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Sample records for acute metabolic responses

  1. Cerebrovascular response to acute metabolic acidosis in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, M.T.P. van de; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Kersten, B.T.P.; Oeseburg, B.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the cerebrovascular response (delta CBV/delta PaCO2) during baseline metabolic conditions and acute metabolic acidosis. METHODS: 15 healthy subjects, 5 m, 10 f, 56 +/- 10 yrs were investigated. For acidification, NH4Cl was given orally. CBV was measured using Near Infrared

  2. Acute responses of muscle protein metabolism to reduced blood flow reflect metabolic priorities for homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Irtun, Oivind; Chinkes, David L; Wolfe, Robert R

    2008-03-01

    The present experiment was designed to measure the synthetic and breakdown rates of muscle protein in the hindlimb of rabbits with or without clamping the femoral artery. l-[ring-(13)C(6)]phenylalanine was infused as a tracer for measurement of muscle protein kinetics by means of an arteriovenous model, tracer incorporation, and tracee release methods. The ultrasonic flowmeter, dye dilution, and microsphere methods were used to determine the flow rates in the femoral artery, in the leg, and in muscle capillary, respectively. The femoral artery flow accounted for 65% of leg flow. A 50% reduction in the femoral artery flow reduced leg flow by 28% and nutritive flow by 26%, which did not change protein synthetic or breakdown rate in leg muscle. Full clamp of the femoral artery reduced leg flow by 42% and nutritive flow by 59%, which decreased (P < 0.05) both the fractional synthetic rate from 0.19 +/- 0.05 to 0.14 +/- 0.03%/day and fractional breakdown rate from 0.28 +/- 0.07 to 0.23 +/- 0.09%/day of muscle protein. Neither the partial nor full clamp reduced (P = 0.27-0.39) the intracellular phenylalanine concentration or net protein balance in leg muscle. We conclude that the flow threshold to cause a fall of protein turnover rate in leg muscle was a reduction of 30-40% of the leg flow. The acute responses of muscle protein kinetics to the reductions in blood flow reflected the metabolic priorities to maintain muscle homeostasis. These findings cannot be extrapolated to more chronic conditions without experimental validation. PMID:18089763

  3. Metabolic responses to acute physical exercise in young rats recovered from fetal protein malnutrition with a fructose-rich diet

    OpenAIRE

    Botezelli José D; Ghezzi Ana C; de Araujo Gustavo G; Cambri Lucieli T; Mello Maria AR

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malnutrition in utero can "program" the fetal tissues, making them more vulnerable to metabolic disturbances. Also there is association between excessive consumption of fructose and the development of metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information regarding the acute effect of physical exercise on subjects recovered from malnutrition and/or fed with a fructose-rich diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic aspects and the response to acute p...

  4. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  5. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannahan, Jonathan H. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Alzate, Oscar [Systems Proteomics Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Winnik, Witold M.; Andrews, Debora [Proteomics Core, Research Core Unit, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schladweiler, Mette C. [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ghio, Andrew J. [Clinical Research Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Gavett, Stephen H. [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Kodavanti, Urmila P., E-mail: Kodavanti.Urmila@epa.gov [Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch, Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  6. High-fat diet did not change metabolic response to acute stress in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Farrokhi, Babak; Ghalami, Jamileh; Hedayati, Mehdi; Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Zardooz, Homeira

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of high-fat diet on metabolic factors in the presence of acute foot-shock and psychological stresses in male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into high-fat (45 % cow intra-abdominal fat) and normal (standard pellets) diet groups; then, each group was allocated into stressed and control groups. Stress was induced by a communication box. Blood samples were collected by retro-orbital-puncture method under isoflurane anesthesia. Plasma levels of gluc...

  7. Metabolic responses to acute physical exercise in young rats recovered from fetal protein malnutrition with a fructose-rich diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botezelli José D

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition in utero can "program" the fetal tissues, making them more vulnerable to metabolic disturbances. Also there is association between excessive consumption of fructose and the development of metabolic syndrome. However, there is little information regarding the acute effect of physical exercise on subjects recovered from malnutrition and/or fed with a fructose-rich diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the metabolic aspects and the response to acute physical exercise in rats recovered from fetal protein malnutrition with a fructose-rich diet. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats were fed with a balanced (B diet or a low-protein (L diet. After birth and until 60 days of age, the offspring were distributed into four groups according to the diet received: B: B diet during the whole experiment; balanced/fructose (BF: B diet until birth and fructose-rich (F diet afterwards; low protein/balanced (LB: L diet until birth and B diet afterwards; low protein/fructose (LF: L diet until birth and F diet afterwards. Results The excess fructose intake reduced the body weight gain, especially in the BF group. Furthermore, the serum total cholesterol and the LDL cholesterol were elevated in this group. In the LF group, the serum total cholesterol and the muscle glycogen increased. Acute physical exercise increased the serum concentrations of glucose, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and liver lipids and reduced the concentrations of muscle glycogen in all groups. Conclusion An excess fructose intake induced some signs of metabolic syndrome. However, protein malnutrition appeared to protect against the short term effects of fructose. In other hand, most responses to acute physical exercise were not influenced by early malnutrition and/or by the fructose overload.

  8. Metabolic responses to the acute ingestion of two commercially available carbonated beverages: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendel Ron W

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study was to compare the effects of two commercially available soft drinks on metabolic rate. Methods After giving informed consent, twenty healthy men and women were randomly assigned to ingest 12 ounces of Celsius™ and, on a separate day, 12 ounces of Diet Coke®. All subjects completed both trials using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolic rate (via indirect calorimetry and substrate oxidation (via respiratory exchange ratio were measured at baseline (pre-ingestion and at the end of each hour for 3 hours post-ingestion. Results Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p ® ingestion. No differences in respiratory exchange ratio were noted between trials. Conclusion These preliminary findings indicate Celsius™ has thermogenic properties when ingested acutely. The effects of repeated, chronic ingestion of Celsius™ on body composition are unknown at this time.

  9. Does Amifostine Reduce Metabolic Rate? Effect of the Drug on Gas Exchange and Acute Ventilatory Hypoxic Response in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep J. Pandit

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113. However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045. In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain.

  10. Does amifostine reduce metabolic rate? Effect of the drug on gas exchange and acute ventilatory hypoxic response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Jaideep J; Allen, Caroline; Little, Evelyn; Formenti, Federico; Harris, Adrian L; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. There was no change in metabolic rate with amifostine as measured by oxygen uptake (p = 0.113). However in carbon dioxide output and respiratory quotient, we detected a small decline over time in control and drug protocols, consistent with a gradual change from carbohydrate to fat metabolism over the course of the relatively long study protocol. A novel result was that amifostine (1000 mg) increased the mean ± SD acute hypoxic ventilatory response from 12.4 ± 5.1 L/min to 20.3 ± 11.9 L/min (p = 0.045). In conclusion, any cellular protective effects of amifostine are unlikely due to metabolic effects. The stimulatory effect on hypoxic ventilatory responses may be due to increased levels of hypoxia inducible factor, either peripherally in the carotid body, or centrally in the brain. PMID:25894815

  11. Cellular metabolic, stress, and histological response on exposure to acute toxicity of endosulfan in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Rupam; Tripathi, Gayatri; Kumar, Kundan; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Krishna, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Endosulfan is one of the most hazardous organochlorines pesticides responsible for environmental pollution, as it is very persistent and shows bio-magnification. This study evaluated the impact of acute endosulfan toxicity on metabolic enzymes, lysozyme activities, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 expression, and histopathology in Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Among the indicators that were induced in dose dependent manner were the enzymes of amino acid metabolism (serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), carbohydrate metabolism (serum lactate dehydrogenase), pentose phosphate pathway (Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) as well as lysozyme and Hsp70 in liver and gill, while liver and gill Isocitrate dehydrogenase (TCA cycle enzyme) and marker of general energetics (Total adenosine triphosphatase) were inhibited. Histopathological alterations in gill were clubbing of secondary gill lamellae, marked hyperplasia, complete loss of secondary lamellae and atrophy of primary gill filaments. Whereas in liver, swollen hepatocyte, and degeneration with loss of cellular boundaries were distinctly noticed. Overall results clearly demonstrated the unbalanced metabolism and damage of the vital organs like liver and gill in Tilapia due to acute endosulfan exposure.

