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Sample records for acute musculoskeletal chest

  1. Reconstruction of the decision-making process in assessing musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Vach, Werner; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the most important determinants from the patient history and clinical examination in diagnosing musculoskeletal chest pain (MSCP) in patients with acute noncardiac chest pain when supported by a structured protocol and to construct a decision tree...

  2. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence......The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...... arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice....

  3. Chiropractic Treatment vs Self-Management in Patients With Acute Chest Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Patients Without Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner

    2012-01-01

    minimal intervention in patients without acute coronary syndrome but with musculoskeletal chest pain. Results suggest that chiropractic treatment might be useful; but further research in relation to patient selection, standardization of interventions, and identification of potentially active ingredients......OBJECTIVE: The musculoskeletal system is a common but often overlooked cause of chest pain. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the relative effectiveness of 2 treatment approaches for acute musculoskeletal chest pain: (1) chiropractic treatment that included spinal manipulation and (2......) self-management as an example of minimal intervention. METHODS: In a nonblinded, randomized, controlled trial set at an emergency cardiology department and 4 outpatient chiropractic clinics, 115 consecutive patients with acute chest pain and no clear medical diagnosis at initial presentation were...

  4. Non-traumatic thoracic emergencies: acute chest pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Lorenzo; Di Fabio, Francesca; Rita Larici, Anna; Merlino, Biagio; Luigia Storto, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Acute chest pain may represent the initial and/or accompanying symptom in a variety of disease processes that may occur in the cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, or musculoskeletal system. Although clinical history, risk factors, and physical examination are important factors in establishing the etiology of symptoms in patients presenting with acute chest pain, imaging modalities are frequently utilized. Noncardiac causes of acute chest pain are reviewed in this paper with special reference to the most recently published literature and emphasis on acute aortic diseases. Imaging modalities with indication of appropriateness, optimal technique and practical keys for interpretation are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner

    2016-01-01

    suggested that chiropractic care was cost-effective with a probability of 97%, given a threshold value of €30 000 per QALY gained. In both groups, there was an increase in the health-related quality of life, and the mean increases were similar over the 12-month evaluation period. The mean differences......AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute......-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI -4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio...

  6. Use of chest sonography in acute-care radiology☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, C.; Valentino, M.; Rimondi, M.R.; Branchini, M.; Baleni, M. Casadio; Barozzi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute lung disease is a daily challenge for radiologists working in acute-care areas. It is generally based on the results of chest radiography performed under technically unfavorable conditions. Computed tomography (CT) is undoubtedly more accurate in these cases, but it cannot always be performed on critically ill patients who need continuous care. The use of thoracic ultrasonography (US) has recently been proposed for the study of acute lung disease. It can be carried out rapidly at the bedside and does not require any particularly sophisticated equipment. This report analyzes our experience with chest sonography as a supplement to chest radiography in an Emergency Radiology Unit. We performed chest sonography – as an adjunct to chest radiography – on 168 patients with acute chest pathology. Static and dynamic US signs were analyzed in light of radiographic findings and, when possible, CT. The use of chest US improved the authors' ability to provide confident diagnoses of acute disease of the chest and lungs. PMID:23397048

  7. Radiological diagnostic in acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawel, Nadine; Bremerich, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Acute chest pain is one of the main symptoms leading to a consultation of the emergency department. Main task of the initial diagnostic is the confirmation or exclusion of a potentially life threatening cause. Conventional chest X-ray and computed tomography are the most significant techniques. Due to limited availability and long examination times magnetic resonance tomography rather plays a limited role in routine clinical workup. In the following paper we will systematically review the radiological diagnostic of the acute life threatening causes of chest pain. Imaging modalities, technical aspects and image interpretation will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Acute chest pain in a patient with a non-strangulated hiatal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander John Scumpia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute chest pain resulting in spontaneous idiopathic hemomediastinum is a rare, potentially life-threatening occurrence. Acute chest pain is a common chief complaint of patients, accounting for 2.4%–6.0% of adult emergency room visits. The clinician's differential diagnoses for acute chest pain rarely include complications of hiatal hernias. An 83-year-old male presented with acute chest pain and was emergently diagnosed with hemomediastinum secondary to spontaneous gastric mesenteric vessel rupture due to a non-strangulated hiatal hernia after physical exertion.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain: design of a multi-purpose trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner

    2008-01-01

    manipulation of the cervical and thoracic spine, mobilisation, and soft tissue techniques. b) Advice promoting self-management and individual instructions focusing on posture and muscle stretch (advice group). Outcome measures are pain, physical function, overall health, self-perceived treatment effect......BACKGROUND: Acute chest pain is a major health problem all over the western world. Active approaches are directed towards diagnosis and treatment of potentially life threatening conditions, especially acute coronary syndrome/ischemic heart disease. However, according to the literature, chest pain...... may also be due to a variety of extra-cardiac disorders including dysfunction of muscles and joints of the chest wall or the cervical and thoracic part of the spine. The diagnostic approaches and treatment options for this group of patients are scarce and formal clinical studies addressing the effect...

  10. Acute chest pain: a purely clinical problem or a question for radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewe, C.

    2008-01-01

    Acute chest pain represents a very common clinical occurrence and at the same time poses a severe diagnostic dilemma. It can be due to an acute life-threatening event such as acute cardiac infarct, or a relatively harmless condition of pain and illness (e.g. vertebrogenic pain) under the main symptom category of acute chest pain. This often unclear symptomatic, behind which there can always be a life-threatening disease leads to an exaggerated grouping of patients into emergency cases and to an increased number of inpatients for observation. The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with no initial ECG changes typical for ischemia is especially problematic. The availability of modern multidetector computed tomography is becoming increasingly more important for radiologists in the diagnosis and clarification of acute chest pain. In this article the clinical difficulties and radiology options for the diagnosis of patients with acute chest pain will be presented and possible future algorithms for diagnosis will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  11. Analysis of chest image performance in patients with acute chlorine poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liangqing; Zheng Jiangang; Yang Keyu; Wu Honglin; Tang Qingfang; Wu Huiming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore chest image features of patients with acute chlorine poisoning and their clinical values. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by chest image features of 117 patients with acute chlorine poisoning. All the patients were classified according to Chinese management of occupational acute chlorine poisoning diagnosis standard. Results: Sixty-five patients presented with stimulus response, and normal or both lungs had a little more white on their chest images. Thirty-one cases presented with minor poisoning, and without or the texture of both lungs was increased, and grew hazy and coarse.seventeen cases were moderate, and small sample vague shadows or single or multiple limitations lamellar shadow. Four cases were serious,and two lungs had extensive and density homogeneous consolidation shadow. Conclusions: It would make the diagnosis and assessment of chlorine poisoning more easier based on the combination of chest image features, the clear history of acute chlorine poisoning and relevant clinical performance. (authors)

  12. Analysis the findings of chest radiograph and CT scan in 217 acute thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaoying

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate chest radiograph and CT scan in assessing acute thoracic trauma. Methods: Retrospectively analyzed the findings of chest radiograph and CT scan in 217 cases of acute thoracic trauma and positive rate of each modality was compared. Results: The positive rate of rib and clavicle fracture was higher in chest radiograph than these in CT scan. But the positive rate of chest wall hematoma, mediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, damage of lung parenchyma and traumatic pulmonary atelectasis was higher in CT scan than those in chest radiograph. Conclusion: The application of the combined imaging modalities improves assessing of acute thoracic trauma, because the imaging manifestation of the lesion is various. (authors)

  13. CPDX (Chest Pain Diagnostic Program) - A Decision Support System for the Management of Acute Chest Pain (User’s Manual)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-25

    pain: appendicitis; renal colic; perforated duodenal ulcer ; acute cholecystitis; small bowel obstruction; and non-specific abdominal pain, This...psychoneurotic disorder; g) epigastric lesions (cholelithiasis, peptic ulcer , etc.). Musculoskeletal pain and costochrondritis denote muscle, rib, or cartilage...hyperventilation syndrome; f) psychoneurotic disorder; g) epigastric lesions (cholelithiasis, peptic ulcer , etc.). Musculoskeletal pain and the

  14. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu; Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko

    2015-01-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  15. Chest HRCT findings in acute transformation of adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia

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    Okada, Fumito; Sato, Haruka; Omeri, Ahmad Khalid; Ono, Asami; Tokuyama, Kouhei; Ando, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Akira; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yufu, Oita (Japan); Ogata, Masao; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Takano, Kuniko [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Yufu, Oita (Japan)

    2015-06-01

    To assess chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with acute transformation of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). We retrospectively identified 72 consecutive patients at our institution with ATLL between October 2000 and March 2014. The cases included acute type (n = 20), lymphoma type (n = 21), smouldering type (n = 24) and chronic type (n = 7). Sixteen (7 men, 9 women; aged 36-85 years, mean 63.3 years) of 31 patients (24 with smouldering and seven with chronic type; 51.6 %) developed acute transformation of ATLL, and had undergone chest HRCT examinations. Parenchymal abnormalities, enlarged lymph nodes, pericardial effusion, pleural effusion and skin lesions were evaluated on HRCT. Chest HRCT of 15 of the 16 patients showed abnormal findings, including ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n = 8), consolidation (n = 5), interlobular septal thickening (n = 5) and nodules (n = 5). Pleural effusion was found in five patients, lymph node enlargement in 10 patients and multiple skin thickening in two patients. Almost all patients with acute transformation of ATLL had abnormal findings on chest HRCT, which consisted mainly of lymph node enlargement, GGO, interlobular septal thickening, nodules and bilateral pleural effusions. (orig.)

  16. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction | Pandie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction. ... Patient history, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers ... Essential adjunctive therapies include antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitors), ...

  17. Comprehensive cardiovascular ECG-gated MDCT as a standard diagnostic tool in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runza, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: grunza@sirm.org; La Grutta, L.; Alaimo, V. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy); Evola, S. [Department of Cardiology, University of Palermo (Italy); Lo Re, F.; Bartolotta, T.V. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy); Cademartiri, F. [Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Cardiovascular CT Unit, University Hospital, Parma (Italy); Midiri, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    Acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection are diseases associated with acute chest pain and may lead to severe morbidity and mortality. These diseases may not be trivial to diagnose in the settings of emergency room. ECG-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), already established for the assessment of pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection, provides reliable information regarding the triage of patients with acute coronary syndrome in the emergency room. MDCT recently appeared to be logistically feasible and a promising comprehensive method for the evaluation of cardiac and non-cardiac chest pain in emergency department patients. The possibility to scan the entire thorax visualizing the thoracic aorta, the pulmonary arteries, and the coronary arteries could provide a new approach to the triage of acute chest pain. The inherent advantage of MDCT with cardiac state-of-the-art capabilities is the rapid investigation of the main sources of acute chest pain with a high negative predictive value. Recent studies also reports an advantage in terms of costs. With current evidence, the selection of patients with acute chest pain candidates to MDCT should remain restricted to avoid unjustified risk of ionizing radiation.

  18. Comprehensive cardiovascular ECG-gated MDCT as a standard diagnostic tool in patients with acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runza, G.; La Grutta, L.; Alaimo, V.; Evola, S.; Lo Re, F.; Bartolotta, T.V.; Cademartiri, F.; Midiri, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, and aortic dissection are diseases associated with acute chest pain and may lead to severe morbidity and mortality. These diseases may not be trivial to diagnose in the settings of emergency room. ECG-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), already established for the assessment of pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection, provides reliable information regarding the triage of patients with acute coronary syndrome in the emergency room. MDCT recently appeared to be logistically feasible and a promising comprehensive method for the evaluation of cardiac and non-cardiac chest pain in emergency department patients. The possibility to scan the entire thorax visualizing the thoracic aorta, the pulmonary arteries, and the coronary arteries could provide a new approach to the triage of acute chest pain. The inherent advantage of MDCT with cardiac state-of-the-art capabilities is the rapid investigation of the main sources of acute chest pain with a high negative predictive value. Recent studies also reports an advantage in terms of costs. With current evidence, the selection of patients with acute chest pain candidates to MDCT should remain restricted to avoid unjustified risk of ionizing radiation

  19. Approach to chest pain and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandie, S; Hellenberg, D; Hellig, F; Ntsekhe, M

    2016-03-01

    Patient history, physical examination, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers are key components of an effective chest pain assessment. The first priority is excluding serious chest pain syndromes, namely acute coronary syndromes (ACSs), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, cardiac tamponade and tension pneumothorax. On history, the mnemonic SOCRATES (Site Onset Character Radiation Association Time Exacerbating/relieving factor and Severity) helps differentiate cardiac from non-cardiac pain. On examination, evaluation of vital signs, evidence of murmurs, rubs, heart failure, tension pneumothoraces and chest infections are important. A 12-lead ECG should be interpreted within 10 minutes of first medical contact, specifically to identify ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). High-sensitivity troponins improve the rapid rule-out of myocardial infarction (MI) and confirmation of non-ST elevation MI (NSTEMI). ACS (STEMI and NSTEMI/unstable anginapectoris (UAP)) result from acute destabilisation of coronary atheroma with resultant complete (STEMI) or subtotal (NSTEMI/UAP) thrombotic coronary occlusion. The management of STEMI patients includes providing urgent reperfusion: primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PPCI) if available, deliverable within 60 - 120 minutes, and fibrinolysis if PPCI is not available. Essential adjunctive therapies include antiplatelet therapy (aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitors), anticoagulation (heparin or low-molecular-weight heparin) and cardiac monitoring.

  20. Inflammation and Rupture of a Congenital Pericardial Cyst Manifesting Itself as an Acute Chest Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aertker, Robert A; Cheong, Benjamin Y C; Lufschanowski, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    We present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a remote history of supraventricular tachycardia and hyperlipidemia, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute-onset chest pain. An electrocardiogram showed no evidence of acute coronary syndrome. A chest radiograph revealed a prominent right-sided heart border. A suspected congenital pericardial cyst was identified on a computed tomographic chest scan, and stranding was noted around the cyst. The patient was treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and the pain initially abated. Another flare-up was treated similarly. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was then performed after symptoms had resolved, and no evidence of the cyst was seen. The suspected cause of the patient's chest pain was acute inflammation of a congenital pericardial cyst with subsequent rupture and resolution of symptoms.

  1. Acute chest pain: The role of MR imaging and MR angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunold, Peter, E-mail: peter.hunold@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Bischoff, Peter, E-mail: peter.bischoff@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Barkhausen, Jörg, E-mail: joerg.barkhausen@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany); Vogt, Florian M., E-mail: florian.vogt@uk-sh.de [Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    MR imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) have gained a high level of diagnostic accuracy in cardiovascular disease. MRI in cardiac disease has been established as the non-invasive standard of reference in many pathologies. However, in acute chest pain the situation is somewhat special since many of the patients presenting in the emergency department suffer from potentially life-threatening disease including acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome. Those patients need a fast and definitive evaluation under continuous monitoring of vital parameters. Due to those requirements MRI seems to be less suitable compared to X-ray coronary angiography and multislice computed tomography angiography (CTA). However, MRI allows for a comprehensive assessment of all clinically stable patients providing unique information on the cardiovascular system including ischemia, inflammation and function. Furthermore, MRI and MRA are considered the method of choice in patients with contraindications to CTA and for regular follow-up in known aortic disease. This review addresses specific features of MRI and MRA for different cardiovascular conditions presenting with acute chest pain.

  2. Long-Term Clinical Impact of Coronary CT Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Sørgaard, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    . BACKGROUND: The prognostic implications of a coronary CTA-guided treatment strategy have not been compared in a randomized fashion to standard care in patients referred for acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: Patients with acute chest pain but normal electrocardiograms and troponin values were randomized...... to treatment guided by either coronary CTA or standard care (bicycle exercise electrocardiogram or myocardial perfusion imaging). In the coronary CTA-guided group, a functional test was included in cases of nondiagnostic coronary CTA images or coronary stenoses of borderline severity. The primary endpoint...... electrocardiograms and troponin values compared to standard care with a functional test. (Cardiac-CT in the Treatment of Acute Chest Pain [CATCH]; NCT01534000)....

  3. Chest radiographic findings in acute paraquat poisoning

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    Na, Gyeong Gyun; Lee, Mi Sook; Kim, Hee Jun; Sun, In O [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To describe the chest radiographic findings of acute paraquat poisoning. 691 patients visited the emergency department of our hospital between January 2006 and October 2012 for paraquat poisoning. Of these 691, we identified 56 patients whose initial chest radiographs were normal but who developed radiographic abnormalities within one week. We evaluated their radiographic findings and the differences in imaging features based on mortality. The most common finding was diffuse consolidation (29/56, 52%), followed by consolidation with linear and nodular opacities (18/56, 32%), and combined consolidation and pneumomediastinum (7/56, 13%). Pleural effusion was noted in 17 patients (30%). The two survivors (4%) showed peripheral consolidations, while the 54 patients (96%) who died demonstrated bilateral (42/54, 78%) or unilateral (12/54, 22%) diffuse consolidations. Rapidly progressing diffuse pulmonary consolidation was observed within one week on follow-up radiographs after paraquat ingestion in the deceased, but the survivors demonstrated peripheral consolidation.

  4. Acute chest pain after bench press exercise in a healthy young adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smereck, Janet A; Papafilippaki, Argyro; Sudarshan, Sawali

    2016-01-01

    Bench press exercise, which involves repetitive lifting of weights to full arm extension while lying supine on a narrow bench, has been associated with complications ranging in acuity from simple pectoral muscle strain, to aortic and coronary artery dissection. A 39-year-old man, physically fit and previously asymptomatic, presented with acute chest pain following bench press exercise. Diagnostic evaluation led to the discovery of critical multivessel coronary occlusive disease, and subsequently, highly elevated levels of lipoprotein (a). Judicious use of ancillary testing may identify the presence of "high-risk" conditions in a seemingly "low-risk" patient. Emergency department evaluation of the young adult with acute chest pain must take into consideration an extended spectrum of potential etiologies, so as to best guide appropriate management.

  5. Painful Vaso-occlusive Crisis as a  Prodromal Phase of Acute Chest Syndrome. Is Only One Chest X-ray Enough? A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Neocleous

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The predominant pathophysiological feature of homozygous sickle cell anemia (SCA is the vaso-occlusion. Vaso-occlusion can be associated with painful crises, which are the primary reason for those patients to seek medical care. Vaso-occlusion is responsible for the acute chest syndrome (ACS with large morbidity and mortality or more rarely (and especially in adults for priapism and acute neurological events (strokes. A 10-year-old boy with homozygous SCA was admitted to the Pediatric Emergencies with painful vaso-occlusive crisis and fever. Initially he had normal chest X-ray but, after 24-hour-hospitalization, he developed  ACS with new chest X-ray findings. He was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, blood transfusions and bronchodilators and after a  six-day treatment, he was significantly improved. The patient was discharged 13 days later with no other therapy at home. The possibility of  ACS development should be still considered, even when a  known patient with SCA presents a  painful vaso-occlusive crisis with an initial normal chest X-ray. Therefore, repeated clinical examination is required and possible changes in  the clinical status could indicate the necessity of a  new radiographic examination. In  this way, early  ACS could be recognized and the catastrophic consequences due to this syndrome could be avoided.

  6. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland); Flohr, Thomas G. [Computed Tomography CTE PA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1{+-}16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1{+-}6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56{+-}9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291{+-}65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334{+-}93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285{+-}66 HU and 268{+-}67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  7. Dual-source computed tomography in patients with acute chest pain: feasibility and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertler, Thomas; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Seifert, Burkhardt; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and image quality of dual-source computed tomography angiography (DSCTA) in patients with acute chest pain for the assessment of the lung, thoracic aorta, and for pulmonary and coronary arteries. Sixty consecutive patients (32 female, 28 male, mean age 58.1±16.3 years) with acute chest pain underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated DSCTA without prior beta-blocker administration. Vessel attenuation of different thoracic vascular territories was measured, and image quality was semi-quantitatively analyzed by two independent readers. Image quality of the thoracic aorta was diagnostic in all 60 patients, image quality of pulmonary arteries was diagnostic in 59, and image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 58 patients. Pairwise intraindividual comparisons of attenuation values were small and ranged between 1±6 HU comparing right and left coronary artery and 56±9 HU comparing the pulmonary trunk and left ventricle. Mean attenuation was 291±65 HU in the ascending aorta, 334±93 HU in the pulmonary trunk, and 285±66 HU and 268±67 HU in the right and left coronary artery, respectively. DSCTA is feasible and provides diagnostic image quality of the thoracic aorta, pulmonary and coronary arteries in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.)

  8. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  9. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, C.L.F.; Griffith, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented

  10. Prognostic factors for short-term improvement in acute and persistent musculoskeletal pain consulters in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Jennifer E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the costs associated with the management of musculoskeletal pain in primary care, predicting the course of these conditions remains a research priority. Much of the research into prognostic indicators however considers musculoskeletal conditions in terms of single pain sites whereas in reality, many patients present with pain in more than one site. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors for early improvement in primary care consulters with acute and persistent musculoskeletal conditions across a range of pain sites. Methods Consecutive patients with a new episode of musculoskeletal pain completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, and then again at the 4/5th treatment visit, and if they were still consulting, at the 10th visit. The outcome was defined as patient self-report improvement sufficient to make a meaningful difference. Independent predictors of outcome were identified using multivariate regression analyses. Results Acute (th visit. Several variables at baseline were associated with improvement at the 4/5th visit, but the predictive models were weak and unable to discriminate between patients who were improved and those who were not. In contrast, it was possible to elicit a predictive model for improvement later on at the 10th visit, but only in patients with persistent pain. Being employed, reporting a decline in work fear-avoidance behaviour at the 4/5th visit, and being better by the 4/5th visit, were all independently associated with improvement. This model accounted for 34.3% (p Conclusions We were unable to identify baseline characteristics that predicted early outcome in musculoskeletal pain patients. However, early self-reported improvement and decline in work fear-avoidance behaviour as predictors of later improvement highlighted the importance of speedy recovery in persistent musculoskeletal pain consulters. Our findings reinforce the elusive nature of baseline predictors, and

  11. Anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papavramidis Theodossis S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The granulomatous inflammation of tuberculosis usually involves the lungs and the hilar lymph nodes. Musculoskeletal tuberculosis (TB occurs in 1–3% of patients with TB, while TB of the chest wall constitutes 1% to 5% of all cases of musculoskeletal TB. Furthermore, nowadays it is rarer to find extrapulmonary TB in immunocompetent rather that non-immunocompetent patients. The present case reports a fifty-six-year-old immunocompetent man with an anterior chest wall tuberculous abscess. The rarity of the present case relates both to the localization of the tuberculous abscess, and to the fact that the patient was immunocompetent. The diagnosis of musculoskeletal tuberculous infection remains a challenge for clinicians and requires a high index of suspicion. The combination of indolent onset of symptoms, positive tuberculin skin test, and compatible radiographic findings, strongly suggests the diagnosis. TB, however, must be confirmed by positive culture or histologic proof. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are important to prevent serious bone and joint destruction.

  12. Examination of musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Mads Hostrup; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Vach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    using a standardized examination protocol, (2) to determine inter-observer reliability of single components of the protocol, and (3) to determine the effect of observer experience. Eighty patients were recruited from an emergency cardiology department. Patients were eligible if an obvious cardiac or non......-cardiac diagnosis could not be established at the cardiology department. Four observers (two chiropractors and two chiropractic students) performed general health and manual examination of the spine and chest wall. Percentage agreement, Cohen's Kappa and ICC were calculated for observer pairs (chiropractors.......01 to 0.59. Provided adequate training of observers, the examination protocol can be used in carefully selected patients in clinical settings and should be included in pre- and post-graduate clinical training....

  13. Interpretation of chest radiographs in both cancer and other critical care patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a clinical, pathophysiological and radiographic pattern that has signs of pulmonary edema occur without elevated pulmonary venous pressures. Clinical presentation and progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome are followed by frequently ordered portable chest X-ray in critically ill patients. We evaluated chest radiographs of ten cancer and other six critical care pediatric patients. The parenchymal imaging of lung in patients with cancer was reported the same as that of other critically ill children despite underlying pathophysiological variations in our investigation. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 270-273

  14. Is the case-mix of patients who self-present to ED similar to general practice and other acute-care facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tim; McDonald, Keith

    2014-12-01

    To benchmark walk-in presentations to emergency departments (ED) with those presenting to other local acute healthcare facilities. A large teaching hospital with an annual ED census of 140, 000 adult patients and surrounding associated acute healthcare providers. A random sample of 384 patients who self-presented to the ED was obtained. Benchmarking data were drawn from two general practices; the Tower Hamlets Community Services walk-in centre (co-located on-site with the ED) and the GP-run out-of-hours service. The case-mix presenting to the ED was characterised by a higher proportion of injuries and chest pain, but fewer simple infections and non-traumatic musculoskeletal conditions as compared to other acute care facilities in our region. Patients with injuries and possible cardiac chest pain were more likely to attend the ED, and those with infection or musculoskeletal problems less likely, as compared with other acute healthcare facilities. The population presenting to the ED is distinct from that presenting to general practice, out-of-hours clinics, or walk-in centres. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E.-L.H.; Strouse, P.J.; Chhem, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    With the development of high-resolution ultrasound transducers, the role of ultrasonography (US) in evaluating the musculoskeletal system has increased. It is now possible to obtain detailed images of bones and soft-tissue structures that were previously unattainable. The advantages of US, when compared with other imaging modalities, are many. It is less expensive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). It does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation, so US examinations can be repeated without harm to the patient. Furthermore, US is performed in real-time, making it possible to assess the musculoskeletal system dynamically, in multiple planes and with contralateral comparison. In experienced hands, US is a quick, noninvasive and cost-effective way to assess the musculoskeletal system in children. It is used to evaluate soft-tissue masses, joint swelling, infections, lesions involving the chest and abdominal walls, bones, muscles and clubfoot deformity and to locate any foreign bodies. (author)

  16. Application of triple rule-out with 64-slice spiral CT in the diagnosis of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pengyu; Li Kuncheng; Du Xiangyin; Cao Lizhen; Liu Jiabin; Yang Yanhuui; Liang Zhigang; Zhu Xiaolian; Liu Jian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of triple rule-out with 64-slice spiral CT in the combined examination of pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta and coronary artery for patients with acute chest pain. Methods: Seventy patients who presented with acute chest pain were included in the study. All of the patients underwent retrospective ECG-gated 64-slice computed tomography triple rule-out examination to evaluate the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. Multi-planar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), curved-planar reconstruction (CPR) and volume rendering (VR) were used to display pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and coronary arteries. We evaluated the image quality of coronary artery and the enhancement of the pulmonary artery and thoracic aorta to estimate if the examination can fulfill the clinical demand for the differential diagnosis of acute chest pain. Results: The mean scan time was (8.5±1.0) s, and the dose of contrast medium injected was 100 ml. There were 95.7% (67/70) of patients whose CT values detected in the pulmonary artery and thoracic aorta after enhancement Were ≥200 HU. The image quality of 85.8% (720/839) coronary segments was classified as excellent, 8.6% (72/839) as good, and 5.6% (47/839) as poor. There were 20 eases with coronary stenoses ≥50%, 2 cases with pulmonary embolism, and 2 cases with aortic dissection. Conclusion: The triple rule-out examination with 64-slice spiral CT could depict pulmonary artery, thoracic aorta, and coronary artery in 8 s with good image quality. It has great potential in the etiological diagnosis for the patients with acute chest pain. (authors)

  17. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: rochitte@cardiol.br [Hospital do Coração - HCor, Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração - InCor - HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies.

  18. Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in the Assessment of Acute Chest Pain in the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazeres, Carlos Eduardo Elias dos; Cury, Roberto Caldeira; Carneiro, Adriano Camargo de Castro; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The coronary computed tomography angiography has recently emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, providing diagnostic and prognostic data that correlate directly with the data provided by invasive coronary angiography. The association of recent technological developments has allowed improved temporal resolution and better spatial coverage of the cardiac volume with significant reduction in radiation dose, and with the crucial need for more effective protocols of risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, recent evaluation of the computed tomography coronary angiography has been performed in the setting of acute chest pain, as about two thirds of invasive coronary angiographies show no significantly obstructive coronary artery disease. In daily practice, without the use of more efficient technologies, such as coronary angiography by computed tomography, safe and efficient stratification of patients with acute chest pain remains a challenge to the medical team in the emergency room. Recently, several studies, including three randomized trials, showed favorable results with the use of this technology in the emergency department for patients with low to intermediate likelihood of coronary artery disease. In this review, we show data resulting from coronary angiography by computed tomography in risk stratification of patients with chest pain in the emergency room, its diagnostic value, prognosis and cost-effectiveness and a critical analysis of recently published multicenter studies

  19. People with dyslexia and heart, chest, skin, digestive, musculoskeletal, vision, learning, speech and mental disorders were more dissatisfied with neighbourhoods: Scottish Household Survey, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2016-12-01

    Rarely do we know the perception toward neighbourhoods in people specifically with health conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to understand the perception toward neighbourhoods among adults with a series of the existing health conditions in a country-wide and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from and analysed in Scottish Household Survey, 2007-2008. Information on demographics, self-reported health conditions and perception toward neighbourhoods and the surrounding facilities was obtained by household interview. Analysis including chi-square test, t test and logistic regression modelling were performed. Of 19,150 Scottish adults (aged 16-80) included in the study cohort, 1079 (7.7 %) people were dissatisfied with their living areas; particularly for those who experienced harassment (15.4 %), did not recycle or with dyslexia, chest, digestive, mental and musculoskeletal problems. Twenty to forty per cent reported common neighbourhood problems including noise, rubbish, disputes, graffiti, harassment and drug misuse. People with heart or digestive problems were more dissatisfied with the existing parks and open space. People with arthritis, chest or hearing problems were more dissatisfied with the waste management condition. People with dyslexia were more dissatisfied with the existing public transportation. People with heart problems were more dissatisfied with the current street cleaning condition. People with hearing, vision, speech, learning problems or dyslexia were also more dissatisfied with sports and recreational facilities. People with heart, chest, skin, digestive, musculoskeletal, vision, learning, speech and mental disorders and dyslexia were more dissatisfied with their current neighbourhood environments. Upgrading neighbourhood planning to tackle social environment injustice and put pleasant life experience as priorty would be suggested. Graphical abstract interrelations of individual health and neighbourhood

  20. Chest radiograph in the acute traumatic rupture of the aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinterits, F.; Grabenwoeger, F.; Dock, W.; Bardach, G.

    1987-01-01

    We tried to find out the validity of 16 wellknown signs indicating an acute traumatic aortic rupture on plain chest radiographs of 22 patients. Angiographically 11 of all patients had a tear at the aortic isthmus. It turned out that 7 of the 16 signs (widened mediastinum, loss of the aortic knob contour, opacification in the aortopulmonary window, bulging of the vascular pedicle predominantly to the left, left apical cap, depression of the left main stem bronchus and displacement of the right paraspinous interface) are of great diagnostic value. (orig.) [de

  1. Common acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hip/lower back was the most prevalent anatomical site of chronic musculoskeletal injury. (p<0.001). The intrinsic ..... Musculoskeletal disorders among nursing personnel in Korea. Int J ... Marieb E. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 7th ed.

  2. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Jorien; Berben, Sivera A.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2016-01-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre–post intervention study was performed as

  3. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, J.G.; Berben, S.A.A.; IJzerman, M.J.; Gaakeer, M.I.; Eenennaam, F.L. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Doggen, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre-post intervention study was performed as

  4. Asthma is a risk factor for acute chest syndrome and cerebral vascular accidents in children with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Paul J

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma and sickle cell disease are common conditions that both may result in pulmonary complications. We hypothesized that children with sickle cell disease with concomitant asthma have an increased incidence of vaso-occlusive crises that are complicated by episodes of acute chest syndrome. Methods A 5-year retrospective chart analysis was performed investigating 48 children ages 3–18 years with asthma and sickle cell disease and 48 children with sickle cell disease alone. Children were matched for age, gender, and type of sickle cell defect. Hospital admissions were recorded for acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accident, vaso-occlusive pain crises, and blood transfusions (total, exchange and chronic. Mann-Whitney test and Chi square analysis were used to assess differences between the groups. Results Children with sickle cell disease and asthma had significantly more episodes of acute chest syndrome (p = 0.03 and cerebral vascular accidents (p = 0.05 compared to children with sickle cell disease without asthma. As expected, these children received more total blood transfusions (p = 0.01 and chronic transfusions (p = 0.04. Admissions for vasoocclusive pain crises and exchange transfusions were not statistically different between cases and controls. SS disease is more severe than SC disease. Conclusions Children with concomitant asthma and sickle cell disease have increased episodes of acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accidents and the need for blood transfusions. Whether aggressive asthma therapy can reduce these complications in this subset of children is unknown and requires further studies.

  5. Possibilities for exposure reduction in computed tomography examination of acute chest pain; Moeglichkeiten der Dosisreduktion bei CT-Untersuchungen des akuten Thoraxschmerzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H.C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Electrocardiogram-gated (ECG) computed tomography (CT) investigations can be accompanied by high amounts of radiation exposure. This is particularly true for the investigation of patients with unclear and acute chest pain. The common approach in patients with acute chest pain is standard spiral CT of the chest. The chest pain or triple-rule-out CT protocol is a relatively new ECG-gated protocol of the entire chest. This article reviews and discusses different techniques for the CT investigation of patients with acute chest pain. By applying the appropriate scan technique, the radiation exposure for an ECG-gated protocol must not necessarily be higher than a standard chest CT scan Aortic pathologies are far better depicted by ECG-gated scan protocols and depending on the heart rate coronary artery disease can also be detected at the same time. The use of ECG-triggered scans will not support the diagnostics of the pulmonary arteries. However, in unspecific chest pain an ECG-triggered scan protocol can provide information on the differential diagnosis. (orig.) [German] EKG-getriggerte CT-Untersuchungen koennen mit einer relativ hohen Strahlenexposition einhergehen. Dies gilt im besonderen Masse fuer die Untersuchung des gesamten Thorax bei Patienten mit unklarem akutem Thoraxschmerz. Bisher wurden Untersuchungen bei Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz in Spiraltechnik ohne EKG-Triggerung durchgefuehrt. Das ''Chest-pain-'' oder ''Triple-rule-out''-Protokoll ist ein neues EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll des gesamten Thorax. Im vorliegenden Artikel werden verschiedene Techniken zur CT-Untersuchung von Patienten mit akutem Thoraxschmerz vorgestellt und besprochen. Mit der richtigen Untersuchungstechnik muss die Strahlenexposition fuer ein EKG-getriggertes Untersuchungsprotokoll nicht hoeher sein als eine Standarduntersuchung ohne EKG. Mit einem EKG-getriggerten Untersuchungsprotokoll laesst sich die Aorta in Hinblick auf

  6. Acute chest pain: a purely clinical problem or a question for radiology; Der akute Thoraxschmerz, ein rein klinisches Problem oder radiologische Fragestellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, C. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinische Abteilung fuer Kardiovaskulaere und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2008-05-15

    Acute chest pain represents a very common clinical occurrence and at the same time poses a severe diagnostic dilemma. It can be due to an acute life-threatening event such as acute cardiac infarct, or a relatively harmless condition of pain and illness (e.g. vertebrogenic pain) under the main symptom category of acute chest pain. This often unclear symptomatic, behind which there can always be a life-threatening disease leads to an exaggerated grouping of patients into emergency cases and to an increased number of inpatients for observation. The diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome with no initial ECG changes typical for ischemia is especially problematic. The availability of modern multidetector computed tomography is becoming increasingly more important for radiologists in the diagnosis and clarification of acute chest pain. In this article the clinical difficulties and radiology options for the diagnosis of patients with acute chest pain will be presented and possible future algorithms for diagnosis will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Der akute Thoraxschmerz repraesentiert ein sehr haeufiges klinisches Beschwerdebild und gleichzeitig ein grosses diagnostisches Dilemma, koennen sich doch sowohl lebensbedrohliche akute Ereignisse (wie der akute Herzinfarkt) als auch mehr oder weniger harmlose Schmerzzustaende und Erkrankungen (wie vertebrogene Schmerzen) unter dem Leitsymptom 'akuter Thoraxschmerz' praesentieren. Diese oft nicht eindeutige Symptomatik, hinter der immer auch ein lebensbedrohliches Krankheitsbild stecken kann, fuehrt zu einer Uebertriagierung der Patienten in Notaufnahmen und zu einer grossen Anzahl an stationaeren 'Absicherungsaufnahmen'. Besonders die Diagnose eines akuten Koronarsyndroms (AKS) bei initial fehlenden ischaemietypischen EKG-Veraenderungen stellt eine spezielle Problematik dar. Durch die Verfuegbarkeit moderner ultraschneller Multidetektorcomputertomographen (MDCT) spielt der Radiologe in der Diagnostik und

  7. Baggage handler seniority and musculoskeletal symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bern, Stine Hvid; Brauer, Charlotte; Møller, Karina Lauenborg

    2013-01-01

    Heavy lifting is associated with musculoskeletal disorders but it is unclear whether it is related to acute reversible effects or to chronic effects from cumulated exposure. The aim of this study was to examine whether musculoskeletal symptoms in Danish airport baggage handlers were associated wi...... with their seniority as baggage handler, indicating chronic effects from cumulated workload....

  8. Acute ECG changes and chest pain induced by neck motion in patients with cervical hernia--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, N; Bilge, M; Eryonucu, B; Cirak, B

    2000-10-01

    We report two cases of acute cervical angina and ECG changes induced by anteflexion of the head. Cervical angina is defined as chest pain that resembles true cardiac angina but originates from cervical discopathy with nerve root compression. In these patients, Prinzmetal's angina, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, left ventricular aneurysm, and cardiomyopathy were excluded. After all, the patient's chest pain was reproduced by anteflexion of head, at this time, their ECGs showed nonspecific ST-T changes in the inferior and anterior leads different from the basal ECG. ECG changes returned to normal when the patient's neck moved to the neutral position. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of cervical angina associated with acute ECG changes by neck motion.

  9. High-sensitivity troponin assays for the early rule-out or diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in people with acute chest pain: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); T. van Asselt (Thea); B.L.T. Ramaekers (Bram); P. Whiting (Penny); P. Thokala (Praveen); M.A. Joore (Manuela); N. Armstrong (Nigel); J. Ross (Janine); J.L. Severens (Hans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground The primary indication for this assessment is the early rule-out of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in people presenting with acute chest pain and suspected, but not confirmed, non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Cardiac troponins (cTns) I and T are used

  10. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part II: Non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    This section of a two-part series on musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS reviews the non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions. In the first part, the infectious conditions were reviewed. The non-infectious conditions include polymyositis, drug-induced myopathy, myositis ossificans, adhesive capsulitis, avascular necrosis, bone marrow abnormalities, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Inflammatory and reactive arthropathies are more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals, and a separate section is dedicated to these conditions, including Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, HIV-associated arthritis, painful articular syndrome, and acute symmetric polyarthritis. Lastly, we include a discussion of HIV-related neoplastic processes that affect the musculoskeletal system, namely Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  11. Pain Management in the Emergency Chain: The Use and Effectiveness of Pain Management in Patients With Acute Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Jorien; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Berben, Sivera A.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint in emergency care, its management is often neglected, placing patients at risk for insufficient pain relief. Our aim is to investigate how often pain management is provided in the prehospital phase and emergency department (ED) and

  12. Acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease: radiographic and clinical analysis of 70 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.; Buonomo, C.

    1997-01-01

    Background. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a pulmonary illness with fever, chest pain, leukocytosis and new pulmonary opacity in a patient with sickle cell disease. It is a common reason for hospitalization in sickle cell patients, and a significant cause of mortality. The etiology of ACS is unclear. Lung or bone infarction and infection, among other possible causes, have been proposed. Objective. We reviewed the chest radiographs and medical records of 41 patients with 70 episodes of ACS and correlated the clinical and radiographic courses in an attempt to better characterize and understand the syndrome. Results. In 87 % of episodes, no identifiable etiology of ACS was found. This group of patients had a median age of 14 years and showed dramatic clinical and radiographic improvement within 24 h of therapy. In the remainder of episodes (13 %), an identifiable etiology was found, usually bacterial pneumonia. These patients were younger than the group without an identifiable etiology (median age 2 years) and had a prolonged radiographic course of illness. Conclusion. The chest radiographs of children with ACS without an identifiable etiology have an extremely typical appearance and evolution. Only in cases which do not have this typical pattern should infection be suspected as the underlying cause. (orig.). With 3 figs

  13. Comparison of traditional cardiovascular risk models and coronary atherosclerotic plaque as detected by computed tomography for prediction of acute coronary syndrome in patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencik, Maros; Schlett, Christopher L; Bamberg, Fabian; Truong, Quynh A; Nichols, John H; Pena, Antonio J; Shapiro, Michael D; Rogers, Ian S; Seneviratne, Sujith; Parry, Blair Alden; Cury, Ricardo C; Brady, Thomas J; Brown, David F; Nagurney, John T; Hoffmann, Udo

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to determine the association of four clinical risk scores and coronary plaque burden as detected by computed tomography (CT) with the outcome of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with acute chest pain. The hypothesis was that the combination of risk scores and plaque burden improved the discriminatory capacity for the diagnosis of ACS. The study was a subanalysis of the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction Using Computer-Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) trial-a prospective observational cohort study. The authors enrolled patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with a chief complaint of acute chest pain, inconclusive initial evaluation (negative biomarkers, nondiagnostic electrocardiogram [ECG]), and no history of coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients underwent contrast-enhanced 64-multidetector-row cardiac CT and received standard clinical care (serial ECG, cardiac biomarkers, and subsequent diagnostic testing, such as exercise treadmill testing, nuclear stress perfusion imaging, and/or invasive coronary angiography), as deemed clinically appropriate. The clinical providers were blinded to CT results. The chest pain score was calculated and the results were dichotomized to ≥10 (high-risk) and modeling was performed to examine the association of risk scores and coronary plaque burden to the outcome of ACS. Unadjusted models were individually fitted for the coronary plaque burden and for Goldman, Sanchis, TIMI, and chest pain scores. In adjusted analyses, the authors tested whether the association between risk scores and ACS persisted after controlling for the coronary plaque burden. The prognostic discriminatory capacity of the risk scores and plaque burden for ACS was assessed using c-statistics. The differences in area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and c-statistics were tested by performing the -2 log likelihood ratio test of nested models. A p value capacity for the diagnosis of ACS. Plaque burden was

  14. Chest CT scans are frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallipuram, Janaki; Dhalla, Sidika; Bell, Chaim M; Dresser, Linda; Han, Heekyung; Husain, Shahid; Minden, Mark D; Paul, Narinder S; So, Miranda; Steinberg, Marilyn; Vallipuram, Mayuran; Wong, Gary; Morris, Andrew M

    2017-04-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) findings of nodules, ground glass opacities, and consolidations are often interpreted as representing invasive fungal infection in individuals with febrile neutropenia. We assessed whether these CT findings were present in asymptomatic individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at low risk of invasive fungal disease. A retrospective study of consecutive asymptomatic adult patients with newly diagnosed AML over a 2-year period was performed at a tertiary care oncology center. Radiology reports of baseline chest CTs were reviewed. Of 145 CT scans, the majority (88%) had pulmonary abnormalities. Many (70%) had one or both of unspecified opacities (52%) and nodules (49%). Ground glass opacities (18%) and consolidations (12%) occurred less frequently. Radiologists suggested pneumonia as a possible diagnosis in 32% (n = 47) of scans. Chest CT may result in over-diagnosis of invasive fungal disease in individuals with febrile neutropenia if interpreted without correlation to the patients' clinical status.

  15. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part II: Non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

    2004-06-01

    This section of a two-part series on musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS reviews the non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions. In the first part, the infectious conditions were reviewed. The non-infectious conditions include polymyositis, drug-induced myopathy, myositis ossificans, adhesive capsulitis, avascular necrosis, bone marrow abnormalities, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Inflammatory and reactive arthropathies are more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals, and a separate section is dedicated to these conditions, including Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, HIV-associated arthritis, painful articular syndrome, and acute symmetric polyarthritis. Lastly, we include a discussion of HIV-related neoplastic processes that affect the musculoskeletal system, namely Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  16. Frequency of chest pain in primary care, diagnostic tests performed and final diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Beatrijs Bn; Willemsen, Robert Ta; Cleef, Lotte E; Boogaerts, Tom; Buntinx, Frank; Glatz, Jan Fc; Dinant, Geert Jan

    2017-11-01

    Observational study of patients with chest pain in primary care: determination of incidence, referral rate, diagnostic tests and (agreement between) working and final diagnoses. 118 general practitioners (GPs) in the Netherlands and Belgium recorded all patient contacts during  2weeks. Furthermore, patients presenting with chest pain were registered extensively. A follow-up form was filled in after 30 days. 22 294 patient contacts were registered. In 281 (1.26%), chest pain was a reason for consulting the GP (mean age for men 54.4/women 53 years). In this cohort of 281 patients, in 38.1% of patients, acute coronary syndrome (ACS) was suspected at least temporarily during consultation, 40.2% of patients were referred to secondary care and 512 diagnostic tests were performed by GPs and consulted specialists. Musculoskeletal pain was the most frequent working (26.1%) and final diagnoses (33.1%). Potentially life-threatening diseases as final diagnosis (such as myocardial infarction) accounted for 8.4% of all chest pain cases. In 23.1% of cases, a major difference between working and final diagnoses was found, in 0.7% a severe disease was initially missed by the GP. Chest pain was present in 281 patients (1.26% of all consultations). Final diagnoses were mostly non-life-threatening. Nevertheless, in 8.4% of patients with chest pain, life-threatening underlying causes were identified. This seems reflected in the magnitude and wide variety of diagnostic tests performed in these patients by GPs and specialists, in the (safe) overestimation of life-threatening diseases by GPs at initial assessment and in the high referral rate we found. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

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    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.henzler@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Rothhaar, Baerbel, E-mail: baerbel.rothhaar@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Metzger, Franz, E-mail: franz.metzger@umm.de [Business Development – Medical Controlling, University Medical Center, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin, E-mail: martin.borggrefe@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  18. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzler, Thomas; Gruettner, Joachim; Meyer, Mathias; Rothhaar, Baerbel; Apfaltrer, Paul; Metzger, Franz; Borggrefe, Martin; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the economic impact of integrating coronary CT angiography (cCTA) or whole chest “triple-rule-out” CTA (TRO-CTA) in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain. Materials and methods: 100 consecutive emergency department patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for ACS underwent cCTA or TRO-CTA (cCTA group). Diagnostic performance, rate and length of hospitalization, hospital costs, hospital reimbursement and hospital profit were analyzed. All findings were compared to those of 100 different patients with acute chest pain that were evaluated with a standard of care (SOC) diagnostic algorithm (SOC group) that did not include cCTA. Diagnostic performance (“safety”) of both algorithms was defined as the absence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) over a 90-day follow-up period. Results: In the cCTA group 60/100 patients were safely discharged at the same day. 19/100 patients were hospitalized due to significant coronary stenosis on cCTA, which was confirmed by invasive coronary catheterization (ICC) in 17/19 patients. Relevant non-coronary disease that led to hospitalization were found in 21 patients of the cCTA group. In the SOC group all patients were hospitalized. 87 of these hospitalized patients underwent ICC for exclusion of coronary artery stenosis. A significant coronary artery stenosis was found in only 25 of these patients. Within the cCTA group no patient suffered from MACE over the 90-day follow-up period. In the SOC group 2 patients were rehospitalized during the 90-day follow-up period due to recurrent chest pain and 1 patient because of a pseudoaneurym of the left femoral artery after ICC. The median hospital costs per patient were significantly lower in the cCTA group than in the SOC group (428.9€ vs. 1575.0€, p < 0.001). The median reimbursement of the cCTA group was less compared to the SOC group (589.8€ vs. 2412.1€, p < 0.001) and patients in the cCTA group gained less profit than

  19. A pilot study of chest tube versus pigtail catheter drainage of acute hemothorax in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Rachel M; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Neff, Lucas P; Grayson, J Kevin; Hight, Rachel A; Galante, Joseph M; Shatz, David V

    2015-12-01

    Evacuation of traumatic hemothorax (HTx) is typically accomplished with large-bore (28-40 Fr) chest tubes, often resulting in patient discomfort. Management of HTx with smaller (14 Fr) pigtail catheters has not been widely adopted because of concerns about tube occlusion and blood evacuation rates. We compared pigtail catheters with chest tubes for the drainage of acute HTx in a swine model. Six Yorkshire cross-bred swine (44-54 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and mechanically ventilated. A 32 Fr chest tube was placed in one randomly assigned hemithorax; a 14 Fr pigtail catheter was placed in the other. Each was connected to a chest drainage system at -20 cm H2O suction and clamped. Over 15 minutes, 1,500 mL of arterial blood was withdrawn via femoral artery catheters. Seven hundred fifty milliliters of the withdrawn blood was instilled into each pleural space, and fluid resuscitation with colloid was initiated. The chest drains were then unclamped. Output from each drain was measured every minute for 5 minutes and then every 5 minutes for 40 minutes. The swine were euthanized, and thoracotomies were performed to quantify the volume of blood remaining in each pleural space and to examine the position of each tube. Blood drainage was more rapid from the chest tube during the first 3 minutes compared with the pigtail catheter (348 ± 109 mL/min vs. 176 ± 53 mL/min), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.19). Thereafter, the rates of drainage between the two tubes were not substantially different. The chest tube drained a higher total percentage of the blood from the chest (87.3% vs. 70.3%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.21). We found no statistically significant difference in the volume of blood drained by a 14 Fr pigtail catheter compared with a 32 Fr chest tube.

  20. A Multivariate Model for Prediction of Obstructive Coronary Disease in Patients with Acute Chest Pain: Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cláudio Lemos Correia

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Currently, there is no validated multivariate model to predict probability of obstructive coronary disease in patients with acute chest pain. Objective: To develop and validate a multivariate model to predict coronary artery disease (CAD based on variables assessed at admission to the coronary care unit (CCU due to acute chest pain. Methods: A total of 470 patients were studied, 370 utilized as the derivation sample and the subsequent 100 patients as the validation sample. As the reference standard, angiography was required to rule in CAD (stenosis ≥ 70%, while either angiography or a negative noninvasive test could be used to rule it out. As predictors, 13 baseline variables related to medical history, 14 characteristics of chest discomfort, and eight variables from physical examination or laboratory tests were tested. Results: The prevalence of CAD was 48%. By logistic regression, six variables remained independent predictors of CAD: age, male gender, relief with nitrate, signs of heart failure, positive electrocardiogram, and troponin. The area under the curve (AUC of this final model was 0.80 (95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 0.75 - 0.84 in the derivation sample and 0.86 (95%CI = 0.79 - 0.93 in the validation sample. Hosmer-Lemeshow's test indicated good calibration in both samples (p = 0.98 and p = 0.23, respectively. Compared with a basic model containing electrocardiogram and troponin, the full model provided an AUC increment of 0.07 in both derivation (p = 0.0002 and validation (p = 0.039 samples. Integrated discrimination improvement was 0.09 in both derivation (p < 0.001 and validation (p < 0.0015 samples. Conclusion: A multivariate model was derived and validated as an accurate tool for estimating the pretest probability of CAD in patients with acute chest pain.

  1. The role of CT in assessing chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capsa, R.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Objective: Thoracic pain represents the common feature of a wide range of diseases of different causes. Usually, chest pain requires a fast workup, in order to eliminate potentially hazardous underlying conditions. The objective of the paper consists of presenting the role of computerized tomography (CT) in assessing the different causes and conditions related to chest pain. Materials and methods: The educational presentation relies on current literature data and mostly on images obtained from patients admitted in the various clinics and departments of our hospital, suffering from chest pain as admittance condition or as a symptom appeared during the hospital stay. Results: There are various radiological and imaging options for assessing a patient with chest pain, with reference to the underlying condition, type of pain onset (acute or chronic), specific indications and contraindications. From all these, CT is considered one of the most useful imaging options, in terms of diagnosis accuracy, fast workup, cost and availability. This paper focuses on the role of CT, presenting the most important diseases and conditions related to potential occurrence of chest pain and the most specific CT signs and findings usually reported in this setting. Furthermore, the presentation separates acute and chronic conditions, presenting the actual imaging protocols employed in this circumstances. Finally, there are considerations regarding CT rule-out protocols used in patients with acute chest pain in emergency conditions. Conclusions: Fast and accurate diagnosis is crucial for patient outcome, often life-saving, but currently there is no single algorithm in the imaging assessment of chest pain, while choosing the best imaging option relies mainly on history, clinical and laboratory data. CT is one of the most important imaging options available in patients with both acute and chronic chest pain. CT rule-out techniques have still to establish their clear role in a

  2. Feasibility of an automatic computer-assisted algorithm for the detection of significant coronary artery disease in patients presenting with acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ki-Woon; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Shim, Hackjoon; Kim, Young-Jin; Choi, Byoung-Wook; Yang, Woo-In; Shim, Jee-Young; Ha, Jongwon; Chung, Namsik

    2012-01-01

    Automatic computer-assisted detection (auto-CAD) of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has been shown to have relatively high accuracy. However, to date, scarce data are available regarding the performance of auto-CAD in the setting of acute chest pain. This study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of an auto-CAD algorithm for cCTA in patients presenting with acute chest pain. We retrospectively investigated 398 consecutive patients (229 male, mean age 50 ± 21 years) who had acute chest pain and underwent cCTA between Apr 2007 and Jan 2011 in the emergency department (ED). All cCTA data were analyzed using an auto-CAD algorithm for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA. The accuracy of auto-CAD was compared with the formal radiology report. In 380 of 398 patients (18 were excluded due to failure of data processing), per-patient analysis of auto-CAD revealed the following: sensitivity 94%, specificity 63%, positive predictive value (PPV) 76%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 89%. After the exclusion of 37 cases that were interpreted as invalid by the auto-CAD algorithm, the NPV was further increased up to 97%, considering the false-negative cases in the formal radiology report, and was confirmed by subsequent invasive angiogram during the index visit. We successfully demonstrated the high accuracy of an auto-CAD algorithm, compared with the formal radiology report, for the detection of >50% CAD on cCTA in the setting of acute chest pain. The auto-CAD algorithm can be used to facilitate the decision-making process in the ED.

