukemia cutis, infection, polyarteritis nodosa and erythema nodosum. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy from the left arm revealed a nodular infiltrate of neutrophils and histiocytoid mononuclear cells solely in the lobular compartment of the subcutaneous fat with focal areas of necrosis. Most cells in the infiltrate labeled with myeloperoxidase (MPO) including the histiocytoid cells. The cells were negative for CD34 and CD117. All special stains for microorganisms were negative. A diagnosis of subcutaneous histiocytoid SS was made. A subcutaneous histiocytoid SS should be suspected when a neutrophilic/histiocytoid panniculitis, occurring in the setting of myeloid disorders, is encountered and after exclusion of an infectious process and leukemia cutis.

  12. [Hepatosplenic and kidneys candidasis complicating an acute myeloblastic leukemia. A case treated with voriconazole and caspofungin].

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    Elouennass, M; Doghmi, K; Fagot, T; Soler, C; Mac Nab, C; Foissaud, V; De Revel, T; Hervé, V

    2005-01-01

    We report the observation of hepato-splenic and kidneys candidiasis complicating the chemotherapy of a myeloblastic leukemia (LAM5b). Following the lack of effectiveness of a first line treatement, using amphotericine B liposomale and 5-fluorocytosine, implementation of an association of new molecules, a triazole of second generation (voriconazole) and an echinocandine (caspofungine) has allowed a successful result.

  13. A tetraploid minimally differentiated acute myeloblastic leukemia with extensive erythrophagocytosis: a case report and literature review.

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    Li, Li; Li, Jianlan; Li, Guoxia; Tan, Yanhong; Chen, Xiuhua; Ren, Fanggang; Guo, Haixiu; Wang, Hongwei

    2012-12-01

    Tetraploidy is a rare chromosome number aberration in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and may be associated with erythrophagocytosis by leukemic blast cells. We report a 48-year-old female patient with minimally differentiated acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML-M0) exhibiting tetraploidy and erythrophagocytosis. The karyotype was 46,XX[2]/92,XXXX[18]. Bone marrow aspirate smears showed large and prominent nuclei, with erythrophagocytosis in leukemic cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using RUNX1 dual color break probes detected four fusion signals, accounting for 95 % (190/200), in one interphase nucleus. The mutations of TP53 and the fusion genes RUNX1/ETO, CBFβ/MYH11, and PML/RARα were all negative. This patient showed a poor response to chemotherapy, and died 66 days after the onset. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of AML-M0 with tetraploidy and erythrophagocytosis and without additional chromosome aberrations. This case of tetraploid AML with poor prognosis suggests that further biological study of more cases of tetraploid AML will be of great importance in improving the understanding and prognosis of this tetraploid AML.

  14. Growth response of acute myeloblastic leukemia cells to recombinant human thrombopoietin.

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    Matsumura, I; Kanakura, Y; Kato, T; Ikeda, H; Ishikawa, J; Horikawa, Y; Hashimoto, K; Moriyama, Y; Tsujimura, T; Nishiura, T

    1995-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a newly identified hematopoietic growth factor that stimulates both megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis through its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor encoded by the c-mpl proto-oncogene. In an effort to investigate the effect of TPO on human myeloid leukemia cells, the expression of c-mpl and the proliferative response to recombinant human (rh) TPO were investigated in a series of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Of 50 cases of AML, the c-mpl mRNA was detectable by means of Northern blot analysis in 26 cases, and the in vitro treatment with rhTPO led to proliferation of AML cells in 22 cases. The c-mpl expression and proliferative response to rhTPO was observed in all subtypes of AML and did not correlate with French-American-British classification, whereas all cases of M7-type AML cells expressed c-mpl and proliferated in response to rhTPO. Furthermore, rhTPO-induced proliferation of AML cells was augmented with the addition of interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6, stem cell factor, or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. These results suggested that c-mpl may be functional in terms of supporting proliferation of various types of AML cells and that TPO may contribute, at least in part, to abnormal growth of the cells, especially in combination with other hematopoietic growth factors.

  15. [Bone marrow autotransplantation in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia in primary remission].

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    Richard, C; Iriondo, A; Baro, J; Conde, E; Hermosa, V; Alsar, M J; Gómez Casares, M T; Muruzabal, M J; Pérez Encinas, M; Zubizarreta, A

    1990-09-22

    Fifteen bone marrow autotransplants (BMAT) in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were performed after the first remission. The mean age was 37 years (range 12 to 60 years). According to the morphological classification FAB, 8 patients had monocytic leukemia (M4, M5) and 7 myeloid leukemia (M1, M2, M3). The mean interval elapsed between the date of complete remission and the BMAT was 3.9 months (range 1 to 5-9 months). In 8 patients this interval was longer than 6 months and in 7 cases it was shorter than 6 months. After achievement of the complete remission all patients underwent certain cycles of intensification before the BMAT. Eight patients received only a cycle whereas 7 patients received more than one cycle (between 2 and 4). The conditioning protocol consisted of cyclophosphamide (CP) (60 mg/kg x 2) and total body radiotherapy (TBR) (10 Gy) in 9 patients; CP and busulfan in five; and CP, cytarabine at high doses and melphalan in one case. Marrow extraction was performed after completion of chemotherapy of intensification. In 5 cases the bone marrow was depleted of leukemic cells by previous in vitro treatment with ASTA-Z. There are at present 8 alive patients. The survival free of illness was 51.8%. Seven patients died: 3 cases because relapse of the leukemia, 3 due to attachment failure of the transplantation, and one patient suffered a viral myocarditis. The survival free of illness was significantly longer in those patients transplanted after 6 months of the complete remission.

  16. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Effects of recombinant human GM-CSF on proliferation of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

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    Griffin, J D; Young, D; Herrmann, F; Wiper, D; Wagner, K; Sabbath, K D

    1986-05-01

    Proliferation of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells in vitro is limited in most cases to a small subset of blasts that have several properties of stem cells. These leukemic colony-forming cells (AML-CFU) generally require addition of exogenous growth factors for proliferation in agar or methylcellulose. These factors can be supplied by media conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal leukocytes or by CSF-secreting tumor cell lines. However, the exact factor or factors required for stimulation of AML-CFU growth have not been defined. We compared the AML-CFU stimulatory activity of a human recombinant GM-CSF with that of GCT-CM, Mo-CM, and the PHA-leukocyte feeder system in 15 cases of AML. In each of the 12 cases that required exogenous growth factors for maximum AML-CFU growth, recombinant GM-CSF could replace either GM-CSF or Mo-CM, and could partially replace the PHA-leukocyte feeder system. These results indicate that this GM-CSF is a growth promoter of AML-CFU in these culture systems.

  18. Acute myeloblastic leukemia-associated Marfan syndrome and Davidoff-Dyke-Masson syndrome: a case report

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    Ahmet Faik Öner

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We present herein a 23-year-old man with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML associated with Davidoff-Dyke-Masson syndrome (DDMS and Marfan syndrome (MS. The diagnosis of DDMS was based on findings including left facial asymmetry, left hemiparesis, mental retardation, right cerebral hemiatrophy, dilatation of the ipsilateral lateral ventricle and calvarial thickening. The diagnosis of MS was based on clinical findings including tall stature, myopia, retinitis pigmentosa, blue scleras, scoliosis, pectus excavatum, arachnodactyly and low ratio of upper/lower body segment. The patient developed hepatosplenomegaly, gingival hypertrophy and pancytopenia. Peripheral blood film and bone marrow examination showed that most of nucleated cells were blasts; immunophenotype of those cells showed CD11+, CD13+, CD14+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of AML (FAB-M5. After induction chemotherapy, remission was obtained. To the best of our knowledge, our case is the third report of AML in MS syndrome, while AML associated with DDMS and MS has not been previously reported in the literature.

  19. Cytogenetic findings in 303 Mexican patients with de novo acute myeloblastic leukemia.

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    Arana-Trejo, R M; Gómez-Morales, E; Rubio-Borja, M E; Kassack-Ipiña, J J; Cervantes-Peredo, A; Guerrero-Rivera, S; González-Llaven, J; Gutiérrez-Romero, M; Pizzuto-Chávez, J; Kofman-Alfaro, S

    1997-01-01

    In this report we show the chromosomal changes seen in a group of 303 Mexican patients with de novo Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia (AML). Two hundred forty-two patients were diagnosed and treated at two hospitals affiliated with the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). These are the Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI and Centro Medico La Raza Hospitals; the remaining 61 patients were diagnosed and treated at the Hospital General de Mexico (HGM). Clonal abnormalities were detected in 75.6% of the patients; this result agrees with what has been reported in other large series of AML studies. The incidence of changes per hospital was similar in patients from the IMSS hospitals (72-75%), while an increase was seen in patients from the HGM (85.2%). The chromosomal changes seen in this study in order of frequency were: t(15;17)[18.8%], t(9;22)[9.2%], miscellaneous chromosomal changes (mainly rearrangements of chromosomes 1,2,3,12y17)[8.2%], abnormalities of 16q22 [7.3%], t(8;21)[6.3%], -7/del(7q)[5.6%], t(6;9)[5.3%], and abnormalities of 11q23 [4.6%]. We reported an increase in the incidence of certain types of chromosomal changes seen in cases of AML, in comparison with reports from other countries. These differences could be due to methodological variations, although ethnic, socioeconomic and nutritional differences must not be disregarded. We support this finding when comparing distribution of changes in the population of patients seen in the IMSS hospitals with those from the HGM; the main difference lies in the socioeconomic level.

  20. Hypertension and Life-Threatening Bleeding in Children with Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Treated with FLT3 Inhibitors

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    Deniz Yılmaz Karapınar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiences with new multikinase inhibitors are limited, especially in children. In this report we summarize our experience with 2 patients with relapsed acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML, one with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3-internal tandem duplication mutation and the other with a single base mutation (D835Y. Both patients received sorafenib, one for 19 days and the other for 42 days, with clofarabine-including chemotherapy. One additionally received sunitinib for a total of 20 days. Both patients developed severe pancytopenia, hypertension, life-threatening bleedings from the gastrointestinal system, and, finally, intrapulmonary hemorrhage. Although both reached severe aplasia of the bone marrow without blastic infiltration, death occurred with neutropenic sepsis.

  1. Antileukemic HLA-restricted T-cell clones generated with naturally processed peptides eluted from acute myeloblastic leukemia blasts.

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    Ostankovitch, M; Buzyn, A; Bonhomme, D; Connan, F; Bouscary, D; Heshmati, F; Dreyfus, F; Choppin, J; Guillet, J G

    1998-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that transfusions of HLA-compatible donor lymphocytes may induce complete remission in marrow-grafted patients with relapses of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). We investigated the in vitro generation of antileukemia T-cell clones obtained from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a partially HLA-compatible donor (HLA-A2 and B7 molecules in common with the leukemic blasts) after stimulation with a pool of naturally processed peptides extracted from leukemic blast cells collected at diagnosis from a patient with hyperleucocytosis AML. We recovered a significant quantity of peptides that bound to the HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 molecules that were able to induce cytolytic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lines and clones specific for the eluted AML peptides and restricted to the HLA-A2 or B7 molecules. Such CTL line did not recognize the patient's nonleukemic cells, and one clone was able to interact with the leukemic blasts from which the naturally processed peptides had been eluted. Such T-cell clones might provide a rationale for the development of adoptive immunotherapy and could be used to improve the efficiency of HLA-compatible T-lymphocyte transfusions and the graft-versus-leukemia response in patients with AML.

  2. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

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    Chen YJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Li-Wen Fang,5 Wen-Chi Su,6,7 Wen-Yi Hsu,1 Kai-Chien Yang,1 Huey-Lan Huang8 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 6Research Center for Emerging Viruses, China Medical University Hospital, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 8Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of

  3. An adult case of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system.

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    Watanabe,Akiharu

    1984-06-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old female with chronic myelogenous leukemia, who developed myeloblastic involvement of the central nervous system during acute myeloblastic transformation of the disease, was treated with methotrexate intrathecally. The therapy produced prompt clinical response and complete reversal of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings. However, the patient expired 10 months following the acute blastic crisis.

  4. Case Report: CD19-positive acute myeloblastic leukemia with trisomy 21 as a sole acquired karyotypic abnormality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-feng WANG; Yi-zhi CHENG; Huan-ping WANG; Zhi-mei CHEN; Ji-yu LOU; Jie JIN

    2009-01-01

    We report that a 63-year-old Chinese female had acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) in which trisomy 21 (+21) was found as the sole acquired karyotypic abnormality. The blasts were positive for myeloperoxidase, and the immunophenotype was positive for cluster of differentiation 19 (CDI9), CD33, CD34, and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DR. The chromosomal analysis of bone marrow showed 47,XX,+21 [2]/46,XX[18]. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that three copies of AML1 were situated in separate chromosomes, and that t(8;21) was negative. The patient did not have any features of Down syndrome. A diagnosis of CD19-positive AML-M5 was established with trisomy 21 as a sole acquired karyotypic abnormality. The patient did not respond well to chemotherapy and died three months after the diagnosis. This is the first reported case of CD19-positive AM L with trisomy 21 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. The possible prognostic significance of the finding in AML with +21 as the sole acquired karyotypic abnormality was discussed.

  5. Complete clinical recovery of a central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis delayed onset in a child with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

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    Yilmaz, D; Karapinar, B; Balkan, C; Ay, Y; Kavakli, K

    2011-02-01

    Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is a demyelinating disease of the pons often associated with the demyelination of extrapontine areas of the central nervous system. It typically occurs 0.5-7 days after a rapid increment in serum Na level in hyponatremic patients and may lead to death. A 2.5-year-old child with a diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia developed febril neutropenia, diarrhea, gastrointestinal hemorrhage followed by pulmonary aspergillosis. He could not tolerate enteral nutrition. He was given broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal treatment. Laboratory tests showed electrolyte abnormalities including hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia in a chronic course. Twenty three days after a rapid correction of hyponatremia (16 mEq/L/24 h) he revealed flask quadriparesis, disphagia, mutism, irregular respiratory pattern and loss of cough and gag reflex. Cranial magnetic resonance showed central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. He required mechanical ventilation and then he regained his neurologic functions. He completed chemotherapy protocol and underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. After 2.5 years of the occurrence of CPM he is in completely normal physical and neurological status. CPM is a very severe but rare disorder in children with underlying disease. In the presence of multiple etiologic factors it may reveal a delayed onset and optimum outcome can be seen even in the severe clinical presentation with adequate intensive support.

  6. The biologic properties of recombinant human thrombopoietin in the proliferation and megakaryocytic differentiation of acute myeloblastic leukemia cells.

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    Matsumura, I; Kanakura, Y; Kato, T; Ikeda, H; Horikawa, Y; Ishikawa, J; Kitayama, H; Nishiura, T; Tomiyama, Y; Miyazaki, H; Matsuzawa, Y

    1996-10-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is implicated as a primary regulator of megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. However, the biologic effects of TPO on human acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells are largely unknown. To determine if recombinant human (rh) TPO has proliferation-supporting and differentiation-inducing activities in AML cells, 15 cases of AML cells that were exclusively composed of undifferentiated leukemia cells and showed growth response to rhTPO in a short-term culture (72 hours) were subjected to long-term suspension culture with or without rhTPO. Of 15 cases, rhTPO supported proliferation of AML cells for 2 to 4 weeks in 4 cases whose French-American-British subtypes were M0, M2, M4, and M7, respectively. In addition to the proliferation-supporting activity, rhTPO was found to induce AML cells to progress to some degree of megakaryocytic differentiation at both morphologic and surface-phenotypic level in 2 AML cases with M0 and M7 subtypes. The treatment of AML cells with rhTPO resulted in rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of the TPO-receptor, c-mpl, and STAT3 in all of cases tested. By contrast, the expression of erythroid/megakaryocyte-specific transcription factors (GATA-1, GATA-2, and NF-E2) was markedly induced or enhanced in only 2 AML cases that showed megakaryocytic differentiation in response to rhTPO. These results suggested that, at least in a fraction of AML cases, TPO could not only support the proliferation of AML cells irrespective of AML subtypes, but could also induce megakaryocytic differentiation, possibly through activation of GATA-1, GATA-2, and NF-E2.

  7. Invasive infection in an acute myeloblastic leukemia patient due to triazole-resistant Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo; da Silva, Carolina Maria; Leão, Mariele Porto Carneiro; Macario, Michele Chianca; Filho, Gustavo Antônio da Trindade Meira Henriques; de Oliveira, Neiva Tinti; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2011-11-01

    Non-albicans Candida species are being increasingly reported as causes of nosocomial fungal infections. For example, invasive candidiasis caused by C. tropicalis has been associated with hematologic malignancies. In this study, we report a fatal case of fungemia and a possible urinary and pulmonary infection in a leukemia patient that was due to a strain of C. tropicalis resistant to 2 triazole antifungals.

  8. Novel strategies of adoptive immunotherapy: How natural killer cells may change the treatment of elderly patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoli, Roberto M; Parisi, Sarah; Curti, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Although many attempts have been made to identify novel molecular-targeted therapies for patients with acute myeloid leukemia, their translation into the clinic have had limited impact. In particular, the question of effective and curative treatments for elderly patients, who are not eligible for stem cell transplantation, remains an unmet medical need. To answer this question, a wide range of immunologic therapeutic strategies, mostly T cell based, have been proposed and investigated. At present, however, the clinical results have been largely unsatisfactory. Natural killer cells have recently been used as a means of adoptive immunotherapy with promising clinical results. On the basis of recent clinical reports and moving from the basic immunobiology of natural killer cells, here we discuss some open issues in the clinical translation of natural killer-based adoptive immunotherapy for the management of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Granulocytic Sarcoma of the Male Breast in Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia with Concurrent Deletion of 5q and Trisomy 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizwan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique case of Granulocytic Sarcoma (GS in a male, who presented to us with a painless right breast mass without any prior history of Leukemia. GS is an extramedullary tumor of myeloproliferative precursors and may involve multiple sites of the body, but involvement of male breast is extremely rare. In the absence of clinical history or hematological abnormality, GS may be misdiagnosed, depending on the degree of myeloid differentiation present within the tumor. Often it is misdiagnosed as lymphoma. Diagnosis is made by finding eosinophilic myelocytes, myeloperoxidase, chloroacetate esterase staining, and lysozyme immunostain. Chemotherapy regimens similar to acute myeloid leukemia are recommended to treat GS. Recognition of this rare entity is important because early, aggressive chemotherapy can induce regression of the tumor and improve patient longevity.

  10. Effects of thrombopoietin (c-mpl ligand) on growth of blast cells from patients with transient abnormal myelopoiesis and acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, H; Shimazaki, C; Yamagata, N; Goto, H; Inaba, T; Kikuta, T; Sumikuma, T; Sudo, Y; Ashihara, E; Fujita, N; Hibi, S; Imashuku, S; Ito, E; Nakagawa, M

    1997-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a ligand for c-mpl that promotes both proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes in vivo and in vitro. We investigated the expression of c-mpl transcripts and the effects of recombinant human TPO (rhTPO) on the proliferation and differentiation of human leukemic cell lines or fresh samples obtained from 32 patients with transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM) or acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Cells were cultured with TPO alone or combined with rh interleukin-3 (IL-3) or stem cell factor (SCF). Expression of c-mpl was verified in 6 of 13 cases tested. All but one of the cases that showed c-mpl expression responded to TPO. Blasts from all cases of TAM or French-American-British (FAB) subtype M7 showed growth responses to TPO with higher sensitivity than cells of other FAB subtypes and these responses were increased by addition of rhIL-3 or rhSCF in some cases. Responses of cells of other FAB subtypes varied. In addition, increased expression of platelet-specific surface antigens on MO7E cells after incubation with rhTPO was observed. These data suggest that TPO may be involved in the abnormal proliferation and differentiation of human leukemic cells, especially of M7 and TAM cells, considered to be of megakaryocytic lineage.

  11. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Identification of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia who benefit from the addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin: results of the MRC AML15 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnett, Alan K; Hills, Robert K; Milligan, Donald

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antibody-directed chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may permit more treatment to be administered without escalating toxicity. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) is an immunoconjugate between CD33 and calicheamicin that is internalized when binding to the epitope. We previously establ...

  14. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  15. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  16. 雷利度胺治疗难治复发急性粒细胞白血病临床观察%Clinical Observation of Lenalidomide Treat Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔德胜; 赵红丽; 董敏; 孙国勋; 施婺丹; 洪珞珈

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe toxicities and efficacy in patients relapsed or refractory acute myeloblastic leukemia wit] lenalidomide. Methods: Lenalidomide was given orally at doses of 50mg daily on days 1 through 21 of 28-day cycles. Results: Si Patients were given a median of four prior therapies (range, two to six therapies), frVe patients with AML responded. Two of 6 patient achieved complete remission (CR), two of 6 patients achieved partial remission (PR), one of 6 patients achieved Peripheral bloa improvement,One patient had disease progression death. Toxicities of lenalidomide were Fatigue (4/6), febrile neutropenia (3/6] neutropenia (4/6), thrombocytopenia(l/6), anemia(l/6). Conclusions: Lenalidomide has significant activity in relapsed or refractory acut myeloblastic leukemia patients and the toxicities was active with relatively low toxicity in patients with relapsed/refractory AML.%目的:观察雷利度胺治疗难治复发急性粒细胞白血病的疗效及不良反应.方法:给予雷利度胺单药治疗,雷利度胺50mg/d,口服给药,连续给药21天,28天为一个疗程.结果:应用雷利度胺4(2~6)个疗程,5例有效,2例获得完全缓解,2例部分缓解,1例因疾病迅速进展死亡退出试验.不良反应主要为疲乏4例,中性粒细胞减少性发热3例,中粒细胞减少4例,血小板减少1例,贫血1例.结论:应用雷利度胺治疗难治复发白血病有效,不良反应轻微且易于耐受.

  17. Clinical case of acute myeloblastic leukemia with t(8;21(q22;q22 in a patient with Klinefelter’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanya Slavcheva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter’s syndrome is characterized by abnormal karyotype 47, XXY and a phenotype associated with hypogonadism and gynecomastia. Often the disease can be diagnosed accidentally, when carrying out cytogenetic analysis in cases of a malignant blood disease. We present the clinical case of a patient diagnosed with acute myelomonoblastic leukemia- M4 Eo (AML- M4, where by means of classic cytogenetics a karyotype was found corre-sponding to Klinefelter’s syndrome. Three induction courses of polychemotherapy wermade, which led to remission of the disease, documented both flowcytometrically and cytogenetically.

  18. [Bone marrow transplantation in Mexico. Report of the 1st successful case in acute myeloblastic leukemia. Grupo de Trasplante Medular Oseo del INNSZ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, E; Sosa, R

    1992-01-01

    The first case of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) done in Mexico is reported. The patient was a 26 year old Mexican woman who in October 1987 was diagnosed of having AML of the M2 subtype. After three cycles of the TADOP regimen (6-thioguanine, cytosine-arabinoside, doxorubicin, vincristine & prednisone), the patient entered complete remission. Unfortunately, after a seven month period of remission she suffered a relapse which was refractory to a new chemotherapy cycle. On 9/14/88 an allogeneic BMT from her HLA identical brother was performed. The conditioning regimen consisted of busulfan and cyclophosphamide. Prophylaxis for GVHD consisted of cyclosporine and methylprednisolone. The posttransplantation course was satisfactory, reaching > 500 neutrophils x 10(9)/L on day 14 and > 50,000 platelets x 10(9)/L without support on day 23 posttransplant. The patient developed fever of unknown etiology, which was satisfactorily resolved with ceftazidime, vancomycin and metronidazole. She also presented a grade II oral and esophageal mucositis. As a late complication, on day 90 posttransplant, she developed a bilateral pneumonia which was resolved with sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim administration. Up to the time of this report (40 months posttransplant) the patient is completely asymptomatic, is under no immunosuppression, and shows no evidence of graft versus host disease or recurrent leukemia.

  19. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ayatollahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 gene is originally defined as a tumor suppressor gene and a transcription factor that overexpressed in leukemic cells. It is highly expressed in more than 80% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, both in bone marrow (BM and in peripheral blood (PB, and it is used as a powerful and independent marker of minimal residual disease (MRD; we have determined the expression levels of the WT1 by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR in PB and BM in 126 newly diagnosed AML patients. Materials and Methods: This study was done in molecular pathology and cancer research center from April 2014 to June 2015, RQ-PCR method was used to determine the WT1 gene expression in BM and/or PB samples from 126 patients of AML, we cloned both WT1 and ABL genes for creating a standard curve, and we calculate copy number of WT1 genes in patients. Results: A total of 126 AML patients consist of 70 males (55.6% and 56 females (44.4%, with a median age of 26 years; 104 (81% patients out of 126 show overexpression of WT1 gene. We also concomitant monitoring of fusion transcripts (PML RARa, AML1-ETO, MLL-MLL, CBFb-MYH11, or DEK-CAN in our patients, the AML1-ETO group showing remarkably low levels of WT1 compared with other fusion transcript and the CBFB-MYH11 showing high levels of WT1. Conclusion: We conclude that WT1 expression by RQ-PCR in AML patients may be employed as an independent tool to detect MRD in the majority of normal karyotype AML patients.

  2. [Comparison of 2 chemotherapy protocols in adult acute myeloblastic leukemia. Results of the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán cooperative group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Mendizábal, E; Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; Labardini-Méndez, J; Gómez-Almaguer, D; Ganci-Cerrud, G; Lozano-de-la-Vega, A

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, the best treatment for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is the induction of bone marrow hypoplasia by ablative combined chemotherapy; the prototype of these schedules is the so-called 7 + 3 (seven days of continuous infusion of cytarabine and three days of one-hour infusion of any anthracycline); these schedules require the support of both platelet transfusions and antibiotics. Other non-ablative schedules have also been tried in the treatment of such patients. Here we analyze the results of the treatment of 76 adult patients with AML; 43 were treated with the classical 7 + 3 schedule, whereas 33 were treated with a combination of chemotherapy used in non-ablative doses (TADOP: thioguanine, arabinosyl-citosine, doxorrubicin, vincristine and prednisone). The results were as follows, respectively, for 7 + 3 and TADOP: complete remission (CR) was achieved in 60 and 48% of patients (p NS); the number of cycles to achieve CR had a median of 1 and 5 months (p less than 0.001); the median duration of the CR was 21 and 10 months (p less than 0.05); fatal myelotoxicity was 30 and 42% (p NS), one-year disease free survival (DFS) was 45 and 46% (p NS) and three-year survival was 22% and 15% (p NS). Additionally, patients treated with 7 + 3 were divided into two groups according to the type of platelet transfusion support; those supported with apheresis equipment and those with centrifugation-derived platelets.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Case of chronic myelocytic leukemia in myeloblastic crisis with eosinophilia after splenic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Kazuo; Otsuka, Teruhisa; Niho, Yoshiyuki; Nagasawa, Kohei; Okamura, Seiichi

    1985-02-01

    We report herein a patient with myeloblastic transformation of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) with eosinophilia after splenic irradiation following chemotherapy. When splenic irradiation of 50 rads per day was given, eosinophils in the peripheral blood increased gradually to more than 70% of the white blood cells, whereas before splenic irradiation they comprised only 1%. Bone marrow aspiration also showed marked eosinophilia after the irradiation. To our knowledge, eosinophilia over 70% both in the peripheral blood and in the bone marrow of patients with myeloblastic transformation of CML has not been reported. (author).

  4. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Early Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Young Adults with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia in First Complete Remission: An Intent-to-Treat Long-Term Analysis of the BGMT Experience%急性髓性白血病年轻患者在第一次完全缓解后行异基因干细胞移植:BGMT研究的长期意向性治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健民; 钟立业

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 文献类型 治疗. 2 证据水平 1b. 3 文献来源 Jourdan E, Boiron JM, Dastugue N, et al.Early allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for young adults with acute myeloblastic leukemia in first complete remission: An intent-to-treat long-term analysis of the BGMT experience [J]. J Clin Oncol,2005,30(23):7676-7684.

  8. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  10. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Modification of the cerebral perfusion during a chemotherapy by arabinoside cytosine (A.R.A.C.) among patients suffering of an acute myelo-blastic leukemia (A.M.L.); Modification de la perfusion cerebrale au cours d'une chimiotherapie par cytosine arabinoside (ARAC) chez les patients atteints d'une leucemie aigue myeloblastique (LAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modzelewski, R.; Vera, P. [Universite de Medecine de Rouen, QUANT.I.F-LITIS EA4108, departement de medecine nucleaire, 76 (France); Lepretre, S.; Tilly, H. [Centre Henri-Becquerel, departement d' hematologie, 76 - Rouen (France); Martinaud, O.; Hannequin, D. [CHU de Rouen, departement de neurologie, 76 (France); Habert, M.O. [CHU de la Pitie-Salpetriere, departement de medecine nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cytosine arabinoside in high doses is a major treatment in acute myelo-blastic leukemia (A.M.L.). This treatment leads to neurological complications in 3-16% of cases, but the EEG, CT or MRI are normal.This prospective study examines brain perfusion in single photon emission tomography (SPECT) for patients receiving high dose arabinoside cytosine (H.D. A.R.A.C.). The SPECT of perfusion with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (H.M.P.A.O.) for patients suffering of A.M.L. allowed to show a reduction of perfusion at the cerebellum level, of the occipito-parietal cortex and thalami, after conventional doses of A.R.A.C., while the patients had not any neurological accidents. (N.C.)

  12. [Undifferentiated blastic cell crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with myeloblastic tumor in the skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, K; Kiyosaki, M; Amaya, H; Nakamaki, T; Hino, K; Tomoyasu, S

    2000-04-01

    A 54-year-old female, who had been treated for 4 years in the chronic phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) was admitted for management of a CML blastic crisis. Blast cells showed strong positive expression of CD7 and HLA-DR, and weakly expressed CD2, CD5 and CD10, as well. The cells were peroxidase negative in peripheral blood and bone marrow. An undifferentiated blastic crisis was diagnosed and she was treated with Interferon-alpha and VP(vincristine 2 mg/week; prednisolone 30 mg/day). A 5-7 mm in diameter tumor in the skin of the anterior right chest appeared one week after VP therapy. The tumor consisted of blasts which were CD13, CD33 and peroxidase positive, unlike the peripheral undifferentiated blasts. This is a rare case of mixed blast crisis with an increase in undifferentiated blasts in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and myeloblastic tumor formation in the skin.

  13. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  14. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  15. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym ANLL; Acute Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Nonl...ymphoblastic Leukemias; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemias; Leukemia, Acute Nonly...mphoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic; Leukemia, Nonlymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemias, Acute Nonlymphoblastic; Leukemias, Acute... Nonlymphocytic; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemias, Acut...e; Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphocytic Leukemias, Acute PharmGKB Accessi

  16. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  17. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  18. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  19. Melittin Nanoparticles Selectively Target Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Blasts to Induce Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张馨之; 方格

    2016-01-01

    In Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), immature white blood cells, called myeloblasts, are formed from blood stem cells and build up in the bone marrow, blocking out white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets.1 Current treatments for AML are aimed at eli

  20. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Acute Monoblastic Leukemias; Acute... Monocytic Leukemia; Acute Monocytic Leukemias; Acute monoblastic leukaemia; Acute monoblastic leukemia; Acute... monocytic leukaemia; Acute monocytic leukemia, morphology; Acute monocytoid leukemia; Leukemia, Acute... Monoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Monocytic; Leukemia, Monoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute... Schilling-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Monoblastic; Leukemias, Acute Monocytic; M5a - Acute monoblastic leukaemia; M5a - Acute

  1. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-lymphocytic-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20042915 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  3. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-myelogenous-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20043431 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  4. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to ... acute granulocytic leukemia, and acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Enlarge Anatomy of the bone. The bone is made up ...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid beta-2-microglobulin in adult patients with acute leukemia or lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Kjeldsen, L; Dalhoff, K

    1992-01-01

    Beta-2-microglobulin (B2m) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 18 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia or lymphoma in order to detect early central nervous system (CNS) involvement or relapse. Six had CNS-involvement documented by neurologic...... determination of CSF-B2m alone may be a useful and sensitive marker of CNS-dissemination in acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma. Using the criteria of CSF-B2m greater than 160 nmol/l as a positive diagnostic test the sensitivity of the test was 100%, the specificity was 76%. The same values for the CSF...