  12. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J; Gray, Jason D; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K; Seifert, Erin L; McEwen, Bruce S; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-12-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism's multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal-medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  13. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters ventilatory and metabolic responses to acute hypoxia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Barbara J; Adrian, Russell; Wang, Zun-Yi; Bates, Melissa L; Dopp, John M

    2016-05-15

    We determined the effects of chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on chemoreflex control of ventilation in conscious animals. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CIH [nadir oxygen saturation (SpO2), 75%; 15 events/h; 10 h/day] or normoxia (NORM) for 21 days. We assessed the following responses to acute, graded hypoxia before and after exposures: ventilation (V̇e, via barometric plethysmography), V̇o2 and V̇co2 (analysis of expired air), heart rate (HR), and SpO2 (pulse oximetry via neck collar). We quantified hypoxia-induced chemoreceptor sensitivity by calculating the stimulus-response relationship between SpO2 and the ventilatory equivalent for V̇co2 (linear regression). An additional aim was to determine whether CIH causes proliferation of carotid body glomus cells (using bromodeoxyuridine). CIH exposure increased the slope of the V̇e/V̇co2/SpO2 relationship and caused hyperventilation in normoxia. Bromodeoxyuridine staining was comparable in CIH and NORM. Thus our CIH paradigm augmented hypoxic chemosensitivity without causing glomus cell proliferation. PMID:26917692

  14. Metabolic responses to the acute ingestion of two commercially available carbonated beverages: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Mendel Ron W; Hofheins Jennifer E

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study was to compare the effects of two commercially available soft drinks on metabolic rate. Methods After giving informed consent, twenty healthy men and women were randomly assigned to ingest 12 ounces of Celsius™ and, on a separate day, 12 ounces of Diet Coke®. All subjects completed both trials using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolic rate (via indirect calorimetry) and substrate oxidation (v...

  15. Acute metabolic responses of postpartal dairy cows to subcutaneous glucagon injections, oral glycerol, or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M A; Allen, P S; Mehyar, N A; Bobe, G; Coetzee, J F; Koehler, K J; Beitz, D C

    2008-09-01

    and glycerol, when co-administered, act to decrease the likelihood of metabolism-related syndrome development in dairy cows.

  16. Acute fatal metabolic complications in alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, A S; Milan, A M; Gallagher, J A; Ranganath, L R

    2016-03-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder of tyrosine metabolism that results from a defect in an enzyme called homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase. The result of this is that homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates in the body. HGA is central to the pathophysiology of this disease and the consequences observed; these include spondyloarthropathy, rupture of ligaments/muscle/tendons, valvular heart disease including aortic stenosis and renal stones. While AKU is considered to be a chronic progressive disorder, it is clear from published case reports that fatal acute metabolic complications can also occur. These include oxidative haemolysis and methaemoglobinaemia. The exact mechanisms underlying the latter are not clear, but it is proposed that disordered metabolism within the red blood cell is responsible for favouring a pro-oxidant environment that leads to the life threatening complications observed. Herein the role of red blood cell in maintaining the redox state of the body is reviewed in the context of AKU. In addition previously reported therapeutic strategies are discussed, specifically with respect to why reported treatments had little therapeutic effect. The potential use of nitisinone for the management of patients suffering from the acute metabolic decompensation in AKU is proposed as an alternative strategy. PMID:26596578

  17. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi): The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otálora-Ardila, Aída; Herrera M., L. Gerardo; Flores-Martínez, José Juan; Welch, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR) are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi). We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin) after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140–185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform. PMID:27792729

  18. Does Amifostine Reduce Metabolic Rate? Effect of the Drug on Gas Exchange and Acute Ventilatory Hypoxic Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jaideep J. Pandit; Caroline Allen; Evelyn Little; Federico Formenti; Harris, Adrian L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Amifostine is added to chemoradiation regimens in the treatment of many cancers on the basis that, by reducing the metabolic rate, it protects normal cells from toxic effects of therapy. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the metabolic rate (by gas exchange) over 255 min in 6 healthy subjects, at two doses (500 mg and 1000 mg) of amifostine infused over 15 min at the start of the protocol. We also assessed the ventilatory response to six 1 min exposures to isocapnic hypoxia mid-protocol. ...

  19. Response of AMP-activated protein kinase and energy metabolism to acute nitrite exposure in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhixin; Li, Erchao; Xu, Chang; Gan, Lei; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a prevalent mammalian energy metabolism sensor, but little is known about its role as an energy sensor in fish experiencing stress. We aimed to study AMPK in Oreochromis niloticus on both the molecular and the physical level. We found that the cDNAs encoding the AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 variants of the O. niloticus catalytic α subunit were 1753bp and 2563 bp long and encoded 571 and 557 amino acids, respectively. Both the AMPKα1 and the AMPKα2 isoform possess structural features similar to mammalian AMPKα, including a phosphorylation site at Thr172 in the N-terminus, and exhibit high homology with other fish and vertebrate AMPKα sequences (81.3%-98.1%). mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms was widely expressed in various tissues with distinctive patterns. AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were primarily expressed in the intestines and brain, respectively. Under acute nitrite challenge, the mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms, as well as AMPK activity, changed over time. Its recovery period in freshwater, combined with the fact that it is highly conserved, suggests that fish AMPK, like its mammalian orthologues, acts as an energy metabolism sensor. Furthermore, subsequent decreases in AMPK mRNA levels and activity suggested that its action was transient but efficient. Physically, glucose, lactic acid and TGs in plasma, as well as energy materials in the hepatopancreas and muscle, were significantly altered over time, indicating changes in energy metabolism during the experimental period. These data have enabled us to characterize energy utilization in O. niloticus and further illustrate the role of fish AMPK as an energy sensor. This study provides new insight into energy metabolism and sensing by AMPK in teleost and necessitates further study of the multiple physiologic roles of AMPK in fish.

  20. Response of AMP-activated protein kinase and energy metabolism to acute nitrite exposure in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhixin; Li, Erchao; Xu, Chang; Gan, Lei; Qin, Jian G; Chen, Liqiao

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a prevalent mammalian energy metabolism sensor, but little is known about its role as an energy sensor in fish experiencing stress. We aimed to study AMPK in Oreochromis niloticus on both the molecular and the physical level. We found that the cDNAs encoding the AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 variants of the O. niloticus catalytic α subunit were 1753bp and 2563 bp long and encoded 571 and 557 amino acids, respectively. Both the AMPKα1 and the AMPKα2 isoform possess structural features similar to mammalian AMPKα, including a phosphorylation site at Thr172 in the N-terminus, and exhibit high homology with other fish and vertebrate AMPKα sequences (81.3%-98.1%). mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms was widely expressed in various tissues with distinctive patterns. AMPKα1 and AMPKα2 were primarily expressed in the intestines and brain, respectively. Under acute nitrite challenge, the mRNA encoding the AMPKα isoforms, as well as AMPK activity, changed over time. Its recovery period in freshwater, combined with the fact that it is highly conserved, suggests that fish AMPK, like its mammalian orthologues, acts as an energy metabolism sensor. Furthermore, subsequent decreases in AMPK mRNA levels and activity suggested that its action was transient but efficient. Physically, glucose, lactic acid and TGs in plasma, as well as energy materials in the hepatopancreas and muscle, were significantly altered over time, indicating changes in energy metabolism during the experimental period. These data have enabled us to characterize energy utilization in O. niloticus and further illustrate the role of fish AMPK as an energy sensor. This study provides new insight into energy metabolism and sensing by AMPK in teleost and necessitates further study of the multiple physiologic roles of AMPK in fish. PMID:27262938

  1. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shivendra D; Aroor, Annayya R; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-20

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  2. The metabolic responses induced by acute dexamethasone predict glucose tolerance and insulin secretion over 10 years in relatives of type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durck, Tina Trier; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Egede, Mette Brogaard;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the metabolic and insulin secretory responses to dexamethasone with the metabolic responses observed at 10 years in normoglycaemic relatives of type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects.......This study aimed to compare the metabolic and insulin secretory responses to dexamethasone with the metabolic responses observed at 10 years in normoglycaemic relatives of type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects....