  3. A new score for the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in acute chest pain with non-diagnostic ECG and normal troponin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Hamdi; Grissa, Mohamed Habib; Beltaief, Kaouther; Amor, Mohamed Haj; Mdimagh, Zouhaier; Boukhris, Amor; Ben Amor, Mehdi; Dridi, Zohra; Letaief, Mondher; Bouida, Wahid; Boukef, Riadh; Najjar, Fadhel; Nouira, Semir

    2015-10-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) represents a difficult diagnostic challenge in patients with undifferentiated chest pain. There is a need for a valid clinical score to improve diagnostic accuracy. To compare the performance of a model combining the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) score and a score describing chest pain (ACS diagnostic score: ACSD score) with that of both scores alone in the diagnosis of ACS in ED patients with chest pain associated with a non-diagnostic ECG and normal troponin. In this observational cohort study, we enrolled 809 patients admitted to a chest pain unit with normal ECG and normal troponin. They were prospectively evaluated in order to calculate TIMI score, chest pain characteristics score and ACSD score. Diagnosis of ACS was the primary outcome and defined on the basis of 2 cardiologists after reviewing the patient medical records and follow-up data. Mortality and major cardiovascular events were followed for 1 month for patients discharged directly from ED. Discriminative power of scores was evaluated by the area under the ROC curve. ACS was confirmed in 90 patients (11.1%). The area under the ROC curve for ACSD score was 0.85 (95% CI 0.80 to 0.90) compared with 0.74 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.81) for TIMI and 0.79 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.84) for chest pain characteristics score. A threshold value of 9 appeared to optimise sensitivity (92%) and negative predictive value (99%) without excessively compromising specificity (62%) and positive predictive value (23%). The ACSD score showed a good discrimination performance and an excellent negative predictive value which allows safely ruling out ACS in ED patients with undifferentiated chest pain. Our findings should be validated in a larger multicentre study. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. The effects of topical heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Mohammadian, Batol; Basiri Moghadam, Mehdi; Nematollahi, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of local heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Chest pain is a very common complaint in patients with acute coronary syndrome. It is managed both pharmacologically and nonpharmacologically. Pharmacological pain management is associated with different side effects. This was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in 2013. A convenience sample of 66 patients with acute coronary syndrome was selected from a coronary care unit of a local teaching hospital affiliated to Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental or the placebo group. Patients in the experimental and the placebo groups received local heat therapy using a hot pack warmed to 50 and 37 °C, respectively. We assessed chest pain intensity, duration and frequency as well as the need for opioid analgesic therapy both before and after the study. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire, the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and a data sheet for documenting pain frequency and duration as well as the need for analgesic therapy. The placebo heat therapy did not significantly decrease the intensity, the duration and the frequency of pain episodes. However, pain intensity, duration and frequency in the experimental group decreased significantly after the study. Moreover, the groups differed significantly in terms of the need for opioid analgesic therapy neither before nor after the intervention. Local heat therapy is an effective intervention for preventing and relieving chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Effective pain management using local heat therapy could help nurses play an important role in providing effective care to patients with acute coronary syndrome and in minimising adverse effects associated with pain medications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Post mastectomy linac IMRT irradiation of chest wall and regional nodes: dosimetry data and acute toxicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Jinli; Li, Jiongyan; Xie, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Zhu, Chuanying; Cai, Gang; Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Xiaomao; Chen, Jiayi

    2013-01-01

    Conventional post-mastectomy radiation therapy is delivered with tangential fields for chest wall and separate fields for regional nodes. Although chest wall and regional nodes delineation has been discussed with RTOG contouring atlas, CT-based planning to treat chest wall and regional nodes as a whole target has not been widely accepted. We herein discuss the dosimetric characteristics of a linac IMRT technique for treating chest wall and regional nodes as a whole PTV after modified radical mastectomy, and observe acute toxicities following irradiation. Patients indicated for PMRT were eligible. Chest wall and supra/infraclavicular region +/−internal mammary nodes were contoured as a whole PTV on planning CT. A simplified linac IMRT plan was designed using either integrated full beams or two segments of half beams split at caudal edge of clavicle head. DVHs were used to evaluate plans. The acute toxicities were followed up regularly. Totally, 85 patients were enrolled. Of these, 45 had left-sided lesions, and 35 received IMN irradiation. Planning designs yielded 55 integrated and 30 segmented plans, with median number of beams of 8 (6–12). The integrated and segmented plans had similar conformity (1.41±0.14 vs. 1.47±0.15, p=0.053) and homogeneity indexes (0.13±0.01 vs. 0.14±0.02, p=0.069). The percent volume of PTV receiving >110% prescription dose was <5%. As compared to segmented plans, integrated plans typically increased V 5 of ipsilateral lung (p=0.005), and heart (p=0.001) in patients with left-sided lesions. Similarly, integrated plans had higher spinal cord D max (p=0.009), ipsilateral humeral head (p<0.001), and contralateral lung D mean (p=0.019). During follow-up, 36 (42%) were identified to have ≥ grade 2 radiation dermatitis (RD). Of these, 35 developed moist desquamation. The median time to onset of moist desquamation was 6 (4–7) weeks from start of RT. The sites of moist desquamation were most frequently occurred in anterior axillary

  6. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosch, H.; Negrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [de

  7. Clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of accelerated diagnostic protocol in a chest pain center compared with routine care of patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (pdiagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (pdiagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (pdiagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), pdiagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14-0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources.

  8. Coronary artery dissection following chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Agarwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma has a high rate of mortality. Coronary dissection causing myocardial infarction (MI following blunt chest trauma is rare. We describe the case of an anterior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 39-year-old male was received in our hospital following a motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient underwent craniotomy for evacuation of hematoma. He developed severe chest pain and an electrocardiogram (ECG revealed anterior ST segment elevation following surgery. Acute coronary event was medically managed; subsequently, coronary angiogram was performed that showed dissection in the left anterior coronary artery, which was stented.

  9. Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease Patients Post Caesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is the most common inherited disease worldwide and is associated with anaemia and intermittent painful crisis. Pregnant women who are affected are known to have increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Acute chest syndrome (ACS is an uncommon but serious complication in pregnant women with SCD that can lead to death. We present two cases of patients with SCD, both of whom had severe ACS within 24 hours post Caesarean section. By accurate diagnosis and appropriate management by a multidisciplinary team, both mothers and fetuses had excellent outcomes. It is suggested that prompt recognition of ACS in a pregnant woman with SCD and collaborative medical and obstetric management are essential to optimize maternal and fetal outcomes.

  10. The effects of balneotherapy on acute, process-related, and cumulative peripheral cardiac responses and pulmonary functions in patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şaş, Senem; Toprak Çelenay, Şeyda; Özer Kaya, Derya

    2016-12-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of balneotherapy on acute, process-related, and cumulative peripheral cardiac responses and pulmonary functions in patients with musculoskeletal disorders. Ninety-eight patients with musculoskeletal disorders referred to physiotherapy with balneotherapy were recruited. The patients received balneotherapy for 20 min 5 times per week for 2 weeks. Blood pressure and pulse were measured at the 0th, 5th, 10th, 20th, and 30th minutes during the 1st and 10th sessions. All patients were subjected to pulmonary function testing before balneotherapy and after the 10th session. It was found that systolic blood pressure decreased between the 10th and 20th minutes of the 1st session and between the 10th and 20th minutes and the 20th and 30th minutes of the 10th session (P balneotherapy (P balneotherapy (P Balneotherapy may be effective for improving peripheral cardiopulmonary responses in patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Horev, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    A 3{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  12. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T.; Horev, G.

    2001-01-01

    A 3 1 / 2 -year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  13. The effect of Tc99m Sestamibi scans during acute chest pain on clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldey, A.; Cameron, P.; Grigg, L.; Knott, J.; Better, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study is to assess whether the increased sensitivity and specificity of Tc99m sestamibi scans, during acute chest pain, will lead to alteration in clinical management and potential cost saving in an Australian population. Consecutive patients who presented with acute chest pain were injected 800 MBq of Tc99m sestamibi during pain (Hot MlBI) and SPECT imaging performed 1-6 hours later. The population was those only with a 'intermediate risk' of myocardial ischaemia The patients included in patients, those in the Emergency Department, and those with a previous history of cardiac disease. 25% of patients required a second, pain free study the following day to differentiate acute ischaemia from prior infarction. A question sheet was filled out by the requesting physician prior to the study indicating the likelihood of cardiac disease and the proposed management if no 'Hot MIBI' scan was available. The treatment that the patient subsequently received was ascertained from the patient's medical record. Of the 28 patients, a prediction whether to or not to proceed to coronary angiography was made in 13 patients prior to the MIBI study being performed. Of the 13, 5 would have had coronary angiography performed. and in all 5, the decision to proceed to coronary angiography was averted by the 'Hot MIBI'. Of note, 3 patients were admitted purely because of an abnormal 'Hot MIBI'. The 'Hot MIBI' was able to reduce coronary care admissions by 83% reduce all admissions by 17%, and avert coronary angiography in 38% of patients. In this intermediate risk category patient, this translates to not only admissions saved but potential cost saving

  14. Diagnostic indicators of non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) has a high healthcare cost, but insufficient guidelines exist for its diagnostic investigation. The objective of the present work was to identify important diagnostic indicators and their accuracy for specific and non-specific conditions underlying NCCP. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. In May 2012, six databases were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Studies evaluating a diagnostic test against a reference test in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were having diagnostic tests for acute cardiovascular disease. Diagnostic accuracy is given in likelihood ratios (LR): very good (LR+ >10, LR- diagnostic test sensitivity and specificity was performed by applying a hierarchical Bayesian model. Results Out of 6,316 records, 260 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included: 20 investigating gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), 3 musculoskeletal chest pain, and 5 psychiatric conditions. Study quality was good in 15 studies and moderate in 13. GERD diagnosis was more likely with typical GERD symptoms (LR + 2.70 and 2.75, LR- 0.42 and 0.78) than atypical GERD symptoms (LR + 0.49, LR- 2.71). GERD was also more likely with a positive response to a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) test (LR + 5.48, 7.13, and 8.56; LR- 0.24, 0.25, and 0.28); the posterior mean sensitivity and specificity of six studies were 0.89 (95% credible interval, 0.28 to 1) and 0.88 (95% credible interval, 0.26 to 1), respectively. Panic and anxiety screening scores can identify individuals requiring further testing for anxiety or panic disorders. Clinical findings in musculoskeletal pain either had a fair to moderate LR + and a poor LR- or vice versa. Conclusions In patients with NCCP, thorough clinical evaluation of the patient’s history, symptoms, and clinical findings can indicate the most appropriate diagnostic tests. Treatment response to high-dose PPI

  15. Tapered oral dexamethasone for the acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charles T.; Stuart, Marie J.; Kesler, Karen; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Wang, Winfred C.; Styles, Lori; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Wun, Ted; Raj, Ahsok; Hsu, Lewis L.; Krishnan, Suba; Kuypers, Frans A; Setty, B. N. Yamaja; Rhee, Seungshin; Key, Nigel S.; Buchanan, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tapered oral dexamethasone for acute chest syndrome (ACS) in sickle cell anaemia was studied using a novel ACS assessment tool and investigational biomarkers. Twelve participants were randomized (mean age 17.3 years) before early study termination. Dexamethasone decreased duration of hospitalization for ACS by 20.8 h compared to placebo (P=0.024). Rebound pain occurred in both groups (3 dexamethasone vs. 1 placebo). Overall, dexamethasone decreased the leucocyte activation biomarker, sL-selectin; however, participants with rebound pain had higher sL-selectin within 24 h of treatment (dexamethasone or placebo). This ACS assessment tool was feasibly applied, and sL-selectin is a promising biomarker of ACS therapy. PMID:21848879

  16. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  17. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  18. High-sensitivity troponin assays for the early rule-out or diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in people eith acute chest pain: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); T. van Asselt (Thea); B. Ramaekers (Bram); P. Whiting (Penny); P. Tokala (Praveen); M.A. Joore (Manuela); N. Armstrong (Nigel); J. Ross (Janine); J.L. Severens (Hans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can ensure quick and effective treatment but only 20% of adults with emergency admissions for chest pain have an AMI. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays may allow rapid rule-out of AMI and avoidance of

  19. High-sensitivity troponin assays for the early rule-out or diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in people with acute chest pain : a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westwood, Marie; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Whiting, Penny; Thokala, Praveen; Joore, Manuela; Armstrong, Nigel; Ross, Janine; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can ensure quick and effective treatment but only 20% of adults with emergency admissions for chest pain have an AMI. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin (hs-cTn) assays may allow rapid rule-out of AMI and avoidance of unnecessary

  20. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  1. Spontaneous Recanalization of the Obstructed Right Coronary Artery Caused by Blunt Chest Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Yumiko; Sakakura, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taniguchi, Yousuke; Nakashima, Ikue; Wada, Hiroshi; Sanui, Masamitsu; Momomura, Shin-Ichi; Fujita, Hideo

    2018-03-30

    Blunt chest trauma can cause a wide variety of injuries including acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Although AMI due to coronary artery dissection caused by blunt chest trauma is very rare, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In the vast majority of patients with AMI, primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) are performed to recanalize obstructed arteries, but PCI carries a substantial risk of hemorrhagic complications in the acute phase of trauma. We report a case of AMI due to right coronary artery (RCA) dissection caused by blunt chest trauma. The totally obstructed RCA was spontaneously recanalized with medical therapy. We could avoid primary PCI in the acute phase of blunt chest trauma because electrocardiogram showed early reperfusion signs. We performed an elective PCI in the subacute phase when the risk of bleeding subsided. Since the risk of severe hemorrhagic complications is greater in the acute phase of blunt chest trauma as compared with the late phase, deferring emergency PCI is reasonable if signs of recanalization are observed.

  2. Myocardial perfusion 320-row multidetector computed tomography-guided treatment strategy for the clinical management of patients with recent acute-onset chest pain: Design of the CArdiac cT in the treatment of acute CHest pain (CATCH)-2 randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper J; Hove, Jens D; Petersen, Jan R; Jørgensen, Tem B S; Abdulla, Jawdat; Heitmann, Merete; Kragelund, Charlotte; Hansen, Thomas Fritz; Udholm, Patricia M; Pihl, Christian; Kühl, J Tobias; Engstrøm, Thomas; Jensen, Jan Skov; Høfsten, Dan E; Kelbæk, Henning; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-09-01

    Patients admitted with chest pain are a diagnostic challenge because the majority does not have coronary artery disease (CAD). Assessment of CAD with coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is safe, cost-effective, and accurate, albeit with a modest specificity. Stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has been shown to increase the specificity when added to CCTA, without lowering the sensitivity. This article describes the design of a randomized controlled trial, CATCH-2, comparing a clinical diagnostic management strategy of CCTA alone against CCTA in combination with CTP. Patients with acute-onset chest pain older than 50 years and with at least one cardiovascular risk factor for CAD are being prospectively enrolled to this study from 6 different clinical sites since October 2013. A total of 600 patients will be included. Patients are randomized 1:1 to clinical management based on CCTA or on CCTA in combination with CTP, determining the need for further testing with invasive coronary angiography including measurement of the fractional flow reserve in vessels with coronary artery lesions. Patients are scanned with a 320-row multidetector computed tomography scanner. Decisions to revascularize the patients are taken by the invasive cardiologist independently of the study allocation. The primary end point is the frequency of revascularization. Secondary end points of clinical outcome are also recorded. The CATCH-2 will determine whether CCTA in combination with CTP is diagnostically superior to CCTA alone in the management of patients with acute-onset chest pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How many medical requests for US, body CT, and musculoskeletal MR exams in outpatients are inadequate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Aliprandi, Alberto; Fausto, Alfonso

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to evaluate how many medical requests for US, CT and MR outpatients exams are inadequate. Materials and methods: We evaluated three series of consecutive requests for outpatients exams, distinguishing firstly the adequate from the inadequate requests. The inadequate requests were classified as: (A) absence of real indication; (B) lacking or vague clinical query; (C) absence of important information on patient's status. US requests concerned 282 patients for 300 body segments, as follows: neck (n=50); upper abdomen (n=95); lower abdomen (n=12); upper and lower abdomen (n=84); musculoskeletal (n=32); other body segments (n=27). CT requests concerned 280 patients for 300 body segments, as follows: chest (n=67); abdomen (n=77); musculoskeletal (n=94); other body segments (n=62). MR musculoskeletal requests concerned 138 patients for 150 body segments, as follows: knee (n=87); ankle (n=13); shoulder (n=28); other body segments (n=22). Results: A total of 228/300 US requests (76%) were inadequate, ranging from 66% (musculoskeletal) to 86% (neck) classified as: A, 21/228 (9%); B, 130/228 (57%); C, 77/228 (34%). A total of 231/300 (77%) body CT request were inadequate, ranging from 72% (chest) to 86% (musculoskeletal), classified as: A, 22/231 (10%); B, 88/231 (38%); C, 121/231 (52%). A total of 124/150 (83%) MR musculoskeletal requests were inadequate, ranging from 69% (ankle) to 89% (knee), classified as: A, 12/124 (10%); B, 50/124 (40%); C, 62/124 (50%). No significant difference was found among the levels of inadequacy for the three techniques and among the body segments for each of the three techniques. Conclusions: The majority of the medical requests for outpatients exams turned out to be inadequate. A large communication gap between referring physicians and radiologists needs to be filled [it

  4. Chest pain in daily practice: occurrence, causes and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Herzig, Lilli; Burnand, Bernard; Bischoff, Thomas; Pécoud, Alain; Junod, Michel; Mühlemann, Nicole; Favrat, Bernard

    2008-06-14

    We assessed the occurrence and aetiology of chest pain in primary care practice. These features differ between primary and emergency care settings, where most previous studies have been performed. 59 GPs in western Switzerland recorded all consecutive cases presenting with chest pain. Clinical characteristics, laboratory tests and other investigations as well as the diagnoses remaining after 12 months of follow-up were systematically registered. Among 24,620 patients examined during a total duration of 300 weeks of observation, 672 (2.7%) presented with chest pain (52% female, mean age 55 +/- 19(SD)). Most cases, 442 (1.8%), presented new symptoms and in 356 (1.4%) it was the reason for consulting. Over 40 ailments were diagnosed: musculoskeletal chest pain (including chest wall syndrome) (49%), cardiovascular (16%), psychogenic (11%), respiratory (10%), digestive (8%), miscellaneous (2%) and without diagnosis (3%). The three most prevalent diseases were: chest wall syndrome (43%), coronary artery disease (12%) and anxiety (7%). Unstable angina (6), myocardial infarction (4) and pulmonary embolism (2) were uncommon (1.8%). Potentially serious conditions including cardiac, respiratory and neoplasic diseases accounted for 20% of cases. A large number of laboratory tests (42%), referral to a specialist (16%) or hospitalisation (5%) were performed. Twentyfive patients died during follow-up, of which twelve were for a reason directly associated with thoracic pain [cancer (7) and cardiac causes (5)]. Thoracic pain was present in 2.7% of primary care consultations. Chest wall syndrome pain was the main aetiology. Cardio - vascular emergencies were uncommon. However chest pain deserves full consideration because of the occurrence of potentially serious conditions.

  5. Musculoskeletal manifestations of bacterial endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Bevilaqua Rangel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The incidence of staphylococcal infection has been increasing during the last 20 years. OBJECTIVE: Report a case of staphylococcal endocarditis preceded by musculoskeletal manifestations, which is a rare form of clinical presentation. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A 45-year-old-man, without addictions and without known previous cardiopathy, was diagnosed as having definitive acute bacterial endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. Its etiology was community-acquired, arising from a non-apparent primary focus. In addition, the musculoskeletal symptoms preceded the infective endocarditis (IE by about 1 month, which occurred together with other symptoms, e.g. mycotic aneurysms and petechiae. Later, the patient showed perforation of the mitral valve and moderate mitral insufficiency with clinical control.

  6. Identifying emergency department patients with chest pain who are at low risk for acute coronary syndromes [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, David; Kim, Jeremy

    2017-07-21

    Though a minority of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain have acute coronary syndromes,identifying the patients who may be safely discharged and determining whether further testing is needed remains challenging. From the prehospital care setting to disposition and follow-up, this systematic review addresses the fundamentals of the emergency department evaluation of patients determined to be at low risk for acute coronary syndromes or adverse outcomes. Clinical risk scores are discussed, as well as the evidence and indications for confirmatory testing. The emerging role of new technologies, such as high-sensitivity troponin assays and advanced imaging techniques, are also presented. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  7. Non-invasive coronary angiography for patients with acute atypical chest pain discharged after negative screening including maximal negative treadmill stress test. A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonello, L; Armero, S; Jacquier, A; Com, O; Sarran, A; Sbragia, P; Panuel, M; Arques, S; Paganelli, F

    2009-05-01

    Among patients admitted in the emergency department for acute atypical chest pain those with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who are mistakenly discharged home have high mortality. A recent retrospective study has demonstrated that multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography could improve triage of these patients. We aimed to prospectively confirm these data on patients with a negative screening including maximal treadmill stress. 30 patients discharged from the emergency department after negative screening for an ACS were included. All patients underwent MSCT angiography of the coronary artery. Patients with coronary atheroma on MSCT had an invasive coronary angiography to confirm these findings. Seven patients (23%) had obstructive coronary artery disease on MSCT. Invasive coronary angiography (ICA) confirmed the diagnosis in all patients. In patients with no previously known coronary artery disease admitted to the emergency department with atypical acute chest pain and discharged after negative screening, including maximal treadmill stress test, MSCT coronary angiography is useful for the diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease.

  8. Diagnostic Value of the Updated Diamond and Forrester Score to Predict Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias; Linde, Jesper James; Kofoed, Klaus Fuglsang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the recently updated clinical guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology on the management of stable coronary artery disease (CAD), the updated Diamond Forrester score has been included as a pretest probability (PTP) score to select patients for further diagnostic testing. ...... useful tool in risk-stratifying patients with acute-onset chest pain at a low-to-intermediate risk of having CAD. Adding a stress test to PTP does not appear to offer significant diagnostic benefit.......OBJECTIVES: In the recently updated clinical guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology on the management of stable coronary artery disease (CAD), the updated Diamond Forrester score has been included as a pretest probability (PTP) score to select patients for further diagnostic testing. We...... investigated the validity of the new guidelines in a population of patients with acute-onset chest pain. METHODS: We examined 527 consecutive patients with either an exercise-ECG stress test or single-photon emission computed tomography, and subsequently coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). We...

  9. Common acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To document the prevalence and nature of musculoskeletal injuries among female adolescent hockey players over a 12-month period (1 November 2011 - 31 October 2012). Methods. Data were collected from 148 high school players who belonged to the KwaZulu-Natal Hockey League via voluntary, ...

  10. Introduction of an accelerated diagnostic protocol in the assessment of emergency department patients with possible acute coronary syndrome: the Nambour Short Low-Intermediate Chest pain project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Terry; Ashover, Sarah; Cullen, Louise; Larsen, Peter; Gibson, Jason; Bilesky, Jennifer; Coverdale, Steven; Parsonage, William

    2013-08-01

    Emergency physicians can feel pressured by opposing forces of clinical reality and the need to publish successful key performance indicators in an environment of increasing demands and cost containment. This is particularly relevant to management of patients with undifferentiated chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome. Unreliability of clinical assessment and high risk of adverse outcomes for all concerned exist, yet national guidelines are at odds with efforts to reduce ED crowding and access block. We report findings from the Nambour Short Low-Intermediate Chest pain risk trial, which safely introduced an accelerated diagnostic protocol with reduced ED length of stay and high patient acceptability. Over a 7-month period, there were no major adverse cardiac events by 30 days in 19% of undifferentiated chest pain presentations with possible acute coronary syndrome discharged after normal sensitive cardiac troponin taken 2 h after presentation and scheduled to return for outpatient exercise stress test. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruettner, Joachim; Fink, Christian; Walter, Thomas; Meyer, Mathias; Apfaltrer, Paul; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Saur, Joachim; Sueselbeck, Tim; Traunwieser, Dominik; Takx, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis

  12. Coronary computed tomography and triple rule out CT in patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Part 1: Impact on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Fink, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Fink@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Walter, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.walter@umm.de [Emergency Department, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Meyer, Mathias, E-mail: mr.meyer.mathias@gmail.com [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Apfaltrer@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); Saur, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.saur@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim, E-mail: tim.sueselbeck@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Traunwieser, Dominik, E-mail: dominik.traunwieser@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Takx, Richard, E-mail: richard.takx@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, Ashley River Tower, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425-2260 (United States); and others

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of coronary CT angiography (coronary CTA) or “triple-rule-out” CT angiography (TRO-CTA) on patient management in the work-up of patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk profile. Materials and methods: 100 patients with acute chest pain and an intermediate cardiac risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) underwent coronary CTA or TRO-CTA for the evaluation of chest pain. Patients with a high and low cardiac risk profile were not included in this study. All patients with significant coronary stenosis >50% on coronary CTA underwent invasive coronary catheterization (ICC). Important other pathological findings were recorded. All patients had a 90-day follow-up period for major adverse cardiac events (MACE). Results: Based on a negative coronary CTA 60 of 100 patients were discharged on the same day. None of the discharged patients showed MACE during the 90-day follow-up. Coronary CTA revealed a coronary stenosis >50% in 19 of 100 patients. ICC confirmed significant coronary stenosis in 17/19 patients. Among the 17 true positive patients, 9 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with stent implantation, 7 were received intensified medical therapy, and 1 patient underwent coronary artery bypass surgery. A TRO-CTA protocol was performed in 36/100 patients due to elevated D-dimer levels. Pulmonary embolism was present in 5 patients, pleural effusion of unknown etiology in 3 patients, severe right ventricular dysfunction with pericardial effusion in 1 patient, and an incidental bronchial carcinoma was diagnosed in 1 patient. Conclusion: Coronary CTA and TRO-CTA allow a rapid and safe discharge in the majority of patients presenting with acute chest pain and an intermediate risk for ACS while at the same time identifies those with significant coronary artery stenosis.

  13. The approach to patients with possible cardiac chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsonage, William A; Cullen, Louise; Younger, John F

    2013-07-08

    Chest pain is a common reason for presentation in hospital emergency departments and general practice. Some patients presenting with chest pain to emergency departments and, to a lesser extent, general practice will be found to have a life-threatening cause, but most will not. The challenge is to identify those who do in a safe, timely and cost-effective manner. An acute coronary syndrome cannot be excluded on clinical grounds alone. In patients with ongoing symptoms of chest pain, without an obvious other cause, ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction should be excluded with a 12-lead electrocardiogram at the first available opportunity. Significant recent advances in the clinical approach to patients with acute chest pain, including better understanding of risk stratification, increasingly sensitive cardiac biomarkers and new non-invasive tests for coronary disease, can help clinicians minimise the risk of unexpected short-term adverse cardiac events. An approach that integrates these advances is needed to deliver the best outcomes for patients with chest pain. All hospital emergency departments should adopt such a strategic approach, and general practitioners should be aware of when and how to access these facilities.

  14. Costovertebral joint dysfunction: another misdiagnosed cause of atypical chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, J. F.; Jolliet, P.; Junod, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The diagnostic work-up of atypical chest pain frequently leads to invasive procedures. However, this painful symptomatology can sometimes be of benign origin and respond to simple therapeutic manoeuvres. A number of musculoskeletal conditions such as costovertebral joint dysfunctions should be carefully considered. We report five cases in which patient discomfort and high costs could have been avoided if awareness of these conditions had led to a correct diagnosis upon initial physical examination. PMID:1448407

  15. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with acute non-specific chest pain in emergency and cardiology departments after the introduction of high-sensitivity troponins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilangkovan, Nivethitha; Mickley, Hans; Diederichsen, Axel

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of clinical, cardiac-related endpoints and mortality among patients presenting to an emergency or cardiology department with non-specific chest pain (NSCP), and who receive testing with a high-sensitivity troponin. A second objective was to identify risk...... factors for the above-noted endpoints during 12 months of follow-up. DESIGN: A prospective multicentre study. SETTING: Emergency and cardiology departments in Southern Denmark. SUBJECTS: The study enrolled 1027 patients who were assessed for acute chest pain in an emergency or cardiology department...

  16. Improved drainage with active chest tube clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiose, Akira; Takaseya, Tohru; Fumoto, Hideyuki; Arakawa, Yoko; Horai, Tetsuya; Boyle, Edward M; Gillinov, A Marc; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of a novel chest drainage system. This system employs guide wire-based active chest tube clearance to improve drainage and maintain patency. A 32 Fr chest tube was inserted into pleural cavities of five pigs. On the left, a tube was connected to the chest canister, and on the right, the new system was inserted between the chest tube and chest canister. Acute bleeding was mimicked by periodic infusion of blood. The amount of blood drained from each chest cavity was recorded every 15 min for 2 h. After completion of the procedure, all residual blood and clots in each chest cavity were assessed. The new system remained widely patent, and the amount of drainage achieved with this system (670+/-105 ml) was significantly (P=0.01) higher than that with the standard tube (239+/-131 ml). The amount of retained pleural blood and clots with this system (150+/-107 ml) was significantly (P=0.04) lower than that with the standard tube (571+/-248 ml). In conclusion, a novel chest drainage system with active tube clearance significantly improved drainage without tube manipulations. 2010 Published by European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Effectiveness of chest physiotherapy in infants hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Gajdos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute bronchiolitis treatment in children and infants is largely supportive, but chest physiotherapy is routinely performed in some countries. In France, national guidelines recommend a specific type of physiotherapy combining the increased exhalation technique (IET and assisted cough (AC. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy (IET + AC in previously healthy infants hospitalized for a first episode of acute bronchiolitis.We conducted a multicenter, randomized, outcome assessor-blind and parent-blind trial in seven French pediatric departments. We recruited 496 infants hospitalized for first-episode acute bronchiolitis between October 2004 and January 2008. Patients were randomly allocated to receive from physiotherapists three times a day, either IET + AC (intervention group, n=246 or nasal suction (NS, control group, n=250. Only physiotherapists were aware of the allocation group of the infant. The primary outcome was time to recovery, defined as 8 hours without oxygen supplementation associated with minimal or no chest recession, and ingesting more than two-thirds of daily food requirements. Secondary outcomes were intensive care unit admissions, artificial ventilation, antibiotic treatment, description of side effects during procedures, and parental perception of comfort. Statistical analysis was performed on an intent-to-treat basis. Median time to recovery was 2.31 days, (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.97-2.73 for the control group and 2.02 days (95% CI 1.96-2.34 for the intervention group, indicating no significant effect of physiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR]=1.09, 95% CI 0.91-1.31, p=0.33. No treatment by age interaction was found (p=0.97. Frequency of vomiting and transient respiratory destabilization was higher in the IET + AC group during the procedure (relative risk [RR]=10.2, 95% CI 1.3-78.8, p=0.005 and RR=5.4, 95% CI 1.6-18.4, p=0.002, respectively. No difference between groups in bradycardia with or

  18. Neuromuscular training with injury prevention counselling to decrease the risk of acute musculoskeletal injury in young men during military service: a population-based, randomised study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suni Jaana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapidly increasing number of activity-induced musculoskeletal injuries among adolescents and young adults is currently a true public health burden. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a neuromuscular training programme with injury prevention counselling is effective in preventing acute musculoskeletal injuries in young men during military service. Methods The trial design was a population-based, randomised study. Two successive cohorts of male conscripts in four companies of one brigade in the Finnish Defence Forces were first followed prospectively for one 6-month term to determine the baseline incidence of injury. After this period, two new successive cohorts in the same four companies were randomised into two groups and followed prospectively for 6 months. Military service is compulsory for about 90% of 19-year-old Finnish men annually, who comprised the cohort in this study. This randomised, controlled trial included 968 conscripts comprising 501 conscripts in the intervention group and 467 conscripts in the control group. A neuromuscular training programme was used to enhance conscripts' motor skills and body control, and an educational injury prevention programme was used to increase knowledge and awareness of acute musculoskeletal injuries. The main outcome measures were acute injuries of the lower and upper limbs. Results In the intervention groups, the risk for acute ankle injury decreased significantly compared to control groups (adjusted hazards ratio (HR = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (95% CI = 0.15 to 0.78, P = 0.011. This risk decline was observed in conscripts with low as well as moderate to high baseline fitness levels. In the latter group of conscripts, the risk of upper-extremity injuries also decreased significantly (adjusted HR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.99, P = 0.047. In addition, the intervention groups tended to have less time loss due to injuries (adjusted HR = 0.55, 95% CI 0

  19. Surgical repair of right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, Jose E; Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Reardon, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Right atrial wall rupture after blunt chest trauma is a catastrophic event associated with high mortality rates. We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who was ejected 40 feet during a motor vehicle accident. Upon presentation, she was awake and alert, with a systolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg. Chest computed tomography disclosed a large pericardial effusion; transthoracic echocardiography confirmed this finding and also found right ventricular diastolic collapse. A diagnosis of cardiac tamponade with probable cardiac injury was made; the patient was taken to the operating room, where median sternotomy revealed a 1-cm laceration of the right atrial appendage. This lesion was directly repaired with 4-0 polypropylene suture. Her postoperative course was uneventful, and she continued to recover from injuries to the musculoskeletal system. This case highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion of cardiac injuries after blunt chest trauma. An algorithm is proposed for rapid recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions.

  20. Usefulness of technetium-99m tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography for short-term risk stratification in patients with acute chest pain in the emergency room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Michitomo; Kondo, Makoto; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2003-01-01

    High-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome are difficult to distinguish from low-risk patients with chest pain in the emergency room. Technetium-99 m ( 99m Tc) tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was investigated to exclude high-risk patients with chest pain in the emergency room. 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT was evaluated using a four-point scoring system in 228 patients (144 men, 84 women, mean age 68±12 years) with chest pain. Negative was defined as the myocardial segments with a defect score (DS) of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin; no significance (NS)), 84.9% (NS) and 60.4% (p 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT is a useful method to exclude high-risk patients among patients with chest pain in the emergency room. (author)

  1. Chest radiographic features of human metapneumovirus infection in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Daniel Dunnavant, F.; Singh, Sudha P.; Ellis, Wendy D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Payne, Daniel C. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Zhu, Yuwei [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States); Griffin, Marie R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Health Policy, Nashville, TN (United States); Edwards, Kathryn M. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Williams, John V. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); University of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was identified in 2001 and is a common cause of acute respiratory illness in young children. The radiologic characteristics of laboratory-confirmed HMPV acute respiratory illness in young children have not been systematically assessed. We systematically evaluated the radiographic characteristics of acute respiratory illness associated with HMPV in a prospective cohort of pediatric patients. We included chest radiographs from children <5 years old with acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the prospective New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) study from 2003 to 2009 and were diagnosed with HMPV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 215 HMPV-positive subjects enrolled at our tertiary care children's hospital, 68 had chest radiographs obtained by the treating clinician that were available for review. Two fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists, independently and then in consensus, retrospectively evaluated these chest radiographs for their radiographic features. Parahilar opacities were the most commonly observed abnormality, occurring in 87% of children with HMPV. Hyperinflation also occurred frequently (69%). Atelectasis (40%) and consolidation (18%) appeared less frequently. Pleural effusion and pneumothorax were not seen on any radiographs. The clinical presentations of HMPV include bronchiolitis, croup and pneumonia. Dominant chest radiographic abnormalities include parahilar opacities and hyperinflation, with occasional consolidation. Recognition of the imaging patterns seen with common viral illnesses like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and HMPV might facilitate diagnosis and limit unnecessary antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  2. Chest radiographic features of human metapneumovirus infection in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Daniel Dunnavant, F.; Singh, Sudha P.; Ellis, Wendy D.; Payne, Daniel C.; Zhu, Yuwei; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Williams, John V.

    2017-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) was identified in 2001 and is a common cause of acute respiratory illness in young children. The radiologic characteristics of laboratory-confirmed HMPV acute respiratory illness in young children have not been systematically assessed. We systematically evaluated the radiographic characteristics of acute respiratory illness associated with HMPV in a prospective cohort of pediatric patients. We included chest radiographs from children <5 years old with acute respiratory illness who were enrolled in the prospective New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN) study from 2003 to 2009 and were diagnosed with HMPV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 215 HMPV-positive subjects enrolled at our tertiary care children's hospital, 68 had chest radiographs obtained by the treating clinician that were available for review. Two fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists, independently and then in consensus, retrospectively evaluated these chest radiographs for their radiographic features. Parahilar opacities were the most commonly observed abnormality, occurring in 87% of children with HMPV. Hyperinflation also occurred frequently (69%). Atelectasis (40%) and consolidation (18%) appeared less frequently. Pleural effusion and pneumothorax were not seen on any radiographs. The clinical presentations of HMPV include bronchiolitis, croup and pneumonia. Dominant chest radiographic abnormalities include parahilar opacities and hyperinflation, with occasional consolidation. Recognition of the imaging patterns seen with common viral illnesses like respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and HMPV might facilitate diagnosis and limit unnecessary antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  3. B-type natriuretic peptide: a novel early blood marker of acute myocardial infarction in patients with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Roberto; Potsch, Alfredo; Maisel, Alan; Tura, Bernardo; Villacorta, Humberto; Nogueira, Mônica Viegas; Campos, Augusta; Gamarski, Roberto; Masetto, Antonio Cláudio; Moutinho, Marco Aurélio

    2005-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the diagnostic value of admission B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with acute chest pain and no ST-segment elevation. A prospective study with 631 consecutive patients was conducted in the emergency department. Non-ST elevation AMI was present in 72 patients and their median admission BNP level was significantly higher than in unstable angina and non-acute coronary syndrome patients. Sensitivity of admission BNP for AMI (cut-off value of 100 pg/mL) was significantly higher than creatine kinase-MB (CKMB) and troponin-I on admission (70.8 vs. 45.8 vs. 50.7%, respectively, P<0.0001) and specificity was 68.9%. Simultaneous use of these markers significantly improved sensitivity to 87.3% and the negative predictive value to 97.3%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission BNP was a significant independent predictor of AMI, even when CKMB and troponin-I were present in the model. BNP is a useful adjunct to standard cardiac markers in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and no ST-segment elevation, particularly if initial CKMB and/or troponin-I are non-diagnostic.

  4. Musculoskeletal injuries description of an under-recognized injury problem among military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauret, Keith G; Jones, Bruce H; Bullock, Steven H; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Canada, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Although injuries are recognized as a leading health problem in the military, the size of the problem is underestimated when only acute traumatic injuries are considered. Injury-related musculoskeletal conditions are common in this young, active population. Many of these involve physical damage caused by micro-trauma (overuse) in recreation, sports, training, and job performance. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the incidence of injury-related musculoskeletal conditions in the military services (2006) and describe a standardized format in which to categorize and report them. The subset of musculoskeletal diagnoses found to be injury-related in previous military investigations was identified. Musculoskeletal injuries among nondeployed, active duty service members in 2006 were identified from military medical surveillance data. A matrix was used to report and categorize these conditions by injury type and body region. There were 743,547 injury-related musculoskeletal conditions in 2006 (outpatient and inpatient, combined), including primary and nonprimary diagnoses. In the matrix, 82% of injury-related musculoskeletal conditions were classified as inflammation/pain (overuse), followed by joint derangements (15%) and stress fractures (2%). The knee/lower leg (22%), lumbar spine (20%), and ankle/foot (13%) were leading body region categories. When assessing the magnitude of the injury problem in the military services, injury-related musculoskeletal conditions should be included. When these injuries are combined with acute traumatic injuries, there are almost 1.6 million injury-related medical encounters each year. The matrix provides a standardized format to categorize these injuries, make comparisons over time, and focus prevention efforts on leading injury types and/or body regions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Predictors of Adverse Outcomes of Patients with Chest Pain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chest pain is a common symptom for referring patients to emergency departments (ED). Among those referred, some are admitted to hospitals with a definite or tentative diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and some are discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. This study aimed at ...

  6. Pulmonary effects of synthetic marijuana: chest radiography and CT findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Eugene A; Henry, Travis S; Veeraraghavan, Srihari; Staton, Gerald W; Gal, Anthony A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the first chest radiographic and CT descriptions of organizing pneumonia in response to smoking synthetic marijuana. Chest radiographs showed a diffuse miliary-micronodular pattern. Chest CT images showed diffuse centrilobular nodules and tree-in-bud pattern and a histopathologic pattern of organizing pneumonia with or without patchy acute alveolar damage. This distinct imaging pattern should alert radiologists to include synthetic marijuana abuse in the differential diagnosis.

  7. Dual-source CT in chest pain diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Nikolaou, K.; Fink, C.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.R.; Becker, A.; Knez, A.

    2007-01-01

    With the depiction of pulmonary arteries, coronary arteries, and the aorta, CT angiography of the chest offers a comprehensive diagnostic work-up of unclear chest pain. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of dual-source CT in this patient group. A total of 47 patients suffering from unclear chest pain were examined with a Siemens Somatom Definition. Volume and flow of contrast media (Ultravist, Schering) were adapted to the body weight. The examinations were evaluated with regard to image quality and contrast opacification and to the diagnostic accuracy with reference to the final clinical diagnosis. Adequate contrast opacification was achieved in all examinations. The depiction of the coronary arteries was diagnostic in all cases. The cause of chest pain could be identified in 41 cases. Among the diagnoses were coronary and myocardial pathologies, valvular disease, aortic aneurysms and dissections, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonic consolidation. DSCT angiography of the chest offers a very good image quality even at high heart rates so that a high diagnostic accuracy is achieved in patients with acute chest pain. (orig.) [de

  8. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very small dose ... Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the most commonly performed diagnostic ...

  9. Melatonin Does Not Affect Oxidative/Inflammatory Biomarkers in a Closed-Chest Porcine Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, Natalie L.; Ekelof, Sarah; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To test whether melatonin reduces oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers in a closed-chest porcine model of acute myocardial infarction. Materials and Methods: Twenty pigs were randomized to receive a total dosage of 200 mg (0.4 mg/ml) of melatonin, or placebo immediately prior to reperfusion....... There was an increase in hs-TnT, but no significant difference between the melatonin-treated and placebo-treated groups. There were no significant differences in development of any of the circulating plasma markers between the two groups. Conclusion: Melatonin treatment did not result in reduction of inflammatory...

  10. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (Ppain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  11. Lung Morphological Changes in Closed Chest Injury (an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Golubev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study lung morphological changes in a closed chest injury model in laboratory animals. Material and methods. Experiments were carried out in 30 male albino nonbred rats weighing 350—380 g. Closed chest injury was simulated, by exposing the chest of anesthetized rats to a 300-g metal cylinder falling from a height of 30 cm. The observation periods were 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Results. The signs of evident perivenular edema that was uncharas-teristic to acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by other causes are an important peculiarity of lung morphological changes in this experimental model of closed chest injury. Conclusion. The experimental studies clarified the pattern of lung morphological changes in the early period after closed chest injury. Key words: closed chest injury, pulmonary edema.

  12. Musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) among agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basher, A; Nath, P; Siddique, Z S; Rahman, M H; Rubel, M A; Sayed, M S; Ahmad, S A; Mondol, G D; Bhuiyan, M R

    2015-01-01

    Farming is a large and main industry in Bangladesh. Large numbers of people are directly involved in farming and have very unique exposure compare to other sectors. Musculoskeletal problems among farmer population are not infrequent. This study was carried out among 200 farmers in one selected district. The study revealed that musculoskeletal problems were common among the farmers working in a traditional way. All the respondents were male. The age of all respondents lie between 20-60 years. Among them 22.5% farmers were illiterate, about 45.5% below Class V. About half (42%) of the respondents had reported pain in different parts of the body at least one or more times during working in land. And about two third (65.5%) of the farmers had history of joint pain and stiffness in last 12 month. Most of the farmers who suffered from musculoskeletal symptoms were 41-60 years. Specially who worked more then 20 years (82.6%) and average 6 hours per day (66.7%). The occurrence of musculoskeletal problems in various part of the body included Knee pain - 48.1%, Back pain (back ache) - 22.9%, Waist pain (low back ache) - 13.3%, Neck pain - 18.3% and shoulder pain - 10.7%. Length of work in year and daily average working hours were found significant association with musculoskeletal pain. It was found that musculoskeletal pain were more common among the farmers when they worked in squatting position (52%) and specially during weeding of plants (31%). Among them only 22% also engaged in other business. Most of the farmers complained dull aching pain (40.6%), only 2.3% noticed severe acute pain, but about 86% farmers' temporary stop their work for pain and 80% get relief after discontinue of work. About 75% respondents visited doctors for their pain which was statistically significant (p=0.001). It was found that the rates of musculoskeletal complaints are more among those individuals who worked relatively bad ergonomic condition, such as body position probably play an important

  13. Pre-hospital management of patients with chest pain and/or dyspnoea of cardiac origin. A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the ESC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beygui, Farzin; Castren, Maaret; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Rosell-Ortiz, Fernando; Christ, Michael; Zeymer, Uwe; Huber, Kurt; Folke, Fredrik; Svensson, Leif; Bueno, Hector; Van't Hof, Arnoud; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Nibbe, Lutz; Charpentier, Sandrine; Swahn, Eva; Tubaro, Marco; Goldstein, Patrick

    2015-08-27

    Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  14. Pulmonary complications of induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia in adults. Findings of chest X-rays and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.; Huettmann, C.; Jacobi, V.; Boehme, A.

    1998-01-01

    To exclude pulmonary complications, 359 chest radiographs and 50 computed tomographs of the lung were performed in 95 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia. The radiological findings were registered, described and correlated with clinical findings in the present study on 2395 days of observation. Results: In summary, 52 patients showed alterations of the lung. Pulmonary hyperhydration was seen in 21 cases, bacterial pneumonia was found in 18 cases, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was documented in 14 cases, and 5 cases of severe haemorrhage were seen. An unexplained pulmonary edema in 13 patients with interstitial and alveolar infiltrates is considered to be a complication of treatment with cytosine-arabinoside. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that chest X-ray and computed tomography have a high impact in detection and treatment of pulmonary complications following intensive chemotherapy. We may expect the development of diffuse opacity following administration of cytosine-arabinoside in medium-sized doses. (orig.) [de

  15. Ventricular septal necrosis after blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ahmadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD after blunt chest trauma is a very rare traumatic affection.We report here a case of blunt chest injury-related VSD and pseudoaneurysm.A 30-year old male truck driver was referred from a trauma center to our hospital seven days after a blunt chest trauma and rib fracture. The patient had severe pulmonary edemaand echocardiography showed large VSD. Several mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of this affection including an acute compression of the heart muscle between the sternum and the spine, leading to excessive changes in the intrathoracic and most likely theintracardiac pressure after blunt chest injury. Traumatical patients with the same symptoms may be at risk of sudden death. Therefore, a high grade of suspicion is mandatory even without solid evidence of myocardial damage on the initial evaluation. In continue somehidden angles of this case was discussed. Given the prognostic implications of traumatic VSD with associated pseudoaneurysm, its detection has critical value for preventing its clinicalsequelae.

  16. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph; Johnson, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  17. Evaluation and treatment of childhood musculoskeletal injury in the office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Peter J; Howard, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation and treatment of acute musculoskeletal injuries can be rewarding for primary care providers. They are common presenting complaints, and with appropriate management, many patients make a full recovery in a short period of time. This article reviews basic principles of evaluation of acutely injured children, treatment strategies, and common injuries, and gives an overview of similar but more dangerous conditions that require referral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms and Clinical Management of Ventricular Arrhythmias following Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. Wolbrom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonpenetrating, blunt chest trauma is a serious medical condition with varied clinical presentations and implications. This can be the result of a dense projectile during competitive and recreational sports but may also include other etiologies such as motor vehicle accidents or traumatic falls. In this setting, the manifestation of ventricular arrhythmias has been observed both acutely and chronically. This is based on two entirely separate mechanisms and etiologies requiring different treatments. Ventricular fibrillation can occur immediately after chest wall injury (commotio cordis and requires rapid defibrillation. Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia can develop in the chronic stage due to underlying structural heart disease long after blunt chest injury. The associated arrhythmogenic tissue may be complex and provides the necessary substrate to form a reentrant VT circuit. Ventricular tachycardia in the absence of overt structural heart disease appears to be focal in nature with rapid termination during ablation. Regardless of the VT mechanism, patients with recurrent episodes, despite antiarrhythmic medication in the chronic stage following blunt chest injury, are likely to require ablation to achieve VT control. This review article will describe the mechanisms, pathophysiology, and treatment of ventricular arrhythmias that occur in both the acute and chronic stages following blunt chest trauma.

  19. Imaging of non-cardiac, non-traumatic causes of acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzl, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.kienzl@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Prosch, Helmut; Töpker, Michael; Herold, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2012-12-15

    Non-traumatic chest pain is a common symptom in patients who present in the emergency department. From a clinical point of view, it is important to differentiate cardiac chest pain from non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). Among the plethora of potential causes of NCCP, life-threatening diseases, such as aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, tension pneumothorax, and esophageal rupture, must be differentiated from non-life threatening causes. The majority of NCCP, however, is reported to be benign in nature. The presentation of pain plays an important role in narrowing the differential diagnosis and initiating further diagnostic management and treatment. As the benign causes tend to recur, and may lead to patient anxiety and great costs, a meticulous evaluation of the patient is necessary to diagnose the underlying disorder or disease.

  20. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdon François

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS. Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6% patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  1. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-09-12

    The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration.

  2. Chest wall syndrome among primary care patients: a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, François; Burnand, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli; Junod, Michel; Pécoud, Alain; Favrat, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of chest pain differs strongly between outpatient and emergency settings. In general practice, the most frequent cause is the chest wall pain. However, there is a lack of information about the characteristics of this syndrome. The aims of the study are to describe the clinical aspects of chest wall syndrome (CWS). Methods Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending 58 private practices over a five-week period from March to May 2001 with undifferentiated chest pain. During a one-year follow-up, questionnaires including detailed history and physical exam, were filled out at initial consultation, 3 and 12 months. The outcomes were: clinical characteristics associated with the CWS diagnosis and clinical evolution of the syndrome. Results Among 24 620 consultations, we observed 672 cases of chest pain and 300 (44.6%) patients had a diagnosis of chest wall syndrome. It affected all ages with a sex ratio of 1:1. History and sensibility to palpation were the keys for diagnosis. Pain was generally moderate, well localised, continuous or intermittent over a number of hours to days or weeks, and amplified by position or movement. The pain however, may be acute. Eighty-eight patients were affected at several painful sites, and 210 patients at a single site, most frequently in the midline or a left-sided site. Pain was a cause of anxiety and cardiac concern, especially when acute. CWS coexisted with coronary disease in 19 and neoplasm in 6. Outcome at one year was favourable even though CWS recurred in half of patients. Conclusion CWS is common and benign, but leads to anxiety and recurred frequently. Because the majority of chest wall pain is left-sided, the possibility of coexistence with coronary disease needs careful consideration. PMID:17850647

  3. The limping child: an algorithm to outrule musculoskeletal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, R A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The acutely limping child presents a significant diagnostic challenge. AIM: The purpose of this study was to create a clinically useful algorithm to allow exclusion of \\'musculoskeletal sepsis\\' as a differential diagnosis in the child presenting with limp. METHODS: Data were collected on all 286 limping children admitted to our centre over a 3-year-period. Using logistic regression analysis, the predictive model was constructed, to exclude infection. RESULTS: Duration of symptoms, constitutional symptoms, temperature, white cell count and ESR were significantly different in children with musculoskeletal infection (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that when all three variables of duration of symptoms >1, <5 days; temperature >37.0 degrees C; and ESR >35 mm\\/h were present, the predicted probability of infection was 0.66, falling to 0.01 when none were present. CONCLUSION: This multivariate model enables us to rule out musculoskeletal infection with 99% certainty in limping children with none of these three presenting variables.