  6. Acute erythroid leukemia: autopsy report of a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rúbia Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia(AML, characterized by predominant erythroid proliferation. The 2008 WorldHealth Organization (WHO classification of AML defined two AEL subtypes:erythroleukaemia (EL, in which erythroid precursors account for 50% or moreof all nucleated bone marrow cells and myeloblasts account for 20% or more ofthe nonerythroid cell population; and pure erythroid leukemia (PEL, in whicherythroid precursors account for 80% or more of all nucleated bone marrowcells. We report the case of an elderly female patient with wasting syndromeand pancytopenia without evidence of blasts in peripheral blood. A diagnosisof PEL was established on the basis of bone marrow biopsy findings. Thepatient died on postadmission day 20, and an autopsy was performed. Wereclassified the disease as EL on the basis of the autopsy findings, whichincluded myeloblasts accounting for more than 20% of the nonerythroid cellsin the bone marrow, as well as leukemic infiltration and myeloid metaplasia insolid organs, such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenal glands, and abdominallymph nodes. A rare disease, AEL accounts for less than 5% of all AMLs and ispractically a diagnosis of exclusion. Autopsy reports of AEL are extremely rarein the literature. We demonstrate that in the case reported here, leukemia cellstended to infiltrate solid organs with myeloid metaplasia. Our findings alsoshow that a larger neoplastic bone marrow sample is crucial to the correctdiagnosis of EL, which is based on morphological and quantitative criteria.

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  8. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemias; Acute... myelomonocytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute myelomonocytic leukemia (clinical); Acute mye...lomonocytic leukemia, FAB M4; Leukemia, Acute Myelomonocytic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M4; Leukemia, Myeloi...d, Naegeli-Type; Leukemia, Naegeli-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Myelomonocytic; Myeloid Leukemia, Acute..., M4; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli Type; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli-Type; Myelomonocytic Leukemia, Acute

  9. IGK with conserved IGΚV/IGΚJ repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Xia, Miaoran; Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yin, C Cameron

    2015-11-17

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig κ light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy.

  10. Unilateral Hydronephrosis and Renal Damage after Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Simanauskiene

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy presented with asymptomatic right hydronephrosis detected on routine yearly ultrasound examination. Previously, he had at least two normal renal ultrasonograms, 4 years after remission of acute myeloblastic leukemia, treated by AML-BFM-93 protocol. A function of the right kidney and no damage on the left was confirmed by a DMSA scan. Right retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy revealed 3 renal arteries with the lower pole artery lying on the pelviureteric junction. Histologically chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis was detected. In the pathogenesis of this severe unilateral renal damage, we suspect the exacerbation of deleterious effects of cytostatic therapy on kidneys with intermittent hydronephrosis.

  11. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article...

  12. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Biphenotypic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute bilineal leukaemia; Acute bilineal leukemia; Acute... biphenotypic leukaemia; Acute biphenotypic leukemia; Acute mixed lineage leukaemia; Acute mixed line...age leukemia; B and T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B and T Cell Leukemia, Acute; B- and T-Cell Acute L...ymphoblastic Leukemia; B- and T-Cell Leukemia, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute..., Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Mixed-Cell; Leukemia, Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Mixed, B and T Cell

  13. A role for paclitaxel in the combination chemotherapy of acute myeloblastic leukaemia: preclinical cell culture studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J E; Minkin, S; Minden, M D; McCulloch, E A

    1996-11-01

    Paclitaxel dose responses in culture have been investigated alone and in association with cytosine arabinoside (ARA-C) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), with the objective of identifying a role for paclitaxel in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukaemia (AML). Initial studies were done to determine if paclitaxel dose responses of AML blast cell precursors were altered by regulatory compounds known to modify the dose responses of ARA-C. In contrast to ARA-C, paclitaxel dose responses were independent of cell culture method, the growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF, and the ligands all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and hydrocortisone. Most blast cell populations were sensitive to paclitaxel; compared with normal marrow progenitors the dose responses were markedly heterogenous with some more, and others less, sensitive. Remission marrow progenitor paclitaxel responses resembled those of AML blasts in heterogeneity. The cell culture model tested the effect of pacliataxel and ATRA on the ARA-C dose responses of OCI/ AML-5; paclitaxel exposure was either before or after ARA-C to test for an effect of schedule; ATRA was added to the MEC cultures after paclitaxel and ARA-C. Repeat experiments were done to test three dose levels each of paclitaxel and ATRA. When paclitaxel was given after ARA-C, synergism was found for all but one of the dose combinations tested; only three examples of synergy were seen when paclitaxel preceded ARA-C. The studies justify trials combining ARA-C, paclitaxel and ATRA using a schedule suggested by the cell culture findings.

  14. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  15. Molecular and epidemiologic findings of childhood acute leukemia in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría-Quesada, Carlos; Vargas, Mario; Venegas, Patricia; Calvo, Melvin; Obando, Catalina; Valverde, Berta; Cartín, Walter; Carrillo, Juan Manuel; Jimenez, Rafael; González, Marcos

    2009-02-01

    In Central America, nearly 70% of pediatric cancer is related to hemato-oncologic disorders, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Preliminary studies have described a high incidence of childhood leukemia in these countries; however, no molecular analyses of these malignancies have yet been carried out. We studied diagnostic samples from 84 patients from the National Children's Hospital in San Jose, Costa Rica (65 precursor B-ALL, 5 T-cell ALL, and 14 acute myeloblastic leukemia). Our methodology included cytogenetic, fluorescent in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction approaches. The observed rate of leukemia was 52.2 cases per million children per year. Twelve out of 65 (18.4%) precursor B-ALL tested positive for TEL-AML1 and 3 cases for BCR-ABL (4.6%). In addition, we detected 2 patients carrying an E2A-PBX1 transcript (3.1%) and 1 patient with an MLL-AF4 fusion gene (1.5%). None of the T-cell ALL cases were positive for either SIL-TAL1 or HOX11L2. Within 14 acute myeloblastic leukemia patients, we confirmed 2 cases with FLT3-internal tandem duplication+, 1 patient with AML1-ETO, and only 1 case carrying a PML-RARalpha rearrangement. The present study confirms the relatively high incidence of pediatric leukemia in Costa Rica and constitutes the first report regarding the incidence of the main molecular alterations of childhood leukemia in our region.

  16. Evaluation of Serum Leptin Level in Children With Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Shahramian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Leptin is a multifunctional hormone plays an important role in regulating lipid, energy, homeostasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, hematopoiesis and cell cycle. This polypeptide is effective in growth and differentiation of leukemic cells through an Ob-R receptor expressed by them. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum leptin levels in patients with acute leukemia and compare it in lymphoid and myeloid groups. Patients and Methods This analytical case-control study, conducted on 60 children in age ranged from 6 months to 16 years in two case and control groups in Ali ibn Abi Talib hospital, Zahedan. They matched based on age and gender and examined after their parent’s satisfaction according to the parental consent forms. None of patients had heart disease, digestive, glandular and metabolic problems, iron deficiency anemia and chronic kidney disease. After collecting the samples, leptin levels of both groups were measured with ELISA kit. Then, the gathered data were analyzed in SPSS-20 software, using independent t-test in considering of 95% confidence interval. Results Leptin serum levels in patients with acute leukemia and controls showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum levels in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloblastic leukemia showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum level in relation to age and gender groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that in patients with acute leukemia, leptin serum levels increase independently of age and gender. In addition, leptin serum levels in acute lymphoid leukemia were higher than acute myeloid leukemia in this study.

  17. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Acute Eosinophilic Leukemias; Acute... eosinophilic leukemia; Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute; Eosinophilic Leukemias, Acute; Leukemia, Acute... Eosinophilic; Leukemias, Acute Eosinophilic PharmGKB Accession Id: PA446179 External Vocabularies Me...SH: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute (D015472) SnoMedCT: Acute eosinophilic leukemia... (277604002) UMLS: C0023439 (C0023439) NDFRT: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [Disease/Finding] (N0000003269)

  19. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML M6; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemia; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemias; Acu...te erythraemic myelosis [obs]; Acute erythremia [obs]; Acute erythremic myelosis [obs]; Acute... erythroid leukaemia; Acute erythroid leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia, M6 type; Acute myeloid le...Erythroblastic Leukemia, Acute; Erythroblastic Leukemias, Acute; Erythroleukaemia...; Erythroleukemia; Erythroleukemias; FAB M6; Leukemia, Acute Erythroblastic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M6; Leukemias, Acute

  20. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  1. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  2. [Therapeutic results in patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia at Sapporo Medical University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2010-10-01

    We reviewed the results of 6 patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) which the diagnostic standard of the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemia (EGIL) at Sapporo Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2008. There were 5 males and 1 females with an average age of 35 years. Among them, 4 were B lymphoid and myeloid, 2 were T lymphoid and myeloid, and one was T/B lymphoid. Two of 4 patients did not attain complete remission, and two relapsed after first treatment with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) protocol. On the other hand, two showed complete remission after the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) protocol. One of 4 patients survived who had been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a post-remission therapy. The ALL protocol was good for the induction therapy. However, overall treatment-related deaths were 4 patients and considerable caution was necessary.

  3. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  5. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  6. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym APL - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APL - Acute ...promyelocytic leukemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acut...e Promyelocytic Leukemias; Acute myeloid leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid le...ukemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid leukemia, t(15;17)(q22;q11-12); Acute promye...locytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, FAB M3; Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute

  7. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  8. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  9. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Childhood acute leukemias are frequent in Mexico City: descriptive epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker-Méndez Vilma

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, acute leukemia is the most common type of childhood cancer. It is particularly common in the Hispanic populations residing in the United States, Costa Rica, and Mexico City. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute leukemia in children who were diagnosed and treated in public hospitals in Mexico City. Methods Included in this study were those children, under 15 years of age and residents of Mexico City, who were diagnosed in 2006 and 2007 with leukemia, as determined by using the International Classification of Childhood Cancer. The average annual incidence rates (AAIR, and the standardized average annual incidence rates (SAAIR per million children were calculated. We calculated crude, age- and sex-specific incidence rates and adjusted for age by the direct method with the world population as standard. We determined if there were a correlation between the incidence of acute leukemias in the various boroughs of Mexico City and either the number of agricultural hectares, the average number of persons per household, or the municipal human development index for Mexico (used as a reference of socio-economic level. Results Although a total of 610 new cases of leukemia were registered during 2006-2007, only 228 fit the criteria for inclusion in this study. The overall SAAIR was 57.6 per million children (95% CI, 46.9-68.3; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL was the most frequent type of leukemia, constituting 85.1% of the cases (SAAIR: 49.5 per million, followed by acute myeloblastic leukemia at 12.3% (SAAIR: 6.9 per million, and chronic myeloid leukemia at 1.7% (SAAIR: 0.9 per million. The 1-4 years age group had the highest SAAIR for ALL (77.7 per million. For cases of ALL, 73.2% had precursor B-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR: 35.8 per million and 12.4% had T-cell immunophenotype (SAAIR 6.3 per million. The peak ages for ALL were 2-6 years and 8-10 years. More than half the children (58.8% were

  12. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Specific small nucleolar RNA expression profiles in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valleron, W; Laprevotte, E; Gautier, E-F; Quelen, C; Demur, C; Delabesse, E; Agirre, X; Prósper, F; Kiss, T; Brousset, P

    2012-09-01

    Apart from microRNAs, little is known about the regulation of expression of non-coding RNAs in cancer. We investigated whether small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) accumulation displayed specific signatures in acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemias. Using microarrays and high-throughput quantitative PCR (qPCR), we demonstrate here that snoRNA expression patterns are negatively altered in leukemic cells compared with controls. Interestingly, a specific signature was found in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with ectopic expression of SNORD112-114 snoRNAs located at the DLK1-DIO3 locus. In vitro experiments carried out on APL blasts demonstrate that transcription of these snoRNAs was lost under all-trans retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and induced by enforced expression of the PML-RARalpha fusion protein in negative leukemic cell lines. Further experiments revealed that the SNORD114-1 (14q(II-1)) variant promoted cell growth through cell cycle modulation; its expression was implicated in the G0/G1 to S phase transition mediated by the Rb/p16 pathways. This study thus reports three important observations: (1) snoRNA regulation is different in normal cells compared with cancer cells; (2) a relationship exists between a chromosomal translocation and expression of snoRNA loci; and (3) snoRNA expression can affect Rb/p16 cell cycle regulation. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that snoRNAs have a role in cancer development.

  14. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  15. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  16. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  17. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  20. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Acute myelogenous leukemia following chemotherapy and radiation for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Teijiro; Hirota, Yuichi; Kondou, Seiji; Matsumoto, Isao; Matsuzaka, Toshimitsu; Iwashita, Akinori

    1989-03-01

    In August 1982, a 44-year-old man was diagnosed as having rectal cancer, histologically diagnosed as well differentiated adenocarcinoma, and abdominoperineal resection and colostomy were performed. Postoperatively, he received chemotherapy with mitomycin C up to a total dose of 100 mg. In September 1986, lung metastasis occurred and he was treated with a combination chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, pirarubicin and 5-fluorouracil. In the following year, radiation treatment (total: 6900 rad) was given for a recurrent pelvic lesion. Peripheral blood on April 30, 1988, showed anemia, thrombocytopenia and appearance of myeloblasts, and a diagnosis of acute myelogenous leukemia (FAB: M1) was made. Combination chemotherapy (including aclarubicin, vincristine, behenoyl ara-C, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine, cytarabine, etoposide and prednisolone) failed to induce remission and the patient died in June 1988. This case was thought to be one of secondary leukemia occurring after chemotherapy and radiation treatment for rectal cancer. This case clearly indicates the need for a careful follow-up of long-term survivors who have received cancer therapy. (author).

  3. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician's experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes.

  4. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E.; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician’s experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes. PMID:26107374

  5. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Traumatic stress in acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Gary; Yuen, Dora; Mischitelle, Ashley; Minden, Mark D; Brandwein, Joseph; Schimmer, Aaron; Marmar, Charles; Gagliese, Lucia; Lo, Christopher; Rydall, Anne; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute leukemia is a condition with an acute onset that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. However, the psychological impact of this life-threatening condition and its intensive treatment has not been systematically examined. In the present study, we investigate the prevalence and correlates of post-traumatic stress symptoms in this population. Methods Patients with acute myeloid, lymphocytic, and promyelocytic leukemia who were newly diagnosed, recently relapsed, or treatment failures were recruited at a comprehensive cancer center in Toronto, Canada. Participants completed the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, CARES Medical Interaction Subscale, and other psychosocial measures. A multivariate regression analysis was used to assess independent predictors of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Results Of the 205 participants, 58% were male, mean age was 50.1 ± 15.4 years, 86% were recently diagnosed, and 94% were receiving active treatment. The mean Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire score was 30.2 ± 22.5, with 27 of 200 (14%) patients meeting criteria for acute stress disorder and 36 (18%) for subsyndromal acute stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress symptoms were associated with more physical symptoms, physical symptom distress, attachment anxiety, and perceived difficulty communicating with health-care providers, and poorer spiritual well-being (all p relationships with health-care providers, and with individual psychological characteristics. Longitudinal study is needed to determine the natural history, but these findings suggest that intervention may be indicated to alleviate or prevent traumatic stress in this population. PMID:22081505

  8. Acta Medica Indonesiana - The Indonesian Journal of Internal Medicine 153 Malignant Pleural Effusion in Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Suharti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions can be the first presentation of a hematologic malignancy. The most common disorders with pleural effusion are Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a frequency of 20 to 30%, especially if mediastinal involvement. Acute and chronic leukemia are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement. We describe a 46-year-old female with history of progressive dyspnoea. Physical examination was revealed massive left pleural effusion. Complete blood count revealed anemia, trombositopenia and normal leucocyte count. Viral serology test shown positive of HBsAg and total antiHBc. Chest X-ray revealed left pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology was myeloblast consistent with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Bone marrow aspiration smear, bone marrow biopsy smear, and flow cytometry analysis were consistent with acute myeloid leukemia without maturation (AML M0-FAB classification. Key words: Acute myeloid leukemia, pleural effusion, infection.

  9. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... was established in January 2000 by the Danish Acute Leukemia Group and has been expanded over the years. It includes adult AML patients diagnosed in Denmark since 2000, ALL patients diagnosed since 2005, and MDS patients diagnosed since 2010. The coverage of leukemia patients exceeds 99%, and the coverage of MDS...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  11. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  12. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma: natural history and biology of an uncommon manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M Yadira; Ghahramani, Grant K; Frisch, Stephanie; Armbrecht, Eric S; Lind, Anne C; Nguyen, Tudung T; Hassan, Anjum; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.

  13. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with gross hematuria

    OpenAIRE

    Kalbani, Naifain Al; Weitzman, Sheila; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Carcao, Manuel; Abla, Oussama

    2007-01-01

    A case of a six-year-old boy presenting with gross hematuria is reported. Investigations revealed the etiology of the hematuria to be thrombocytopenia in the setting of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis of leukemia was confirmed by bone marrow examination. The patient’s hematuria completely resolved with platelet transfusions. Although thrombocytopenia is a very common presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, gross hematuria is exceedingly rare. Thus, thro...

  14. Acute myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emilio, A; Dragone, P; De Negri, G; Montaldi, A; Stella, M; Battista, R

    1989-01-01

    We report on a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed at the 22nd week of pregnancy. She received chemotherapeutic treatment and reached a complete remission. At the 28th week of gestation the patient delivered, by cesarean section, a normal male infant. At present the mother is still disease-free 27 months after diagnosis. The child, too, is in good health. We point out the possibility of producing live babies with current chemotherapy regimens without exposing either the mother or the fetus to excessive risks.

  15. Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia Presenting as Leukemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Narayanan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis (LC is defined as infiltration of the skin by leukemic cells resulting in clinically recognizable cutaneous lesions. It is common in congenital leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. However, LC has rarely been reported with mixed phenotypic acute leukemia (MPAL. We report the case of a lady who presented with erythematous papular and nodular lesions all over the body. Skin biopsy showed leukemic infiltration and bone marrow aspiration showed MPAL of the T/myeloid with monocytic differentiation lineage. This is the first report of an adult patient with MPAL of the T/myeloid with monocytic differentiation type presenting with leukemia cutis. She was started on chemotherapy with Hyper-CVAD. There is complete resolution of the skin lesions and she has achieved bone marrow remission after the first cycle of chemotherapy.

  16. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  17. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Isolated Trisomy 19 Associated with Diffuse Myelofibrosis and Osteosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stelling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary myelofibrosis (PMF, per WHO criteria, is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm that usually presents with a proliferation of granulocytic and megakaryocytic lineages with an associated fibrous deposition and extramedullary hematopoiesis. The bone marrow histologic findings of this disorder are typically characterized by the presence of myeloid metaplasia with an associated reactive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and osteosclerosis. However, marked myelofibrosis is not solely confined to PMF and may also be associated with other conditions including but not limited to acute megakaryoblastic leukemias (FAB AML-M7. Here, we describe a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with marked myelofibrosis with osteosclerosis and an isolated trisomy 19. A 19-year-old male presented with severe bone pain of one week duration with a complete blood cell count and peripheral smear showing a mild anemia and occasional circulating blasts. A follow up computed tomography (CT scan showed diffuse osteosclerosis with no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Subsequently, the bone marrow biopsy showed markedly sclerotic bony trabeculae and a hypercellular marrow with marked fibrosis and intervening sheets of immature myeloid cells consistent with myeloblasts with monocytic differentiation. Importantly, these myeloblasts were negative for megakaryocytic markers (CD61 and vWF, erythroid markers (hemoglobin and E-cadherin, and lymphoid markers (CD3, CD19, and TdT. Metaphase cytogenetics showed an isolated triosomy 19 with no JAK2 V617F mutation. The patient was treated with induction chemotherapy followed by allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which subsequently resulted in a rapid resolution of bone marrow fibrosis, suggesting graft-anti-fibrosis effect. This is a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis with trisomy 19 that may provide insights into the prognosis and

  18. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Successful pregnancy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre, A; Chunchurreta, R; Rodriguez-Alarcon, J; Cruz, E; Prada, M

    1982-01-01

    A successful pregnancy with a normal baby in a woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with daunorubicin from the ninth week of gestation is reported. Daunorubicin is an effective agent against this leukemia during pregnancy. That daunorubicin may be safely used, when required during the early gestation, is suggested.

  3. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  5. Prognotic significance of pretreatment proliferative activity in adult acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, J S; George, S L; Frei, E; Bodey, G P; Nickerson, R C; Freireich, E J

    1977-04-01

    A statistical analysis of the prognostic significance of eight pretreatment variables was undertaken for 71 previously untreated adult patients with acute leukemia seen at M.D. Anderson Hospital over a 5 1/2-year period. None of the patients had received any prior therapy. Nearly all of the patients (68 of the 71) were treated with 4- or 5-day courses of arabinosyl-cytosine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine (oncovin) and prednisone (COAP). The pretreatment variables studied were age at diagnosis, the percent labeling index of the bone marrow leukemic cells, diagnosis, the highest temperature prior to start of treatment, the marrow clot section cellularity and smear differential percent of blasts, percent absolute marrow leukemic cell infiltrate and absolute number of blasts X 10(3)/mm3 in the peripheral blood. Fifty-one patients had acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and 20 patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using a statistical regression model approach, the only variables found to be of significant prognostic importance with respect to the probability of complete remission for AML patients were the pretreatment percent labeling index, the age of the patient and the highest temperature prior to start of treatment. Unlike AML, the initial percent labeling index did not appear to be of prognostic significance for ALL patients. AML patients with high labeling indices (larger than or equal to 9%) and young patients in general (especially those less than 40 years old) had the best remission rates. With respect to the length of complete remission and survival for all patients, the only important variables were the pretreatment percent labeling index and the age of the patient, respectively. Once in complete remission, an initially high labeling index was an unfavorable sign with respect to length of remission, regardless of the patient's diagnosis. The results of this study are supportive of studies in experimental systems

  6. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... patients is currently 90%. MAIN VARIABLES AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Approximately, 250 AML patients, 25 ALL patients, and 230 MDS patients are registered in the DNLR every year. In January 2015, the registry included detailed patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment characteristics...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  7. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Two cases of acute erythroid leukemia presenting with marked macrocytic anemia, reticulocytosis and hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Seisuke; Kasahara, Akinori; Mizuno, Shoma; Uchikoga, Osamu; Kuroda, Momoko; Miyoshi, Haruka; Shiomi, Kohei; Umena, Sachio; Noguchi, Toshio; Kishimoto, Nobuyasu; Matsumura, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Case 1. The laboratory findings of a hematological analysis of a 53-year-old woman with palpitations and dyspnea revealed the following: red blood cell (RBC) count: 9.4×10(5)/μL with 60.0‰ reticulocytes; Hb: 3.7 g/dL; mean corpuscular volume (MCV): 124.5 fL; white blood cell (WBC) count: 2,800/μL with 10.0% myeloblasts. Case 2. Similarly, a 42-year-old man with dizziness had a RBC count of 1.63×10(6)/μL with 24.0% reticulocytes, an Hb level of 6.0 g/dL, an MCV of 120.2 fL and a WBC count of 3,100/μL with 4.0% myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspirates in both patients confirmed a diagnosis of acute erythroid leukemia (AEL), which can present as marked macrocytic anemia with an MCV in excess of 120 fL and hemolysis.

  9. Subtype-specific patterns of molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, D; Haferlach, T; Schnittger, S; Perglerová, K; Kern, W; Haferlach, C

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can be grouped into morphologically or genetically defined subtypes. Today, the AML phenotype-genotype associations, that is, FAB/WHO (French-American-British/World Health Organization) definitions and recurrent molecular mutations, are not fully understood. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of molecular mutations on the AML differentiation stage by molecular profiling of 4373 adult de novo AML patients in 7 cytomorphological subtypes. We investigated mutations in 20 genes, including myeloid transcription factors (CEBPA, RUNX1), tumor suppressors (TP53, WT1), DNA modifiers (DNMT3A, IDH1/2, TET2), chromatin modifiers (ASXL1, MLL), signal transduction genes (FLT3, KRAS, NRAS) and NPM1. The most frequently mutated genes per cytomorphological subtype were RUNX1 in M0 (43%), NPM1 in M1 (42%), DNMT3A in M2 (26%), NPM1 in M4 (57%), M5a (49%) and M5b (70%) and TP53 in M6 (36%). Although some gene mutations were frequent in several cytomorphological subtypes, a series of associations of co-occurring mutations with distinct phenotypes were identified for molecularly defined subcohorts. FLT3, NPM1 and WT1 mutations were associated with an immature phenotype in myeloblastic AML, whereas other combinations involving ASXL1, RUNX1, MLL-PTD, CEBPA or KRAS were more frequent in myeloblastic AML with maturation. Within the NPM1 mutated subcohort, ASXL1 mutations were significantly associated with a monoblastic differentiation and DNMT3A mutations with a monocytic phenotype.

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference [Genetics Home Reference (Conditions)

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Acute Myeloid...te myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA Fanconi anemia You may also search Genetics Home Reference for Acut...e Myeloid Leukemia for additional information. Published : October 27, 2014 Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference ...

  12. Acquisition of a Philadelphia chromosome concomitant with transformation of a refractory anemia into an acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, N; Krulik, M; De Gramont, A; Brissaud, P; Debray, J

    1985-04-01

    The authors present a case of Philadelphia (Ph1) positive acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) following a refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) that had been Ph1-negative for 17 months. During the transformation of RAEB into AML, the Ph1 was discovered in 100% of the examined cells. With therapy a partial remission was obtained, during which some 46,XY cells reappeared mixed with Ph1 cells along with a new clone: 47,XY,+11 originating from a Ph1-negative cell. During the terminal blast crisis, the karyotype returned to 46,XY,Ph1. The AML lasted 21 months. The authors discuss: (1) the significance of Ph1-positive AML with a review of the literature; (2) the de novo acquisition of a Ph1 during the course of a blood disorder; and (3) the meaning of a second abnormal clone originating from 46,XY cells.

  13. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Acute promyelocytic leukemia and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagounidis, A A; Beckmann, M W; Giagounidis, A S; Aivado, M; Emde, T; Germing, U; Riehs, T; Heyll, A; Aul, C

    2000-04-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the use of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) as a differentiating agent induces complete remission in a high percentage of patients. In pregnancy, however, this drug bears the risk of severe teratogenicity to the child. We report the case of a 23-yr-old woman at 21 weeks' gestation suffering from APL. She was treated with ATRA (45 mg/m2) for 40 d and two courses of standard chemotherapy. The mother achieved complete remission within 22 d of treatment. Fetal development was normal, and a healthy premature girl was born in the 35th week of pregnancy. In a review of the literature we have identified 14 cases of APL in pregnancy treated with ATRA alone or in combination with chemotherapy. ATRA has been used as early as in the 3rd week of gestation and in no case have malformations or other teratogenic effects occurred. Side-effects, however, ranged from fetal cardiac arrhythmias to induction of labour. Although known to exhibit severe teratogenic effects during the first trimester of pregnancy, ATRA seems to be reasonably safe during the second and third trimesters in the treatment of APL. However, careful obstetric follow-up is mandatory regarding fetal cardiac complications.

  16. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition.

  17. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  19. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  3. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia in the pregnant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mostly occurs in older patients, it could be seen in women of childbearing age. It is therefore not surprising that in some patients, the management of AML will be complicated by a coexistent pregnancy. However, the association of leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000-100,000 pregnancies. During pregnancy, most leukemias are acute: two-thirds are myeloid and one-third are lymphoblastic. There is no standard approach for this clinical dilemma, in part because of variables such as the type of AML, the seriousness of the symptoms, and the patient's personal beliefs. In many cases, the diagnostic workup has to be altered because of the pregnancy, and often available treatments have varying risks to the fetus. While chemotherapy is reported to have some risks during the first trimester, it is admitted that it can be administered safely during the second and the third trimesters.

  5. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant Engl

  6. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant

  7. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of normal white and red blood cells and platelets in the body, which causes many of the signs and symptoms of the condition. People with acute promyelocytic leukemia are especially susceptible to developing bruises, small red dots under the skin (petechiae), nosebleeds, bleeding ...

  8. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  9. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, Bob; Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Biemond, Bart J.; Gratwohl, Alois; de Greef, Georgine E.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Gregor, Michael; Theobald, Matthias; Schanz, Urs; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  10. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  11. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  12. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia ...

  13. ASSOCIATION OF POLYMORPHISM IN BIOTRANSFORMATION SYSTEM GENES CYP1A1 AND GST WITH RISK OF RELAPSE IN CHILDHOOD ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Gra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of polymorphism in genes coding biotransformation system may play an important role in formation of primary childhood acute leukemia, and affects the incidence and features of relapse. We developed a biological microchip which allows to analyze 14 mutations in eight genes of biotransfor mation system: cyp1a1, cyp2d6, gstt1, gstm1, nat2, mthfr, cyp2c9 and cyp2c19. This biochip has been used to study DNA samples from 332 children with diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all and 71 children with diagnosis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML. it was obtained that variant genotype cyp1a1 *1/*2а more often occur in children with relapse of disease than in children with primary diagnosed leukemia (or = 2,11, p = 0,0291. Also it has been shown, that «null» gstt1 genotype is less frequent in children with relapse of disease than in children with primary diagnosed leukemia (or = 0,55, p = 0,0265. Upon sex stratification, boys with relapse of all demonstrated an increased occurrence of the cyp1a1 genotype *1/*2а in combination with the gstt1 «nonnull» genotype relative to patients with primarily diagnosed all (or = 3,09, p = 0,0254. In addition, girls with relapse of acute leukemia displayed a 2,4_fold lower frequency of the «null» gstm1 genotype as compared with the girls group with primary leukemia (or = 0,41, p = 0,0175. Thus, it was shown that studied genotypes cyp1a1 and GST might be prognostic risk factors of relapse in childhood acute leukemia.Key words: acute leukemia, drug resistance, cytochrome p 450, glutathione-s-transferases, polymorphism, oligonucleotide biochips.

  14. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  15. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  16. Myeloblastic leukemia cells conditionally blocked by myc-estrogen receptor chimeric transgenes for terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvakumaran, M; Liebermann, D; Hoffman-Liebermann, B

    1993-05-01

    Conditional mutants of the myeloblastic leukemic M1 cell line, expressing the chimeric mycer transgene, have been established. It is shown that M1 mycer cells, like M1, undergo terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and programmed cell death (apoptosis) after treatment with the physiologic differentiation inducer interleukin-6. However, when beta-estradiol is included in the culture medium, M1 mycer cells respond to differentiation inducers like M1 myc cell lines, where the differentiation program is blocked at an intermediate stage. By manipulating the function of the mycer transgene product, it is shown that there is a 10-hour window during myeloid differentiation, from 30 to 40 hours after the addition of the differentiation inducer, when the terminal differentiation program switches from being dependent on c-myc suppression to becoming c-myc suppression independent, where activation of c-myc has no apparent effect on mature macrophages. M1 mycer cell lines provide a powerful tool to increase our understanding of the role of c-myc in normal myelopoiesis and in leukemogenesis, also providing a strategy to clone c-myc target genes.

  17. Pathologic rupture of the spleen in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and leukostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Cunha De Santis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the spleen can be classified as spontaneous, traumatic, or pathologic. Pathologic rupture has been reported in infectious diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, and hematologic malignancies such as acute and chronic leukemias. Splenomegaly is considered the most relevant factor that predisposes to splenic rupture. A 66-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia evolved from an unclassified myeloproliferative neoplasm, complaining of fatigue and mild upper left abdominal pain. He was pale and presented fever and tachypnea. Laboratory analyses showed hemoglobin 8.3 g/dL, white blood cell count 278 × 109/L, platelet count 367 × 109/L, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ratio 2.10, and international normalized ratio (INR 1.60. A blood smear showed 62% of myeloblasts. The immunophenotype of the blasts was positive for CD117, HLA-DR, CD13, CD56, CD64, CD11c and CD14. Lactate dehydrogenase was 2384 U/L and creatinine 2.4 mg/dL (normal range: 0.7-1.6 mg/dL. Two sessions of leukapheresis were performed. At the end of the second session, the patient presented hemodynamic instability that culminated in circulatory shock and death. The post-mortem examination revealed infiltration of the vessels of the lungs, heart, and liver, and massive infiltration of the spleen by leukemic blasts. Blood volume in the peritoneal cavity was 500 mL. Acute leukemia is a rare cause of splenic rupture. Male gender, old age and splenomegaly are factors associated with this condition. As the patient had leukostasis, we hypothesize that this, associated with other factors such as lung and heart leukemic infiltration, had a role in inducing splenic rupture. Finally, we do not believe that leukapheresis in itself contributed to splenic rupture, as it is essentially atraumatic.