  3. Effects of Acute Endurance Exercise Performed in the Morning and Evening on Inflammatory Cytokine and Metabolic Hormone Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Ki Kim

    Full Text Available To compare the effects of endurance exercise performed in the morning and evening on inflammatory cytokine responses in young men.Fourteen healthy male participants aged 24.3 ± 0.8 years (mean ± standard error performed endurance exercise in the morning (0900-1000 h on one day and then in the evening (1700-1800 h on another day with an interval of at least 1 week between each trial. In both the morning and evening trials, the participants walked for 60 minutes at approximately 60% of the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max on a treadmill. Blood samples were collected to determine hormones and inflammatory cytokines at pre-exercise, immediately post exercise, and 2 h post exercise.Plasma interleukin (IL-6 and adrenaline concentrations were significantly higher immediately after exercise in the evening trial than in the morning trial (P < 0.01, both. Serum free fatty acids concentrations were significantly higher in the evening trial than in the morning trial at 2 h after exercise (P < 0.05. Furthermore, a significant correlation was observed between the levels of IL-6 immediately post-exercise and free fatty acids 2 h post-exercise in the evening (r = 0.68, P < 0.01.These findings suggest that the effect of acute endurance exercise in the evening enhances the plasma IL-6 and adrenaline concentrations compared to that in the morning. In addition, IL-6 was involved in increasing free fatty acids, suggesting that the evening is more effective for exercise-induced lipolysis compared with the morning.

  4. Reduced cortisol and metabolic responses of thin ewes to an acute cold challenge in mid-pregnancy: implications for animal physiology and welfare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else Verbeek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low food availability leading to reductions in Body Condition Score (BCS; 0 indicates emaciation and 5 obesity in sheep often coincides with low temperatures associated with the onset of winter in New Zealand. The ability to adapt to reductions in environmental temperature may be impaired in animals with low BCS, in particular during pregnancy when metabolic demand is higher. Here we assess whether BCS affects a pregnant animal's ability to cope with cold challenges. METHODS: Eighteen pregnant ewes with a BCS of 2.7±0.1 were fed to attain low (LBC: BCS2.3±0.1, medium (MBC: BCS3.2±0.2 or high BCS (HBC: BCS3.6±0.2. Shorn ewes were exposed to a 6-h acute cold challenge in a climate-controlled room (wet and windy conditions, 4.4±0.1°C in mid-pregnancy. Blood samples were collected during the BCS change phase, acute cold challenge and recovery phase. RESULTS: During the BCS change phase, plasma glucose and leptin concentrations declined while free fatty acids (FFA increased in LBC compared to MBC (P<0.01, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively and HBC ewes (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively. During the cold challenge, plasma cortisol concentrations were lower in LBC than MBC (P<0.05 and HBC ewes (P<0.05, and FFA and insulin concentrations were lower in LBC than HBC ewes (P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively. Leptin concentrations declined in MBC and HBC ewes while remaining unchanged in LBC ewes (P<0.01. Glucose concentrations and internal body temperature (T(core increased in all treatments, although peak T(core tended to be higher in HBC ewes (P<0.1. During the recovery phase, T4 concentrations were lower in LBC ewes (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Even though all ewes were able to increase T(core and mobilize glucose, low BCS animals had considerably reduced cortisol and metabolic responses to a cold challenge in mid-pregnancy, suggesting that their ability to adapt to cold challenges through some of the expected pathways was reduced.

  5. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  6. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Aziz Khan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosis, increased secretion of adreno corticotropic hormones, and production of acute phase proteins. Acute phase proteins are produced in liver under the influence of cytokines, which through blood stream passes to the site of inflammation and kill the pathogens by opsonization and activating complement pathways. The changes in the concentrations of positive acute-phase proteins and negative acute-phase proteins are due to the changes in their production by liver. Three of the best known acute phase proteins are C-reactive protein, serum anyloid A, and haptoglobin. Some disease states are casually related to acute phase proteins. C-reactive protein mediated compliment activation has a key role in some forms of tissue alteration such as cardiac infarction. Elevated S amyloid A levels are seen in chronic arthritis and tuberculosis. Other acute phase proteins show more moderate rise, usually less than fivefold.

  7. Effects of high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose on the pharmacokinetics of fructose and acute metabolic and hemodynamic responses in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Myphuong T; Frye, Reginald F; Rivard, Christopher J; Cheng, Jing; McFann, Kim K; Segal, Mark S; Johnson, Richard J; Johnson, Julie A

    2012-05-01

    It is unclear whether high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which contains a higher amount of fructose and provides an immediate source of free fructose, induces greater systemic concentrations of fructose as compared with sucrose. It is also unclear whether exposure to higher levels of fructose leads to increased fructose-induced adverse effects. The objective was to prospectively compare the effects of HFCS- vs sucrose-sweetened soft drinks on acute metabolic and hemodynamic effects. Forty men and women consumed 24 oz of HFCS- or sucrose-sweetened beverages in a randomized crossover design study. Blood and urine samples were collected over 6 hours. Blood pressure, heart rate, fructose, and a variety of other metabolic biomarkers were measured. Fructose area under the curve and maximum concentration, dose-normalized glucose area under the curve and maximum concentration, relative bioavailability of glucose, changes in postprandial concentrations of serum uric acid, and systolic blood pressure maximum levels were higher when HFCS-sweetened beverages were consumed as compared with sucrose-sweetened beverages. Compared with sucrose, HFCS leads to greater fructose systemic exposure and significantly different acute metabolic effects.

  8. INFLAMMATION AND ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Farah Aziz Khan; Mohd Fareed Khan

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infection takes place by the cooperative cascade of cytokines and leukocytes. Tumor necrosis factor, interlukin-1, and interlukin-6 play important roles as proinflammatory cytokines to mediate local inflammation and activate other inflammatory cells e.g. neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. At least 15 different low molecular weight cytokine are secreted by activated leukocytes and are responsible for triggering acute phase response in the form of fever, leukocytosi...

  9. Cytokines and the hepatic acute phase response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshage, H

    1997-01-01

    The acute phase response is an orchestrated response to tissue injury, infection or inflammation. A prominent feature of this response is the induction of acute phase proteins, which are involved in the restoration of homeostasis. Cytokines are important mediators of the acute phase response. Uncont

  10. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  11. REPEATED ACUTE STRESS INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM IN RAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama R.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute stress induced alterations in the activity levels of rate limiting enzymes and concentration of intermediates of different pathways of carbohydrate metabolism have been studied. Adult male Wistar rats were restrained (RS for 1 h and after an interval of 4 h they were subjected to forced swimming (FS exercise and appropriate controls were maintained. Five rats were killed before the commencement of the experiment (initial controls, 5 control and equal number of stressed rats were killed 2 h after RS and remaining 5 rats in each group were killed 4 h after FS. There was a significant increase in the adrenal 3β- hydroxy steroid dehydrogenase activity following RS, which showed further increase after FS compared to controls and thereby indicated stress response of rats. There was a significant increase in the blood glucose levels following RS which showed further increase and reached hyperglycemic condition after FS. The hyperglycemic condition due to stress was accompanied by significant increases in the activities of glutamate- pyruvate transaminase, glutamate- oxaloacetate transaminase, glucose -6- phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase and significant decrease in the glucose -6- phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase activities, whereas pyruvate kinase activity did not show any alteration compared to controls. Further, the glycogen and total protein contents of the liver were decreased whereas those of pyruvate and lactate showed significant increase compared to controls after RS as well as FS.The results put together indicate that acute stress induced hyperglycemia results due to increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis without alteration in glycolysis. The study first time reveals that after first acute stress exposure, the subsequent stressful experience augments metabolic stress response leading to hyperglycemia. The results have relevance to human health as human beings are exposed to several stressors in a day and

  12. Increased extracellular heat shock protein 90α in severe sepsis and SIRS associated with multiple organ failure and related to acute inflammatory-metabolic stress response in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitrolaki, Michaela-Diana; Dimitriou, Helen; Venihaki, Maria; Katrinaki, Marianna; Ilia, Stavroula; Briassoulis, George

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian heat-shock-protein (HSP) 90α rapidly responses to environmental insults. We examined the hypothesis that not only serum HSP72 but also HSP90α is increased in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), severe-sepsis (SS), and/or sepsis (S) compared to healthy children (H); we assessed HSP90α relation to (a) multiple organ system failure (MOSF) and (b) inflammatory-metabolic response and severity of illness. A total of 65 children with S, SS, or SIRS and 25 H were included. ELISA was used to evaluate extracellular HSP90α and HSP72, chemiluminescence interleukins (ILs), flow-cytometry neutrophil-CD64 (nCD64)-expression. HSP90α, along with HSP72, were dramatically increased among MOSF patients. Patients in septic groups and SIRS had elevated HSP90α compared to H (P < 0.01). HSP90α was independently related to predicted death rate and severity of illness; positively to HSP72, nCD64, ILs, length of stay, days on ventilator, and fever; negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). The HSP72 was increased in SS/S and related negatively to HDL and LDL (P < 0.05). Serum HSP90α is markedly elevated in children with severe sepsis and is associated with MOSF. Better than the HSP72, also increased in SS, SIRS, and MOSF, HSP90α is related to the inflammatory stress, fever, outcome endpoints, and predicted mortality and inversely related to the low-LDL/low-HDL stress metabolic pattern. PMID:27583886

  13. Acute Phase Response in Animals: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cray, Carolyn; Zaias, Julia; Altman, Norman H

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase response is a complex systemic early-defense system activated by trauma, infection, stress, neoplasia, and inflammation. Although nonspecific, it serves as a core of the innate immune response involving physical and molecular barriers and responses that serve to prevent infection, clear potential pathogens, initiate inflammatory processes, and contribute to resolution and the healing process. Acute phase proteins, an integral part of the acute phase response, have been a focus...