  4. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of multimodal and multi-agent approach to acute pain management for better patient care. Data Source:The material ..... in the management of pain and stiffness arising ..... include immediate, direct psychologic feedback to the motivated ...

  5. A history of a prior myocardial infarct does not negate the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in the evaluation of acute chest pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Danbing; Jonathan Knott; Leeanne Grigg; Meir Lichtenstein; Nathan Better

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Acute myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG) has a high sensitivity and moderate specificity to detect acute ischaemia and predict cardiac events. However, previous studies excluded patients with a history of prior myocardial infarction (MI). The purpose of our study was to assess the utility of acute MPI for evaluating patients with acute chest pain and a non-diagnostic ECG. We aim to study patients both with and without a history of prior MI, including normal and abnormal studies, as well as to assess the independent predictive value of a prior MI history in determining patient outcome. Methods: We studied 367 consecutive patients with (group 1, n--107) and without. (group 2, n=260) a history of prior MI. 800 MBq Tc99m sestamibi was injected while chest pain was present ('HOT' MIBI). SPECT imaging was performed 1-6 hours post injection. Scan results were reported as,normal, ischaemia, infarct or equivocal. For patients with a defect, a 24-hour painfree study ( C OLD' MIBI) was offered to differentiate ischaemia from infarct. Follow-up was at 1 year by review of the patient's medical record. Outcomes were (1) Hard cardiac events (HE), defined as cardiac death and non-fatal MI, and (2) Total cardiac events (TE), defined as HE or revascularisation. Results: For the total study population, 206 had a normal study, with a HE rate 0.97% (2/206), while 161 had an abnormal study, with HE rate 12.4% (20/161). Patients in Group 2 were much more likely to have a normal study than those in Group 1 (p<.001). An equivocal result is seen in 5 patients, with no cardiac events, while 5 patients had a non-cardiac death. These groups were too small for separate analysis. A COLD MIBI was required in 77.6% of group 1, but only 24.2% of group 2 patients (p<0.001). On univariate analysis, acute ischaemia on MIBI scan, history of prior MI, diabetes, Q wave on ECG and age are all predictors

  6. Chest pain: Coronary CT in the ER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Maffei (Erica); S. Seitun (Sara); A.I. Guaricci (Andrea); F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCardiac CT has developed into a robust clinical tool during the past 15 years. Of the fields in which the potential of cardiac CT has raised more interest is chest pain in acute settings. In fact, the possibility to exclude with high reliability obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD)

  7. Mechanisms Mediating Vibration-induced Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Analyzed in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Dina, Olayinka A.; Joseph, Elizabeth K.; Levine, Jon D.; Green, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    While occupational exposure to vibration is a common cause of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, eliminating exposure produces limited symptomatic improvement, and re-exposure precipitates rapid recurrence or exacerbation. To evaluate mechanisms underlying these pain syndromes, we have developed a model in the rat, in which exposure to vibration (60–80 Hz) induces, in skeletal muscle, both acute mechanical hyperalgesia as well as long-term changes characterized by enhanced hyperalgesia t...

  8. Early detection of myocardial infarction following blunt chest trauma by computed tomography: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thung-Lip; Hsuan, Chin-Feng; Shih, Chen-Hsiang; Liang, Huai-Wen; Tsai, Hsing-Shan; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Hsu, Kwan-Lih

    2017-02-10

    Blunt cardiac trauma encompasses a wide range of clinical entities, including myocardial contusion, cardiac rupture, valve avulsion, pericardial injuries, arrhythmia, and even myocardial infarction. Acute myocardial infarction due to coronary artery dissection after blunt chest trauma is rare and may be life threatening. Differential diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction from cardiac contusion at this setting is not easy. Here we demonstrated a case of blunt chest trauma, with computed tomography detected myocardium enhancement defect early at emergency department. Under the impression of acute myocardial infarction, emergent coronary angiography revealed left anterior descending artery occlusion. Revascularization was performed and coronary artery dissection was found after thrombus aspiration. Finally, the patient survived after coronary stenting. Perfusion defects of myocardium enhancement on CT after blunt chest trauma can be very helpful to suggest myocardial infarction and facilitate the decision making of emergent procedure. This valuable sign should not be missed during the initial interpretation.

  9. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma.

  10. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    1987-01-01

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma. (orig.)

  11. Chest Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Early Lung Cancer Diagnosis as an Opportunity to Diagnose Vertebral Fractures in HIV-Infected Smokers, an ANRS EP48 HIV CHEST Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenin, Yann; Makinson, Alain; Cournil, Amandine; Eymard-Duvernay, Sabrina; Lentz, Pierre; Delemazure, Anne-Sophie; Corneloup, Olivier; Fabre, Sylvie; Quesnoy, Mylène; Poire, Sylvain; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Cyteval, Catherine; Reynes, Jacques; Le Moing, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of vertebral fractures on chest low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in HIV-infected smokers. Cross-sectional study of vertebral fractures visualized on chest LDCT from a multicenter prospective cohort evaluating feasibility of chest LDCT for early lung cancer diagnosis in HIV-infected subjects. Subjects were included if 40 years or older, had been active smokers within the last 3 years of at least 20 pack-years, and had a CD4 T-lymphocyte nadir cell count 100 cells per microliter. Spinal reconstructed sagittal planes obtained from chest axial native acquisitions were blindly read by a musculoskeletal imaging specialist. Assessment of the fractured vertebra used Genant semiquantitative method. The study end point was the prevalence of at least 1 vertebral fracture. Three hundred ninety-seven subjects were included. Median age was 49.5 years, median smoking history was 30 pack-years, median last CD4 count was 584 cells per microliter, and median CD4 nadir count was 168 cells per microliter; 90% of subjects had a viral load below 50 copies per milliliter. At least 1 fracture was visible in 46 (11.6%) subjects. In multivariate analysis, smoking ≥40 packs-years [OR = 2.5; 95% CI: (1.2 to 5.0)] was associated with an increased risk of vertebral fracture, while HIV viral load <200 copies per milliliter [OR = 0.3; 95% CI: (0.1 to 0.9)] was protective. Prevalence of vertebral fractures on chest LDCT was 11.6% in this high-risk population. Smoking cessation and early introduction of antiretroviral therapy for prevention of vertebral fractures could be beneficial. Chest LDCT is an opportunity to diagnose vertebral fractures.

  12. Role of contrast-enhanced helical CT in the evaluation of acute thoracic aortic injuries after blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglione, M.; Pinto, A.; Pinto, F.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Grassi, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the value of contrast-enhanced helical CT for detecting and managing acute thoracic aortic injury (ATAI). Between June 1995 and February 2000, 1419 consecutive chest CT examinations were performed in the setting of major blunt trauma. The following CT findings were considered indicative of ATAI: intimal flap; pseudoaneurysm; contour irregularity; lumen abnormality; and extravasation of contrast material. On the basis of these direct findings no further diagnostic investigations were performed. Isolated mediastinal hematoma on CT scans was considered an indirect sign of ATAI: In these cases, thoracic aortography was performed even if CT indicated normal aorta. Seventy-seven patients had abnormal CT scans: Among the 23 patients with direct CT signs, acute thoracic aortic injuries was confirmed at thoracotomy in 21. Two false-positive cases were observed. The 54 remaining patients had isolated mediastinal hematoma without aortic injuries at CT and corresponding negative angiograms. The 1342 patients with negative CT scans were included in the 8-month follow-up program and did not show any adverse sequela based on clinical and radiographic criteria. Contrast-enhanced helical CT has a critical role in the exclusion of thoracic aortic injuries in patient with major blunt chest trauma and prevents unnecessary thoracic aortography. Direct CT signs of ATAI do not require further diagnostic investigations to confirm the diagnosis: Isolated aortic bands or contour vessel abnormalities should be first considered as possible artifacts or related to non-traumatic etiologies especially when mediastinal hematoma is absent. In cases of isolated mediastinal hematoma other possible sources of bleeding should be considered before directing patients to thoracic aortography. (orig.)

  13. Editor's Choice-The organization of chest pain units: Position statement of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Marc J; Ahrens, Ingo; Sinnaeve, Peter; Diletti, Roberto; Rossini, Roberta; Goldstein, Patrick; Czerwińska, Kasia; Bueno, Héctor; Lettino, Maddalena; Münzel, Thomas; Zeymer, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Chest pain units are defined as organizational short stay units with specific management protocols designed to facilitate and optimize the diagnosis of patients presenting with chest pain in the emergency department. The present document is intended to standardize and facilitate the installation of chest pain units nearby to the emergency department or as an integral part of the emergency department. Recommendations on organizational structure, physical and technical requirements and on disease management are presented. More standardized installation and implementation of chest pain units will enhance the quality of chest pain units and improve the quality of care of our chest pain patients.

  14. Omega-3 index and prognosis in acute coronary chest pain patients with a low dietary intake of omega-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, Ricardo León; Naesgaard, Patrycja Anna; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjørn; Gundersen, Thomas; Nilsen, Dennis W T

    2013-04-01

    The omega-3 index (eicosapentaenoic acid + docosahexaenoic acid) content in red blood cell membranes has been suggested as a novel risk marker for cardiac death. Objective. To assess the ability of the omega-3 index to predict all-cause mortality, cardiac death and sudden cardiac death following hospitalization with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), and to include arachidonic acid (AA) in risk assessment. The omega-3 index was measured in 572 consecutive patients (median 63 years and 59% males) admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS in an inland Northern Argentinean city with a dietary habit that was essentially based on red meat and a low intake of fish. Clinical endpoints were collected during a 5-year follow-up period, median 3.6 years, range 1 day to 5.5 years. Stepwise Cox regression analysis was employed to compare the rate of new events in the quartiles of the omega-3 index measured at inclusion. Multivariable analysis was performed. No statistical significant differences in baseline characteristics were noted between quartiles of the omega-3 index. The median of the adjusted omega-3 index was 3.6%. During the follow-up period, 100 (17.5%) patients died. Event rates were similar in all quartiles of the omega-3 index, with no statistical significant differences. AA added no prognostic information. In a population with a low intake of fish and fish oils, the adjusted omega-3 index did not predict fatal events following hospitalization in patients with acute chest pain and suspected ACS.

  15. Association of pneumonia and lung cancer: the value of convalescent chest radiography and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, H.; Kragsbjerg, P.

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective study of 1011 hospitalized patients with pneumonia was undertaken to assess the value of routine convalescent chest radiography for detection of underlying lung cancer. To investigate the mode of clinical onset of pulmonary carcinoma, 232 inpatients with this diagnosis were also studied. The findings may be summarized as follows: 1. 13/1011 pneumonia patients were found to have previously undiagnosed pulmonary carcinoma; 2. many of these carcinomas (8/13) were disclosed by an acute chest X-ray; 3. pulmonary carcinoma was found by convalescent chest X-ray in 2/88 patients not feeling well and in 2/524 patients feeling well at follow-up, and non of these 4 patients benefitted from the carcinoma diagnosis; 4. ESR was of no value in detecting underlying pulmonary carcinoma at follow-up in patients with pneumonia; 5. of the 232 patients with pulmonary carcinoma, 29 (12.5%) presented with an acute respiratory tract infection; 6. most of these latter patients did not recover as expected and their correct diagnosis was made based on a chest X-ray performed because of persistent symptoms. We suggest that patients with radiologically verified pneumonia undergo clinical examination or are interviewed 4-5 weeks after the onset. If signs or symptoms of respiratory disease persist, chest X-ray should be performed. We consider, however, that routine convalescent chest radiography with the aim of detecting any underlying pulmonary tumour could be omitted if the patient has completely recovered 1 month after the acute onset of illness. (9 refs.)

  16. Nursing patients with acute chest pain: practice guided by the Prince Edward Island conceptual model for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Janelle F; Murnaghan, Donna A

    2010-01-01

    Current research suggests that pain is a relatively common phenomenon with 60-90% of patients presenting to emergency departments reporting pain (e.g., chest pain, trauma, extremity fractures and migraine headache) that require treatment [Hogan, S.L., 2005. Patient satisfaction with pain management in the emergency department. Advanced Emergency Nursing Journal 27(4), 284-294]. This article explores the use of conceptual theoretical empirical (C-T-E) framework to guide a senior nursing student in a case study of patient with chest pain. The Middle Range Theory of Pain described by Good [Good, M., 1998. A middle-range theory of acute pain management: use in research. Nursing Outlook 46(3), 120-124] and Melzack's [Melzack, R., 1987. The short-form McGill pain questionnaire. Pain, 30, 191-197] short form McGill pain questionnaire were applied along with the Prince Edward Island conceptual model (PEICM) for nursing. Results indicate that the nursing student increased her ability to work in partnership, assess relevant and specific information, and identify a number of strategies to help the patient achieve pain control by using a complement of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Moreover, the C-T-E approach provided an organized and systematic theoretical approach for the nursing student to assist a patient in pain control.

  17. Reliability of the CARE rule and the HEART score to rule out an acute coronary syndrome in non-traumatic chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumneh, Thomas; Richard-Jourjon, Vanessa; Friou, Emilie; Prunier, Fabrice; Soulie-Chavignon, Caroline; Choukroun, Jacques; Mazet-Guilaumé, Betty; Riou, Jérémie; Penaloza, Andréa; Roy, Pierre-Marie

    2018-03-02

    In patients consulting in the Emergency Department for chest pain, a HEART score ≤ 3 has been shown to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a low risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) occurrence. A negative CARE rule (≤ 1) that stands for the first four elements of the HEART score may have similar rule-out reliability without troponin assay requirement. We aim to prospectively assess the performance of the CARE rule and of the HEART score to predict MACE in a chest pain population. Prospective two-center non-interventional study. Patients admitted to the ED for non-traumatic chest pain were included, and followed-up at 6 weeks. The main study endpoint was the 6-week rate of MACE (myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty, coronary bypass, and sudden unexplained death). 641 patients were included, of whom 9.5% presented a MACE at 6 weeks. The CARE rule was negative for 31.2% of patients, and none presented a MACE during follow-up [0, 95% confidence interval: (0.0-1.9)]. The HEART score was ≤ 3 for 63.0% of patients, and none presented a MACE during follow-up [0% (0.0-0.9)]. With an incidence below 2% in the negative group, the CARE rule seemed able to safely rule out a MACE without any biological test for one-third of patients with chest pain and the HEART score for another third with a single troponin assay.

  18. The Role of Echocardiography in Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Maryam; Parsaee, Mozhgan; Maleki, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Echocardiography is a non-invasive diagnostic technique which provides information regarding cardiac function and hemodynamics. It is the most frequently used cardiovascular diagnostic test after electrocardiography and chest X-ray. However, in a patient with acute chest pain, Transthoracic Echocardiography is essential both for diagnosing acute coronary syndrome, zeroing on the evaluation of ventricular function and the presence of regional wall motion abnormalities, and for ruling out other etiologies of acute chest pain or dyspnea, including aortic dissection and pericardial effusion. Echocardiography is a versatile imaging modality for the management of patients with chest pain and assessment of left ventricular systolic function, diastolic function, and even myocardial and coronary perfusion and is, therefore, useful in the diagnosis and triage of patients with acute chest pain or dyspnea. This review has focused on the current applications of echocardiography in patients with coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction. PMID:23646042

  19. Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) as an early diagnostic biomarker in patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vupputuri, Anjith; Sekhar, Saritha; Krishnan, Sajitha; Venugopal, K; Natarajan, K U

    2015-01-01

    Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is an emerging biomarker, which was found to be sensitive for the early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We prospectively investigated the usefulness of H-FABP determination for the evaluation of acute chest pain in patients arriving at the emergency department. Fifty-four patients presenting with acute ischemic chest pain were evaluated. H-FABP was estimated at admission using latex-enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay. Serial cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatinine kinase-MB (CK-MB) determination, ischemia workup with stress testing, and/or coronary angiogram (CAG) were performed according to standard protocols. The sensitivity and specificity of H-FABP was 89.7% and 68%, for cTnI it was 62.1% and 100%, and for CK-MB it was 44.8% and 92%, respectively for diagnosis of AMI. The sensitivity of H-FABP was found to be far superior to initial cTnI and CK-MB, for those seen within 6h (100% vs. 46.1%, 33% respectively). On further evaluation of patients with positive H-FABP and negative cTnI, 71.4% of the patients had significant lesion on CAG, indicating ischemic cause of H-FABP elevation. Six patients with normal cTnI and CK-MB with high H-FABP had ST elevation on subsequent ECGs and were taken for primary angioplasty. H-FABP is a highly sensitive biomarker for the early diagnosis of AMI. H-FABP as early marker and cTnI as late marker would be the ideal combination to cover the complete diagnostic window for AMI. Detection of myocardial injury by H-FABP may also be applied in patients with unstable angina. H-FABP can also be used as a marker for early detection of STEMI before the ECG changes become apparent. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book includes a chapter on chest radiographs. A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. The chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph.

  1. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, Kpp; Mannam, P R; Rajendran, K; John, R A; Ramasami, P

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20-72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%), generalized myalgia (83%), headache (65%), dyspnea (54%), cough (24.3%), and altered sensorium (14%). Almost half of the patients (49.4%) had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%), airspace opacity (10.5%), reticulonodular opacities (10.3%), peribronchial thickening (5.8%), and pulmonary edema (2%). Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89-33.16), invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42-50.88), inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35-17.62), higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; Pscrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  2. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gyoo; Sik; Oh, Kyung Seung; Kim, Jong Min; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Jang, Tae Won; Jung, Man Hong [Kosin Medical College, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is one of a recently described idiopathic eosinophilic lung disease, which differs from chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Patients with acute eosinophilic pneumonia develop acute onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion on chest radiograph, and show an increase in number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung biopsy specimen. Prompt and complete response to corticosteroid therapy without any recurrence is characteristically seen in patient with this disease. Although the etiology of acute eosinophilic pneumonia is not known, it has been suggested to be related to a hypersensitivity phenomenon to an unidentified inhaled antigen. We report four cases of acute eosinophilic pneumonia presented with acute onset of dyspnea, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in previously healthy adults.

  3. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gyoo; Sik; Oh, Kyung Seung; Kim, Jong Min; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Jang, Tae Won; Jung, Man Hong

    1995-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is one of a recently described idiopathic eosinophilic lung disease, which differs from chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Patients with acute eosinophilic pneumonia develop acute onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion on chest radiograph, and show an increase in number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung biopsy specimen. Prompt and complete response to corticosteroid therapy without any recurrence is characteristically seen in patient with this disease. Although the etiology of acute eosinophilic pneumonia is not known, it has been suggested to be related to a hypersensitivity phenomenon to an unidentified inhaled antigen. We report four cases of acute eosinophilic pneumonia presented with acute onset of dyspnea, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in previously healthy adults

  4. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi in the diagnosis of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilleece, T.; Salehi, N.; Better, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A 45-year-old male was admitted to coronary care with a two-day history of recurrent chest pain. Despite maximal medical therapy, pain persisted. Examination and ECG with pain, were normal, suspicion of ischaemia was moderately high but coronary angiography was not immediately available. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi was prepared at the start of the day according to the standard preparation protocol (Du Pont). Coronary Care informed the Nuclear Medicine Department immediately the patient experienced a further episode of chest pain. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi was administered in coronary care, 4.30 minutes after being advised of the onset of further chest pain. Images were acquired 60 minute post-injection; 15 minutes after the patient had been given 200 mL of milk. A triple-headed gamma camera was used to acquire SPECT images over a 1200 arc, 30 frames of 30 seconds using a 64 x 64 matrix. The patient was laying prone with arms raised out of the field of view. Images showed a normal distribution of technetium-99m -Sestamibi throughout the myocardium. Due to ongoing clinical suspicion by the treating physician, coronary angiography was subsequently performed. This showed normal coronary arteries. Medical therapy was ceased and the patient discharged the next day. We concluded that the chest pain at the time of injection was not ischaemic. Previous trials had shown a 95% sensitivity for this method of diagnosing ischaemia. This method permits a novel and simple technique for diagnosing myocardial ischaemia and obviating the need for cardiac catheterization in this group of patients

  5. Picture quiz: a case of sudden severe chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, Mustafa Abu; Sullivan, P; Stivaros, Stavros M

    2007-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with no previous medical history presented to hospital with sudden onset of acute epigastric pain radiating to the anterior chest wall and both shoulders. There was no history of recent trauma and he had not been vomiting.

  6. What Are the Predictors of Altered Central Pain Modulation in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Populations? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jacqui; Nijs, Jo; Yeowell, Gillian; Goodwin, Peter Charles

    2017-09-01

    Altered central pain modulation is the predominant pain mechanism in a proportion of chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders and is associated with poor outcomes. Although existing studies predict poor outcomes such as persistent pain and disability, to date there is little consensus on what factors specifically predict altered central pain modulation. To review the existing literature on the predictive factors specifically for altered central pain modulation in musculoskeletal pain populations. This is a systematic review in accordance with supplemented PRISMA guidelines. A systematic search was performed by 2 mutually blinded reviewers. Relevant articles were screened by title and abstract from Medline, Embase, PubMed, CINAHL, and Web of Science electronic databases. Alternative sources were also sought to locate missed potential articles. Eligibility included studies published in English, adults aged 18 to 65, musculoskeletal pain, baseline measurements taken at the pre-morbid or acute stage, > 3-month follow-up time after pain onset, and primary outcome measures specific to altered central pain modulation. Studies were excluded where there were concurrent diseases or they were non-predictive studies. Risk of bias was assessed using the quality in prognostic studies (QUIPS) tool. Study design, demographics, musculoskeletal region, inclusion/exclusion criteria, measurement timelines, predictor and primary outcome measures, and results were extracted. Data were synthesized qualitatively and strength of evidence was scored using the grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluations (GRADE) scoring system. Nine eligible articles were located, in various musculoskeletal populations (whiplash, n = 2; widespread pain, n = 5; temporomandibular disorder, n = 2). Moderate evidence was found for 2 predictive factors of altered central pain modulation: 1) high sensory sensitivity (using genetic testing or quantitative sensory tests), and 2) psychological

  7. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weininger, Markus [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ramachandra, Ashok [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Fink, Christian [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany); Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Henzler, Thomas [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  8. Adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT and adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT for the assessment of acute chest pain: Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weininger, Markus; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ramachandra, Ashok; Fink, Christian; Rowe, Garrett W.; Costello, Philip; Henzler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recent innovations in CT enable the evolution from mere morphologic imaging to dynamic and functional testing. We describe our initial experience performing myocardial stress perfusion CT in a clinical population with acute chest pain. Methods and materials: Myocardial stress perfusion CT was performed on twenty consecutive patients (15 men, 5 women; mean age 65 ± 8 years) who presented with acute chest pain and were clinically referred for stress/rest SPECT and cardiac MRI. Prior to CT each patient was randomly assigned either to Group A or to Group B in a consecutive order (10 patients per group). Group A underwent adenosine-stress dynamic real-time myocardial perfusion CT using a novel “shuttle” mode on a 2nd generation dual-source CT. Group B underwent adenosine-stress first-pass dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT using the same CT scanner in dual-energy mode. Two experienced observers visually analyzed all CT perfusion studies. CT findings were compared with MRI and SPECT. Results: In Group A 149/170 myocardial segments (88%) could be evaluated. Real-time perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 86% (84%) sensitivity, 98% (92%) specificity, 94% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (92%) negative predictive value in comparison with perfusion MRI for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects. In Group B all myocardial segments were available for analysis. Compared with MRI, dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT (versus SPECT) had 93% (94%) sensitivity, 99% (98%) specificity, 92% (88%) positive predictive value, and 96% (94%) negative predictive value for detecting hypoperfused myocardial segments. Conclusion: Our results suggest the clinical feasibility of myocardial perfusion CT imaging in patients with acute chest pain. Compared to MRI and SPECT both, dynamic real-time perfusion CT and first-pass dual-energy perfusion CT showed good agreement for the detection of myocardial perfusion defects.

  9. Acute aortic dissection mimics acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction in a Marfan syndrome patient

    OpenAIRE

    Phowthongkum, Prasit

    2010-01-01

    A 30-year old man with acute chest pain was diagnosed with acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction following electrocardiography. After a failed coronary angiography, an echocardiogram revealed an aortic intimal flap after which acute aortic dissection was diagnosed. The patient received a successful Bentall operation without immediate complication. Retrospective examination then confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. This case demonstrates acute aortic dissection may mimic acut...

  10. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2-6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6-11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered.

  11. Risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries among Greek Army officer cadets undergoing Basic Combat Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenetidis, Konstantinos; Paxinos, Thrasivoulos

    2011-10-01

    Predictors of work-related injuries were assessed using data from a group of Greek Army officer cadets. Cadets (n = 253) were monitored by physicians for musculoskeletal injuries resulting through a 7-week Basic Combat Training (BCT) period. Potential predictors of musculoskeletal injuries (Cadets' entry number, body mass index [BMI], body fat percentage [BFP], gender, age, sport experience, and nationality) were modeled via univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. Using odds ratio (OR) and confidence interval (CI), it was shown that older age (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.56-0.96), female gender (OR = 0.13; 95% CI = 0.02-0.81), high BFP (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.07-1.37), and Greek nationality (OR = 0.22; 95% CI = 0.07-0.69) were all associated with musculoskeletal injuries. These factors, except for gender, were also related to overuse injuries. During BCT, adiposity expressed as BFP and not as BMI can predict the magnitude and type (acute-overuse) of musculoskeletal injuries in Greek cadets.

  12. How do patients with chest pain access Emergency Department care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Severen, Evie; Willemsen, Robert; Vandervoort, Pieter; Sabbe, Marc; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Buntinx, Frank

    2017-12-01

    It is important that patients with symptoms of acute coronary syndrome receive appropriate medical care as soon as possible. Little is known about the preadmission actions that patients with chest pain take before arrival at the Emergency Department (ED). This study aimed to describe the actions of patients with chest pain or pressure after onset of symptoms. What is the first action following onset of symptoms? Who is the first lay or professional person to be contacted? Which steps are taken first? How is the patient transported to the hospital? Consecutive patients, arriving at the ED of two large hospitals in Belgium, were asked additional questions during the initial assessment. Overall, 35% of 412 consecutive patients with chest pain admitted to the ED were diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome. A total of 57% contacted a GP between symptom onset and arrival at the ED. Only 32% of the patients were transported to the ED by ambulance, 16% drove themselves and 52% arrived by other means of transport (by family, neighbour, GP, public transport). In Belgium, the GP is still the first professional to be contacted for most patients. Other patients initially rely on their partner, family or friends when symptoms emerge. Too often, patients with chest pain rely on other transport to get to the ED instead of calling the Emergency Medical Services. This study included only patients who ultimately attended the ED.

  13. Diagnosing pulmonary edema: lung ultrasound versus chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Noble, Vicki E; Liteplo, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Diagnosing the underlying cause of acute dyspnea can be challenging. Lung ultrasound may help to identify pulmonary edema as a possible cause. To evaluate the ability of residents to recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound using chest radiographs as a comparison standard. This is a prospective, blinded, observational study of a convenience sample of resident physicians in the Departments of Emergency Medicine (EM), Internal Medicine (IM), and Radiology. Residents were given a tutorial on interpreting pulmonary edema on both chest radiograph and lung ultrasound. They were then shown both ultrasounds and chest radiographs from 20 patients who had presented to the emergency department with dyspnea, 10 with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary edema, and 10 with alternative diagnoses. Cohen's κ values were calculated to describe the strength of the correlation between resident and gold standard interpretations. Participants included 20 EM, 20 IM, and 20 Radiology residents. The overall agreement with gold standard interpretation of pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound (74%, κ = 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.55) was superior to chest radiographs (58%, κ = 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.30) (P Radiology residents interpreted chest radiographs more accurately than did EM and IM residents. Residents were able to more accurately identify pulmonary edema with lung ultrasound than with chest radiograph. Physicians with minimal exposure to lung ultrasound may be able to correctly recognize pulmonary edema on lung ultrasound.

  14. Clinical Evaluation of Iliopsoas Strain with Findings from Diagnostic Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Agility Performance Canines – 73 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cullen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Iliopsoas injury and strain is a commonly diagnosed disease process, especially amongst working and sporting canines. There has been very little published literature regarding iliopsoas injuries and there is no information regarding the ultrasound evaluation of abnormal iliopsoas muscles. This manuscript is intended to describe the ultrasound findings in 73 canine agility athletes who had physical examination findings consistent with iliopsoas discomfort. The population was chosen given the high incidence of these animals for the development of iliopsoas injury; likely due to repetitive stress.Methods: Medical records of 73 agility performance canines that underwent musculoskeletal ultrasound evaluation of bilateral iliopsoas muscle groups were retrospectively reviewed. Data included signalment, previous radiographic findings, and ultrasound findings. A 3-tier grading scheme for acute strains was used while the practitioner also evaluated for evidence of chronic injury and bursitis.Results: The majority of pathologies were localised to the tendon of insertion, with the majority being low grade I-II strains (80.8%. Tendon fibre disruption (71.2% and indistinct hypoechoic lesions (91.8% were the most common of acute changes noted. Hyperechoic chronic changes were noted in 84.9 percent of cases. Acute and chronic changes were commonly seen together (62.8%.Conclusion: Diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound was used to identify lesions of the iliopsoas tendon consistent with acute and chronic injury, as well as identifying the region of pathology. The majority of agility performance dogs had low grade acute strains based on the tiered system, with mixed acute and chronic lesions being noted frequently.Application: Diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound provides a non-invasive diagnostic modality for patients suspected of having an iliopsoas strain.

  15. Persistent chest pain following oral dipyridamole for thallium 201 myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwai, A.H.; Jacobson, A.F.; McIntyre, K.M.; Williams, W.H.; Tow, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    A patient was admitted to the hospital with acute chest pain. After acute myocardial infarction was ruled out, he underwent a stress thallium 201 scintigraphy using oral dipyridamole and developed persistent angina with sedimentation time segement elevation. This complication has not been reported previously. It is recommended that appropriate intervention be available if severe ischemia develops following administration of dipyridamole for diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  16. Clinical presentation and manual therapy for lower quadrant musculoskeletal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Carol A; Clark, Jeffrey D; Duncombe, Alison M; O'Hearn, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Chronic lower quadrant injuries constitute a significant percentage of the musculoskeletal cases seen by clinicians. While impairments may vary, pain is often the factor that compels the patient to seek medical attention. Traumatic injury from sport is one cause of progressive chronic joint pain, particularly in the lower quarter. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in different lower quadrant pain syndromes, such as lumbar spine related leg pain, osteoarthritis of the knee, and following acute injuries such as lateral ankle sprain and anterior cruciate ligament rupture. Proper management of lower quarter conditions should include assessment of balance and gait as increasing pain and chronicity may lead to altered gait patterns and falls. In addition, quantitative sensory testing may provide insight into pain mechanisms which affect management and prognosis of musculoskeletal conditions. Studies have demonstrated analgesic effects and modulation of spinal excitability with use of manual therapy techniques, with clinical outcomes of improved gait and functional ability. This paper will discuss the evidence which supports the use of manual therapy for lower quarter musculoskeletal dysfunction.

  17. Age- and sex-based resource utilisation and costs in patients with acute chest pain undergoing cardiac CT angiography. Pooled evidence from ROMICAT II and ACRIN-PA trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Hoffmann, Udo [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Mayrhofer, Thomas [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Stralsund University of Applied Science, School of Business Studies, Stralsund (Germany); Ferencik, Maros [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Knight Cardiovascular Institute, Portland, OR (United States); Bittner, Daniel O. [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Medicine 2 - Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Hallett, Travis R.; Janjua, Sumbal [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Schlett, Christopher L. [Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Nagurney, John T. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Udelson, James E. [Tufts Medical Center, Division of Cardiology and the Cardio-Vascular Center, Boston, MA (United States); Truong, Quynh A. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Woodard, Pamela K. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hollander, Judd E. [Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Emergency Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Litt, Harold [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2018-02-15

    To determine resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups in two large randomized diagnostic trials. We pooled patient-specific data from ACRIN-PA 4005 and ROMICAT II that enrolled subjects with acute chest pain at 14 US sites. Subjects were randomized between a standard work-up and a pathway utilizing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and followed for the occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and resource utilisation during index hospitalisation and 1-month follow-up. Study endpoints included diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of ACS as well as resource utilisation. Among 1240 patients who underwent CCTA, negative predictive value of CCTA to rule out ACS remained very high (≥99.4%). The proportion of patients undergoing additional diagnostic testing and cost increased with age for both sexes (p < 0.001), and was higher in men as compared to women older than 60 years (43.1% vs. 23.4% and $4559 ± 3382 vs. $3179 ± 2562, p < 0.01; respectively). Cost to rule out ACS was higher in men (p < 0.001) and significantly higher for patients older than 60 years ($2860-5935 in men, p < 0.001). CCTA strategy in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups, mandating improved selection for advanced imaging. (orig.)

  18. Age- and sex-based resource utilisation and costs in patients with acute chest pain undergoing cardiac CT angiography. Pooled evidence from ROMICAT II and ACRIN-PA trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Hoffmann, Udo; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Bittner, Daniel O.; Hallett, Travis R.; Janjua, Sumbal; Schlett, Christopher L.; Nagurney, John T.; Udelson, James E.; Truong, Quynh A.; Woodard, Pamela K.; Hollander, Judd E.; Litt, Harold

    2018-01-01

    To determine resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups in two large randomized diagnostic trials. We pooled patient-specific data from ACRIN-PA 4005 and ROMICAT II that enrolled subjects with acute chest pain at 14 US sites. Subjects were randomized between a standard work-up and a pathway utilizing cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and followed for the occurrence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and resource utilisation during index hospitalisation and 1-month follow-up. Study endpoints included diagnostic accuracy of CCTA for the detection of ACS as well as resource utilisation. Among 1240 patients who underwent CCTA, negative predictive value of CCTA to rule out ACS remained very high (≥99.4%). The proportion of patients undergoing additional diagnostic testing and cost increased with age for both sexes (p < 0.001), and was higher in men as compared to women older than 60 years (43.1% vs. 23.4% and $4559 ± 3382 vs. $3179 ± 2562, p < 0.01; respectively). Cost to rule out ACS was higher in men (p < 0.001) and significantly higher for patients older than 60 years ($2860-5935 in men, p < 0.001). CCTA strategy in patients with acute chest pain results in varying resource utilisation according to age and gender-specific subgroups, mandating improved selection for advanced imaging. (orig.)

  19. Acute aortic dissection mimics acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction in a Marfan syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phowthongkum, Prasit

    2010-01-01

    A 30-year old man with acute chest pain was diagnosed with acute inferoposterior wall myocardial infarction following electrocardiography. After a failed coronary angiography, an echocardiogram revealed an aortic intimal flap after which acute aortic dissection was diagnosed. The patient received a successful Bentall operation without immediate complication. Retrospective examination then confirmed the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. This case demonstrates acute aortic dissection may mimic acute myocardial infarction.

  20. Predictors of image quality of coronary computed tomography in the acute care setting of patients with chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberg, Fabian; Abbara, Suhny; Schlett, Christopher L.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Truong, Quynh A.; Rogers, Ian S. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nagurney, John T. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Brady, Thomas J. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology and Division of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: uhoffmann@partners.org

    2010-04-15

    Objective: We aimed to determine predictors of image quality in consecutive patients who underwent coronary computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of acute chest pain. Method and materials: We prospectively enrolled patients who presented with chest pain to the emergency department. All subjects underwent contrast-enhanced 64-slice coronary multi-detector CT. Two experienced readers determined overall image quality on a per-patient basis and the prevalence and characteristics of non-evaluable coronary segments on a per-segment basis. Results: Among 378 subjects (143 women, age: 52.9 {+-} 11.8 years), 345 (91%) had acceptable overall image quality, while 33 (9%) had poor image quality or were unreadable. In adjusted analysis, patients with diabetes, hypertension and a higher heart rate during the scan were more likely to have exams graded as poor or unreadable (odds ratio [OR]: 2.94, p = 0.02; OR: 2.62, p = 0.03; OR: 1.43, p = 0.02; respectively). Of 6253 coronary segments, 257 (4%) were non-evaluable, most due to severe calcification in combination with motion (35%). The presence of non-evaluable coronary segments was associated with age (OR: 1.08 annually, 95%-confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), baseline heart rate (OR: 1.35 per 10 beats/min, 95%-CI: 1.11-1.67, p = 0.003), diabetes, hypertension, and history of coronary artery disease (OR: 4.43, 95%-CI: 1.93-10.17, p < 0.001; OR: 2.27, 95-CI: 1.01-4.73, p = 0.03; OR: 5.12, 95%-CI: 2.0-13.06, p < 0.001; respectively). Conclusion: Coronary CT permits acceptable image quality in more than 90% of patients with chest pain. Patients with multiple risk factors are more likely to have impaired image quality or non-evaluable coronary segments. These patients may require careful patient preparation and optimization of CT scanning protocols.

  1. Myocardial perfusion assessed by contrast echocardiography and single photon emission computed tomography in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and normal electrocardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, J. Jr.; Ferreira, S.M.A.; Matias, W. Jr.; Giorgi, M.C.P.; Izaki, M.; Luz, P.L.; Ramires, J.A.F.; Meneghetti, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim : Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) in comparison with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for the detection of myocardial ischemia in patients with acute chest pain. Material and Methods : Eighteen patients (pts) with chest pain lasting ≥30 minutes, occurring within 6 hours of emergency room presentation and a normal or no diagnostic electrocardiogram were studied. Pts underwent rest MCE and SPECT. For both exams myocardial perfusion was assessed in the same 7 segments (apical, anterior, inferior, anteroseptal, inferoseptal, lateral and posterior) of left ventricle. A total of 126 segments were analyzed. Images were classified as positive for ischemia if they had a perfusion defect. Coronary angiography was performed if MCE or SPECT images were classified as positive for ischemia or by clinical indication. Otherwise the patients underwent stress SPECT. Significant coronary artery disease (CAD) was defined as ≥70% stenosis in a major coronary artery or its branches. Final diagnosis of an acute coronary event (ACE) was established in the presence of positive findings in MCE or SPECT in addition to significant CAD in the corresponding territory. Kappa statistics were calculated to evaluate the concordance between MCE and SPECT. κ values of ≤0.4, >0.4 and >0.7 indicate fair, good and excellent agreement, respectively. Results: Thirteen out of 18 pts underwent coronary angiography (seven pts had positive findings on SPECT, 2 on MCE, 2 on both exams and 1 had clinical indication). Significant CAD was detected on six. Five pts underwent stress SPECT and no perfusion defect was detected. Therefore, six pts (33.3%) had an ACE and 12 (66.6%) had not. There were no statistical differences between groups according to age, gender, duration of pain, free pain interval, presence of risk factors and antecedents. Concordance between MCE and SPECT for evaluation of perfusion defects showed a ? coefficient of 0

  2. Treatment efficacy for non-cardiovascular chest pain: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob M Burgstaller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP leads to impaired quality of life and is associated with a high disease burden. Upon ruling out cardiovascular disease, only vague recommendations exist for further treatment. OBJECTIVES: To summarize treatment efficacy for patients presenting with NCCP. METHODS: Systematic review and meta-analysis. In July 2013, Medline, Web of Knowledge, Embase, EBSCOhost, Cochrane Reviews and Trials, and Scopus were searched. Hand and bibliography searches were also conducted. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating non-surgical treatments in patients with NCCP were included. Exclusion criteria were poor study quality and small sample size (<10 patients per group. RESULTS: Thirty eligible RCT's were included. Most studies assessed PPI efficacy for gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD, n = 10. Two RCTs included musculoskeletal chest pain, seven psychotropic drugs, and eleven various psychological interventions. Study quality was high in five RCTs and acceptable in 25. PPI treatment in patients with GERD (5 RCTs, 192 patients was more effective than placebo [pooled OR 11.7 (95% CI 5.5 to 25.0, heterogeneity I2 = 6.1%]. The pooled OR in GERD negative patients (4 RCTs, 156 patients was 0.8 (95% CI 0.2 to 2.8, heterogeneity I2 = 50.4%. In musculoskeletal NCCP (2 RCTs, 229 patients manual therapy was more effective than usual care but not than home exercise [pooled mean difference 0.5 (95% CI -0.3 to 1.3, heterogeneity I2 = 46.2%]. The findings for cognitive behavioral treatment, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants were mixed. Most evidence was available for cognitive behavioral treatment interventions. LIMITATIONS: Only a small number of studies were available. CONCLUSIONS: Timely diagnostic evaluation and treatment of the disease underlying NCCP is important. For patients with suspected GERD, high-dose treatment with PPI is effective. Only limited evidence was available

  3. Use of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS in a cardiac emergency room: chest pain unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastão L. F. Soares-Filho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients complaining of chest pain who seek a chest pain unit attendance. INTRODUCTION: Patients arriving at a Chest Pain Unit may present psychiatric disorders not identified, isolated or co-morbid to the main illness, which may interfere in the patient prognosis. METHODOLOGY: Patients were assessed by the "Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" as a screening instrument wile following a systematized protocol to rule out the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and other potentially fatal diseases. Patients with 8 or more points in the scale were considered "probable case" of anxiety or depression. RESULTS: According to the protocol, 59 (45.4% of 130 patients studied presented Chest Pain of Determined Cause, and 71 (54.6% presented Chest Pain of Indefinite Cause. In the former group, in which 43 (33.1% had acute coronary syndrome, 33.9% were probable anxiety cases and 30.5% depression cases. In the second group, formed by patients without acute coronary syndrome or any clinical conditions involving greater morbidity and mortality risk, 53.5% were probable anxiety cases and 25.4% depression. CONCLUSION: The high anxiety and depression prevalence observed may indicate the need for early and specialized approach to these disorders. When coronary arterial disease is present, this may decrease complications and shorten hospital stay. When psychiatric disorder appears isolated, is possible to reduce unnecessary repeated visits to emergency room and increase patient's quality of life.

  4. Use of the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) in a cardiac emergency room: chest pain unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Filho, Gastão L F; Freire, Rafael C; Biancha, Karla; Pacheco, Ticiana; Volschan, André; Valença, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio E

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients complaining of chest pain who seek a chest pain unit attendance. Patients arriving at a Chest Pain Unit may present psychiatric disorders not identified, isolated or co-morbid to the main illness, which may interfere in the patient prognosis. Patients were assessed by the 'Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale' as a screening instrument wile following a systematized protocol to rule out the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and other potentially fatal diseases. Patients with 8 or more points in the scale were considered 'probable case' of anxiety or depression. According to the protocol, 59 (45.4%) of 130 patients studied presented Chest Pain of Determined Cause, and 71 (54.6%) presented Chest Pain of Indefinite Cause. In the former group, in which 43 (33.1%) had acute coronary syndrome, 33.9% were probable anxiety cases and 30.5% depression cases. In the second group, formed by patients without acute coronary syndrome or any clinical conditions involving greater morbidity and mortality risk, 53.5% were probable anxiety cases and 25.4% depression. The high anxiety and depression prevalence observed may indicate the need for early and specialized approach to these disorders. When coronary arterial disease is present, this may decrease complications and shorten hospital stay. When psychiatric disorder appears isolated, is possible to reduce unnecessary repeated visits to emergency room and increase patient's quality of life.

  5. Use of resting myocardial scintigraphy during chest pain to exclude diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Correa, Patricia Lavatori; Volschan, Andre; Viegas, Monica; Pimenta, Lucia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Images of myocardial perfusion taken during an episode of chest pain have been used for patients in the emergency department. Objective: To evaluate the operating characteristics of 99m Tc-Tetrofosmin scintigraphy during an episode of chest pain to exclude the diagnosis of cute myocardial infarction. Methods: One hundred and eight patients admitted with chest pain, or up to four hours after the end of symptoms and non diagnostic electrocardiogram, underwent resting scintigraphy and measurement of troponin I concentrations. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI) were not excluded (24 patients). Troponin I concentrations were determined at admission and 6 hours later. Nuclear physicians performed a blind analysis of the images, and myocardial infarction was confirmed whenever troponin I level increase was three times that of the control. Results: Resting perfusion image was abnormal in all 6 patients with MI. Only 1 patient had a normal image and increased troponin levels. Fifty-five patients had positive images without MI, and 46 patients had normal images and troponin levels. The prevalence of the disease was 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the resting images during an episode of chest pain to diagnose MI was 85.7% and 45.5%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 97.7%. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chest pain protocol with SPECT showed an excellent negative predictive value to exclude diagnosis of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that resting perfusion image is an important tool at the chest pain unit. (author)

  6. Clinical and Radiologic Predictive Factors of Rib Fractures in Outpatients With Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; McMahon, Colm J; Shah, Samir; Wu, Jim S; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Kung, Justin W

    To identify the clinical and radiologic predictive factors of rib fractures in stable adult outpatients presenting with chest pain and to determine the utility of dedicated rib radiographs in this population of patients. Following Institutional Review Board approval, we performed a retrospective review of 339 consecutive cases in which a frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series had been obtained for chest pain in the outpatient setting. The frontal chest radiograph and dedicated rib series were sequentially reviewed in consensus by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the initial report. The consensus interpretation of the dedicated rib series was used as the gold standard. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis assessed clinical and radiological factors associated with rib fractures. Fisher exact test was used to assess differences in medical treatment between the 2 groups. Of the 339 patients, 53 (15.6%) had at least 1 rib fracture. Only 20 of the 53 (37.7%) patients' fractures could be identified on the frontal chest radiograph. The frontal chest radiograph had a sensitivity of 38% and specificity of 100% when using the rib series as the reference standard. No pneumothorax, new mediastinal widening or pulmonary contusion was identified. Multiple variable logistic regression analysis of clinical factors associated with the presence of rib fractures revealed a significant association of trauma history (odds ratio 5.7 [p rib fractures in this population demonstrated a significant association of pleural effusion with rib fractures (odds ratio 18.9 [p rib fractures received narcotic analgesia in 47.2% of the cases, significantly more than those without rib fractures (21.3%, p rib fractures have a higher association with a history of minor trauma and age ≥40 in the adult population. Radiographic findings associated with rib fractures include pleural effusion. The frontal chest radiograph alone has low sensitivity in

  7. Radiological diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis: CT versus chest radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fugeng; Pan Jishu; Chen Qihang; Zhou Cheng; Yu Jingying; Tang Dairong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT or Chest radiograph in diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. Methods: The study population included 21 patients with chest wall tuberculosis confirmed by operation or biopsy. Chest radiograph and plain CT were performed in all eases, while enhanced CT in 9 cases, and all images were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results: Single soft tissue mass of the chest wall was detected in all cases on CT, but not on chest radiograph(χ 2 =42.000, P 2 =4.421, P<0.05). Conclusion: CT, especially enhanced CT scan is the first choice in the diagnosis of chest wall tuberculosis. (authors)

  8. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in music students-associated musculoskeletal signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, A; Möller, H; Seidel, W; Rigotti, T

    2012-12-01

    Pain and overuse are common problems for musicians. Up to 80% of professional musicians suffer from playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). The prevalence rate in music students is very high as well. Sufficient data on the underlying musculoskeletal dysfunctions however is scarce. Additionally, the self-assessment of health in musicians seems to differ compared to non-musicians, which might influence their attitudes concerning preventive strategies. Evaluation of frequency of PRMD in music students, investigation of signs and symptoms in music students compared to non-music controls, comparison of self-reported health and well-being between the two groups. Prospective, cross-sectional, case control, non-randomized. Other (University volunteers). Music students in comparison to a non-music control group. Musculoskeletal examination and questionnaire of 36 volunteers of a music university and 19 volunteer students of an university of education were analyzed. The total number of musculoskeletal dysfunctions and differences between the student groups were examined. The personal pain and health self-rating were compared between music and non-music students. Eighty one percent of musicians experienced PRMD. Musicians experienced 6.19 pain regions on average compared to 4.31 of non-musicians. Musicians experiencing PRMD reported significantly (PMusic students presented with nearly the double amount (8.39 versus 4.37) of musculoskeletal dysfunctions per person compared to the non-music control group. Nevertheless, musicians significantly (P<0.05) rated their health more positively than the controls. Musicians presented with more pain regions and a higher amount of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Further studies evaluating the clinical relevance and their role in the development of PRMD are warranted. Screening of musicians for musculoskeletal dysfunction may identify those musicians at increased risk. Early treatment may prevent PRMD in musicians. Additional

  9. Chest radiographic manifestations of scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KPP Abhilash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Rationale: Respiratory system involvement in scrub typhus is seen in 20–72% of patients. In endemic areas, good understanding and familiarity with the various radiologic findings of scrub typhus are essential in identifying pulmonary complications. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to a tertiary care center with scrub typhus between October 2012 and September 2013 and had a chest X ray done were included in the analysis. Details and radiographic findings were noted and factors associated with abnormal X-rays were analyzed. Results: The study cohort contained 398 patients. Common presenting complaints included fever (100%, generalized myalgia (83%, headache (65%, dyspnea (54%, cough (24.3%, and altered sensorium (14%. Almost half of the patients (49.4% had normal chest radiographs. Common radiological pulmonary abnormalities included pleural effusion (14.6%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (14%, airspace opacity (10.5%, reticulonodular opacities (10.3%, peribronchial thickening (5.8%, and pulmonary edema (2%. Cardiomegaly was noted in 3.5% of patients. Breathlessness, presence of an eschar, platelet counts of 2 mg/dL had the highest odds of having an abnormal chest radiograph. Patients with an abnormal chest X-ray had a higher requirement of noninvasive ventilation (odds ratio [OR]: 13.98; 95% confidence interval CI: 5.89–33.16, invasive ventilation (OR: 18.07; 95% CI: 6.42–50.88, inotropes (OR: 8.76; 95% CI: 4.35–17.62, higher involvement of other organ systems, longer duration of hospital stay (3.18 ± 3 vs. 7.27 ± 5.58 days; P< 0.001, and higher mortality (OR: 4.63; 95% CI: 1.54–13.85. Conclusion: Almost half of the patients with scrub typhus have abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiography should be included as part of basic evaluation at presentation in patients with scrub typhus, especially in those with breathlessness, eschar, jaundice, and severe thrombocytopenia.

  10. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  11. The HEART score is useful to predict cardiovascular risks and reduces unnecessary cardiac imaging in low-risk patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siping; Huang, Bo; Zou, Yunliang; Guo, Jianbin; Liu, Ziyong; Pi, Dangyu; Qiu, Yunhong; Xiao, Chun

    2018-06-01

    The present study was to investigate whether the HEART score can be used to evaluate cardiovascular risks and reduce unnecessary cardiac imaging in China.Acute coronary syndrome patients with the thrombosis in myocardial infarction risk score risk HEART score group and 2 patients (1.5%) in the high risk HEART score group had cardiovascular events. The sensitivity of HEART score to predict cardiovascular events was 100% and the specificity was 46.7%. The potential unnecessary cardiac testing was 46.3%. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that per one category increase of the HEART score was associated with nearly 1.3-fold risk of cardiovascular events.In the low-risk acute chest pain patients, the HEART score is useful to physicians in evaluating the risk of cardiovascular events within the first 30 days. In addition, the HEART score is also useful in reducing the unnecessary cardiac imaging.

  12. Chest radiographic findings of scrub typhus: an analysis of 160 cases occurred in Ulsan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Oh, Dong Heon; Kim, Ki Sung; Woo, Je Ho; Kwon, Jung Hyeok [Dong Kang General Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-03-15

    Scrub typhus (Tsutsugamushi disease) is an acute febrile systemic illness caused by Rickettsia Tsutsugamushi that is transmitted to humans by the bite of larval-stage trombiculid mites (chiggers). The authors analyzed chest radiographic findings of scrub typhus in 160 patients in Ulsan area. One hundred and eight (67.5%) of 160 patients showed abnormal findings which included lung lesions in 108 patients (67.5%), cardiomegaly in 37 patients (23.1%), lymphadenopathy in 25 patients (15.6%) and pleural effusion in 11 patients (6.9%). Among the lung lesions, interstitial patterns were seen in 107 patients (66.9%), mostly fine or medium reticulonodular, and air-space patterns in 14 patients (8.8%) and combined interstitial and air-space patterns in 13 patients (8.1%). Sixty-four patients (40%) had combined chest radiographic findings. The typical chest radiographic findings of scrub typhus would be helpful in evaluation of the causes of acute febrile illness that occur during late fall in the endemic area.