  18. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. A case of systemic mastocytosis associated with acute myeloid leukemia terminating as aleukemic mast cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Mi Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Ki; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Seo, Eul-Ju; Park, Sang Hyuk; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Kyu-Hyung

    2013-03-01

    In up to 40% of systemic mastocytosis (SM) cases, an associated clonal hematological non-mast cell lineage disease such as AML is diagnosed before, simultaneously with, or after the diagnosis of SM. A 40-yr-old man was diagnosed with AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22). Mast cells were not noted at diagnosis, but appeared as immature forms at relapse. After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), leukemic myeloblasts were not observed; however, neoplastic metachromatic blasts strikingly proliferated during the state of bone marrow aplasia, and finally, aleukemic mast cell leukemia developed. As the disease progressed, we observed serial morphologic changes from immature mast cells with myeloblasts to only metachromatic blasts and atypical mast cells as mast cell leukemia; FISH analysis showed that the neoplastic mast cells originated from the same clone as the leukemic myeloblasts of AML.

  20. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed.

  1. Cytogenetic patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of chromosomal banding patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) reveals that approximately 50% of patients have an abnormal karyotype. Although there is substantial variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities occur, e.g., +8, -7, and the 8;21 translocation (often accompanied by loss of an X or Y chromosome). The 15;17 translocation appears to be highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. These abnormalities usually are not seen in remission, but reappear in relapse, sometimes exhibiting further clonal evolution; a +8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Patients with ANLL following treatment of a malignant lymphoma tend to have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  2. Acute leukemic appendicitis in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Karachiwala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic and lymphomatous infiltration of the appendix is a rare complication. We present the case of a 31-year-old male with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed acute abdomen on day 11 of induction chemotherapy with idarubicin and cytarabine. After appropriate work-up, a clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made. Despite severe pancytopenia, he successfully underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The final pathology revealed leukemic infiltration of the appendix. It is hypothesized that the leukemic infiltration may play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Further, this case demonstrates the need to maintain a high index of suspicion and prompt surgical intervention for surgical pathologies in neutropenic patients.

  3. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  4. B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Haeri, Sina; Baker, Arthur M; Boles, Jeremiah; Brown, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and can be rapidly fatal if left untreated. The need for immediate treatment of ALL, coupled with the maternal-fetal risks from the chemotherapy regimen render a therapeutic dilemma in pregnant women with ALL. We report a case of ALL diagnosed in the 24th week of pregnancy to outline our management strategy, to demonstrate the feasibility of treatment with multi-agent chemotherapy, and to provide a review of the literature.

  5. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  6. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. JAK Mutations in High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Charles G. Mullighan; Jinghui Zhang; Richard C. Harvey; J. Racquel Collins-Underwood; Brenda A. Schulman; Letha A. Phillips; Sarah K. Tasian; Mignon L. Loh; Xiaoping Su; Wei Liu; Meenakshi Devidas; Susan R. Atlas; I-Ming Chen; Robert J. Clifford; Daniela S. Gerhard; William L. Carroll; Gregory H. Reaman; Malcolm Smith; James R. Downing; Stephen P. Hunger; Cheryl L. Willman; Janet D. Rowley

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of distinct clinical and biological subtypes that are characterized by specific chromosomal abnormalities or gene mutations...

  8. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  10. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Silencing HIF-1α reduces the adhesion and secretion functions of acute leukemia hBMSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Dong-Feng

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α is an important transcription factor, which plays a critical role in the formation of solid tumor and its microenviroment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression and function of HIF-1α in human leukemia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs and to identify the downstream targets of HIF-1α. HIF-1α expression was detected at both the RNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α were detected in stromal cells by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIF-1α was blocked by constructing the lentiviral RNAi vector system and infecting the BMSCs. The Jurkat cell/BMSC co-cultured system was constructed by putting the two cells into the same suitable cultured media and conditions. Cell adhesion and secretion functions of stromal cells were evaluated after transfection with the lentiviral RNAi vector of HIF-1α. Increased HIF-1α mRNA and protein was detected in the nucleus of the acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with normal BMSCs. The lentiviral RANi vector for HIF-1α was successfully constructed and was applied to block the expression of HIF-1α. When HIF-1α of BMSCs was blocked, the expression of VEGF and SDF-1 secreted by stromal cells were decreased. When HIF-1α was blocked, the co-cultured Jurkat cell’s adhesion and migration functions were also decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that HIF-1α acts as an important transcription factor and can significantly affect the secretion and adhesion functions of leukemia BMSCs.

  12. Silencing HIF-1α reduces the adhesion and secretion functions of acute leukemia hBMSCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Dong-Feng [Department of Hematology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing (China); Liu, Ting [Department of Ophthalmology, DaPing Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing (China); Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Xi; Liang, Xue; Chen, Xing-Hua; Kong, Pei-Yan [Department of Hematology, XinQiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, ChongQing (China)

    2012-06-29

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is an important transcription factor, which plays a critical role in the formation of solid tumor and its microenvironment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression and function of HIF-1α in human leukemia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and to identify the downstream targets of HIF-1α. HIF-1α expression was detected at both the RNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) were detected in stromal cells by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIF-1α was blocked by constructing the lentiviral RNAi vector system and infecting the BMSCs. The Jurkat cell/BMSC co-cultured system was constructed by putting the two cells into the same suitable cultured media and conditions. Cell adhesion and secretion functions of stromal cells were evaluated after transfection with the lentiviral RNAi vector of HIF-1α. Increased HIF-1α mRNA and protein was detected in the nucleus of the acute myeloblastic and acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared with normal BMSCs. The lentiviral RANi vector for HIF-1α was successfully constructed and was applied to block the expression of HIF-1α. When HIF-1α of BMSCs was blocked, the expression of VEGF and SDF-1α secreted by stromal cells was decreased. When HIF-1α was blocked, the co-cultured Jurkat cell's adhesion and migration functions were also decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that HIF-1α acts as an important transcription factor and can significantly affect the secretion and adhesion functions of leukemia BMSCs.

  13. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  15. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  17. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  18. Zoonotic Infections in Pediatric Patients With Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal dise...

  19. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  20. Molecular cytogenetics for acute megakaryocytic leukemia diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Matveeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AML M7 – a rare disease characterized by poor treatment response, except for t(1;22 variant in infants. Cytogenetic abnormalities in AML M7 are highly heterogeneous. We collected samples from children with AML M7 to analyze the disease cytogenetic profile. During September 2009 to March 2012 20 AML M7 patients was studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Complex and heterogeneous chromosomal abnormalities were revealed. It was found that no recurring abnormalities and cytogenetic markers unique to each patients. Also, the 19p13 amplification described previously only in myeloid cell lines was detected.

  1. Molecular cytogenetics for acute megakaryocytic leukemia diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Matveeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute megakaryocytic leukemia (AML M7 – a rare disease characterized by poor treatment response, except for t(1;22 variant in infants. Cytogenetic abnormalities in AML M7 are highly heterogeneous. We collected samples from children with AML M7 to analyze the disease cytogenetic profile. During September 2009 to March 2012 20 AML M7 patients was studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Complex and heterogeneous chromosomal abnormalities were revealed. It was found that no recurring abnormalities and cytogenetic markers unique to each patients. Also, the 19p13 amplification described previously only in myeloid cell lines was detected.

  2. Liver Involvement with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mathews

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver involvement with acute myeloid leukemia (AML is rarely reported. The majority of published cases suggest a cholestatic picture and obstructive jaundice at presentation. On the contrary, our patient presented with transaminitis without cholestasis. Elevated liver function tests persisted in our patient despite cholecystectomy; however, they normalized with chemotherapy administration, suggesting that AML was the causative effect of the hepatitis-like picture. Our review of the literature revealed that most reported cases of AML with liver involvement had short-lived remissions and an overall ominous prognosis. In our opinion, patients who have liver involvement with AML should be offered alternative investigational therapies with a low hepatic toxicity profile.

  3. Epigenetic Modifications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant epigenetic modifications are well-recognized drivers for oncogenesis. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is no exception and serves as a model toward the significant impact these heritable alterations can have in leukemogenesis. In this brief review, we will focus on the main aspects of epigenetics which control leukemogenesis in pediatric ALL, mainly DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA alterations. As we continue to gain better understanding of the driving mechanisms for pediatric ALL at both diagnosis and relapse, therapeutic interventions directed toward these pathways and mechanisms can be harnessed and introduced into clinical trials for pediatric ALL.

  4. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission.

  5. Maternal acute lymphoctic leukemia with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia gene occurring during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Nassar, Amr; Saleh, Abu J; Almhareb, Fahed; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Walter, Claudia; Bakr, Mohammad; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease during pregnancy, accounting for about 15% of all cases of pregnancy-associated leukemia. Although mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangement is the dominant genetic aberration in infantile acute leukemia, the occurrence of MLL gene rearrangement in maternal ALL occurring during pregnancy has not been reported. Out of 31 cases of maternal leukemia diagnosed during pregnancy at our institution, 5 were ALL cases. Three of the 5 patients had MLL gene rearrangement. The data for these 5 patients are presented in this report. We believe that the association of MLL gene rearrangement with maternal leukemia is biologically plausible and this observation needs to be validated in a larger cohort of pregnancy-associated maternal leukemia cases.

  6. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  8. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  9. Cytogenetics of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2009-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for 15-20% of all childhood acute leukemias, while it is responsible for more than half of the leukemic deaths in these patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in pediatric AML supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow-up and treatment selection in childhood AML. It reviews in detail the types and frequencies of most common chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with French American British (FAB) subtypes and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some less frequent or rare chromosome aberrations in which the prognostic classification has not been determined yet owning to the small number of patients and the variable treatment modalities used in different study groups. Furthermore, it discusses the association of specific chromosome rearrangements with prenatal exposure to carcinogenic agents or therapeutic agents and highlights the ongoing and future research on pediatric AML in the evolving field of Cytogenetics.

  10. Zoonotic infections in pediatric patients with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothstein, Katherine; Fisher, Brian; Li, Yimei; Seif, Alix; Harris, Tracey; Torp, Kari; Kavcic, Marko; Huang, Yuan-Shung V; Rheingold, Susan R; Aplenc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal diseases were the most commonly (86.4%) identified zoonotic illnesses. Although rare, zoonotic diseases do occur in children with leukemia and frequency varies by age, region, and gender.

  11. Successful acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy in two children with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Fukumura, Akiko; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Masahiko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare type of leukemia expressing both myeloid and lymphoid markers. There is limited information, especially on pediatric cases. Therefore, the optimal therapeutic approach to pediatric MPAL has not been defined. Here, we report two pediatric cases of MPAL. According to the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria, patient 1 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for the myeloid marker myeloperoxidase (MPO), and B-lymphoid markers. Patient 2 was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) using EGIL criteria. According to the 2008 WHO classification, however, patient 2 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for CD3, T-lymphoid markers and MPO. We chose an ALL-type therapy consisting of both lymphoid- and myeloid-directed agents; these patients have maintained complete remission following treatment. Further information on pediatric MPAL is needed to establish an appropriate therapeutic strategy including stem cell transplantation for this rare condition. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Abrupt evolution of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Akiko; Sakoda, Hiroto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Inano, Shojiro; Sueki, Yuki; Yanagida, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2013-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal disorder arising from an alteration in multipotent stem cells, which lose the ability of normal proliferation and differentiation. Disease progression occurs in approximately 30% MDS cases. Specific chromosomal alterations seem responsible for each step in the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Multiple genetic aberrations occur during the clonal evolution of MDS; however, few studies report the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. We report a rare case of Ph-positive AML, which evolved during the course of low-risk MDS. The patient, a 76-year-old man with mild leukocytopenia, was diagnosed with MDS, refractory neutropenia (RN). After 1.5 yr, his peripheral blood and bone marrow were suddenly occupied by immature basophils and myeloblasts, indicating the onset of AML. A bone marrow smear showed multilineage dysplasia, consistent with MDS evolution. Chromosomal analysis showed an additional t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation. Because progression occurred concurrently with emergence of the Ph chromosome, we diagnosed this case as Ph-positive AML with basophilia arising from the clonal evolution of MDS. The patient was initially treated with nilotinib. A hematological response was soon achieved with disappearance of the Ph chromosome in the bone marrow. Emergence of Ph-positive AML in the course of low-risk MDS has rarely been reported. We report this case as a rare clinical course of MDS.

  13. Cannabis Extract Treatment for Terminal Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with a Philadelphia Chromosome Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadvinder Singh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a cancer of the white blood cells and is typically well treated with combination chemotherapy, with a remission state after 5 years of 94% in children and 30-40% in adults. To establish how aggressive the disease is, further chromosome testing is required to determine whether the cancer is myeloblastic and involves neutrophils, eosinophils or basophils, or lymphoblastic involving B or T lymphocytes. This case study is on a 14-year-old patient diagnosed with a very aggressive form of ALL (positive for the Philadelphia chromosome mutation. A standard bone marrow transplant, aggressive chemotherapy and radiation therapy were revoked, with treatment being deemed a failure after 34 months. Without any other solutions provided by conventional approaches aside from palliation, the family administered cannabinoid extracts orally to the patient. Cannabinoid resin extract is used as an effective treatment for ALL with a positive Philadelphia chromosome mutation and indications of dose-dependent disease control. The clinical observation in this study revealed a rapid dose-dependent correlation.

  14. KEGG DISEASE / Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) [KEGG DISEASE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE: H00003 Entry H00003Disease Name Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Description Acute.... Category Cancer Brite Human diseases [BR:br08402] Cancers Cancers of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues H00003Acute...atopoietic and related tissue C92Myeloid leukaemia H00003Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Cancer-accociated carb...ohydrates [br08441.html] H00003 Pathway hsa05221Acute myeloid leukemiahsa05202Transcriptional misregulation ... or t(16; 16)(p13, q22), (CBF-beta/MYH11) ICD-O: 9866/3, Tumor type: Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (AML with

  15. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori G Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000 with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML-M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity.

  16. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  18. Role of autophagy in acute myeloid leukemia therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ping Zhang; Yu-Na Niu; Na Yuan; Ai-Hong Zhang; Dan Chao; Qiu-Ping Xu; Li-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Despite its dual role in determining cell fate in a wide array of solid cancer cell lines,autophagy has been robustly shown to suppress or kill acute myeloid leukemia cells via degradation of the oncogenic fusion protein that drives leukemogenesis.However,autophagy also induces the demise of acute leukemia cells that do not express the known fusion protein,though the molecular mechanism remains elusive.Nevertheless,since it can induce cooperation with apoptosis and differentiation in response to autophagic signals,autophagy can be manipulated for a better therapy on acute myeloid leukemia.

  19. Preleukemia: hematological disorders prior to onset of leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi,Isao

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Published data on Japanese leukemia patients with a preleukemic hematological disorder were assessed. The reexamined cases were from the "Japona Centra Revuo Medicina" reported during the period from 1952 to 1971. Among preleukemic hematological disorders, hypoplastic anemia was the most frequently reported (41 of 62 cases. These "hypoplastic preleukemia" patients were rather elderly and terminated mostly in atypical myelocytic leukemia. The chief hematological feature of the hypoplastic preleukemia cases was the coexistence of a relative erythroid hyperplasia and a slight increase of myeloblasts in the bone marrow that was unusual in hypoplastic anemia. The presence of pancytopenia and hypocellular marrow with a relative erythroid hyperplasia combined with a slight increase of myeloblasts probably indicates hypoplastic preleukemia that terminates later in acute leukemia.

  20. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  1. [Infections in the child with acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, J M; Jiménez, E; Jiménez, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five febrile episodes in 82 children with acute leukemia were studied; 46% of the patients were from urban and 54% from rural areas. The origin of the fever was identified in 91% of the episodes, prevailing pneumonia, septicemia, chickenpox and herpes zoster. The etiological agent was identified in 46% of the cases. A viral predominance was evident, and among them varicela-zoster, following in importance gram-negative bacteria. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis carinii were isolated in two occassions each. Sepsis was found more frequently in children with active leukemia than in those in remission (p less than 0.001). Forty-four febrile episodes occurred in patients with less than 1,000 neutrophils/ul. The daily-risk rate of infection was higher in children fom rural than in those from urban areas (p less than 0.001). After clinical and laboratory studies, methicillin and gentamicin were used, in addition to carbenicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is selected cases. This treatment was effective in 86% of the cases. Twelve (15%) children died, 6 of whom were in remission at that moment.

  2. Targeting the acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Alexandre; Luciana, M; Krause, Fontanari; Rego, Eduardo M

    2010-02-01

    The idea that within the bulk of leukemic cells there are immature progenitors which are intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and able to repopulate the tumor after treatment is not recent. Nevertheless, the term leukemia stem cells (LSCs) has been adopted recently to describe these immature progenitors based on the fact that they share the most relevant features of the normal hematopoetic stem cells (HSCs), i.e. the self-renewal potential and quiescent status. LSCs differ from their normal counterparts and from the more differentiated leukemic cells regarding the default status of pathways regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, telomere maintenance and transport pumps activity. In addition, unique features regarding the interaction of these cells with the microenvironment have been characterized. Therapeutic strategies targeting these unique features are at different stages of development but the reported results are promising. The aim of this review is, by taking acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a bona fide example, to discuss some of the mechanisms used by the LSCs to survive and the strategies which could be used to eradicate these cells.

  3. c-fms expression in acute leukemias with complex phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrès, H; Dubreuil, P; Falzetti, F; Courcoul, M A; Lopez, M; Falcinelli, F; Birg, F; Tabilio, A; Mannoni, P

    1990-10-01

    The c-fms proto-oncogene product, which is the receptor for the macrophage colony-stimulating factor CSF-1, is always found expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cells, irrespective of their stage of differentiation according to the FAB classification (Dubreuil P, Torrès H, Courcoul M, Birg F, Mannoni P. Blood 1988;72:1081-1085). We have extended this study and looked for c-fms expression in poorly differentiated myeloid leukemias, in a series of acute leukemias of either T or B origin and in biphenotypic leukemias. We now report that expression of c-fms is still related to the myeloid origin of the leukemic proliferation, but that it can also be found in some acute leukemias presenting clonal rearrangements of the T cell receptor gene. Thus expression of the c-fms/CSF-1 receptor may not be exclusively a marker for myeloid proliferations.

  4. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  5. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  6. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-na; ZHOU Jin; Jan Jacob Schuringa; Edo Vellenga

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1991 to 2009.Study selection Articles regarding the risk stratification and therapeutic options of AML, as well as the characteristics of leukemic stem cells were selected.Results AML is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome dependent on several prognostic factors,including age, cytogenetics and molecular markers. The advances in the understanding of AML pathogenesis and development will generate potential novel agents that might improve the treatment results of standard chemotherapy.Conclusion Deeper insight into the multiple transforming events of AML may aid us in designing combinations of small molecule inhibitors based on the individual patient characteristics.

  7. Serological identification of immunogenic antigens in acute monocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo

    2005-05-01

    In order to improve disease-free survival and potentially a cure, it is necessary to identify more potent leukemia antigen. Here, we defined the acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (LAA) recognized by the humoral immune system for the first time. We have applied the method of serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX) on acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5), followed by DNA sequencing and analyzing of positive clones. Then, the reactivity of normal and other leukemia sera with positive clones were performed. Thirty-five distinct novel antigens reactive with autologous IgG were identified by SEREX analysis on an acute monocytic leukemia patient and were characterized according to cDNA sequence and the reactivity with allogeneic sera. Twenty of the 35 antigens identified in this study were recognized by IgG antibodies in normal sera, and the remaining 15 were recognized exclusively by sera from allogeneic leukemia patients but not by normal donor sera, suggested that the immune response to these 15 antigens are leukemia related. The 15 immunogenic antigens detected by immune responses in the autologous host facilitate the identification of epitopes recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and are potential candidates for diagnosis and immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  8. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  10. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other

  11. Genome wide molecular analysis of minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Fernando P. G.; Almeida, Ines; Morolli, Bruno; Brouwer-Mandema, Geeske; Wessels, Hans; Vossen, Rolf; Vrieling, Harry; Marijt, Erik W. A.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2009-01-01

    Background Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia is heterogeneous in karyotype and is defined by immature morphological and molecular characteristics. This originally French-American-British classification is still used in the new World Health Organization classification when other criteri

  12. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  13. Meta-Analysis of Cytochrome P2D6 Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Acute Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Limin; Ruan Linhai

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To provide a more robust assessment to the effect of cytochrome P2D6 (CYP2D6) polymorphisms on the risk of acute leukemia (AL), and to evaluate the association between the two most commonly studied CYP2D6 polymorphisms (CYP2D6*3 and CYP2D6*4) and AL risk by meta-analysis. Methods:All case-control studies investigating an association between the CYP2D6*3 or CYP2D6*4 polymorphisms and AL risk were included. Either fixed-effects or random-effects models were applied to combine odds ratios (ORs) and 95%conifdence intervals (CIs) by RevMan 5.1. Q-statistic was used to evaluate the heterogeneity, and both Egger’s test and funnel plots were used to assess publication bias. Results:Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The results we acquired were that the OR value and 95%CI of CYP2D6*4 wild type, heterozygous mutant and homozygous mutant were 0.94 (0.66-1.35), 1.04(0.74-1.45) and 1.63 (0.95-2.81), respectively with Z=0.33, 0.23 and 1.76 (P>0.05), indicating that there was no signiifcant association between CYP2D6*4 polymorphism and the risk of AL. We also performed subgroup analysis by the AL immunophenotype for those groups with heterogeneity. The results of the combined analysis of CYP2D6*4 wild type, heterozygous mutant and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were Z=0.08, 0.08 (P>0.05), for acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were Z=0.17, 0.26 (P>0.05), indicating that there was no signiifcant association between CYP2D6*4 polymorphism and the development of both ALL and AML. Conclusion:CYP2D6 polymorphisms are not associated with AL risk.

  14. Advances in Management of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Arsenic Trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with specific features in cell morphology, is classified as M3 by French-American-British (FAB).Among M3, 95% of patients show specific chromosome translocation t(15;17)q(22;21) with PML-RAR α fusion gene, and 5% of patients show other subtypes. According to the statistical analysis of 2 540 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cases in Harbin Institute of Hematology & Oncology, APL accounted for 23%.

  15. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  16. Intestinal mucus accumulation in a child with acutemyeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namık Özbek

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal mucus accumulation is a very rare situation observed in some solid tumors, intestinal inflammation, mucosal hyperplasia, elevated intestinal pressure, and various other diseases. However, it has never been described in acute myeloblastic leukemia. The pathogenesis of intestinal mucus accumulation is still not clear. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl with acute myeloblastic leukemia and febrile neutropenia in addition to typhlitis. She was also immobilized due to joint contractures of the lower extremities and had intestinal mucus accumulation, which was, at first, misdiagnosed as intestinal parasitosis. We speculate that typhlitis, immobilization and decreased intestinal motility due to usage of antiemetic drugs might have been the potential etiologic factors in this case. However, its impact on prognosis of the primary disease is unknown.

  17. Infections in acute leukemia in Indian Children

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    B Roy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In the present study acute leukemic children were studied to determine the incidence and principal site of infection, correlation with absolute neutrophil count, causative organisms and to standardize the initial empirical anti microbial therapy. Materials and methods: A total 40 children in the age group 6 month to 12 year with acute leukemia relapse were included in this study. A total 82 infectious episodes including 61 febrile episodes were investigated for infectious etiology. Results: We found that the frequency of infections increased significantly with the degree of immunocompromisation specially neutropenia (ANC < 500/cmm. The skin and soft tissue was the commonest site of infection (26.83%, followed by respiratory tract (21.95%. Staphylococcus nonhemolytic coagulase-negative (34%, followed by Klebsiella (17% were the most common organisms isolated from blood. Staphylococcus non-hemolytic coagulase-negative was also the commonest isolate (26% from other sites of infection. Most strains were sensitive to Cloxacillin, cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: For the treatment of febrile episodes, empirical use of beta-lactamase resistant penicillin e.g. Cloxacillin or cephalosporin combined with an aminoglycosides with a broad spectrum antifungal like fluconazole in selective cases at the first sign of infection is recommended. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 40-47 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9672

  18. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  19. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presented as Multiple Breast Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrak, Ilkay Koray; Yalin, Turkay; Ozmen, Zafer; Aksoz, Tolga; Doughanji, Roula [Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2009-10-15

    Breast metastases in cases leukemia are very rare and occur primarily in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We report the involvement of breast metastases in a 30-year-old woman with acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient's mammograms revealed an extremely dense pattern with ill-defined, denser mass-like lesions in both breasts. A bilateral breast ultrasonographic evaluation revealed lobular-shaped and partly ill-defined hypoechoic masses with a multi-septated nodular (mottled) appearance.

  20. Geographical Distribution and Cluster Detection of Childhood Leukemia in the Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto; Garibaldi-Covarrubias, Roberto; Romo-Rubio, Hugo; Soto-Sumuano, Leonardo; Ruiz-Chávez, Carlos Fernando; Suárez-Arredondo, Mijail; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in childhood. Analyzing the spatial distribution of acute leukemia may generate the identification of risk factors. To study the incidence rate of acute leukemia, its geographic distribution, and cluster detection in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, Mexico. We included children under 15 years of age diagnosed with acute leukemia during the period 2010-2014 in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara. Each case was geo-referenced to street level to latitude and longitude coordinates using Quantum Geographic Information System (QGIS). Spatial clusters were found in the location of the acute leukemia cases applying the Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) algorithm with R statistical software. A total of 269 cases of leukemia were registered, 227 (84%) were acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 42 (16%) acute myeloblastic leukemia. The mean age was 6 ± 4 years. The mean incidence of acute leukemia was 6.44 cases/100,000 inhabitants: El Salto 10.12/100,000, Guadalajara 7.55/100,000, and Tlaquepaque 6.74/100,000. The DBSCAN found three clusters, all located within the municipality of Guadalajara. The incidence of acute leukemia in our population is higher than that in Canada and the USA. We found three spatial clusters of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the municipality of Guadalajara, suggesting the presence of local predisposing factors.

  1. Lack of Correlation Between the CCR5-Δ32 Mutation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Iranian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yousef; Momeni, Mohammad; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Khandany, Behjat Kalantary; Moogooei, Mozhgan; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are crucially important in the pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific chemokine receptor for CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), CCL4 and CCL5 which all play key roles in identifying cancer properties and localization of leukemia cells. It has been demonstrated that the known mutation in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32) leads to mal-expression of the receptor and affect its function. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of CCR5-Δ32 mutation within Iranian AML patients. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 60 AML patients and 300 healthy controls. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation was evaluated using Gap-PCR technique. Our results showed that CCR5-Δ32 mutation was not found in the patients, while three out of the controls had hetrozygotic form of this mutation. The rest of studied samples had the wild form of the gene. According to these findings, it can probably be concluded that the CCR5-Δ32 is not associated with susceptibility to AML in Iranian patients.

  2. Identification of homogeneously staining regions in leukemia patients

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    Mohammad Heydarian Moghadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneously staining regions (HSR or double minute chromosomes (dmin are autonomously replicating extra-chromosomal elements that are frequently associated with gene amplification in a variety of cancers. The diagnosis of leukemia patients was based on characterization of the leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow cytogenetics. This study report two cases, one with Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia without maturation (AML-M1, aged 23-year-old female, and the other with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-blast crisis, a 28-year-old female associated with double minute chromosomes. Most cases of acute myeloid leukemia with dmin in the literature (including our cases have been diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia.

  3. Acute appendicitis in acute leukemia and the potential role of decitabine in the critically ill patient

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    Deepti Warad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia is uncommon and often recognized late. Immunocompromised host state coupled with the importance of avoiding treatment delays makes management additionally challenging. Leukemic infiltration of the appendix though rare must also be considered. Although successful conservative management has been reported, surgical intervention is required in most cases. We present our experience with acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia and a case of complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia with a short course of decitabine. Decitabine may serve as bridging therapy in critically ill patients who are unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy.

  4. Brucella bacteremia in patients with acute leukemia: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Anazi Khalid

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis may cause serious infections in healthy individuals living in countries that are endemic for the infection. However, reports of brucella infections in immunocompromised hosts are relatively rare. Case Presentations Reported here are two patients with acute leukemia who developed Brucella melitensis bacteremia during their follow up at the Armed Forces Hospital in Riyadh. The first patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia during the transformation of his myelodysplasia into acute myeloid leukemia. The second patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia while his acute lymphoblastic leukemia was under control. Interestingly, he presented with acute cholecystitis during the brucella sepsis. Both brucella infections were associated with a marked reduction in the hematological parameters in addition to other complications. The bacteremic episodes were successfully treated with netilmicin, doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Brucellosis can cause systemic infections, complicated bacteremia and serious morbidity in patients with acute leukemia living in endemic areas. These infections may occur at the presentation of the leukemia or even when the leukemia is in remission. Nevertheless, the early diagnosis of brucellosis and the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for sufficient duration usually improves the outcome in these immunocompromised patients.

  5. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  6. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  7. Expression of leukemic stem cell associated membrane antigens in acute leukemia cells%白血病干细胞相关抗原在急性白血病细胞中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖平; 曾耀英; 林蔚

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨白血病干细胞(leukemia stem cell,LSC)相关抗原在不同亚型急性白血病细胞中的表达规律.方法 采用流式细胞术检测LSC相关抗原CD96,CD90,CD123,CD71等在50例不同亚型急性白血病细胞中的表达,包括急性粒细胞白血病未分化型(M1)、急性粒细胞白血病部分分化型(M2)、急性早幼粒细胞白血病(Ms)、急性粒-单核细胞白血病(M4)和急性B淋巴细胞白血病.结果 CD96在M.的表达率(90.00%)明显高于M2(18.18%)和急性B淋巴细胞白血病(20.00%)(P<0.05);各亚型急性白血病均表达CD123,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05) ;CD71在急性髓细胞白血病各亚型中(M1、M2、M3和M4)阳性表达率分别为80.00%、72.73%、90.00%和100.00%,明显高于急性B淋巴细胞白血病(P<0.05);CD90在急性B淋巴细胞白血病中阳性表达率为13.33%,高于急性髓细胞白血病(P>0.05).结论 CD71与CD96的表达有亚型特异性,CD96可能具有指示系列分化和细胞分化程度的作用,CD71可用于区分急性淋巴细胞白血病和急性髓细胞白血病.%Objective To study the expression of leukemic stem cell associated membrane antigens in acute leukemia cells with different subtypes. Methods Leukemic stem cell associated membrane antigens CD96, CD90, CD123 and CD71 were detected with flow cytometry in 50 acute leukemia patients with different subtypes including acute myeloblast leukemia without cell maturation (M1), acute myeloblast leukemia with cell maturation (M2), acute promyelocytic leukemia (M3), acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMML) and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Results The positive rate of CD96 expression in M3(90. 00%) was significantly higher than that in M2(18. 18%) and B-ALL (20. 00%)(P 0. 05). The positive rate of CD71 expression in four subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (M1 , M2, M3 and M4) was 80. 00%, 72. 73%, 90. 00% and 100. 00% respectively, all of which were significantly higher than

  8. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Coexistent t(8;21)(q22;q22) Translocation and 5q Deletion in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Katsuya; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Sanada, Yukinari; Kawamoto, Shinichiro; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Minami, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    The t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation is specifically observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M2 subtype, whereas del(5q) is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Thus, t(8;21)(q22;q22) and del(5q) appear to be mutually exclusive, and the association between them has not been characterized yet. Here, we report an 81-year-old woman with coexistent t(8;21)(q22;q22) and del(5q) at initial diagnosis. The bone marrow was infiltrated with 18.4% myeloblasts, and showed marked myeloid and erythroid dysplasia. Myeloblasts were positive for CD19 and CD56 as well as CD13, CD33, CD34 and HLA-DR. G-banding and spectral karyotyping showed 46,XX,del(5)(q?),t(8;21)(q22;q22)[18]/46,XX[2]. Both del(5)(q?) and t(8;21)(q22;q22) were present in a single clone. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase spreads detected a RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion signal on the der(8)t(8;21)(q22;q22), and confirmed deletion of CSF1R signaling at 5q33-q34 on the del(5)(q?). Furthermore, FISH on interphase nuclei revealed that the RUNX1/RUNX1T1 fusion signal and deletion of CSF1R signaling were found in 66.0% and 58.0% of interphase cells, respectively, suggesting that del(5)(q?) occurred in cells with RUNX1/RUNX1T1. These results indicated a diagnosis of AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22)/RUNX1/RUNX1T1 rather than MDS, even though the percentage of bone marrow myeloblasts was less than 20%. Based on these findings, together with those of other reported cases, del(5q) seems to be an extremely rare but recurrent secondary aberration in AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22).