  14. Metabolic fingerprinting to understand therapeutic effects and mechanisms of silybin on acute liver damage in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic fingerprinting is a rapid and noninvasive analysis, representing a powerful approach for the characterization of phenotypes and the distinction of specific metabolic states due to environmental alterations. It has become a valuable analytical approach for the characterization of phenotypes and is the rapidly evolving field of the comprehensive measurement of ideally all endogenous metabolites in bio-samples. Silybin has displayed bright prospects in the prevention and therapy of liver injury, and we had conducted a preliminary exploration on the molecular mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of silybin. Because the knowledge on the metabolic responses of an acute liver damage rat to the silybin is still scarce, metabolic fi ngerprinting can provide relevant information on the intrinsic metabolic adjustments. Materials and Methods: Here, the physiological and metabolic changes in the acute liver damage rat were investigated by performing a metabolic analysis. The phenotypic response was assessed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS combined with pattern recognition approaches such as principal components analysis and partial least squares projection to supervised latent structures and discriminant analysis. Multivariate analysis of the data showed trends in scores plots that were related to the concentration of the silybin. Results: Results indicate 10 ions (7 upregulated and 3 downregulated as differentiating metabolites. Key observations include perturbations of metabolic pathways linked to glutathione metabolism, tryptophan metabolism, cysteine and methionine metabolism, etc., Overall, this investigation illustrates the power of the LC/MS combined with the pattern recognition methods that can engender new insights into silybin affecting on metabolism pathways of an acute liver damage rat. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that the combination of metabolic fi ngerprinting with appropriate

  15. Acute metabolic decompensation due to influenza in a mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. McGuire

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The urea cycle functions to incorporate ammonia, generated by normal metabolism, into urea. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs are caused by loss of function in any of the enzymes responsible for ureagenesis, and are characterized by life-threatening episodes of acute metabolic decompensation with hyperammonemia (HA. A prospective analysis of interim HA events in a cohort of individuals with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC deficiency, the most common UCD, revealed that intercurrent infection was the most common precipitant of acute HA and was associated with markers of increased morbidity when compared with other precipitants. To further understand these clinical observations, we developed a model system of metabolic decompensation with HA triggered by viral infection (PR8 influenza using spf-ash mice, a model of OTC deficiency. Both wild-type (WT and spf-ash mice displayed similar cytokine profiles and lung viral titers in response to PR8 influenza infection. During infection, spf-ash mice displayed an increase in liver transaminases, suggesting a hepatic sensitivity to the inflammatory response and an altered hepatic immune response. Despite having no visible pathological changes by histology, WT and spf-ash mice had reduced CPS1 and OTC enzyme activities, and, unlike WT, spf-ash mice failed to increase ureagenesis. Depression of urea cycle function was seen in liver amino acid analysis, with reductions seen in aspartate, ornithine and arginine during infection. In conclusion, we developed a model system of acute metabolic decompensation due to infection in a mouse model of a UCD. In addition, we have identified metabolic perturbations during infection in the spf-ash mice, including a reduction of urea cycle intermediates. This model of acute metabolic decompensation with HA due to infection in UCD serves as a platform for exploring biochemical perturbations and the efficacy of treatments, and could be adapted to explore acute decompensation in other

  16. Effect of acute acid loading on acid-base and calcium metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, Palle J

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acid-base and calcium metabolic responses to acute non-carbonic acid loading in idiopathic calcium stone-formers and healthy males using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h ammonium chloride loading studies were performed in 12 m...

  17. [Metabolism of various biogenic amines in acute viral neuroinfections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, I N; Shchegoleva, R A; Ponomarenko, V P; Leshchinskaia, E V; Kodkind, G Kh

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of biogenic amines was examined in 62 patients with various acute viral neuroinfections. The control group consisted of 57 persons. Depending on the process character and disease period variations of the levels of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolylacetic acid, coeruloplasmin and histamine were discovered. A comparison of the results obtained with the clinical course of the diseases revealed a certain correlation, especially in patients with acute meningoencephalitis.

  18. Manipulation of the metabolic response in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    Surgical injury is followed by profound changes in endocrine metabolic function and various host defense mechanisms leading to catabolism, immunosuppression, ileus, impaired pulmonary function, and hypoxemia. These physiologic changes are supposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperative...... morbidity. Effective afferent neural blockade with continuous epidural local anesthetic techniques inhibits a major part of the endocrine metabolic response, leading to improved protein economy but without important effects on inflammatory or immunologic responses. In contrast, pain treatment with other...... modalities such as nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opioids has only a small inhibitory effect on endocrine metabolic responses. Preoperative high-dose glucocorticoid therapy provides additional pain relief and improves pulmonary function, but it reduces the inflammatory response (acute...

  19. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  20. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2016-01-01

    imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N......-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.......058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration...

  1. Selected Metabolic Responses to Skateboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; Hunt, Ian; Stickley, Christopher D.; Kimura, Iris F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the popularity of skateboarding worldwide, the authors believe that no previous studies have investigated the metabolic demands associated with recreational participation in the sport. Although metabolic equivalents (METs) for skateboarding were published in textbooks, the source of these values is unclear. Therefore, the rise in…

  2. Acute Metabolic Changes Associated With Analgesic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is used to measure brain metabolites. Limited data exist on the analgesic-induced spectroscopy response. This was an explorative study with the aims to investigate the central effects of two analgesic drugs, an opioid and a selective...

  3. Acute overexpression of lactate dehydrogenase-A perturbs beta-cell mitochondrial metabolism and insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, E K; Zhao, C; Rutter, G A

    2000-07-01

    Islet beta-cells express low levels of lactate dehydrogenase and have high glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase activity. To determine whether this configuration favors oxidative glucose metabolism via mitochondria in the beta-cell and is important for beta-cell metabolic signal transduction, we have determined the effects on glucose metabolism and insulin secretion of acute overexpression of the skeletal muscle isoform of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-A. Monitored in single MIN6 beta-cells, LDH hyperexpression (achieved by intranuclear cDNA microinjection or adenoviral infection) diminished the response to glucose of both phases of increases in mitochondrial NAD(P)H, as well as increases in mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic free ATP, and cystolic free Ca2+. These effects were observed at all glucose concentrations, but were most pronounced at submaximal glucose levels. Correspondingly, adenoviral vector-mediated LDH-A overexpression reduced insulin secretion stimulated by 11 mmol/l glucose and the subsequent response to stimulation with 30 mmol/l glucose, but it was without significant effect when the concentration of glucose was raised acutely from 3 to 30 mmol/l. Thus, overexpression of LDH activity interferes with normal glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in the islet beta-cell type, and it may therefore be directly responsible for insulin secretory defects in some forms of type 2 diabetes. The results also reinforce the view that glucose-derived pyruvate metabolism in the mitochondrion is critical for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the beta-cell.

  4. Hepatic metabolism of ibuprofen in rats under acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Shefali; Keshri, Gaurav Km; Gupta, Asheesh

    2013-09-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia induced at high altitude causes a subnormal oxygen concentration in cells which affects the drug metabolic and pharmacokinetic (PK) capacity of the body. The metabolism and PK of drugs like ibuprofen may be impaired under hypoxia and may require a different than usual therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe therapy. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of acute hypobaric hypoxia (AHH) on hepatic metabolism and PK of ibuprofen in rats. Animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for AHH exposure (6 and 24 h) in a decompression chamber and were administrated with single dose of ibuprofen (80 mg/kg body weight, p.o.). The results showed that GST activity was significantly reduced at 6 h (15%) and 24 h (23%) (pibuprofen exhibited significant increase by 42% and 51% (pibuprofen however, it requires further investigation under chronic hypobaric hypoxic conditions.