  13. Chest radiographic findings of scrub typhus: an analysis of 160 cases occurred in Ulsan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Hwa; Oh, Dong Heon; Kim, Ki Sung; Woo, Je Ho; Kwon, Jung Hyeok

    1993-01-01

    Scrub typhus (Tsutsugamushi disease) is an acute febrile systemic illness caused by Rickettsia Tsutsugamushi that is transmitted to humans by the bite of larval-stage trombiculid mites (chiggers). The authors analyzed chest radiographic findings of scrub typhus in 160 patients in Ulsan area. One hundred and eight (67.5%) of 160 patients showed abnormal findings which included lung lesions in 108 patients (67.5%), cardiomegaly in 37 patients (23.1%), lymphadenopathy in 25 patients (15.6%) and pleural effusion in 11 patients (6.9%). Among the lung lesions, interstitial patterns were seen in 107 patients (66.9%), mostly fine or medium reticulonodular, and air-space patterns in 14 patients (8.8%) and combined interstitial and air-space patterns in 13 patients (8.1%). Sixty-four patients (40%) had combined chest radiographic findings. The typical chest radiographic findings of scrub typhus would be helpful in evaluation of the causes of acute febrile illness that occur during late fall in the endemic area

  14. Manifestações músculo-esqueléticas como apresentação inicial das leucemias agudas na infância Musculoskeletal manifestations as the onset of acute leukemias in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria Passarelli Lupoli Barbosa

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: estudar a prevalência e as características clínicas e laboratoriais dos pacientes com manifestações músculo-esqueléticas na apresentação inicial das leucemias agudas. Métodos: estudo de casos prevalentes, retrospectivo, descritivo, no qual foram avaliados pacientes com diagnóstico de leucemia aguda, atendidos no Instituto de Oncologia Pediátrica da UNIFESP, de novembro de 1999 a fevereiro de 2000. As queixas músculo-esqueléticas foram investigadas através de um questionário. Os dados referentes ao exame físico e provas laboratoriais, no início da doença, foram obtidos através da revisão de prontuários. Resultados: sessenta e uma crianças foram incluídas neste estudo, sendo que 93% apresentavam leucemia linfóide aguda, e 7% leucemia mielóide aguda. Trinta e oito crianças (62% apresentaram dor músculo-esquelética no início da doença. Artrite foi observada em 8 casos (13%. A média de articulações acometidas foi 2,5 (variando de 1 a 6, sendo as mais acometidas os joelhos, os tornozelos e os cotovelos. Três pacientes (4,9% apresentavam hemograma normal, 54 (88% hemoglobina baixa (em 6 pacientes foi a única alteração, leucopenia em 14 (22%, leucocitose em 26 (42%, e plaquetopenia em 46 (75% pacientes. Oito pacientes (13% mostravam blastos em sangue periférico. Conclusão: as queixas músculo-esqueléticas são manifestações iniciais freqüentes das leucemias agudas, e devem ser consideradas no diagnóstico diferencial da dor em membros e das artrites agudas ou crônicas da infância. Os exames laboratoriais podem ser inicialmente normais, tornando ainda mais difícil esta diferenciação.Objective: to study the frequency, the clinical features and laboratory exams of patients with musculoskeletal symptoms at the onset of acute leukemia. Methods: retrospective, descriptive study including patients diagnosed with acute leukemia, and treated at the Institute of Pediatric Oncology of UNIFESP, carried out

  15. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju

    2015-01-01

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP

  16. Chest CT findings in patients with non-cardiovascular causes of chest pain: Focusing on pulmonary tuberculosis in a tuberculosis endemic country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Ryu, Yon Ju [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To review the common causes of non-cardiovascular chest pain (NCCP) according to the location and lesion type as seen on chest CT, and to evaluate CT findings in tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of NCCP. In the period 2009 to 2012, patients having NCCP without definitive evidence of acute myocardial infarction, pulmonary thromboembolism, and aortic dissection, were included. In total, 162 patients (60.5% male; 39.5% female), with a mean age of 51 years, were enrolled. CT images were evaluated by location and lesion type, for causes of NCCP. Chest CT revealed that the most common location for the cause of NCCP was the pleura (45.1%), followed by the subpleural lung parenchyma (30.2%). The most common lesion causing NCCP was TB (33.3%), followed by pneumonia (19.1%). Of the 54 TB cases, 40 (74.1%) were stable TB and 14 (25.9%) were active TB; among these 54 patients, NCCP was most commonly the result of fibrotic pleural thickening (55.6%), followed by subpleural stable pulmonary TB (14.8%). Results of chest CT revealed that TB was a major cause of NCCP in a TB endemic area. Among the TB patients, fibrotic pleural thickening in patients with stable TB was the most common cause of NCCP.

  17. Imaging of chest trauma: radiological patterns of injury and diagnostic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomoschitz, Fritz M.; Eisenhuber, Edith; Linnau, Ken F.; Peloschek, Philipp; Schoder, Maria; Bankier, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    In patients after chest trauma, imaging plays a key role for both, the primary diagnostic work-up, and the secondary assessment of potential treatment. Despite its well-known limitations, the anteroposterior chest radiograph remains the starting point of the imaging work-up. Adjunctive imaging with computed tomography, that recently is increasingly often performed on multidetector computed tomography units, adds essential information not readily available on the conventional radiograph. This allows better definition of trauma-associated thoracic injuries not only in acute traumatic aortic injury, but also in pulmonary, tracheobronchial, cardiac, diaphragmal, and thoracic skeletal injuries. This article reviews common radiographic findings in patients after chest trauma, shows typical imaging features resulting from thoracic injury, presents imaging algorithms, and recalls to the reader less common but clinically relevant entities encountered in patients after thoracic trauma

  18. Rib fractures induced by coughing: an unusual cause of acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maeseneer, M; De Mey, J; Debaere, C; Meysman, M; Osteaux, M

    2000-03-01

    We report three patients with stress fractures of the ribs induced by coughing. Standard radiographs of the chest and ribs did not reveal evidence of rib fractures in any of the patients. Bone scintigraphy, performed 1 to 2 weeks after initial onset of symptoms, showed a focal area of increased uptake along the chest wall in all cases. Thin section angulated helical CT directly visualized the subtle rib fractures. Initial diagnosis of a cough-induced fracture of the rib may be difficult because of the associated underlying disorder, and unnecessary examinations are commonly performed. Identification of a cough-induced fracture of the rib using helical CT may be clinically important to avoid unnecessary concern and additional examinations.

  19. [Musculoskeletal medicine--strategies towards a "good musculoskeletal consultation"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfsons, Simon

    2011-03-01

    The burden of musculoskeletal disease and disability is huge. The direct costs of diagnosis and treatment are dwarfed by the indirect costs to society comprised of sick leave, early retirement, pension funds and disability allowances. Chronic musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction account for the most common cause for chronic pain and for up to 25% of all consultations to family practitioners in the developed world. It is therefore surprising to find that education and training in musculoskeletal medicine has been given short shrift by medical schools, specialist training programs for family practitioners and post graduate continuing medical education. This has been shown quite comprehensively by Mashov and Tabenkin in this edition of the journal. At the close of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010, as declared by the WHO, it is timely to see what has been achieved in terms of the original goals for this decade. There has been a major effort for increasing awareness both in the health community and the general public towards managing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Much has been written, but far less performed in changing the priorities of medical schools and family practice programs towards teaching and training doctors to adequately recognize and treat patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal problems. In Israel, it is estimated that the indirect costs through lost productivity amount to up to 1.15 billion shekels a year. Investing time and money in training programs for medical students and doctors, together with building an incentive program for primary care physicians to adequately treat this huge chronically disabled population is not only feasible, but can also make great inroads towards easing suffering while curtailing costs.

  20. Diagnostic pattern of patients with acute chest pain and symptoms of patients with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davodian, D.; Lindskou, T. A.; Søvsø, M. B.

    2018-01-01

    diseases, and 90.4% did not have MI. However, most MI-patients presented with chest pain and these had better outcomes than the ones without chest pain. Conflict of interest None Funding The professorship of EFC is supported by a grant administered by Aalborg University from the Danish philanthropic...

  1. Severe Hyperthyroidism Presenting with Acute ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute myocardial infarction is life-threatening. A cardiac troponin rise accompanied by typical symptoms, ST elevation or depression is diagnostic of acute myocardial infarction. Here, we report an unusual case of a female who was admitted with chest pain. However, she did not present with a typical profile of an acute myocardial infarction patient. Case Presentation. A 66-year-old Han nationality female presented with chest pain. The electrocardiogram (ECG revealed arched ST segment elevations and troponin was elevated. However, the coronary angiography showed a normal coronary arterial system. Thyroid function tests showed that this patient had severe hyperthyroidism. Conclusion. Our case highlights the possibility that hyperthyroidism may cause a large area of myocardium injury and ECG ST segment elevation. We suggest routine thyroid function testing in patients with chest pain.

  2. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the ... treatment for a variety of lung conditions such as pneumonia, emphysema and cancer. A chest x-ray ...

  3. Observer variation in chest radiography of acute lower respiratory infections in children: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swingler, George H

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the accuracy of chest radiograph findings in acute lower respiratory infection in children is important when making clinical decisions. I conducted a systematic review of agreement between and within observers in the detection of radiographic features of acute lower respiratory infections in children, and described the quality of the design and reporting of studies, whether included or excluded from the review. Included studies were those of observer variation in the interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children (neonatal nurseries excluded) in which radiographs were read independently and a clinical population was studied. I searched MEDLINE, HealthSTAR and HSRPROJ databases (1966 to 1999), handsearched the reference lists of identified papers and contacted authors of identified studies. I performed the data extraction alone. Ten studies of observer interpretation of radiographic features of lower respiratory infection in children were identified. Seven of the studies satisfied four or more of the seven design and reporting criteria. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. Inter-observer agreement varied with the radiographic feature examined. Kappa statistics ranged from around 0.80 for individual radiographic features to 0.27–0.38 for bacterial vs viral etiology. Little information was identified on observer agreement on radiographic features of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Agreement varied with the features assessed from 'fair' to 'very good'. Aspects of the quality of the methods and reporting need attention in future studies, particularly the description of criteria for radiographic features

  4. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x- ...

  5. FLAIL CHEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Crnjac

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major thoracic trauma is consistent with high mortality rate because of associated injuries of vital thoracic organs and dangerous complications. The flail chest occurs after disruption of the skeletal continuity of chest wall and demands because of its pathophysiological complexity rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment.Conclusions. Basic pathophysiological mechanism of the flail chest is respiratory distress, which is provoked by pulmonary contusions and paradoxical chest wall motion. The treatment should be pointed to improvement and support of respiratory functions and include aggressive pain control, pulmonary physiotherapy and selective mechanical ventilation. Views about operative fixation of the flail chest are still controversial. Neither mortality rate neither long-term disability are improved after operative fixation.

  6. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Chest X-ray Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  7. Use of musculoskeletal ultrasonography in the diagnosis of pes anserine tendinitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, V T; Shermer, C D

    2001-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Department with a chief complaint of acute, nontraumatic medial knee pain. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography was performed, and the diagnosis of pes anserine tendinitis was elucidated. A discussion of this clinical entity, the characteristic ultrasonographic findings, and therapy follow in this case report.

  8. Chronic Musculoskeletal Disabilities following Snake Envenoming in Sri Lanka: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subashini Jayawardana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is a major public health problem in agricultural communities in the tropics leading to acute local and systemic impairments with resultant disabilities. Snakebite related long-term musculoskeletal disabilities have been a neglected area of research. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study in an agricultural community to describe the chronic musculoskeletal disabilities of snake envenoming.A sample representative of residents of a single district in a region of high incidence of snake envenoming was recruited to identify ever snakebite victims. They were evaluated for chronic musculoskeletal disabilities that had developed immediately or within four weeks after the snakebite and persisted over three months. In-depth interviews, validated musculoskeletal functional assessment criteria and specialists' examinations were utilised. Among the 816 victims, 26 (3.2%, 95% confidence interval: 2.2-4.6% had musculoskeletal disabilities, persisting on average for 13.4 years (SD = 14.4. The disabilities were mostly in lower limbs (61.5% and ranged from swelling (34.6%, muscle wasting (46.1%, reduced motion (61.5%, reduced muscle power (50%, impaired balance (26.9%, chronic non-healing ulcers (3.85%, abnormal gait (3.85%, fixed deformities (19.2% to amputations (15.4%. Based on disability patterns, six snakebite-related musculoskeletal syndromes were recognised. The offending snakes causing disabilities were cobra (30.8%, Russell's viper (26.9% and hump-nosed viper (7.7%. Cobra bites manifested muscle wasting (87.5%, reduced muscle power (87.5%, joint stiffness (62.5% and deformities (37.5% while viper bites manifested impaired balance (42.8%, pain (71.4% and swelling (71.4%.Snakebite envenoming is associated with considerable long-term musculoskeletal disabilities. Facilities for specialized care and rehabilitation need to be established in high risk areas.

  9. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Lee, Justin S.; Coulter, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  10. CT of the chest in suspected child abuse using submillisievert radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Thomas R.; Seibert, J.A.; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lee, Justin S. [University of California-Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin P. [Medical Center Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, University of California-Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The cornerstone of child abuse imaging is the skeletal survey, but initial imaging with radiographs may not demonstrate acute and non-displaced fractures, especially those involving the ribs. Given the high mortality of undiagnosed non-accidental trauma, timely diagnosis is crucial. CT is more sensitive in assessing rib fractures; however the effective radiation dose of a standard chest CT is high. We retrospectively identified four children (three boys, one girl; age range 1-4 months) admitted between January 2013 and February 2014 with high suspicion for non-accidental trauma from unexplained fractures of the long bones; these children all had CT of the chest when no rib fractures were evident on the skeletal survey. The absorbed radiation dose estimates for organs and tissue from the four-view chest radiographs and subsequent CT were determined using Monte Carlo photon transport software, and the effective dose was calculated using published tissue-weighting factors. In two children, CT showed multiple fractures of the ribs, scapula and vertebral body that were not evident on the initial skeletal survey. The average effective dose for a four-view chest radiograph across the four children was 0.29 mSv and the average effective dose for the chest CT was 0.56 mSv. Therefore the effective dose of a chest CT is on average less than twice that of a four-view chest radiograph. Our protocol thus shows that a reduced-dose chest CT may be useful in the evaluation of high specificity fractures of non-accidental trauma when the four-view chest radiographs are negative. (orig.)

  11. Pattern and outcome of chest injuries at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest injuries constitute a continuing challenge to the trauma or general surgeon practicing in developing countries. This study was conducted to outline the etiological spectrum, injury patterns and short term outcome of these injuries in our setting. Patients and methods This was a prospective study involving chest injury patients admitted to Bugando Medical Centre over a six-month period from November 2009 to April 2010 inclusive. Results A total of 150 chest injury patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 3.8:1. Their ages ranged from 1 to 80 years (mean = 32.17 years). The majority of patients (72.7%) sustained blunt injuries. Road traffic crush was the most common cause of injuries affecting 50.7% of patients. Chest wall wounds, hemothorax and rib fractures were the most common type of injuries accounting for 30.0%, 21.3% and 20.7% respectively. Associated injuries were noted in 56.0% of patients and head/neck (33.3%) and musculoskeletal regions (26.7%) were commonly affected. The majority of patients (55.3%) were treated successfully with non-operative approach. Underwater seal drainage was performed in 39 patients (19.3%). One patient (0.7%) underwent thoracotomy due to hemopericardium. Thirty nine patients (26.0%) had complications of which wound sepsis (14.7%) and complications of long bone fractures (12.0%) were the most common complications. The mean LOS was 13.17 days and mortality rate was 3.3%. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, associated injuries, the type of injury, trauma scores (ISS, RTS and PTS) were found to be significant predictors of the LOS (P trauma scores (ISS, RTS and PTS), the need for ICU admission and the presence of complications (P Chest injuries resulting from RTCs remain a major public health problem in this part of Tanzania. Urgent preventive measures targeting at reducing the occurrence of RTCs is necessary to reduce the incidence of chest injuries in this region. PMID:21244706

  12. Chest X-Ray

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    Full Text Available ... I’d like to talk with you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most ... far outweighs any risk. For more information about chest x-rays, visit Radiology Info dot org. Thank you for your time! ...

  13. Emergency radiology of the pediatric chest: What every radiologist should know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirks, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiology plays a critical role in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of thoracic disease seen in the pediatric emergency room. The history and physical examination of a small infant or an ill child are less reliable than in the adult. Physical examination of the chest in an uncooperative infant is difficult or nonspecific at best and impossible at worst. This does not, however, negate the importance of an adequate history and physical examination before radiologic evaluation. Numerous chest abnormalities in children have a similar history and similar manifestations or physical examination despite specific radiolic features. Conversely, a nonspecific radiologic appearance may become diagnostic when interpreted in the proper clinical context. This paper presents an overview of emergency radiology of pediatric chest disease. The emphasis is on practical matters: acute pediatric chest conditions that are commonly seen in the emergency room, outpatient clinic, or private office are illustrated and discussed. Practical aspects of imaging techniques, interpretative approach, pulmonary infection, asthma, airway foreign body, hydrocarbon aspiration, and near-drowning are emphasized

  14. Acquired ventricular septal defect: A rare sequel of blunt chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is the most common congenital cardiac lesion encountered worldwide. Only very rarely is it acquired, and causation through blunt injury in a child is extremely rare. A previously healthy 7‑year‑old boy suffered blunt chest trauma while at play. He presented 11 days later with features of acute ...

  15. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine [Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (China); Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Chinese University of Hong Kong (China); Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng (Singapore); Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley [Division of Infectious Diseases, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung [Department of Paediatrics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, 30-32 Ngan Shing Street, Shatin, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai [Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital, Lai King Hill Road, Lai Chi Kok, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Khong, Pek L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age{>=}10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  16. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): chest radiographic features in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Manson, David; Chu, Winnie C.W.; Metreweli, Constantine; Tsou, Ian Y.Y.; Wansaicheong, Gervais K.L.; Chee, Thomas S.G.; Kaw, Gregory J.L.; Allen, Upton; Bitnun, Ari; Read, Stanley; Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Fok, Tai-Fai; Hon, Ellis K.L.; Li, Albert M.; Ng, Pak-Cheung; Chiu, Man-Chun; Leung, Chi-Wai; Khong, Pek L.; Stringer, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We abstracted data (n=62) on the radiologic appearance and course of SARS in pediatric patients with suspect (n=25) or probable (n=37) SARS, diagnosed in five hospital sites located in three cities: Toronto, Singapore, and Hong Kong. Available chest radiographs and thoracic CTs were reviewed for the presence of the following radiographic findings: airspace disease, air bronchograms, airways inflammation and peribronchial thickening, interstitial disease, pleural effusion, and hilar adenopathy. A total of 62 patients (suspect=25, probable=37) were evaluated for SARS. Patient ages ranged from 5.5 months to 17 years and 11.5 months (average, 6 years and 10 months) with a female-to-male ratio of 32:30. Forty-one patients (66.1%) were in close contact with other probable, suspect, or quarantined cases; 10 patients (16.1%) had recently traveled to WHO-designated affected areas within 10 days; and 7 patients (11.2%) were transferred from other hospitals that had SARS patients. Three patients, who did not have close/hospital contact or travel history to affected areas, were classified as SARS cases based on their clinical signs and symptoms and on the fact that they were living in an endemic area. The most prominent clinical presentations were fever, with a temperature over 38 C (100%), cough (62.9%), rhinorrhea (22.6%), myalgia (17.7%), chills (14.5%), and headache (11.3%). Other findings included sore throat (9.7%), gastrointestinal symptoms (9.7%), rigor (8.1%), and lethargy (6.5%). In general, fever and cough were the most common clinical presentations amongst younger pediatric SARS cases (age<10 years), whereas, in addition to these symptoms, headache, myalgia, sore throat, chills, and/or rigor were common in older patients (age≥10 years). The chest radiographs of 35.5% of patients were normal. The most prominent radiological findings that were observed in the remaining patients were areas of consolidation (45.2%), often peripheral with multifocal lesions in 22

  17. Cash's textbook of chest, heart and vascular disorders for physiotherapists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downie, P.A.; Innocenti, D.M.; Jackson, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    A very high proportion of the patients treated by physiotherapy will have had a chest radiograph (x-ray) either because their primary disease is pulmonary or there is some long standing heart or lung illness which should be taken into account during the management of an acute problem. This chapter outlines the principles involved in reading the radiograph

  18. Chest Pain: The Need to Consider Less Frequent Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Magalhães

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is one of the most frequent patient’s complaints. The commonest underlying causes are well known, but, sometimes, in some clinical scenarios, it is necessary to consider other diagnoses. We report a case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male, chronically hypertensive, who complained of recurrent episodes of chest pain and fever with elevated acute phase reactants. The first investigation was negative for some of the most likely diagnosis and he quickly improved with anti-inflammatory drugs. Over a few months, his symptoms continued to recur periodically, his hypertension was aggravated, and he developed headaches and lower limbs claudication. After a temporal artery biopsy that was negative for vasculitis, he underwent a positron emission tomography suggestive of Takayasu Arteritis. Takayasu Arteritis is a rare chronic granulomatous vasculitis of the aorta and its first-order branches affecting mostly females up to 50 years old. Chest pain is experienced by >40% of the patients and results from the inflammation of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or coronaries.

  19. Investigation of therapeutic strategy for acute empyema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochinaga, Koji; Akamine, Shinji; Muraoka, Masashi; Morino, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Recently, it has been reported that video-assisted thoracoscopic chest drainage is a useful treatment for acute empyema, but its indication has not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed acute empyema patients by dividing them into 3 groups: operation group (7 patients), drainage group (6 patients), and antibiotic treatment group (9 patients), and then we evaluated the therapeutic strategy by examining the radiological findings, drainage period, and hospital stay. In the antibiotic treatment group, the ratio of pleural effusion on chest radiograph was under 1/4 in all patients. There were 5 patients who showed multilocular findings on chest CT, and all patients underwent an operation. Regarding the drainage period, the operation group showed a significantly shorter period than the drainage group. Concerning the hospital stay, the drainage group showed a significantly longer stay than the other 2 groups. The ratio of pleural effusion on chest radiograph was under 1/4, giving an indication for antibiotic treatment. With multilocular findings on CT, an indication for surgery is needed. Patients requiring drainage, which necessitates a long hospital stay, should be advised to consider surgery. (author)

  20. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, David K; Prows, Janalyn; Leavitt, Dennis; Egger, Marlene J; Morgan, John G; Stewart, J Robert

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at the our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 150 consecutive patients from 1980 to 1994. Materials and Methods: Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations in all patients. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 (1(2)) weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. The 10 most recently treated patients were censored for disease progression, survival, and late effects calculations, thus giving a mean follow up of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Results: Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. 27% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local control, freedom from distant failure and overall survival was 91%, 64%, and 67% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 30% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (p<0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 10% of patients having arm edema, 15% hyperpigmentation

  1. Mechanisms mediating vibration-induced chronic musculoskeletal pain analyzed in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dina, Olayinka A; Joseph, Elizabeth K; Levine, Jon D; Green, Paul G

    2010-04-01

    While occupational exposure to vibration is a common cause of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, eliminating exposure produces limited symptomatic improvement, and reexposure precipitates rapid recurrence or exacerbation. To evaluate mechanisms underlying these pain syndromes, we have developed a model in the rat, in which exposure to vibration (60-80Hz) induces, in skeletal muscle, both acute mechanical hyperalgesia as well as long-term changes characterized by enhanced hyperalgesia to a proinflammatory cytokine or reexposure to vibration. Exposure of a hind limb to vibration-produced mechanical hyperalgesia measured in the gastrocnemius muscle of the exposed hind limb, which persisted for approximately 2 weeks. When nociceptive thresholds had returned to baseline, exposure to a proinflammatory cytokine or reexposure to vibration produced markedly prolonged hyperalgesia. The chronic prolongation of vibration- and cytokine-hyperalgesia was prevented by spinal intrathecal injection of oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) antisense to protein kinase Cepsilon, a second messenger in nociceptors implicated in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain. Vibration-induced hyperalgesia was inhibited by spinal intrathecal administration of ODN antisense to receptors for the type-1 tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) receptor. Finally, in TNFalpha-pretreated muscle, subsequent vibration-induced hyperalgesia was markedly prolonged. These studies establish a model of vibration-induced acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain, and identify the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha and the second messenger protein kinase Cepsilon as targets against which therapies might be directed to prevent and/or treat this common and very debilitating chronic pain syndrome. Copyright 2010 American Pain Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Chest radiography practice in critically ill patients: a postal survey in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graat, Marleen E; Hendrikse, Karin A; Spronk, Peter E; Korevaar, Johanna C; Stoker, Jaap; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-01-01

    To ascertain current chest radiography practice in intensive care units (ICUs) in the Netherlands. Postal survey: a questionnaire was sent to all ICUs with > 5 beds suitable for mechanical ventilation; pediatric ICUs were excluded. When an ICU performed daily-routine chest radiographs in any group of patients it was considered to be a 'daily-routine chest radiography' ICU. From the number of ICUs responding, 63% practice a daily-routine strategy, in which chest radiographs are obtained on a daily basis without any specific reason. A daily-routine chest radiography strategy is practiced less frequently in university-affiliated ICUs (50%) as compared to other ICUs (68%), as well as in larger ICUs (> 20 beds, 50%) as compared to smaller ICUs (< 20 beds, 65%) (P > 0.05). Remarkably, physicians that practice a daily-routine strategy consider daily-routine radiographs helpful in guiding daily practice in less than 30% of all performed radiographs. Chest radiographs are considered essential for verification of the position of invasive devices (81%) and for diagnosing pneumothorax, pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (82%, 74% and 69%, respectively). On demand chest radiographs are obtained after introduction of thoracic drains, central venous lines and endotracheal tubes in 98%, 84% and 75% of responding ICUs, respectively. Chest films are also obtained in case of ventilatory deterioration (49% of responding ICUs), and after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (59%), tracheotomy (58%) and mini-tracheotomy (23%). There is notable lack of consensus on chest radiography practice in the Netherlands. This survey suggests that a large number of intensivists may doubt the value of daily-routine chest radiography, but still practice a daily-routine strategy

  3. Computed tomography of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.W.; Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 10 chapters. The chapter titles are: Soft Tissue Masses; Primary Bone Tumors; The Role of CT in the Therapeutic Management of Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Inflammation; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Trauma; The Foot and Ankle; The Shoulder; Measurement of Bone Mineral for Early Detection of Osteoporosis; MRI of the Musculoskeletal System; and Advances in CT Imaging of Musculoskeletal Pathology

  4. Can ECG-gated MDCT be considered an obligatory step to plan and manage a new chest-pain unit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runza, G.; Alaimo, V.; La Grutta, L.; Galia, M.; Basile, A.; Cademartiri, F.; Krestin, G.P.; Midiri, M.

    2007-01-01

    The recent improvements in multi-detector computed tomography technology and its application in cardiac field allow to consider this non-invasive imaging technique as a promising comprehensive method for detecting significant coronary stenoses in a chest-pain unit. The possibility to use the ECG-synchronisation acquisition protocol, normally limited to the cardiac volume, for the entire thoracic vascular system should have the remarkable potential to reduce invasive and non-invasive procedures actually used to investigate acute chest pain and the number of unnecessary hospital admissions without reducing appropriate admissions in patients with chest pain

  5. Severe Chest Wall Toxicity From Cryoablation in the Setting of Prior Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Binkley, Michael S; Aggarwal, Sonya; Qian, Yushen; Carter, Justin N; Shah, Rajesh; Loo, Billy W

    2016-02-02

    We present the case of a 42-year-old woman with metastatic synovial sarcoma of parotid origin, treated definitively with chemoradiation, who subsequently developed oligometastatic disease limited to the lungs. She underwent multiple left and right lung wedge resections and left lower lobectomy, followed by right lower lobe stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), 54 Gy in three fractions to a right lower lobe lesion abutting the chest wall. Two years later, she was treated with cryoablation for a separate right upper lobe nodule abutting the chest wall. Two months later, she presented with acute shortness of breath, pleuritic chest pain, decreased peripheral blood O2 saturation, and productive cough. A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated severe chest wall necrosis in the area of recent cryoablation that, in retrospect, also received a significant radiation dose from her prior SABR. This case demonstrates that clinicians should exercise caution in using cryoablation when treating lung tumors abutting a previously irradiated chest wall. Note: Drs. Loo and Shah contributed equally as co-senior authors.

  6. Chest tube placement in thorax trauma - comparison chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heim, P.; Maas, R.; Buecheler, E.; Tesch, C.

    1998-01-01

    Estimation of chest tube placement in patients with thoracic trauma with regard to chest tube malposition in chest radiography in the supine position compared to additional computed tomography of the thorax. Material and methods: Apart from compulsory chest radiography after one or multiple chest tube insertions, 31 severely injured patients with thoracic trauma underwent a CT scan of the thorax. These 31 patients with 40 chest tubes constituted the basis for the present analysis. Results: In chest radiography in the supine position there were no chest tube malpositions (n=40); In the CT scans 25 correct positions, 7 pseudo-malpositions, 6 intrafissural and 2 intrapulmonary malpositions were identified. Moreover 16 sufficient, 18 insufficient and 6 indifferent functions of the chest tubes were seen. Conclusion: In case of lasting clinical problems and questionable function of the chest tube, chest radiography should be supplemented by a CT scan of the thorax in order to estimate the position of the chest tube. (orig.) [de

  7. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of eperisone hydrochloride in the treatment of acute musculoskeletal spasm associated with low back pain: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Chandanwale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Eperisone hydrochloride is a centrally acting muscle relaxant inhibiting the pain reflex pathway, having a vasodilator effect. Aims : To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of eperisone in patients with acute musculoskeletal spasm associated with low back pain. Settings and Design : Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentric trial conducted at five tertiary care orthopedic centers across India. Materials and Methods : It was planned to enroll 240 patients of either sex between 18-60 years with acute musculoskeletal spasm (AMSP with low back pain (LBP due to spondylosis deformans, prolapsed disc or muscle sprain. Patients with other associated unrelated spasm conditions were excluded. Assessments were done for finger-to-floor distance (FFD, lumbar pain, Lasegue′s sign, tenderness of vertebral muscles, need for rescue medication and response to therapy for efficacy and tolerability. Statistical Analysis : Parametric data were analyzed by ′t′ test and ANOVA, and non-parametric data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney ′U′ test and Kruskall-Wallis test. Proportions were compared using Fischer′s (Chi-square test. Results : Two hundred and forty patients were randomized to receive eperisone 150 mg/day in three divided doses (n=120 or placebo (n=120 for 14 days, of which 15 patients did not complete and 225 patients completed the study (eperisone, 112 and placebo, 113. Significantly greater improvement in FFD (P<0.001 from baseline on Day 14 was seen with eperisone (150.66 to 41.75 compared to placebo (138.51 to 101.60. Improvements in other parameters were greater with the eperisone group. For 89 (79.46% patients the therapy was rated as good-excellent with eperisone compared to 43 (38.05% patients with placebo. Nausea, abdominal pain, headache and dizziness were the common adverse events with both therapies. Rescue drug was needed by 40 (35.71% eperisone patients and 83 (73.45% placebo patients

  9. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial infarction after blunt chest trauma: a heartbreaking soccer-shot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarassy Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac injury occasionally occurs as a result of blunt chest trauma. Most cardiac complications in chest trauma are due to myocardial contusion rather than direct damage to the coronary arteries. However, traumatic coronary injury has been reported, and a variety of underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed. We present a 26 year old patient presenting with an acute coronary syndrome as a consequence of a soccer-shot impact to the chest. CMR showed apical inferior infarction, as well as multiple small septal lesions which were presumed to have resulted from embolization. The culprit lesion was a proximal 75% LAD stenosis with a prominent plaque-rupture and thrombus-formation, and the distal LAD was occluded by thromboembolic material.

  10. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inadvertent chest tube insertion in congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation and congenital lobar emphysema-highlighting an important problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Solanki, Ravi S; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Agarwala, Surenderkumar

    2013-01-01

    Chest tube insertion in congenital cystic lung lesions is an important problem in children with acute respiratory distress having a cystic lucent lesion on chest radiograph. To evaluate the imaging findings and complications in cases of congenital cystic lung lesions with chest tube insertion and suggest the role of appropriate imaging for management of these patients. Chest radiographs and CT scans of children with congenital cystic lung lesions who had inadvertent chest tube insertion preoperatively were retrospectively reviewed for imaging appearances and complications. Fifteen patients comprising 10 cases of congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and 5 cases of congenital lobar emphysema (CLE) were included. Majority of the cases were infants. CCAM was misdiagnosed as complicated pneumatocele (n = 5) and pneumothorax (n = 5), while CLE was misdiagnosed as tension pneumothorax (n = 5) on the chest radiograph findings. Final diagnosis was made on CT and operative findings with histopathology. Complications noted were pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, and infection in cases of CCAM, and change in imaging appearance and pneumothorax in cases of CLE. Chest tube insertion in congenital cystic lesions increases the rate of associated complications. Chest CT has a definite role in early diagnosis and deciding appropriate management in these cases

  12. Indications for chest CT. Retrospective study of cases with normal chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Shiro

    1995-01-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in thoracic radiology is now well appreciated, and the number of chest CTs has greatly increased. There are, however, many chest CT cases that are completely or almost completely normal. Indications for chest CT should be re-evaluated considering the cost and radiation exposure associated with the examination. Reviewing the reports of 4930 chest CT examinations performed in three hospitals during the period of two years, the author found 620 (12.6%) negative CT examinations. In 312 of the 620, the CT was requested because of 'abnormal shadow' on chest radiograph. When the same chest radiographs were re-evaluated by two radiologists, no abnormality was noted in 257 cases (82.4%). CT examinations were considered justified in only 55 cases (17.6%). There was a significant difference in the frequency of normal chest CT examinations between the university hospital and two other hospitals. The causes of false positive interpretation of chest radiographs were analyzed, and it was felt that fundamental knowledge necessary to interpret chest radiographs was lacking. The importance of close cooperation between clinicians and radiologists should be emphasized. (author)

  13. American College of Chest Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation Participate in the e-Community Get Social Career Connection Publications CHEST Journal CHEST SEEK Guidelines & Consensus Statements CHEST Physician CHEST NewsBrief Coding for Chest Medicine Tobacco Dependence Toolkit (3rd Ed.) Mobile Websites and Apps CHEST Journal ...

  14. Novel computed tomographic chest metrics to detect pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Andrew L; Juarez, Maya M; Shelton, David K; MacDonald, Taylor; Li, Chin-Shang; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Albertson, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Early diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) can potentially improve survival and quality of life. Detecting PH using echocardiography is often insensitive in subjects with lung fibrosis or hyperinflation. Right heart catheterization (RHC) for the diagnosis of PH adds risk and expense due to its invasive nature. Pre-defined measurements utilizing computed tomography (CT) of the chest may be an alternative non-invasive method of detecting PH. This study retrospectively reviewed 101 acutely hospitalized inpatients with heterogeneous diagnoses, who consecutively underwent CT chest and RHC during the same admission. Two separate teams, each consisting of a radiologist and pulmonologist, blinded to clinical and RHC data, individually reviewed the chest CT's. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, sex, ascending aortic diameter, body surface area, thoracic diameter and pulmonary wedge pressure showed that a main pulmonary artery (PA) diameter ≥29 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 4.8), right descending PA diameter ≥19 mm (OR = 7.0), true right descending PA diameter ≥ 16 mm (OR = 4.1), true left descending PA diameter ≥ 21 mm (OR = 15.5), right ventricular (RV) free wall ≥ 6 mm (OR = 30.5), RV wall/left ventricular (LV) wall ratio ≥0.32 (OR = 8.8), RV/LV lumen ratio ≥1.28 (OR = 28.8), main PA/ascending aorta ratio ≥0.84 (OR = 6.0) and main PA/descending aorta ratio ≥ 1.29 (OR = 5.7) were significant predictors of PH in this population of hospitalized patients. This combination of easily measured CT-based metrics may, upon confirmatory studies, aid in the non-invasive detection of PH and hence in the determination of RHC candidacy in acutely hospitalized patients

  15. Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Maharaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality and is characterised by nonhydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of accurate quantification of extravascular lung water in diagnosis, management, and prognosis in “acute lung injury” and “acute respiratory distress syndrome”. Several studies have verified the accuracy of both the single and the double transpulmonary thermal indicator techniques. Both experimental and clinical studies were searched in PUBMED using the term “extravascular lung water” and “acute lung injury”. Extravascular lung water measurement offers information not otherwise available by other methods such as chest radiography, arterial blood gas, and chest auscultation at the bedside. Recent data have highlighted the role of extravascular lung water in response to treatment to guide fluid therapy and ventilator strategies. The quantification of extravascular lung water may predict mortality and multiorgan dysfunction. The limitations of the dilution method are also discussed.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  17. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Rt. 140, 101 The City Drive ZC 5005, CA 92868-3298, Orange (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  18. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI Patient Instructions ... Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  19. Chest Pain: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Chest pain: First aid Chest pain: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Causes of chest pain can vary from minor problems, such as indigestion ... 26, 2018 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-chest-pain/basics/ART-20056705 . Mayo ...

  20. Modificaciones funcionales ventilatorias en pacientes con anemia drepanocítica y antecedentes de síndrome torácico agudo Respiratory functional changes in patients with sickle cell anemia and history of acute chest synd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José René Mesa Cuervo

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo prospectivo para evaluar la función ventilatoria en pacientes con anemia drepanocítica (AD y antecedentes de síndrome torácico agudo (STA atendidos en consulta externa del Instituto de Hematología e Inmunología de septiembre de 1999 a septiembre del 2000. El universo de estudio se dividió en 2 grupos: el primero constituido por 36 pacientes con el diagnóstico de AD y antecedente de STA, y el segundo por 17, con una distribución por edades y sexos similar al anterior con AD, pero sin el antecedente de STA. A todos los pacientes seleccionados se les realizaron las pruebas funcionales ventilatorias (PFV siguiendo criterios internacionales. La disfunción ventilatoria restrictiva se observó en todos los pacientes con AD independiente del antecedente de STA, sin embargo, el antecedente de 2 y más STA mostró los mayores porcentajes. La edad y el sexo no influyeron en los resultados espirométicosA prospective descriptive study was made to evaluate the respiratory function in patients with sickle cell anemia and history of acute chest syndrome seen at the outpatient service of the Institute of Hematology and Immunology from September 1999 to September 2000. The universe of study was divided into 2 groups: the first was made up of 36 patients diagnosed with sickle cell anemia and history of acute thoracic syndrome; and the second included 17 patients with sickle cell anemia, distributed by age and sex in a similar way as in the first one, but without history of acute chest syndrome. All the selected patients were applied the respiratory function tests according to the international criteria. Restrictive respiratory dysfunction was observed in all patients with sickle cell anemia regardless of their history of acute chest syndrome; however, the history of two or more syndromes showed the highest percentages. Age and sex did not influence the results

  1. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...... of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...

  2. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/ critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...... of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...

  3. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...... of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis: Skeletal manifestations observed on portable chest roentgenograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, R.B.; Sullivan, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the thoracic skeletal radiographic findings of rheumatoid arthritis, observed on portable chest examinations of 21 patients. Their pathophysiology is reviewed and additional examples of a recently described finding are illustrated: erosion of the medial surface of the proximal humerus with subsequent pathologic fracture, associated with superior and medial migration of the humeral head [11]. It has been proposed that erosion of the medial aspect of the proximal humerus is due to impingement wear, and that pathologic fracture results from the fulcrum effect of the inferior lip of the glenoid on the humerus. Rheumatoid arthritis is often diagnosed by the clinician rather than the radiologist. However, in acutely ill patients receiving portable chest radiographs, complete history and laboratory findings are often unavailable. Attention to the thoracic skeleton may clarify pleural and/or parenchymal lung disease in these patients. (orig.)

  5. Pediatric chest imaging. Chest imaging in infants and children. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucaya, Javier [Vall d' Hebron Hospitals, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology and Inst. of Diagnostic Imaging; Hospital Quiron, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Strife, Janet L. (eds.) [Cincinnati Univ. Coll. of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center

    2008-07-01

    Imaging of the pediatric chest continues to evolve rapidly. All chapters in this 2nd edition of Pediatric Chest Imaging have been extensively updated, with additional disease-specific information and numerous new illustrations. The book thus presents the state of the art in the diagnosis of pediatric chest disorders, highlighting the role played by advanced technology. As the conventional features of most of these disorders are extremely well known, special attention is devoted to the technical aspects of the modern imaging modalities, their indications, and the diagnostic information that they supply. Individual chapters focus on chest ultrasound, nuclear medicine imaging, high-resolution chest CT, helical CT, and pediatric cardiac CT and pediatric cardiacMRI. Others are directed towards specific disorders, including congenital malformations of the chest, chest tumors, pulmonary infection, trauma, the lung in systemic diseases, the pediatric airway, foreign bodies, the thymus, and the chest wall. Without exception, the authors of this book are internationally known specialists with great expertise in the field. This book will serve as a handy, superbly illustrated reference for all who routinely image children, as well as for those who need access to information on how best to image them. (orig.)

  6. Chest radiological patterns predict the duration of mechanical ventilation in children with RSV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodhan, Parthak; Westra, Sjirk J.; Lin, James; Karni-Sharoor, Sarit; Regan, Susan; Noviski, Natan

    2009-01-01

    RSV-infected children demonstrate various radiographic features, some of which are associated with worse clinical outcomes. To investigate whether specific chest radiological patterns in RSV-infected children with acute respiratory failure (ARF) in the peri-intubation period are associated with prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. We included RSV-infected children 8 days, a backward stepwise regression arrived at a model that included age and right and left lung atelectasis. Using day 2 chest radiograph results, the best model included age and left lung atelectasis. A model combining the two days' findings yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.92 with a satisfactory fit (P = 0.95). Chest radiological patterns around the time of intubation can identify children with RSV-associated ARF who would require prolonged mechanical ventilation. (orig.)

  7. Chest computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Rosenfeld, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    are not suitable to study CF lung disease in young children. Chest computed tomography (CT) holds great promise for use as a sensitive surrogate endpoint in CF. A large body of evidence has been produced to validate the use of chest CT as primary endpoint to study CF lung disease. However, before chest CT can...

  8. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Leukemic Infiltration of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Kuang Wu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome resulting from leukemic pulmonary infiltrates is seldom diagnosed antemortem. Two 60- and 80-year-old women presented with general malaise, progressive shortness of breath, and hyperleukocytosis, which progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS after admission. Acute leukemia with pulmonary infection was initially diagnosed, but subsequent examinations including open lung biopsy revealed leukemic pulmonary infiltrates without infection. In one case, the clinical condition and chest radiography improved initially after combination therapy with chemotherapy for leukemia and aggressive pulmonary support. However, new pulmonary infiltration on chest radiography and hypoxemia recurred, which was consistent with acute lysis pneumopathy. Despite aggressive treatment, both patients died due to rapidly deteriorating condition. Leukemic pulmonary involvement should be considered in acute leukemia patients with non-infectious diffusive lung infiltration, especially in acute leukemia with a high blast count.

  9. The role of psychosocial stress in the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Valentina; Chang, Wei-Ju; Liston, Matthew B; McAuley, James H; Schabrun, Siobhan

    2017-11-03

    Psychosocial factors play an important role in chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders. Although psychosocial stress is likely to contribute to the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain, investigations are limited to work-related stress or examination of specific conditions such as upper limb pain. The purpose of this review is to assess the evidence for an aetiological role of psychological stress in chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders. A systematic review and meta-analysis will be conducted. Electronic databases will be searched using predefined search terms to identify relevant studies. Data will be extracted by two independent reviewers, and disagreement will be resolved by a third reviewer. Only prospective longitudinal studies that assess psychosocial stress at baseline will be included. The population of interest will be inception cohorts or cohorts of people who have not yet developed chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders. The primary outcome measure will be the onset of chronic musculoskeletal pain. To our knowledge, this review will be the first to systematically explore the available evidence on the aetiological role of psychosocial stress for the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain disorders. This review has the capacity to inform clinical practice on the importance of an early identification and, consequently, treatment of individuals who present with acute musculoskeletal disorders accompanied by a high level of stress. PROSPERO CRD42017059949.

  10. Diagnostic Yield of Recommendations for Chest CT Examination Prompted by Outpatient Chest Radiographic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, H. Benjamin; Gilman, Matthew D.; Wu, Carol C.; Cushing, Matthew S.; Halpern, Elkan F.; Zhao, Jing; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Shepard, Jo-Anne O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the diagnostic yield of recommended chest computed tomography (CT) prompted by abnormalities detected on outpatient chest radiographic images. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval; informed consent was waived. Reports of all outpatient chest radiographic examinations performed at a large academic center during 2008 (n = 29 138) were queried to identify studies that included a recommendation for a chest CT imaging. The radiology information system was queried for these patients to determine if a chest CT examination was obtained within 1 year of the index radiographic examination that contained the recommendation. For chest CT examinations obtained within 1 year of the index chest radiographic examination and that met inclusion criteria, chest CT images were reviewed to determine if there was an abnormality that corresponded to the chest radiographic finding that prompted the recommendation. All corresponding abnormalities were categorized as clinically relevant or not clinically relevant, based on whether further work-up or treatment was warranted. Groups were compared by using t test and Fisher exact test with a Bonferroni correction applied for multiple comparisons. Results There were 4.5% (1316 of 29138 [95% confidence interval {CI}: 4.3%, 4.8%]) of outpatient chest radiographic examinations that contained a recommendation for chest CT examination, and increasing patient age (P recommendation for chest CT examination. Of patients within this subset who met inclusion criteria, 65.4% (691 of 1057 [95% CI: 62.4%, 68.2%) underwent a chest CT examination within the year after the index chest radiographic examination. Clinically relevant corresponding abnormalities were present on chest CT images in 41.4% (286 of 691 [95% CI: 37.7%, 45.2%]) of cases, nonclinically relevant corresponding abnormalities in 20.6% (142 of 691 [95% CI: 17.6%, 23.8%]) of cases, and no corresponding abnormalities in 38

  11. Ergonomic practices within patient care units are associated with musculoskeletal pain and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Jack T.; Hopcia, Karen; Sembajwe, Grace; Kenwood, Christopher; Stoddard, Anne M.; Tveito, T. Helene; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-01-01

    Background With the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) for patient care unit workers, prevention efforts through ergonomic practices within units may be related to symptoms associated with typical work-related MSDs. Methods We completed a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers (n=1572) in two large academic hospitals in order to evaluate relationships between self-reported musculoskeletal pain, work interference due to this pain, and limitations during activities of daily living (functional limitations) and with ergonomic practices and other organizational policy and practices metrics within the unit. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses tested the significance of these associations. Results Prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 3-months was 74% with 53% reporting pain in the low back. 32.8% reported that this pain interfered with their work duties and 17.7% reported functional limitations in the prior week. Decreased ergonomic practices were significantly associated with reporting pain in four body areas (low back, neck/shoulder, arms, and lower extremity) in the previous 3-months, interference with work caused by this pain, symptom severity and limitations in completing activities of daily living in the past week. Except for low back pain and work interference, these associations remained significant when psychosocial covariates such as psychological demands were included in multiple logistic regressions, Conclusions Ergonomic practices appear to be associated with many of the musculoskeletal symptoms denoting their importance for prevention efforts in acute health care settings. PMID:22113975

  12. [Chest Injury and its Surgical Treatment in Polytrauma Patients. Five-Year Experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodička, J; Doležal, J; Vejvodová, Š; Šafránek, J; Špidlen, V; Třeška, V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Thoracic trauma, one of the most frequent injuries in patients with multiple traumata, is found in 50 to 80% of these patients and it is crucial for the patient's prognosis. It accounts for 25% of all death from polytraumatic injuries. The aim of this retrospective study was an analysis of the occurrence of chest injuries in polytrauma patients and their surgical treatment in the Trauma Centre or Department of Surgery of the University Hospital Pilsen in a five-year period. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients with injuries meeting the definition of polytrauma and an Injury Severity Score (ISS) ≥16 were included. The demographic characteristics, mechanism of multiple trauma, ISS value and chest injury were recorded in each patient. The number of injured patients in each year of the study was noted. In the patients with chest injury, the type of injury and method of treatment were assessed. The therapy was further analysed including its timing. The number of deaths due to polytrauma involving chest injury, the cause of death and its time in relation to the patient's admission to the Trauma Centre were evaluated. RESULTS In the period 2010-14, 513 polytrauma patients were treated; of them 371 (72.3%) were men with an average age of 40.5 years. The most frequent cause of injury was a traffic accident (74%). The average ISS of the whole group was 35 points. Chest injury was diagnosed in 469 patients (91.4%) of whom only five (1.1%) had penetrating injury. Pulmonary contusion was most frequent (314 patients; 67%). A total of 212 patients with chest injury underwent surgery (45.2%); urgent surgery was performed in 143 (67.5%), acute surgery in 49 (23.1%) and delayed surgery in 63 (29.7%) patients. Chest drainage was the major surgical procedure used in the whole group. Of 61 patients who died, 52 had chest injury. In this subgroup the most frequent cause of death was decompensated traumatic shock (26 patients; 50%). In the whole group, 32 polytrauma

  13. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.-Y.; Kim, J.H.; Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N.; Kim, Y.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  14. H1N1 influenza infection in children: Frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.-Y. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.H., E-mail: jhkate@skku.ed [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, H.; Jeon, T.Y.; Shin, K.E.; Shin, W.S.; Jung, H.N. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.-J. [Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To describe the frequency, pattern, and outcome of chest radiographic abnormalities in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Materials and methods: Three hundred and fourteen paediatric patients with confirmed H1N1 influenza infection who underwent chest radiography at presentation at a single institution during the outbreak in 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Abnormal chest radiographic findings related to acute infection were analysed in terms of frequency, pattern, and distribution. Medical records and follow-up radiographs were also reviewed to assess clinical features and outcomes. Results: Chest lesions suggesting acute infection were identified in 49 (16%) patients (mean age 8.2 years, range approximately 1.8-18.5 years). The most common finding was prominent peribronchial marking (71%), followed by air-space opacity (51%) with or without volume decrease, generalized hyperinflation (24%), and pleural effusion (20%). Other minor findings included pneumomediastinum (n = 2) and a nodule (n = 1). Distributions were bilateral (55%) or unilateral (45%) with frequent involvement of lower (78%), and middle (59%) lung zones. Thirty-nine patients (80%) were hospitalized and six (12%) required mechanical ventilation, followed by recovery. Thirty-one out of the 33 patients that underwent follow-up radiography showed marked resolution of all radiographic abnormalities. Conclusion: The frequency of a chest radiographic abnormality was found to be low in children with H1N1 influenza infection. Although typical radiographic findings of a viral lower respiratory infection were more common, unilateral involvement and air-space opacity were common, often with pleural effusion. Furthermore, pulmonary lesions showed near complete resolution on follow-up radiographs in the majority of patients.

  15. Diagnostic value of chest ultrasound after cardiac surgery: a comparison with chest X-ray and auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzani, Antonella; Manca, Tullio; Brusasco, Claudia; Santori, Gregorio; Valentino, Massimo; Nicolini, Francesco; Molardi, Alberto; Gherli, Tiziano; Corradi, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Chest auscultation and chest x-ray commonly are used to detect postoperative abnormalities and complications in patients admitted to intensive care after cardiac surgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether chest ultrasound represents an effective alternative to bedside chest x-ray to identify early postoperative abnormalities. Diagnostic accuracy of chest auscultation and chest ultrasound were compared in identifying individual abnormalities detected by chest x-ray, considered the reference method. Cardiac surgery intensive care unit. One hundred fifty-one consecutive adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. All patients included were studied by chest auscultation, ultrasound, and x-ray upon admission to intensive care after cardiac surgery. Six lung pathologic changes and endotracheal tube malposition were found. There was a highly significant correlation between abnormalities detected by chest ultrasound and x-ray (k = 0.90), but a poor correlation between chest auscultation and x-ray abnormalities (k = 0.15). Chest auscultation may help identify endotracheal tube misplacement and tension pneumothorax but it may miss most major abnormalities. Chest ultrasound represents a valid alternative to chest x-ray to detect most postoperative abnormalities and misplacements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Work load and musculoskeletal complaints during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J A; van Dijk, F J; Frings-Dresen, M H

    1994-06-01

    Many pregnant women have musculoskeletal complaints, the onset and aggravation of which are thought to be associated with their activity or work postures. The purpose of this paper was to obtain more insight into the influence of pregnancy on the load of the musculoskeletal system at work to provide a better basis for preventing complaints. To this end, literature pertinent to a model called "work load of the musculoskeletal system" was reviewed. The model was developed to describe how work contributes to musculoskeletal complaints. It was found that pregnancy causes changes in a worker's characteristics. These changes can lead to changes in the work situation, activity pattern, and postural characteristics and possibly result in a change in work load. In addition, physical changes such as weight gain increase the work load in a given posture. The load-bearing capacity of the musculoskeletal system decreases due to pregnancy. The changes in load and the decrease in load-bearing capacity singly or simultaneously increase the risk of musculoskeletal complaints. The multifactorial cause of musculoskeletal complaints during pregnancy reveals various possibilities for prevention.