  10. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Expression of CD71 by flow cytometry in acute leukemias: More often seen in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Amit; Dorwal, Pranav; Jain, Dharmendra; Tyagi, Neetu; Mehra, Simmi; Sachdev, Ritesh; Raina, Vimarsh

    2016-01-01

    CD71 is a marker that has been usually used for identifying dysplasia in the erythroid series. We have tried to evaluate the expression of CD71 in various types of acute leukemias. We studied 48 patients of acute leukemia, of which 25 were acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 13 were precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), 8 were T-ALL, and 2 were mixed phenotype acute leukemia (T/myeloid) as per the WHO classification. We found that the expression of CD71 was most prevalent in AMLs (84%), followed by T-ALL (50%) and least in B-ALL (30%). This finding clearly shows the higher expression of CD71 in AMLs compared to other common type of leukemias, such as B- and T-ALL. We suggest that the high expression of CD71 in AMLs could be used as a diagnostic marker and may also be used for minimal residual disease analysis after further studies in posttreatment scenario. This study is the first of its kind in the South Asian population.

  12. Notch signaling in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieselhuber, N R; Klco, J M; Verdoni, A M; Lamprecht, T; Sarkaria, S M; Wartman, L D; Ley, T J

    2013-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is initiated by the PML-RARA (PR) fusion oncogene and has a characteristic expression profile that includes high levels of the Notch ligand Jagged-1 (JAG1). In this study, we used a series of bioinformatic, in vitro, and in vivo assays to assess the role of Notch signaling in human APL samples, and in a PML-RARA knock-in mouse model of APL (Ctsg-PML-RARA). We identified a Notch expression signature in both human primary APL cells and in Kit+Lin-Sca1+ cells from pre-leukemic Ctsg-PML-RARA mice. Both genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of Notch signaling abrogated the enhanced self-renewal seen in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells from pre-leukemic Ctsg-PML-RARA mice, but had no influence on cells from age-matched wild-type mice. In addition, six of nine murine APL tumors tested displayed diminished growth in vitro when Notch signaling was inhibited pharmacologically. Finally, we found that genetic inhibition of Notch signaling with a dominant-negative Mastermind-like protein reduced APL growth in vivo in a subset of tumors. These findings expand the role of Notch signaling in hematopoietic diseases, and further define the mechanistic events important for PML-RARA-mediated leukemogenesis.

  13. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Daisy; Hladnik, Lindsay

    2009-06-01

    Management of the pregnant patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a challenge. Immediate treatment of APL is critical, as it is an oncologic emergency, with a high risk of morbidity and mortality associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, administration of chemotherapy and differentiating agents in pregnancy is controversial because of potential teratogenic effects. In addition, complications associated with APL, including retinoic acid syndrome, add to the complexity of management. To better understand how to manage this complex patient care situation, we searched the PubMed database (January 1972-May 2008) for English-language articles about maternal and fetal outcomes resulting from APL treatment during pregnancy. A total of 42 cases from 35 articles were identified: 12 first-trimester, 21 second-trimester, and 9 third-trimester cases. The most commonly administered agents were all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), anthracyclines, and antimetabolites. Complete remission was reported in 35 (83%) of 42 patients. Administration of ATRA or chemotherapy in the first trimester was associated with an increased risk of fetal malformations and spontaneous abortion, whereas administration in the second and third trimesters was associated with relatively favorable fetal outcomes. The overall treatment of the pregnant patient with APL should include a discussion about pregnancy termination, especially if APL is diagnosed in the first trimester. If the pregnancy is to continue, then the appropriate chemotherapy regimen needs to be determined. Frequent fetal monitoring, along with aggressive management of potential APL-related complications, is necessary to allow for optimal maternal and fetal outcomes.

  14. Elastase mediated fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudijk, E J; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Bos, R; Fijnheer, R

    2000-06-01

    The bleeding syndrome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is complex and consists of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hyperfibrinolysis. Elastase, derived from malignant promyelocytes, is believed to mediate the fibrinogeno- and fibrinolysis by aspecific proteolysis. In this study we measured the role of elastase in fifteen patients with APL by using an assay for elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with sepsis induced DIC. High levels of elastase were observed in sepsis and APL. The levels of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products were significantly higher in APL patients compared to patients with sepsis induced DIC. Nevertheless, the level of elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) was higher in the sepsis group (635.3 ng/ml, compared to 144.3 ng/ml in APL; p <0.0001). So, the enormous increase in fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products in APL cannot be explained by elastase activity. This study suggests a minor role for elastase mediated proteolysis in the hemorrhagic diathesis in APL patients.

  15. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Progress Through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun J.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pieters, Rob; Schrappe, Martin; Biondi, Andrea; Vora, Ajay; Baruchel, André; Silverman, Lewis B.; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Escherich, Gabriele; Horibe, Keizo; Benoit, Yves C.M.; Izraeli, Shai; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Liang, Der-Cherng; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.; Mullighan, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. Methods A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was reviewed and revised by the committee chairs of the major ALL study groups. Results With long-term survival rates for ALL approaching 90% and the advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses, several international study groups or consortia were established to conduct collaborative research to further improve outcome. As a result, treatment strategies have been improved for several subtypes of ALL, such as infant, MLL-rearranged, Philadelphia chromosome–positive, and Philadelphia chromosome–like ALL. Many recurrent genetic abnormalities that respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and multiple genetic determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. Conclusion The information gained from collaborative studies has helped decipher the heterogeneity of ALL to help improve personalized treatment, which will further advance the current high cure rate and the quality of life for children and adolescents with ALL. PMID:26304874

  16. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

  17. Upregulation of Leukocytic Syncytin-1 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxin; Jiang, Yaxian; Ouyang, Hongmei; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Guiqian; Fan, Xin; Tao, Rui; Jiang, Jie; Niu, Hua

    2016-07-09

    BACKGROUND Syncytin-1, a cell membrane-localizing fusogen, is abnormally expressed in several cancers, including endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. Although abnormal syncytin-1 expression has been detected in two-thirds of leukemia blood samples, its expression profile in acute leukemia patients has not yet been analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS Bone marrow samples from 50 acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cases and 14 B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-cell ALL) patients were subjected to flow cytometry to assess leukocyte type distributions and leukocytic syncytin-1 surface expression. RT-PCR was applied to assess leukocytic syncytin-1 mRNA expression. Statistical analysis was applied to compare syncytin-1 expression between AML and B-cell ALL patients across blasts, granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes as well as to determine clinical factors statistically associated with changes in syncytin-1 expression. RESULTS The leukocyte type distributions of the AML and B-cell ALL cohorts highly overlapped, with an observable difference in blast distribution between the 2 cohorts. The AML cohort displayed significantly greater syncytin-1 surface and mRNA expression (pphenotype and the acute monocytic leukemia phenotype in particular.

  18. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  19. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usvasalo, Anu; Räty, Riikka; Knuutila, Sakari; Vettenranta, Kim; Harila-Saari, Arja; Jantunen, Esa; Kauppila, Marjut; Koistinen, Pirjo; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Salmi, Toivo T; Silvennoinen, Raija; Elonen, Erkki; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M

    2008-08-01

    Interest has recently been paid to adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly because all reports so far published indicate that these patients have a better outcome when treated with pediatric rather than adult therapeutic protocols. There are different biological subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with distinct features and prognoses; the distribution of these subtypes is not well known among adolescents. We, therefore, studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults aged 10 to 25 years in Finland. This population-based study included 225 consecutive patients aged 10-25 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during 1990-2004. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (10-16 years) were treated with pediatric Nordic (NOPHO) protocols, and 97 patients (17-25 years) with Finnish Leukemia Group National protocols. We characterized the biological subtypes, clinical features and outcome of these patients. For the whole cohort, the remission rate was 96%, 5-year event-free survival 62% and overall survival 72%. The 5-year event-free survival was 67% for the pediatric treatment group and 60% for the adult treatment group (p=n.s.). Patients with inferior outcome were those with a white blood cell count >or= 100 x 10(9)/L, the Philadelphia chromosome and MLL. Good prognostic features were TEL-AML1, hyperdiploidy, and pediatric intermediate risk stratification. Unlike all previous studies, we found that the outcome of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with pediatric or adult therapeutic protocols was comparable. The success of the adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy emphasizes the benefit of central referral of patients to academic centers and adherence to research protocols.

  20. Small?molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia?initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF?04449913 (PF?913) is a selective, small?molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof?of?concept and mechanism of action of PF?913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signali...

  1. ADAMTS2 gene dysregulation in T/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tota, Giuseppina; Coccaro, Nicoletta; Zagaria, Antonella; Anelli, Luisa; Casieri, Paola; Cellamare, Angelo; Minervini, Angela; Minervini, Crescenzio Francesco; Brunetti, Claudia; Impera, Luciana; Carluccio, Paola; Cumbo, Cosimo; Specchia, Giorgina; Albano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemias (MPAL) include acute leukemias with blasts that express antigens of more than one lineage, with no clear evidence of myeloid or lymphoid lineage differentiation. T/myeloid (T/My...

  2. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this may be restricted to the case of double mutations in CEBPA in adult acute myeloid leukemia. In pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, data on the impact of these mutations are limited to one series, ...

  3. Survival after intestinal mucormycosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, R; Arnau, E; Julia, A; Lopez, A; Nadal, A; Allende, E

    1986-12-15

    A young woman with acute myelocytic leukemia developed acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding immediately after a first remission induction of her leukemia. After the site of bleeding was located in the descending colon, a necrotic bleeding ulcer was resected. Histologic examination of the ulcer established the diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B was administered because of the high risk of dissemination. The patient has been followed for 9 months with no evidence of relapse of infection. Survival after gastrointestinal mucormycosis in acute leukemia has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Success in managing mucormycosis depends on the adherence to the recommended principles of early aggressive diagnostic measures, excisional surgery, amphotericin B therapy, and control of the underlying predisposing condition.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Different Approaches to Measure Treatment Response in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley B.; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Wang, Kathleen Y.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Onciu, Mihaela; Jacobsen, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Dahl, Gary V.; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Degar, Barbara; Leung, Wing; Downing, James R.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Campana, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), initial treatment response by morphologic analysis of bone marrow predicts long-term outcome. Response can now be assessed by minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring with flow cytometry or polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We determined the relation among the results of these approaches and their prognostic value. Patients and Methods In the multicenter AML02 study, follow-up bone marrow samples from 203 children and adolescents with newly diagnosed AML were examined by flow cytometry (n = 1,514), morphology (n = 1,382), and PCR amplification of fusion transcripts (n = 508). Results were correlated with treatment outcome. Results Among 1,215 samples with less than 5% leukemic myeloblasts by morphology, 100 (8.2%) were MRD positive (≥ 0.1%) by flow cytometry, whereas 96 (57.5%) of the 167 samples with ≥ 5% blasts were MRD negative. Virtually all (308 of 311; 99.0%) MRD-negative samples by PCR were also MRD negative by flow cytometry. However, only 19 (9.6%) of the 197 PCR-positive samples were flow cytometry positive, with analyses of AML1-ETO and CBFβ-MYH11 accounting for most discrepancies, whereas eight of 13 MLL-positive samples had detectable MRD by flow cytometry. MRD by flow cytometry after induction 1 or 2 predicted lower event-free survival and higher relapse rate (P < .001) and was an independent prognostic factor in a multivariable analysis; prediction was not improved by morphologic information or molecular findings. Conclusion In childhood AML, morphologic assessment of treatment response has limited value if MRD is measured by flow cytometry. MLL fusion transcripts can provide prognostic information in some patients, whereas monitoring of AML1-ETO and CBFβ-MYH11 transcripts is largely uninformative. PMID:22965955

  5. Transformation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Child

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Childhood myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is an uncommon condition. Unlike adult MDS, pediatric patients have a more progressive course and rapidly transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Evolution to acute lymphoblastic leukemia is extremely rare. We report a 5 year old female child who presented with refractory anemia with excess blasts and transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia 4 months after initial diagnosis.

  6. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  7. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The Cancergram covers both acute and chronic leukemia in all of its forms (acute lymphocytic, acute monocytic, acute or sub-acute granulocytic, chronic granulocytic, chronic lymphocytic, chronic monocytic, plasma cell, stem cell, and hairy cell). Other neoplastic conditions of the reticuloendothelial system, lymphatic system, spleen, multiple myeloma, macroglobulinemia and other monoclonal gammopathies are excluded, and will be coveted by other Cancergrams now under development. This Cancergram includes abstracts concerning all clinical aspects of the disease, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other pre-clinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance.

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  10. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  11. General Information about Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  12. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lower part of the spinal column, after a small area on the lower back is numbed. These treatments are given in addition to treatment that is used to kill leukemia cells in the rest of the body. All children ...

  13. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lymphoid tissue is found in lymph nodes, the thymus, the spleen, the tonsils and adenoids, and is ... destroy some germs by surrounding and digesting them. Development of leukemia Any type of early blood-forming ...

  14. Myeloablative Versus Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Bart L; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Logan, Brent R; Wu, Juan; Devine, Steven M; Porter, David L; Maziarz, Richard T; Warlick, Erica D; Fernandez, Hugo F; Alyea, Edwin P; Hamadani, Mehdi; Bashey, Asad; Giralt, Sergio; Geller, Nancy L; Leifer, Eric; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Mendizabal, Adam M; Horowitz, Mary M; Deeg, H Joachim; Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2017-04-10

    Purpose The optimal regimen intensity before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. We hypothesized that lower treatment-related mortality (TRM) with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) would result in improved overall survival (OS) compared with myeloablative conditioning (MAC). To test this hypothesis, we performed a phase III randomized trial comparing MAC with RIC in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. Patients and Methods Patients age 18 to 65 years with HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 and < 5% marrow myeloblasts pre-HCT were randomly assigned to receive MAC (n = 135) or RIC (n = 137) followed by HCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. The primary end point was OS 18 months post-random assignment based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Secondary end points included relapse-free survival (RFS) and TRM. Results Planned enrollment was 356 patients; accrual ceased at 272 because of high relapse incidence with RIC versus MAC (48.3%; 95% CI, 39.6% to 56.4% and 13.5%; 95% CI, 8.3% to 19.8%, respectively; P < .001). At 18 months, OS for patients in the RIC arm was 67.7% (95% CI, 59.1% to 74.9%) versus 77.5% (95% CI, 69.4% to 83.7%) for those in the MAC arm (difference, 9.8%; 95% CI, -0.8% to 20.3%; P = .07). TRM with RIC was 4.4% (95% CI, 1.8% to 8.9%) versus 15.8% (95% CI, 10.2% to 22.5%) with MAC ( P = .002). RFS with RIC was 47.3% (95% CI, 38.7% to 55.4%) versus 67.8% (95% CI, 59.1% to 75%) with MAC ( P < .01). Conclusion OS was higher with MAC, but this was not statistically significant. RIC resulted in lower TRM but higher relapse rates compared with MAC, with a statistically significant advantage in RFS with MAC. These data support the use of MAC as the standard of care for fit patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes.

  15. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Ploidy and clinical characteristics of childhood acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large series (n = 596) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) focusing on modal numbers (MN) from the population-based NOPHO-AML trials. Abnormal karyotypes were present in 452 cases (76%) and numerical aberrations were present in 40% (n = 237) of all pediatric AML. Among...... with early onset (median age 2 years), female sex (57%), and a dominance of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) (29%). Hypodiploidy constituted 8% of all AML and was associated with older age (median age 9 years), male predominance (60%), FAB M2 (56%), and t(8;21)(q22;q22) (56%) with loss of sex...

  17. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  18. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  19. Relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Trausti; Söderhäll, Stefan; Arvidson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is the main reason for treatment failure in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Despite improvements in the up-front therapy, survival after relapse is still relatively poor, especially for high-risk relapses. The aims of this study were to assess outcomes following acute lymphoblastic...... leukemia relapse after common initial Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology protocol treatment; to validate currently used risk stratifications, and identify additional prognostic factors for overall survival. Altogether, 516 of 2735 patients (18.9%) relapsed between 1992 and 2011 and were...

  20. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia “myelodysplastic type’’ in transformation to acute myeloid leukemia – diagnostic and therapeutic options: case report and literature review / Leucemie mielomonocitară cronică forma mielodisplazică în transformare spre leucemie acută mieloidă – diagnostic și opțiuni terapeutice: prezentare de caz și revizuirea literaturii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cîrstea Mihaela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder that is characterized by the presence of an absolute monocytosis (1 × 10^ 9/l in the peripheral blood, the overlap of myelodisplastic aspects and myeloproliferative aspects in the bone marrow and tendency to transform into acute myeloid leukemia. CMML is considered to be the most aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia. We present the case of a 48 years old woman who was hospitalized in March 2013 in the Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation for anemia related symptoms. Initial investigations showed anemia, relative monocytosis (10% monocytes of the WBC differential with an increasing absolute number of monocytes (> 1,000/μl in the following months. Initial exploration of the bone marrow (aspirate and bone marrow biopsy and immunohistochemistry IHC tests revealed elements of trilinear dysplasia and an increased percentage of myeloblasts (11-14%. In the next four months myeloblasts percentage remained below 20% (8-14% and it has been observed a gradually increasing of monocytoid elements (> 20%. Immunophenotyping in the bone marrow aspirate identified a monocytic proliferation with high percentage (8% of immature cells. The karyotype reported the presence of clones with t (1;3. Initially diagnosed as RAEB-2 (WHO the case was recomitted in CMML-type 2 with a progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT has been performed after getting the best possible therapeutic response with AML chemotherapy type (complete remission. Allo-HSCT was performed using myeloablative conditioning, 12 months after diagnosis. The patient is now in complete remission, 24 months after allo-HSCT.

  1. Understanding Health Care Costs in a Wisconsin Acute Leukemia Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Steinert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated factors driving health care costs of patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Standard costs identified in insurance claims data obtained from the Wisconsin Health Information Organization were used in a sample of 837 acute leukemia patients from April 2009 to June 2011. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization guided selection of patient and community factors expected to influence health care costs. A generalized linear model fitting gamma-distributed data with log-link technique was used to analyze cost. Results: Type of treatment received and disease severity represented significant cost drivers, and patients receiving at least some of their treatment from academic medical centers experienced higher costs. Inpatient care and pharmacy costs of patients who received treatment from providers located in areas of higher poverty experienced lower costs, raising questions of potential treatment and medical practice disparities between provider locations. Directions of study findings were not consistent between different types of services received and underscore the complexity of investigating health care cost. Conclusions: While prevalence of acute leukemia in the United States is low compared to other diseases, its extreme high cost of treatment is not well understood and potentially influences treatment decisions. Acute leukemia health care costs may not follow expected patterns; further exploration of the relationship between cost and the treatment decision, and potential treatment disparities between providers in different socioeconomic locations, is needed.

  2. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  3. Optimizing asparaginase therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzari, Carmelo; Conter, Valentino; Starý, Jan; Colombini, Antonella; Moericke, Anja; Schrappe, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Asparaginases are important agents used in the treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three types of asparaginase are currently available: two are derived from Escherichia coli [native asparaginase and pegylated asparaginase (PEG-asparaginase)] and one from Erwinia chrysanthemi (crisantaspase). All three products share the same mechanism of action but have different pharmacokinetic properties, which do not make them easily interchangeable. Among the known toxicities and side-effects, allergic reactions and silent inactivation represent the most important limitations to the prolonged use of any asparaginase product, with associated reduced therapeutic effects and poorer outcomes. Routine real time monitoring can help to identify patients with silent inactivation and facilitate a switch to a different product to ensure continued depletion of asparagine, completion of the treatment schedule and maintenance of outcomes. However, the most appropriate second-line treatment is still a matter of debate. PEG-asparaginase has lower immunogenicity and a longer half-life than native Escherichia coli (E. coli) asparaginase, which makes it useful for both first-line and second-line use with a reduced number of doses. However, PEG-asparaginase displays cross-reactivity with native E. coli asparaginase that may harm its therapeutic effects. Crisantaspase does not display cross-reactivity to either of the E. coli-derived products, which has made crisantaspase the second-line treatment option in a number of recent protocols. As crisantaspase has a much shorter biological half-life than the E. coli-derived products, the appropriate dosage and administration schedule are of paramount importance in delivering treatment with this product. In the ongoing trial AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica - Berlin-Franklin-Munster), in which PEG-asparaginase is used first-line, one dose of PEG-asparaginase is substituted by seven doses

  4. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. [Tumor lysis syndrome in a pregnancy complicated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Goris, M P; Sánchez-Zamora, R; Torres-Aguilar, A A; Briones Garduño, J C

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is rare during pregnancy, affects about 1 in 75,000 pregnancies, of all leukemias diagnosed only 28% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, this is a risk factor to develop spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome, it's a oncologic complication potentially deadly if the prophylactic treatment its avoided. Cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia associated with pregnancy has been poorly documented in the literature the association of these two entities to pregnancy is the first report published worldwide, so the information is limited.

  7. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Azizi, Zahra; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; DABAGHI, MOHAMMAD; NADIMI, MOTAHAREH

    2015-01-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the...

  8. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Arising in CALR Mutated Essential Thrombocythemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E. Langabeer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in an existing myeloproliferative neoplasm is rare with historical cases unable to differentiate between concomitant malignancies or leukemic transformation. Molecular studies of coexisting JAK2 V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms and mature B cell malignancies indicate distinct disease entities arising in myeloid and lymphoid committed hematopoietic progenitor cells, respectively. Mutations of CALR in essential thrombocythemia appear to be associated with a distinct phenotype and a lower risk of thrombosis yet their impact on disease progression is less well defined. The as yet undescribed scenario of pro-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia arising in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia is presented. Intensive treatment for the leukemia allowed for expansion of the original CALR mutated clone. Whether CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms predispose to the acquisition of additional malignancies, particularly lymphoproliferative disorders, is not yet known.

  9. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  10. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. EPIDEMIOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Magalhães Rego

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Distinct epidemiological characteristics have been described in Acute Promielocytic Leukemia (APL. Populations from Latin America have a higher incidence of APL and in some geographic areas a distinct distribution of the PML-RARA isoforms is present. Here, we review the main differences in APL epidemilogy in Latin America as well as treatment outcomes.

  12. Pneumatosis Intestinalis in a Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Mangaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis Intestinalis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the intestinal wall. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed nausea and nonbloody diarrhea. CT showed intramural air in transverse and descending colon. Patient clinically improved with conservative management.

  13. Collaborative efforts driving progress in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zwaan (Michel); E.A. Kolb (Edward A.); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); J. Abrahamsson; S. Adachi (Susumu); R. Aplenc (Richard); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. Gibson (Brenda); H. Hasle (Henrik); G. Leverger (Guy); F. Locatelli (Franco); C. Ragu (Christine); R.C. Ribeiro (Raul C.); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); L. Sung (Lillian); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); U. Creutzig; G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, nati

  14. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenkamp, Trudy D; Izraeli, Shai; Zimmermann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials from 1995...

  15. L-asparaginase treatment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pieters (Rob); S.P. Hunger (Stephen); J. Boos (Joachim); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); L.B. Silverman (Lewis); A. Baruchel (André); N. Goekbuget (Nicola); M. Schrappe (Martin); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAsparaginases are a cornerstone of treatment protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are used for remission induction and intensification treatment in all pediatric regimens and in the majority of adult treatment protocols. Extensive clinical data have shown that intensive a

  16. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and int

  17. Obesity in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iughetti Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. Continuous progress in risk-adapted treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has secured 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% and 8-year survival rates approaching 90%. Almost 75% of survivors, however, have a chronic health condition negatively impacting on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity can be considered one of the most important health chronic conditions in the general population, with an increasing incidence in patients treated for childhood cancers and especially in acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors who are, at the same time, more at risk of experiencing precocious cardiovascular and metabolic co-morbidities. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation and chemotherapy or to primary tumor together with lifestyle modifications and genetic factors could affect long-term outcomes. Nevertheless, the etiology of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia is not yet fully understood. The present review has the aim of summarizing the published data and examining the most accepted mechanisms and main predisposing factors related to weight gain in this particular population.

  18. Bone histomorphometry in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, JA; Koudstaal, J; Wiersema-Buist, J; Kamps, WA; Timens, W

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain insight into bone formation and resorption in children with newly diagnosed untreated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In 23 consecutive children with ALL, a bone biopsy was taken from the crista iliaca posterior under ketamine anesthesia, together with t

  19. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in acute leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasschaert, SLA; van der Kolk, Dorina M.; De Bont, ESJM; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA; De Vries, EGE

    Multidrug resistance, cross- resistance to structurally and functionally unrelated drugs, is an important cause of treatment failure in acute leukemia. Multidrug resistance can result from the overexpression of ATP- dependent efflux pumps, such as P- glycoprotein and members of the multidrug

  20. Relationship between ABO blood group and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavasolian, F; Abdollahi, E; Vakili, M; Amini, A

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) constitute a family of genetically heterogeneous lymphoid neoplasms derived from B- and T-lymphoid progenitors. ALL affects both children and adults. Diagnosis is based on morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features that allow differentiation from normal progenitors and other hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic neoplasms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ALL and ABO blood group. This is a case-control study that was carried out in Amir Oncology Hospital in Shiraz during 2011 to2013. The case group consisted of 293 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. And compared with 300 subject in control group ( the age in the case group was between 2-5 year, and the age in the control group was between 2-45 year) .Statistical analyzes was done performed by chi -square test. The results was considered significant when p value ABO blood group distribution was 82(A), 59 (B), 24 (AB) and 128(O) in patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and the blood group of 300 participants in the control group include, 63% (25) A, 69% (25.6) B, 18 % 06.8) AB and 101% (42.6) O. The ABO blood group distribution showed that there is significant differences between ABO blood group and patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia . This study showed significant association between ALL and ABO blood group and showed that blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of All (p value<0.001).

  1. Epigenetics in MLL-rearranged infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.P.M. Stumpel (Dominique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNowadays the cure rate for children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has exceeded 80%. Although this is considered to be one of the major successes in pediatric oncology, the subgroup of patients that did not benefit from the improved therapeutic strategies should not be

  2. Occupational exposure to solvents and acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talibov, Madar; Lehtinen-Jacks, Susanna; Martinsen, Jan Ivar;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the current study was to assess the relation between occupational exposure to solvents and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). METHODS: Altogether, this study comprises 15 332 incident cases of AML diagnosed in Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland from 1961-2005 and 76...

  3. Pharmacogenetics Influence Treatment Efficacy in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devidsen, M.L.; Dalhoff, K.; Schmiegelow, K.

    2008-01-01

    in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far Focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate...

  4. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  5. Etiology of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: the adrenal hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Vestergaard, T.; Nielsen, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    The pattern of infections in the first years of life modulates our immune system, and a low incidence of infections has been linked to an increased risk of common childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We here present a new interpretation of these observations--the adrenal hypothesis...

  6. Pharmacogenetics influence treatment efficacy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Marie Louise; Dalhoff, Kim; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2008-01-01

    in treatment resistance and toxic side effects. As most childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment protocols include up to 13 different chemotherapeutic agents, the impact of individual SNPs has been difficult to evaluate. So far focus has mainly been on the widely used glucocorticosteroids, methotrexate...

  7. Prognosis of children with mixed phenotype acute leukemia treated on the basis of consistent immunophenotypic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejstrikova, Ester; Volejnikova, Jana; Fronkova, Eva; Zdrahalova, Katerina; Kalina, Tomas; Sterba, Jaroslav; Jabali, Yahia; Mihal, Vladimir; Blazek, Bohumir; Cerna, Zdena; Prochazkova, Daniela; Hak, Jiri; Zemanova, Zuzana; Jarosova, Marie; Oltova, Alexandra; Sedlacek, Petr; Schwarz, Jiri; Zuna, Jan; Trka, Jan; Stary, Jan; Hrusak, Ondrej

    2010-06-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) represents a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The European Group for the Immunological Classification of Leukemias (EGIL) scoring system unambiguously defines MPAL expressing aberrant lineage markers. Discussions surrounding it have focused on scoring details, and information is limited regarding its biological, clinical and prognostic significance. The recent World Health Organization classification is simpler and could replace the EGIL scoring system after transformation into unambiguous guidelines. Simple immunophenotypic criteria were used to classify all cases of childhood acute leukemia in order to provide therapy directed against acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Prognosis, genotype and immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangement status were analyzed. The incidences of MPAL were 28/582 and 4/107 for children treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia regimens, respectively. In immunophenotypic principal component analysis, MPAL treated as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia clustered between cases of non-mixed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia, while other MPAL cases were included in the respective non-mixed B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia clusters. Analogously, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements followed the expected pattern in patients treated as having acute myeloid leukemia (non-rearranged, 4/4) or as having B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (rearranged, 20/20), but were missing in 3/5 analyzed cases of MPAL treated as having T-cell acute lymphobastic leukemia. In patients who received acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment, the 5-year event-free survival of the MPAL cases was worse than that of the non-mixed cases (53+/-10% and 76+/-2% at 5 years, respectively, P=0.0075), with a more pronounced difference among B lineage cases. The small numbers of MPAL cases

  8. CXXC5 (Retinoid-Inducible Nuclear Factor, RINF) is a Potential Therapeutic Target in High-Risk Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, Audrey; Fredly, Hanne; Aloysius, Thomas Aquinas; Bullinger, Lars; Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; de la Grange, Pierre; Delhommeau, François; Hagen, Karen Marie; Récher, Christian; Dusanter-Fourt, Isabelle; Knappskog, Stian; Lillehaug, Johan Richard

    2013-01-01

    The retinoid-responsive gene CXXC5 localizes to the 5q31.2 chromosomal region and encodes a retinoid-inducible nuclear factor (RINF) that seems important during normal myelopoiesis. We investigated CXXC5/RINF expression in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells derived from 594 patients, and a wide variation in CXXC5/RINF mRNA levels was observed both in the immature leukemic myeloblasts and in immature acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, patients with low-risk cytogenetic abnormalities showed significantly lower levels compared to patients with high-risk abnormalities, and high RINF/CXXC5/ mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival for patients receiving intensive chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. This association with prognosis was seen both when investigating (i) an unselected patient population as well as for patients with (ii) normal cytogenetic and (iii) core-binding factor AML. CXXC5/RINF knockdown in AML cell lines caused increased susceptibility to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, and regulation of apoptosis also seemed to differ between primary human AML cells with high and low RINF expression. The association with adverse prognosis together with the antiapoptotic effect of CXXC5/RINF suggests that targeting of CXXC5/RINF should be considered as a possible therapeutic strategy, especially in high-risk patients who show increased expression in AML cells compared with normal hematopoietic cells. PMID:23988457

  9. Pleural effusion as the initial extramedullary manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/PEKat0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nieves-Nieves

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Leukemias rarely debut by pleural involvement as the first manifestation of the hematologic malignancy. This complication is most commonly seen in solid tumors such as carcinomas of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract and lymphomas. We present a case of a 66 year old male who presented with a pleural leukemic infiltration of his undiagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia that was not a complication of the disease extension, but the acute presentation of the illness. Progressive shortness of breath for two weeks, cough, clear sputum and weight loss were the initial complaints. Serum dyscrasia suggested a hematologic abnormality. A chest x-ray performed demonstrated a buildup of fluid with layering in the left pleural cavity. Diagnostic thoracentesis suggested an exudative etiology with cytology remarkable for 62% leukemic myeloblast. The diagnosis was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy with expression of the antigens CD 34+ and CD13+, with unfavorable cytogenetic prognosis and a trisomy 21 chromosomal defect. Chemotherapy was initiated, though no remission achieved with induction chemotherapy. Complications and disease progression precludes in the patient’s death. Although rare, due to the unusual presentation of the disease, this case clearly demonstrates the importance of biochemical analysis and cytopathology specimens obtained in pleural fluid.

  10. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  11. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  12. HISTORY OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: A TALE OF ENDLESS REVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cicconi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Only few thousand people are diagnosed each year of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL worldwide. However, for a number of reasons such rare disease is regarded as a paradigm in the entire field of medicine. Once considered the most malignant human leukemia as well as the one associated with the worst prognosis, APL has been transformed in the past few decades into the most frequently curable one. This extraordinary progress has been the result of an unprecedented coincidence of advances in both biological and clinical research.