  5. Fetal and maternal metabolic responses to exercise during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Michelle F; Artal, Raul

    2016-03-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by physiological, endocrine and metabolic adaptations creating a pseudo-diabetogenic state of progressive insulin resistance. These adaptations occur to sustain continuous fetal requirements for nutrients and oxygen. Insulin resistance develops at the level of the skeletal muscle, and maternal exercise, especially activity involving large muscle groups improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. We discuss the maternal hormonal and metabolic changes associated with a normal pregnancy, the metabolic dysregulation that may occur leading to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and the consequences to mother and fetus. We will then examine the acute and chronic (training) responses to exercise in the non-pregnant state and relate these alterations to maternal exercise in a low-risk pregnancy, how exercise can be used to regulate glucose tolerance in women at risk for or diagnosed with GDM. Lastly, we present key exercise guidelines to help maintain maternal glucose regulation and suggest future research directions. PMID:26803360

  6. [Metabolic response to trauma and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerbegović, Meldijana; Durić, Amira; Muratović, Nusreta; Mulalić, Lejla; Hamzanija, Emina

    2003-01-01

    Trauma, surgery, burns and infection are accompanied with catabolic response which is characterized by enhanced protelysis, enhanced excretion of nitrogen, neoglucogenesis and resistance of peripheral tissues to insulin. This catabolic response is mediated through neural pathways and neuroendocrine axis. The purpose of this response is restoration of adequate perfusion and oxygenation and releasing of energy and substrates for the tissues, organs and systems which functions are essential for the survival. Metabolic response to injury and severe infection leads to decomposition of skeletal muscle proteins to amino acids, intensive liver gluconcogenesis from lactate, glycerol and alanin with enhanced oxidation of aminoacids. These substrates are necessary for synthesis of various mediators of protein or lipid nature, which are important for the defense and tissue regeneration. The changes result in negative balance of nitrogen, loss of body weight, and lower plasma concentration of all aminoacids. Patients who were unable to develop this hypercatabolic response have poor prognosis, and the patients with hypercatabolic response rapidly lose their body cell mass and without metabolic and nutritive support have more complications and higher mortality. Although neoglucogenesis, proteolysis and lipolysis are resistant to exogenous nutrients, metabolic support in critical illness improves the chances for survival until the healing of the disease. Casual therapy in such conditions is elimination of "stressors" which maintain abnormal endocrine and metabolic response. Adequate oxygenation, hemostasis, infection control and control of extracellular compartment expansion and low flows, are essential for the efficacy of nutritive support and that is the only way to convalescence and wound healing. PMID:15017867

  7. Plasma omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid status and monounsaturated fatty acids are altered by chronic social stress and predict endocrine responses to acute stress in titi monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disturbances in fatty acid (FA) metabolism may link chronic psychological stress, endocrine responsiveness, and psychopathology. Therefore, lipid metabolome-wide responses and their relationships with endocrine (cortisol; insulin; adiponectin) responsiveness to acute stress (AS) were assessed in a ...

  8. Metabolic responses to hypoglycemia in juvenile diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T;

    1980-01-01

    Glucagon and metabolic responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in seven juvenile diabetics, age 31 +/- 2 years (mean and S.E.M.), duration of diabetes 17 +/- 3 years, with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (decreased beat-to-beat variation in heart rate during hyperventilation and/or o...

  9. Acute neuromuscular responses to car racing

    OpenAIRE

    Backman, Jani

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine racing car drivers’ acute neuromuscular responses to race driving. The secondary purpose was to compare the cardiovascular loading of driving to that of maximal rowing action. Methods: The subjects of the present cross-sectional study (n = 9) were international level karting drivers. The study was performed in two parts; the laboratory tests and driving test. All subjects took part to the laboratory tests and five of the subjects per...

  10. Energy and Oxygen Metabolism Disorder During Septic Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-li Yang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute kidney injury (AKI during septic shock, which is one of the most common clinical syndromes in the intensive care unit (ICU, has a high mortality rate and poor prognosis, partly because of a poor understanding of the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction during septic shock. Although ischemic injury of the kidney has been reported to result from adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion, increasing evidence has demonstrated that AKI occurs in the absence of renal hypoperfusion and even occurs during normal or increased renal blood flow (RBF; nevertheless, whether energy metabolism disorder is involved in septic AKI and whether it changes according to renal hemodynamics have not been established. Moreover, tubular cell apoptosis, which is closely related to ATP depletion, rather than necrosis, has been shown to be the major form of cell injury during AKI. Methods: We used canine endotoxin shock models to investigate the hemodynamics, renal energy metabolism, renal oxygen metabolism, and pathological changes during septic AKI and to explore the underlying mechanisms of septic AKI. Results: The present results revealed that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ pool and the ATP/adenosine diphosphate (ADP ratio were significantly decreased during the early phase of septic AKI, which is accompanied by a decreased renal oxygen extraction ratio (O2ER% and decreased renal oxygen consumption (VO2. Furthermore, significant apoptosis was observed following renal dysfunction. RBF and renal oxygen delivery were not significantly altered. Conclusion: These results suggest that imbalanced energy metabolism, rather than tubular cell apoptosis, may be the initiator of renal dysfunction during septic shock.

  11. Systemic inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu FANG; Xiao-Lei Moore; Anthony M Dart; Le-Min WANG

    2015-01-01

    Acute cardiomyocyte necrosis in the infarcted heart generates damage-associated molecular patterns, activating complement and toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 signaling, and triggering an intense inflammatory response. Inflammasomes also recognize danger signals and mediate sterile inflammatory response following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Inflammatory response serves to repair the heart, but excessive inflammation leads to adverse left ventricular remodeling and heart failure. In addition to local inflammation, profound systemic inflammation response has been documented in patients with AMI, which includes elevation of circulating inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cell adhesion molecules, and activation of peripheral leukocytes and platelets. The excessive inflammatory response could be caused by a deregulated immune system. AMI is also associated with bone marrow activation and spleen monocytopoiesis, which sustains a continuous supply of monocytes at the site of inflammation. Accumulating evidence has shown that systemic inflammation aggravates atherosclerosis and markers for systemic inflammation are predictors of adverse clinical outcomes (such as death, recurrent myocardial in-farction, and heart failure) in patients with AMI.

  12. Fluid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis in acute response stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO En-qiang; TANG Yao-qing; FEI Jian; QIN Shuai; WU Jun; LI Lei; MIN Dong; ZHANG Sheng-dao

    2009-01-01

    Background Fluid therapy for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) should not only resolve deficiency of blood volume, but also prevent fluid sequestration in acute response stage. Up to date, there has not a strategy for fluid therapy dedicated to SAP. So, this study was aimed to investigate the effects of fluid therapy treatment on prognosis of SAP. Methods Seventy-six patients were admitted prospectively according to the criteria within 72 hours of SAP onset. They were randomly assigned to a rapid fluid expansion group (Group I, n=36) and a controlled fluid expansion group (Group Ⅱ, n=40). Hemodynamic disorders were either quickly (fluid infusion rate was 10-15 ml·kg-1·h-1, Group Ⅰ) or gradually improved (fluid infusion rate was 5-10 ml·kg-1·h-1, Group Ⅱ) through controlling the rate of fluid infusion. Parameters of fluid expansion, blood lactate concentration were obtained when meeting the criteria for fluid expansion. And APACHE Ⅱ scores were obtained serially for 72 hours. Rate of mechanical ventilation, incidence of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), sepsis, and survival rate were obtained. Results The two groups had statistically different (P 0.05). Total amount of fluid sequestration within 4 days was higher in Group Ⅰ ((5378±2751)ml) than in Group Ⅱ ((4215±1998)ml, P<0.05). APACHE Ⅱ scores were higher in Group Ⅰ on days 1,2, and 3 (P<0.05). Rate of mechanical ventilation was higher in group Ⅰ (94.4%) than in group Ⅱ (65%, P<0.05). The incidences of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) and sepsis were significantly lower in Group Ⅱ (P <0.05). Survival rate was remarkably lower in Group Ⅰ (69.4%) than in Group Ⅱ (90%, P <0.05). Conclusions Controlled fluid resuscitation offers better prognosis in patients with severe volume deficit within 72 hours of SAP onset.