  17. Chest Seal Placement for Penetrating Chest Wounds by Prehospital Ground Forces in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Steven G; April, Michael D; Naylor, Jason F; Simon, Erica M; Fisher, Andrew D; Cunningham, Cord W; Morissette, Daniel M; Fernandez, Jessie Renee D; Ryan, Kathy L

    Thoracic trauma represents 5% of all battlefield injuries. Communicating pneumothoraces resulting in tension physiology remain an important etiology of prehospital mortality. In addressing penetrating chest trauma, current Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) guidelines advocate the immediate placement of a vented chest seal device. Although the Committee on TCCC (CoTCCC) has approved numerous chest seal devices for battlefield use, few data exist regarding their use in a combat zone setting. To evaluate adherence to TCCC guidelines for chest seal placement among personnel deployed to Afghanistan. We obtained data from the Prehospital Trauma Registry (PHTR). Joint Trauma System personnel linked patients to the Department of Defense Trauma Registry, when available, for outcome data upon reaching a fixed facility. In the PHTR, we identified 62 patients with documented gunshot wound (GSW) or puncture wound trauma to the chest. The majority (74.2%; n = 46) of these were due to GSW, with the remainder either explosive-based puncture wounds (22.6%; n = 14) or a combination of GSW and explosive (3.2%; n = 2). Of the 62 casualties with documented GSW or puncture wounds, 46 (74.2%) underwent chest seal placement. Higher proportions of patients with medical officers in their chain of care underwent chest seal placement than those that did not (63.0% versus 37.0%). The majority of chest seals placed were not vented. Of patients with a GSW or puncture wound to the chest, 74.2% underwent chest seal placement. Most of the chest seals placed were not vented in accordance with guidelines, despite the guideline update midway through the study period. These data suggest the need to improve predeployment training on TCCC guidelines and matching of the Army logistical supply chain to the devices recommended by the CoTCCC. 2017.

  18. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gives detailed pictures of structures within the chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and ... helpful to assess the vessels of the chest cavity (arteries and veins). MRA can also demonstrate an ...

  19. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. MRI ... of the chest. assess disorders of the chest bones (vertebrae, ribs and sternum) and chest wall soft ...

  20. Treatment of chikungunya musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldo, Lusiele; Wakimoto, Mayumi Duarte; Ferreira, Heloisa; Bressan, Clarisse; Calvet, Guilherme Amaral; Pinheiro, Geraldo Castelar; Siqueira, Andre Machado; Brasil, Patrícia

    2018-04-01

    Chikungunya virus is amongst the fastest expanding vector transmissible diseases in recent years and has been causing massive epidemics in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Despite human infection by this virus being first described in the 1950s, there is a lack of adequate therapeutic evaluations to guide evidence-based recommendations. The current guidelines rely heavily in specialists' opinion and experience instead of using higher rated evidence. Areas covered: A systematic review of the literature was performed- not restricted to clinical trials - reporting the therapeutic response against this infection with the intent to gather the best evidence of the treatment options against musculoskeletal disorders following chikungunya fever. The 15 studies included in the analysis were categorized considering the initiation of treatment during the acute, subacute and chronic phase. Expert commentary: This review demonstrates the complexity of chikungunya fever and difficulty of therapeutic management. This review found no current evidence-based treatment recommendations for the musculoskeletal disorders following chikungunya fever. To provide an optimal treatment that prevents perpetuation or progression of chikungunya infection to a potentially destructive and permanent condition without causing more harm is an aim that must be pursued by researchers and health professionals working with this disease.

  1. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  3. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A.; Hermier, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis (∼ 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  4. Mitral Perivalvular Leak after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Rare Cause of Severe Subacute Mitral Regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Nicola; Facciorusso, Antonio; Vigna, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Blunt chest trauma is a very rare cause of valve disorder. Moreover, mitral valve involvement is less frequent than is aortic or tricuspid valve involvement, and the clinical course is usually acute. In the present report, we describe the case of a 49-year-old man with a perivalvular mitral injury that became clinically manifest one year after a violent, nonpenetrating chest injury. This case is atypical in regard to the valve involved (isolated mitral damage), the injury type (perivalvular leak in the absence of subvalvular abnormalities), and the clinical course (interval of one year between trauma and symptoms).

  5. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  6. Prognostic value of CT-derived left atrial and left ventricular measures in patients with acute chest pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takx, Richard A.P. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging − North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Nance, John W. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Bamberg, Fabian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Abro, Joseph A. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Carr, Christine M. [Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Litwin, Sheldon E. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • LV mass and LA diameter are independent prognostic factor for composite MACE. • LV mass and LA diameter were not significant prognostic factors for MACE in African Americans. • Assessment of LV mass by CT may have a role in the management of patients. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine which left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) parameters are associated with future major adverse cardiac event (MACE) and whether these measurements have independent prognostic value beyond risk factors and computed tomography (CT)-derived coronary artery disease measures. Materials and methods: This retrospective analysis was performed under an IRB waiver and in HIPAA compliance. Subjects underwent coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a dual-source CT system for acute chest pain evaluation. LV mass, LV ejection fraction (EF), LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), LA ESV and LA diameter, septal wall thickness and cardiac chamber diameters were measured. MACE was defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or late revascularization. The association between cardiac CT measures and the occurrence of MACE was quantified using Cox proportional hazard analysis. Results: 225 subjects (age, 56.2 ± 11.2; 140 males) were analyzed, of whom 42 (18.7%) experienced a MACE during a median follow-up of 13 months. LA diameter (HR:1.07, 95%CI:1.01–1.13 per mm) and LV mass (HR:1.05, 95%CI:1.00–1.10 per g) remained significant prognostic factor of MACE after controlling for Framingham risk score. LA diameter and LV mass were also found to have prognostic value independent of each other. The other morphologic and functional cardiac measures were no significant prognostic factors for MACE. Conclusion: CT-derived LA diameter and LV mass are associated with future MACE in patients undergoing evaluation for chest pain, and portend independent prognostic value beyond traditional risk factors, coronary calcium score, and

  7. Chest tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest drainage tube insertion; Insertion of tube into chest; Tube thoracostomy; Pericardial drain ... Be careful there are no kinks in your tube. The drainage system should always sit upright and be placed ...

  8. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  9. Design Approach of Biologically-Inspired Musculoskeletal Humanoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuto Nakanishi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize more natural and various motions like humans, humanlike musculoskeletal tendon-driven humanoids have been studied. Especially, it is very challenging to design musculoskeletal body structure which consists of complicated bones, redundant powerful and flexible muscles, and large number of distributed sensors. In addition, it is very challenging to reveal humanlike intelligence to manage these complicated musculoskeletal body structure. This paper sums up life-sized musculoskeletal humanoids Kenta, Kotaro, Kenzoh and Kenshiro which we have developed so far, and describes key technologies to develop and control these robots.

  10. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to your health. While a chest x-ray use a ... posted: How to Obtain and Share ...

  11. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Craig L; Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal findings included: a high prevalence and incidence of lower extremity, hip and back injuries; preliminary evidence that psychosocial and psychological issues such as stress and coping strategies affect injury frequency and duration; history of a previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain in the contralateral ankle in dance students; fatigue may play a role in ACL injury in dancers; acute hamstring strains in dancers affect tendon more than muscle tissue, often resulting in prolonged absence from dance. It is concluded that, while there are positive developments in the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of MSK injuries and pain in dancers, much room for improvement remains. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  12. Thin chest wall is an independent risk factor for the development of pneumothorax after chest tube removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Rahul J; Whelan, James F; Ferrada, Paula; Duane, Therese M; Malhotra, Ajai K; Aboutanos, Michel B; Ivatury, Rao R

    2012-04-01

    The factors contributing to the development of pneumothorax after removal of chest tube thoracostomy are not fully understood. We hypothesized that development of post pull pneumothorax (PPP) after chest tube removal would be significantly lower in those patients with thicker chest walls, due to the "protective" layer of adipose tissue. All patients on our trauma service who underwent chest tube thoracostomy from July 2010 to February 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient age, mechanism of trauma, and chest Abbreviated Injury Scale score were analyzed. Thoracic CTs were reviewed to ascertain chest wall thickness (CW). Thickness was measured at the level of the nipple at the midaxillary line, as perpendicular distance between skin and pleural cavity. Chest X-ray reports from immediately prior and after chest tube removal were reviewed for interval development of PPP. Data are presented as average ± standard deviation. Ninety-one chest tubes were inserted into 81 patients. Patients who died before chest tube removal (n = 11), or those without thoracic CT scans (n = 13) were excluded. PPP occurred in 29.9 per cent of chest tube removals (20/67). When PPP was encountered, repeat chest tube was necessary in 20 per cent of cases (4/20). After univariate analysis, younger age, penetrating mechanism, and thin chest wall were found to be significant risk factors for development of PPP. Chest Abbreviated Injury Scale score was similar in both groups. Logistic regression showed only chest wall thickness to be an independent risk factor for development of PPP.

  13. Chronic Osteoporotic Pain in Mice: Cutaneous and Deep Musculoskeletal Pain Are Partially Independent of Bone Resorption and Differentially Sensitive to Pharmacological Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyako Suzuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the pathological changes in osteoporotic bones are well established, the characterization of the osteoporotic pain and its appropriate treatment are not fully elucidated. We investigated the behavioral signs of cutaneous and deep musculoskeletal pain and physical function; time-dependent changes in bone mineral density (BMD and the emergence of the behavioral phenotype; and the effects of pharmacological interventions having different mechanisms of action (chronic intraperitoneal administration of pamidronate [0.25 mg/kg, 5x/week for 5 weeks] versus acute treatment with intraperitoneal morphine [10 mg/kg] and pregabalin [100 mg/kg] in a mouse model of ovariectomized or sham-operated mice 6 months following surgery. We observed reduced BMD associated with weight gain, referred cutaneous hypersensitivity, and deep musculoskeletal pain that persisted for 6 months. Chronic bisphosphonate treatment, 6 months after ovariectomy, reversed bone loss and hypersensitivity to cold, but other behavioral indices of osteoporotic pain were unchanged. While the efficacy of acute morphine on cutaneous pain was weak, pregabalin was highly effective; deep musculoskeletal pain was intractable. In conclusion, the reversal of bone loss alone is insufficient to manage pain in chronic osteoporosis. Additional treatments, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological, should be implemented to improve quality of life for osteoporosis patients.

  14. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and chest wall and may be used to help evaluate shortness of breath, persistent cough, fever, chest ... or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and monitor treatment for a variety of ...

  15. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, L.K.; Jacobson, G.M.; Leavitt, D.D.; Stewart, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues

  16. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  17. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong

    2002-01-01

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  18. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breath, persistent cough, fever, chest pain or injury. It may also be useful to help diagnose and ... have some concerns about chest x-rays. However, it’s important to consider the likelihood of benefit to ...

  19. The Fear of Movement/Pain in Musculoskeletal Pain-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Akhbari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and review psychological influences of pain such as kinesiophobia and pain-related fear on patients with musculoskeletal pain and on rehabilitation outcomes. Materials & Methods: Fear is a universal and powerful emotion and, as a result, it can have a profound impact on human behavior. the fear-motivated behavior has the potential to adversely impact rehabilitation outcomes for patients with musculoskeletal pain. cross-sectional studies consistently documented a positive association between elevated pain-related fear and increased pain intensity and disability. in addition, several longitudinal studies indicated that elevated pain-related fear is a precursor to poor clinical outcomes. existence of catastrophizing in patients effect on the fear of movement/ (reinjury. this fear contributes to avoidance behaviors and subsequent disuse, depression, and disability. it has been established that kinesiophobia plays a negative role in the outcome of the rehabilitation of acute and chronic low back pain, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia syndrome. Results: The recent studies suggest that physical therapists should consider the role of pain-related fear and avoidance behaviors in patients' function and they should assess these cognitive and behavioral factors. or (physical therapists should assess pain-related fear when rehabilitating certain individuals with musculoskeletal pain. currently, there is a lot of evidence for the assessment of pain-related fear in patients with musculoskeletal pain. self-report questionnaires are readily available for assessment and investigation of pain-related fear and several studies have found support for their validity and reliability. recent research indicated that besides fear-avoidance responses, endurance-related responses lead to chronic pain via physical overload. the existence of mental kinesiophobia has been established in patients with chronic stress complaints, and this

  20. Musculoskeletal manifestations in sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ravikanth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by substitution of glutamic acid by valine at the sixth position of the beta globin chain. The sequence of events leads to pain crisis. Ischemia of the tissues resulting from decreased blood flow is believed to occur in pain crisis. Repeated or prolonged sickling causes red cell death in the form of hemolytic anemia. The majority of hospital admissions are due to painful crisis. These patients are at increased risk for both osteomyelitis and infarction of the long bones. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of early osteomyelitis and its differentiation from infarction in sickle cell disease patients with acute bone crisis. Others findings include dactylitis, medullary infarcts, diploic space widening, fish mouth vertebrae, and avascular necrosis. We present a case series on the various musculoskeletal manifestations of sickle cell disease.

  1. International spinal cord injury musculoskeletal basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Burns, A S; Curt, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International....

  2. Musculoskeletal sporotrichosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A.C.; Destouet, J.M.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic, indolent, fungal infection that rarely involves the musculoskeletal system. The etiologic agent, Sporothrix schenckii, is ubiquitous in nature and has been isolated from soil, timber, decaying vegetation, and a variety of foliage. The organism gains entrance to the body through trauma to the skin or, in rare instances, by inhalation. The vast majority of infections in humans is characterized by nodular or ulcerated lesions of the cutaneous tissues and adjacent lymphatics. Osteoarticular involvement may occur either by contiguous spread from a cutaneous focus, through direct inoculation of tissue by the organism, or by hematogenous dissemination. The rarity of musculoskeletal sporotrichosis often causes a delay in diagnosis which leads to inappropriate therapy and permanent deformity in some patients. Three cases which show a spectrum of bone and joint involvement are presented.

  3. Musculoskeletal sporotrichosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.C.; Destouet, J.M.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic, indolent, fungal infection that rarely involves the musculoskeletal system. The etiologic agent, Sporothrix schenckii, is ubiquitous in nature and has been isolated from soil, timber, decaying vegetation, and a variety of foliage. The organism gains entrance to the body through trauma to the skin or, in rare instances, by inhalation. The vast majority of infections in humans is characterized by nodular or ulcerated lesions of the cutaneous tissues and adjacent lymphatics. Osteoarticular involvement may occur either by contiguous spread from a cutaneous focus, through direct inoculation of tissue by the organism, or by hematogenous dissemination. The rarity of musculoskeletal sporotrichosis often causes a delay in diagnosis which leads to inappropriate therapy and permanent deformity in some patients. Three cases which show a spectrum of bone and joint involvement are presented. (orig.)

  4. Studying morbidity and predicting mortality in patients with blunt chest trauma using a novel clinical score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini Manay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A departmental audit in March 2015 revealed significant mortality rate of 40% in blunt chest trauma patients (much greater than the global 25%. A study was thus planned to study morbidity and predictors of mortality in blunt chest trauma patients admitted to our hospital. Methods: This study was a prospective observational study of 139 patients with a history of blunt chest trauma between June 2015 and November 2015 after the Institutional Ethics Committee approval in April 2015. The sample size was calculated from the prevalence rate in our institute from the past medical records. Results: The morbidity factors following blunt chest injuries apart from pain were need for Intensive Care Unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Significant predictors of mortality in our study were SpO2 16, and need for mechanical ventilation. By calculating the likelihood ratios of each respiratory sign, a clinical score was devised. Conclusion: The modifiable factors affecting morbidity and mortality were identified. Mild to moderate chest injury due to blunt trauma is difficult to diagnose. The restoration of respiratory physiology has not only significant implications on recovery from chest injury but also all other injuries. It is our sincere hope that the score we have formulated will help reduce mortality and morbidity after further trials.

  5. Effects of Air Stacking Maneuver on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Compartmental Volumes of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Antonio; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dourado-Júnior, Mario; Saturnino, Lailane; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2017-11-01

    To assess the acute effects of air stacking on cough peak flow (CPF) and chest wall compartmental volumes of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) versus healthy subjects positioned at 45° body inclination. Cross-sectional study with a matched-pair design. University hospital. Persons (N=24) with ALS (n=12) and age-matched healthy subjects (n=12). CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, chest wall vital capacity, chest wall tidal volume and operational volumes, breathing pattern, and percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume were measured by optoelectronic plethysmography. Compared with healthy subjects, significantly lower CPF (P=.007), chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (Pprotocol in the healthy subjects, mainly because of end-inspiratory (P<.001) and abdominal volumes (P=.008). No significant differences were observed in percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume and end-expiratory volume of both groups. No significant differences were found in chest wall tidal volume, operational volume, and breathing pattern in persons with ALS. Air stacking is effective in increasing CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, and chest wall vital capacity of persons with ALS with no hyperinflation. Differences in compartmental volume contributions are probably because of lung and chest wall physiological changes. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chest tomosynthesis: technical and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Ase Allansdotter; Vikgren, Jenny; Bath, Magnus

    2014-02-01

    The recent implementation of chest tomosynthesis is built on the availability of large, dose-efficient, high-resolution flat panel detectors, which enable the acquisition of the necessary number of projection radiographs to allow reconstruction of section images of the chest within one breath hold. A chest tomosynthesis examination obtains the increased diagnostic information provided by volumetric imaging at a radiation dose comparable to that of conventional chest radiography. There is evidence that the sensitivity of chest tomosynthesis may be at least three times higher than for conventional chest radiography for detection of pulmonary nodules. The sensitivity increases with increasing nodule size and attenuation and decreases for nodules with subpleural location. Differentiation between pleural and subpleural lesions is a known pitfall due to the limited depth resolution in chest tomosynthesis. Studies on different types of pathology report increased detectability in favor of chest tomosynthesis in comparison to chest radiography. The technique provides improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography and facilitates the exclusion of pulmonary lesions in a majority of patients, avoiding the need for computed tomography (CT). However, motion artifacts can be a cumbersome limitation and breathing during the tomosynthesis image acquisition may result in severe artifacts significantly affecting the detectability of pathology. In summary, chest tomosynthesis has been shown to be superior to chest conventional radiography for many tasks and to be able to replace CT in selected cases. In our experience chest tomosynthesis is an efficient problem solver in daily clinical work. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Biological variation in musculoskeletal injuries: current knowledge, future research and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V; Posthumus, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from familial and genetic association studies have reported that DNA sequence variants play an important role, together with non-genetic factors, in the aetiology of both exercise-associated and occupational-associated acute and chronic musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries. The associated variants, which have been identified to date, may contribute to the interindividual variation in the structure and, by implication, mechanical properties of the collagen fibril and surrounding matrix within musculoskeletal soft tissues, as well as their response to mechanical loading and other stimuli. Future work should focus on the establishment of multidisciplinary international consortia for the identification of biologically relevant variants involved in modulating injury risk. These consortia will improve the limitations of the published hypothesis-driven genetic association studies, since they will allow resources to be pooled in recruiting large well-characterised cohorts required for whole-genome screening. Finally, clinicians and coaches need to be aware that many direct-to-consumer companies are currently marketing genetic tests directly to athletes without it being requested by an appropriately qualified healthcare professional, and without interpretation alongside other clinical indicators or lifestyle factors. These specific genetic tests are premature and are not necessarily required to evaluate susceptibility to musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Current practice should rather consider susceptibility through known risk factors such as a positive family history of a specific injury, a history of other tendon and/or ligament injuries and participation in activities associated with the specific musculoskeletal injuries. Potential susceptible athletes may then be individually managed to reduce their risk profile. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  9. Suspected acute pulmonary emboli: cost-effectiveness of chest helical computed tomography versus a standard diagnostic algorithm incorporating ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcos, G.; Chi, K.K.G.; Berry, G.; Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW; Shiell, A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a controversy regarding the investigation of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE). To compare the cost-effectiveness of alternative methods of diagnosing acute PE, chest helical computed tomography (CT) alone and in combination with venous ultrasound (US) of legs and pulmonary angiography (PA) were compared to a conventional algorithm using ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphy supplemented in selected cases by US and PA. A decision-analytical model was constructed to model the costs and effects of the three diagnostic strategies in a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients each. Transition probabilities were based on published data. Life years gained by each strategy were estimated from published mortality rates. Schedule fees were used to estimate costs. The V/Q protocol is both more expensive and more effective than CT alone resulting in 20.1 additional lives saved at a (discounted) cost of $940 per life year gained. An additional 2.5 lives can be saved if CT replaces V/Q scintigraphy in the diagnostic algorithm but at a cost of $23,905 per life year saved. It resulted that the more effective diagnostic strategies are also more expensive. In patients with suspected PE, the incremental cost-effectiveness of the V/Q based strategy over CT alone is reasonable in comparison with other health interventions. The cost-effectiveness of the supplemented CT strategy is more questionable. Copyright (2000) The Australasian College of Physicians

  10. Physical therapy intervention in patients with non-cardiac chest pain following a recent cardiac event: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid T Berg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the effect of two different physical therapy interventions in patients with stable coronary heart disease and non-cardiac chest pain. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out at a university hospital in Norway. A total of 30 patients with known and stable coronary heart disease and self-reported persistent chest pain reproduced by palpation of intercostal trigger points were participating in the study. The intervention was deep friction massage and heat pack versus heat pack only. The primary outcome was pain intensity after the intervention period and 3 months after the last treatment session, measured by Visual Analogue Scale, 0 to 100. Secondary outcome was health-related quality of life. Results: Treatment with deep friction massage and heat pack gave significant pain reduction compared to heat pack only (–17.6, 95% confidence interval: –30.5, –4.7; p < 0.01, and the reduction was persistent at 3 months’ follow-up (–15.2, 95% confidence interval: –28.5, –1.8; p = 0.03. Health-related quality of life improved in all three domains in patients with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion: Deep friction massage combined with heat pack is an efficient treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain in patients with stable coronary heart disease.

  11. Learning chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrozo Pupo, John C. (ed.) [Magdalena Univ., Santa Maria (Colombia). Respire - Inst. for Respiratory Care

    2013-03-01

    Useful learning tool for practitioners and students. Overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology. Aid to the correct interpretation of chest X-ray images. Radiology of the thorax forms an indispensable element of the basic diagnostic process for many conditions and is of key importance in a variety of medical disciplines. This user-friendly book provides an overview of the imaging techniques used in chest radiology and presents numerous instructive case-based images with accompanying explanatory text. A wide range of clinical conditions and circumstances are covered with the aim of enabling the reader to confidently interpret chest images by correctly identifying structures of interest and the causes of abnormalities. This book, which will be an invaluable learning tool, forms part of the Learning Imaging series for medical students, residents, less experienced radiologists, and other medical staff. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in prarticular.

  12. Chest radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a reference in plain chest film diagnosis provides a thorough background in the differential diagnosis of 22 of the most common radiologic patterns of chest disease. Each chapter is introduced with problem cases and a set of questions, followed by a tabular listing of the appropriate differential considerations. The book emphasizes plain films, CT and some MR scans are integrated to demonstrate how these modalities enhance the work of a case

  13. Pulmonary hydatid cyst in a pregnant patient causing acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hijazi Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old primigravida, at 32 weeks of gestation, presented with acute onset of respiratory failure and circulatory shock. Chest imaging showed findings suggestive of ruptured hydatid cyst, which was confirmed by histology post-thoracotomy. Tissue cultures from the removed cyst grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis also. She was successfully managed in the intensive care unit and was then discharged home on antituberculosis medications in addition to albendazole after prolonged hospitalization and a need for chest tube for bronchopleural fistula. Acute respiratory failure and anaphylactic shock secondary to ruptured pulmonary hydatid cyst and superimposed pulmonary tuberculosis in a pregnant lady should be considered in patients living in endemic areas.

  14. Musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti P. Deshmukh; Asmita G. Akarte

    2017-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal complications of diabetes have been generally ignored and poorly treated as compared to other complications. Hence we carried out this study to find the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in type II diabetes mellitus and its correlation with age, BMI, duration of diabetes, and control of diabetes. Methods: 100 consecutive patients of type II diabetes were studied. Duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, and any musculoskeletal complaints were noted....

  15. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  16. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-27

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  17. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Johnsen, Karen Kirstine; Thomsen, Henrik

    on collimation and dose reduction in digital chest radiography Methods and Materials A retrospective study of digital chest radiography is performed to evaluate the primary x-ray tube collimation of the PA and lateral radiographs. Data from one hundred fifty self-reliant female patients between 15 and 55 years...

  18. Acute myocarditis mimicking myocardial infarction can misdirect the diagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Yildirim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocarditis is a well-recognized but rare manifestation of mostly viral infections. It can present with various clinical manifestations and may mimic myocardial infarction (MI since patients usually present with chest pain, and the electrocardiographic changes similar to those observed in acute ST-elevation MI. We, herein, present such an extreme case of acute myocarditis characterized by dynamic ST segment elevation with reciprocal changes in the electrocardiogram.

  19. Does the quality of chest compressions deteriorate when the chest compression rate is above 120/min?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hoon; Kim, Kyuseok; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Taeyun; Kang, Changwoo; Park, Chanjong; Kim, Joonghee; Jo, You Hwan; Rhee, Joong Eui; Kim, Dong Hoon

    2014-08-01

    The quality of chest compressions along with defibrillation is the cornerstone of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which is known to improve the outcome of cardiac arrest. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the compression rate and other CPR quality parameters including compression depth and recoil. A conventional CPR training for lay rescuers was performed 2 weeks before the 'CPR contest'. CPR anytime training kits were distributed to respective participants for self-training on their own in their own time. The participants were tested for two-person CPR in pairs. The quantitative and qualitative data regarding the quality of CPR were collected from a standardised check list and SkillReporter, and compared by the compression rate. A total of 161 teams consisting of 322 students, which includes 116 men and 206 women, participated in the CPR contest. The mean depth and rate for chest compression were 49.0±8.2 mm and 110.2±10.2/min. Significantly deeper chest compression depths were noted at rates over 120/min than those at any other rates (47.0±7.4, 48.8±8.4, 52.3±6.7, p=0.008). Chest compression depth was proportional to chest compression rate (r=0.206, pcompression including chest compression depth and chest recoil by chest compression rate. Further evaluation regarding the upper limit of the chest compression rate is needed to ensure complete full chest wall recoil while maintaining an adequate chest compression depth. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. The chest radiological manifestation in psittacosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Fu Jiazhen; Wang Shulan; Zhang Shuxin; Sun Guochang; Tang Guangjian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the clinical characteristics and imaging features of psittacosis. Methods: The clinical features and imaging appearances of 3 cases with acute psittacosis were retrospectively analyzed. The related literature was reviewed. Results: The clinical manifestation of psittacosis was high fever in the patients. Physical findings included pulse-temperature dissociation, localized lung crackles, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. Laboratory findings showed elevation of ESR in all cases, and liver dysfunction was present in 2 cases. The counts of white blood cells were normal, but the percent of neutrophils might be increased. The chest X-ray and CT scan showed air-space consolidation and ground-glass attenuation in the lung, and miliary, nodular, or consolidated shadows were found in pathological areas. Pleural effusions were also present in 2 cases. Psittacosis was diagnosed from the history of exposure to infected parrots and elevation of the IgG and IgM titer for Chlamydia psittaci. Erythromycin was effective in all 3 patients. Conclusion: Although the appearance of psittacosis on clinical findings and chest X-ray and CT scan is not characteristic, psittacosis can be diagnosed with the combination of the history of exposure to infected parrots and laboratory findings. CT scan can reveal the focus earlier and accurately, and catching the imaging features of psittacosis is helpful in differential diagnosis. (authors)

  1. Impact of 64-slice coronary CT on the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain: results of a prospective two-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiaens, Luc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Cardiologie, Poitiers (France); Duchat, Florent; Boudiaf, Mourad; Fargeaudou, Yann; Ledref, Olivier; Soyer, Philippe [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Tasu, Jean-Pierre [CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Radiologie, Poitiers (France); Sirol, Marc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); INSERM UFR U942, Insuffisance Cardiaque et Biomarqueurs, Universite Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris VII - Denis Diderot, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie Vasculaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2012-05-15

    Our two-centre prospective study evaluates the usefulness of 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CCT) to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in patients admitted in emergency departments (ED) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with low-to-intermediate risk score. Patients (175) admitted for acute chest pain (ACP), unmodified electrocardiogram and first troponin measurement within normal ranges were included. A second troponin measurement and a 64-slice CCT within 24 h were performed. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded during follow-up (6 months {+-} 2). 64-slice CCT was either normal or showed non-significant coronary stenosis in the majority of patients (78%). 64-slice CCT depicted significant stenosis (>50% diameter) in 22% of patient whereas initial clinical and biological evaluation was reassuring. For negative CCTs, elevated troponin at second measurement did not modify the strategy or treatment of patients. No MACEs were noted during follow up. In 12% of patients CCT identified unsuspected non-coronary abnormalities. Our study confirms 64-slice CCT utility to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in 8/10 patients admitted in ED with ACP or ACS with low-to-intermediate risk score. Early discharge with a negative 64-slice CCT is associated with very low risk of cardiac events at 6 months. (orig.)

  2. The role and effectiveness of adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of musculoskeletal disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of musculoskeletal disorders is an increasing challenge to clinicians. Successful treatment relies on a wide range of multidisciplinary interventions. Adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy has been used as an orthopaedic treatment for several decades. Positive outcomes have been reported by many authors for orthopaedic infections, wound healing, delayed union and non-union of fractures, acute traumatic ischemia of the extremities, compromised grafts, and burn injuries. Severe side effects have also been reported with this therapy. To aid in the use of HBO therapy in orthopaedics, we reviewed 43 papers published in the past four decades and summarised the mechanisms, effectiveness, indications and contraindications, side effects, and cost impact of adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of difficult musculoskeletal disorders. Adjunctive HBO therapy is an effective treatment modality for the management of some severe and refractory musculoskeletal problems. If appropriate candidates are carefully identified, hyperbaric oxygen is a limb- and sometimes life-saving therapy. HBO therapy significantly reduces the length of the patient′s hospital stay, amputation rate, and wound care expenses. Thus, it is a cost-effective modality. A clinician must understand the side effects and risks of HBO treatment. Close monitoring throughout the treatment is warranted to minimise the risk to the patients.

  3. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-03-04

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Flow-mediated dilatation has no independent prognostic effect in patients with chest pain with or without ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Line Skjold; Malmqvist, Beata B; Hansen, Are

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic effect of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in patients with chest pain admitted to a coronary care unit. METHODS: Endothelium-dependent FMD in the brachial artery was examined in 223 patients with acute chest pain. All patients...... underwent a stress test at the time of admittance. On the basis of a positive stress test, a prior myocardial infarction (MI), prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary bypass surgery (CABG), 137 patients were categorized as having ischaemic heart disease (IHD). RESULTS: Patients with IHD...

  5. Clinical applications of dynamic functional musculoskeletal ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petscavage-Thomas J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jonelle Petscavage-Thomas Department of Radiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: There is an increasing trend in medicine to utilize ultrasound for diagnosis of musculoskeletal pathology. Although magnetic resonance imaging provides excellent spatial resolution of musculoskeletal structures in multiple imaging planes and is generally the cross-sectional modality of choice, it does not provide dynamic functional assessment of muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Dynamic maneuvers with ultrasound provide functional data and have been shown to be accurate for diagnosis. Ultrasound is also less expensive, portable, and more readily available. This article will review the common snapping, impingement, and friction syndromes imaged with dynamic ultrasound. It will also discuss future areas of research, including musculoskeletal sonoelastography. Keywords: snapping, dynamic, ultrasound, functional, musculoskeletal

  6. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a tru...

  7. Ultrasonic measurements of chest wall thickness and realistic chest phantom for calibration of Pu lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    There are four important problems for the measurements of chest wall thickness using ultrasonic device: (1) selection of optimum position of transducer and the number of measured points on the chest covered with detector, (2) estimation of adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall, especially for dispersed adipose like 'marbled beef', (3) determination of regression equations for the prediction of chest wall thickness, derived from groups of different body shape, i.e. corpulent and lean, and (4) estimation of effective chest wall thickness involved self-absorption layer of lung tissue, which changes with distribution of activity in the lungs. This quantity can not be measured with ultrasonic device. Realistic chest phantom was developed. The phantom contains removable model organs (lungs, liver, kidneys and heart), model trachea and artificial rib cage, and also includes chest plates that can be placed over the chest to simulate wide range adipose-to-muscle ratio in the chest wall. Various soft tissue substitutes were made of polyurethane with different concentrations of additive, and the rib cage were made of epoxy resin with calcium carbonate. The experimental data have shown that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration. (author)

  8. Work-related musculoskeletal injuries in Prosthetists and Orthotists in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S; Stuckey, R; Oakman, J

    2018-06-12

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in prosthetists/orthotists working in Australia. Secondary to this, the relationship between work-related hazards and work-related musculoskeletal disorders will be examined. In 2012 a self-report survey was conducted with the prosthetist/orthotist workforce in Australia (N=139, 56% response rate). Data on workplace physical and psychosocial hazards, job satisfaction, work life balance and musculoskeletal discomfort were collected. Predictors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders was 80%. Gender (β= 1.31, p=0.03), total weekly hours (β=0.9, pwork-related musculoskeletal disorders. Females reported higher levels of work-related musculoskeletal disorder discomfort than males in all body areas. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders prevalence is high in prosthetists/orthotists. This suggests that focus on work place injury prevention is required. Targeted prevention requires systematic identification and then control of all relevant workplace hazards.

  9. Acute Renal Failure due to Non-Traumatic Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagehan Aslan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a musculoskeletal clinical and biochemical syndrome which is seen associated with traumatic and non-traumatic causes and is known as muscular dystrophy. Rhabdomyolysis which develops following crush-type trauma (Crush syndrome is rarely seen but is a well-known clinical event in the etiology of acute renal failure. Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is rare. The case is here presented of a patient who was diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis on presentation with acute renal failure and to whom repeated dialysis was applied.

  10. Non-Invasive Mechanic Ventilation Using in Flail Chest, Caused By Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Onat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 75-year-old woman admitted our faculty emergency room with shortness of breath, and chest pain after traffic accident’s second hour. She was diagnosed as bilateral multipl rib fractures, left clavicula fracture, and left flail chest by phsical and radiological examinations. She was transfered to Chest Surgery Depatment’s intensive care unit. The patient was undergone non-invasive mask mechanic ventilation support, because of the decreasing of blood oxygen saturation and increasing of arteriel blood partial carbondioxide pressure. The treatment of non-invasive mechanic ventilation was succesfull for ventilation support. With this report, we would like to attentioned that non-invasive mechanic ventilation for blunt chest trauma patients could be used succesfully and could be used instead of endotracheal invasive mechanic ventilation.

  11. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among farm workers: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders among farm workers: A case study of an agricultural college in Zimbabwe. ... hazards, therefore a need for intervention to protect them from musculoskeletal complaints. Improvement in farm work practices through ergonomic training might help reduce musculoskeletal complaints.

  12. Relationship Between Physiological Parameters and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Undifferentiated Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Jaimi H; Beamish, Daniel; Parsonage, William; Hawkins, Tracey; Schluter, Jessica; Dalton, Emily; Parker, Kate; Than, Martin; Hammett, Christopher; Lamanna, Arvin; Cullen, Louise

    2016-01-01

    The investigators of this study sought to examine whether abnormal physiological parameters are associated with increased risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain. We used prospectively collected data on adult patients presenting with suspected ACS in 2 EDs in Australia and New Zealand. Trained research nurses collected physiological data including temperature, respiratory rate, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) on presentation to the ED. The primary endpoint was ACS within 30 days of presentation, as adjudicated by cardiologists using standardized guidelines. The prognostic utility of physiological parameters for ACS was examined using risk ratios. Acute coronary syndrome was diagnosed in 384 of the 1951 patients (20%) recruited. Compared with patients whose SBP was between 100 and 140 mm Hg, patients with an SBP of lower than 100 mm Hg or higher than 140 mm Hg were 1.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.2-1.7) more likely to have ACS. Similarly, compared with patients whose temperature was between 36.5°C and 37.5°C, patients with temperature of lower than 36.5°C or higher than 37.5°C were 1.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.6) more likely to have ACS. Heart rate and respiratory rate were not predictors of ACS. Patients with abnormal temperature or SBP were slightly more likely to have ACS, but such risk was of too small a magnitude to be useful in clinical decision making. Other physiological parameters (heart rate and respiratory rate) had no prognostic value. The use of physiological parameters cannot reliably confirm or rule out ACS.

  13. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Baig M; Hefny, Ashraf F

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. A 63- year- old man presented to the Emergency Department complaining of left lateral chest pain due to a fall on his chest at home. On examination, he was hemodynamically stable. An urgent chest X-ray showed evidence of left sided pneumothorax. CT scan of the chest showed pneumothorax of more than 30% of the left hemithorax (around 600ml of air) with multiple left ribs fracture. Patient refused tube thoracostomy and was admitted to surgical department for close observation. The patient was managed conservatively without chest tube insertion. A repeat CT scan of the chest has shown complete resolution of the pneumothorax. The clinical spectrum of pneumothorax varies from asymptomatic to life threatening tension pneumothorax. In stable patients, conservative management can be safe and effective for small pneumothorax. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the English literature with large pneumothorax which resolved spontaneously without chest drain. Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms among otolaryngology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kevin; Grundfast, Kenneth M; Levi, Jessica R

    Previous studies have suggested that musculoskeletal symptoms are common among practicing otolaryngologists. Early training can be the ideal time to foster knowledge of ergonomics and develop safe work habits, however, little data exists regarding musculoskeletal symptoms in residents. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize musculoskeletal symptoms in a preliminary sample of otolaryngology residents. A cross-sectional survey incorporating the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was sent to 30 Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residencies to examine musculoskeletal symptoms among residents. A two-sample test of proportions was performed to compare symptoms between male and female residents. In total, 141 respondents (response rate=34.7%) completed the survey. Fifty-five percent of survey respondents were male and 45% were female. Musculoskeletal symptoms were most frequently reported in the neck (82.3%), followed by the lower back (56%), upper back (40.4%), and shoulders (40.4%). The most common symptoms were stiffness in the neck (71.6%), pain in the neck (61.7%), and pain in the lower back (48.2%). In total, 6.4% of residents missed work and 16.3% of residents stopped during an operation at some point due to their symptoms. Most residents (88.3%) believed their musculoskeletal symptoms were attributed to their surgical training. Female residents were significantly more likely to experience neck (p<0.0001) and wrist/hand (p=0.019) discomfort compared to male residents. Musculoskeletal symptoms were common among residents, approaching rates similar to those previously identified in practicing otolaryngologists. Increased emphasis on surgical ergonomics is warranted to improve workplace safety and prevent future injury. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Chest? What is MRI of the Chest? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... heart, valves, great vessels, etc.). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  16. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to assess the anatomy and function of the heart and its blood flow. Tell your doctor about ... chest cavity, including the mediastinum , chest wall, pleura, heart and vessels, from almost any angle. MRI also ...

  17. Predictors of Adverse Outcomes of Patients with Chest Pain and Primary Diagnosis of Non-Cardiac Pain at the Time of Discharge from Emergency Department: A 30-Days Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Mohammadhossien; Mirzaei, Masoud; Amin, Ahmad; Emami, Mahmoud; Aryanpoor, Reza; Shamsi, Farimah; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi

    2016-07-01

    Chest pain is a common symptom for referring patients to emergency departments (ED). Among those referred, some are admitted to hospitals with a definite or tentative diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and some are discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain. This study aimed at investigating 30 days' adverse outcomes of patients discharged from ED of a major heart center in Iran. Out of 1638 chest pain admissions to the centre during 2010-2011, 962 patients (mean age= 50.9±15.9 years) who were admitted to Afshar Heart Center's ED with chest pain as their chief complaint, and discharged with primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain, were followed for any adverse cardiac events 30 days post discharge. The adverse events were: unstable angina, non-ST-elevated myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), coronary revascularization (percutaneous angioplasty, coronary artery bypass grafting) and death. Adverse cardiac events, including acute coronary syndrome (ACS), revascularization and death were observed in 30 patients (3.1%) including: acute MI n=5 (0.5%, sudden cardiac death inn=1 (0.1%, coronary revascularization in n=8 (0.8%) and hospitalization due to unstable angina/NSTEMI in n=16 (1-7%). Adverse events were seen more frequently in patients with history of hypertension, dyslipidemia and previous coronary artery disease. In univariate analysis, the chance of postdischarge adverse cardiac events was higher in patients with hypertension (OR=9.36, CI=3.24-27.03), previous coronary artery disease (OR= 3.8, CI=1.78-8.0), dyslipidemia (OR=3.5, CI=1.7-7.38) and discharge against medical advice (OR=2.85, CI= 1.37-5.91). The extent of adverse cardiac events in patients with a primary diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain within 30 days of discharge was significant, mandating nation-wide registries to provide better care for these patients.

  18. Musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigirey, V

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about musculoskeletal injuries and the diagnosis of osseous tumors. The use of the radiology, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance contribute to detect the localization of the osseous lesions as well as the density (lytic, sclerotic, mixed) and the benign and malignant tumors.

  19. Learning musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, Joan C. (eds.) [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona; Ribes, Ramon

    2010-07-01

    This introduction to musculoskeletal imaging is a further volume in the Learning Imaging series. Written in a user-friendly format, it takes into account that musculoskeletal radiology is a subspecialty which has widely expanded its scope and imaging capabilities with the advent of ultrasound, MRI, multidetector CT, and PET. The book is divided into ten sections covering: infection and arthritis, tumors, tendons and muscles, bone marrow, spine, shoulder, elbow, hand and wrist, hip and pelvis, knee, and ankle and foot. Each chapter is presented with an introduction and ten case studies with illustrations and comments from anatomical, physiopathological and radiological standpoints along with bibliographic recommendations. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in particular. (orig.)

  20. Learning musculoskeletal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilanova, Joan C.; Ribes, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    This introduction to musculoskeletal imaging is a further volume in the Learning Imaging series. Written in a user-friendly format, it takes into account that musculoskeletal radiology is a subspecialty which has widely expanded its scope and imaging capabilities with the advent of ultrasound, MRI, multidetector CT, and PET. The book is divided into ten sections covering: infection and arthritis, tumors, tendons and muscles, bone marrow, spine, shoulder, elbow, hand and wrist, hip and pelvis, knee, and ankle and foot. Each chapter is presented with an introduction and ten case studies with illustrations and comments from anatomical, physiopathological and radiological standpoints along with bibliographic recommendations. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in particular. (orig.)

  1. Clinical manifestation as acute coronary syndrome without electrocardiographically ischemia: a clue for aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Yi Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is a critical condition requiring immediate assessment and management. Clinical presentation is commonly associated with severe chest pain and high blood pressure. However, misdiagnosis is frequent because of various features. We presented a case of 51-year-old woman who complained of dyspnea for 3 d after she experienced back pain for one week. She was presented with severe respiration distress with impending respiration failure on arrival to our hospital. Her chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with acute pulmonary edema. The laboratory data revealed elevated cardiac enzyme and electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia. She was hospitalized under the initial diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The patient remained hemodynamically stable, and experienced one episode of chest discomfort. After electrocardiography, she was found with bigeminy ventricular premature beats without ST-T change. Follow-up cardiac enzyme demonstrated progressive declined. Cardiac catheterization was performed on the third day of admission, and coronary angiography revealed large intimal flap on aortic root with bilateral coronary artery involvement. Surgical management was arranged after immediate chest computed tomography study.

  2. The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions : a manikin study

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Richard A.; Soar, Jasmeet; Davies, Robin P.; Akhtar, Naheed; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose\\ud Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables.\\ud Methods\\ud Twenty healthcare professionals performed two minutes of co...

  3. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  4. Endobronchial Tuberculosis and Chest Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sasani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial tuberculosis and chest radiography I read, with interest, the article entitled “Clinical and Para-clinical Presentations of Endobronchial Tuberculosis” by Ahmadi Hoseini H. S. et al. (1 published in this journal. I would like to focus on some details about the chest X-ray of patients as elaborated by the authors in the results section. Accordingly, the findings of chest radiography in the available patients were as follows: pulmonary consolidation (75%, reduced pulmonary volume (20%, and hilar adenopathy (10%. This is an incomplete statement because the authors did not explain whether there was any normal chest radiography in the study population. In addition, it is not clear whether the X-ray examinations of the patients were normal, how many abnormal plain films yielded the presented data. On the other hand, the fact that the studied patients had no normal chest radiography is  controversial since in the literature, 10-20% of the patients with endobronchial tuberculosis are reported to have normal chest X-ray (2, 3. In fact, this is one of the problems in the diagnosis of the disease, as well as a potential cause of delayed diagnosis and treatment of the patients. Therefore, the absence of normal chest radiographs is in contrast to the available literature, and if not an error, it could be a subject of further investigation.

  5. Managing a chest tube and drainage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Rajaraman; Hoque, Happy; Davies, Tony W

    2010-02-01

    Intercostal drainage tubes (ie, chest tubes) are inserted to drain the pleural cavity of air, blood, pus, or lymph. The water-seal container connected to the chest tube allows one-way movement of air and liquid from the pleural cavity. The container should not be changed unless it is full, and the chest tube should not be clamped unnecessarily. After a chest tube is inserted, a nurse trained in chest-tube management is responsible for managing the chest tube and drainage system. This entails monitoring the chest-tube position, controlling fluid evacuation, identifying when to change or empty the containers, and caring for the tube and drainage system during patient transport. This article provides an overview of indications, insertion techniques, and management of chest tubes. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of chest tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules: effect of clinical experience and comparison with chest radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, Sara; Vikgren, Jenny; Svalkvist, Angelica; Johnsson, Åse A.; Boijsen, Marianne; Flinck, Agneta; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Kheddache, Susanne; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis refers to the technique of collecting low-dose projections of the chest at different angles and using these projections to reconstruct section images of the chest. In this study, a comparison of chest tomosynthesis and chest radiography in the detection of pulmonary nodules was performed and the effect of clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis was evaluated. Three senior thoracic radiologists, with more than ten years of experience of chest radiology and 6 months of clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis, acted as observers in a jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristics (JAFROC-1) study, performed on 42 patients with and 47 patients without pulmonary nodules examined with both chest tomosynthesis and chest radiography. MDCT was used as reference and the total number of nodules found using MDCT was 131. To investigate the effect of additional clinical experience of chest tomosynthesis, a second reading session of the tomosynthesis images was performed one year after the initial one. The JAFROC-1 figure of merit (FOM) was used as the principal measure of detectability. In comparison with chest radiography, chest tomosynthesis performed significantly better with regard to detectability. The observer-averaged JAFROC-1 FOM was 0.61 for tomosynthesis and 0.40 for radiography, giving a statistically significant difference between the techniques of 0.21 (p<0.0001). The observer-averaged JAFROC-1 FOM of the second reading of the tomosynthesis cases was not significantly higher than that of the first reading, indicating no improvement in detectability due to additional clinical experience of tomosynthesis.

  7. Musculoskeletal problems among string instrumentalists in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedayo T. Ajidahun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musicians who play string instruments are affected more by musculoskeletal injuries when compared to other instrument playing groups. Musculoskeletal problems are commonly found in the upper extremities and trunk. Several risk factors such as gender, practice hours and instrument played are associated with the prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal problems among string instrumentalists. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, distribution, severity and risk factors for musculoskeletal problems among string instrumentalists. Method: A cross-sectional study design using both online and paper-based questionnaires were used to collect data from string instrumentalists playing in both amateur and professional orchestras in South Africa. Results: A total of 114 string instrumentalists participated in the study, of which 86 (77% reported problems in one or more anatomic regions while 39 (35% were currently experiencing musculoskeletal problems that affected their performance. The trunk and both shoulders were the most commonly affected body regions. The majority of the participants reported the severity of the complaints as mild to moderate with aching, soreness, tingling and fatigue being the most commonly used descriptors of the symptoms of playing-related musculoskeletal problems. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems that affect performance is high among string instrumentalists in South Africa. An evaluation of associated risk factors with the aim of reducing injuries may be important in improving performance.

  8. Selective chest imaging for blunt trauma patients: The national emergency X-ray utilization studies (NEXUS-chest algorithm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Robert M; Hendey, Gregory W; Mower, William R

    2017-01-01

    Chest imaging plays a prominent role in blunt trauma patient evaluation, but indiscriminate imaging is expensive, may delay care, and unnecessarily exposes patients to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. To improve diagnostic chest imaging utilization, we conducted 3 prospective multicenter studies over 12years to derive and validate decision instruments (DIs) to guide the use of chest x-ray (CXR) and chest computed tomography (CT). The first DI, NEXUS Chest x-ray, consists of seven criteria (Age >60years; rapid deceleration mechanism; chest pain; intoxication; altered mental status; distracting painful injury; and chest wall tenderness) and exhibits a sensitivity of 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 98.2-99.4%) and a specificity of 13.3% (95% CI, 12.6%-14.0%) for detecting clinically significant injuries. We developed two NEXUS Chest CT DIs, which are both highly reliable in detecting clinically major injuries (sensitivity of 99.2%; 95% CI 95.4-100%). Designed primarily to focus on detecting major injuries, the NEXUS Chest CT-Major DI consists of six criteria (abnormal CXR; distracting injury; chest wall tenderness; sternal tenderness; thoracic spine tenderness; and scapular tenderness) and exhibits higher specificity (37.9%; 95% CI 35.8-40.1%). Designed to reliability detect both major and minor injuries (sensitivity 95.4%; 95% CI 93.6-96.9%) with resulting lower specificity (25.5%; 95% CI 23.5-27.5%), the NEXUS CT-All rule consists of seven elements (the six NEXUS CT-Major criteria plus rapid deceleration mechanism). The purpose of this review is to synthesize the three DIs into a novel, cohesive summary algorithm with practical implementation recommendations to guide selective chest imaging in adult blunt trauma patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation of a chest pain management service improves patient care and reduces length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Adam C; O'Dwyer, Kristina M; Cullen, Louise; Brown, Anthony; Denaro, Charles; Parsonage, William

    2014-03-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common complaints in patients presenting to an emergency department. Delays in management due to a lack of readily available objective tests to risk stratify patients with possible acute coronary syndromes can lead to an unnecessarily lengthy admission placing pressure on hospital beds or inappropriate discharge. The need for a co-ordinated system of clinical management based on enhanced communication between departments, timely and appropriate triage, clinical investigation, diagnosis, and treatment was identified. An evidence-based Chest Pain Management Service and clinical pathway were developed and implemented, including the introduction of after-hours exercise stress testing. Between November 2005 and March 2013, 5662 patients were managed according to a Chest Pain Management pathway resulting in a reduction of 5181 admission nights by more timely identification of patients at low risk who could then be discharged. In addition, 1360 days were avoided in high-risk patients who received earlier diagnosis and treatment. The creation of a Chest Pain Management pathway and the extended exercise stress testing service resulted in earlier discharge for low-risk patients; and timely treatment for patients with positive and equivocal exercise stress test results. This service demonstrated a significant saving in overnight admissions.

  10. Comparison of chest compression quality between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method during CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Sub

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to grasp difference in quality of chest compression accuracy between the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone application and the standardized traditional chest compression method. Participants were progressed 64 people except 6 absentees among 70 people who agreed to participation with completing the CPR curriculum. In the classification of group in participants, the modified chest compression method was called as smartphone group (33 people). The standardized chest compression method was called as traditional group (31 people). The common equipments in both groups were used Manikin for practice and Manikin for evaluation. In the meantime, the smartphone group for application was utilized Android and iOS Operating System (OS) of 2 smartphone products (G, i). The measurement period was conducted from September 25th to 26th, 2012. Data analysis was used SPSS WIN 12.0 program. As a result of research, the proper compression depth (mm) was shown the proper compression depth (p< 0.01) in traditional group (53.77 mm) compared to smartphone group (48.35 mm). Even the proper chest compression (%) was formed suitably (p< 0.05) in traditional group (73.96%) more than smartphone group (60.51%). As for the awareness of chest compression accuracy, the traditional group (3.83 points) had the higher awareness of chest compression accuracy (p< 0.001) than the smartphone group (2.32 points). In the questionnaire that was additionally carried out 1 question only in smartphone group, the modified chest compression method with the use of smartphone had the high negative reason in rescuer for occurrence of hand back pain (48.5%) and unstable posture (21.2%).

  11. Chest Reconstruction and Chest Dysphoria in Transmasculine Minors and Young Adults: Comparisons of Nonsurgical and Postsurgical Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson-Kennedy, Johanna; Warus, Jonathan; Okonta, Vivian; Belzer, Marvin; Clark, Leslie F

    2018-05-01

    Transmasculine youth, who are assigned female at birth but have a gender identity along the masculine spectrum, often report considerable distress after breast development (chest dysphoria). Professional guidelines lack clarity regarding referring minors (defined as people younger than 18 years) for chest surgery because there are no data documenting the effect of chest surgery on minors. To examine the amount of chest dysphoria in transmasculine youth who had had chest reconstruction surgery compared with those who had not undergone this surgery. Using a novel measure of chest dysphoria, this cohort study at a large, urban, hospital-affiliated ambulatory clinic specializing in transgender youth care collected survey data about testosterone use and chest distress among transmasculine youth and young adults. Additional information about regret and adverse effects was collected from those who had undergone surgery. Eligible youth were 13 to 25 years old, had been assigned female at birth, and had an identified gender as something other than female. Recruitment occurred during clinical visits and via telephone between June 2016 and December 2016. Surveys were collected from participants who had undergone chest surgery at the time of survey collection and an equal number of youth who had not undergone surgery. Outcomes were chest dysphoria composite score (range 0-51, with higher scores indicating greater distress) in all participants; desire for chest surgery in patients who had not had surgery; and regret about surgery and complications of surgery in patients who were postsurgical. Of 136 completed surveys, 68 (50.0%) were from postsurgical participants, and 68 (50.0%) were from nonsurgical participants. At the time of the survey, the mean (SD) age was 19 (2.5) years for postsurgical participants and 17 (2.5) years for nonsurgical participants. Chest dysphoria composite score mean (SD) was 29.6 (10.0) for participants who had not undergone chest reconstruction, which

  12. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific scaling of cadaver-based musculoskeletal models is important for accurate musculoskeletal analysis within multiple areas such as ergonomics, orthopaedics and occupational health. We present two procedures to scale ‘generic’ musculoskeletal models to match segment lengths and joint...... three scaling methods to an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal model and compared predicted knee joint contact forces to those measured with an instrumented prosthesis during gait. Additionally, a Monte Carlo study was used to investigate the sensitivity of the knee joint contact force to random...