  13. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  14. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and WHO Performance Status (PS) on achievement......-term mortality [adjusted 90-day MR, PS⩾2=3.43 (95%CI=2.30-5.13); adjusted 91-day-3-year MR=1.35 (95%CI=1.06-1.74)]. We propose that more patients with comorbidity may benefit from intensive chemotherapy.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 5 August 2014; doi:10.1038/leu.2014.234....

  15. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia with Bilateral Renal Masses Masquerading as Nephroblastomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Thakore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in the pediatric patient population. However, renal involvement as the primary manifestation of ALL is rare. We report a case of a 4-year-old boy with bilateral renal lesions resembling nephroblastic rests as the first finding of early stage ALL preceding hematological changes and subsequent classic clinical findings by two weeks. These renal hypodensities completely resolved after one week of induction chemotherapy. This case demonstrates that renal involvement can be the only initial presenting finding of leukemia. Children with lesions resembling nephroblastic rests need appropriate surveillance due to the risk of malignant disease.

  16. Clonal origins of ETV6-RUNX1+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alpar, D.; Wren, D.; Ermini, Luca;

    2015-01-01

    Studies on twins with concordant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have revealed that ETV6-RUNX1 gene fusion is a common, prenatal genetic event with other driver aberrations occurring subclonally and probably postnatally. The fetal cell type that is transformed by ETV6-RUNX1 is not identified...... by such studies or by the analysis of early B-cell lineage phenotype of derived progeny. Ongoing, clonal immunoglobulin (IG) and cross-lineage T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements are features of B-cell precursor leukemia and commence at the pro-B-cell stage of normal B-cell lineage development. We reasoned...

  17. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  18. Aberrant Phenotype in Iranian Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jahedi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of aberrant phenotypes and possible prognostic value in peripheral and bone marrow blood mononuclear cells of Iranian patients with AML. Methods: 56 cases of de novo AML (2010-2012 diagnosed by using an acute panel of monoclonal antibodies by multiparametric flowcytometry. Immunophenotyping was done on fresh bone marrow aspirate and/or peripheral blood samples using the acute panel of MoAbs is stained with Phycoerythrin (PE /fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC, Allophycocyanin (APC and Peridinin-chlorophyll protein complex (perCP. We investigated Co-expression of lymphoid-associated markers CD2, CD3, CD7, CD 10, CD19, CD20 and CD22 in myeloblasts. Results: Out of the 56 cases, 32 (57.1% showed AP. CD7 was positive in 72.7% of cases in M1 and 28.5% in M2 but M3 and M4 cases lacked this marker. We detected CD2 in 58.35 of M1cases, 21.40% of M2 cases, 33.3 of M3 and 20% of M5; but M4 patients lacked this marker. The CBC analysis demonstrated a wide range of haemoglobin concentration, Platelet and WBC count which varied from normal to anaemia, thrombocytopenia to thrombocytosis and leukopenia to hyper leukocytosis. Conclusions: Our findings showed that CD7 and CD2 were the most common aberrant marker in Iranian patients with AML. However, we are not find any significant correlation between aberrant phenotype changing and MRD in our population. Taken together, this findings help to provide new insights in to the investigation of other aberrant phenotypes that may play roles in diagnosis and therapeutic of AML.

  19. Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Treatment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...tment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...on(s) being investigated Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia... language Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide re...arbazina nei pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide recidivata/refrattaria i cui blasti esprimono bassi

  20. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Acute hepatitis A induction of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadhi, V; Emuron, D; Gupta, R

    2010-09-01

    Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with malaise for a month without spontaneous bruising/bleeding, infections, or B-symptoms, such as fevers, night sweats, or unintentional weight loss. Nonspecific viral transformation of bone marrow has been discussed in the literature, but we specifically describe hepatitis A-induced adult-onset precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which is the first reported case in the literature.

  2. Non-infectious chemotherapy-associated acute toxicities during childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Müller, Klaus; Mogensen, Signe Sloth; Mogensen, Pernille Rudebeck; Wolthers, Benjamin Ole; Stoltze, Ulrik Kristoffer; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Frandsen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    During chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, all organs can be affected by severe acute side effects, the most common being opportunistic infections, mucositis, central or peripheral neuropathy (or both), bone toxicities (including osteonecrosis), thromboembolism, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, endocrinopathies (especially steroid-induced adrenal insufficiency and hyperglycemia), high-dose methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity, asparaginase-associated hypersensitivity, pancreatitis, and hyperlipidemia. Few of the non-infectious acute toxicities are associated with clinically useful risk factors, and across study groups there has been wide diversity in toxicity definitions, capture strategies, and reporting, thus hampering meaningful comparisons of toxicity incidences for different leukemia protocols. Since treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia now yields 5-year overall survival rates above 90%, there is a need for strategies for assessing the burden of toxicities in the overall evaluation of anti-leukemic therapy programs. PMID:28413626

  3. How I treat acute and chronic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Tal; Pereg, David; Lishner, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence of pregnancy associated leukemia is approximately 1 case out of 10,000 pregnancies. This rare occurrence precludes the conducting of large, prospective studies to examine diagnostic, management and outcome issues. The treatment of a pregnant woman with leukemia may be associated with severe adverse fetal outcome including death and malformations, and therefore poses a difficult challenge for both the patient and the attending physician. Chemotherapy during the 1st trimester is associated with an increased risk for congenital malformations. However, this risk diminishes as pregnancy advances. When acute leukemia is diagnosed during the 1st trimester, patients should be treated promptly similar to non-pregnant patients. However, the aggressive induction therapy should follow pregnancy termination. When the diagnosis is made later in pregnancy standard chemotherapy regimen should be considered and usually pregnancy termination is not mandatory. However, both the mother and the fetus should be under close observation and delivery should be postponed to a non-cytopenic period. Pregnancy associated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can be treated with interferon throughout pregnancy with no apparent increase in adverse fetal outcome. In the very rare case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) during pregnancy treatment can usually be delayed until after delivery.

  4. Chromosomal banding patterns in patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 50% of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients studied with banding techniques have detectable clonal karyotypic abnormalities. Although there is considerable variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities are observed, including trisomy 8, monosomy 7, and the 8;21 translocation (frequently accompanied by loss of an X or Y). The 15;17 translocation is highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Clonal evolution of the karyotype can be observed in a significant number of ANLL patients for whom serial cytogenetic analyses are obtained. Gain of a No. 8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Bone marrow cells from paients who develop ANLL following treatment of a previous malignancy often have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of all or part of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  5. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa H. Arnaoaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  6. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  7. New decision support tool for acute lymphoblastic leukemia classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhukar, Monica; Agaian, Sos; Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we build up a new decision support tool to improve treatment intensity choice in childhood ALL. The developed system includes different methods to accurately measure furthermore cell properties in microscope blood film images. The blood images are exposed to series of pre-processing steps which include color correlation, and contrast enhancement. By performing K-means clustering on the resultant images, the nuclei of the cells under consideration are obtained. Shape features and texture features are then extracted for classification. The system is further tested on the classification of spectra measured from the cell nuclei in blood samples in order to distinguish normal cells from those affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. The results show that the proposed system robustly segments and classifies acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on complete microscopic blood images.

  8. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a comprehensive review and 2017 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, T; Abdul-Hay, M

    2017-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the second most common acute leukemia in adults, with an incidence of over 6500 cases per year in the United States alone. The hallmark of ALL is chromosomal abnormalities and genetic alterations involved in differentiation and proliferation of lymphoid precursor cells. In adults, 75% of cases develop from precursors of the B-cell lineage, with the remainder of cases consisting of malignant T-cell precursors. Traditionally, risk stratification has been based on clinical factors such age, white blood cell count and response to chemotherapy; however, the identification of recurrent genetic alterations has helped refine individual prognosis and guide management. Despite advances in management, the backbone of therapy remains multi-agent chemotherapy with vincristine, corticosteroids and an anthracycline with allogeneic stem cell transplantation for eligible candidates. Elderly patients are often unable to tolerate such regimens and carry a particularly poor prognosis. Here, we review the major recent advances in the treatment of ALL. PMID:28665419

  10. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  11. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with a uterine cervical mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of female genital tract with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is extremely rare, and it is even rarer for a patient to have symptomatic presentation. We report the case of a middle-aged lady with ALL, who presented with severe abnormal uterine bleeding and a uterine cervical mass. Biopsy of the cervical mass showed infiltration by leukemic blasts. She received chemotherapy with Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster protocol and is alive in remission after 10 years.

  12. Mercaptopurine/Methotrexate Maintenance Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Nielsen, Stine N; Frandsen, Thomas L;

    2014-01-01

    The antileukemic mechanisms of 6-mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate (MTX) maintenance therapy are poorly understood, but the benefits of several years of myelosuppressive maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well proven. Currently, there is no international consensus on drug...... intensive and toxic earlier treatment phases, and often more challenging. Ongoing research address the applicability of drug metabolite measurements for dose adjustments, extensive host genome profiling to understand diversity in treatment efficacy and toxicity, and alternative thiopurine dosing regimens...

  13. Vincristine sulfate liposomal injection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Soosay Raj TA; Smith AM; Moore AS

    2013-01-01

    Trisha A Soosay Raj,1 Amanda M Smith,2 Andrew S Moore,1,21Royal Children's Hospital, Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Vincristine (VCR) is one of the most extensively used cytotoxic compounds in hemato-oncology. VCR is particularly important for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a...

  14. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  15. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  16. Optic nerve infiltration by acute lymphoblastic leukemia: MRI contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Maria de Fatima; Braga, Flavio Tulio [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Paulista School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, Antonio Jose da [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Division of Diagnostic Imaging in Pediatrics, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-08-01

    We describe the clinical presentation and imaging features of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that was complicated by optic nerve infiltration. The clinical and diagnostic characteristics of this complication must be recognized so that optimal therapy can be started to prevent blindness. MR imaging is useful in early detection and should be performed in any leukemic patient with ocular complaints, even during remission. (orig.)

  17. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  18. Cellulitis with Leukocytopenia as an Initial Sign of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Sakamoto; Naoki Oiso; Masakatsu Emoto; Shusuke Uchida; Ayaka Hirao; Yoichi Tatsumi; Itaru Matsumura; Akira Kawada

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies are immunosuppressive and may develop cutaneous or invasive infections as a primary sign of immune suppression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia M3) is caused by translocation of reciprocal chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), which produces an oncogenic protein. We herein describe a 71-year-old man having cellulitis with leukocytopenia as a first sign of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Dermatologists and hematologists should keep in min...

  19. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syn...

  20. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  1. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction...

  3. Activation of a promyelocytic leukemia-tumor protein 53 axis underlies acute promyelocytic leukemia cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablain, Julien; Rice, Kim; Soilihi, Hassane; de Reynies, Aurélien; Minucci, Saverio; de Thé, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARA) fusion protein, which interferes with nuclear receptor signaling and PML nuclear body (NB) assembly. APL is the only malignancy definitively cured by targeted therapies: retinoic acid (RA) and/or arsenic trioxide, which both trigger PML-RARA degradation through nonoverlapping pathways. Yet, the cellular and molecular determinants of treatment efficacy remain disputed. We demonstrate that a functional Pml-transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) axis is required to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells in a mouse model of APL. Upon RA-induced PML-RARA degradation, normal Pml elicits NB reformation and induces a Trp53 response exhibiting features of senescence but not apoptosis, ultimately abrogating APL-initiating activity. Apart from triggering PML-RARA degradation, arsenic trioxide also targets normal PML to enhance NB reformation, which may explain its clinical potency, alone or with RA. This Pml-Trp53 checkpoint initiated by therapy-triggered NB restoration is specific for PML-RARA-driven APL, but not the RA-resistant promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-RARA variant. Yet, as NB biogenesis is druggable, it could be therapeutically exploited in non-APL malignancies.

  4. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia in Four Year Old Female Child - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudha V. Kushtagi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is the most common malignancy of childhood representing about 30 % of oncohematological diseases diagnosed in children less than 15 years of age. We report the case of a 4 year old girl with acute promyelocytic leukemia whose blasts showed the morphology characteristic of acute promyelocytic leukemia variant. The case is reported because in the paediatric population the acute promyelocytic leukemia is a rare occurrence moreover, it represent a true oncohematology emergency, in this case the laboratory has a significant role since the timing of diagnosis must be very short. It helps in therapeutic protocols compared to conventional therapeutic protocols in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML, the introduction of retinoid All-Trans-Retinoic Acid (ATRA, both in children and adults with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL, has significantly reduced the early mortality.

  5. CpG island methylator phenotype and its relationship with prognosis in adult acute leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai-Ying; Wu, Dan-Sen; Zhou, Hua-Rong; Shen, Jian-Zhen

    2014-09-01

    To investigated the relationship between CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and prognosis in adults with acute leukemia. Bone marrow samples from 53 acute myeloid leukemia and 50 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients were collected. The methylation status of 18 tumor suppressor genes was determined using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Greater than 30% of acute leukemia patients had methylated p15, p16, CDH1, CDH13, RUNX3, sFRP1, ID4, and DLC-1 genes; methylation of ≥4 were defined as CIMP positive. Age, type of leukemia, white blood cell count, and CIMP status were significantly associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) (P acute leukemia.

  6. Acute myocardial infarction as a finding of acute promyelocytic leukemia-related coagulation disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkurt, Zübeyde N; Aypar, Eda; Sarifakiogullari, Serpil; Taçoy, Gülten; Özdag, Murat; Kahraman, Seda; Çengel, Atiye

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has one of the most favorable prognoses among other leukemia subtypes. However, the major cause of mortality in APL is disseminated intravascular coagulation at the presentation. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction (MI) at the time of APL diagnosis before treatment. The patient suffered from chest pain, sweating and giddiness. He was hypoxic, hypotensive and bradycardic. ECG showed inferior MI. Unfractioned heparin infusion (850 U/h) was started and 5 min after the previous ECG showed total ST resolution. We suggest that in this case, MI was not related to atherosclerotic plaque rupture but related to DIC manifestation.

  7. Outcomes after Induction Failure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrappe, Martin; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Saha, Vaskar; Gaynon, Paul S.; Baruchel, André; Conter, Valentino; Otten, Jacques; Ohara, Akira; Versluys, Anne Birgitta; Escherich, Gabriele; Heyman, Mats; Silverman, Lewis B.; Horibe, Keizo; Mann, Georg; Camitta, Bruce M.; Harbott, Jochen; Riehm, Hansjörg; Richards, Sue; Devidas, Meenakshi; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Failure of remission-induction therapy is a rare but highly adverse event in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). METHODS We identified induction failure, defined by the persistence of leukemic blasts in blood, bone marrow, or any extramedullary site after 4 to 6 weeks of remission-induction therapy, in 1041 of 44,017 patients (2.4%) 0 to 18 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated by a total of 14 cooperative study groups between 1985 and 2000. We analyzed the relationships among disease characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes in these patients. RESULTS Patients with induction failure frequently presented with high-risk features, including older age, high leukocyte count, leukemia with a T-cell phenotype, the Philadelphia chromosome, and 11q23 rearrangement. With a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (range, 1.5 to 22.1), the 10-year survival rate (±SE) was estimated at only 32±1%. An age of 10 years or older, T-cell leukemia, the presence of an 11q23 rearrangement, and 25% or more blasts in the bone marrow at the end of induction therapy were associated with a particularly poor outcome. High hyperdiploidy (a modal chromosome number >50) and an age of 1 to 5 years were associated with a favorable outcome in patients with precursor B-cell leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation from matched, related donors was associated with improved outcomes in T-cell leukemia. Children younger than 6 years of age with precursor B-cell leukemia and no adverse genetic features had a 10-year survival rate of 72±5% when treated with chemotherapy only. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric ALL with induction failure is highly heterogeneous. Patients who have T-cell leukemia appear to have a better outcome with allogeneic stem-cell transplantation than with chemotherapy, whereas patients who have precursor B-cell leukemia without other adverse features appear to have a better outcome with chemotherapy. (Funded by Deutsche

  8. Acute leukemia case presented with hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Selçuk Bektaş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old girl patient referred to our emergency clinic with articular pain, stomachache and fever complaints. Past history revealed that she was suffering from pain in both knees and ankle joints for 8 days. The joint temperature increased and swelling did not accompany articular pain. Family history was unremarkable. In the physical examination, there was sensitivity in the knees, elbows and ankles during movement. The patient had normal complete blood cell count, and no blast or atypical cells were observed in peripheral smear. Serum electrolytes, liver and kidney function tests were normal except for hypercalcemia. The 25 (OH vitamin D and 1-25 (OH2 vitamin D levels were within normal range. In bone marrow aspiration, infiltration of cells with lymphoblastic and homogenous cellular features was observed. With positivity of cCD79, CD19, CD45, the case was considered as preB cell leukemia. Body bone scintigraphy performed for bone metastasis was normal. After the chemotherapy, hydration and furosemid treatment, the calcium level returned to normal. This case emphasized on the fact that, children with hypercalcemia should undergo a detailed examination for malignancies even though no blast or atypical lymphocyte are observed in their peripheral blood smear before steroid treatment is applied and if necessary, bone marrow aspiration should be taken into account.

  9. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002. Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  10. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Rani Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects.

  11. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  12. Massive myeloid sarcoma affecting the central nervous system, mediastinum, retroperitoneum, liver, and rectum associated with acute myeloblastic leukaemia: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best-Aguilera, C R; Vazquez-Del Mercado, M; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Herrera-Zarate, L; Navarro-Hernandez, R E; Martin-Marquez, B T; Oregon-Romero, E; Ruiz-Quezada, S; Bonilla, G M; Lomeli-Guerrero, A

    2005-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary tumours with granulocytic precursors. When associated with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML), these tumours usually affect no more than two different extramedullary regions. This report describes a myeloid sarcoma associated with AML with tumour formation at five anatomical sites. The patient was a 37 year old man admitted in September 1999 with a two month history of weight loss, symptoms of anaemia, rectal bleeding, and left facial nerve palsy. The anatomical sites affected were: the rectum, the right lobe of the liver, the mediastinum, the retroperitoneum, and the central nervous system. A bone marrow smear was compatible with AML M2. Flow cytometry showed that the peripheral blood was positive for CD4, CD11, CD13, CD14, CD33, CD45, and HLA-DR. A karyotypic study of the bone marrow revealed an 8;21 translocation. The presence of multiple solid tumours in AML is a rare event. Enhanced expression of cell adhesion molecules may be the reason why some patients develop myeloid sarcomas. PMID:15735171

  13. Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia: historical overview and a new definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, O K; Arber, D A

    2010-11-01

    Acute leukemia with a mixed phenotype is a rare disease and comprises 2-5% of all acute leukemias. These disorders have been known historically by a variety of names, such as mixed lineage leukemia, bilineal leukemia and biphenotypic leukemia, and the criteria for diagnosis have often been arbitrary. The scoring criteria proposed by the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias represented a major attempt to define this disorder. However, the relative weight given to some markers and the lack of lineage specificity of most markers have raised questions regarding the significance of this approach. In 2008, the World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid tumors proposed a simpler diagnostic algorithm, which relies on fewer and more lineage-specific markers to define mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL). MPAL with t(9;22) and MLL rearrangement have been separated. Several studies have suggested that patients with acute leukemia of mixed phenotype have a worse clinical outcome when compared with matched controls with acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Further studies are needed to confirm the significance of MPAL as currently defined, to determine a standardized treatment approach and to better understand the biological and clinical aspects of this disease.

  14. Small-molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF-04449913 (PF-913) is a selective, small-molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof-of-concept and mechanism of action of PF-913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in AML cells, and evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the Smoothened inhibitor PF-913. In primary AML cells, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway was more pronounced in CD34(+) cells than CD34(-) cells. In vitro treatment with PF-913 induced a decrease in the quiescent cell population accompanied by minimal cell death. In vivo treatment with PF-913 attenuated the leukemia-initiation potential of AML cells in a serial transplantation mouse model, while limiting reduction of tumor burden in a primary xenotransplant system. Comprehensive gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PF-913 modulated self-renewal signatures and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, PF-913 sensitized AML cells to cytosine arabinoside, and abrogated resistance to cytosine arabinoside in AML cells cocultured with HS-5 stromal cells. These findings imply that pharmacologic inhibition of Hedgehog signaling attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential, and also enhanced AML therapy by sensitizing dormant leukemia stem cells to chemotherapy and overcoming resistance in the bone marrow microenvironment. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Angiogenesis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Opportunities for Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Trujillo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML arises from neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and relapsed disease remains one of the greater challenges in treating this hematologic malignancy. This paper focuses on angiogenic aspects of AML including the significance and prognostic value of bone marrow microvessel density and circulating cytokine levels. We show three general mechanisms whereby AML exploits angiogenic pathways, including direct induction of angiogenesis, paracrine regulation, and autocrine stimulation. We also present early evidence that leukemia cells contribute directly to vascular endothelia. Novel treatment strategies are proposed, and a review of relevant antiangiogenic clinical trials is presented. By understanding how blood vessels can serve as a reservoir for refractory and relapsed AML, new diagnostics and promising treatment strategies can be developed.

  16. Clinical features and early treatment response of central nervous system involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a therapeutic challenge. PROCEDURE: To explore leukemia characteristics of patients with CNS involvement at ALL diagnosis, we analyzed clinical features and early treatment response of 744...... leukemia and patients without such characteristics (0.50 vs. 0.61; P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: CNS involvement at diagnosis is associated with adverse prognostic features but does not indicate a less chemosensitive leukemia....

  17. Impaired dexamethasone-related increase of anticoagulants is associated with the development of osteonecrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. te Winkel (Mariël Lizet); I.M. Appel (Inge); R. Pieters (Rob); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCoagulation alterations may be involved in osteonecrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Retrospectively, we evaluated the available coagulation parameters at diagnosis and during induction treatment of 161 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 24 with symptomatic osteonecros

  18. The negative impact of being underweight and weight loss on survival of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, Marissa A. H.; Pluijm, Saskia M. F.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; te Winkel, Mariel L.; Fiocco, Martha; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; van den Berg, Henk; Leeuw, Jan A.; Bruin, Marrie C. A.; Bresters, Dorine; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index and change in body mass index during treatment may influence treatment outcome of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, previous studies in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported contradictory results. We prospectively collected data on body composit

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dania Lizet Quintanilla-Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification.

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available abel Study of Sargramostim Among Patients Receiving Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelog...g Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number...r disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute ...Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1...r investigation E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level PT E.1.2Classification code 10000880 E.1.2Term Acute

  1. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute... lymphoblastic leukemia E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute lymphoblastic

  2. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  3. Detection of FLT3 Oncogene Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    FLT3 (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. FLT3 is also expressed on leukemia blasts in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In order to determine the frequency of FLT3 oncogene mutations, we analyzed genomic DNA of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and...

  4. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available estigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia E.1.1.1Medical conditio...E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000845 E.1.2Term Acute lymphoblastic leukemia E.

  5. Aurora kinases in childhood acute leukemia: The promise of aurora B as therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Hartsink-Segers (S.); C.M. Zwaan (Michel); C. Exalto (Carla); M.W.J. Luijendijk (M. W J); V. Calvert (V.); E.F. Petricoin (Emanuel F.); W.E. Evans (William); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); V. de Haas (Valerie); M. Hedtjärn (M.); B.R. Hansen (B.); T. Koch (T.); H.N. Caron (Huib); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the effects of targeting the mitotic regulators aurora kinase A and B in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aurora protein expression levels in pediatric ALL and AML patient samples were determined by western blot and reverse ph

  6. High frequency of BTG1 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Hjorth, Lars; Behrendtz, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children with Down syndrome (ML-DS and DS-ALL) have revealed significant differences in abnormality patterns between such cases and acute leukemias in general. Also, certain molecular genetic aberrations characterize DS...

  7. All-trans-retinoic acid-induced pseudotumor cerebri in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All-trans-retinoic acid is an integral part in the treatment strategy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. Here we describe a case of pseudotumor cerebri associated with all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA during the induction therapy in an adult with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL.

  8. Unravelling Pathobiological Molecular Mechanisms of T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. Mendes (Rui Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractT-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) represents 10-15% of pediatric acute leukemias. Despite major therapeutic improvements due to treatment intensification and refined risk-adapted stratification during the past decade, ~30% of T-ALL cases relapse with very poor prognosis.

  9. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollink, Iris H. I. M.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Arentsen-Peters, Susan T. C. J. M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Peeters, Justine K.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Balgobind, Brian V.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Trka, Jan; Baruchel, Andre; Creutzig, Ursula; Pieters, Rob; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zwaan, C. Michel

    2011-01-01

    Background Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but this m

  10. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.W. Verhaak (Roel); B.J. Wouters (Bas); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); S. Abbas (Saman); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); S. Lugthart (Sanne); B. Löwenberg (Bob); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific mol

  11. Characterization of CEBPA mutations and promoter hypermethylation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.I.M. Hollink (Iris); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); S.T.C.J.M. Arentsen-Peters (Susan); M. Zimmermann (Martin); J. Peeters (Justine); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B.V. Balgobind (Brian); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); J. Trka (Jan); A. Baruchel (André); U. Creutzig (Ursula); R. Pieters (Rob); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); C.M. Zwaan (Michel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Dysfunctioning of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBP α) in acute myeloid leukemia can be caused, amongst others, by mutations in the encoding gene (CEBPA) and by promoter hypermethylation. CEBPA-mutated acute myeloid leukemia is associated with a favorable outcome, but th

  12. New vessel formation and aberrant VEGF/VEGFR signaling in acute leukemia : Does it matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bont, ESJM; Neefjes, VME; Rosati, S; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Although many patients with acute leukemia achieve a hematological complete remission with aggressive intensive therapy protocols, a large proportion shows reoccurrence of disease. Novel strategies are warranted. In acute leukemia new vessel formation is observed. New vessel formation is the result

  13. New vessel formation and aberrant VEGF/VEGFR signaling in acute leukemia : Does it matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bont, ESJM; Neefjes, VME; Rosati, S; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Although many patients with acute leukemia achieve a hematological complete remission with aggressive intensive therapy protocols, a large proportion shows reoccurrence of disease. Novel strategies are warranted. In acute leukemia new vessel formation is observed. New vessel formation is the result

  14. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  15. Effect of age and body weight on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is very toxic and the association between outcome and age and Body Mass Index is unclear. We investigated effect of age and Body Mass Index on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. We studied all patients who completed first indu...

  16. Conventional chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia: a Brazilian experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Borgia Barbosa Pagnano

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Young patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieve complete remission (CR using conventional chemotherapy in about 55-85%. However, 30% of patients fail to achieve CR and the remission duration is often only about 12 months. More intensive treatment after CR seems to be necessary in order to maintain CR and obtain a definitive cure. In Brazil, few reports have been published on this important subject. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe a Brazilian experience in the treatment of "de novo" acute myeloid leukemia (AML in younger adult patients (age < 60 years. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis. SETTING: University Hospital, Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, State University of Campinas, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Newly diagnosed cases of "de novo" AML in the period from January 1994 to December 1998 were evaluated retrospectively, in relation to response to treatment, overall survival (OS and disease free survival (DFS. Cases with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were also included in this analysis. RESULTS: On the basis of an intention to treat, 78 cases of AML, including 17 cases of APL, were evaluated. The overall median follow-up was 272 days. The complete remission (CR rate was 63.6% in the AML group (excluding APL and 78% in the APL group. The 5-year estimated disease-free survival (DFS was 80% for the APL group and 34% for the AML group (P = 0.02. The 5-year estimated overall survival (OS was 52% for the APL group and 20.5% for the AML group, respectively (P = NS. Relapse was observed in 12/39 (30.7% patients with AML and 1/11 (9% with APL. CONCLUSIONS: These results are similar to those reported in the literature. However, relapse and mortality rates remain high, and a search for more aggressive strategies in order to prevent relapse is recommended.

  17. Epidemiology of childhood leukemia in the presence and absence of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezei, Gabor; Sudan, Madhuri; Izraeli, Shai; Kheifets, Leeka

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a common congenital anomaly, and children with DS have a substantially higher risk of leukemia. Although understanding of genetic and epigenetic changes of childhood leukemia has improved, the causes of childhood leukemia and the potential role of environmental exposures in leukemogenesis remain largely unknown. Although many epidemiologic studies have examined a variety of environmental exposures, ionizing radiation remains the only generally accepted environmental risk factor for childhood leukemia. Among suspected risk factors, infections, exposure to pesticides, and extremely low frequency magnetic fields are notable. While there are well-defined differences between leukemia in children with and without DS, studies of risk factors for leukemia among DS children are generally consistent with trends seen among non-DS (NDS) children. We provide background on DS epidemiology and review the similarities and differences in biological and epidemiologic features of leukemia in children with and without DS. We propose that both acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloblastic leukemia among DS children can serve as an informative model for development of childhood leukemia. Further, the high rates of leukemia among DS children make it possible to study this disease using a cohort approach, a powerful method that is unfeasible in the general population due to the rarity of childhood leukemia.

  18. Genetic structure of avian myeloblastosis virus, released from transformed myeloblasts as a defective virus particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, Peter H.; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo

    1980-01-01

    Chicken myeloblasts transformed by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) in the absence of nondefective helper virus (termed nonproducer cells) were found to release a defective virus particle (DVP) that contains avian tumor viral gag proteins but lacks envelope glycoprotein and a DNA polymerase. Nonproducer cells contain a Pr76 gag precursor protein and also a protein that is indistinguishable from the Pr180 gag-pol protein of nondefective viruses. The RNA of the DVP is 7.5 kilobases (kb) long and is 0.7 kb shorter than the 8.2-kb RNAs of the helper viruses of AMV, MAV-1 and MAV-2. Comparisons based on RNA·cDNA hybridization and mapping of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides indicated that DVP RNA shares with MAV RNAs nearly isogenic 5′-terminal gag and pol-related sequences of 5.3 kb and a 3′-terminal c-region of 0.7 kb that is different from that found in other avian tumor viruses. Adjacent to the c-region, DVP RNA contains a contiguous specific sequence of 1.5 kb defined by 14 specific oligonucleotides. Except for two of these oligonucleotides that map at its 5′ end, this sequence is unrelated to any sequences of nondefective avian tumor viruses of four different envelope subgroups as well as to the specific sequences of fibroblast-transforming avian acute leukemia and sarcoma viruses of four different RNA subgroups. The specific sequence of the DVP RNA is present in infectious stocks of AMV from this and other laboratories in an AMV-transformed myeloblast line from another laboratory, and it is about 70% related to nucleotide sequences of E26 virus, an independent isolate of an AMV-like virus. Preliminary experiments show DVP to be leukemogenic if fused into susceptible cells in the presence of helper virus. We conclude that DVP RNA is the leukemogenic component of infectious AMV and that its specific sequence, termed AMV, may carry genetic information for oncogenicity. Thus we have found here a transformation-specific RNA sequence, unrelated to helper virus

  19. Genital Infection as a First Sign of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Oiso

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fournier’s gangrene is a life-threatening disorder caused by aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infection. We report a case of genital infection as the initial warning sign of acute myeloid leukemia. We were able to prevent progression to Fournier’s gangrene in our patient by immediate intensive therapy with incision, blood transfusions and intravenous administration of antibiotics. This case suggests that hematologists and dermatologists should keep in mind that genital infection can be a first sign of hematologic malignancy.

  20. Massive pulmonary embolism at the onset of acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Sorà

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Life-threatening bleeding is a major and early complication of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, but in the last years there is a growing evidence of thromboses in  APL. We report the first case of a young woman with dyspnea as the first symptom of APL due to massive pulmonary embolism (PE successfully treated with thrombolysis for PE and heparin. APL has been processed with a combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO obtaining complete remission.