  13. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas; Mattijssen, Frits; Evers-van Gogh, Inkie; Schaart, Gert; Jeppesen, Jacob; Kneppers, Anita; Mensink, Marco; Voshol, Peter J.; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Tan, Nguan Soon; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Berbée, Jimmy F.; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2014-01-01

    Physical exercise causes profound changes in energy metabolism in humans. In this study we show that resting skeletal muscle has a crucial role in the metabolic response to acute exercise. During endurance exercise, selective induction of the protein angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) in nonexercising muscle reduces local fatty acid uptake, presumably to prevent fat overload, while directing fatty acids to the active skeletal muscle as fuel. Our data thus suggest that nonexercising muscle has a ke...

  14. Acute leptin deficiency, leptin resistance, and the physiologic response to leptin withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Montez, Jason M.; Soukas, Alex; Asilmaz, Esra; Fayzikhodjaeva, Gulnorakhon; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2005-01-01

    Food restriction and weight loss result in reduced plasma leptin, which is associated with a pleiotropic biologic response. However, because weight loss itself is also associated with changes in numerous other humoral and metabolic signals, it can be difficult to determine the precise features of the biologic response to acute leptin deficiency. To study this response in the absence of changes in nutritional state, we have developed a protocol that allows such analysis in normal, non-food-res...

  15. Metabolic activity and collagen turnover in human tendon in response to physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, H; Miller, B F;

    2005-01-01

    interstitial increase in growth factors that are known potentially to stimulate synthesis of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins. Taken together, human tendon tissue mounts a vigorous acute and chronic response to mechanical loading in terms of metabolic-circulatory changes as well...

  16. Acute phase protein response during acute ruminal acidosis in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, A. M.; Thoefner, M. B.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.;

    2011-01-01

    acids. In humans, inflammation has been linked to metabolic diseases. In cattle, studies into the possible links between acid-base changes, inflammation/innate immunity and metabolic disease are warranted as this might improve our understanding of the production disease complexes occurring in particular...

  17. Muscle unloading-induced metabolic remodeling is associated with acute alterations in PPARdelta and UCP-3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzatti, Dawn J; Smith, Melissa A; Oita, Radu C; Lim, Fei-Ling; White, Andrew J; Reid, Michael B

    2008-07-15

    A number of physiological changes follow prolonged skeletal muscle unloading as occurs in spaceflight, bed rest, and hindlimb suspension (HLS) and also in aging. These include muscle atrophy, fiber type switching, and loss of the ability to switch between lipid and glucose usage, or metabolic inflexibility. The signaling and genomic events that precede these physiological manifestations have not been investigated in detail, particularly in regard to loss of metabolic flexibility. Here we used gene arrays to determine the effects of 24-h HLS on metabolic remodeling in mouse muscle. Acute unloading resulted in differential expression of a number of transcripts in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle, including many involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. These include the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). In contrast to Ppar-alpha and Ppar-gamma, which were downregulated by acute HLS, Ppar-delta was upregulated concomitant with increased expression of its downstream target, uncoupling protein-3 (Ucp-3). However, differential expression of Ppar-delta was both acute and transient in nature, suggesting that regulation of PPARdelta may represent an adaptive, compensatory response aimed at regulating fuel utilization and maintaining metabolic flexibility. PMID:18445701

  18. [Markers of metabolic syndrome and peptides regulating metabolism in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczeń, Szymon; Tomasik, Przemysław; Balwierz, Walentyna; Surmiak, Marcin; Sztefko, Krystyna; Galicka-Latała, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Along with the growing epidemic of overweight the risk of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality are increasing markedly. Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a condition clustering together several risk factors of those complications such as visceral obesity, glucose intolerance, arterial hypertension and dislipidemia. The risk of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors is higher than in general population. We aimed to assess (1) the relationships between chosen adipokines and neuropeptides, chemotherapy, CRT, and body fatness and (2) evaluate adipokines and neuropeptides concentrations as a new markers of MS in children. We conducted cross-sectional evaluation of 82 ALL survivors (median age: 13.2 years; range: 4,8-26,2; median time from treatment: 3.2 years), including fasting laboratory testing: peptides (leptin, GLP-1, orexin, PYY, apelin), total cholesterol and its fractions, triglycerides; anthropometric measurements (weight, height), systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We estimated percentiles of body mass index and percentiles of blood pressure. Between 82 survivors overweight and diastolic hypertension was diagnosed in 31% of patients (35% in CRT group) and 15% respectively. At least one abnormality in lipids concentrations was found in 43%. Girls were more affected than boys. Statistically significant increased in leptin and apelin concentrations and decreased in soluble leptin receptor concentrations in the overweight group were observed compared to the non overweight subjects. Significant increase in orexin levels in females who had received CRT compared to those who had not received CRT was found. CRT is the main risk factor of elevated of body mass among survivors of childhood leukemia. Dyslipidemia and hypertension, along with increased adiposity indicate higher risk of MS development. Girls are more affected than boys. Leptin, orexin and apelin seem to be good markers of increased adiposity especially after CRT

  19. Acute toxicity and effect of some petroleum hydrocarbon on the metabolic index in Etroplus suratensis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Farshchi, P.

    Acute toxicity (LC sub(50)) and effect of some petroleum hydrocarbons (Toluene, Quinoline, Pyridine and Naphthalene) on the metabolic index (oxygen consumption rate) of an estuarine fish. Etroplus suratensis is reported. The LC sub(50) values were...

  20. Respiratory muscle strength and muscle endurance are not affected by acute metabolic acidemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nizet, T.; Heijdra, Y.F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Ven, M.J.T. van de; Bosch, F.H.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue in asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) contributes to respiratory failure with hypercapnia, and subsequent respiratory acidosis. Therapeutic induction of acute metabolic acidosis further increases the respiratory drive and, therefore, may diminish ventilator

  1. Induction of a stringent metabolic response in intracellular stages of Leishmania mexicana leads to increased dependence on mitochondrial metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor C Saunders

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania parasites alternate between extracellular promastigote stages in the insect vector and an obligate intracellular amastigote stage that proliferates within the phagolysosomal compartment of macrophages in the mammalian host. Most enzymes involved in Leishmania central carbon metabolism are constitutively expressed and stage-specific changes in energy metabolism remain poorly defined. Using (13C-stable isotope resolved metabolomics and (2H2O labelling, we show that amastigote differentiation is associated with reduction in growth rate and induction of a distinct stringent metabolic state. This state is characterized by a global decrease in the uptake and utilization of glucose and amino acids, a reduced secretion of organic acids and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. Isotopomer analysis showed that catabolism of hexose and fatty acids provide C4 dicarboxylic acids (succinate/malate and acetyl-CoA for the synthesis of glutamate via a compartmentalized mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In vitro cultivated and intracellular amastigotes are acutely sensitive to inhibitors of mitochondrial aconitase and glutamine synthetase, indicating that these anabolic pathways are essential for intracellular growth and virulence. Lesion-derived amastigotes exhibit a similar metabolism to in vitro differentiated amastigotes, indicating that this stringent response is coupled to differentiation signals rather than exogenous nutrient levels. Induction of a stringent metabolic response may facilitate amastigote survival in a nutrient-poor intracellular niche and underlie the increased dependence of this stage on hexose and mitochondrial metabolism.

  2. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in adults with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The intense intrathecal inflammation observed in acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is associated with pronounced changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism. In seven substudies, CBF and metabolism were measured in adults with ABM as well as healthy volunteers during various interventions...

  3. Thyroid Hormone Receptor beta Mediates Acute Illness-Induced Alterations in Central Thyroid Hormone Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Boelen; J. Kwakkel; O. Chassande; E. Fliers

    2009-01-01

    Acute illness in mice profoundly affects thyroid hormone metabolism in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. It remains unknown whether the thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-beta is involved in these changes. In the present study, we investigated central thyroid hormone metabolism during lipopolysacchar

  4. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Żur

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability.