  13. Musculoskeletal colour/power Doppler in sports medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M I; Boesen, M; Langberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    This review article discusses the aspects of sports medicine where musculoskeletal Doppler ultrasound has valuable contribution in diagnosis and/or treatment of some of the typical musculoskeletal sports injuries. Also, conditions where the Doppler ultrasound has no value are discussed. Some...

  14. Epidemiology and clinical profile of common musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology and clinical profile of common musculoskeletal diseases in patients with diabetes mellitus at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ... or worsening of MSD. Keywords: musculoskeletal complications; diabetic foot; foot care; trigger finger; Dupuytren's contracture; stiff frozen shoulder ...

  15. Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann, J P; Enzenauer, R J

    1995-05-01

    A pediatric case of Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis is described. A 12-year-old black boy was admitted to the pediatric service for presumed right knee septic arthritis. Symptoms included acute pain and swelling with decreased range-of-motion. Although the patient's right knee symptoms and positive Lyme serology were consistent with a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, the presence of sensorineural hearing loss and interstitial keratitis with inflammatory arthritis suggested a diagnosis of Cogan's syndrome. Subsequent Western blot analysis was negative for Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. The patient had dramatic clinical improvement of musculoskeletal and ophthalmologic complaints shortly after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, although residual sensorineural hearing loss persisted.

  16. Fisioterapia respiratória em crianças com doença falciforme e síndrome torácica aguda Respiratory therapy in children with sickle cell disease and acute chest syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Valter Hostyn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar uma revisão sistemática da literatura médica para identificar as técnicas de fisioterapia respiratória aplicadas em crianças com doença falciforme e síndrome torácica aguda, bem como descrever seu nível de evidência e recomendação. FONTES DE DADOS: Revisão bibliográfica nos bancos de dados Medline, Lilacs, SciELO e Cochrane no período de 1995 e 2009, com os descritores: "doença falciforme", "síndrome torácica aguda", "fisioterapia", "criança", "inspirometria de incentivo", em português e inglês, excluindo-se os estudos de revisão. Os artigos foram classificados por nível de evidência. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Foram encontrados cinco artigos; destes, três utilizaram a inspirometria de incentivo e observaram que ela evita as complicações pulmonares associadas à síndrome torácica aguda (nível de evidência II, II e IV, um deles (evidência II comparou a inspirometria de incentivo com o dispositivo de pressão expiratória, sem diferenças entre ambos. Um artigo utilizou uma rotina de cuidados, incluindo a inspirometria de incentivo (evidência V, e observou redução do tempo de internação hospitalar e do uso de medicação oral para dor. Outro estudo com a ventilação não invasiva para crianças com desconforto respiratório e com incapacidade de realizar a inspirometria de incentivo relatou melhora da oxigenação e do desconforto respiratório (nível de evidência V. CONCLUSÕES: As técnicas de fisioterapia respiratória com dispositivos de inspirometria de incentivo, de pressão expiratória e a ventilação não invasiva podem ser aplicadas em crianças com doença falciforme e síndrome torácica aguda; o nível de recomendação é C.OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the medical literature to identify chest physiotherapy techniques applied to children with sickle cell disease and acute chest syndrome, and to report their level of evidence and recommendation. DATA SOURCE: A bibliographic

  17. Musculoskeletal pain in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannini, Suely Nóbrega; Dória-Filho, Ulysses; Damiani, Durval; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pain, musculoskeletal syndromes, orthopedic disorders and using computers and playing videogames among obese adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study that investigated 100 consecutive obese adolescents and 100 healthy-weight controls using a confidential, self-report questionnaire covering demographic data, sports participation, painful musculoskeletal system symptoms and using computers and playing videogames. The questionnaire's test-retest reliability was tested. Physical examination covered six musculoskeletal syndromes and seven orthopedic disorders. The kappa index for test-retest was 0.724. Pain and musculoskeletal syndromes were equally prevalent in both groups (44 vs. 56%, p = 0.09; 12 vs. 16%, p = 0.541; respectively). Notwithstanding, orthopedic disorders (98 vs. 76%, p = 0.0001), tight quadriceps (89 vs. 44%, p = 0.0001) and genu valgum (87 vs. 24%, p = 0.0001) were significantly more prevalent in obese adolescents than in controls. Median time spent using a computer the day before, on Saturdays and on Sundays were all lower among the obese subjects (30 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.0001; 1 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.001; and 0 vs. 30 minutes, p = 0.02; respectively). Obese adolescents were less likely to play handheld videogames (2 vs. 11%, p = 0.003) and there was no difference in the two groups' use of full-sized videogames (p > 0.05). Comparing obese adolescents with pain to those free from pain revealed that pain was more frequent among females (59 vs. 39%, p = 0.048) and was associated with greater median time spent playing on Sundays [0 (0-720) vs. 0 (0-240) minutes, p = 0.028]. Obesity can cause osteoarticular system damage at the start of adolescence, particularly to the lower limbs. Programs developed specifically for obese female adolescents with musculoskeletal pain are needed.

  18. Musculoskeletal System Symptoms in Goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim Akin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with thyroid dysfunction. Methods: One hundred and twenty-three patients (100 female, 23 male who visited the nuclear medicine department for thyroid gland scintigraphy were included in our study. According to thyroid hormone levels, patients were allocated into five categories: hyperthyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroidism, and hypothyroidism. Before neurological and musculoskeletal examinations, a standardized symptom questionnaire was completed including questions about sensory symptoms, muscle weakness, restricted joint mobility, musculoskeletal pain. Neurological examination, range of motion of joints, effusion or swelling of joints was assessed. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis was done by the clinical and radiological characteristics. The diagnosis of FMS was made according to criteria of American College of Rheumatology. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, a T-score ≤ -2.5 was classified as osteoporosis, whereas a T-score between -2.5 and -1.0 was classified as osteopenia. Thyroid status was determined by serum TSH levels. Results: Eighty-one percent of the patients were female (100 and 19% were male (23. Mean age of female patients was 49.99±15.27 years (range 20-87 and mean age of male patients was 61.8±12.33 years (range 34-88. When divided according to thyroid status, 21.1% (n=26 had hyperthyroidism, 21.1% (n=26 had subclinical hyperthyroidism, 49.6% (n=61 were euthyroid, 4.9% (n=6 had subclinical hypothyroidism and 3.3% (n=4 were hypothyroid. None of 59% of patients had any musculoskeletal diagnosis. Osteoporosis was the most common problem, affecting 23.7% of patients Conclusion: The presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in patients with goiter should be considered and investigated. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 261-269

  19. Clinical assessment compared with chest X-Ray after removal of chest tube to diagnose pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, F. A.; Noor, Q. U. H.; Mehmood, U.; Imtiaz, T.; Zafar, U.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical judgment in ruling out pneumothorax during the removal of the chest tube by auscultating the chest before removal and after the extubation of the chest tube in comparison to x ray radiological results. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore Pakistan, from August 2015 to March 2016. Material and Methods: A sample size of 100 was calculated. Patients were selected via non probability purposive sampling. Children under 14 years were not included. The patients with mal-positioned chest tube, surgical site infection, air leak and the patients with more than one chest tube on one side were excluded. A proforma was made and filled by one person. Chest tubes were removed by two trained senior registrars according to a protocol devised. It was ensured that there was no air leak present before removal clinically and radiologically. Another chest x-ray was done within 24 hours of extubation to detect any pathology that might have occurred during the process. Any complication in the patient clinically was observed till the x-ray film became available. Two sets of readings were obtained. Set A included auscultation findings and set B included x ray results. Results: Out of 100 patients, 60 (60 percent) were males and 40 (40 percent) females. The ages of the patients ranged between 17-77 years. Mean age of the patient was 43.27 ± 17.05 years. In set A out of 100 (100 percent) no pneumothorax developed clinically. In set B out of 100 patients 99 (99 percent) showed no pneumothorax on chest x ray, only 1 (1 percent) showed pneumothorax which was not significant (less than 15 percent on X ray). However, the patient remained asymptomatic clinically and there was no need of reinsertion of the chest tube. Conclusion: Auscultatory findings in diagnosing a significant pneumothorax are justified. Hence, if the chest tube is removed according to the protocol, clinically by

  20. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: an overlooked cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Hackbart Bermudes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC, also known as apical ballooning syndrome, broken heart syndrome, or stress-induced cardiomyopathy, is defined as a transient disturbance of the left ventricle, which is quite often associated with electrocardiographic abnormalities that may mimic acute myocardial infarction. The syndrome is also characterized by a mild alteration of cardiac biomarkers in absence of coronary blood flow obstruction on the coronariography. Clinical presentation is often manifested by angina, dyspnea, syncope, and arrhythmias. Peculiarly, the left ventricle takes the form of “tako-tsubo” (a Japanese word for “octopus trap” on the imaging workup. The authors report the case of a post-menopausal, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and type-II diabetic woman admitted at the emergency service with acute chest pain post physical exertion. Electrocardiogram showed signs of ischemia and myocardial necrosis markers were mildly increased. Echocardiography and ventriculography showed apical and mid-ventricular akinesia, with mild atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Thus diagnostic workup and the outcome followed the diagnostic criteria for TTC. The authors called attention to the potential of overlooking this diagnosis, since this syndrome is still not widely recognized.

  1. Digital chest radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debess, Jeanne Elisabeth; Vejle-Sørensen, Jens Kristian; Thomsen, Henrik

    ,3 mAs and SID SID of 180 centimetres using a phantom and lithium fluoride thermo luminescence dosimeter (TLD). Dose to risk organs mamma, thyroid and colon are measured at different collimations with one-centimetre steps. TLD results are used to estimate dose reduction for different collimations...... at the conference. Conclusion: Collimation improvement in basic chest radiography can reduce the radiation to female patients at chest x-ray examinations....

  2. Aquatic exercise & balneotherapy in musculoskeletal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2012-06-01

    This is a best-evidence synthesis providing an evidence-based summary on the effectiveness of aquatic exercises and balneotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. The most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions addressed in this review include: low back pain, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. Over 30 years of research demonstrates that exercises in general, and specifically aquatic exercises, are beneficial for reducing pain and disability in many musculoskeletal conditions demonstrating small to moderate effect sizes ranging between 0.19 and 0.32. Balneotherapy might be beneficial, but the evidence is yet insufficient to make a definitive statement about its use. High-quality trials are needed on balneotherapy and aquatic exercises research especially in specific patient categories that might benefit most. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 46 CFR 169.743 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 169.743 Section 169.743... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.743 Portable magazine chests. Portable magazine chests must be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST...

  4. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... chest is performed to: assess abnormal masses, including cancer of the lungs or other tissues, which either cannot be assessed ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and ... tissues, except for lung abnormalities where Chest CT is a preferred imaging ...

  5. Musculoskeletal disorders in main battle tank personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Guldager, Bernadette; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders of personnel in the main battle tank (MBT) units in the Danish army with those of personnel in other types of army units, and to investigate associations between job function in the tank, military rank, and musculoskeletal problems......, and ankle. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There were only 4 women in the MBT group; as a consequence, female personnel were excluded from the study. The participation rate was 58.0% (n = 184) in the MBT group and 56.3% (n = 333) in the reference group. The pattern of musculoskeletal disorders among personnel...

  6. Correlation of physical factors with musculoskeletal pain among physiotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhi Rajen Kalyani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The etiology of musculoskeletal work related disorders remains largely unclear, pain being the predominant complaint. The prevalence of neck pain, shoulder pain, upper and lower back pain increases drastically during professional practice in Physiotherapy. This study evaluated the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. Also, the study determined the role of modifiable risk factors for physiotherapists (physical activity, psychological status and quantity and quality of sleep for pain. Method: The study population includes 60 physiotherapists with atleast work experience of 1 year and work duration of 6 hours per day. Outcome measures used were Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire as a screening tool, Orebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire, The Short Questionnaire to Assess Health-Enhancing Physical Activity (SQUASH, University of Cambridge sleep questionnaire and Internet Mental Health Quality of Life (IMHQOL scale. Results: Comparatively, pain was more concentrated at spinal regions than peripheral locations among physiotherapists. Surprisingly, many physiotherapists reported multiple sites of musculoskeletal pains. Conclusion: A weak correlation was established between physical activity and musculoskeletal pain among physiotherapists.

  7. Nodule detection in digital chest radiography: Summary of the radius chest trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, M.; Baath, M.; Boerjesson, S.; Kheddache, S.; Grahn, A.; Ruschin, M.; Tingberg, A.; Mattson, S.; Maansson, L. G.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the Europe-wide research project 'Unification of physical and clinical requirements for medical X-ray imaging' - governed by the Radiological Imaging Unification Strategies (RADIUS) Group - a major image quality trial was conducted by members of the group. The RADIUS chest trial aimed at thoroughly examining various aspects of nodule detection in digital chest radiography, such as the effects of nodule location, system noise, anatomical noise, and anatomical background. The main findings of the RADIUS chest trial concerning the detection of a lung nodule with a size in the order of 10 mm can be summarised as: (1) the detectability of the nodule is largely dependent on its location in the chest, (2) the system noise has a minor impact on the detectability at the dose levels used today, (3) the disturbance of the anatomical noise is larger than that of the system noise but smaller than that of the anatomical background and (4) the anatomical background acts as noise to a large extent and is the major image component affecting the detectability of the nodule. (authors)

  8. Commentary: the importance of musculoskeletal medicine and anatomy in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Charles S; Ahn, Christine S

    2010-03-01

    Medical schools in the United States have continued to demonstrate deficiencies in musculoskeletal education. In response to the findings of numerous studies and to the objectives of the U.S. Bone and Joint Decade (an international collaborative movement sanctioned by the United Nations and the World Health Organization for the purpose of promoting awareness of musculoskeletal disease), several institutions, including Harvard Medical School, have reassessed the preclinical musculoskeletal curriculum at their respective medical schools. A cross-sectional survey at Harvard in 2004 found that students lacked clinical confidence in dealing with the musculoskeletal system. In addition, only one quarter of the graduating class of medical students passed a nationally validated exam in basic musculoskeletal competency. In 2005, 33 total hours of musculoskeletal medicine were added to the musculoskeletal blocks of the preclinical anatomy, pathophysiology, and physical examination courses. Alongside this movement toward more musculoskeletal education, there has been continued debate over the relevance and cost-effectiveness of cadaveric and surface anatomy labs. With the advent of advanced imaging technology, some argue that dissection anatomy is outdated and labor-intensive, whereas three-dimensional images are more accessible and time-effective for today's students. However, knowledge of anatomy is a critical foundation to learning musculoskeletal medicine. Thus, making room for more musculoskeletal curriculum time by cutting out cadaveric anatomy labs may ultimately be counterproductive.

  9. Regional variance of visually lossless threshold in compressed chest CT images: Lung versus mediastinum and chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Chun, Eun Ju; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Kim, Young Hoon; Hahn, Seokyung; Lee, Kyung Won

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the visually lossless threshold (VLT) for the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression of chest CT images and to demonstrate the variance of the VLT between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Subjects and methods: Eighty images were compressed reversibly (as negative control) and irreversibly to 5:1, 10:1, 15:1 and 20:1. Five radiologists determined if the compressed images were distinguishable from their originals in the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Exact tests for paired proportions were used to compare the readers' responses between the reversible and irreversible compressions and between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Results: At reversible, 5:1, 10:1, 15:1, and 20:1 compressions, 0%, 0%, 3-49% (p < .004, for three readers), 69-99% (p < .001, for all readers), and 100% of the 80 image pairs were distinguishable in the lung, respectively; and 0%, 0%, 74-100% (p < .001, for all readers), 100%, and 100% were distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, respectively. The image pairs were less frequently distinguishable in the lung than in the mediastinum/chest wall at 10:1 (p < .001, for all readers) and 15:1 (p < .001, for two readers). In 321 image comparisons, the image pairs were indistinguishable in the lung but distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, whereas there was no instance of the opposite. Conclusion: For JPEG2000 compression of chest CT images, the VLT is between 5:1 and 10:1. The lung is more tolerant to the compression than the mediastinum/chest wall.

  10. Regional variance of visually lossless threshold in compressed chest CT images: Lung versus mediastinum and chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Jung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kholee@snubhrad.snu.ac.kr; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Chun, Eun Ju; Bajpai, Vasundhara; Kim, Young Hoon [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of); Hahn, Seokyung [Medical Research Collaborating Center, Seoul National University Hospital, 28 Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Won [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300 Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To estimate the visually lossless threshold (VLT) for the Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression of chest CT images and to demonstrate the variance of the VLT between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Subjects and methods: Eighty images were compressed reversibly (as negative control) and irreversibly to 5:1, 10:1, 15:1 and 20:1. Five radiologists determined if the compressed images were distinguishable from their originals in the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Exact tests for paired proportions were used to compare the readers' responses between the reversible and irreversible compressions and between the lung and mediastinum/chest wall. Results: At reversible, 5:1, 10:1, 15:1, and 20:1 compressions, 0%, 0%, 3-49% (p < .004, for three readers), 69-99% (p < .001, for all readers), and 100% of the 80 image pairs were distinguishable in the lung, respectively; and 0%, 0%, 74-100% (p < .001, for all readers), 100%, and 100% were distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, respectively. The image pairs were less frequently distinguishable in the lung than in the mediastinum/chest wall at 10:1 (p < .001, for all readers) and 15:1 (p < .001, for two readers). In 321 image comparisons, the image pairs were indistinguishable in the lung but distinguishable in the mediastinum/chest wall, whereas there was no instance of the opposite. Conclusion: For JPEG2000 compression of chest CT images, the VLT is between 5:1 and 10:1. The lung is more tolerant to the compression than the mediastinum/chest wall.

  11. Chest Pain with Normal Thallium-201 Myocardial Perfusion Image – Is It Really Normal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pang-Yen; Lin, Wen-Yu; Lin, Li-Fan; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Yang, Shih-Ping; Liou, Jun-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion image (MPI) is commonly used to detect coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain. Although a normal thallium-201 MPI result is generally considered to be a good prognosis and further coronary angiogram is not recommended, there are still a few patients who suffer from unexpected acute coronary events. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical prognosis in patients with normal thallium-201 MPI. Methods From January 2006 to August 2012, a total 22,003 patients undergoing thallium-201 MPI in one tertiary center were screened. Of these, 8092 patients had normal results and were investigated retrospectively. During follow-up, 54 patients underwent coronary angiogram because of refractory typical angina pectoris or unexpected acute coronary events. These 54 patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 26 (48.1%) patients with angiography-proven significant coronary artery stenosis, and group II consisted of 28 (51.9%) patients without significant stenosis. Results Patients in group I had a higher prevalence of prior coronary stenting and electrocardiographic features of ST depression compared with patients in group II. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that both prior coronary stenting and ST depression were risk predictors of unexpected acute coronary events in the patients with normal thallium-201 MPI [odds ratio (OR), 5.93; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-34.06, p = 0.05 and OR, 7.10; 95% CI: 1.28-39.51, p = 0.03,respectively]. Conclusions Although there is a low incidence of unexpected acute coronary events in patients with chest pain and normal thallium-201 MPI, physicians should be aware of the potentials risk in certain patients in this specific population. PMID:27274174

  12. Selection related to musculoskeletal complaints among employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zwart, B. C.; Broersen, J. P.; van der Beek, A. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.; van Dijk, F. J.

    1997-01-01

    To (a) describe differences in the outcome of cross sectional and longitudinal analysis on musculoskeletal complaints relative to age and work demands, and (b) to assess the entrance and drop out selection on musculoskeletal complaints among groups of employees relative to age and work demands. A

  13. The prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a condition characterized by a predominance of haemoglobin S (hbss) in the red blood cells. Musculoskeletal involvement is one of the commonest clinical manifestations of SCA. There is limited information on the prevalence, patterns and factors associated with Musculoskeletal ...

  14. Rib plating of acute and sub-acute non-union rib fractures in an adult with cystic fibrosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Nathan C; Van Boerum, Don H; Liou, Theodore G

    2014-10-01

    Rib fractures associated with osteoporosis have been reported to occur ten times more frequently in adults with cystic fibrosis. Fractures cause chest pain, and interfere with cough and sputum clearance leading to worsened lung function and acute exacerbations which are the two main contributors to early mortality in cystic fibrosis. Usual treatment involves analgesics and time for healing; however considerable pain and disability result due to constant re-injury from chronic repetitive cough. Recently, surgical plating of rib fractures has become commonplace in treating acute, traumatic chest injuries. We describe here successful surgical plating in a White cystic fibrosis patient with multiple, non-traumatic rib fractures. A-37-year old White male with cystic fibrosis was readmitted to Intermountain Medical Center for a pulmonary exacerbation. He had developed localized rib pain while coughing 2 months earlier, with worsening just prior to hospital admission in conjunction with a "pop" in the same location while bending over. A chest computerized tomography scan at admission demonstrated an acute 5th rib fracture and chronic non-united 6th and 7th right rib fractures. An epidural catheter was placed both for analgesia and to make secretion clearance possible in preparation for the surgery performed 2 days later. Under general anesthesia, he had open reduction and internal fixation of the right 5th, 6th and 7th rib fractures with a Synthes Matrix rib set. After several days of increased oxygen requirements, fever, fluid retention, and borderline vital signs, he stabilized. Numerical pain rating scores from his ribs were lower post-operatively and he was able to tolerate chest physical therapy and vigorous coughing. In our case report, rib plating with bone grafting improved rib pain and allowed healing of the fractures and recovery, although the immediate post-op period required close attention and care. We believe repair may be of benefit in selected cystic

  15. Development and initial cohort validation of the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) for use across musculoskeletal care pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan C; Kang, Sujin; Benedetto, Elena; Myers, Helen; Blackburn, Steven; Smith, Stephanie; Dunn, Kate M; Hay, Elaine; Rees, Jonathan; Beard, David; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Barker, Karen; Ellis, Benjamin; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Price, Andrew

    2016-08-05

    Current musculoskeletal outcome tools are fragmented across different healthcare settings and conditions. Our objectives were to develop and validate a single musculoskeletal outcome measure for use throughout the pathway and patients with different musculoskeletal conditions: the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ). A consensus workshop with stakeholders from across the musculoskeletal community, workshops and individual interviews with a broad mix of musculoskeletal patients identified and prioritised outcomes for MSK-HQ inclusion. Initial psychometric validation was conducted in four cohorts from community physiotherapy, and secondary care orthopaedic hip, knee and shoulder clinics. Stakeholders (n=29) included primary care, physiotherapy, orthopaedic and rheumatology patients (n=8); general practitioners, physiotherapists, orthopaedists, rheumatologists and pain specialists (n=7), patient and professional national body representatives (n=10), and researchers (n=4). The four validation cohorts included 570 participants (n=210 physiotherapy, n=150 hip, n=150 knee, n=60 shoulder patients). Outcomes included the MSK-HQ's acceptability, feasibility, comprehension, readability and responder burden. The validation cohort outcomes were the MSK-HQ's completion rate, test-retest reliability and convergent validity with reference standards (EQ-5D-5L, Oxford Hip, Knee, Shoulder Scores, and the Keele MSK-PROM). Musculoskeletal domains prioritised were pain severity, physical function, work interference, social interference, sleep, fatigue, emotional health, physical activity, independence, understanding, confidence to self-manage and overall impact. Patients reported MSK-HQ items to be 'highly relevant' and 'easy to understand'. Completion rates were high (94.2%), with scores normally distributed, and no floor/ceiling effects. Test-retest reliability was excellent, and convergent validity was strong (correlations 0.81-0.88). A new

  16. Work load and musculoskeletal complaints during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, J. A.; van Dijk, F. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Many pregnant women have musculoskeletal complaints, the onset and aggravation of which are thought to be associated with their activity or work postures. The purpose of this paper was to obtain more insight into the influence of pregnancy on the load of the musculoskeletal system at work to provide

  17. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Norikazu; Yasojima, Hiroyuki; Mizutani, Makiko; Nakamori, Shoji; Kanazawa, Toru; Kuriyama, Keiko; Mano, Masayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu

    2014-01-01

    Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient's chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery. PMID:24660001

  18. Primary Chest Wall Abscess Mimicking a Breast Tumor That Occurred after Blunt Chest Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall abscess occurring after blunt chest trauma is rare. We present the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with a swelling in her left breast. The patient had experienced blunt chest trauma 2 months back. Needle aspiration revealed pus formation in the patient’s chest. Computed tomography revealed a mass in the lower region of the left mammary gland, with thickening of the parietal pleura and skin and fracture of the fifth rib under the abscess. Following antibiotic administration and irrigation of the affected region, surgical debridement was performed. During surgery, we found that the pectoralis major muscle at the level of the fifth rib was markedly damaged, although the necrotic tissue did not contact the mammary gland. We diagnosed the lesion as a chest wall abscess that occurred in response to blunt chest trauma. Her postoperative course was uneventful. There has been no recurrence for six months after surgery.

  19. Surgical treatment of chest instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitka, M.; Masek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the ribs is the most common thoracic injury after blunt trauma. Chest wall instability (flail chest) is a common occurrence in the presence of multiple ribs fracture. Unilateral or bilateral fractures more ribs anteriorly or posteriorly will produce enough instability that paradoxical respiratory motion results in hypoventilation of an unacceptable degree. Open approach and surgical stabilisation of the chest preserved pulmonary function, improved pain control, minimized posttraumatic deformities and shorter back to work time. (author)

  20. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Brandon C.; Overbey, Douglas M.; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T.; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Burlew, Clay C.; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E.; Pieracci, Fredric M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Methods Retrospective coho...

  1. Spectrum of Radiological Findings in Leptospirosis on Chest Radiograph and Ultrasonography-Study during Epidemics in South Gujarat Region of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Shastri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leptospirosis is an acute generalised infectious disease caused by any of the group of spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. The disease can involve many organs mainly liver, central nervous system, kidneys, skeletal muscle, and lungs. Diagnosis can be done on the basis of epidemiological, clinical and laboratory features. As the disease has varied manifestations, it is frequently misdiagnosed even in areas of high prevalence. A delay in diagnosis can leads to severe form of disease and development of its complications. Aim: To find out involvement of thoracic and abdominal organs in each and every patient with the help of chest radiographs and Ultrasonography (USG of abdomen and thorax. Also, to put together the radiological spectrum of pulmonary manifestations, and other system involvement in leptospirosis during epidemics in south Gujarat region and their role in early diagnosis and follow up of patients. Materials and Methods: Study was carried out for 3 years. Total 380 patients of suspected leptospirosis were referred during epidemic during months of July to October in year 2008, 2009 and 2010 for confirmation of diagnosis and management. Total 275 patients were confirmed for leptospirosis by serological test (ELISA during first and second week of illness which was included in our study. All 275 patients were evaluated with chest radiographs and ultrasound of chest and abdomen. Those patients which are clinically suspected for leptospirosis but were serologically negative were excluded. Results: Out of 275 confirmed patients of leptospirosis, 54 patients had signs of pulmonary haemorrhage on chest radiograph (19.65%. Out of these 54 patients 50 (which accounts 92% of pulmonary hemorrhage patients and 18% of total 275 patients died due to severe pulmonary haemorrhage and respiratory distress. Pleural effusion was diagnosed on X-ray chest in 10 patients but it was found in 68 patients on USG. Signs of acute renal disease were

  2. Chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez A, Juan Carlos; Saenz M, Oscar; Martinez M, Camilo; Gonzales A Francisco; Nicolas R, Jose; Vergara V, Erika P; Pereira G, Alberto M

    2010-01-01

    In emergency departments, chest pain is one of the leading motives of consultation. We thus consider it important to review aspects such as its classification, causes, and clinical profiles. Initial assessment should include a full clinical history comprising thorough anamnesis and physical examination. Adequate interpretation of auxiliary tests, ordered in accordance with suspected clinical conditions, should lead to accurate diagnosis. We highlight certain symptoms and clinical signs, ECG and X-ray findings, cardiac bio markers, arterial blood gases, and CT-scanning. Scores of severity and prognosis such as TIMI are assessed. Optimal treatment of the clinical conditions leading to chest pain depends on adequate initial approach and assessment.

  3. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  4. Correlations between quality indexes of chest compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ling; Yan, Li; Huang, Su-Fang; Bai, Xiang-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a kind of emergency treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest, and chest compression is the most important and necessary part of CPR. The American Heart Association published the new Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care in 2010 and demanded for better performance of chest compression practice, especially in compression depth and rate. The current study was to explore the relationship of quality indexes of chest compression and to identify the key points in chest compression training and practice. Totally 219 healthcare workers accepted chest compression training by using Laerdal ACLS advanced life support resuscitation model. The quality indexes of chest compression, including compression hands placement, compression rate, compression depth, and chest wall recoil as well as self-reported fatigue time were monitored by the Laerdal Computer Skills and Reporting System. The quality of chest compression was related to the gender of the compressor. The indexes in males, including self-reported fatigue time, the accuracy of compression depth and the compression rate, the accuracy of compression rate, were higher than those in females. However, the accuracy of chest recoil was higher in females than in males. The quality indexes of chest compression were correlated with each other. The self-reported fatigue time was related to all the indexes except the compression rate. It is necessary to offer CPR training courses regularly. In clinical practice, it might be better to change the practitioner before fatigue, especially for females or weak practitioners. In training projects, more attention should be paid to the control of compression rate, in order to delay the fatigue, guarantee enough compression depth and improve the quality of chest compression.

  5. Acute hyperventilation leading to hypocalcaemia during spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Acute hyperventilation leading to hypocalcaemia during spinal anaesthesia his chest was clear. Trousseau's sign2 was noticed on the left hand, where the sphygmomanometer cuff was placed and inflated for mea- surement. A blood sample for the measurement of ionized calcium and blood gases was drawn. An infusion of ...

  6. Scintigraphic evaluation of suspected acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, M.K.; Hopkins, G.B.; Carroll, C.F.X.

    1977-01-01

    Ninety-one patients with chest pain suggestive of acute myocardial infarction were studied by static technetium /sup 99m/Tc stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy and dynamic sodium pertechnetate /sup 99m/Tc cardioangiography. Twenty-three of 26 patients (88%) with acute transmural infarcts and 12 of 17 patients (71%) with nontransmural infarcts had abnormal static studies. In 45 patients with negative scintigrams, ECG or serum enzyme changes consistent with acute infarction failed to develop. Three false-positive static studies (6%) were recorded. Twenty of 43 (47%) patients with acute infarction had hemodynamic or structural abnormalities identified by cardioangiography. The dynamic study also proved helpful in localizing the site of infarction and in ruling out certain causes of false-positive static scintigrams

  7. [The effect of different types of sports and athletes' age on the pathological changes of the musculoskeletal system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkasov, E E; Puzin, S N; Litvinenko, A S; Kurshev, V V; Bezuglov, E N

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the most common musculoskeletal diseases, depending on the type of sports and athletes' age. The results of examination of 976 athletes aged from 16 to 42 years (average age - 28,9±2,3) with musculoskeletal diseases were analyzed. Medical diagnostic procedures included clinical, laboratory, instrumental (radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound) investigations and functional testing (goniometry, manual muscle testing). Majority of patients were diagnosed to have diseases of the knee (17.9%) and ankle joints (11.3%), the heel bone (12.9%), Achilles tendon (10.2%), post-traumatic musculoskeletal diseases (16.2%), degenerative-dystrophic diseases of the spine (12.8%). In the young age group (16 to 20 years) post-traumatic disorders were most common. In the middle-age group (21 to 30 years) along with post-traumatic disorders diseases of the knee frequently occurred. For athletes over 30 years old, along with diseases of the knee spinal diseases were found to occur 2-3 times more frequently in comparison with other age groups. Injuries which are more common for different types of sports were identified: acute traumas - competitive sports, diseases of the calcaneus - sports with running and jumping (athletics, volleyball, soccer), disease of ankle joints - sport with sharp change in movement direction (hockey, figure skating), disease of the knee - sports with high load of the knee joint (figure skating, gymnastics, volleyball, diseases of bones and joints of the upper extremity - tennis, disease of spine - weightlifting. pathological changes in the musculoskeletal system depend on the type of sports and the age of athletes. The combination of age and risk factors associated with type of sport increases the possibility of development of these diseases of the musculoskeletal system.

  8. CT of AIDS-related musculoskeletal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper characterizes musculoskeletal inflammatory diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients and with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CT, radiographic, and clinical data were reviewed in 10 patients, and patterns and features were compared with those in musculoskeletal infections occurring in non-AIDS patients. Infection was confirmed by means of biopsy or aspiration in eight cases and strongly suggested in the other two by blood cultures, cell counts, and other data

  9. The forgotten view: Chest X-ray - Lateral view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham M. Ittyachen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With CT (computed tomography chest gaining more importance as a diagnostic tool, chest X-ray especially the lateral view is taken less commonly nowadays. Besides CT chest is also proven to be superior to chest X-ray in patients with major blunt trauma. We are presenting a 68-year old male who was partially treated from outside for a left sided pneumonia. He came to our hospital because of persisting chest pain. Chest X-ray, frontal view (postero-anterior was almost normal except for a mild opacity in the left lower zone. CT scan of the chest revealed a fluid collection posteriorly enclosed within enhancing pleura. Chest X-ray, left lateral view showed a corresponding posterior pleural based opacity. We are presenting this case to highlight the importance of the lateral view of the chest X-ray. In selected cases there is still a role for the lateral view. With the three dimensional visualization provided by the CT, the lateral view of the chest may be easier to understand. Consequent to the initial diagnosis by CT further follow up can be done with the chest X-ray. In a limited way this mitigates unnecessary expenditure and more importantly prevents the patient from exposure to harmful radiation in the form of repeated CT.

  10. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Baig M.; Hefny, Ashraf F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. Presentation of case: A 63- year- old man presented...

  11. Acute and chronic lumbosacral pain: Topical problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Vladimirovna Podchufarova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an account of approaches to treating patients with acute and chronic back pain in the context of evidence-based medicine and current clinical guidelines. In the vast majority, acute back pain is a benign self-limiting condition (nonspecific musculoskeletal pain and most patients need additional instrumental examinations. An active approach to treatment is considered to be optimal. It is expedient to apply a more differential approach involving the refinement of mechanisms for development of the pain syndrome and the elaboration of treatment strategy in relation to the leading pathophysiological mechanism when examining the patients with chronic back pain.

  12. Noncardiac chest pain: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Takahisa; Fass, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) has been defined as recurrent chest pain that is indistinguishable from ischemic heart pain after excluding a cardiac cause. NCCP is a common and highly challenging clinical problem in Gastrointestinal practice that requires targeted diagnostic assessment to identify the underlying cause of the symptoms. Treatment is tailored according to the cause of NCCP: gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal dysmotility or functional chest pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current diagnosis and treatment of NCCP. Utilization of new diagnostic techniques such as pH-impedance and high-resolution esophageal manometry, and the introduction of a new definition for functional chest pain have helped to better diagnose the underlying mechanisms of NCCP. A better therapeutic approach toward GERD-related NCCP, the introduction of new interventions for symptoms due to esophageal spastic motor disorders and the expansion of the neuromodulator armamentarium for functional chest pain have changed the treatment landscape of NCCP. GERD is the most common esophageal cause of NCCP, followed by functional chest pain and esophageal dysmotility. The proton pump inhibitor test, upper endoscopy, wireless pH capsule and pH-impedance are used to identify GERD-induced NCCP. High-resolution esophageal manometry is the main tool to identify esophageal motor disorder in non-GERD-related NCCP. Negative diagnostic assessment suggests functional chest pain. Potent antireflux treatment is offered to patients with GERD-related NCCP; medical, endoscopic or surgical interventions are considered in esophageal dysmotility; and neuromodulators are prescribed for functional chest pain. Assessment and treatment of psychological comorbidity should be considered in all NCCP patients.

  13. Acute effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes in patients after a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Illia Ndf; Fregonezi, Guilherme Af; Melo, Rodrigo; Cabral, Elis Ea; Aliverti, Andrea; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia Mh

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess how volume-oriented incentive spirometry applied to patients after a stroke modifies the total and compartmental chest wall volume variations, including both the right and left hemithoraces, compared with controls. Twenty poststroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjects were studied by optoelectronic plethysmography during spontaneous quiet breathing (QB), during incentive spirometry, and during the recovery period after incentive spirometry. Incentive spirometry was associated with an increased chest wall volume measured at the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage and abdominal compartment (P = .001) and under 3 conditions (P spirometry, and postincentive spirometry, respectively. Under all 3 conditions, the contribution of the abdominal compartment to VT was greater in the stroke subjects (54.1, 43.2, and 48.9%) than in the control subjects (43.7, 40.8, and 46.1%, P = .039). In the vast majority of subjects (13/20 and 18/20 during QB and incentive spirometry, respectively), abdominal expansion precedes rib cage expansion during inspiration. Greater asymmetry between the right and left hemithoracic expansions occurred in stroke subjects compared with control subjects, but it decreased during QB (62.5%, P = .002), during incentive spirometry (19.7%), and postincentive spirometry (67.6%, P = .14). Incentive spirometry promotes increased expansion in all compartments of the chest wall and reduces asymmetric expansion between the right and left parts of the pulmonary rib cage; therefore, it should be considered as a tool for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  14. Musculoskeletal disorder survey for pond workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, A.; Partiwi, S. G.; Dewi, H. N. F.

    2018-04-01

    Mucsuloskeletal disorder will affect worker performance and become serious injury when ignored, so that workers cannot work normally. Therefore, an effective strategy plan is needed to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorder. A pond worker is profession with high risk of physical complain. Four main activities are ponds preparation, seed distribution, pond maintenance, and harvesting. The methods employed in this current musculoskeletal disorder survey are questionnaire and interview. The result from 73 questionnaires shown that most of pond workers were working for 7 days a week. Prevalence physical complain are on neck, shoulders, upper back, lower back, and knees. The level of perceived complaint is moderate pain. However, most of them do not contact therapists or physicians. Therefore it is necessary to improve the working methods to be able to reduce physical complains due to musculoskeletal disorder.

  15. Large hiatal hernia at chest radiography in a woman with cardiorespiratory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Daniele; Parrinello, Gaspare; Cardillo, Mauro; Pomilla, Marina; Trapanese, Caterina; Michele, Bellanca; Lupo, Umberto; Schimmenti, Caterina; Cuttitta, Francesco; Pietrantoni, Rossella; Vogiatzis, Danai; Licata, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is a frequent entity. Rarely, it may exert a wide spectrum of clinical presentations mimicking acute cardiovascular events such as angina-like chest pain until manifestations of cardiac compression that can include postprandial syncope, exercise intolerance, respiratory function, recurrent acute heart failure, and hemodynamic collapse. A 69-year-old woman presented to the emergency department complaining of fatigue on exertion, cough, and episodes of restrosternal pain with less than 1 hour of duration. Her medical history only included some episodes of bronchitis and no history of hypertension. The 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrated sinus rhythm with right bundle-branch block. Laboratory tests, including cardiac troponin I, were within normal reference values. Chest radiography showed no significant pulmonary alterations and revealed in mediastinum a huge abnormal shadow overlapping the right heart compatible with a gastric bubble.The gastroscopy confirmed a large HH. A 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram, using all standard and modified apical and parasternal views, revealed an echolucent mass, compatible with HH, compressing the right atrium. Also, it showed an altered left ventricular relaxation and a mild increase of pulmonary artery pressure (35 mm Hg). Spirometry showed a mild obstruction of the small airways, whereas coronary angiography showed normal coronary arteries. We concluded that the patient's symptomatology was related to the compressive effects of the large hiatal ernia, a neglected cause of cardiorespiratory symptoms. The surgical repair of HH was indicated.

  16. Imaging in percutaneous musculoskeletal interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi, Afshin; Guth, Stephane; Guermazi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This is one of the first books to deal specifically with imaging in percutaneous musculoskeletal interventions. The use of different imaging modalities during these procedures is well described. In the first chapter, the basic procedures and different guidance techniques are presented and discussed. The ensuing chapters describe in exhaustive detail the abilities and uses of imaging in guiding procedures ranging from biopsy and joint injection to management of pain and tumors. These procedures are extensively documented in adults as well as in the pediatric population. The third part of the book describes the different indications for vascular interventions in musculoskeletal lesions. The final chapter focuses on ultrasound-guided interventions, as they are more common and tend to be fashionable. The book is well illustrated with carefully chosen and technically excellent images. Each of the 18 chapters is written by an expert of international repute, making this book the most current and complete treatment of the subject available. It should be of great interest to interventional radiologists and also musculoskeletal and general radiologists. (orig.)

  17. Early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Xiaoguang; Feng Suchen; Xia Guoguang; Zhao Tao; Gu Xiang; Qu Hui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan and its role in the early diagnosis. Methods: Forty cases of SARS in keeping with the criteria of the Ministry of Health had chest CT scans within 7 days of onset of symptoms, and CR chest X-ray films were available as well. These chest X-rays and CT images were retrospectively reviewed to determine if there were any abnormalities on the images. The lesions on the chest CT images were then further analyzed in terms of the number, location, size, and density. Results: Positive abnormalities on chest CT scans were revealed in all 40 SARS cases. Positive findings on CR chest films were showed in only 25 cases, equivocal in 6, and normal in 9 cases. The main abnormalities seen on CT and X-rays were pulmonary infiltrations varied markedly in severity. 70 % cases had 1 or 2 lesions on chest CT scan, 30 % cases had 3 or more lesions. The lesions seen on chest CT scan tended to be ground-glass opacification, sometimes with consolidation which was very faint and inhomogeneous, easily missed on chest X-rays. Typically the lesions were located in the periphery of the lung, or both central and peripheral lung, but very rare in a pure central location. They were commonly in the shape of patch or ball. Conclusions: Chest CT scan is much more sensitive in detecting the lesions of the lung in SARS. The early appearance of SARS on chest CT scan is characteristic but non-specific, indicating that chest CT scan plays a very important role in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of SARS

  18. Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions in Patients With Chronic Pelvic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune Mygind; Thorhauge, Kirsten; Forman, Axel

    2016-01-01

    stratified levels of self-reported pelvic pain, self-rated health, education, and work status based on musculoskeletal dysfunction status. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional design to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal dysfunctions in women with CPP who were referred to a tertiary care...... between the groups with respect to self-rated health, education, work status, and pain level. Pain location was significantly different after Bonferroni correction in 1 out of the 36 aspects. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of CPP patients, 51% were categorized as having a musculoskeletal dysfunction. Overall...

  19. Interrelationships between chronic tension-type headache, musculoskeletal pain, and vitamin D deficiency: Is osteomalacia responsible for both headache and musculoskeletal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache, musculoskeletal symptoms, and vitamin D deficiency are common in the general population. However, the interrelations between these three have not been delineated in the literature. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied a consecutive series of patients who were diagnosed as having chronic tension-type headache (CTTH and were subjected to the estimation of serum vitamin D levels. The subjects were divided into two groups according to serum 25(OH D levels as normal (>20 ng/ml or vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml. Results: We identified 71 such patients. Fifty-two patients (73% had low serum 25(OH D (<20 ng/dl. Eighty-three percent patients reported musculoskeletal pain. Fifty-two percent patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for chronic widespread pain. About 50% patients fulfilled the criteria for biochemical osteomalacia. Low serum 25(OH D level (<20 ng/dl was significantly associated with headache, musculoskeletal pain, and osteomalacia. Discussion: These suggest that both chronic musculoskeletal pain and chronic headache may be related to vitamin D deficiency. Musculoskeletal pain associated with vitamin D deficiency is usually explained by osteomalacia of bones. Therefore, we speculate a possibility of osteomalacia of the skull for the generation of headache (osteomalacic cephalalgia?. It further suggests that both musculoskeletal pain and headaches may be the part of the same disease spectrum in a subset of patients with vitamin D deficiency (or osteomalacia, and vitamin D deficiency may be an important cause of secondary CTTH.

  20. Improving screen-film chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, N.; Baker, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally symmetric screens and double emulsion symmetric films with medium to wide latitutde are used for radiography of the chest. Beacuse of mismatch of transmitted exposure through the chest with limited latitude of the film, most of the dense areas of the chest are underexposed. Kodak's recent innovation of a unique asymmetry screen-film system (InSight) alleviates this problem. Our phantom measurement indicates that the InSight system offers wider recording range, and the flexible grid permits more positional latitude than conventional grids. Our five-year extensive clinical experience indicates that dense anatomic structures, such as mediastinum, retrocardiac and subdiaphragmatic, are more visible in the InSight system than in the conventional symmetric system. Similarly, a substantial improvement in image quality in portable chest imaging is realized by use of flexible grids because of scatter rejection and invisible grid lines. (author)

  1. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  2. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  3. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Annette; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Zier, Sandra; Reiners, Karlheinz; Sommer, Claudia

    2004-12-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2/proximal myotonic myopathy (DM2/PROMM) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder. Musculoskeletal pain is one of its frequent symptoms but also occurs in other chronic noninflammatory muscle disorders (OMD). To characterize the phenotype of DM2/PROMM-associated musculoskeletal pain and to test whether it shows features distinct from OMD. Outpatient clinic for patients with neuromuscular disorders, university hospital. Twenty-four patients with DM2/PROMM (12 women and 12 men; median age, 57 years) and 24 age- and sex-matched patients with OMD consecutively recruited during a 3-year period were examined for musculoskeletal pain. Standardized pain assessment; McGill Pain Questionnaire; depression score; and quantification of pain thresholds to blunt pressure on limb muscles with analgometer. Unlike patients with OMD who have musculoskeletal pain, patients with DM2/PROMM distinguished a wide spectrum of coexisting pain types. The major pain type in patients with DM2/PROMM was exercise-related, temperature-modulated, and palpation-induced, whereas, cramps were rare. In 8 of the patients with DM2/PROMM and in 3 of the patients with OMD, musculoskeletal pain was the most disabling symptom. Besides many similarities, DM2/PROMM-associated musculoskeletal pain shows features distinct from OMD.

  4. Successful treatment of cardiogenic shock by stenting of the left main coronary artery in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Božidarka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS are sometimes severely hemodynamicly compromised. Urgent coronary angiography should be performed in these patients in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI centers according to the ESC NSTE-ACS guidelines to determine suitabilty for percutaneous or surgical revascularization. Case report. We reported a 62-year-old male with chest pain admitted to the Coronary Care Unit. ST segment depression of 2 mm in leads I, L and V4-6 was revealed at electrocardiogram. After following 6 hours the patient had chest pain and signs of cardiogenic shock despite of the therapy. Chest x-ray showed pulmonary edema. Echocardiographic examination showed dyskinetic medium and apical segments of septum. The patient underwent coronary angiography immediately which revealed 75% stenosis of the left main coronary artery with thrombus. The use of a GPIIb/III inhibitor-tirofiban and stent implantation resulted in TIMI III flow. After that the patient had no chest pain and acute heart failure subsided in the following days Echocardiography done at the fourth day from PCI showed only hypokinesis medium and apical segment of septum. The patient was discharged at day 11 from admission in a stable condition. Conclusion. Stenting of left main coronary artery stenosis in patients with cardiogenic shock and non- ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes may be a life saving procedure.

  5. Blow/trauma to the chest and sudden cardiac death: Commotio cordis and contusio cordis are leading causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krexi, Lydia; Sheppard, Mary N

    2018-01-01

    Background In forensic practice, a blow to the chest can lead to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Commotio cordis and contusio cordis are leading causes. Methods From a database of 4678 patients who suffered from SCD, we found three patients with commotio cordis and two patients with contusio cordis. All the patients were examined macroscopically and microscopically and had negative toxicology screen. Results The three patients who died due to commotio cordis were young males (16, 23 and 38 years old). The circumstances of death were: a blow to the chest by a football, by a friend during a party and during an assault. The hearts were completely normal at autopsy. The two patients who had contusio cordis were older males (42 and 63 years old). Both patients died during traffic accidents. At autopsy, one had significant contusion over the left ventricle, and the second had contusion over the right ventricle. Conclusion This study indicates that a blow to the chest is very important to document in the circumstances of death, and a detailed history is vital. It raises the left ventricular intra-cavitary pressure, leading to commotio cordis with immediate death with a normal heart. Blunt chest trauma can cause direct myocardial lesions, with acute changes leading to contusio cordis.

  6. Regionally adaptive histogram equalization of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherrier, R.H.; Johnson, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in digital chest radiography have resulted in the acquisition of high-quality digital images of the human chest. With these advances, there arises a genuine need for image processing algorithms, specific to chest images. The author has implemented the technique of histogram equalization, noting the problems encountered when it is adapted to chest images. These problems have been successfully solved with a regionally adaptive histogram equalization method. Histograms are calculated locally and then modified according to both the mean pixel value of a given region and certain characteristics of the cumulative distribution function. The method allows certain regions of the chest radiograph to be enhanced differentially

  7. An Overview of Recent Patents on Musculoskeletal Interface Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rohit T.; Browe, Daniel P.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2018-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues e.g. between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose. PMID:26577344

  8. The impact of chest compression rates on quality of chest compressions - a manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Richard A; Soar, Jasmeet; Davies, Robin P; Akhtar, Naheed; Perkins, Gavin D

    2012-03-01

    Chest compressions are often performed at a variable rate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The effect of compression rate on other chest compression quality variables (compression depth, duty-cycle, leaning, performance decay over time) is unknown. This randomised controlled cross-over manikin study examined the effect of different compression rates on the other chest compression quality variables. Twenty healthcare professionals performed 2 min of continuous compressions on an instrumented manikin at rates of 80, 100, 120, 140 and 160 min(-1) in a random order. An electronic metronome was used to guide compression rate. Compression data were analysed by repeated measures ANOVA and are presented as mean (SD). Non-parametric data was analysed by Friedman test. At faster compression rates there were significant improvements in the number of compressions delivered (160(2) at 80 min(-1) vs. 312(13) compressions at 160 min(-1), P<0.001); and compression duty-cycle (43(6)% at 80 min(-1) vs. 50(7)% at 160 min(-1), P<0.001). This was at the cost of a significant reduction in compression depth (39.5(10)mm at 80 min(-1) vs. 34.5(11)mm at 160 min(-1), P<0.001); and earlier decay in compression quality (median decay point 120 s at 80 min(-1) vs. 40s at 160 min(-1), P<0.001). Additionally not all participants achieved the target rate (100% at 80 min(-1) vs. 70% at 160 min(-1)). Rates above 120 min(-1) had the greatest impact on reducing chest compression quality. For Guidelines 2005 trained rescuers, a chest compression rate of 100-120 min(-1) for 2 min is feasible whilst maintaining adequate chest compression quality in terms of depth, duty-cycle, leaning, and decay in compression performance. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of the Guidelines 2010 recommendation for deeper and faster chest compressions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Severe acute respiratory syndrome in a doctor working at the Prince of Wales Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, R S M

    2003-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome is a new disease that is highly contagious and is spreading in the local community and worldwide. This report is of a hospital medical officer with severe acute respiratory syndrome. He presented with sudden onset of fever, chills, myalgia, headache, and dizziness in early March 2003. He developed progressive respiratory symptoms and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates during the second week of his illness. Blood tests showed lymphopenia, mild thrombocytopenia, and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time with normal d-dimer level. His chest condition gradually responded to ribavirin and corticosteroids, and serial chest X-ray showed resolving pulmonary infiltrates. The importance of early diagnosis lies in the potential for early treatment, leading to better response.

  10. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, S; Tribler, J; Snorgaard, O

    2012-01-01

    The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors.......The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors....

  11. Tailor's chair and musculoskeletal disorders in Nigeria | Akanbi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that seat devices which are not ergonomically designed, impose various work postures on operators which may partly be responsible for their musculoskeletal disorders. Hence, the redesign of sitting devices with ergonomic characteristics is recommended. Keywords: Musculoskeletal disorders, sewing ...

  12. Musculoskeletal Adverse Events Associated with Adjuvant Aromatase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar J. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal symptoms including arthralgia and myalgia occur frequently in aging women, particularly during the transition to menopause, when plasma estrogens precipitously decline. In postmenopausal women (PMW with breast cancer, third-generation aromatase inhibitors (AIs as adjuvant hormonal therapy have proven to be more effective, and to have a more predictable side effect profile, than tamoxifen. However, AIs further reduce plasma estrogens in PMW, exacerbating musculoskeletal symptoms. Clinical trial data have shown significantly higher incidences of arthralgia and myalgia with AIs compared with women on tamoxifen or placebo. Symptoms may be severe enough to significantly affect quality of life; musculoskeletal symptoms are a frequent reason for discontinuing therapy. In many cases, symptoms can be effectively managed with oral analgesics or other strategies. Early recognition and effective management of musculoskeletal symptoms can help maximize treatment compliance, enabling patients to derive optimal benefit from therapy in terms of preventing recurrence.