  1. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  2. CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA - A MULTIPARAMETER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL, a malignancy of lymphoid lineage cells, has excellent prognosis in children. Leukemia is the most prevalent childhood cancer and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL constitutes 75% of all cases. The most frequent presenting symptoms are fever, weight loss and pallor. Early detection of clinical symptoms positively affects timely diagnosis. AIMS & OBJECTIVES The objectives of the present study were to assess frequency of presenting symptoms, laboratory data and prognostic factors in children with diagnosis of ALL. MATERIALS & METHODS The present study (2014 was performed in the hematology section of Department of Pathology of Gajra Raja Medical College, Gwalior over a period of 12 months from 1st October 2013 to 30th September 2014. This was a prospective study. The blood samples were received from various departments of Jayarogya hospital especially from the Pediatric and Medicine departments. RESULTS Out of the 37 cases diagnosed as Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, 25(67.57% were male and 12(32.43%, were female, (male:female ratio: 2.1:1. 43.35% of patients which comprises highest number of cases belonged to 11-20 years of age group. The most frequent presenting symptoms was fever (83.78% followed by weakness (70.27% and loss of appetite (27% while most frequent presenting sign was pallor (86.48% followed by lymphadenopathy (67.57% and splenomegaly (48.65%. Complete blood cell count was abnormal in all of the patients, and pancytopenia was detected in 10.81% of the patients. Of all the patients, 91.89% had abnormal white blood cell (WBC count at presentation, 10.81% had leucopenia and 80% had leucocytosis. FAB L1 subtype was more common as compared to FAB L2 subtype. CONCLUSION In our study (2014, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia was more prevalent in males than in females and more common in childhood than in adult. FAB L1 subtype was more common as compared to FAB L2 subtype.

  3. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  4. Acute myeloid leukemia: conventional cytogenetics, FISH, and moleculocentric methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Bagg, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex group of hematologic neoplasms characterized by distinctive morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic abnormalities. However, it has become evident that genetic aberrations are central to the genesis of AML and have assumed an increasingly relevant role in the classification of AML. Here we discuss hallmark recurrent translocations that define specific World Health Organization (WHO) entities and other frequently encountered genetic aberrations that do not (yet) define specific entities. Additionally, we discuss emerging technologies and their application to the discovery of new abnormalities and to their potential role in the future diagnosis and classification of AML.

  5. Esophageal Candidiasis as the Initial Manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komeno, Yukiko; Uryu, Hideki; Iwata, Yuko; Hatada, Yasumasa; Sakamoto, Jumpei; Iihara, Kuniko; Ryu, Tomiko

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman presented with persistent dysphagia. A gastroendoscopy revealed massive esophageal candidiasis, and oral miconazole was prescribed. Three weeks later, she returned to our hospital without symptomatic improvement. She was febrile, and blood tests showed leukocytosis (137,150 /μL, blast 85%), anemia and thrombocytopenia. She was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). She received chemotherapy and antimicrobial agents. During the recovery from the nadir, bilateral ocular candidiasis was detected, suggesting the presence of preceding candidemia. Thus, esophageal candidiasis can be an initial manifestation of AML. Thorough examination to detect systemic candidiasis is strongly recommended when neutropenic patients exhibit local candidiasis prior to chemotherapy.

  6. Testis Scintigraphy in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Şencan Eren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a pediatric malignancy associated with remissions and relapses. Common relapsing sitesare meninges, testis and ovary. Testicular scintigraphy is a highly specific modality used mainly in the differential diagnosis of testicular torsion and epidydimitis/epidydimo-orchitis. There is only one interesting image on leukemic infiltration with scrotal scintigraphy in the literature. The aim of this case presentation is to report that although the scintigraphic appearance of testicular torsion was observed in a patient with the diagnosis of ALL, testicular ALL infiltration was revealed in pathologic examination.

  7. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryeziu, Emrush; Kryeziu, K; Bajraktari, Gjani; Abazi, M; Zylfiu, B; Rudhani, I; Sadiku, Sh; Ukimeri, A; Brovina, A; Dreshaj, Sh; Telaku, S

    2010-01-01

    Ecthymagangrenosum (EG)is a rare condition with characteristic clinical appearance of red maculae that progresses to a central area of necrosis surrounded by an erythematous halo. The most frequently it is caused by Pseudomonas bacteriaemia in neutropenic patient. The authors presents a patient with acute myloblastic leukemia M4 type in whom in relapse EG caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. The patient was treated with antibiotics and surgical debridement. The author wants to point out on clinical significance this condition with high mortality rate.

  8. Pyomyositis During Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Liang Kao

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we report on the correct diagnosis and effective treatment procedures for pyomyositis, a very rare complication that remains a diagnostic challenge in children being treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We report the case of a 10-year-old girl suffering from pyomyositis with ALL. Correct diagnosis is usually delayed because the initial symptom of pyomyositis, usually local pain, is similar to the common side effect of vincristine, a drug necessary for ALL induction therapy. We summarize the procedures taken to reach a timely diagnosis and therapeutic success.

  9. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervera, Jose; Montesinos, Pau; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M.; Calasanz, Maria J.; Aventin, Anna; Ferro, Maria T.; Luno, Elisa; Sanchez, Javier; Vellenga, Edo; Rayon, Chelo; Milone, Gustavo; de la Serna, Javier; Rivas, Concha; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Tormo, Mar; Amutio, Elena; Gonzalez, Marcos; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods Based on cytogenetic dat

  10. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cervera (José); P. Montesinos (Pau); J.M. Hernandez-Rivas (J. M.); M.J. Calasanz (Maria); A. Aventín (Anna); M.T. Ferro (María); E. Luño (Elisa); J. Sánchez (Javier); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Chelo); G. Milone (Gustavo); J. de Serna (Javier); C. Rivas (Concha); J.D. González (José David); M. Tormo (Mar); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods: Based on c

  11. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbiao; Zhou; Wee-Joo; Chng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia(AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells(LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells(HSC), LSC possess selfrenewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normalHSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC.

  12. MORPHOLOGIC & FLOWCYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN CHHATTISGARH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Parveen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Immunophenotyping of leukemi a by flowcytometry offers a better classification of the hematopoietic lineage of malignant cells as compared to morphology. AIM : To determine the immunophenotypic subtypes of acute leukemia in a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIAL & METHODS : A one y ear study of morphologic & flowcytometric data of patients with acute leukemia. RESULTS : Total numbers of acute leukemia patients diagnosed morphologically were 45, out of which 20 patients underwent immunophenotyping by flowcytometry. Maximum patients wer e in the age group of 0 - 10 yrs followed by 11 - 20 yrs with males outnumbering female. Immunophenotypically they belonged to ALL - B cell lineage, ALL - T cell lineage, AML, biphenotypic, inconclusive. CONCLUSION : Immunophenotyping of acute leukemias by flowcyto metry, not only helps to confirm the morphologic diagnosis but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia

  13. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  14. Physiologically based toxicokinetic modeling of secondary acute myelolytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Manas Kumar; Nath, Debjani

    2014-01-01

    Benzene, designated as environmental and occupational carcinogen and hematotoxin, has been associated with secondary leukemia. To develop a toxicokinetic model of AML, benzene can be used as leukemogenic agent. The aim of the present study was to optimize the dose, period and time of cumulative benzene exposure of Swiss Albino mice and to analyze survival rate; alteration in cell cycle regulation and other clinical manifestations in mice exposed to benzene vapour at a dose 300 ppm × 6 h/day × 5 days/week for 2 weeks, i.e., 9000(a)ppm cumulative dose. Analyzing physiological parameters like plasma enzyme profile, complete hematology (Hb %, RBC indices and WBC differentials), hematopoietic cells morphology, expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, tissue histology and analysis of DNA fragmentation, optimum conditions were established. Down regulation of p53 and p21 and up regulation of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin D1 and E in this exposed group were marked as the optimum conditions of cellular deregulation for the development of secondary AML. Elevated level of Plasma AST/ALT with corresponding changes in liver histology showing extended sinusoids within the hepatocytic cell cords in optimally exposed animals also confirmed the toxicokinetic relation of benzene with leukemia. It can be concluded from the above observations that the 9000(a)ppm exposed animals can serve as the induced laboratory model of secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

  15. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival.

  16. Nanoparticle targeted therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Noriko; Lee, Joyce; Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Sarangi, Susmita; Chang, Astra; McLaughlin, Bridget; Zhou, Ping; Kenney, Elaina; Kraynov, Liliya; Arnott, Sarah; McGee, Jeannine; Nolta, Jan; Lam, Kit

    2011-06-01

    The goal of our project is to develop a unique ligand-conjugated nanoparticle (NP) therapy against childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LLP2A, discovered by Dr. Kit Lam, is a high-affinity and high-specificity peptidomimetic ligand against an activated α4β1 integrin. Our study using 11 fresh primary ALL samples (10 precursor B ALL and 1 T ALL) showed that childhood ALL cells expressed activated α4β1 integrin and bound to LLP2A. Normal hematopoietic cells such as activated lymphocytes and monocytes expressed activated α4β1 integrin; however, normal hematopoietic stem cells showed low expression of α4β1 integrin. Therefore, we believe that LLP2A can be used as a targeted therapy for childhood ALL. The Lam lab has developed novel telodendrimer-based nanoparticles (NPs) which can carry drugs efficiently. We have also developed a human leukemia mouse model using immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ null mice engrafted with primary childhood ALL cells from our patients. LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using primary leukemia cells and this mouse model. NPs will be loaded first with DiD near infra-red dye, and then with the chemotherapeutic agents daunorubicin or vincristine. Both drugs are mainstays of current chemotherapy for childhood ALL. Targeting properties of LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be evaluated by fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry, MTS assay, and mouse survival after treatment. We expect that LLP2A-conjugated NPs will be preferentially delivered and endocytosed to leukemia cells as an effective targeted therapy.

  17. A Rare Case of Extramedullary T/Myeloid Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia with t(1;5)(q23;q33)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monabati, Ahmad; Safaei, Akbar; Nouri, Sadat; Safavi, Moeinadin; Solhjoo, Freidoon

    2016-01-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare neoplasm which accounts for 2–5% of all leukemias and it is classified under heading of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage in 2008 WHO classification...

  18. Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Without Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Campana, Dario; Pei, Deqing; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Kaste, Sue C.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Onciu, Mihaela; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Kun, Larry E.; Jeha, Sima; Cheng, Cheng; Howard, Scott C.; Simmons, Vickey; Bayles, Amy; Metzger, Monika L.; Boyett, James M.; Leung, Wing; Handgretinger, Rupert; Downing, James R.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2009-01-01

    Background We conducted a clinical trial to test whether prophylactic cranial irradiation could be omitted in all children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods A total of 498 evaluable patients were enrolled. Treatment intensity was based on presenting features and the level of minimal residual disease after remission induction treatment. Continuous complete remission was compared between the 71 patients who previously would have received prophylactic cranial irradiation and the 56 historical controls who received it. Results The 5-year event-free and overall survival probabilities (95% confidence interval) for all 498 patients were 85.6% (79.9% to 91.3%) and 93.5% (89.8% to 97.2%), respectively. The 5-year cumulative risk of isolated central-nervous-system (CNS) relapse was 2.7% (1.1% to 4.2%), and that of any CNS relapse (isolated plus combined) was 3.9% (1.9% to 5.9%). The 71 patients had significantly better continuous complete remission than the 56 historical controls (P=0.04). All 11 patients with isolated CNS relapse remain in second remission for 0.4 to 5.5 years. CNS leukemia (CNS-3 status) or a traumatic lumbar puncture with blasts at diagnosis and a high level of minimal residual disease (≥ 1%) after 6 weeks of remission induction were significantly associated with poorer event-free survival. Risk factors for CNS relapse included the presence of the t(1;19)[TCF3-PBX1], any CNS involvement at diagnosis, and T-cell immunophenotype. Common adverse effects included allergic reactions to L-asparaginase, osteonecrosis, thrombosis, and disseminated fungal infection. Conclusions With effective risk-adjusted chemotherapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation can be safely omitted in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:19553647

  19. Tipifarnib in the treatment of newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E Karp

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Judith E Karp1, Jeffrey E Lancet21Division of Hematologic Malignancies, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2H. Lee Moffitt Comprehensive Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, USAAbstract: Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs represent a new class of signal transduction inhibitors that block the processing of cellular polypeptides that have cysteine terminal residues and, by so doing, interdict multiple pathways involved in proliferation and survival of diverse malignant cell types. Tipifarnib is an orally bioavailable, nonpeptidomimetic methylquinolone FTI that has exhibited clinical activity in patients with myeloid malignancies including elderly adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML who are not candidates for traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, patients with high-risk myelodysplasia, myeloproliferative disorders, and imatinib-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia. Because of its relatively low toxicity profile, tipifarnib provides an important alternative to traditional cytotoxic approaches for elderly patients who are not likely to tolerate or even benefit from aggressive chemotherapy. In this review, we will focus on the clinical development of tipifarnib for treatment of newly diagnosed AML, both as induction therapy for elderly adults with poor-risk AML and as maintenance therapy following achievement of first complete remission following induction and consolidation therapies for poor-risk AML. As with all other malignancies, the optimal approach is likely to lie in rational combinations of tipifarnib with cytotoxic, biologic and/or immunomodulatory agents with non-cross-resistant mechanisms of action. Gene expression profi ling has identified networks of differentially expressed genes and gene combinations capable of predicting response to single agent tipifarnib. The clinical and correlative laboratory trials in progress and under development will provide the critical foundations for

  20. Vincristine sulfate liposomal injection for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soosay Raj TA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Trisha A Soosay Raj,1 Amanda M Smith,2 Andrew S Moore,1,21Royal Children's Hospital, Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; 2Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaAbstract: Vincristine (VCR is one of the most extensively used cytotoxic compounds in hemato-oncology. VCR is particularly important for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, a disease that accounts for approximately one-third of all childhood cancer diagnoses. VCR's full therapeutic potential has been limited by dose-limiting neurotoxicity, classically resulting in autonomic and peripheral sensory–motor neuropathy. In the last decade, however, the discovery that liposomal encapsulation of chemotherapeutics can modulate the pharmacokinetic characteristics of a compound has stimulated much interest in liposomal VCR (vincristine sulfate liposomal injection [VSLI] formulations for the treatment of ALL and other hematological malignancies. Promising data from recent clinical trials investigating VSLI in adults with ALL resulted in US Food and Drug Administration approval for use in patients with Philadelphia chromosome (t[9;22]/BCR–ABL1 (Ph-negative (Ph- disease. Additional clinical trials of VSLI in adults and children with both Ph-positive (Ph+ and Ph- ALL are ongoing. Here we review the preclinical and clinical experience to date with VSLI for ALL.Keywords: vincristine sulfate liposomal injection, liposomes, sphingosomal vincristine, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chemotherapy

  1. Chemotherapy for acute leukemia during pregnancy. Five case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassas, A; Kartalis, G; Klearchou, N; Tsatalas, K; Sinacos, Z; Mantalenakis, S

    1984-01-01

    We summarize the cases of four women with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and of one with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) presenting in the first, second and third trimester of pregnancy. Remission of AML was induced by doxorubicin, vincristine, and cytosine arabinoside. The ALL case was treated with vincristine and prednisone initially, and subsequently with vindesine for maintenance. Four patients entered a complete (3 AML and the ALL case), and one (AML) a partial remission. This patient was delivered of a normal, 3140 g, male infant by Caesarian section in the 38th gestational week and 1 month later she died of her disease. One patient (AML, promyelocytic type) who presented in the 10th week of pregnancy underwent elective abortion while in remission after induction treatment. The patient with ALL gave birth to a normal, full-term, male infant by Caesarian section. The two other patients (AML) had spontaneous deliveries of normal male infants in the 37th and 38th weeks of pregnancy. Growth and development of three of the children are normal at 12, 36, and 37 months of life while the fourth child was lost to follow-up evaluation. The disease relapsed in all mothers but they are still alive at 15 (ALL), 37, and 42 months after diagnosis. We feel that current chemotherapy could improve the high post-partum maternal mortality rate and the chance of producing live babies without excessive risk to the fetus or the mother, even if administered relatively early in the course of pregnancy.

  2. Correlation of morphologic and cytochemical diagnosis with flowcytometric analysis in acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Belurkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The classification of acute leukemias has revolutionized over the years. Immunophenotyping of acute leukemia has gained popularity because of its influence on treatment and prognosis of the disease. The various antigens expressed by the leukemic cells can be assessed by flowcytometry (FCA and can be used in rendering specific treatment and predicting the outcome of the different types of acute leukemia. Aims: The main aim of this study was to compare the morphologic and cytochemical diagnoses with flowcytometric diagnoses in acute leukemia and to analyze the usefulness of FCA over morphology. Results: In this study we analyzed 50 cases of acute leukemia and found concordance rate as high as 86% between morphologic/cytochemical diagnosis and flowcytometric diagnosis. Of these, complete concordance was seen in 58% of the cases and partial concordance was seen in 22% of the cases. Non-concordance was seen in only 4% of our cases. In remaining 16% of our cases FCA helped in sub classifying the acute leukemia where morphology and cytochemistry had failed to do so. CD19 and 20 were found to be consistent B-cell markers and CD3 was a very specific marker for T-cell leukemia. CD13 and 33 were important myeloid markers and were aided by other secondary panel of markers like CD14, CD117 and CD41. Conclusion: FCA not only helps in confirming morphologic diagnosis in acute leukemia but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia. Immunophenotyping is of utmorst importance in classifying acute leukemia as it greatly influences the treatment and the prognosis.

  3. Association of ARID5B gene variants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Yemeni children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Absi, Boshra; Noor, Suzita M; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Salem, Sameer D; Ahmed, Radwan H; Razif, Muhammad Fm; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2017-04-01

    Studies have shown an association between ARID5B gene polymorphisms and childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the association between ARID5B variants and acute lymphoblastic leukemia among the Arab population still needs to be studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between ARID5B variants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Yemeni children. A total of 14 ARID5B gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 289 Yemeni children, of whom 136 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 153 were controls, using the nanofluidic Dynamic Array (Fluidigm 192.24 Dynamic Array). Using logistic regression adjusted for age and gender, the risks of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were presented as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. We found that nine SNPs were associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia under additive genetic models: rs7073837, rs10740055, rs7089424, rs10821936, rs4506592, rs10994982, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074. Furthermore, the recessive models revealed that six SNPs were risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: rs10740055, rs7089424, rs10994982, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074. The gender-specific impact of these SNPs under the recessive genetic model revealed that SNPs rs10740055, rs10994982, and rs6479779 in females, and rs10821938 and rs7923074 in males were significantly associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Under the dominant model, SNPs rs7073837, rs10821936, rs7896246, and rs6479778 in males only showed striking association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The additive model revealed that SNPs with significant association with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were rs10821936 (both males and females); rs7073837, rs10740055, rs10994982, and rs4948487 (females only); and rs7089424, rs7896246, rs10821938, and rs7923074 (males only). In addition, the ARID5B haplotype block (CGAACACAA) showed a higher risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The haplotype (CCCGACTGC) was

  4. [Possibilities of remission of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults: retrospective study of 51 patients subjected to a "total therapy" protocol in the period 1969-1983].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Fayos, J; Outeiriño, J; Pacho, E; Villalobos, E; Calabuig, T; Prieto, E; Bosch, J M; Sánchez Guilarte, J; Rodríguez, C

    1989-05-01

    Between 1969 and 1983, 51 (35 men and 16 women) new cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were diagnosed in patients aged 15 to 85 years (mean 21 yrs.). All patients received a "total therapy" which included: 1st induction (PRD, VCR, DBR, and/or L-ASN); 2nd, Central Nervous System profilaxis (craneal TCT and/or intrathecal MTx); 3rd, maintenance (6MP and MTx) and 4th, reinductions every 3 months (PRD, VCR, and DRB). This treatment lasted for at least 3 years. Complete Remission (CR) was achieved in 45 patients (88.2%): 3 of these patients were referred to other centers to continue treatment, 1 patient developed an early "metamorphosis" to hemophagocytic hystiocytosis and another patient developed a late chronic granulocytic leukemia (Ph +) dying a few months later after an acute myeloblastic worsening. During treatment 16 patients relapsed (9 in bone marrow and 7 in Central Nervous System). Treatment was discontinued in 24 patients with complete remission of which 5 relapsed in bone marrow 17 to 61 months after treatment). In one of the latter (ALL Ph +) an allogenic bone marrow transplant was performed and CR was achieved and maintained 46 months later. The post diagnosis acutarial curve of the 51 patients gave a mean survival of 6 years with a plateau at 43% of the patients after 11 years. The duration of the first uninterrupted CR was of 6.5 years and a plateau was reached at 46% of the patients after 10.5 years. At the present time, 20 patients are in CR (46 to 129 months) without treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Minimally-Myelosuppressive Asparaginase-Containing Induction Regimen for Treatment of a Jehovah’s Witness with mutant IDH1/NPM1/NRAS Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Emadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML who do not wish to accept blood product transfusion, including Jehovah’s Witnesses, is extremely challenging. The use of conventional chemotherapy for induction of complete remission (CR results in profound anemia and thrombocytopenia requiring frequent transfusions of blood products, without which such treatment will be life-threatening. Finding a well tolerable, minimally myelosuppressive induction regimen for such patients with AML is a clear example of area of unmet medical need. Here, we report a successful treatment of a 52-year-old Jehovah’s Witness with newly diagnosed AML with peg-asparaginase, vincristine and methylprednisolone. The AML was characterized with normal karyotype, and mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-Arg132Ser, nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1-Trp289Cysfs*12 and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS-G1y12Va1. After one 28-day cycle of treatment, the patient achieved complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi and after the second cycle, he achieved CR with full blood count recovery. The patient has never received any blood products. Notwithstanding that myeloperoxidase-induced oxidative degradation of vincristine results in its lack of activity as monotherapy in AML, its combination with corticosteroid and asparaginase has resulted in a robust remission in this patient. Diminished steroid clearance by asparaginase activity as well as reduction in serum glutamine level induced by glutaminase enzymatic activity of asparaginase may have contributed to effective killing of the myeloblasts that carry IDH1/NPM1/NRAS mutations. In conclusion, asparaginase-containing regimens, which are approved for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL but not AML, can be used to treat patients with AML who do not accept blood transfusion.

  6. Therapy-induced secondary acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in a pediatric patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Daniel N; Morris, Heather D; Feusner, James H; Koduru, Prasad; Wilson, Kathleen; Timmons, Charles F; Cavalier, MaryEllen; Luu, Hung S

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is classified based upon recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. The t(15;17)(q24.1;q21.1) abnormality is found in 5% to 8% of de novo acute myeloid leukemia and is diagnostic of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The translocation results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor-α (RARA) gene at 17q21.1 and the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene at 15q24.1. Standard APL therapy is a combination of all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Anthracycline treatment is associated with secondary clonal chromosomal aberrations that can lead to therapy-related secondary myeloid neoplasms. We present a pediatric case of relapsed APL coexistent with treatment-associated secondary myeloid neoplasm with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1).

  7. [A case of mediastinal growing teratoma syndrome with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masachika; Igarashi, Natsue; Fujimori, Fumio; Kuriyama, Hideyuki; Ebe, Yusuke; Nishibori, Takeaki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Hosaka, Yasuko; Yamato, Yasushi; Togashi, Kenichi; Yano, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man who was diagnosed with a mediastinal germ cell tumor. After induction chemotherapy, the tumor marker levels normalized, but the tumor itself continued to grow. Surgical resection was performed successfully, but the patient developed acute megakaryoblastic leukemia 6 months later, and induction and consolidation therapies failed to achieve remission. Leukemia cells invaded the central nervous system following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the patient died 5 months after being diagnosed with leukemia. This very rare case of a mediastinal germ cell tumor met the criteria for "growing teratoma syndrome", against a background of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia.

  8. Inhibition factors of arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Meijuan; Zhang Zhuo; Zhou Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize limitations involved in arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in acute promyelocytic leukemia,because current studies show that some individuals of acute promyelocytic leukemia have relatively poor outcomes during treatment with arsenic trioxide.Data sources Most relevant articles were included in the PubMed database between 2000 and 2013 with the keywords "acute promyelocytic leukemia","arsenic trioxide","thiol" or "methylation".In addition,a few older articles were also reviewed.Study selection Data and articles related to arsenic trioxide effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia treatment were selected and reviewed.We developed an overview of limitations associated with arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect.Results This review focuses on the researches about the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia and summarizes three mainly limitations which can influence the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect to different degrees.First,with the combination of arsenic and glutathione the therapeutic effect and cytotoxicity decrease when glutathione concentration increases; second,arsenic methylation,stable arsenic methylation products weaken the apoptosis effect of arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells; third,gene mutations affect the sensitivity of tumor cells to arsenic trioxide and increase the resistance of leukemia cells to arsenic trioxide.Conclusions The chief limitations are listed in the review.If we can exclude all of them,we can obtain a better therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  9. Acute myelogenous leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tin Receptor Agonist, Eltrombopag, Administered to Subjects with Acute Myelogenou...tion(s) being investigated Acute myelogenous leukemia E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute...1.2Version 18.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000886 E.1.2Term Acute

  10. Cell-Type-Specific Effects of Silibinin on Vitamin D-Induced Differentiation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells Are Associated with Differential Modulation of RXRα Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Wassermann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant polyphenols have been shown to enhance the differentiation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells induced by the hormonal form of vitamin D3 (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; 1,25D. However, how these agents modulate 1,25D effects in different subtypes of AML cells remains poorly understood. Here, we show that both carnosic acid (CA and silibinin (SIL synergistically enhancd 1,25D-induced differentiation of myeloblastic HL60 cells. However, in promonocytic U937 cells, only CA caused potentiation while SIL attenuated 1,25D effect. The enhanced effect of 1,25D+CA was accompanied by increases in both the vitamin D receptor (VDR and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRα protein levels and vitamin D response element (VDRE transactivation in both cell lines. Similar increases were observed in HL60 cells treated with 1,25D + SIL. In U937 cells, however, SIL inhibited 1,25D-induced VDRE transactivation concomitant with downregulation of RXRα at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. These inhibitory effects correlated with the inability of SIL, with or without 1,25D, to activate the Nrf2/antioxidant response element signaling pathway in U937 cells. These results suggest that opposite effects of SIL on 1,25D-induced differentiation of HL60 and U937 cells may be determined by cell-type-specific signaling and transcriptional responses to this polyphenol resulting in differential modulation of RXRα expression.

  11. Recurrence of a t(8;21-Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Form of a Granulocytic Sarcoma Involving Cranial Bones: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambra Di Veroli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcoma (GS is a rare extramedullary solid tumor defined as an accumulation of myeloblasts or immature myeloid cells. It can cooccur with or precede the acute myeloid leukemia (AML as well as following treated AML. The incidence of GS in AML patients is 3–8% but it significantly rises in M2 FAB subtype AML. This variety of AML harbors t(8;21 in up to 20–25% of cases (especially in children and black ones of African origin and, at a molecular level, it is characterized by the generation of a fusion gene known as RUNX1-RUNX1T1. Approximately 10% of M2 AML patients will develop GS, as a consequence, the t(8;21 and the relative transcript represent the most common cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities in GS. FLT3-ITD mutation was rarely described in AML patients presenting with GS. FLT3 ITD is generally strongly associated with poor prognosis in AML, and is rarely reported in patients with t(8;21. GS presentation is extremely variable depending on organs involved; in general, cranial bones and sinus are very rarely affected sites. We report a rare case of GS occurring as a recurrence of a previously treated t(8;21, FLT3-ITD positive AML, involving mastoid bones and paravertebral tissues.

  12. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  13. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  14. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro. CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06–27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86–25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with

  15. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M

    2017-02-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06-27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86-25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with central

  16. Prolonged remission of leukemia associated with polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazani, A; Tatarsky, I; Barzilai, D

    1977-09-01

    A patient with polycythemia vera (PV) received successive treatment by phlebotomies, radioactive phosphorus, myleran and cyclophosphamide. Sixteen years after the diagnosis, he developed acute myeloblastic leukemia. A complete remission was achieved following two courses of COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, Cytosine Arabinoside, and prednisone) therapy. Four months later, while still in leukemic remission, he became mildly polycythemic again and the treatment with phlebotomies and cyclophosphamide was resume. The patient has subsequently been in complete remission of leukemia for over three years and his polycythemia is controlled by small doses of cyclophosphamide. This appears to be a unique case of such a prolonged remission of leukemia in the course of PV, with a return to a mild polycythemia state.

  17. Temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai-Yoshida, Emi; Ogihara, Masaaki; Ozawa, Miwa; Nozaki, Taiki; Morino, Michiharu; Manabe, Atsushi; Hosoya, Ryota

    2013-07-01

    Of 71 acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors at our hospital over the past 10 years, 2 children developed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS). This is the first report to describe the clinical course of MTLE-HS observed longitudinally by EEG and MRI. Patient 1 experienced a seizure during chemotherapy involving intrathecal methotrexate. Postseizure MRI suggested methotrexate encephalopathy or leukemic invasion. Anticonvulsant therapy was initiated; subsequent EEGs and MRIs revealed normal results. Three years after chemotherapy, a diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave pattern was observed on interictal EEG. Five years after chemotherapy, the patient developed MTLE-HS comprising complex partial seizures, typical temporal spikes on EEG, and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Patient 2 did not experience seizures during chemotherapy. Four years later, the patient started experiencing complex partial seizures, and a diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave pattern was observed on interictal EEG. A clinical picture of MTLE-HS developed 2 years later. In both patients, nonspecific EEG abnormalities (ie, diffuse, irregular spike-and-wave activity) preceded the appearance of HS on MRI by 2 years, suggesting an insidious advance of HS during the latent period. Such atypical EEG findings may indicate MTLE-HS during follow-up of leukemia patients. MTLE-HS develops several years after an initial precipitating incident such as prolonged seizures, central nervous system infection, and brain trauma. In our cases, the initial precipitating incident may have been chemotherapy and/or prolonged seizures. Thus, MTLE-HS associated with leukemia may not be as rare as generally believed. A large cohort study of late neurologic complications is warranted.

  18. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  19. Subdural hemorrhages in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Yin; CaiXia Qiu; XiaoHui Dong; YeLong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a rare hematological malignancy.Pure subdural hemorrhages in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient are extremely rare.Case presentation:This case presented acute spontaneous subdural hemorrhage without head trauma at first,and acute lymphoblastic leukemia was diagnosed later.The second time,the patient was admitted with multiple pure subdural hemorrhages in different locations and periods with a history of slight head trauma.Conclusions:Pure subdural hemorrhages can occur in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.More care would be needed for pure subdural hemorrhages without obvious head trauma,and patients with hematological malignancies should be protected from even mild head trauma.

  20. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Man Treated With Fingolimod for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Cohan MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A man with relapsing multiple sclerosis, treated with fingolimod 0.5 mg/d for 15 months, developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and died 4 months after immune ablation and bone marrow allograft, from graft versus host disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported in a patient treated with fingolimod. Although no causal relationship can be established between fingolimod use and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk in this single case, future surveillance for lymphatic cell malignancies in patients treated with fingolimod appears justified.

  1. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  2. Parental Tobacco Smoking and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metayer, Catherine; Petridou, Eleni; Aranguré, Juan Manuel Mejía; Roman, Eve; Schüz, Joachim; Magnani, Corrado; Mora, Ana Maria; Mueller, Beth A; de Oliveira, Maria S Pombo; Dockerty, John D; McCauley, Kathryn; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hatzipantelis, Emmanouel; Rudant, Jérémie; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Kaatsch, Peter; Miligi, Lucia; Wesseling, Catharina; Doody, David R; Moschovi, Maria; Orsi, Laurent; Mattioli, Stefano; Selvin, Steve; Kang, Alice Y; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2016-08-15

    The association between tobacco smoke and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is well established in adults but not in children. Individual-level data on parental cigarette smoking were obtained from 12 case-control studies from the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC, 1974-2012), including 1,330 AML cases diagnosed at age <15 years and 13,169 controls. We conducted pooled analyses of CLIC studies, as well as meta-analyses of CLIC and non-CLIC studies. Overall, maternal smoking before, during, or after pregnancy was not associated with childhood AML; there was a suggestion, however, that smoking during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk in Hispanics (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 3.61) but not in other ethnic groups. By contrast, the odds ratios for paternal lifetime smoking were 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.62) and 1.18 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.51) in pooled and meta-analyses, respectively. Overall, increased risks from 1.2- to 1.3-fold were observed for pre- and postnatal smoking (P < 0.05), with higher risks reported for heavy smokers. Associations with paternal smoking varied by histological type. Our analyses suggest an association between paternal smoking and childhood AML. The association with maternal smoking appears limited to Hispanic children, raising questions about ethnic differences in tobacco-related exposures and biological mechanisms, as well as study-specific biases.