  5. Metabolic Responses of Bacterial Cells to Immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żur, Joanna; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta; Guzik, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    In recent years immobilized cells have commonly been used for various biotechnological applications, e.g., antibiotic production, soil bioremediation, biodegradation and biotransformation of xenobiotics in wastewater treatment plants. Although the literature data on the physiological changes and behaviour of cells in the immobilized state remain fragmentary, it is well documented that in natural settings microorganisms are mainly found in association with surfaces, which results in biofilm formation. Biofilms are characterized by genetic and physiological heterogeneity and the occurrence of altered microenvironments within the matrix. Microbial cells in communities display a variety of metabolic differences as compared to their free-living counterparts. Immobilization of bacteria can occur either as a natural phenomenon or as an artificial process. The majority of changes observed in immobilized cells result from protection provided by the supports. Knowledge about the main physiological responses occurring in immobilized cells may contribute to improving the efficiency of immobilization techniques. This paper reviews the main metabolic changes exhibited by immobilized bacterial cells, including growth rate, biodegradation capabilities, biocatalytic efficiency and plasmid stability. PMID:27455220

  6. Investigation into the acute effects of total and partial energy restriction on postprandial metabolism among overweight/obese participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2016-03-28

    The intermittent energy restriction (IER) approach to weight loss involves short periods of substantial (75-100 %) energy restriction (ER) interspersed with normal eating. This study aimed to characterise the early metabolic response to these varying degrees of ER, which occurs acutely and prior to weight loss. Ten (three female) healthy, overweight/obese participants (36 (SEM 5) years; 29·0 (sem 1·1) kg/m2) took part in this acute three-way cross-over study. Participants completed three 1-d dietary interventions in a randomised order with a 1-week washout period: isoenergetic intake, partial 75 % ER and total 100 % ER. Fasting and postprandial (6-h) metabolic responses to a liquid test meal were assessed the following morning via serial blood sampling and indirect calorimetry. Food intake was also recorded for two subsequent days of ad libitum intake. Relative to the isoenergetic control, postprandial glucose responses were increased following total ER (+142 %; P=0·015) and to a lesser extent after partial ER (+76 %; P=0·051). There was also a delay in the glucose time to peak after total ER only (P=0·024). Both total and partial ER interventions produced comparable reductions in postprandial TAG responses (-75 and -59 %, respectively; both P<0·05) and 3-d energy intake deficits of approximately 30 % (both P=0·015). Resting and meal-induced thermogenesis were not significantly affected by either ER intervention. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the ability of substantial ER to acutely alter postprandial glucose-lipid metabolism (with partial ER producing the more favourable overall response), as well as incomplete energy-intake compensation amongst overweight/obese participants. Further investigations are required to establish how metabolism adapts over time to the repeated perturbations experienced during IER, as well as the implications for long-term health. PMID:26819200

  7. Comparison of the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on metabolic features in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatemeh ROSTAMKHANI; Homeira ZARDOOZ; Saleh ZAHEDIASL; Babak FARROKHI

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed to compare the effects of acute and chronic psychological stress on metabolic factors.Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into control and stressed groups.Stress was applied by a communication box acutely (1 d) and chronically (15 and 30 d).Blood sampling was carried out by retro-orbital-puncture method.The plasma levels of glucose,cholesterol,triglyceride,insulin,and corticosterone were measured.In addition,feed and water intake,latency to eat and drink,adrenal and body weights were determined.Acute and chronic psychological stress did not significantly change basal plasma corticosterone levels.However,immediately (1 min) after acute exposure to stress,plasma corticosterone level increased compared to that before stress exposure.Acute stress increased plasma insulin levels significantly.Fifteen days of stress exposure resulted in plasma glucose increase.Chronic stress significantly increased feed intake,latency to eat,and adrenal weight compared to acute stress.The body weights of both control and stressed groups increased markedly during the experiment.Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index did not change significantly in the stressed group.In conclusion,application of acute and chronic psychological stress leads to different metabolic and/or behavioral changes but the metabolic changes resulting from acute exposure to stress seem to be more pronounced.

  8. Biofilm shows spatially stratified metabolic responses to contaminant exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, Bulbul; Renslow, Ryan S.; Silvia, Crystal P.; Liang SHI; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Jim K. Fredrickson; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are core to a range of biological processes, including the bioremediation of environmental contaminants. Within a biofilm population, cells with diverse genotypes and phenotypes coexist, suggesting that distinct metabolic pathways may be expressed based on the local environmental conditions in a biofilm. However, metabolic responses to local environmental conditions in a metabolically active biofilm interacting with environmental contaminants have never been quantitatively elucidated...

  9. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chia Chen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted that autodigestion and activated leukocytes play important roles in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Proinflammatory cytokines are associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ failure syndrome in acute pancreatitis. A compensatory anti-inflammatory response occurs in parallel with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Trypsin secreted by the pancreatic acinar cells activates proteaseactivated receptor-2 which can result in the production of cytokines. Protease inhibitors such as aprotinin, gabexate mesilate, nafamostat mesilate, ulinastatin, etc. can inhibit the various enzymes and inflammatory response in experimental and clinical studies. Thus, protease inhibitors have been considered as a potential treatment to inhibit the pancreatic inflammation in acute pancreatitis. The beneficial effects of antiproteases on experimental severe acute pancreatitis may be, in part, due to the modulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. The effect of protease inhibitors on the inflammatory response in human acute pancreatitis deserves further study.

  10. Acute Modulation of Sugar Transport in Brain Capillary Endothelial Cell Cultures during Activation of the Metabolic Stress Pathway*

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Anthony J.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    GLUT1-catalyzed equilibrative sugar transport across the mammalian blood-brain barrier is stimulated during acute and chronic metabolic stress; however, the mechanism of acute transport regulation is unknown. We have examined acute sugar transport regulation in the murine brain microvasculature endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Acute cellular metabolic stress was induced by glucose depletion, by potassium cyanide, or by carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, which reduce or deplete i...

  11. Acute cardiovascular responses while playing virtual games simulated by Nintendo Wii®

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Gusthavo Augusto Alves; Felipe, Danilo De Souza; Silva, Elisangela; De Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; Higino, Wonder Passoni; Da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; Carvalho, Wellington Roberto Gomes; Aparecido de Souza, Renato

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the acute cardiovascular responses that occur while playing virtual games (aerobic and balance) emulated by Nintendo Wii®. [Subjects] Nineteen healthy male volunteers were recruited. [Methods] The ergospirometric variables of maximum oxygen consumption, metabolic equivalents, and heart rate were obtained during the aerobic (Obstacle Course, Hula Hoop, and Free Run) and balance (Soccer Heading, Penguin Slide, and Table Tilt) games of Wii Fit Plus® softwar...

  12. Acute Ozone-Induced Pulmonary and Systemic Metabolic Effects Are Diminished in Adrenalectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Desinia B; Snow, Samantha J; Schladweiler, Mette C; Richards, Judy E; Ghio, Andrew J; Ledbetter, Allen D; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2016-04-01

    Acute ozone exposure increases circulating stress hormones and induces metabolic alterations in animals. We hypothesized that the increase of adrenal-derived stress hormones is necessary for both ozone-induced metabolic effects and lung injury. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats underwent bilateral adrenal demedullation (DEMED), total bilateral adrenalectomy (ADREX), or sham surgery (SHAM). After a 4 day recovery, rats were exposed to air or ozone (1 ppm), 4 h/day for 1 or 2 days and responses assessed immediately postexposure. Circulating adrenaline levels dropped to nearly zero in DEMED and ADREX rats relative to SHAM. Corticosterone tended to be low in DEMED rats and dropped to nearly zero in ADREX rats. Adrenalectomy in air-exposed rats caused modest changes in metabolites and lung toxicity parameters. Ozone-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance were markedly attenuated in DEMED rats with nearly complete reversal in ADREX rats. Ozone increased circulating epinephrine and corticosterone in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Free fatty acids (P = .15) and branched-chain amino acids increased after ozone exposure in SHAM but not in DEMED or ADREX rats. Lung minute volume was not affected by surgery or ozone but ozone-induced labored breathing was less pronounced in ADREX rats. Ozone-induced increases in lung protein leakage and neutrophilic inflammation were markedly reduced in DEMED and ADREX rats (ADREX > DEMED). Ozone-mediated decreases in circulating white blood cells in SHAM were not observed in DEMED and ADREX rats. We demonstrate that ozone-induced peripheral metabolic effects and lung injury/inflammation are mediated through adrenal-derived stress hormones likely via the activation of stress response pathway. PMID:26732886

  13. Acute phase response in Wistar rats after controlled hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanović Predrag; Maličević Ž.; Andrić N.; Nikolovski-Stefanović Zorica

    2011-01-01

    After injury the acute-phase response of the organism activates mechanisms which imply the release of cytokines, stress hormones, and mediators of pain and inflammation. The main function of the acutephase response is to hinder further damage of the injured tissue by activating reparative processes. The increase in the concentration of acute phase proteins and the concurrent decrease in albumins and prealbumins indicate that there is a strong link between t...