  13. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung Eun [Sangkye Paek Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  14. Unilateral Hemithorax Opacification on Chest Radiograph : Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Chest Ultrasonography with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namkung, Sook; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Seung Eun

    1996-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography (CT) inpatients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on chest radiograph (CXR). Chest US and CT scans from 41 consecutive patients with opacification more than one third of unilateral hemithorax on CXR were prospectively evaluated by two independent radiologists. Each radiologist recorded 1) the nature of pleural effusion (transudate vs. exudate), 2) presence or absence of pulmonary lesion, 3) the characteristic of pulmonary lesion (consolidation or atelectasis and tumor), and 4) presence of solid pleural tumor. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US was compared with CT scan in patients with pleural, pulmonary or other disease. In 32 patients with pleural effusion, differentiation between transudate and exudate was feasible in 27 (84%) patients with US and 26 (81%) patients with CT. In 32 patients with pulmonary and other pleural diseases, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of US in lesion detection were 86%, 75% and 83% respectively when CT was regarded as a diagnostic gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of chest US is comparable to CT in patients with hemithorax opacification on CXR

  15. Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation in musculoskeletal pain of acute spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R R; Meyer, P R; Cerullo, L J

    1980-01-01

    Cervical, thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar fractures associated with physiologic complete or incomplete spinal cord injuries frequently have severe soft-tissue injury as well as severe pain associated with the site or area of injury. Transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation has proved effective in the treatment of various causes of severe acute and chronic intractable pains. We applied this modality to a group of 20 patients who had acute spinal cord injuries and pain associated with severe, extensive soft-tissue injury. Its advantages include ease of application, lack of major complications, increased intestinal peristalsis, and avoidance of narcotic analgesic medications. It also produced significant (greater than 50%) pain relief in 75% of patients treated by transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation.

  16. Pleural ultrasonography versus chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax: review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrajab, Saadah; Youssef, Asser M; Akkus, Nuri I; Caldito, Gloria

    2013-09-23

    Ultrasonography is being increasingly utilized in acute care settings with expanding applications. Pneumothorax evaluation by ultrasonography is a fast, safe, easy and inexpensive alternative to chest radiographs. In this review, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the current literature comparing ultrasonography and chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We searched English-language articles in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library dealing with both ultrasonography and chest radiography for diagnosis of pneumothorax. In eligible studies that met strict inclusion criteria, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural ultrasonography in comparison with chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We reviewed 601 articles and selected 25 original research articles for detailed review. Only 13 articles met all of our inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. One study used lung sliding sign alone, 12 studies used lung sliding and comet tail signs, and 6 studies searched for lung point in addition to the other two signs. Ultrasonography had a pooled sensitivity of 78.6% (95% CI, 68.1 to 98.1) and a specificity of 98.4% (95% CI, 97.3 to 99.5). Chest radiography had a pooled sensitivity of 39.8% (95% CI, 29.4 to 50.3) and a specificity of 99.3% (95% CI, 98.4 to 100). Our meta-regression and subgroup analyses indicate that consecutive sampling of patients compared to convenience sampling provided higher sensitivity results for both ultrasonography and chest radiography. Consecutive versus nonconsecutive sampling and trauma versus nontrauma settings were significant sources of heterogeneity. In addition, subgroup analysis showed significant variations related to operator and type of probe used. Our study indicates that ultrasonography is more accurate than chest radiography for detection of pneumothorax. The results support the previous investigations in this field, add new valuable information

  17. Invasive treatment of NSTEMI patients in German Chest Pain Units - Evidence for a treatment paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frank P; Schmitt, Claus; Hochadel, Matthias; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Darius, Harald; Maier, Lars S; Schmitt, Claus; Heusch, Gerd; Voigtländer, Thomas; Mudra, Harald; Gori, Tommaso; Senges, Jochen; Münzel, Thomas

    2018-03-15

    Patients with non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) represent the largest fraction of patients with acute coronary syndrome in German Chest Pain units. Recent evidence on early vs. selective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is ambiguous with respect to effects on mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and recurrent angina. With the present study we sought to investigate the prognostic impact of PCI and its timing in German Chest Pain Unit (CPU) NSTEMI patients. Data from 1549 patients whose leading diagnosis was NSTEMI were retrieved from the German CPU registry for the interval between 3/2010 and 3/2014. Follow-up was available at median of 167days after discharge. The patients were grouped into a higher (Group A) and lower risk group (Group B) according to GRACE score and additional criteria on admission. Group A had higher Killip classes, higher BNP levels, reduced EF and significant more triple vessel disease (pGerman Chest Pain Units. This treatment paradox may worsen prognosis in patients who could derive the largest benefit from early revascularization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Severe Plasmodium ovale malaria complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome in a young Caucasian man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abramo, Alessandra; Gebremeskel Tekle, Saba; Iannetta, Marco; Scorzolini, Laura; Oliva, Alessandra; Paglia, Maria Grazia; Corpolongo, Angela; Nicastri, Emanuele

    2018-04-02

    Although Plasmodium ovale is considered the cause of only mild malaria, a case of severe malaria due to P. ovale with acute respiratory distress syndrome is reported. A 37-year old Caucasian man returning home from Angola was admitted for ovale malaria to the National Institute for Infectious Diseases Lazzaro Spallanzani in Rome, Italy. Two days after initiation of oral chloroquine treatment, an acute respiratory distress syndrome was diagnosed through chest X-ray and chest CT scan with intravenous contrast. Intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline were started and he made a full recovery. Ovale malaria is usually considered a tropical infectious disease associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, severe disease and death have occasionally been reported. In this case clinical failure of oral chloroquine treatment with clinical progression towards acute respiratory distress syndrome is described.

  19. Chest computed tomography of a patient revealing severe hypoxia due to amniotic fluid embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inui Daisuke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Amniotic fluid embolism is one of the most severe complications in the peripartum period. Because its onset is abrupt and fulminant, it is unlikely that there will be time to examine the condition using thoracic computed tomography (CT. We report a case of life-threatening amniotic fluid embolism, where chest CT in the acute phase was obtained. Case presentation A 22-year-old Asian Japanese primiparous woman was suspected of having an amniotic fluid embolism. After a Cesarean section for cephalopelvic disproportion, her respiratory condition deteriorated. Her chest CT images were examined. CT findings revealed diffuse homogeneous ground-glass shadow in her bilateral peripheral lung fields. She was therefore transferred to our hospital. On admission to our hospital's intensive care unit, she was found to have severe hypoxemia, with SpO2 of 50% with a reservoir mask of 15 L/min oxygen. She was intubated with the support of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. She was successfully extubated on the sixth day, and discharged from the hospital on the twentieth day. Conclusion This is the first case report describing amniotic fluid embolism in which CT revealed an acute respiratory distress syndrome-like shadow.

  20. Prevention of Acute Exacerbations of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbeau, Jean; Diekemper, Rebecca L.; Ouellette, Daniel R.; Goodridge, Donna; Hernandez, Paul; Curren, Kristen; Balter, Meyer S.; Bhutani, Mohit; Camp, Pat G.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Dechman, Gail; Dransfield, Mark T.; Fiel, Stanley B.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Hanania, Nicola A.; Ireland, Belinda K.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Marciniuk, Darcy D.; Mularski, Richard A.; Ornelas, Joseph; Stickland, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States as well as throughout the rest of the world. An exacerbation of COPD (periodic escalations of symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and sputum production) is a major contributor to worsening lung function, impairment in quality of life, need for urgent care or hospitalization, and cost of care in COPD. Research conducted over the past decade has contributed much to our current understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of COPD. Additionally, an evolving literature has accumulated about the prevention of acute exacerbations. METHODS: In recognition of the importance of preventing exacerbations in patients with COPD, the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) joint evidence-based guideline (AECOPD Guideline) was developed to provide a practical, clinically useful document to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the prevention of acute exacerbations according to major categories of prevention therapies. Three key clinical questions developed using the PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) format addressed the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD: nonpharmacologic therapies, inhaled therapies, and oral therapies. We used recognized document evaluation tools to assess and choose the most appropriate studies and to extract meaningful data and grade the level of evidence to support the recommendations in each PICO question in a balanced and unbiased fashion. RESULTS: The AECOPD Guideline is unique not only for its topic, the prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD, but also for the first-in-kind partnership between two of the largest thoracic societies in North America. The CHEST Guidelines Oversight Committee in partnership with the CTS COPD Clinical Assembly launched this project with the objective that a systematic review and critical evaluation of the published literature by clinical experts and researchers in

  1. Prevalence of triathlon-related musculoskeletal pain among Kwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subjects' training history and epidemiology of triathlon-related musculoskeletal pain were gathered employing the use of a self report musculoskeletal pain questionnaire, in addition to body mass, stature, Q-angles and navicular height measurements. Descriptive statistics which included the mode, mean, frequency, ...

  2. Personality and Its Relationship with Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Ahmadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Individual factors are usually important as non-occupational parameters that participate in the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Personality traits are one of the individual factors that affect physical illness, which are constant over time, thereby reflecting stable individual differences. Identifying the personality trait can be used to predict musculoskeletal disorders in workers and select individual with appropriate personality traits for different works. Objectives The purpose of the present study was to identify the personality traits used to determine the relationship between different personality traits and the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Methods 136 people of 2 different companies in Tabriz (in 2015 were selected as the study population. The first group was selected from the petrochemical repair workers and the second from a dairy factory. The 50-item version of Goldberg’s big five personality scale was used to assess the personality traits. Nordic questionnaire was employed to evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Chi-square test was incorporated for analyzing the data. Finally, logistic regression test was used to study the factors affecting upper and lower body pain. Results Results indicated that individual personality traits were associated with musculoskeletal disorder prevalence in some members of body: Extraversion with wrist (P-value = 0.013 and hip (P-value = 0.044, emotional stability with shoulder (P-value = 0.012, wrist (P-value = 0.043, back (P-value = 0.034, low back (P-value = 0.029 and ankle( P-value = 0.014, Conscientiousness with Hip ( P-value = 0.009, Agreeableness with shoulder (P-value = 0.004, back (P-value = 0.001, Hip ( P-value = 0.006 and ankle ( P-value = 0.019. Conclusions According to the results of this study, the personality traits can contribute to musculoskeletal disorders. Therefore, notice of personality traits can be used to predict individuals who

  3. Prevalence and predictors of musculoskeletal pain among Danish fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Østergaard, Helle; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    at sea, age, BMI and education were used as predictors for the overall musculoskeletal pain score (multiple linear regression) and for each single pain site (multinomial logistic regression). RESULTS: The prevalence of pain was high for all musculoskeletal locations. Overall, more than 80...... demanding and impacting their musculoskeletal pain. Potential explanation for this unexpected result like increased work pressure and reduced financial attractiveness in small scale commercial fishery needs to be confirmed in future research....

  4. Musculoskeletal Problems Among Greek Perioperative Nurses in Regional Hospitals in Southern Peloponnese : Musculoskeletal Problems in Perioperative Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakola, Helen; Zyga, Sofia; Stergioulas, Apostolos; Kipreos, George; Panoutsopoulos, George

    2017-01-01

    The surgery unit is a particularly labor-intensive environment in the hospital. Studies reflect the correlation of labor risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries among nurses but few have investigated the relationship to perioperative nurses. The purpose of this study is the identification and definition of ergonomic risk factors in the operating room and their connection with musculoskeletal disorders in perioperative nurses in regional hospitals in Greece. Forty four Greek perioperative nurses working in regional hospitals in southern Peloponnese participated. Anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data, which consisted of three parts (investigating musculoskeletal symptoms, description of work, psychometric evaluation). The analysis was done with the statistical program SPSS.19. Symptoms of musculoskeletal problems emerged. Specifically, 54.4% in the lumbar, 47.7% in the neck, 45.5% in the shoulder, followed by smaller percentages of the hip, knee, elbow and ankle. 6.8% of participants indicated no musculoskeletal symptoms in the last year while 74.9% of those who had symptoms presented them in two or more areas. Activities rated as a major problem among others were the manual handling, tools with weight and vibration etc. 100% of respondents agreed that the work in the surgery unit is demanding and has anxiety. The lack of support from the government (81.8%), combined with the low perioperative nurses (6.8%) having the opportunity to participate in administrative decisions concerning them were related to problems in the organization and management of work. Apart from engineers target factors, a main aim should be the organization of work within the framework of a national policy based on European directives on the protection and promotion of the health and safety of workers.

  5. Chest tube insertion - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest tubes are inserted to drain blood, fluid, or air and allow full expansion of the lungs. The tube is placed in the pleural space. The area where the tube will be inserted is numbed (local anesthesia). The patient may also be sedated. The chest ...

  6. Acute Respiratory Distress following Intravenous Injection of an Oil-Steroid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Russell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of acute respiratory distress and hypoxemia following accidental intravenous injection of an oil-steroid solution in a body builder is presented. Chest roentography at the time of presentation showed diffuse bilateral opacities, and computed tomography revealed predominantly peripheral ground-glass opacifications. The patient’s symptoms gradually improved over 48 h and imaging of the chest was unremarkable one week later. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this rare but potentially life-threatening complication of intravenous oil injection are discussed.

  7. Investigation of the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Zachrisson, Sara; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2009-02-01

    Chest tomosynthesis has recently been introduced to healthcare as a low-dose alternative to CT or as a tool for improved diagnostics in chest radiography with only a modest increase in radiation dose to the patient. However, no detailed description of the dosimetry for this type of examination has been presented. The aim of this work was therefore to investigate the dosimetry of chest tomosynthesis. The chest tomosynthesis examination was assumed to be performed using a stationary detector and a vertically moving x-ray tube, exposing the patient from different angles. The Monte Carlo based computer software PCXMC was used to determine the effective dose delivered to a standard-sized patient from various angles using different assumptions of the distribution of the effective dose over the different projections. The obtained conversion factors between input dose measures and effective dose for chest tomosynthesis for different angular intervals were then compared with the horizontal projection. The results indicate that the error introduced by using conversion factors for the PA projection in chest radiography for estimating the effective dose of chest tomosynthesis is small for normally sized patients, especially if a conversion factor between KAP and effective dose is used.

  8. Work related musculoskeletal pain among teachers in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of musculoskeletal pain specifically within the teaching profession has not been given sufficient attention in the literature especially in Nigeria. This study determined the prevalence of work related musculoskeletal pain among public secondary school teachers in Ife-Central Local Government Area (LGA), Osun ...

  9. A Rare Side Effect due to TNF-Alpha Blocking Agent: Acute Pleuropericarditis with Adalimumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Ozkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism is an important treatment strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, vasculitis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Adalimumab is one of the well-known tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents. There are several side effects reported in patients with adalimumab therapy. Cardiac side effects of adalimumab are rare. Only a few cardiac side effects were reported. A 61-year-old man treated with adalimumab for the last 6 months due to psoriatic arthritis presented with typically acute pleuropericarditis. Chest X-ray and echocardiography demonstrated marked pericardial effusion. Patient was successfully evaluated for the etiology of acute pleuro-pericarditis. Every etiology was excluded except the usage of adalimumab. Adalimumab was discontinued, and patient was treated with 1200 mg of ibuprofen daily. Control chest X-ray and echocardiography after three weeks demonstrated complete resolution of both pleural and pericardial effusions. This case clearly demonstrated the acute onset of pericarditis with adalimumab usage. Acute pericarditis and pericardial effusion should be kept in mind in patients with adalimumab treatment.

  10. Computed tomography of chest wall abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikezoe, Junpei; Morimoto, Shizuo; Akira, Masanori

    1986-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of the chest wall become less common because of the improvement of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents. Over a 5-year period, 7 patients with chest wall inflammatory diseases underwent chest computed tomography. These were 2 tuberculous pericostal abscesses, 2 empyema necessitatis, 1 spinal caries, and 2 bacterial chest wall abscesses (unknown organisms). Computed tomography (CT) helped in demonstrating the density, border, site, and extent of the lesions. CT images also demonstrated the accompaning abnormalities which included bone changes, pleural calcification, or old tuberculous changes of the lung. CT was very effective to demonstrate the communicating portions from the inside of the bony thorax to the outside of the bony thorax in 2 empyema necessitatis. (author)

  11. Creatine kinase radioimmunoassay and isoenzyme electrophoresis compared in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homburger, H.A.; Jacob, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    We compared, in 116 patients, the relative usefulness of results of tests for creatine kinase B-isoenzymes, as measured by radioimmunoassay, and the MB isoenzyme, as measured by electrophoresis, in diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. The radioimmunoassay was specific for isoenzymes of creatine kinase containing the B subunit. All patients with acute transmural infarcts had positive test results by both techniques, but concentrations of B-isoenzymes were more frequently above normal than were MB bands in the case of patients with acute subendocardial infarcts and in the case of all patients with acute myocardial infarcts from whom sera were collected more than 24 h after onset of chest pain. Concentrations of B-isoenzymes also were increased, even when MB bands were not electrophoretically detectable in specimens from several patients without documented acute myocardial infarcts. These abnormal results presumably were caused by increased concentrations of the BB isoenzyme in serum. Accordingly, an increased concentration of B-isoenzymes had less diagnostic specificity and predictive value for acute myocardial infarction than did a detectable MB band. Results of isoenzyme electrophoresis were more reliable for establishing this diagnosis, but the results of radioimmunoassay were more reliable for excluding it in patients with chest pain as the primary symptom

  12. ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME DAN ACUTE PNEUMONIA PADA NEAR DROWNING:SEBUAH LAPORAN KASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Prinka Adyana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Near drowning is a condition in which the victim survived the first 24 hours. The WorldHealth Organization (WHO , recorded worldwide in 2000 there were 400,000 incidentdrowned accidentally . That is, this figure ranks second only to traffic accidents.Aspiration pneumonia is a complication of near drwoning which occurred in 80 % ofcases of near drowning, while 50 % of patients sink into acute respiratory distresssyndrome ( ARDS . This case report discusses the acute respiratory distress syndromeand acute pneumonia in near drowning 24 years old , who had drowned at the beach for± 15 minutes , the chest x - ray obtained pulmonary edema dd / lung pnuemonia therepneuomothorax . Examination of multislice spiral computed tomography ( MSCT bilateral pneumothorax Thorax obtained major and minor fisuura right and left majorfissure , pneumomediastinum , pulmonary pneumonia contusio / suspected aspirationpneumonia , emphysema subcutis . In intensive care patients conducted for 9 days andreturn to akitivitas everyday

  13. Work-related musculoskeletal discomfort among heavy truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazerian, Ramtin; Korhan, Orhan; Shakeri, Ehsan

    2018-03-13

    Heavy truck drivers are exposed to various psychological, psychosocial and physiological factors, some of which can cause musculoskeletal discomfort in different body regions. This study aims to investigate the correlation between different factors of musculoskeletal discomfort in heavy truck drivers. A cross-sectional study design was applied. A total of 384 participants were interviewed using an updated version of the Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire. While hypothesis testing was used to assess the association of different factors in musculoskeletal discomfort, logistic regression was applied to explore different correlations among questions of the survey. The results demonstrate that hours of exposure to vibration were associated with discomfort in the neck and shoulders (p  0.05. Fifty-seven percent of the drivers were suffering from discomfort in their lower back region. Moreover, seat comfort was found to be highly correlated with discomfort in the neck, shoulder and upper back areas. Additionally, with aging the likelihood of experiencing discomfort in the neck, upper back and knees is increased.

  14. 46 CFR 196.37-47 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 196.37-47 Section 196.37-47... Markings for Fire and Emergency Equipment, etc. § 196.37-47 Portable magazine chests. (a) Portable magazine chests shall be marked in letters at least 3 inches high: PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST — FLAMMABLE — KEEP...

  15. A chest radiograph scoring system in patients with severe acute respiratory infection: a validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Emma; Haven, Kathryn; Reed, Peter; Bissielo, Ange; Harvey, Dave; McArthur, Colin; Bringans, Cameron; Freundlich, Simone; Ingram, R. Joan H.; Perry, David; Wilson, Francessa; Milne, David; Modahl, Lucy; Huang, Q. Sue; Gross, Diane; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Grant, Cameron C.

    2015-01-01

    The term severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) encompasses a heterogeneous group of respiratory illnesses. Grading the severity of SARI is currently reliant on indirect disease severity measures such as respiratory and heart rate, and the need for oxygen or intensive care. With the lungs being the primary organ system involved in SARI, chest radiographs (CXRs) are potentially useful for describing disease severity. Our objective was to develop and validate a SARI CXR severity scoring system. We completed validation within an active SARI surveillance project, with SARI defined using the World Health Organization case definition of an acute respiratory infection with a history of fever, or measured fever of ≥ 38 °C; and cough; and with onset within the last 10 days; and requiring hospital admission. We randomly selected 250 SARI cases. Admission CXR findings were categorized as: 1 = normal; 2 = patchy atelectasis and/or hyperinflation and/or bronchial wall thickening; 3 = focal consolidation; 4 = multifocal consolidation; and 5 = diffuse alveolar changes. Initially, four radiologists scored CXRs independently. Subsequently, a pediatrician, physician, two residents, two medical students, and a research nurse independently scored CXR reports. Inter-observer reliability was determined using a weighted Kappa (κ) for comparisons between radiologists; radiologists and clinicians; and clinicians. Agreement was defined as moderate (κ > 0.4–0.6), good (κ > 0.6–0.8) and very good (κ > 0.8–1.0). Agreement between the two pediatric radiologists was very good (κ = 0.83, 95 % CI 0.65–1.00) and between the two adult radiologists was good (κ = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57–0. 93). Agreement of the clinicians with the radiologists was moderate-to-good (pediatrician:κ = 0.65; pediatric resident:κ = 0.69; physician:κ = 0.68; resident:κ = 0.67; research nurse:κ = 0.49, medical students: κ = 0.53 and κ = 0.56). Agreement between clinicians was good-to-very good

  16. Musculoskeletal diseases in forestry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Slađana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common hazards in the forestry that may induce disorders of the musculoskeletal system are vibrations, unfavorable microclimatic conditions, noise, over-time working hours, work load and long-term repeated movements. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases and its difference among workers engaged in various jobs in the forestry. Two groups of workers were selected: woodcutters operating with chain-saw (N=33 and other loggers (N=32. Selected workers were of the similar age and had similar total length of employment as well as the length of service in the forestry. Both groups of workers employed in the forestry had the high prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases (woodcutters 69.7% and other loggers 62.5%, respectively. Degenerative diseases of spinal column were very frequent, in dependently of the type of activity in the forestry. Non-significantly higher risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was found in woodcutters with chain-saw compared to workers having other jobs in the forestry (OR=3.09; 95%CI=0.64-19.72. The lateral epicondylitis was found only in woodcutters operating with chain-saw with the prevalence of 18.2%.

  17. The single chest tube versus double chest tube application after pulmonary lobectomy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Compared with the double chest tube, the single chest tube significantly decreases amount of drainage, duration of chest tube drainage, pain score, the number of patients who need thoracentesis, and cost. Although there is convincing evidence to confirm the results mentioned herein, they still need to be confirmed by large-sample, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials.

  18. Pain management of musculoskeletal injuries in children: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samina; Drendel, Amy L; Kircher, Janeva; Beno, Suzanne

    2010-07-01

    Pain is the most common reason for seeking health care in the Western world and is a contributing factor in up to 80% of all emergency department (ED) visits. In the pediatric emergency setting, musculoskeletal injuries are one of the most common painful presentations. Inadequate pain management during medical care, especially among very young children, can have numerous detrimental effects. No standard of care exists for the management of acute musculoskeletal injury-related pain in children. Within the ED setting, pain from such injuries has been repeatedly shown to be undertreated. Upon completion of this CME article, the reader should be better able to (1) distinguish multiple nonpharmacological techniques for minimizing and treating pain and anxiety in children with musculoskeletal injuries, (2) apply recent medical literature in deciding pharmacological strategies for the treatment of children with musculoskeletal injuries, and (3) interpret the basic principles of pharmacogenomics and how they relate to analgesic efficacy. Pediatric musculoskeletal injuries are both common and painful. There is growing evidence that, in addition to pharmacological therapy, nonpharmacological methods can be introduced to improve analgesia in the ED and after discharge. Traditionally, acetaminophen with codeine has been used to treat moderate orthopedic injury-related pain in children. Other oral opioids (hydrocodone, oxycodone) are gaining popularity, as well. Current data suggest that ibuprofen is at least as effective as acetaminophen-codeine and codeine alone. Medication compliance might be improved if adverse effects were minimized, and ibuprofen has been shown to have a similar or better adverse effect profile than the oral opioids to which it has been compared. Pharmacogenomic data show that nearly 50% of individuals have at least 1 reduced functioning allele resulting in suboptimal conversion of codeine to active analgesic, so it is not surprising that codeine

  19. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Neder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. Methods: 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia, musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis, and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were performed in leprosy patients. Results: At least one musculoskeletal manifestation was observed in 14% of leprosy patients and in none of the controls. Five leprosy patients had asymmetric polyarthritis of small hands joints. Nerve function impairment was observed in 22% of leprosy patients, type 1 leprosy reaction in 18%, and silent neuropathy in 16%. None of the patients and controls presented musculoskeletal pain syndromes, and the frequencies of all antibodies and cyoglobulins were similar in both groups (p > 0.05. Further analysis of leprosy patients demonstrated that the frequencies of nerve function impairment, type 1 leprosy reaction, and silent neuropathy were significantly observed in patients with versus without musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0036, p = 0.0001, and p = 0.309, respectively, as well as multibacillary subtypes in leprosy (86% vs. 42%, p = 0.045. The median of physicians' visual analog scale (VAS, patients' VAS, pain VAS, and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ were significantly higher in leprosy patients with musculoskeletal manifestations (p = 0.0001, p = 0.002, p = 0002, and p = 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: This was the first study to identify musculoskeletal manifestations associated with nerve dysfunction in pediatric leprosy patients. Hansen's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis of asymmetric arthritis, especially in endemic regions.

  20. A Mokken analysis of the literacy in musculoskeletal problems questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Brett; Mulcahy, Jane; Coffey, Amy; Addinsall, Laura; Ryan, Stephanie; Fitzgerald, Kylie

    2017-12-21

    Limited health literacy is known to impact on medication adherence, hospital readmission and potentially poorer health outcomes. The literature on the health literacy of those with musculoskeletal conditions suggests greater functional limitations and increased pain levels. There are a number of measures of health literacy. One that specifically relates to musculoskeletal complaints is the Literacy in Musculoskeletal Problems (LiMP) questionnaire. The LiMP contains 9 multiple choice items that cover anatomy, musculoskeletal conditions and the diagnosis of musculoskeletal complaints. The aim of the study was to evaluate the dimensionality and internal structure of the LiMP in patients attending for osteopathy care at a student-led clinic, as a potential measure of musculoskeletal health literacy. Three hundred and sixty-one (n = 361) new patients attending the Victoria University Osteopathy Clinic completed the LiMP and a demographic and health information questionnaire prior to their initial consultation. Mokken scale analysis, a nonparametric item response theory approach, was used to evaluate the dimensionality and structure of the LiMP in this population, to ascertain whether the questionnaire was measuring a single latent construct - musculoskeletal health literacy. McDonald's omega and Cronbach's alpha were calculated as the reliability estimations. The relationship between the LiMP and a single item screen of health literacy was also undertaken. The 9 items on the LiMP did not form a Mokken scale and the reliability estimations were below an acceptable level (alpha and omega literacy (p literacy. Further research may also develop a health literacy measure that is specific to patients seeking manual therapy care for musculoskeletal complaints.

  1. Patterns of Musculoskeletal Diseases seen in Zambian Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of long-term pain and physical disability affecting many people worldwide and have an enormous economic and social impact on the individual, society and national health systems. Although the burden of disease due to musculoskeletal disorders is said to be ...

  2. Pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis: assessment with chest CT at chest radiography dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Caroline W; Basten, Ines A; Ilsen, Bart; Buls, Nico; Van Gompel, Gert; De Wachter, Elke; Nieboer, Koenraad H; Verhelle, Filip; Malfroot, Anne; Coomans, Danny; De Maeseneer, Michel; de Mey, Johan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate a computed tomographic (CT) protocol with iterative reconstruction at conventional radiography dose levels for the assessment of structural lung abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis ( CF cystic fibrosis ). In this institutional review board-approved study, 38 patients with CF cystic fibrosis (age range, 6-58 years; 21 patients 18 years) underwent investigative CT (at minimal exposure settings combined with iterative reconstruction) as a replacement of yearly follow-up posteroanterior chest radiography. Verbal informed consent was obtained from all patients or their parents. CT images were randomized and rated independently by two radiologists with use of the Bhalla scoring system. In addition, mosaic perfusion was evaluated. As reference, the previous available conventional chest CT scan was used. Differences in Bhalla scores were assessed with the χ(2) test and intraclass correlation coefficients ( ICC intraclass correlation coefficient s). Radiation doses for CT and radiography were assessed for adults (>18 years) and children (chest CT protocol can replace the two yearly follow-up chest radiographic examinations without major dose penalty and with similar diagnostic quality compared with conventional CT.

  3. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  4. Physical recreational activity and musculoskeletal disorders in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Mynarski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of physical activity (PA in the prevention and treatment of civilization diseases has been recognized by the medical society. Despite extensive knowledge and well-documented evidence of health aspects of PA, the identification and assessment of the PA level in various social and professional groups are still needed. The main goal of this research was to work out a preliminary assessment of possible relationship between recreational physical activity and reduced common musculoskeletal disorders in nurses. Material and Methods: The study included 93 nurses, aged 41.4±7.31, with body height of 164.4±7.04 and body weight of 64.5±10.8. The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ was applied to assess pain and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ (long version to assess the level of physical activity. The intergroup differences, due to the occurrence of pain and physical activity levels, were determined using the Mann Whitney test and the Kruskal Wallis test. To evaluate the significance of individual factors potentially influencing the onset of musculoskeletal pains, the Chi2 test for independence was performed. Results: Over 70% of the examined nurses reported musculoskeletal complaints, mostly related with lower back pain. Taking up recreational activity, of at least moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA, reduces the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusion: It is most likely that recreational physical activity at appropriate parameters may prevent musculoskeletal disorders, especially in nurses with long work experience. However, this hypothesis needs to be verified by experimental studies with use of objective tools for the assessment of physical activity. Med Pr 2014;65(2:181–188

  5. 46 CFR 108.651 - Portable magazine chests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable magazine chests. 108.651 Section 108.651... AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.651 Portable magazine chests. Each portable magazine chest must be marked: “PORTABLE MAGAZINE CHEST—FLAMMABLE—KEEP LIGHTS AND FIRE AWAY” in letters at...

  6. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Musculoskeletal Disease: Common Inflammatory Pathways Suggest a Central Role for Loss of Muscle Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey H. Collins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation can arise in response to a variety of stimuli, including infectious agents, tissue injury, autoimmune diseases, and obesity. Some of these responses are acute and resolve, while others become chronic and exert a sustained impact on the host, systemically, or locally. Obesity is now recognized as a chronic low-grade, systemic inflammatory state that predisposes to other chronic conditions including metabolic syndrome (MetS. Although obesity has received considerable attention regarding its pathophysiological link to chronic cardiovascular conditions and type 2 diabetes, the musculoskeletal (MSK complications (i.e., muscle, bone, tendon, and joints that result from obesity-associated metabolic disturbances are less frequently interrogated. As musculoskeletal diseases can lead to the worsening of MetS, this underscores the imminent need to understand the cause and effect relations between the two, and the convergence between inflammatory pathways that contribute to MSK damage. Muscle mass is a key predictor of longevity in older adults, and obesity-induced sarcopenia is a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes. Muscle is highly plastic, undergoes regular remodeling, and is responsible for the majority of total body glucose utilization, which when impaired leads to insulin resistance. Furthermore, impaired muscle integrity, defined as persistent muscle loss, intramuscular lipid accumulation, or connective tissue deposition, is a hallmark of metabolic dysfunction. In fact, many common inflammatory pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the interrelated tissues of the musculoskeletal system (e.g., tendinopathy, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis. Despite these similarities, these diseases are rarely evaluated in a comprehensive manner. The aim of this review is to summarize the common pathways that lead to musculoskeletal damage and disease that result from and contribute to MetS. We propose the overarching

  7. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Musculoskeletal Disease: Common Inflammatory Pathways Suggest a Central Role for Loss of Muscle Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kelsey H; Herzog, Walter; MacDonald, Graham Z; Reimer, Raylene A; Rios, Jaqueline L; Smith, Ian C; Zernicke, Ronald F; Hart, David A

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation can arise in response to a variety of stimuli, including infectious agents, tissue injury, autoimmune diseases, and obesity. Some of these responses are acute and resolve, while others become chronic and exert a sustained impact on the host, systemically, or locally. Obesity is now recognized as a chronic low-grade, systemic inflammatory state that predisposes to other chronic conditions including metabolic syndrome (MetS). Although obesity has received considerable attention regarding its pathophysiological link to chronic cardiovascular conditions and type 2 diabetes, the musculoskeletal (MSK) complications (i.e., muscle, bone, tendon, and joints) that result from obesity-associated metabolic disturbances are less frequently interrogated. As musculoskeletal diseases can lead to the worsening of MetS, this underscores the imminent need to understand the cause and effect relations between the two, and the convergence between inflammatory pathways that contribute to MSK damage. Muscle mass is a key predictor of longevity in older adults, and obesity-induced sarcopenia is a significant risk factor for adverse health outcomes. Muscle is highly plastic, undergoes regular remodeling, and is responsible for the majority of total body glucose utilization, which when impaired leads to insulin resistance. Furthermore, impaired muscle integrity, defined as persistent muscle loss, intramuscular lipid accumulation, or connective tissue deposition, is a hallmark of metabolic dysfunction. In fact, many common inflammatory pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the interrelated tissues of the musculoskeletal system (e.g., tendinopathy, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis). Despite these similarities, these diseases are rarely evaluated in a comprehensive manner. The aim of this review is to summarize the common pathways that lead to musculoskeletal damage and disease that result from and contribute to MetS. We propose the overarching hypothesis that there

  8. Acute aortic dissection: be aware of misdiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asteri Theodora

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute aortic dissection (AAD is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate assessment and therapy. A patient suffering from AAD often presents with an insignificant or irrelevant medical history, giving rise to possible misdiagnosis. The aim of this retrospective study is to address the problem of misdiagnosing AD and the different imaging studies used. Methods From January 2000 to December 2004, 49 patients (41 men and 8 women, aged from 18–75 years old presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital for different reasons and finally diagnosed with AAD. Fifteen of those patients suffered from arterial hypertension, one from giant cell arteritis and another patient from Marfan's syndrome. The diagnosis of AAD was made by chest X-ray, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. Results Initial misdiagnosis occurred in fifteen patients (31% later found to be suffering from AAD. The misdiagnosis was myocardial infarction in 12 patients and cerebral infarction in another three patients. Conclusion Aortic dissection may present with a variety of clinical manifestations, like syncope, chest pain, anuria, pulse deficits, abdominal pain, back pain, or acute congestive heart failure. Nearly a third of the patients found to be suffering from AD, were initially otherwise diagnosed. Key in the management of acute aortic dissection is to maintain a high level of suspicion for this diagnosis.

  9. Potential of ultrasound in the pediatric chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trinavarat, Panruethai, E-mail: pantrinavarat@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Graz (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound (US) of chest, even with inherent limitations of the US beam and air, has been useful in many pediatric chest conditions. It has extended its role and is now widely used by many subspecialists in medicine. This review article will cover techniques, indications, and applications of chest US in neonates, infants and children, including also different common as well as some rare and modern aspects and applications, such as pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary lesions, mediastinum, diaphragm, and chest wall. Other related imaging modalities are also briefly discussed.

  10. CT of blunt chest trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, D.; Babyn, P.S.; Palder, S.; Bergmann, K.

    1993-01-01

    While trauma is still the leading cause of death in the pediatric age range, it is surprising how little the CT appearances of pediatric chest injury have been investigated in the literature. We have reviewed the CT findings of blunt chest trauma in 44 children for whom chest CT examinations were requested to investigate the extent of intrathoracic injury. We noted a propensity for pulmonary contusions to be located posteriorly or posteromedially, and for them to be anatomically nonsegmental and crescentic in shape. This is possibly attributable to the relatively compliant anterior chest wall in children. The CT appearances of other major thoracic injuries are described, including pulmonary lacerations, pneumothoraces, malpositioned chest tubes, mediastinal hematomas, aortic injury, tracheobronchial injury, hemopericardium, and spinal injuries with paraspinal fluid collections. Children demonstrating findings incidental to the actual injury yet important to the subsequent therapy are also presented. We conclude that, in the event of clinically significant blunt chest trauma, the single supine chest examination in the trauma room is insufficient to adequately identify the extent of intrathoracic injury. With the exception of concern for aortic injury for which aortography is indicated, a dynamically enhanced CT scan of the thorax should be performed as clinically significant findings may result in altered therapy. (orig.)

  11. Management of chest drainage tubes after lung surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yukitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Since chest tubes have been routinely used to drain the pleural space, particularly after lung surgery, the management of chest tubes is considered to be essential for the thoracic surgeon. The pleural drainage system requires effective drainage, suction, and water-sealing. Another key point of chest tube management is that a water seal is considered to be superior to suction for most air leaks. Nowadays, the most common pleural drainage device attached to the chest tube is the three-bottle system. An electronic chest drainage system has been developed that is effective in standardizing the postoperative management of chest tubes. More liberal use of digital drainage devices in the postoperative management of the pleural space is warranted. The removal of chest tubes is a common procedure occurring almost daily in hospitals throughout the world. Extraction of the tube is usually done at the end of full inspiration or at the end of full expiration. The tube removal technique is not as important as how it is done and the preparation for the procedure. The management of chest tubes must be based on careful observation, the patient's characteristics, and the operative procedures that had been performed.

  12. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.maurer@i-med.ac.at

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasonography is one of the first line imaging modalities for the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders in children. This article provides an overview of the most important pathologic entities in which ultrasonography significantly contributes to the diagnostic workup.

  13. Fatal musculoskeletal injuries of Quarter Horse racehorses: 314 cases (1990-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafian, Tiffany L; Case, James T; Kinde, Hailu; Daft, Barbara M; Read, Deryck H; Moore, Janet D; Uzal, Francisco A; Stover, Susan M

    2012-10-01

    To determine major causes of death and the anatomic location of musculoskeletal injuries in Quarter Horse racehorses in California. Retrospective case series. 314 Quarter Horse racehorses with musculoskeletal injuries that were necropsied through the California Horse Racing Board Postmortem Program from 1990 to 2007. Postmortem pathology reports were retrospectively reviewed. Musculoskeletal injuries were categorized by anatomic region and described. The number of Quarter Horse starts and starters for the same period of time were obtained from a commercial database for determination of fatal injury incidence. Musculoskeletal injuries accounted for 314 of the 443 (71 %) Quarter Horse racehorses that died during the 18-year study period. Fatal musculoskeletal injuries occurred at a rate of 2.0 deaths/1,000 race starts and 18.6 deaths/1,000 horses that started a race. Musculoskeletal injuries occurred predominantly during racing (84%) and in the forelimbs (81%). The most common fatal musculoskeletal injuries were metacarpophalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joint (fetlock) support injuries (40%) and carpal (24%), vertebral (10%), and scapular (8%) fractures. Proximal interphalangeal (pastern) joint luxations resulted in death of 3% of horses. Fracture configurations of some bones were consistent with those of Thoroughbred racehorses. Evidence of preexisting stress remodeling of bone was reported for some fractures. Knowledge of common locations and types of fatal musculoskeletal injuries in racing Quarter Horses may enhance practitioners' ability to detect mild injuries early, rest horses, and help prevent catastrophic injuries.

  14. Assessment of a new undergraduate module in musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queally, Joseph M; Cummins, Fionnan; Brennan, Stephen A; Shelly, Martin J; O'Byrne, John M

    2011-02-02

    Despite the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders seen by primary care physicians, numerous studies have demonstrated deficiencies in the adequacy of musculoskeletal education at multiple stages of medical education. The aim of this study was to assess a newly developed module in musculoskeletal medicine for use at European undergraduate level (i.e., the medical-school level). A two-week module in musculoskeletal medicine was designed to cover common musculoskeletal disorders that are typically seen in primary care. The module incorporated an integrated approach, including core lectures, bedside clinical examination, and demonstration of basic practical procedures. A previously validated examination in musculoskeletal medicine was used to assess the cognitive knowledge of ninety-two students on completion of the module. A historical control group (seventy-two students) from a prior course was used for comparison. The new module group (2009) performed significantly better than the historical (2006) control group in terms of score (62.3% versus 54.3%, respectively; p pass rate (38.4% versus 12.5%, respectively; p = 0.0002). In a subgroup analysis of the new module group, students who enrolled in the graduate entry program (an accelerated four-year curriculum consisting of students who have already completed an undergraduate university degree) were more likely to perform better in terms of average score (72.2% versus 57%, respectively; p pass rates (70.9% versus 21.4%, respectively; p paper represents an educational advance at undergraduate (i.e., medical-school) level as demonstrated by the improvement in scores in a validated examination. As pressure on medical curricula grows to accommodate advancing medical knowledge, it is important to continue to improve, assess, and consolidate the position of musculoskeletal medicine in contemporary medical education.

  15. Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Disorders in Household Appliances Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aioob Ghanbary

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the most prevalent work-related disorders and injuries and being the main cause of disability. This study was conducted to assessment of the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in worker company household appliances production. Posture analysis was evaluated by OWAS method and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders by Nordic questionnaire. With evaluating musculoskeletal disorders among company household appliances production can intervention action to reduce musculoskeletal disorders was carried out. This cross-sectional study was performed on 100 workers of the appliance manufacturing industry. These Individuals were included 15 persons from foam injection workshop, 17 persons from molding workshop, 17 operators of presses, 17 persons from packaging, 17 person from cutting unit and 17 operators of rivet. The Nordic questionnaire was completed by Individuals for the organs of arm, back, leg and wrist and Posture analysis was performed by OWAS method. The data were analyzed using Spss software version 18 and descriptive statistics and Anova test. Nordic questionnaire results revealed that highest disorders were observed in the arm (25%, back (22% and leg (21%. Also Anova test showed that was observed a significant correlation respectively between age and work experience with the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (p<0.02 (p<0.01. The results showed based on the level of risk OWAS for each job respectively, the highest level of risk associated with foam injection unit, packaging and cutting unit (risk level 4 and the lowest level of risk associated with molding workshop unit (risk level 2.The results of this study showed that household appliances Manufacturing workers due to the nature of their jobs are at risk of musculoskeletal disorders and Ergonomic interventions to do such as workstation redesign, reduced working hours, cycle of rest-work development.

  16. Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Disorders among computer Users in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoub Ghanbary

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Along with widespread use of computers, work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs have become the most prevalent ergonomic problems in computer users. With evaluating musculoskeletal disorders among Computer Users can intervent a action to reduce musculoskeletal disorders carried out. The aim of the present study was to Assessment of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Computer Users in Isfahan University with Rapid Office Strain Assessment (ROSA method and Nordic questionnaire. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 96 computer users in Isfahan university. The data were analyzed using correlation and line regression by test spss 20. and descriptive statistics and Anova test. Data collection tool was Nordic questionnaire and Rapid Office Strain Assessment method checklist. The results of Nordic questionnaire showed that prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in computer users were in the shoulder (62.1%, neck (54.9% and back (53.1% respectively more than in other parts of the body. Based on the level of risk of ROSA were 19 individuals in an area of low risk, 50 individual area of notification and 27 individual in the area hazard and need for ergonomics interventions. Musculoskeletal disorders prevalence were in women more than men. Also Anova test showed that there is a direct and significant correlation between age and work experience with a final score ROSA (p<0.001. The study result showed that the prevalence of MSDs among computer users of Isfahan universities is pretty high and must ergonomic interventions such as computer workstation redesign, users educate about ergonomic principles computer with work, reduced working hours in computers with work, and elbows should be kept close to the body with the angle between 90 and 120 degrees to reduce musculoskeletal disorders carried out.

  17. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Krane, Elliot J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Holmes, Tyson H. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, CA (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Cystic Fibrosis Center for Excellence in Pulmonary Biology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  18. Chest CT in children: anesthesia and atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Beverley; Gawande, Rakhee; Krane, Elliot J.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Robinson, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    There has been an increasing tendency for anesthesiologists to be responsible for providing sedation or anesthesia during chest CT imaging in young children. Anesthesia-related atelectasis noted on chest CT imaging has proven to be a common and troublesome problem, affecting image quality and diagnostic sensitivity. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a standardized anesthesia, lung recruitment, controlled-ventilation technique developed at our institution to prevent atelectasis for chest CT imaging in young children. Fifty-six chest CT scans were obtained in 42 children using a research-based intubation, lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation CT scanning protocol. These studies were compared with 70 non-protocolized chest CT scans under anesthesia taken from 18 of the same children, who were tested at different times, without the specific lung recruitment and controlled-ventilation technique. Two radiology readers scored all inspiratory chest CT scans for overall CT quality and atelectasis. Detailed cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated at baseline, and during recruitment and inspiratory imaging on 21 controlled-ventilation cases and 8 control cases. Significant differences were noted between groups for both quality and atelectasis scores with optimal scoring demonstrated in the controlled-ventilation cases where 70% were rated very good to excellent quality scans compared with only 24% of non-protocol cases. There was no or minimal atelectasis in 48% of the controlled ventilation cases compared to 51% of non-protocol cases with segmental, multisegmental or lobar atelectasis present. No significant difference in cardiorespiratory parameters was found between controlled ventilation and other chest CT cases and no procedure-related adverse events occurred. Controlled-ventilation infant CT scanning under general anesthesia, utilizing intubation and recruitment maneuvers followed by chest CT scans, appears to be a safe and effective method to obtain

  19. Physical Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Disorders: What's hot? What's cool?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A.J. van der; IJmker, S.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter discusses the physical ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders and summarizes the Triennial International Ergonomics Association (IEA) World Congress 2006-IEA2006-highlights on physical ergonomics and work-related MusculoSkeletal Disorders (MSDs). Two general trends are observed.

  20. Management of non-traumatic chest pain by the French Emergency Medical System: Insights from the DOLORES registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo-Silberman, Stéphane; Assez, Nathalie; Vivien, Benoît; Tazarourte, Karim; Mokni, Tarak; Bounes, Vincent; Greffet, Agnès; Bataille, Vincent; Mulak, Geneviève; Goldstein, Patrick; Ducassé, Jean Louis; Spaulding, Christian; Charpentier, Sandrine

    2015-03-01

    The early recognition of acute coronary syndromes is a priority in health care systems, to reduce revascularization delays. In France, patients are encouraged to call emergency numbers (15, 112), which are routed to a Medical Dispatch Centre where physicians conduct an interview and decide on the appropriate response. However, the effectiveness of this system has not yet been assessed. To describe and analyse the response of emergency physicians receiving calls for chest pain in the French Emergency Medical System. From 16 November to 13 December 2009, calls to the Medical Dispatch Centre for non-traumatic chest pain were included prospectively in a multicentre observational study. Clinical characteristics and triage decisions were collected. A total of 1647 patients were included in the study. An interview was conducted with the patient in only 30.5% of cases, and with relatives, bystanders or physicians in the other cases. A Mobile Intensive Care Unit was dispatched to 854 patients (51.9%) presenting with typical angina chest pains and a high risk of cardiovascular disease. Paramedics were sent to 516 patients (31.3%) and a general practitioner was sent to 169 patients (10.3%). Patients were given medical advice only by telephone in 108 cases (6.6%). Emergency physicians in the Medical Dispatch Centre sent an effecter to the majority of patients who called the Emergency Medical System for chest pain. The response level was based on the characteristics of the chest pain and the patient's risk profile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. How to remove a chest drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allibone, Elizabeth

    2015-10-07

    RATIONALE AND KEY POINTS: This article aims to help nurses to undertake the removal of a chest drain in a safe, effective and patient-centred manner. This procedure requires two practitioners. The chest drain will have been inserted aseptically to remove air, blood, fluid or pus from the pleural cavity. ▶ Chest drains may be small or wide bore depending on the underlying condition and clinical setting. They may be secured with a mattress suture and/or an anchor suture. ▶ Chest drains are usually removed under medical instructions when the patient's lung has inflated, the underlying condition has resolved, there is no evidence of respiratory compromise or failure, and their anticoagulation status has been assessed as satisfactory. ▶ Chest drains secured with a mattress suture should be removed by two practitioners. One practitioner is required to remove the tube and the other to tie the mattress suture (if present) and secure the site. REFLECTIVE ACTIVITY: Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How reading this article will change your practice. 2. How this article could be used to educate patients with chest drains. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  2. Development and validation of a musculoskeletal physical examination decision-making test for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Julie Y; Awan, Hisham M; Rowley, David M; Nagel, Rollin W

    2013-01-01

    Despite a renewed emphasis among educators, musculoskeletal education is still lacking in medical school and residency training programs. We created a musculoskeletal multiple-choice physical examination decision-making test to assess competency and physical examination knowledge of our trainees. We developed a 20-question test in musculoskeletal physical examination decision-making test with content that most medical students and orthopedic residents should know. All questions were reviewed by ratings of US orthopedic chairmen. It was administered to postgraduate year 2 to 5 orthopedic residents and 2 groups of medical students: 1 group immediately after their 3-week musculoskeletal course and the other 1 year after the musculoskeletal course completion. We hypothesized that residents would score highest, medical students 1 year post-musculoskeletal training lowest, and students immediately post-musculoskeletal training midrange. We administered an established cognitive knowledge test to compare student knowledge base as we expected the scores to correlate. Academic medical center in the Midwestern United States. Orthopedic residents, chairmen, and medical students. Fifty-four orthopedic chairmen (54 of 110 or 49%) responded to our survey, rating a mean overall question importance of 7.12 (0 = Not Important; 5 = Important; 10 = Very Important). Mean physical examination decision-making scores were 89% for residents, 77% for immediate post-musculoskeletal trained medical students, and 59% 1 year post-musculoskeletal trained medical students (F = 42.07, pphysical examination decision-making test was found to be internally consistent (Kuder-Richardson Formula 20 = 0.69). The musculoskeletal cognitive knowledge test was 78% for immediate post-musculoskeletal trained students and 71% for the 1 year post-musculoskeletal trained students. The student physical examination and cognitive knowledge scores were correlated (r = 0.54, pphysical examination decision-making test

  3. A Novel Device for Accurate Chest Tube Insertion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, Niels; Moeller, Lars B; Olesen, Winnie H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal positioning of a large-bore chest tube is in the part of the pleural cavity that needs drainage. It is recommended that the chest tube be positioned apically in pneumothorax and basally for fluids. However, targeted chest tube positioning to a specific part of the pleural cavity...... can be a challenge. METHODS: A new medical device, the KatGuide, was developed for accurate guiding of a chest tube (28F) to an intended part of the pleural cavity. The primary end point of this randomized, controlled trial was optimal position of the chest tube. The optimal position in pneumothorax...

  4. Advances in chest drain management in thoracic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    An adequate chest drainage system aims to drain fluid and air and restore the negative pleural pressure facilitating lung expansion. In thoracic surgery the post-operative use of the conventional underwater seal chest drainage system fulfills these requirements, however they allow great variability amongst practices. In addition they do not offer accurate data and they are often inconvenient to both patients and hospital staff. This article aims to simplify the myths surrounding the management of chest drains following chest surgery, review current experience and explore the advantages of modern digital chest drain systems and address their disease-specific use. PMID:26941971

  5. Workplace Stresses and Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Dehdashti

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are a significant occupational problem among employees and workers. This study attempted to explore the effect of stressors in the hospital environment on nurses’ development of musculoskeletal disorders. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a random sample of 123 hospital nurses from Semnan University of Medical Sciences. Data were collected during working days over 3 months starting from January 2014. Participants completed a standardized questionnaire for stresses and musculoskeletal disorders at work. Musculoskeletal disorders were used as the dependent variables, while demographic, physical, and psychosocial work factors were used as independent variables. Results Our study revealed prevalence of low back ache, neck ache, shoulder ache, arm-elbow ache, and hand-wrist pain rated 48.3%, 39.5%, 33.1%, 31.3%, and 23.4%, respectively. The findings showed significant statistical association between musculoskeletal complaints in neck and upper extremity with exposed stress levels (P = 0.04. Musculoskeletal symptoms rates increased in employees experienced poor work posture (P = 0.01, fatigue (P = 0.04, and work-family conflict (P = 0.04. Conclusions This study provides indication of the relationship between work environment stress levels and musculoskeletal disorders. Physical and psychosocial stressors should be considered for the development of preventive measures.