  3. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  4. Leukemia associated antigens: their dual role as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Barbara-Ann; Mohamedali, Azim; Mills, Ken I; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Schmitt, Michael; Greiner, Jochen

    2007-02-14

    Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs) are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX) and mass spectrometry (MS). In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel) and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia following radioactive iodine therapy for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Ankit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive iodine (RAI therapy plays an important role in the management of thyroid malignancies. Leukemia is a very rare complication of radioactive therapy. There are very few case reports with doses below 100 mCi causing leukemia. We report a case of papillary carcinoma of the thyroid treated with 80 mCi RAI who later developed acute myeloid leukemia. Thus, all patients with thyroid carcinoma treated with RAI should undergo periodic hematological examinations irrespective of RAI dose.

  6. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna; Österroos, Albin; Hassan, Sadia Bashir; Gullbo, Joachim; Rickardson, Linda; Jarvius, Malin; Nygren, Peter; Fryknäs, Mårten; Höglund, Martin; Larsson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 mu M drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low...

  7. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone's most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34(+) leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone's most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for "clinically-relevant" leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Cytogenetic features of acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias in pediatric patients with Down syndrome: An iBFM-SG study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Forestier (Erik); S. Izraeli (Shai); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); O.A. Haas (Oskar); A. Pession (Andrea); K. Michalová (Kyra); B. Stark (Batia); C.J. Harrison (Christine); A. Teigler-Schlegel; B. Johansson (Bert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChildren with Down syndrome (DS) have a markedly increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To identify chromosomal changes cooperating with +21 that may provide information on the pathogenesis of these leukemias, we analyzed 215 DS-ALLs and

  9. The mystery of electroencephalography in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Cohen, Rony; Pollak, Lea; Kivity, Sara; Eidlitz-Markus, Tal; Stark, Batya; Yaniv, Isaac; Shuper, Avinoam

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during the course of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. The study group consisted of 48 children with ALL who underwent a total of 72 EEGs at various stages of the disease. The medical files were reviewed for pertinent clinical data, and the EEGs were evaluated for changes in brain activity. Abnormal background activity was noted in 52.2% of the EEGs done at 1-10 days of therapy, in 43.5% of those done at 10-60 days, and only 4.3% of those done at later stages (p=0.037). These findings, together with earlier reports, suggest that early-stage ALL, even before treatment, may be associated with excessive slow EEG activity, which improves over time. The EEG changes, by themselves, are not an indication of central nervous system leukemia or a predictor of later seizures or other central nervous system involvement.

  10. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Eosinophilia and Strongyloides Stercoralis Hyperinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Zahedpasha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children. Bone pain is an important symptom that can be severe. Eosinophilia without any other abnormal laboratory findings is rare in ALL. Strongyloides stercoralis in ALL causes disseminated fatal disease.Case Presentation: This 9-year-old girl presented with bone pain in lumbar region. Bone pain was the only symptom. The patient didnt have organomegaly. The BM samples were studied by flow cytometry, which showed pre-B cell ALL. Larva of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in fecal examination. Plain chest x ray showed bilateral para-cardiac infiltration. Strongyloidiasis was treated before starting chemotherapy. After two days treatment with Mebendazol the patient developed cough, dyspnea, respiratory distress and fever. The treatment changed to Ivermectin for 2 days. Chemotherapy started five days after diagnosis of leukemia.Conclusion: The patient complained merely of bone pain in lumbar region without any other signs and symptoms. Peripheral blood smear showed eosinophilia without any other abnormality. Stool examination showed Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. We suggest that all patients diagnosed as ALL in tropical and subtropical regions should be evaluated for parasitic infection especially with Strongyloides stercoralis.

  11. Transplant Outcomes for Children with Hypodiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Parinda A.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Eapen, Mary; He, Wensheng; Seber, Adriana; Gibson, Brenda; Camitta, Bruce M.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Lehmann, Leslie; Vicent, Marta Gonzalez; Diaz Pérez, Miguel A.; Ayas, Mouhab; Qayed, Muna; Carpenter, Paul A.; Jodele, Sonata; Lund, Troy C.; Leung, Wing H.; Davies, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have inferior outcomes despite intensive risk adapted chemotherapy regimens. We describe 78 children with hypodiploid ALL who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) between 1990 and 2010. Thirty nine (50%) patients had ≤ 43 chromosomes, 12 (15%) had 44 chromosomes and 27 (35%) had 45 chromosomes. Forty three (55%) patients were transplanted in first remission (CR1) while 35 (45%) were transplanted in ≥CR2. Twenty nine patients (37%) received a graft from a related donor and 49 (63%) from an unrelated donor. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning regimen. The 5-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS), relapse, and treatment related mortality (TRM) for the entire cohort were 51%, 56%, 27% and 22% respectively. Multivariate analysis confirmed that mortality risks were higher for patients transplanted in CR2 (HR 2.16, p=0.05), with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.15, p=0.05) and for those transplanted in the first decade of the study period (HR 2.60, p=0.01). Similarly, treatment failure risks were higher with chromosome number ≤43 (HR 2.28, p=0.04) and the earlier transplant period (HR 2.51, p=0.01). Although survival is better with advances in donor selection and supportive care, disease-related risk factors significantly influence transplantation outcomes. PMID:25865650

  12. Retinoid receptor signaling and autophagy in acute promyelocytic leukemia

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    Orfali, Nina [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); McKenna, Sharon L. [Cork Cancer Research Center, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Cahill, Mary R. [Department of Hematology, Cork University Hospital, Cork (Ireland); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States); Mongan, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.mongan@nottingham.ac.uk [Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Retinoids are a family of signaling molecules derived from vitamin A with well established roles in cellular differentiation. Physiologically active retinoids mediate transcriptional effects on cells through interactions with retinoic acid (RARs) and retinoid-X (RXR) receptors. Chromosomal translocations involving the RARα gene, which lead to impaired retinoid signaling, are implicated in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), alone and in combination with arsenic trioxide (ATO), restores differentiation in APL cells and promotes degradation of the abnormal oncogenic fusion protein through several proteolytic mechanisms. RARα fusion-protein elimination is emerging as critical to obtaining sustained remission and long-term cure in APL. Autophagy is a degradative cellular pathway involved in protein turnover. Both ATRA and ATO also induce autophagy in APL cells. Enhancing autophagy may therefore be of therapeutic benefit in resistant APL and could broaden the application of differentiation therapy to other cancers. Here we discuss retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis, leukemogenesis, and APL treatment. We highlight autophagy as a potential important regulator in anti-leukemic strategies. - Highlights: • Normal and aberrant retinoid signaling in hematopoiesis and leukemia is reviewed. • We suggest a novel role for RARα in the development of X-RARα gene fusions in APL. • ATRA therapy in APL activates transcription and promotes onco-protein degradation. • Autophagy may be involved in both onco-protein degradation and differentiation. • Pharmacologic autophagy induction may potentiate ATRA's therapeutic effects.

  13. Functional integration of acute myeloid leukemia into the vascular niche.

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    Cogle, Christopher R; Goldman, Devorah C; Madlambayan, Gerard J; Leon, Ronald P; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A; Asbaghi, Steven A; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L; Hromas, Robert A; Scott, Edward W; Fleming, William H

    2014-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the upregulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost fourfold reduction in proliferative activity compared with non-vascular-associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to downregulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. These novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for AML.

  14. The genomic landscape of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Linda; Wei, Lei; Diaz-Flores, Ernesto; Walsh, Michael; Zhang, Jinghui; Ding, Li; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Churchman, Michelle; Andersson, Anna; Chen, Shann-Ching; McCastlain, Kelly; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Wu, Gang; Patel, Samir N; Heatley, Susan L; Phillips, Letha A; Song, Guangchun; Easton, John; Parker, Matthew; Chen, Xiang; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Hedlund, Erin; Drenberg, Christina; Baker, Sharyn; Pei, Deqing; Cheng, Cheng; Huether, Robert; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Tabib, Yashodhan; Dooling, David J; Ochoa, Kerri; Minden, Mark; Lewis, Ian D; To, L Bik; Marlton, Paula; Roberts, Andrew W; Raca, Gordana; Stock, Wendy; Neale, Geoffrey; Drexler, Hans G; Dickins, Ross A; Ellison, David W; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C; Devidas, Meenakshi; Carroll, Andrew J; Heerema, Nyla A; Wood, Brent; Borowitz, Michael J; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Raimondi, Susana C; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Hunger, Stephen P; Loh, Mignon L; Mullighan, Charles G

    2013-03-01

    The genetic basis of hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a subtype of ALL characterized by aneuploidy and poor outcome, is unknown. Genomic profiling of 124 hypodiploid ALL cases, including whole-genome and exome sequencing of 40 cases, identified two subtypes that differ in the severity of aneuploidy, transcriptional profiles and submicroscopic genetic alterations. Near-haploid ALL with 24-31 chromosomes harbor alterations targeting receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and Ras signaling (71%) and the lymphoid transcription factor gene IKZF3 (encoding AIOLOS; 13%). In contrast, low-hypodiploid ALL with 32-39 chromosomes are characterized by alterations in TP53 (91.2%) that are commonly present in nontumor cells, IKZF2 (encoding HELIOS; 53%) and RB1 (41%). Both near-haploid and low-hypodiploid leukemic cells show activation of Ras-signaling and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-signaling pathways and are sensitive to PI3K inhibitors, indicating that these drugs should be explored as a new therapeutic strategy for this aggressive form of leukemia.

  15. FLT3 inhibitors: clinical potential in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospital, Marie-Anne; Green, Alexa S; Maciel, Thiago T; Moura, Ivan C; Leung, Anskar Y; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy that is cured in as few as 15%–40% of cases. Tremendous improvements in AML prognostication arose from a comprehensive analysis of leukemia cell genomes. Among normal karyotype AML cases, mutations in the FLT3 gene are the ones most commonly detected as having a deleterious prognostic impact. FLT3 is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, and alterations of the FLT3 gene such as internal tandem duplications (FLT3-ITD) deregulate FLT3 downstream signaling pathways in favor of increased cell proliferation and survival. FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) emerged as a new therapeutic option in FLT3-ITD AML, and clinical trials are ongoing with a variety of TKI either alone, combined with chemotherapy, or even as maintenance after allogenic stem cell transplantation. However, a wide range of molecular resistance mechanisms are activated upon TKI therapy, thus limiting their clinical impact. Massive research efforts are now ongoing to develop more efficient FLT3 TKI and/or new therapies targeting these resistance mechanisms to improve the prognosis of FLT3-ITD AML patients in the future. PMID:28223820

  16. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Tasian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, primary chemorefractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic agents is not feasible given the potential for significant toxicity to normal tissues with conventional chemotherapy and the risk for long-term end-organ dysfunction. Significant emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML via phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remains a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who will otherwise fail standard therapy.

  17. Nucleophosmin mutations in childhood acute myelogenous leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Dell'Oro, Maria Grazia; Mecucci, Cristina; Giarin, Emanuela; Masetti, Riccardo; Rossi, Vincenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Falini, Brunangelo

    2005-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein involved in leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, and it regulates the alternate reading frame (ARF)-p53 tumor-suppressor pathway. Recently, it has been demonstrated that mutations of the NPM1 gene alter the protein at its C-terminal, causing its cytoplasmic localization. Cytoplasmic NPM was detected in 35% of adult patients with primary non-French-American-British (FAB) classification M3 acute myeloid leukemia (AML), associated mainly with normal karyotype. We evaluated the prevalence of the NPM1 gene mutation in non-M3 childhood AML patients enrolled in the ongoing Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP-AML02) protocol in Italy. NPM1 mutations were found in 7 (6.5%) of 107 successfully analyzed patients. NPM1-mutated patients carried a normal karyotype (7/26, 27.1%) and were older in age. Thus, the NPM1 mutation is a frequent abnormality in AML patients without known genetic marker; the mutation may represent a new target to monitor minimal residual disease in AML and a potential candidate for alternative and targeted treatments.

  18. Unilateral Exudative Retinal Detachment as the Sole Presentation of Relapsing Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Azık

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocular findings are rarely the initial symptom of leukemia, although up to 90% of all leukemia patients have fundus changes during the course of the disease. Herein we report a relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with the sole presentation of sudden visual loss and exudative retinal detachment. An 8-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed sudden visual loss during his first remission period. Bullous retinal detachment with total afferent pupillary defect was observed. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intraocular mass lesion; simultaneously obtained bone marrow and cerebrospinal fluid samples showed no evidence of leukemic cells. Following local irradiation, and systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy the mass disappeared. Local irradiation, and systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy effectively controlled the isolated ocular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and eliminated the need for enucleation.

  19. [Extramedullary onset of mixed phenotype acute leukemia with MLL gene rearrangement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Ichiro; Shobu, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takeo; Hamanaka, Satoshi; Nozaki, Yumi; Nakajima, Kei; Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2013-03-01

    Rearrangements of the mixed lineage leukemia MLL gene at chromosome 11q23 are common chromosomal abnormalities in human leukemia. MLL fused with numerous partner genes causes different leukemia phenotypes that depend on the function of partner genes. MLLT3-MLL is generated by translocation t(9;11), which primarily induces acute myeloid leukemia in humans, whereas MLLT3-MLL induces ALL or biphenotypic leukemia in mice. The microenvironment that surrounds leukemia cells plays a central role in this process. We report a patient with mixed phenotype acute leukemia with MLLT3-MLL. This patient, a 44-year-old woman, initially exhibited extramedullary leukemia with multiple tumors and subsequently developed bone marrow disease. The leukemia cells exhibited myeloid (CD13 and MPO) and B cell (CD19 and CD79a) phenotypes. Chromosomal analysis and RT-PCR assay revealed tumor cells with the MLLT3-MLL fusion gene. We treated this patient with a drug regimen for AML (Ara-C plus anthracycline), and complete remission was obtained. This report describes the fourth case of mixed phenotypic leukemia with extramedullary disease. The extramedullary circumstance may underlie the biphenotypic features of these patients.

  20. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with i(17)(q10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamura, Junki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Tsukada, Nodoka; Hosoki, Takaaki; Shindo, Motohiro; Sato, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    We herein report a rare chromosomal abnormality observed in an acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patient. She had several APL derivative clones including a clone with i(17)(q10) abnormality, which consists of two kinds of structural abnormalities, a cryptic translocation of t(15;17) and an isochromosome of 17q. Although an obvious microscopic t(15;17) change was not observed on either arms of the isochromosome, PML/RARα fusion signals were detected on an interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. By several cytogenetic analyses of her bone marrow cells, it was confirmed that the i(17)(q10) clone was derived from the classic t(15;17) clone via another intervening clone, cryptic t(15;17). PMID:27853080

  1. Acute promyelocytic leukemia: what is the new standard of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Justin M; Tallman, Martin S

    2014-09-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is one of the most exciting stories of modern medicine. Once a disease that was highly lethal, the majority of patients are now cured with the advent of molecularly targeted therapy with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO). In many patients, chemotherapy can be omitted completely, particularly in patients with low- or intermediate-risk disease (white blood cell count ≤ 10,000/μl). Recent data show overall survival exceeding 90% with ATRA and ATO-based induction and consolidation strategies. In the uncommon patient in whom relapse does occur, most can still be cured with ATO and autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. Remaining challenges in APL management include the rapid identification and treatment of newly diagnosed patients to decrease the early death rate, optimizing treatment strategies in high-risk patients (white blood cell count>10,000/μl), and the role of maintenance therapy in lower risk patients.

  2. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Presenting with Severe Marrow Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presenting with severely fibrotic marrow. There are four other reports of similar cases in the literature. Our patient was treated with All-Transretinoic Acid- (ATRA- containing induction chemotherapy, followed by consolidation and maintenance therapy. He achieved a complete morphologic remission with adequate count recovery in a timely fashion, and later a molecular remission was documented. The patient remains in molecular remission and demonstrates normal blood counts now more than 4 years after induction. Since the morphological appearance may not be typical and the bone marrow may not yield an aspirate for cytogenetic analysis, awareness of such entity is important to make a correct diagnosis of this potentially curable disease.

  3. Sapacitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkin, Maxim; Richards, Ashley I

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains poor and new treatment approaches are urgently needed. A novel nucleoside analog sapacitabine has recently emerged as a feasible agent because of its oral administration and acceptable toxicity profile. Clinical efficacy of sapacitabine, both as a single agent and in combination, has been evaluated in elderly AML patients or AML patients unfit for standard intensive chemotherapy. Response rates varied from 15 to 45% in phase II studies. Sapacitabine was overall well-tolerated with gastrointestinal and myelosuppression-related complications were the most common side effects. Unfortunately, in a phase III study sapacitabine showed no clinical superiority as compared to low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients with AML. Another large phase III study comparing the combination of sapacitabine with decitabine to decitabine alone is currently ongoing and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015 or by the first half of 2016.

  4. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. [Precursors of acute leukemia: myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipe, H H

    2011-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) represent neoplastic proliferations of hematopoietic stem cells, which may progress to loss of differentiation and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transitions between MDSs and MPNs as well as combinations between both disorders occur and MPNs may acquire dysplastic features combined with cytopenia. Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms show dysplastic and myeloproliferative properties and have in common genetic aberrations at the stem cell level (TET2, ASXL 1, CBL, IDH 1, IDH 2, EZH2, p53, Runx1), which may be found in one cell or may affect different hematopoietic stem cells, expanding in parallel. Progress to AML follows a linear clonal evolution only in a subset of cases. Alternatively AML derives from secondary clones, devoid of any marker mutation or originates from a common aberrant progenitor cell which shares other but not the JAK2 ( V617F ) mutation.

  6. Study on subsequent neurologic complications in children with acute leukemia

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    Kobayashi, Naoaki; Shimazaki, Haruyo; Hoshi, Yasutaka; Akatsuka, Jun-ichi (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-06-01

    Twenty-seven children with acute leukemia were studied in order to detect the subsequent neurologic complications due to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Twenty-four patients with ALL received central nervous system prophylaxis including cranial irradiation. The methods of evaluation consisted of electroencephalogram (EEG), computed tomography of the head (CT scan), soft neurological sign, intelligence quotient (IQ) and Bender Gestalt test. The patients with relapse showed severe abnormalities in various kinds of examinations. Younger children at diagnosis were associated with a higher abnormality rate of soft neurological signs and Bender Gestalt test. Factors which were found to be closely associated with a lower IQ score included younger children at diagnosis and longer duration of remission time. These results indicate the need for caution for the dosage of cranial irradiation for younger patients in CNS prophylaxis, and improvement of a lower IQ score in long-term survivors requires further investigation as to the appropriate intellectual environment for their development after remission. (author).

  7. Treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Oliver G; Wassmann, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) includes at least one-quarter of all adults with ALL. Until recently, conventional chemotherapy programs that have been effective in other precursor B-cell ALL cases have been unable to cure patients with this diagnosis. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation early in first remission has been the recommended therapy. The availability of imatinib mesylate and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors and small molecules that affect the BCR/ABL signaling pathways may be changing the treatment paradigm and the prognosis for these patients. The results from clinical trials using imatinib in the frontline setting and in relapsed patients as well as preliminary experience treating imatinib-resistant Ph(+) ALL will be described.

  8. Clinical activity of alvocidib (flavopiridol) in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidner, Joshua F; Karp, Judith E

    2015-12-01

    There have been minimal therapeutic advancements in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over the past 4 decades and outcomes remain unsatisfactory. Alvocidib (formerly flavopiridol) is a multi-serine threonine cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with demonstrable in vitro and clinical activity in AML when combined in a timed sequential chemotherapy regimen, FLAM (alvocidib followed by cytarabine continuous infusion and mitoxantrone). FLAM has been evaluated in sequential phase 1 and phase 2 studies in 149 and 256 relapsed/refractory and newly diagnosed non-favorable risk AML patients, respectively, with encouraging findings in both patient populations warranting further investigation. This review highlights the mechanism of action of alvocidib, pre-clinical studies of alvocidib in AML, and the clinical trials evaluating alvocidib alone and in combination with cytotoxic agents (FLAM) in AML.

  9. Acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy: a systematic analysis of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Giri, Smith; Manandhar, Samyak; Pathak, Ranjan; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in pregnancy are largely unknown. The MEDLINE database was systematically searched to obtain 43 articles with 71 patients with new-onset APL during pregnancy. Induction therapy included various regimens of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), cytarabine, and anthracycline and resulted in a complete remission rate of 93%. Obstetric and fetal complications included pre-term deliveries (46%), spontaneous/therapeutic abortion/intrauterine death (33.3%) and other neonatal complications (25.9%). Mothers diagnosed in the first trimester were more likely to experience obstetric (p pregnancy. The vast majority of APL patients in pregnancy may achieve remission with initial induction therapy. APL or its therapy in pregnancy, however, is associated with a high risk of fetal and obstetrical complications. The results of our study may help in patient counseling and informed decision-making.

  10. Acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy: report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, Ugo; Figuera, Amalia; Milone, Giuseppe; Meli, Carmela Rita; Guido, Giulia; Indelicato, Francesco; Moschetti, Gaetano; Leotta, Salvatore; Tornello, Antonella; Poidomani, Massimo; Murgano, Pamela; Pinto, Valeria; Giustolisi, Rosario

    2004-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by onset at a young age and a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis, which is attributed to a disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like coagulopathy. The discovery of all-trans-retinoic acid has changed the course of APL treatment by reducing the onset of DIC and inducing a complete and durable remission in more than 90% of patients. The occurrence of APL during pregnancy is not a frequent event, but the management of these patients raises many therapeutic and ethical dilemmas and requires a careful clinical case evaluation of fetal and maternal risk, coagulation status, the parents' wishes, and therapeutic options. Here we describe 3 patients with APL diagnosed during pregnancy. Clinical data and the therapeutic approaches are presented. In the discussion, we analyze clinical decisions and therapeutic options and compare our cases with those found in the literature.

  11. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  12. The detection of KIT mutations in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Silva Machado

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study describes a new method used in the clinicallaboratory at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein to detect mutationsin exons 8 and 17 of the KIT gene in patients with acute myeloidleukemia. Methods: Genomic DNA extraction was performed on 54samples of peripheral blood or bone marrow from patients with acutemyeloid leukemia. The extracted DNA was amplified by polymerasechain reaction and sequenced, and the fragments were analyzed.Results: Within the analyzed samples, we detected four mutations inexon 8, two mutations in exon 17, and mutations or a double mutationin one sample. Conclusion: The tests detecting mutations in exon 8and 17 on the KIT gene were successfully standardized. The test isnow included among the routine diagnostics employed for patients atHospital Israelita Albert Einstein clinical laboratory.

  13. Neutropenia, fever, and infection in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, J A; Stuart, M J; Stockman, J A; Oski, F A

    1977-02-01

    In an attempt to determine the relationship between neutropenia (absolute granulocyte count less than 1,000/cu mm), infection, and disease status, 20 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were observed for a total of 34 patient-years. Febrile episodes occurred with much greater frequency in patients during the course of treatment induction (0.9/mo), or while in relapse (2.46/mo) than while in remission (0.19/mo). A cause for fever was identified much more frequently in patients in remission, both when neutropenic and nonneutropenic. When absolute granulocyte counts fell below 200/cu mm, a cause for fever was generally identified regardless of disease status. We propose that the majority of febrile episodes in patients at the time of induction of treatment or in relapse with neutrophil counts of more than 200/cu mm are caused by the disease process rather than secondary to a diagnosable infection.

  14. Current findings for recurring mutations in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Shinichiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a multistep process that requires at least two genetic abnormalities for the development of the disease. The identification of genetic mutations in AML has greatly advanced our understanding of leukemogenesis. Recently, the use of novel technologies, such as massively parallel DNA sequencing or high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, has allowed the identification of several novel recurrent gene mutations in AML. The aim of this review is to summarize the current findings for the identification of these gene mutations (Dnmt, TET2, IDH1/2, NPM1, ASXL1, etc., most of which are frequently found in cytogenetically normal AML. The cooperative interactions of these molecular aberrations and their interactions with class I/II mutations are presented. The prognostic and predictive significances of these aberrations are also reviewed.

  15. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Integrating Genomics into Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasian, Sarah K; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common malignancy of childhood, is a genetically complex entity that remains a major cause of childhood cancer-related mortality. Major advances in genomic and epigenomic profiling during the past decade have appreciably enhanced knowledge of the biology of de novo and relapsed ALL and have facilitated more precise risk stratification of patients. These achievements have also provided critical insights regarding potentially targetable lesions for development of new therapeutic approaches in the era of precision medicine. This review delineates the current genetic landscape of childhood ALL with emphasis upon patient outcomes with contemporary treatment regimens, as well as therapeutic implications of newly identified genomic alterations in specific subsets of ALL. PMID:26194091

  16. Relapsing acute myeloid leukemia presenting as hypopyon uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna P Hegde

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior segment infiltration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML presenting as hypopyon uveitis is very rare. We report this case as an uncommon presentation in a patient on remission after bone marrow transplant for AML. In addition to the hypopyon, the patient presented with "red eye" caused by ocular surface disease due to concurrent graft-versus-host disease and glaucoma. The classical manifestations of masquerade syndrome due to AML were altered by concurrent pathologies. Media opacities further confounded the differential diagnosis. We highlight the investigations used to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. In uveitis, there is a need to maintain a high index of clinical suspicion, as early diagnosis in ocular malignancy can save sight and life.

  17. [Abnormal Notch-Hes Signaling Pathways and Acute Leukemia -Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zhen-Yang; Wang, Li; Gao, Chun-Ji

    2017-02-01

    The abnormal activation of Notch signaling is closely related to the development of acute leukemia (AL). The core elements of the Notch signaling system include Notch receptors, Notch ligands, CSL DNA-binding proteins, and effectors like target genes. Any factors, which affect ligands, receptors, signal transducers and effectors, can influence the signal transduction of Notch signaling greatly. Based on the role of Notch signaling in AL, several targeted drugs against Notch upstream signaling have been developed. However, due to the complexity and pleiotropic effects of Notch upstream signaling, these targeted drugs display strong side effects. Thus, Hes (Hairy Enhancer of Split) factors as a primary Notch effector, also play an important role in the pathogenesis of AL. This review summarizes recent progresses on Notch-Hes signaling in AL, hopping to provide references for further excavation of the Notch-Hes signaling, and lay foundations for developing the next generation of targeted drugs.

  18. Acute myocardial/cerebral infarction as first/relapse manifestation in one acute promyelocytic leukemia patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Suo, Shanshan; Mao, Liping; Wang, Lei; Yang, Chunmei; Xu, Weilai; Lou, Yinjun; Mai, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    In the clinical setting, bleeding is a common manifestation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), whereas thrombosis is relatively rare, especially as an initial symptom. Here, we report an unusual case of APL with acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation and cerebral infarction as the relapse manifestation in a healthy young woman. This unique case emphasizes that a thrombotic event could be the first manifestation of an underlying hematological disorder such as APL and could also be a sign of relapse. Rapid detection of the underlying disorder and the timely use of anticoagulation therapy and ATRA are crucial for preventing further deterioration of the disease and saving the patient's life.

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Survival and treatment response in adults with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with a modified International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Crespo-Solis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute promyelocytic leukemia has good prognosis in view of the high complete remission and survival rates achieved with therapies containing all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide. However, there is a significant risk of death during induction due to hemorrhage secondary to disseminated intravascular coagulation. This has contributed to a gap in the prognosis of patients between developed and developing countries. The International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia was created in 2005 and proposed a treatment protocol based on daunorubicin and all-trans retinoic acid stratified by risk geared toward developing countries. Herein are presented the results from the first patient cohort treated in a single developing country hospital employing a slightly modified version of the International Consortium protocol in a real life setting. Twenty patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia were enrolled: 27.8% had low-risk, 55.6% intermediate risk and 16.7% high-risk. The complete remission rate was 94.4% after a median of 42 days. Both relapse rates and death rates were one patient (5.5% each. No deaths were observed during consolidation. After a median follow-up of 29 months, the overall survival rate was 89.1%. Efficacy and safety of the International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia protocol has been reproduced in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients from a developing country.

  1. Cord blood transplantation for the treatment of acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meerim Park; Young-ho Lee

    2013-01-01

    Objective This review discussed the available data on treatment outcomes of cord blood transplantation (CBT) for acute leukemia.Data sources The data cited in this review were obtained from articles listed in Medline and Pubmed.Study selection We reviewed the articles of clinical results from various registries and institutions,as well as our experiences with CBT in children,adolescents and adults.Results This research has clearly shown that cord blood (CB) has several unique characteristics resulting in distinct advantage and disadvantages when compared to transplantation with unrelated donor bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells.The field of CBT has advanced from investigating its safety and feasibility to addressing more specific issues such as accelerating engraftment,extending access,and examining outcomes in specific subgroups of patients.Many approaches have been investigated in the attempt to improve engraftment and survival.Variable factors have been identified,such as factors related to donor choice (human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility,cell dose,and others) and transplantation (conditioning and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimen).Data support that CB should be considered a reasonable option in those that do not have HLA matched sibling donor and for those in whom the time to transplant is critical.Conclusions CB is a reasonable alternative to unrelated donor bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells for transplantation.Recently developed strategies aimed at improving hematopoietic recovery and reducing early transplantation-related mortality could further improve treatment outcomes of CBT for patients with acute leukemia.

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of the trial TropicALL study; Thromboprophylaxis in Children treated for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with L...oprofylaxe in kinderen behandeld voor Acute lymfatische leukemie met laag-moleculair-gewicht heparine: een g...dition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Acute... Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.2Version 17.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10000845 E.1.2Term Acute

  3. The landscape of somatic mutations in infant MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Anna K; Ma, Jing; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL rearrangements (MLL-R) represents a distinct leukemia with a poor prognosis. To define its mutational landscape, we performed whole-genome, exome, RNA and targeted DNA sequencing on 65 infants (47 MLL-R and 18 non-MLL-R cases) and 20 older childr...

  4. Delayed Neurotoxicity Associated with Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Peter D.; Kamen, Barton A.

    2006-01-01

    Most children diagnosed today with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured. However, treatment entails risk of neurotoxicity, causing deficits in neurocognitive function that can persist in the years after treatment is completed. Many of the components of leukemia therapy can contribute to adverse neurologic sequelae, including…

  5. Gene-expression patterns in drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and response to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); C. Cheng (Cheng); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); M.V. Relling (Mary); R. Pieters (Rob); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); M.L. den Boer (Monique); W. Yang; A.J. Veerman; K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is curable with chemotherapy in approximately 80 percent of patients. However, the cause of treatment failure in the remaining 20 percent of patients is largely unknown. METHODS: We tested leukemia cells from 173

  6. Acute leukemia during pregnancy: obstetric management and perinatal outcome of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, A; Velasco, J G; Pinilla, J; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A

    1995-12-01

    The coexistence of leukemia and pregnancy is extremely rare. This paper describes two cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed during the second trimester of pregnancy and the most suitable approach to the management of this situation is analyzed. Possible teratogenic effects of mono- or polychemotherapy during pregnancy, depending upon the gestational age at which chemotherapy is given, are discussed.

  7. Glioblastoma multiforme in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Kirit

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had received prophylactic cranial irradiation (1800 cGy /10 fractions and intrathecal methotrexate. Five years later, he developed a glioblastoma multiforme in the right frontal region while the leukemia was in remission. It is possible that the glioma may have been induced by radiation and /or chemotherapy.

  8. Tracheoesophageal fistula resulting from invasive aspergillosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) in adult patients is an uncommon complication in leukemia. We present here on a case of TEF in a 46-year-old woman with ALL. The patient was asymptomatic and TEF is resulted from aspergillus bronchitis during the chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

  9. [Abnormal reaction for anaesthetics in a critically ill child with acute myeloid leukemia--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujok, Grzegorz; Knapik, Piotr; Macioł, Zbigniew

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a case report of an abnormal reaction for anaesthetics correlated with cytostatic therapy in the course of preparation time for bone marrow transplantation due to acute myeloid leukemia. Problems of pharmacological interaction of ketamine and benzodiazepines are emphasized. Special attention was paid to the risk of abnormal drug reactions during general anaesthesia in children with leukemia.

  10. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing

  11. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF BRAIN AND ACUTE LEUKEMIA CYTOPLASMIC GENE EXPRESSION IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    adel abd elhaleim hagag

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract      Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML accounts for 25%-35% of the acute leukemia in children. BAALC (Brain and Acute Leukemia, Cytoplasmic gene is a recently identified gene on chromosome 8q22.3 that has prognostic significance in AML.  The aim of this work was to study the impact of BAALC gene expression on prognosis of AML in Egyptian children. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 40 patients of newly diagnosed AML who were subjected to the following: Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations including: complete blood count, LDH, bone marrow aspiration, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping, assessment of BAALC Gene by real time PCR in bone marrow aspirate mononuclear cells before the start of chemotherapy. Results: BAALC gene expression showed positive expression in 24 cases (60% and negative expression in 16 cases (40%. Patients who showed positive BAALC gene expression included 10 patients achieved complete remission, 8 patients died and 6 relapsed patients, while patients who showed negative expression include 12 patients achieved complete remission, 1 relapsed patient and 3 patients died. There was significant association between BAALC gene expression and FAB classification of patients of AML patientsas positive BAALC expression is predominantly seen in FAB subtypes M1 and M2 compared with negative BAALC gene expression that was found more in M3 and M4 (8 cases with M1, 12 cases with M2, 1 case with M3 and 3 cases with M4 in positive BAALC expression versus 2 cases with M1, 3 cases with M2, 4 cases with M3 and 7 cases with M4 in BAALC gene negative expression group with significant difference regarding FAB subtypes. As regard age, sex, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pallor, purpura, platelets count, WBCs count, and percentage of blast cells in BM, the present study showed no significant association with BAALC. Conclusion: BAALC expression is an important prognostic factor in AML

  12. Multiplex high-throughput gene mutation analysis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Jennifer; Beadling, Carol; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Fleming, William H; Loriaux, Marc; Heinrich, Michael C; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Kelemen, Katalin; Leeborg, Nicky; Gatter, Ken; Braziel, Rita M; Press, Richard; Corless, Christopher L; Fan, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Classification of acute myeloid leukemia increasingly depends on genetic analysis. However, the number of known mutations in acute myeloid leukemia is expanding rapidly. Therefore, we tested a high-throughput screening method for acute myeloid leukemia mutation analysis using a multiplex mass spectrometry-based approach. To our knowledge, this is the first reported application of this approach to genotype leukemias in a clinical setting. One hundred seven acute myeloid leukemia cases were screened for mutations using a panel that covers 344 point mutations across 31 genes known to be associated with leukemia. The analysis was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction for mutations in genes of interest followed by primer extension reactions. Products were analyzed on a Sequenom MassARRAY system (San Diego, CA). The multiplex panel yielded mutations in 58% of acute myeloid leukemia cases with normal cytogenetics and 21% of cases with abnormal cytogenetics. Cytogenetics and routine polymerase chain reaction-based screening of NPM1, CEBPA, FLT3-ITD, and KIT was also performed on a subset of cases. When combined with the results of these standard polymerase chain reaction-based tests, the mutation frequency reached 78% in cases with normal cytogenetics. Of these, 42% harbored multiple mutations primarily involving NPM1 with NRAS, KRAS, CEBPA, PTPN11, IDH1, or FLT3. In contrast, cases with abnormal cytogenetics rarely harbored more than 1 mutation (1.5%), suggesting different underlying biology. This study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of broad-based mutation profiling of acute myeloid leukemia in a clinical setting. This approach will be helpful in defining prognostic subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia and contribute to the selection of patients for enrollment into trials with novel inhibitors.

  13. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  14. Management of acute promyelocytic leukemia: Recommendations from an expert panel on behalf of the European LeukemiaNet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel); D. Grimwade (David); M.S. Tallman (Martin); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P. Fenaux (Pierre); E.H. Estey (Elihu); T. Naoe (Tomoki); E. Lengfelder (Eva); T. Büchner (Thomas); H. Döhner (Hartmut); A.K. Burnett (Alan); F. Lo-Coco (Francesco)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and, more recently, arsenic trioxide (ATO) into the therapy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has revolutionized the management and outcome of this disease. Several treatment strategies using these agents, usually in combination with

  15. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  16. Inhibition of glycolysis modulates prednisolone resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulleman, Esther; Kazemier, Karin M.; Holleman, Amy; VanderWeele, David J.; Rudin, Charles M.; Broekhuis, Mathilde J. C.; Evans, William E.; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment failure in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is related to cellular resistance to glucocorticoids (eg, prednisolone). Recently, we demonstrated that genes associated with glucose metabolism are differentially expressed between prednisolone-sensitive and prednisolone-resistant pr

  17. Diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia in a dental hospital; report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-10

    Oct 10, 2014 ... leading to a diagnosis of acute leukemia that directs the patient to seek early dental consultation. .... tests showed that the HIV infection/AIDS were negative, and ... shortness of breath, anemia, petechiae, bone and joint pain,.

  18. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Lee, Maria Lúcia de Martino; Andreoni, Solange; Geloneze, Bruno; Lederman, Henrique; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population...

  19. Imaging of liver and spleen candidiasis in patients with acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seino, Yasuo; Tamakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Kimura, Y.; Miyazaki, S.; Miura, R.; Ishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with acute leukemia were found to have candidal abscess of liver and spleen. CT and US showed hepatosplenomegaly and microabscess. These findings might be useful in diagnosis of visceral candidiasis.

  20. Cardiac function in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarfelt, Marianne; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Glosli, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We report cardiac function of patients treated for Childhood acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy only according to three consecutive Nordic protocols. METHODS: Ninety-eight of 138 eligible patients accepted examination with standardized echocardiography. Results were compared...

  1. RNA-Guided CRISPR-Cas9 System-Mediated Engineering of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brabetz, Oliver; Alla, Vijay; Angenendt, Linus; Schliemann, Christoph; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Arteaga, Maria-Francisca; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Current acute myeloid leukemia (AML) disease models face severe limitations because most of them induce un-physiological gene expressions that do not represent conditions in AML patients and/or depend on external promoters...

  2. The controversy of varicella vaccination in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caniza, Miguela A; Hunger, Stephen P; Schrauder, Andre

    2012-01-01

    The available guidelines for varicella vaccination of susceptible children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have become increasingly conservative. However, vaccination of those who have remained in continuous complete remission for 1 year and are receiving chemotherapy is still considered...

  3. Hepatotoxicity During Maintenance Therapy and Prognosis in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Maria S.; Nygaard, Ulrikka; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a known toxicity to treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hepatotoxicity occurs during maintenance therapy and is caused by metabolites of 6-Mercaptopurine (6 MP) and Methotrexate (MTX). Our objective was to investigate the association between alanine...

  4. MicroRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common blood disorders include hematopoietic cell malignancies or leukemias and plasma cell dyscrasia, all of which have associated microRNA abnormalities. In this paper, we discuss several leukemias including acute myeloid leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and identify altered microRNAs and their targets. Immune disorders with altered blood levels of antibodies include autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with associated anti-self-autoantibodies and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN also have related microRNA abnormalities. The alterations in microRNAs may serve as therapeutic targets in these blood disorders.

  5. Stepwise discriminant function analysis for rapid identification of acute promyelocytic leukemia from acute myeloid leukemia with multiparameter flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguo; Li, Yan; Tong, Yongqing; Gao, Qingping; Mao, Xiaolu; Zhang, Wenjing; Xia, Zunen; Fu, Chaohong

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has been accelerated by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC). However, diagnostic interpretation of MFC readouts for APL depends on individual experience and knowledge, which inevitably increases the risk of arbitrariness. We appraised the feasibility of using stepwise discriminant function analysis (SDFA) based on MFC to optimize the minimal variables needed to distinguish APL from other acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without complicated data interpretation. Samples from 327 patients with APL (n = 51) and non-APL AML (n = 276) were randomly allocated into training (243 AML) and test sets (84 AML) for SDFA. The discriminant functions from SDFA were examined by correct classification, and the final variables were validated by differential expression. Finally, additional 20 samples from patients with atypical APL and AML confusable with APL were also identified by SDFA method and morphological analysis. The weighed discriminant function reveals seven differentially expressed variables (CD2/CD9/CD11b/CD13/CD34/HLA-DR/CD117), which predict a molecular result for APL characterization with an accuracy that approaches 99% (99.6 and 98.8% for AML samples in training and test sets, respectively). Furthermore, the SDFA outperformed either single variable analysis or the more limited 3-component analysis (CD34/CD117/HLA-DR) via separate SDFA, and was also superior to morphological analysis in terms of diagnostic efficacy. The established SDFA based on MFC with seven variables can precisely and rapidly differentiate APL and non-APL AML, which may contribute to the urgent initiation of all-trans-retinoic acid-based APL therapy.

  6. Acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with constitutional 47,XXY karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla M. Jalbut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (KS, a 47,XXY chromosomal abnormality, has been shown to be associated with a number of malignancies, but has not been linked to acute leukemias to date. We present a case of a 54-year-old male diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with monocytic differentiation, whose cytogenetic and subsequent FISH analyses revealed a constitutional 47,XXY karyotype. We also review and discuss relevant prior literature.

  7. B Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Presenting as a Bile Duct Stricture Diagnosed With Cholangioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Michael J.; Jiang, Liuyan; Lukens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Indeterminate biliary strictures represent a diagnostic challenge requiring further work-up, which encompasses a variety of diagnostic modalities. We report a very rare case of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia presenting as a biliary stricture following remission of acute myeloid leukemia, which was initially treated with allogenic stem cell transplant. After multiple diagnostic modalities were implemented with no success, the use of cholangioscopy-guided biopsies was the key for the final diagnosis.

  8. TELOMERASE ACTIVITY AND hTERT mRNA EXPRESSION IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冬梅; 张洹

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical implications of telomerase activity and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression as useful diagnostic marker in acute leukemia. Methods: Expression of hTERT was detected by reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 24 cases with acute leukemia and in 12 normal persons. Quantitative levels of telomerase activity were examined by polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunoassay (PCR-ELISA). Results: In the bone marrow and peripheral blood of 24 acute leukemia, telomerase activity was detected in 75% of the samples, with absorbances (A) of 0.538(0.062 and 0.463(0.054, respectively. Whereas in 12 normal peripheral blood, telomerase activity had only a positive rate of 8.3%, with A value of 0.16(0.012. telomerase activities in the bone marrow and peripheral blood of acute leukemia were significantly higher than in normal control (P<0.05). RT-PCR analysis revealed that hTERT mRNA was expressed in 79.17%(19/24) of acute leukemia, but in only 1 of 12 normal peripheral blood. In 24 acute leukemias, 17 cases had both positive telomerse activity and hTERT mRNA expression. The expression of hTERT mRNA is correlated with telomerase activity (P<0.01). Conclusion: Telomerase and hTERT mRNA could be useful in diagnosis of acute leukemia. hTERT gene expression was strongly associated with telomerase activity in acute leukemia.

  9. Mosaic Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic B cell-leukemia. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra-Baltazar, Isabel Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS or trisomy 21 is a constitutional chromosomal abnormality, which may be mosaic in 1 % to 4 % of cases. DS mosaic diagnosis is difficult because most patients have a normal phenotype and show no significant clinical abnormalities. Patients with DS have a higher risk of developing acute leukemia such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We report the case of a 19-year old woman with mosaic trisomy 21 and ALL.

  10. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: prevalence and prognostic value

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for clinical decision-making. We analyzed 882 well-characterized acute myeloid leukemia cases to determine the prevalence and prognostic impact of ASXL1 exon12 mutations. Truncating ASXL1 mutations were present i...

  11. Central nervous system involvement in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: diagnosis by immunophenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Silva Peres Cancela

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is the most commonly affected extramedullary site in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Although morphologic evaluation of the cerebrospinal fluid has been traditionally used for diagnosing central nervous system involvement, it is a method of low sensitivity. The present study aimed at evaluating the use of immunophenotyping in the detection of blasts in the cerebrospinal fluid from children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  12. Hypoplastic acute myeloid leukemia-M4: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia (AML is defined as AML with bone marrow cellularity <20%. Hypocellular AML is an infrequent entity. Its frequency ranges between 5% and 12% of all cases of AML. Hypocellular variants of acute leukemia almost always have a myeloid phenotype and usually develop secondary to radiation or chemotherapy. We report a rare case of Hypocellular AML-M4 occurring in a 60-year-old woman who was incidentally found to be positive for HIV.

  13. Acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemophilia A patient:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 李洪强; 赵辉; 王婷婷; 季林祥; 杨仁池; 韩忠朝

    2004-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is the M3 subtype of the French-American-British (FAB) classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Hemophilia is a congenital bleeding disorder characterized by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX. In our center, more than one thousand patients with haemophilia A have been treated since 1980.1 In June 2002, APL was first diagnosed in one person with haemophilia (PWH). The coincidence of these two diseases led to challenges in developing a treatment strategy.

  14. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin;

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact.......Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  15. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with pregnancy: a rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi Bhargava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy complicated with leukemia is rare. Validated data out of which conclusions may be drawn regarding management of pregnancy with leukemia are sparse. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 887-888

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia with pregnancy: a rare case

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy complicated with leukemia is rare. Validated data out of which conclusions may be drawn regarding management of pregnancy with leukemia are sparse. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000): 887-888

  17. SET-NUP214 fusion in acute myeloid leukemia- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaborski Margarete

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SET-NUP214 fusion resulting from a recurrent cryptic deletion, del(9(q34.11q34.13 has recently been described in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and in one case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The fusion protein appears to promote elevated expression of HOXA cluster genes in T-ALL and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We screened a panel of ALL and AML cell lines for SET-NUP214 expression to find model systems that might help to elucidate the cellular function of this fusion gene. Results Of 141 human leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested, only the T-ALL cell line LOUCY and the AML cell line MEGAL expressed the SET(TAF-Iβ-NUP214 fusion gene transcript. RT-PCR analysis specifically recognizing the alternative first exons of the two TAF-I isoforms revealed that the cell lines also expressed TAF-Iα-NUP214 mRNA. Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and array-based copy number analysis were both consistent with del(9(q34.11q34.13 as described. Quantitative genomic PCR also confirmed loss of genomic material between SET and NUP214 in both cell lines. Genomic sequencing localized the breakpoints of the SET gene to regions downstream of the stop codon and to NUP214 intron 17/18 in both LOUCY and MEGAL cells. Both cell lines expressed the 140 kDa SET-NUP214 fusion protein. Conclusion Cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL express the recently described SET-NUP214 fusion gene. Of special note is that the formation of the SET exon 7/NUP214 exon 18 gene transcript requires alternative splicing as the SET breakpoint is located downstream of the stop codon in exon 8. The cell lines are promising model systems for SET-NUP214 studies and should facilitate investigating cellular functions of the the SET-NUP214 protein.

  18. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaak, Roel G W; Wouters, Bas J; Erpelinck, Claudia A J; Abbas, Saman; Beverloo, H Berna; Lugthart, Sanne; Löwenberg, Bob; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J M

    2009-01-01

    We examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific molecular subtypes. The favorable cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, i.e., acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;21), t(15;17) or inv(16), were predicted with maximum accuracy (positive and negative predictive value: 100%). Mutations in NPM1 and CEBPA were predicted less accurately (positive predictive value: 66% and 100%, and negative predictive value: 99% and 97% respectively). Various other characteristic molecular acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, i.e., mutant FLT3 and RAS, abnormalities involving 11q23, -5/5q-, -7/7q-, abnormalities involving 3q (abn3q) and t(9;22), could not be correctly predicted using gene expression profiling. In conclusion, gene expression profiling allows accurate prediction of certain acute myeloid leukemia subtypes, e.g. those characterized by expression of chimeric transcription factors. However, detection of mutations affecting signaling molecules and numerical abnormalities still requires alternative molecular methods.

  19. Microgranular acute promyelocytic leukemia: a distinct clinical, ultrastructural, and cytogenetic entity

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    Golomb, H.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Vardiman, J.W.; Testa, J.R.; Butler, A.

    1980-02-01

    Three patients with acute leukemia, disseminated intravaslar coagulation, and a specific acquired chromosome abnormality (t(15;17)) were found by transmission electron microscopy to have the typical distribution of granules seen in promyelocytes. However, the average granule sizes were 120, 170 and 180 nm, respectively, for the three patients, significantly less than the 250-nm resolution of light microscopy. We regard the leukemia in these three patients as comprising a distinct clinical, ultrastructural, and cytogenetic entity that we have chosen to all microgranular acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  20. S-1 induced secondary acute erythroid leukemia with a chromosome inv(12)(p13;q13)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kensuke Matsumoto; Akira Kitanaka; Makiko Uemura; Fusako Waki; Tetsuya Fukumoto; Hiroaki Ohnishi; Yoshitsugu Kubota; Toshihiko Ishida

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy by S-1 following gastrectomy is considered standard treatment in Japan. Analysis of follow-up data have proved the efficacy of S-1 administration,and that hematological adverse events were relatively rare. PPyrimidine anti-metabolites, including S-1, have shown relatively lower risks for secondary hematological malignancies in comparison to alkylating agents and topoisomerase-Ⅱ inhibitors. We here report a case of therapy-related leukemia after S-1 administration. A patient who had received S-1as the sole adjuvant chemotherapy was diagnosed with acute erythroid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first report of S-1 induced acute leukemia.

  1. Development of acute leukemia in a known case of fanconi anaemia ( aplastic anaemai

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    Preeti Jhaveri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease associated with an abnormal DNA damage. Although Fanconi anemia is well known for its association of Aplastic anemia and characteristic birth defects, leukemia and solid tumors also occur at a high rate in this group of patients. A patient male / 20yrs, known case of Fanconi anemia presented with ulcer over left lower limb. On further evaluation, the patient was found to have pancytopenia and his peripheral smear revealed many atypical blast like cells. So bone marrow study was done which revealed it to be Acute leukemia probably Acute Myeloid leukemia.

  2. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Shiek Aejaz Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 patients of all age groups were enrolled for the study, of which flow cytometry was done in 144 patients. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using the variables on SPSS (statistical package for social sciences software on computer. Survival curves were estimated by method of Kaplan-Meir. Results: Majority of the patients were of B-cell (68.1% and 30.6% patients were of T-cell lineage. Of these, 80.6% patients were having cALLa positivity. Complete remission (CR was achieved in 59.1%, 16.4% relapsed, and 20.1% patients died. Conclusions: Phenotyping has become an important and integral part of diagnosis, classification, management and prognosticating in ALL. B-cell has been found to have a better survival over T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. cALLa antigen positivity has good impact in achieving CR in only B-cell lineage, myeloid coexpression has no significant effect on the outcome. BFM (Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster based protocols though showed a higher CR and survival vis-a-vis UKALL-XII. However, patients enrolled in former group being of low risk category and lesser in numbers cannot be compared statistically with a fair degree of confidence.

  3. PATHOGENESIS AND TREATMENT OF THROMBOHEMORRHAGIC DIATHESIS IN ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

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    Anna Falanga

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is a distinct subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by t(15;17 chromosomal translocation, which involves the retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-alpha. APL typically presents with a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis. Before the introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA for the cure of APL, fatal hemorrhages due, at least in part, to the APL-associated coagulopathy, were a major cause of induction remission failure. The laboratory abnormalities of blood coagulation found in these patients are compatible with a syndrome of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Major determinants of the coagulopathy of APL are endogenous factors expressed by the leukemic cells, including procoagulant factors, fibrinolytic proteins, and non-specific proteolytic enzymes. In addition, these cells have an increased capacity to adhere to the vascular endothelium, and to secrete inflammatory cytokines [i.e. interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha], which in turn stimulate the expression of prothrombotic activities by endothelial cells and leukocytes. ATRA can interfere with each of the principal hemostatic properties of the leukemic cell, thus reducing the APL cell procoagulant potential, in parallel to the induction of cellular differentiation. This effect occurs in vivo, in the bone marrow of APL patients receiving ATRA, and is associated with the improvement of the bleeding symptoms. Therapy with arsenic trioxide (ATO also beneficially affects coagulation in APL. However, early deaths from bleeding still remain a major problem in APL and further research is required in this field. In this review, we will summarize our current knowledge of the pathogenesis of the APL-associated coagulopathy and will overview the therapeutic approaches for the management of this complication.

  4. Transformation of myelodysplastic syndromes into acute myeloid leukemias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 刘鸿; 白洁; 曹燕然; 何广胜; 凃梅峰; 王秀丽; 郝玉书; 杨天楹; 杨崇礼

    2004-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), also called preleukemias, are a group of myeloid hematopoietic malignant disorders. We studied the transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Methods Leukemic transformation in 151 patients with MDS was dynamically followed up. The clinical manifestation, peripheral blood and bone marrow condition, karyotypes, immunophenotypes, response to treatment, and prognosis of AML evolution from MDS (MDS-AML) were also observed.Results During the course of this study, over the past eight years and seven months, 21 (13.91%) of 151 MDS patients progressed to overt leukemia, with a median interval of 5 (1-23) months. There were no significant differences between rates of leukemic transformation in comparison with the refractory anemia (RA), RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), and RAEB in transformation (RAEB-t) patient groups. Transformation occurred either gradually or rapidly. There were five parameters positively correlated to leukemic transformation: under 40 years of age, pancytopenia of 3 lineages, more than 15% blasts in the bone marrow, at least two abnormal karyotypes, and treatment with combined chemotherapy. All of the 21 patients with leukemia suffered from MDS-AML, and most of them were M2, M4, or M5. Two (9.52%) MDS-AML patients developed extramedullary infiltration. Leukopenia was found in 47.62% of these patients. Two thirds of these patients, whose bone marrows were generally hypercellular, suffered from neutropenia. After developing AML, 8 (47.06%) patients developed abnormal karyotypes. High expression of immature myeloid antigens, including CD33 [(49.83±24.50)%], CD13 [(36.38±33.84)%], monocytic antigen CD14 [(38.50±24.60)%], and stem cell marker CD34 [(34.67±30.59)%], were found on bone marrow mononuclear cells from MDS-AML patients after leukemic transformation. In some cases, lymphoid antigens, such as CD5, CD7, CD9, and CD19, coexisted with myeloid antigens. A low complete remission rate (31

  5. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  6. Fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptidis, John; Aloizos, Stavros; Chlorokostas, Panagiotis; Gourgiotis, Stavros

    2014-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a hemopoietic myeloid stem cell neoplasm. It is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults,and its incidence increases with age. Acute myeloid leukemia is characterized by the rapid growth of abnormal white blood cells that accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. As the leukemic cells keep filling the bone marrow, symptoms of the disease started to appear: fatigue, bleeding, increased frequency of infections, and shortness of breath. Cardiac tamponade or pericardial tamponade is an acute medical condition in which the accumulation of pericardial fluid prevents the function of the heart. Signs and symptoms include Beck triad (hypotension, distended neck veins, and muffled heart sounds), paradoxus pulses, tachycardia, tachypnea, and breathlessness. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are rare and severe complications of leukemia; they often develop during the radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or infections in the course of leukemia. This study sought to assess the fatal cardiac tamponade as the first manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found no reports in the literature linking these 2 clinical entities. Although the patient had no signs or diagnosis of AML previously, this case was remarkable for the rapidly progressive symptoms and the fatal outcome. The pericardial effusion reaccumulated rapidly after its initial drainage; it is a possible explanation that the leukemic cells interfered with cardiac activity or that they decreased their contractility myocytes secreting a toxic essence.

  7. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  8. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Mayur D; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S; Kota, Vamsi K

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  9. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Baruchel, Andre; Devidas, Meenakshi; Escherich, Gabriele; Gibson, Brenda; Heydrich, Christiane; Horibe, Keizo; Ishida, Yasushi; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Michel, Gérard; Pieters, Rob; Piette, Caroline; Pui, Ching-Hon; Raimondi, Susana; Silverman, Lewis; Stanulla, Martin; Stark, Batia; Winick, Naomi; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. Patients and Methods We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980 and 2007. Results Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival estimates for AML were 11.2% ± 2.9% for 125 patients diagnosed before 2000 and 34.1% ± 6.3% for 61 patients diagnosed after 2000 (P < .001); 5-year survival estimates for MDS were 17.1% ± 6.4% (n = 36) and 48.2% ± 10.6% (n = 33; P = .005). Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation failed to improve outcome of secondary myeloid malignancies after adjusting for waiting time to transplantation. Five-year survival rates were above 90% for patients with meningioma, Hodgkin lymphoma, thyroid carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and parotid gland tumor, and 68.5% ± 6.4% for those with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Eighty-nine percent of patients with brain tumors had received cranial irradiation. Solid tumors were associated with cyclophosphamide exposure, and myeloid malignancy was associated with topoisomerase II inhibitors and starting doses of methotrexate of at least 25 mg/m2 per week and mercaptopurine of at least 75 mg/m2 per day. Myeloid malignancies with monosomy 7/5q− were associated with high hyperdiploid ALL karyotypes, whereas 11q23/MLL-rearranged AML or MDS was associated with ALL harboring translocations of t(9;22), t(4;11), t(1;19), and t(12;21) (P = .03). Conclusion SMNs, except for brain tumors, AML, and MDS, have outcomes similar to their primary counterparts. PMID:23690411

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  11. Mutation of the NPM1 gene contributes to the development of donor cell-derived acute myeloid leukemia after unrelated cord blood transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Macías, Gabriela; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Gayoso, Jorge; Noriega, Víctor; Serrano, David; Balsalobre, Pascual; Muñoz-Martínez, Cristina; Díez-Martín, José L; Buño, Ismael

    2013-08-01

    Donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a rare but severe complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Its true incidence is unknown because of a lack of correct recognition and reporting, although improvements in molecular analysis of donor-host chimerism are contributing to a better diagnosis of this complication. The mechanisms of leukemogenesis are unclear, and multiple factors can contribute to the development of DCL. In recent years, cord blood has emerged as an alternative source of hematopoietic progenitor cells, and at least 12 cases of DCL have been reported after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We report a new case of DCL after unrelated cord blood transplantation in a 44-year-old woman diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukemia with t(1;19) that developed acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype and nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutation in donor cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NPM1 mutation contributing to DCL development.

  12. Meralgia Paresthetica as a Presentation of Acute Appendicitis in a Girl With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Miho; Kodama, Yuichi; Fukano, Reiji; Okamura, Jun; Ogaki, Kippei; Sakaguchi, Yoshihisa; Migita, Masahiro; Inagaki, Jiro

    2015-04-01

    A 7-year-old girl with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed recurrent fever and meralgia paresthetica (MP) during chemotherapy, which resolved after administration of antibiotics. Five months after the onset of these symptoms, enhanced computed tomography showed a periappendiceal abscess extending into the psoas muscle. The cause of her fever and MP was thought to be appendicitis, which probably developed during induction chemotherapy but did not result in typical abdominal pain. Patients with recurrent fever and MP should be evaluated by imaging examinations including computed tomography to search for appendicitis.

  13. Pictorial essay: Acute neurological complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema A Kembhavi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the commonest childhood malignancy with high cure rates due to recent advances in central nervous system (CNS prophylaxis. The disease per se, as well as the prophylactic therapy, predisposes the child to complications such as cerebrovascular events, infections, drug toxicities, etc. The purpose of this study is to highlight the pathophysiology and the imaging features (with appropriate examples of these complications and to propose a diagnostic algorithm based on MRI. Interpreting these scans in the light of clinical inputs very often helps the radiologist reach an appropriate diagnosis and help treatment and management.

  14. Dietary intake and childhood leukemia: The Diet and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (DALLT) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, Elena J; Orjuela, Manuela; Stevenson, Kristen; Cole, Peter D; Lin, Meiko; Athale, Uma H; Clavell, Luis A; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Michon, Bruno; Schorin, Marshall A; Welch, Jennifer Greene; Asselin, Barbara L; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Kelly, Kara M

    2016-10-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at elevated risk for nutrition-related morbidity both during and after therapy. We present the demographic characteristics and nutrient intake at study entry of a prospective cohort in which evaluating dietary intake in children diagnosed with ALL was investigated. Dietary intake data were collected for participants enrolled on the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium Protocol. Dietary intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was compared with the dietary reference intake by ALL risk group (standard and high risk). Dietary intake data were collected from 81% of participants (n = 640). We found that 27% of participants were overweight/obese. Intake of total calories and other nutrients exceeded the dietary reference intake in up to 79% of children. This was evident in both risk groups and was pronounced among younger children. For micronutrients, dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D (females only), and zinc differed significantly between patients with standard-risk and those with high-risk ALL. This study was successful in collecting dietary intake data at the time of cancer diagnosis in a multicenter setting in a pediatric population at high-risk for nutrition-related morbidity. We identified "at-risk" dietary intakes, which vary by sex and ALL risk group; such patients may benefit from future dietary interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O’Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan H.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan A.; Pierce, Sherry; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are uncommon in CLL. We retrospectively identified 95 patients with CLL also diagnosed with AL (n=38) or MDS (n=57), either concurrently (n=5) or subsequent (n=90) to CLL diagnosis and report their outcomes. Median number of CLL treatments prior to AL and MDS was 2(0–9) and 1(0–8), respectively; the most common regimen was purine analogue combined with alkylating agent±CD20 mAb. Twelve had no prior CLL treatment. Among 38 with AL, 33 had AML, 3 had ALL (1Ph+), 1 had biphenotypic, and 1 had extramedullary (bladder) AML. Unfavorable AML karyotype was noted in 26, intermediate-risk in 7. There was no association between survival from AL and number of prior CLL regimens or karyotype. Expression of CD7 on blasts was associated with shorter survival. Among MDS cases, all IPSS were represented; karyotype was unfavorable in 36, intermediate in 6, and favorable in 12 patients; 10 experienced transformation to AML. Shorter survival from MDS correlated with higher-risk IPSS, poor-risk karyotype, and increased number of prior CLL treatments. Overall, outcomes for patients with CLL subsequently diagnosed with AL or MDS were poor; AL/MDS occurred without prior CLL treatment. Effective therapies for these patients are desperately needed. PMID:26290497

  16. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Continuing high early death rate in acute promyelocytic leukemia: a population-based report from the Swedish Adult Acute Leukemia Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, S; Ravn, A; Carlsson, L; Antunovic, P; Deneberg, S; Möllgård, L; Derolf, A Rangert; Stockelberg, D; Tidefelt, U; Wahlin, A; Wennström, L; Höglund, M; Juliusson, G

    2011-07-01

    Our knowledge about acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients is mainly based on data from clinical trials, whereas population-based information is scarce. We studied APL patients diagnosed between 1997 and 2006 in the population-based Swedish Adult Acute Leukemia Registry. Of a total of 3897 acute leukemia cases, 3205 (82%) had non-APL acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 105 (2.7%) had APL. The incidence of APL was 0.145 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The median age at the time of diagnosis was 54 years; 62% were female and 38% male. Among younger APL patients, female sex predominated (89% of patients <40 years). Of the 105 APL patients, 30 (29%) died within 30 days (that is, early death (ED)) (median 4 days) and 28 (26%) within 14 days from diagnosis. In all, 41% of the EDs were due to hemorrhage; 35% of ED patients never received all-trans-retinoic acid treatment. ED rates increased with age but more clearly with poor performance status. ED was also associated with high white blood cells, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, C-reactive protein and low platelet count. Of non-ED patients, 97% achieved complete remission of which 16% subsequently relapsed. In total, 62% are still alive at 6.4 years median follow-up. We conclude that ED rates remain very high in an unselected APL population.

  18. Targeted Therapy: The New Lease on Life for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, and Beyond%Targeted Therapy: The New Lease on Life for Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia, and Beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Under a research project funded by NSFC, Prof. Chen Saijuan of Shanghai Jiaotong University Ruijin Hospital and Prof. Zhou Guangbiao of Institute of Zoology of CAS, published a review article entitled "Targeted therapy. The new lease on life for acute promyelocytic leukemia, and beyond" on IUBMB Life, 64(8). 671-675, 2012

  19. Radiation-induced hypopituitarism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mirouliaei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy among children for whom radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used for treatment. When hypothalamus-pituitary axis is exposed to radiotherapy, children′s hormone level and quality of life are influenced. The aim of this study is to determine late effects of radiotherapy on hormonal level in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this study 27 children with ALL, who have been referred to Shahid Ramezanzadeh Radiation Oncology Center in Yazd-Iran and received 18-24 Gy whole brain radiation with Cobalt 60 or 9 MV linear accelerator, were assessed. These patient′s basic weight, height and hormonal levels were measured before radiotherapy and also after different periods of time. Results: GHD (growth hormone deficiency after clonidine stimulation test was observed in 44% ( n=12 and that in 50% of them ( n=6, less than 1 year, had been passed from their radiation therapy. None of these patients demonstrated hormone deficiency in other axes. Conclusions: This study showed that even application of a 18-24 Gy radiation dose might influence growth hormone levels; therefore, we recommend reduction of radiotherapy dose in such patients whenever possible.

  20. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Adi, Y. A., E-mail: yudi.adi@math.uad.ac.id [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (Indonesia); Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L. [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Hardianti, M. S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia)

    2016-04-06

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.