  6. Amphotericin B cement beads: A good adjunctive treatment for musculoskeletal mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Arockiaraj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is one among the aggressive, invasive fungal infections usually seen in immunocompromised patients. Mucormycosis osteomyelitis is very rare. We present a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who complained of pain over the right proximal thigh. Plain radiograph revealed ill defined osteolytic lesion of proximal femur. MRI showed altered signal in proximal femur with focal collection and cortical breach. Biopsy and tissue culture diagnosed mucormycosis both histologically and microbiologically. He was treated with aggressive debridement, skeletal stabilization, and amphotericin antifungal cement beads. He recovered with no residual pain, minimal limb shortening, and no clinical or radiological evidence of recurrence at 3 years followup. The high index of suspicion, early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, and adequate antifungal therapy play a significant role in the treatment of musculoskeletal mucormycosis.

  7. The utility of chest X-ray as a screening tool for blunt thoracic aortic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Adam; Inaba, Kenji; Siboni, Stefano; Effron, Zachary; Haltmeier, Tobias; Jaffray, Paul; Reddy, Sravanthi; Lofthus, Alexander; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Dubose, Joseph; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2016-01-01

    The early and accurate identification of patients with blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a challenge. Traditionally, a portable AP chest X-ray (CXR) is utilized as the initial screening modality for BTAI, however, there is controversy surrounding its sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the sensitivity of CXR as a screening modality for BTAI. After IRB approval, all adult (≥18 yo) blunt trauma patients admitted to LAC+USC (01/2011-12/2013) who underwent CXR and chest CT were retrospectively reviewed. Final radiology attending CXR readings were reviewed for mediastinal abnormalities (widened mediastinum, mediastinal to chest width ratio greater than 0.25, irregular aortic arch, blurred aortic contour, opacification of the aortopulmonary window, and apical pleural haematoma) suggestive of aortic injury. Chest CT final attending radiologist readings were utilized as the gold standard for diagnosis of BTAI. The primary outcome analyzed was CXR sensitivity. A total of 3728 patients were included in the study. The majority of patients were male (72.6%); mean age was 43 (SD 20). Median ISS was 9 (IQR 4-17) and median GCS was 15 (IQR 14-15). The most common mechanism of injury was MVC (48.0%), followed by fall (20.6%), and AVP (16.9%). The total number of CXRs demonstrating a mediastinal abnormality was 200 (5.4%). Widened mediastinum was present on 191 (5.1%) of CXRs, blurred aortic contour on 10 (0.3%), and irregular aortic arch on 4 (0.1%). An acute aortic injury confirmed by chest CT was present in 17 (0.5%) patients. Only 7 of these with CT-confirmed BTAI had a mediastinal abnormality identified on CXR, for a sensitivity of 41% (95% CI: 19-67%). The results from this study suggest that CXR alone is not a reliable screening modality for BTAI. A combination of screening CXR and careful consideration of other factors, such as mechanism of injury, will be required to effectively discriminate between those who should and should not undergo chest

  8. Chest x-ray in Q-fever pneumonia: a series of 71 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encinas, B.; Cerezal, L.F.; Fidalgo, I.; Bustamente, M.; Lopez Calderon, M.

    1995-01-01

    Chest X ray features of 71 cases of Q-fever serologically confirmed and with clinical manifestations of acute respiratory disease were retrospectively assessed in order to evaluate the radiographic features. In 68 cases (96%) The X-ray films were abnormal. Segmental consolidation, sometimes multiple and bilateral were tue most usual findings. Nodular opacities were found in 6 cases (9%) and can mimic a tumor. Cavitacion , a very unusual findings, was found in two nodular consolidations(two patients). Laminar atelectasis was less common than proviously reported. As in other series, total resolution or with minimal scars occurs within 3 months 15 refs

  9. Review article: Methodology for the 'rapid review' series on musculoskeletal injuries in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Kirsten; McPhee, Megan; Bell, Anthony; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Russell, Trevor

    2018-02-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common presentation to the ED, with significant costs involved in the management of these injuries, variances in care within the ED and associated morbidity. A series of rapid review papers were completed to guide best practice for the assessment and management of common musculoskeletal injuries presenting to the ED. This paper presents the methodology used across the rapid reviews. PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, TRIP and the grey literature, including relevant organisational websites, were searched in 2015. The search was repeated consistently for each topic area (injuries of the foot and ankle, knee, hand and wrist, elbow, shoulder, lumbar spine and cervical spine). English-language primary studies, systematic reviews and guidelines that were published in the last 10 years and addressed acute musculoskeletal injury management were considered for inclusion. Data extraction of each included article was conducted, followed by a quality appraisal. The extracted data from each article was synthesised to group similar evidence together. For each rapid review, the evidence has been organised in a way that a clinician can direct their attention to a specific component of the clinical cycle of care in the ED, such as the assessment, diagnostic tests, management and follow-up considerations from ED. The series of rapid reviews are designed to foster evidence-based practice within the ED, targeting the injuries most commonly presenting. The reviews provide clinicians in EDs with rapid access to the best current evidence, which has been synthesised and organised to assist decision-making. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  10. Incidence, aetiology and prevention of musculoskeletal injuries in volleyball: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, O; Maas, M; Verhagen, E; Zwerver, J; Gouttebarge, V

    2017-07-01

    Currently, there is no overview of the incidence and (volleyball-specific) risk factors of musculoskeletal injuries among volleyball players, nor any insight into the effect of preventive measures on the incidence of injuries in volleyball. This study aimed to review systematically the scientific evidence on the incidence, prevalence, aetiology and preventive measures of volleyball injuries. To this end, a highly sensitive search strategy was built based on two groups of keywords (and their synonyms). Two electronic databases were searched, namely Medline (biomedical literature) via Pubmed, and SPORTDiscus (sports and sports medicine literature) via EBSCOhost. The results showed that ankle, knee and shoulder injuries are the most common injuries sustained while playing volleyball. Results are presented separately for acute and overuse injuries, as well as for contact and non-contact injuries. Measures to prevent musculoskeletal injuries, anterior knee injuries and ankle injuries were identified in the scientific literature. These preventive measures were found to have a significant effect on decreasing the occurrence of volleyball injuries (for instance on ankle injuries with a reduction from 0.9 to 0.5 injuries per 1000 player hours). Our systematic review showed that musculoskeletal injuries are common among volleyball players, while effective preventive measures remain scarce. Further epidemiological studies should focus on other specific injuries besides knee and ankle injuries, and should also report their prevalence and not only the incidence. Additionally, high-quality studies on the aetiology and prevention of shoulder injuries are lacking and should be a focus of future studies.

  11. A case of acute respiratory failure in a young man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Di Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A 40 years old man presents with a few hours history of progressive dyspnea. He was suffering from almost a week of low grade fever. The night before the onset of dyspnea he had high fever (39,5°C, polyuria and dysuria. His blood pressure is 115/65 mmHg and his oxygen saturation while breathing ambient air is 81%. Chest auscultation reveals rales bilaterally. A chest radiography shows bilateral pulmonary infiltrates consistent with pulmonary edema. How should this patient be evaluated to establish the cause of the acute pulmonary edema and to determine appropriate therapy?

  12. Chest X-ray quality in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children: from prescription to optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevan, M.; Cotelo, E.; Hortal, M.; Iraola, I.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI), primarily pneumonia, is the leading cause of childhood death in developing countries. The increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistance and the high cost of vaccines lead to considering the first strategy to reduce pneumonia deaths the early detection of the disease. Case management begins with the clinical examination and may continue with the prescription of a chest x-ray. Consequently, the radiograph should meet quality standards, and radiologists and paediatricians must know how to interpret the images. Special attention should be paid on patient dose due to children radiosensitivity, high frequency and chest x rays rejection rate. This paper is a retrospective study of chest radiographs performed in 5731 children with clinical diagnosis of ALRI assisted in three Uruguayan hospitals during the three year investigation supported by the Division of Vaccines and Immunization of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) that had the aim of estimating the burden of pneumonia (from 2001 to 2004). It is analyzed the prescription of radiographs during the diagnosis and in later controls (2220 children assisted in two of the three hospitals). Patient doses are estimated from technical parameters and equipment specifications. The investigation also analyzes patient doses that could have been avoided if paediatricians had managed the disease according to the established protocols. Results show that 82.4 % of chest X-rays diagnosed pneumonia and that some children underwent up to ten radiographs. Significant differences were found in patient dose in the three hospitals, concluding that education on image quality on chest radiographs of radiologists, paediatricians and radiological technologists is the first and best tool for the earlier diagnosis of pneumonia in children and for the application of Radiation Protection (RP) principles in medical exposures. (author)

  13. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) diagnoses more injuries than chest radiography, so-called occult injuries. Wide availability of chest CT has driven substantial increase in emergency department use, although the incidence and clinical significance of chest CT findings have not been fully described. We determine the frequency, severity, and clinical import of occult injury, as determined by changes in management. These data will better inform clinical decisions, need for chest CT, and odds of intervention. Our sample included prospective data (2009 to 2013) on 5,912 patients at 10 Level I trauma center EDs with both chest radiography and chest CT at physician discretion. These patients were 40.6% of 14,553 enrolled in the parent study who had either chest radiography or chest CT. Occult injuries were pneumothorax, hemothorax, sternal or greater than 2 rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, thoracic spine or scapula fracture, and diaphragm or great vessel injury found on chest CT but not on preceding chest radiography. A priori, we categorized thoracic injuries as major (having invasive procedures), minor (observation or inpatient pain control >24 hours), or of no clinical significance. Primary outcome was prevalence and proportion of occult injury with major interventions of chest tube, mechanical ventilation, or surgery. Secondary outcome was minor interventions of admission rate or observation hours because of occult injury. Two thousand forty-eight patients (34.6%) had chest injury on chest radiography or chest CT, whereas 1,454 of these patients (71.0%, 24.6% of all patients) had occult injury. Of these, in 954 patients (46.6% of injured, 16.1% of total), chest CT found injuries not observed on immediately preceding chest radiography. In 500 more patients (24.4% of injured patients, 8.5% of all patients), chest radiography found some injury, but chest CT found occult injury. Chest radiography found all injuries in only 29.0% of injured patients. Two hundred and two

  14. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Bhaskar, N.

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  15. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Imaging of chest wall infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Jelassi, Helmi; Chaabane, Skander; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Ben Miled-Mrad, Khaoula

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of infections can affect the chest wall including pyogenic, tuberculous, fungal, and some other unusual infections. These potentially life-threatening disorders are frequent especially among immunocompromised patients but often misdiagnosed by physical examination and radiographs. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and imaging features of these different chest wall infections according to the different imaging modalities with emphasis on ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The outcome of chest wall infection depends on early diagnosis, severity of the immunosuppression, offending organism, and extent of infection. Because clinical findings and laboratory tests may be not contributive in immunocompromised patients, imaging plays an important role in the early detection and precise assessment of the disease. US, CT, and MRI are all useful: bone destruction is more accurately detected with CT whereas soft tissue involvement are better visualized with US and MRI. CT and US are also used to guide percutaneous biopsy and drainage procedures. MR images are helpful in pre-operative planning of extensive chest wall infections. (orig.)

  17. Musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging: Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Fisher, C.F.; Fulmer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior contrast, resolution, and multiplanar imaging capability, allowing excellent definition of soft-tissue and bone marrow abnormalities. For these reasons, magnetic resonance imaging has become a major diagnostic imaging method for the evaluation of many musculoskeletal disorders. The applications of magnetic resonance imaging for musculoskeletal diagnosis are summarized and examples of common clinical situations are given. General guidelines are suggested for the musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging

  18. [Stress fractures of the ribs with acute thoracic pain in a young woman, diagnosed by the bone scan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgitzikis, Athanasios; Siopi, Dimitra; Doumas, Argyrios; Mitka, Ekaterini; Antoniadis, Antonios

    2010-01-01

    We report the unusual case of a 29 -year old woman with emotional instability who presented with acute onset chest pain after severe chronic cough. The chest X-ray and the serological tests were normal but the CT scanning, and the bone scanning revealed multiple bilateral rib stress fractures, caused by severe coughing and physical activity and worsened by the patient's emotional instability.

  19. CT/MRI of musculoskeletal complications of AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyatt, S.H. [Russel H. Morgan Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fishman, E.K. [Russel H. Morgan Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    While uncommon, many musculoskeletal disorders may be seen in association with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Infections such as osteomyelitis, bacterial myositis and septic arthritis, neoplasms such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma, and myopathies and polymyositis have been reported in this patient population. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging frequently detect unanticipated musculoskeletal disease in a patient with AIDS, and may further help to distinguish infections from neoplastic disorders. (orig.)

  20. Should the lateral chest radiograph be routinely performed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Fatuma; Williams, Imelda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The chest x-ray is one of the most common plain film radiographic examinations performed. Inclusion of the lateral chest radiograph varies internationally and nationally across radiology departments and states in Australia. Search strategy: A search strategy of the databases Cochrane Library, Ovid Medline/Medline, PubMed, Scopus and Science Direct was conducted. The results were restricted to those published between 1985 and 2013 and those published in English. The following search terms were used: ‘lateral chest’, ‘radiograph’, ‘digital radiography’, ‘chest x-ray’, ‘plain film radiography’, ‘ionising radiation’. The results were restricted to publications with these terms in the title, abstract and/or keywords. Main findings: There are few national or international guidelines pertaining to the inclusion of the lateral chest x-ray as routine. Primary concerns are the increased radiation dose associated with the additional chest view and reduction of medical imaging services cost. Modern digital imaging systems result in a lower radiation dose. The diagnostic yield of the lateral chest x-ray is highly dependent on the clinical indications of the patient. Further research into the routine inclusion of the lateral chest x-ray is recommended. Conclusion: Review of the literature suggests that the lateral chest radiograph should not be performed routinely unless clinically indicated

  1. Role of computed tomography in blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Chan Wha; Kim, Hae Kyoon

    1994-01-01

    In patient with blunt trauma of chest, supine AP x-ray cannot differentiate the lung contusion, laceration, atelectasis, and hemothorax definitely. Therefore, computed tomographic evaluation is needed for accurate evaluation of the injuries. In our knowledge, there are few reports about CT findings of blunt chest trauma, in our country, therefore we tried to fluid the characteristic CT findings in patients with blunt trauma. We analyzed the plain x-ray and CT image of 4 patients with blunt chest trauma. Location and morphology of lung parenchymal contusion and laceration, hemopneumothorax, chest wall injuries and location of chest tube. Lung parenchymal contusion was noted in 53 segments., of 16 patients infiltration(n=27 segment), and multiple nodular pattern was noted in 15 segment, pattern of consolidation along the lung periphery was seen in 11 segment. Laceration was noted in 18 lesion and most commonly located in paravertebral area(b=8). CT scan of chest in patient with blunt chest trauma, provides accurate information of the pattern of injuries, and localization, therefore, should be performed as possible

  2. Calculation of the Cardiothoracic Ratio from Portable Anteroposterior Chest Radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Sung Bin; Oh, Won Sup; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Sam Soo

    2011-01-01

    Cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), the ratio of cardiac diameter (CD) to thoracic diameter (TD), is a useful screening method to detect cardiomegaly, but is reliable only on posteroanterior chest radiography (chest PA). We performed this cross-sectional 3-phase study to establish reliable CTR from anteroposterior chest radiography (chest AP). First, CDChest PA/CDChest AP ratios were determined at different radiation distances by manipulating chest computed tomography to simulate chest PA and AP. CDChest PA was inferred from multiplying CDChest AP by this ratio. Incorporating this CD and substituting the most recent TDChest PA, we calculated the 'corrected' CTR and compared it with the conventional one in patients who took both the chest radiographies. Finally, its validity was investigated among the critically ill patients who performed portable chest AP. CDChest PA/CDChest AP ratio was {0.00099 × (radiation distance [cm])} + 0.79 (n = 61, r = 1.00, P chest AP with an available previous chest PA. This might help physicians detect congestive cardiomegaly for patients undergoing portable chest AP. PMID:22065900

  3. Video Analysis of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Nigerian and English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Video Analysis of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Nigerian and English Professional Soccer Leagues: A Comparative Study. ... The knee and the ankle were the most common injured parts. Most injuries were caused by tackling ... Keywords: Soccer Players, Nigerian Premier League, English Premier League. Musculoskeletal ...

  4. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a review of the principles and techniques of musculoskeletal MRI and its broad range of diagnostic applications. Opening chapters of the book summarize the principles of musculoskeletal MRI, explaining how these principles can be applied to provide optimal tissue contrast and characterization. Step-by-step guidelines are then offered on patient selection, positioning, and coil techniques, with full consideration of how coils, number of averages, matrix size, repetition time, and other factors affect image quality. Patient throughput and the most commonly used pulse sequences are also discussed. The book features coverage of the use of MRI in evaluation of specific diseases: bone and soft tissue tumors;infections;musculoskeletal trauma;spinal disorders;and miscellaneous conditions. The authors' comparisons of MRI with computed tomography, ultrasound, isotopes, and other techniques will assist the physician in determining which clinical problems are best evaluated by MRI. Where MRI is the optimal technique, the text outlines the examination procedure, indicates which sequences provide the most information, and describes the pathologic findings that can be observed in MRI scans

  5. Musculoskeletal injuries among Malaysian badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, A H; George, J; Ramlan, A A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by Malaysian badminton players. This is a retrospective case notes review of all badminton players who attended the National Sports Institute (NSI) Clinic, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and were diagnosed with musculoskeletal injuries. In a two and a half year period, from January 2005 to June 2007, 469 musculoskeletal injuries were diagnosed among badminton players at the NSI Clinic. The mean age of the players who attended the clinic was 19.2 (range 13-52) years. Approximately 60 percent of the injuries occurred in players younger than 20 years of age. The majority of injuries (91.5 percent) were categorised as mild overuse injury and mostly involved the knee. The majority of the injuries sustained by badminton players in this study were due to overuse, primarily in the knee. The majority of the injuries were diagnosed in younger players and occurred during training/practice sessions. There was no difference in terms of incidence and types of injuries between the genders.

  6. Mass chest radiography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papavasiliou, C.

    1987-01-01

    In Greece mass chest radiography has been performed regularly on various population groups as a measure to control tuberculosis. Routine chest radiography is performed in most Greek hospitals on admission. In this report available data-admittedly inadequate-directly or indirectly addressing the problem of benefit versus the risk or cost associated with this examination is presented

  7. Exploring musculoskeletal injuries in the podiatry profession: an international cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cylie M; Penkala, Stefania; Smith, Peter; Haines, Terry; Bowles, Kelly-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Workplace injury is an international costly burden. Health care workers are an essential component to managing musculoskeletal disorders, however in doing this, they may increase their own susceptibility. While there is substantial evidence about work-related musculoskeletal disorders across the health workforce, understanding risk factors in specific occupational groups, such as podiatry, is limited. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of work related low back pain in podiatrists. This was an international cross-sectional survey targeting podiatrists in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. The survey had two components; general demographic variables and variables relating to general musculoskeletal pain in general or podiatry work-related musculoskeletal pain. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with musculoskeletal stiffness and pain and low back pain intensity. Thematic analysis was used to group comments podiatrists made about their musculoskeletal health. There were 948 survey responses (5% of Australian, New Zealand and United Kingdom registered podiatrists). There were 719 (76%) podiatrists reporting musculoskeletal pain as a result of their work practices throughout their career. The majority of injuries reported were in the first five years of practice ( n  = 320, 45%). The body area reported as being the location of the most significant injury was the low back (203 of 705 responses, 29%). Being female ( p  < 0.001) and working in private practice ( p  = 0.003) was associated with musculoskeletal pain or stiffness in the past 12 months. There were no variables associated with pain or stiffness in the past four weeks. Being female was the only variable associated with higher pain ( p  = 0.018). There were four main themes to workplace musculoskeletal pain: 1. Organisational and procedural responses to injury, 2. Giving up work, taking time off, reducing

  8. Implementation of a Prehospital Triage System for Patients With Chest Pain and Logistics for Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in the Region of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Rob; Appelman, Yolande; Bronzwaer, Jean G.; Slagboom, Ton; Amoroso, Giovanni; van Exter, Pieternel; Tijssen, G. P. Jan; de Winter, Robbert J.

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to describe the logistics of a prehospital triage system for patients with acute chest pain in the region of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Ambulance electrocardiograms (ECGs) were evaluated immediately in 1 of the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-capable centers. Patients accepted for

  9. Very late coronary spasm inducing acute myocardial infarction in a heart transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Francesco; Lopizzo, Agostino; Centola, Antonio; Cuculo, Andrea; Ruggiero, Antonio; Di Biase, Matteo; Brunetti, Natale Daniele

    2016-12-01

    : We report coronary angio findings of very late (10-year) coronary spasm inducing acute myocardial infarction with typical chest pain in a heart transplant recipient. Coronary spasm was promptly relieved by intra-coronary infusion of nitrates.

  10. Acute perimyocarditis mimicking transmural myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although acute pericarditis has charachteristic electrocardiographic (ECG findings that differentiate it from acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI; in certain cases diagnosis is somewhat difficult especially when the ECG reveals focal instead of diffuse changes and moreover when pericarditis is associated with an underlying myocarditis causing elevation of the cardiac biomarkers therefore increasing the difficulty in differentiating between both enteties. This is especially important because adverse lethal side effect can occur if thrombolytic therapy is administered for a patient with acute pericarditis, or if a diagnosis of transmural MI is missed. In this case report we are describing an 18 year old male patient who presented with an acute onset of severe chest pain associated with focal ECG changes and elevated cardiac enzymes mimicking transmural MI. This report aims to sensitize readers to this debate and create awareness among cardiologists and intensivists with both presentations and how to reach an accurate diagnosis.

  11. Everyday burden of musculoskeletal conditions among villagers in rural Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hondras, Maria; Hartvigsen, Jan; Myburgh, Corrie

    2016-01-01

    with an interpreter. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim, with Setswana contextually translated into English. The theoretical lens included Bury's biographical disruption, in which he distinguishes between "meaning as consequence" and "meaning as significance". RESULTS: Interviews revealed co-existing accounts...... for the consequences and significance of musculoskeletal burden related to 3 themes: (i) hard work for traditional lives; (ii) bearing the load of a rugged landscape; and, (iii) caring for others with disrupted lives. Physical labour with musculoskeletal symptoms had economic and subsistence consequences. The loss...... of independence and social identity to fulfil traditional roles held meaning as significance. Outmigration for wage labour and other shifts in family structure compounded everyday musculoskeletal burden. CONCLUSION: Uncovering burden is an important first step to address musculoskeletal care needs in developing...

  12. Early detection of interstitial pneumonia by WXGa-citrate scintigraphy. Cases of abnormal pulmonary WXGa uptake with normal chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Mikami, Riichiro; Ryujin, Yoshitada

    1985-04-01

    In this paper we report our recent experience indicating usefulness of WXGa-citrate scintigraphy in 4 cases with inflammatory pulmonary diseases. These cases showed abnormal pulmonary WXGa uptake with normal chest radiographs. The first case with malignant lymphoma and the second one with lung cancer suffered from pulmonary infection following secondary immuno-insufficiency due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Pneumocystis carinii was suspected as causative agent in the first case, and gram negative bacilli in the second case. The third case with lung cancer developed radiation pneumonia after radiotherapy. The fourth case with acute bronchitis developed drug induced interstitial pneumonia presumably due to minocycline administration. It is concluded that WXGa-citrate scintigraphy is more sensitive for early detection of interstitial pneumonia than routine chest radiography.

  13. The Effect of Different Types of Musculoskeletal Injuries on Blood Concentration of Serum Amyloid A in Thoroughbred Racehorses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turło, Agnieszka; Cywińska, Anna; Czopowicz, Michał; Witkowski, Lucjan; Niedźwiedź, Artur; Słowikowska, Malwina; Borowicz, Hieronim; Jaśkiewicz, Anna; Winnicka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Training-induced muscle, skeletal and joint trauma may result in acute phase response reflected by the changes in the blood concentration of serum amyloid A (SAA) in racehorses. It remains yet unclear if such systemic reaction could be triggered by sport injuries and what is the impact of different types of musculoskeletal trauma on SAA concentrations in racehorses. This study aimed to determine changes in the SAA blood concentration in racehorses with different types of injuries of musculoskeletal system. Materials and Methods The study involved 28 racehorses diagnosed after the race with bone fractures (n = 7), dorsal metacarpal disease (n = 11), joint trauma (n = 4) or tendon and muscle trauma (n = 6) and 28 healthy control racehorses. Serum samples were collected twice, between 1 and 4 days of the injury or succesful completion of the race. SAA concentration was measured using the commercial ELISA kit. Differences between mean SAA concentration in respective groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test. Results Mean SAA concentration within the first 4 days of the injury of muscle and tendon was significantly higher than in bone fractures, dorsal metacarpal disease, joint trauma or in the healthy horses (p<0,001). There were no significant differences between the other groups. Conclusions Strain injuries of muscle and tendons can cause a moderate increase in SAA blood concentration in racehorses, reflecting the occurrence of the acute phase response. Similar reaction is not observed in the stress-related bone injuries. PMID:26466121

  14. The Effect of Different Types of Musculoskeletal Injuries on Blood Concentration of Serum Amyloid A in Thoroughbred Racehorses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Turło

    Full Text Available Training-induced muscle, skeletal and joint trauma may result in acute phase response reflected by the changes in the blood concentration of serum amyloid A (SAA in racehorses. It remains yet unclear if such systemic reaction could be triggered by sport injuries and what is the impact of different types of musculoskeletal trauma on SAA concentrations in racehorses. This study aimed to determine changes in the SAA blood concentration in racehorses with different types of injuries of musculoskeletal system.The study involved 28 racehorses diagnosed after the race with bone fractures (n = 7, dorsal metacarpal disease (n = 11, joint trauma (n = 4 or tendon and muscle trauma (n = 6 and 28 healthy control racehorses. Serum samples were collected twice, between 1 and 4 days of the injury or succesful completion of the race. SAA concentration was measured using the commercial ELISA kit. Differences between mean SAA concentration in respective groups were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc test.Mean SAA concentration within the first 4 days of the injury of muscle and tendon was significantly higher than in bone fractures, dorsal metacarpal disease, joint trauma or in the healthy horses (p<0,001. There were no significant differences between the other groups.Strain injuries of muscle and tendons can cause a moderate increase in SAA blood concentration in racehorses, reflecting the occurrence of the acute phase response. Similar reaction is not observed in the stress-related bone injuries.

  15. Incidence of work-related musculoskeletal pain among dentists in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dentists commonly experience musculoskeletal pain during the course of their career. This study investigated the incidence and mechanism of work-related musculoskeletal pain among practising dentists in Kwa-Zulu Natal. A descriptive survey was conducted among 94 dentists, who voluntarily consented to participate in ...

  16. Musculoskeletal symptoms in pharmaceutical sales representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Katherine; Gyi, Diane; Haslam, Cheryl

    2010-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a leading cause of work-related ill health. Existing literature indicates that pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs) report a high prevalence of MSDs, possibly exacerbated by the nature of work (prolonged driving and manual handling). In addition, they experience difficulty in accessing occupational health services. To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors among PSRs in order to assist their occupational health management through raising risk awareness. A self-completed questionnaire distributed to 205 PSRs within a UK pharmaceutical company was used to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, psychosocial factors, work tasks undertaken and company car use. To assist understanding of work tasks and organizational factors, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of 12 key personnel. The questionnaire response rate was 68%. PSRs reported high mileage and 100% reported working from the car in a typical day. Forty-seven per cent reported both manual handling for > or = 4 h/day and 'often' or 'sometimes' working from the car. Fifty-seven per cent reported low back symptoms in the last 12 months. Interview data revealed issues relating to car choice, storage in the boot and working from the car, which should be considered when developing priorities for preventive management of MSDs. Musculoskeletal symptoms appear to be a problem for PSRs, with risk factors reported as prolonged driving, sitting in the car, working from the car and manual handling. Interventions to facilitate their occupational health management should focus on raising awareness of the risks of prolonged driving and working from the car.

  17. Acute Calcific Tendinitis of the Index Finger in a Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walocko, Frances M; Sando, Ian C; Haase, Steven C; Kozlow, Jeffrey H

    2017-09-01

    Calcific tendinitis is characterized by calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within tendons and is a common cause of musculoskeletal pain in adults. Its clinical manifestations may be acute, chronic, or asymptomatic. Acute calcific tendinitis is self-resolving condition that is rarely reported in the pediatric population and may be overlooked for more common processes, leading to unnecessary treatment. A chart reivew was performed of a single case of acute calcific tendonitis of the index finger in a child. We describe a case of calcific tendinitis of the index finger in a 9-year-old boy who was referred to us for a second opinion after surgical exploration of an acutely inflamed digit was recommended based on his initial presentation. The calcifications and symptoms resolved over time without operative management. Although rare in children, acute calcific tendinitis can present similar to an infection. However, appropriate managment is non-operative as the symptoms and radiographic findings resolve over time.

  18. Musculoskeletal symptoms among female garment factory workers in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Sarah R; Vijitha de Silva, P; Lipscomb, Hester J; Ostbye, Truls

    2012-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and their association with sociodemographic risk factors among female garment factory workers in Sri Lanka. 1058 randomly selected female garment factory workers employed in the free trade zone of Kogalla, Sri Lanka were recruited to complete two interviewer-administered questionnaires assessing musculoskeletal symptoms and health behaviors. Musculoskeletal complaints among female garment workers in the FTZ of Kogalla are less common than expected. Sociocultural factors may have resulted in underreporting and similarly contribute to the low rates of healthcare utilization by these women. 164 (15.5%) of workers reported musculoskeletal symptoms occurring more than 3 times or lasting a week or more during the previous 12-month period. Back (57.3%) and knee (31.7%) were the most common sites of pain. Although most symptomatic women reported that their problems interfered with work and leisure activities, very few missed work as a result of their pain. Prevalence correlated positively with increased age and industry tenure of less than 12 months. Job type, body mass index, and education were not significant predictors of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  19. Pulmonary nodule size evaluation with chest tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsson, Åse A; Fagman, Erika; Vikgren, Jenny; Fisichella, Valeria A; Boijsen, Marianne; Flinck, Agneta; Kheddache, Susanne; Svalkvist, Angelica; Båth, Magnus

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate intra- and interobserver variability, as well as agreement for nodule size measurements on chest tomosynthesis and computed tomographic (CT) images. The Regional Ethical Review Board approved this study, and all participants gave written informed consent. Thirty-six segmented nodules in 20 patients were included in the study. Eight observers measured the left-to-right, inferior-to-superior, and longest nodule diameters on chest tomosynthesis and CT images. Intra- and interobserver repeatability, as well as agreement between measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, were assessed as recommended by Bland and Altman. The difference between the mean manual and the segmented diameter was -2.2 and -2.3 mm for left-to-right and -2.6 and -2.2 mm for the inferior-to-superior diameter for measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images, respectively. Intraobserver 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for the longest diameter ranged from a lower limit of -1.1 mm and an upper limit of 1.0 mm to -1.8 and 1.8 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -0.6 and 0.9 mm to -3.1 and 2.2 mm for axial CT. Interobserver 95% LOA ranged from -1.3 and 1.5 mm to -2.0 and 2.1 mm for chest tomosynthesis and from -1.8 and 1.1 mm to -2.2 and 3.1 mm for axial CT. The 95% LOA concerning the mean of the observers' measurements of the longest diameter at chest tomosynthesis and axial CT were ±2.1 mm (mean measurement error, 0 mm). For the different observers, the 95% LOA between the modalities ranged from -2.2 and 1.6 mm to -3.2 and 2.8 mm. Measurements on chest tomosynthesis and CT images are comparable, because there is no evident bias between the modalities and the repeatability is similar. The LOA between measurements for the two modalities raise concern if measurements from chest tomosynthesis and CT were to be used interchangeably. © RSNA, 2012.

  20. Influence of chest radiotherapy in frequency and patterns of chest relapse in disseminated small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mira, J.G.; Livingston, R.B.; Moore, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    The value of radiotherapy to the chest (RC) in disseminated small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) has been questioned. Two protocols for disseminated SCLC from the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) have been compared. The first one included radiotherapy (RT), 3000 rad in two weeks, to the primary tumor, mediastinum and supraclavicular areas, while the second one deleted any RC. Multidrug chemotherapy (CT) and brain RT were used in both protocols. Nonresponders to CT were removed from the study. Our main findings are as follows: (1) Initial chest relapses (patients with no initial extrathoracic relapse) have increased from 24-55% when RC is not given (P = 0.0001). Overall chest relapse (adding those patients that relapsed simultaneously in the chest plus other sites) in the second protocol was 73%. (2) Amount of response to CT does not influence the chances for relapse. Even complete responders to CT have a high chance for chest relapse. (3) Sites of relapse without RC are mainly in the primary tumor, ipsilateral hilus and mediastinum. (4) With RC, relapses shift to the chest periphery, mostly to the lung outside the radiotherapy field and to the pleura. (5) The two very different CT regimens have produced similar percentages and duration of response. (6) CT schema with periodic reinductions prolongs duration of response and survival over schema with continuous maintenance. Hence, interruption of CT to allow RC does not seem to adversely influence CT efficacy

  1. MR imaging of appendicular musculoskeletal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathol, M.H.; Montgomery, W.J.; Yuh, W.T.C.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty cases of musculoskeletal trauma to the extremities examined by MR imaging have been reviewed retrospectively. Examples of various injuries will be shown, including disruption of ligament and tendon, muscular tear and edema, hemorrhage (local or diffuse), vascular injury, bone marrow contusion, osteocartilaginous fracture, meniscal tear, and joint fluid. Many of these patients were collegiate athletes, and MR was valuable in establishing a rapid, accurate diagnosis influencing not only treatment but also return to competition. Negative examinations allowed resumption of competition with a high degree of confidence. The advantages and disadvantages of MR in musculo-skeletal trauma are discussed

  2. Nonspecific motility disorders, irritable esophagus, and chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krarup, Anne Lund; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Hejazi, Reza A; McCallum, Richard W; Vega, Kenneth J; Frazzoni, Marzio; Frazzoni, Leonardo; Clarke, John O; Achem, Sami R

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents commentaries on whether Starling's law applies to the esophagus; whether erythromycin affects esophageal motility; the relationship between hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and vigorous achalasia; whether ethnic- and gender-based norms affect diagnosis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders; health care and epidemiology of chest pain; whether normal pH excludes esophageal pain; the role of high-resolution manometry in noncardiac chest pain; whether pH-impedance should be included in the evaluation of noncardiac chest pain; whether there are there alternative therapeutic options to PPI for treating noncardiac chest pain; and the usefulness of psychological treatment and alternative medicine in noncardiac chest pain. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok; Ham, Soo-Youn; Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Soo-Youn [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  5. Novel Musculoskeletal Loading System for Small Exercise Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Meghan; Newby, Nate; Trinh, Tinh; Hanson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight places astronauts at increased risk for muscle strain and bone fracture upon return to a 1-g or partial gravity environment. Functionally limiting decrements in musculoskeletal health are likely during Mars proving-ground and Earth-independent missions given extended transit times and the vehicle limitations for exercise devices (low-mass, small volume, little to no power). This is particularly alarming for exploration missions because astronauts will be required to perform novel and physically demanding tasks (i.e. vehicle egress, exploration, and habitat building activities) on unfamiliar terrain. Accordingly, NASA's exploration roadmap identifies the need for development of small exercise equipment that can prevent musculoskeletal atrophy and has the ability to assess musculoskeletal health at multiple time points during long-duration missions.

  6. Nitrofurantoin-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome during pregnancy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif S. Wahba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is a rarely seen complication with nitrfurantoin. We report improvement of a parturient who was admitted to our hospital’s obstetrical unit with life threatening nitrofurantoin-induced acute respiratory failure. She had been taking nitrofurantoin for one week for urinary tract infection (UTI. Her chest radiography showed bilateral parenchymal infiltrates of the lung. The patient responded well to nitrofurantoin discontinuation and methylprednisolone infusion 1 mg/kg/day.

  7. Chest Trauma in Athletic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas R; Kunz, Derek E

    2018-03-01

    While overall sports participation continues at high rates, chest injuries occur relatively infrequently. Many conditions of chest injury are benign, related to simple contusions and strains, but the more rare, severe injuries carry a much higher risk of morbidity and mortality than the typical issues encountered in athletic medicine. Missed or delayed diagnosis can prove to be catastrophic. Sports medicine providers must be prepared to encounter a wide range of traumatic conditions relating to the torso, varying from the benign chest wall contusion to the life-threatening tension pneumothorax. Basic field-side management should be rapid and focused, using the standardized approach of Advanced Traumatic Life Support protocol. Early and appropriate diagnosis and management can help allow safe and enjoyable sports participation.

  8. Investigation of paramedics' compliance with clinical practice guidelines for the management of chest pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Figgis, Ken

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndromes remain a leading cause of preventable early deaths. However, previous studies have indicated that paramedics\\' compliance with chest pain protocols is suboptimal and that many patients do not receive the benefits of appropriate prehospital treatment. AIMS: To evaluate paramedics\\' level of compliance with national clinical practice guidelines and to investigate why, in certain circumstances, they may deviate from the clinical guidelines. SETTING: The Health Service Executive Mid-Western Regional Ambulance Service which serves a mixed urban and rural population across three counties in the west of Ireland. METHOD: A retrospective review of completed ambulance Patient Care Report Forms was conducted for all adult patients with non-traumatic chest pain treated between 1 December 2007 and 31 March 2008. During the same study period, paramedics were asked to complete a prospective questionnaire survey investigating the rationale behind their treatment decisions, their estimation of patient risk and their attitudes towards the clinical practice guidelines and training. RESULTS: 382 completed Patient Care Report Forms were identified for patients with chest pain, of whom 84.8% received ECG monitoring, 75.9% were given oxygen, 44.8% were treated with sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and 50.8% were treated with aspirin. Only 20.4% of patients had a prehospital 12-lead ECG recorded. 58 completed questionnaires were returned (response rate 15%); 64% of respondents said they had received insufficient training to identify ECG abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Prehospital treatment with oxygen, aspirin, sublingual GTN and ECG monitoring remains underused by paramedics, even though only a small number of patients had documented contraindications to their use. The small number of patients who received a prehospital 12-lead ECG is a cause of particular concern and suggests that incomplete patient assessment may contribute to undertreatment

  9. Musculoskeletal disorders among Thai women in construction-related work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanklang, Suda; Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Silpasuwan, Pimpan; Mungarndee, Suriyaphun S

    2014-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder symptoms and its risk factors among women rebar workers. A simple random sampling method was used and data were collected by face-to-face interview and ergonomic assessment from February to March 2011. A total of 272 women rebar workers with at least 6 months' job experience participated in this study. The findings revealed that 57.7% of workers reported musculoskeletal disorder symptoms with low back and shoulders as the most common body parts affected (46.0%). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated 2 variables that are significantly associated with musculoskeletal disorders: prolonged working hours (adjusted odds ratio = 7.63; 95% confidence interval = 2.06-28.31) and awkward posture (adjusted odds ratio = 43.79; 95% confidence interval = 17.09-112.20). The high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among women rebar workers suggests that an appropriate ergonomic workstation design and ergonomic training for women rebar workers are necessary.

  10. [Bone scintigraphy with 99mTc-MDP in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia initially diagnosed of Still's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Velazco, A; González García, F M; Albalá González, M D; Pacheco Capote, C; Latre Romero, J M

    2005-01-01

    We present a 43-year-old male, who was admitted with the diagnosis of Adult-onset Still's disease, after several months of arthralgias, febricula and loss of weight. Chest x-ray, abdominal ultrasonography, chest, abdomen and pelvic CT scan and bone scintigraphy were performed. Scintigraphic findings oriented to the performance of a bone marrow biopsy with diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. Contribution of chest x-ray to the diagnosis of HIV virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, C.; Sabbarani, S.

    1987-01-01

    After revising literature concerning Pneumocystis Carinii Pneumoniae (PCP), the authors undertook a close examination of the immunological system of the HIVab-positive patients that suffered opportunistic pneumopathy from PCP. Hundred-forty-three cases of HIVab-positive (mean age of 29), prevalently heroine drugusers, were studied. There were 13 AIDS, 26 ARC, 91 LAS cases and 13 patients with only Ab positivity for HIV. Four hundred chest radiographs were examined without previous knowledge of case histories. A small number of hilum and/or mediastinal lymphoadenopathies was observed. Moreover, percentage increase in acute lung inflammatory diseases, mainly interstitial, was seen. These data were correlated to the worsening of the HIV infection and to the developing of LAS, ARC and ADIS. In a number of cases there was radiological evidence of pregressed inflammatory episodes. The clinical pattern of PCP patients is dramatic and often fatal. Clinical-radiological cases with special reference to acute interstitial disease, caused by opportunistic agents, are presented

  12. Acute myocardial infarction with a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram. Case presentation and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przybojewski, J Z; Gilburt, S G.M. [Tygerberg Hospital, Stellenbosch (South Africa). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1983-12-17

    The clinical presentation of a young hypertensive White man with acute high lateral non-transmural myocardial infarction (MI) is documented. This diagnosis was established on the grounds of a history of chest pain, elevated serial serum enzyme levels, technetium-99m pyrophosphate ('hot-spot') scintigraphy, exercise thallium-201 ('cold-spot') scanning, left ventricular cine angiography and selective coronary arteriography. Daily resting 12-lead ECGs failed to demonstrate unequivocal features of acute non-transmural subendocardial MI. The diagnostic difficulties facing the clinician in a case of acute MI associated with a non-diagnostic ECG are stressed, and the ECG features of acute subendocardial MI are reviewed.

  13. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  14. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P chest radiography (P chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sintomas osteomusculares em professores do Ensino Fundamental Musculoskeletal symptoms in Elementary School teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJFP Carvalho

    2006-01-01

    of severity. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed using a significance level of 5%. The stepwise criterion was utilized for the multivariate analysis. The variables were analyzed using the chi-squared test of association or Fisher's test. Results: The participants' average age was 40 years; 99.4% were women and 90.4% of them presented musculoskeletal symptoms. The regions most affected were: lower back, chest, neck, shoulders, wrists and hands. The presence of pain was significantly associated with absence of children (p = 0.03 and duration of professional activities shorter than or equal to 15 years (p = 0.03. In the multivariate analysis, the presence of pain in the neck region (odds ratio (OR: 6.2; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.426.7, shoulders (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.17.2, chest (OR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.15.5 and wrists and hands (OR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.03.9 presented significant associations with age less than 30 years, age 3039 years, absence of children and absence of a stable relationship, respectively. Conclusion: Teachers presented high occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms and this confirms the need for further studies.

  16. Smoking expands expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease regardless of educational level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Juel, Knud

    2004-01-01

    Lifetime with musculoskeletal disease were estimated for never smokers and smokers at three educational levels. Expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease was 7.4 and 10.6 years for 30-year-old men and women, respectively. Regardless of educational level smokers could expect more years...... with the diseases than never smokers. Thus, the impact of smoking on the burden of musculoskeletal diseases is not confounded by educational level....

  17. Value of Myocardial Perfusion Assessment With Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Patients With Recent Acute-Onset Chest Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørgaard, Mathias H; Linde, Jesper J; Kühl, J Tobias

    2018-01-01

    was the frequency of coronary revascularization among patients referred for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) based on index computed tomography evaluation. Secondary endpoints were invasive procedural complications at index-related ICA, post-index cardiac death, hospital admittance because of recurrence of chest...

  18. The efficacy of 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing in the diagnosis of bacteria from blood, bone and synovial fluid samples of children with musculoskeletal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashavya, S; Gross, I; Michael-Gayego, A; Simanovsky, N; Lamdan, R

    2018-04-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are among the most common bacterial infections in children leading to hospitalization, invasive procedures and prolonged antibiotic administration. Blood, synovial and sometimes tissue cultures are essential for the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal infections; 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing is a novel diagnostic tool for the detection of bacteria.While the yield of 16S rDNA sequencing in synovial fluid was previously assessed, data regarding the efficacy of this method from blood samples or partially treated children with suspected musculoskeletal infections is lacking.In this study we assessed the yield of 16S rDNA sequencing in blood, bone and synovial samples of children with musculoskeletal infections. Blood, synovial and bone samples were collected from children with suspected musculoskeletal infections and analyzed for the presence of 16S rDNA, the results were then compared with the benchmark microbial cultures. During the study period, 41 children (18 boys and 23 girls) with suspected acute musculoskeletal infection were enrolled. A positive blood culture was found in 6/31 cases (19.4%) with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus being the most commonly isolated bacterium. No significant 16S rDNA detection in blood samples was recorded.Synovial fluid culture was positive in 6/28 samples (21%), Kingella kingae being the most common pathogen. When using the 16S rDNA sequencing method, the rate of positive results in synovial fluid was higher with bacterial detection in 12/23 (52%) samples. The 16S rDNA sequencing method was also able to identify pathogens in samples taken from partially treated children where cultures were negative with 16S rDNA detection in 5/5 samples. Although 16S rDNA sequencing may increase the yield of bacterial detection in synovial samples of patients with musculoskeletal infections, there is no benefit from applying this method on blood samples. The 16S rDNA sequencing method may be

  19. Ward-based, nurse-led, outpatient chest tube management: analysis of impact, cost-effectiveness and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherveniakov, Peter; De Siqueira, Jonathan; Milton, Richard; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas

    2012-06-01

    Prolonged drainage and air leaks are recognized complications of elective and acute thoracic surgery and carry significant burden on inpatient stay and outpatient resources. Since 2007, we have run a ward-based, nurse-led clinic for patients discharged with a chest drain in situ. The aim of this study is to assess its cost-effectiveness and safety. We present a retrospective review of the activity of the clinic for a period of 12 months (November 2009-10). An analysis of the gathered data is performed, focusing specifically on the duration of chest tube indwelling, the indications, complications and cost efficiency. The nurse-led clinic was housed in the thoracic ward with no additional fixed costs. Seventy-four patients were reviewed (53 males, 21 females, mean age of 59) and subsequently discharged from the clinic in this time period, accounting for 149 care episodes. Thirty-three (45%) of the patients underwent a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery procedure, 35 (47%) of them a thoracotomy and 7 (9%) had a bedside chest tube insertion. Following hospital discharge, the chest tubes were removed after a median of 14 days (range 1-82 days). Fifty-eight percent of the patients were reviewed because of a prolonged air leak, 26% for persistent fluid drainage and 16% due to prolonged drainage following evacuation of empyemas. For the care episodes analysed, we estimate that the clinic has generated an income of €24,899 for the department. Hourly staffing costs for the service are significantly lower compared with those of the traditional outpatient clinic: €15 vs. €114. Our results show that a dedicated chest tube monitoring clinic is a safe and efficient alternative to formal outpatient clinic review. It can lead to shorter hospital stays and is cost effective.

  20. Possibilities of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fischer, S.; Koetter, I.

    2004-01-01

    This contribution outlines possibilities and limitations of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases. Benefits and drawbacks of the novel whole-body MRI technology are discussed and a possible whole-body MRI sequence protocol for musculoskeletal examinations is proposed. Muscle, joint and bone diseases are discussed in which the application of whole-body MRI may be of advantage. Particularly, polymyositis, muscledystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ancylosans, multiple trauma, skeletal metastases, multiple myeloma and malignant lymphoma are mentioned. Whole-body MRI opens new advantages for the examination of multifocal musculoskeletal diseases. The clinical benefit of this method for particular diseases has to be evaluated in further studies, however. (orig.) [de

  1. Complementary and alternative treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazio, Simeon; Balen, Diana

    2011-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high and increasing worldwide. Patients usually use CAM in addition to conventional medicine, mainly to treat pain. In a large number of cases, people use CAM for chronic musculoskeletal pain as in osteoarthritis, back pain, neck pain, or fibromyalgia. Herewith, a review is presented of CAM efficacy in treating musculoskeletal pain for which, however, no scientific research has so far provided evidence solid enough. In some rare cases where adequate pain control cannot be achieved, CAM might be considered in rational and individual approach based on the first general rule in medicine "not to harm" and on the utility theory of each intervention, i.e. according to the presumed mechanism of painful stimulus and with close monitoring of the patient's response. Further high quality studies are warranted to elucidate the efficacy and side effects of CAM methods. Therefore, conventional medicine remains the main mode of treatment for patients with musculoskeletal painful conditions.

  2. Applications of radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Pingping; Tian Yueqin

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, acute coronary syndrome(ACS) has been getting more and more attentions. Radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can make a quick accurate diagnosis for patients with acute chest pain who cann't be diagnosed by conventional methods. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of MPI are relatively high. Besides, MPI can be applicated in the detection of ischemic and infarct size and degree, the risk stratification and the assessment of prognosis of the patients with ACS, and the appraisal of the effect of strategies. (authors)

  3. Quantitative right and left ventricular functional analysis during gated whole-chest MDCT: A feasibility study comparing automatic segmentation to semi-manual contouring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Walker, Matthew J.; Zech, Francis; Crombrugghe, Rodolphe de; Vlassenbroek, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of an automatic, whole-heart segmentation algorithm for measuring global heart function from gated, whole-chest MDCT images. Material and methods: 15 patients with suspicion of PE underwent whole-chest contrast-enhanced MDCT with retrospective ECG synchronization. Two observers computed right and left ventricular functional indices using a semi-manual and an automatic whole-heart segmentation algorithm. The two techniques were compared using Bland-Altman analysis and paired Student's t-test. Measurement reproducibility was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient. Results: Ventricular analysis with automatic segmentation was successful in 13/15 (86%) and in 15/15 (100%) patients for the right ventricle and left ventricle, respectively. Reproducibility of measurements for both ventricles was perfect (ICC: 1.00) and very good for automatic and semi-manual measurements, respectively. Ventricular volumes and functional indices except right ventricular ejection fraction obtained from the automatic method were significantly higher for the RV compared to the semi-manual methods. Conclusions: The automatic, whole-heart segmentation algorithm enabled highly reproducible global heart function to be rapidly obtained in patients undergoing gated whole-chest MDCT for assessment of acute chest pain with suspicion of pulmonary embolism.

  4. Chest Injuries Associated with Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Although there have been significant advances in management, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. Extracranial injuries, especially chest injuries increase mortality in patients with TBI in both short.

  5. Association between chronic musculoskeletal pain and executive function in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, S; Sawa, R; Nakatsu, N; Saito, T; Sugimoto, T; Nakamura, R; Misu, S; Ueda, Y; Ono, R

    2017-11-01

    We examined the association of chronic musculoskeletal pain with executive function in community-dwelling older adults. This cross-sectional study recruited 234 community-dwelling older adults in Japan (mean age: 72.7, women: 62.8%). Chronic musculoskeletal pain was defined as having moderate or more severe pain lasting ≥ 3 months. Executive function was assessed using the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), Trail Making Test (TMT) parts A and B, Letter Verbal Fluency Test (LVFT) and Category Verbal Fluency Test (CVFT). Prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal pain was 19% (n = 44). In the univariate analysis, the DSST and CVFT scores were significantly lower in the chronic musculoskeletal pain group than in the control group (DSST: chronic musculoskeletal pain group vs. control group, 40.2 vs. 45.4, respectively, p dwelling older adults. The association of chronic musculoskeletal pain with executive function requires further investigation. Our results suggest an association between moderate-severe chronic musculoskeletal pain and impairments of semantic fluency and processing speed in community-dwelling older adults. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  6. Development and validation of an index of musculoskeletal functional limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Jeffrey N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While musculoskeletal problems are leading sources of disability, there has been little research on measuring the number of functionally limiting musculoskeletal problems for use as predictor of outcome in studies of chronic disease. This paper reports on the development and preliminary validation of a self administered musculoskeletal functional limitations index. Methods We developed a summary musculoskeletal functional limitations index based upon a six-item self administered questionnaire in which subjects indicate whether they are limited a lot, a little or not at all because of problems in six anatomic regions (knees, hips, ankles and feet, back, neck, upper extremities. Responses are summed into an index score. The index was completed by a sample of total knee replacement recipients from four US states. Our analyses examined convergent validity at the item and at the index level as well as discriminant validity and the independence of the index from other correlates of quality of life. Results 782 subjects completed all items of the musculoskeletal functional limitations index and were included in the analyses. The mean age of the sample was 75 years and 64% were female. The index demonstrated anticipated associations with self-reported quality of life, activities of daily living, WOMAC functional status score, use of walking support, frequency of usual exercise, frequency of falls and dependence upon another person for assistance with chores. The index was strongly and independently associated with self-reported overall health. Conclusion The self-reported musculoskeletal functional limitations index appears to be a valid measure of musculoskeletal functional limitations, in the aspects of validity assessed in this study. It is useful for outcome studies following TKR and shows promise as a covariate in studies of chronic disease outcomes.

  7. [Analysis of musculoskeletal disorders, work load and working postures among manufacturing workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan-fa; Gu, Gui-zhen; Sun, Shi-yi; Wang, Hai-sheng; Cui, Shou-ming; Yang, Xiao-fa; Yang, Shu-le; He, Li-hua; Wang, Sheng

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the distribution of the musculoskeletal disorders, work load and working postures