  14. Acute starvation in pregnancy: a cause of severe metabolic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A; Felstead, D; Doraiswami, M; Stocks, G M; Waheed, U

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of starvation-induced metabolic ketoacidosis in a previously healthy 29-year-old, nulliparous woman at 32 weeks of gestation. She was admitted to hospital with mild preeclampsia associated with persistent nausea and vomiting that progressed to severe preeclampsia requiring urgent control of hypertension before caesarean delivery. Prolonged and severe vomiting limited oral caloric intake and led to starvation ketoacidosis, characterised by ketonuria and a raised anion gap metabolic acidosis that required intensive care support. Despite significant metabolic derangement the patient appeared clinically well. Intravascular volume was replenished. Fluid restriction used as part of our preeclampsia treatment regimen delayed the therapeutic administration of sufficient dextrose, which rapidly corrected her metabolic derangement when commenced after delivery. Electrolyte supplementation was given to prevent re-feeding syndrome. Both mother and baby were discharged without sequelae.

  15. Cardiovascular and metabolic responses to tap water ingestion in young humans: does the water temperature matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Girona, M.; Grasser, Erik Konrad; Abdul G Dulloo; Montani, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Drinking water induces short-term cardiovascular and metabolic changes. These effects are considered to be triggered by gastric distension and osmotic factors, but little is known about the influence of water temperature.Methods: We determined, in a randomized crossover study, the acute cardiovascular and metabolic responses to 500 mL of tap water at 3 °C (cold), 22 °C (room) and 37 °C (body) in 12 young humans to ascertain an effect of water temperature. We measured continuous beat-to-b...

  16. [18F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [18F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [18F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BMTOT). Active bone marrow (BMACT) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BMTOT. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V10, V20, V30, and V40, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BMTOT and BMACT were 27% and 38%, respectively. BMACT volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm3, respectively; P<.0001). BMACT V30 was significantly correlated with a reduction in BMACT SUV (R2, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BMACT SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R2, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R2, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BMTOT and BMACT correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BMTOT and BMACT that are exposed to even relatively low doses of radiation are associated with a decrease in WBC counts following CRT. The loss in

  17. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elicin, Olgun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Callaway, Sharon [Velocity Medical Solutions, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Prior, John O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bourhis, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Ozsahin, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmut.ozsahin@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G., E-mail: fernanda.herrera@chuv.ch [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  18. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... to baseline ventilation, whereas CMR(glu) increased. CONCLUSION: In patients with acute bacterial meningitis, we found variable levels of CBF and cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity, a low a-v DO(2), low cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen and glucose, and a cerebral lactate efflux. In these patients...

  19. Resistance to chemotherapy is associated with altered glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    SONG, KUI; Li, Min; Xu, Xiaojun; Xuan, Li; HUANG, GUINIAN; Liu, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    Altered glucose metabolism has been described as a cause of chemoresistance in multiple tumor types. The present study aimed to identify the expression profile of glucose metabolism in drug-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and provide potential strategies for the treatment of drug-resistant AML. Bone marrow and serum samples were obtained from patients with AML that were newly diagnosed or had relapsed. The messenger RNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, glucose tra...

  20. Acute Brain Metabolic Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys with a History of Cocaine Use

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Porche’Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin; Votaw, John R.; Howell, Leonard L.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N=6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of i.v. drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute i.m. cocaine-induced changes in brain metabol...

  1. Acute Stress Response in Critically Ill Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. den Brinker (Marieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe understanding of the endocrine changes in critically ill children is important, as it provides insights in the pathophysiology of the acute stress in children and its differences compared with adults. Furthermore, it delineates prognostic factors for survival and supports the rati

  2. Acute Glucose Response Properties Beyond Feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, C Joseph; Krashes, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic AgRP neurons potently coordinate feeding behavior to ensure an organism's viability. However, their acute role in glucose-regulatory function remains to be addressed. Steculorum et al. now report that activation of a specific set of AgRP neurons results in an impairment of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown fat through a myogenic signature program. PMID:27052261

  3. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  4. Citric acid as the last therapeutic approach in an acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation of propionic acidaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmeyer, Manuela; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Terpe, Friederike; Beblo, Skadi; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schlensog-Schuster, Franziska; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle represents the key enzymatic steps in cellular energy metabolism. Once the TCA cycle is impaired in case of inherited metabolic disorders, life-threatening episodes of metabolic decompensation and severe organ failure can arise. We present the case of a 6 ½-year-old girl with propionic acidaemia during an episode of acute life-threatening metabolic decompensation and severe lactic acidosis. Citric acid given as an oral formulation showed the potential to sustain the TCA cycle flux. This therapeutic approach may become a treatment option in a situation of acute metabolic crisis, possibly preventing severe disturbance of energy metabolism.

  5. Acute administration of l-tyrosine alters energetic metabolism of hippocampus and striatum of infant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Andrea C; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Furlanetto, Camila B; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Schuck, Patrícia F; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosinemia type II is an inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the gene that encodes tyrosine aminotransferase, which leads to increased blood tyrosine levels. Considering that tyrosine levels are highly elevated in fluids of patients with tyrosinemia type II, and that previous studies demonstrated significant alterations in brain energy metabolism of young rats caused by l-tyrosine, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of acute administration of l-tyrosine on the activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II, II-III, and IV in posterior cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of infant rats. Wistar rats (10 days old) were killed 1h after a single intraperitoneal injection of tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. The activities of energy metabolism enzymes were evaluated in brain of rats. Our results demonstrated that acute administration of l-tyrosine inhibited the activity of citrate synthase activity in striatum and increased the activities of malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase in hippocampus. On the other hand, these enzymes were not affected in posterior cortex. The activities of complex I and complex II were inhibited by acute administration of l-tyrosine in striatum. On the other hand, the acute administration of l-tyrosine increased the activity of activity of complex II-III in hippocampus. Complex IV was not affected by acute administration of l-tyrosine in infant rats. Our results indicate an alteration in the energy metabolism in hippocampus and striatum of infant rats after acute administration of l-tyrosine. If the same effects occur in the brain of the patients, it is possible that energy metabolism impairment may be contribute to possible damage in memory and cognitive processes in patients with tyrosinemia type II.

  6. Hepatic Steatosis in Response to Acute Alcohol Exposure in Zebrafish requires Srebp Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Michael J.; Cinaroglu, Ayca; Gao, Chuan; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2008-01-01

    Steatosis is the most common consequence of acute alcohol abuse and may predispose to more severe hepatic disease. Increased lipogenesis driven by the sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors is essential for steatosis associated with chronic alcohol ingestion, but the mechanisms underlying steatosis following acute alcohol exposure are unknown. Zebrafish larvae represent an attractive vertebrate model for studying alcoholic liver disease (ALD), because they possess the pathways to metabolize alcohol, the liver is mature by 4 days post-fertilization (dpf), and alcohol can be simply added to their water. Exposing 4 dpf zebrafish larvae to 2% ethanol (EtOH) for 32 hours achieves ∼80 mM intracellular EtOH and upregulation of hepatic cyp2e1, sod and bip, indicating that EtOH is metabolized and provokes oxidant stress. EtOH-treated larvae develop hepatomegaly and steatosis accompanied by changes in the expression of genes required for hepatic lipid metabolism. Based on the importance of SREPBs in chronic ALD, we explored the role of Srebps in this model of acute ALD. Srebp activation was prevented in gonzo larvae, which harbor a mutation in the membrane bound transcription factor protease 1 (mbtps1) gene, and in embryos injected with a morpholino to knock-down Srebp cleavage activating protein (scap). Both gonzo mutants and scap morphants were resistant to steatosis in response to 2% EtOH, and the expression of many Srebp target genes are down regulated in gonzo mutant livers. Conclusion Zebrafish larvae develop signs of acute ALD, including steatosis. Srebp activation is required for steatosis in this model. The tractability of zebrafish genetics provides a valuable tool for dissecting the molecular pathogenesis of acute ALD. PMID:19127516

  7. Acute effects of ghrelin administration on glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Esben Thyssen; Djurhuus, Christian Born; Gjedsted, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ghrelin infusion increases plasma glucose and nonesterified fatty acids, but it is uncertain whether this is secondary to the concomitant release of GH. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to study direct effects of ghrelin on substrate metabolism. DESIGN: This was a randomized, single-blind, p...

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C Oliveira

    Full Text Available Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA. Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines. Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids, adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  10. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, M. A. H.; Lopez-Lopez, E.; te Winkel, M. L.; Tissing, W.; de Rooij, J. D. E.; Gutierrez-Camino, A.; Garcia-Orad, A.; den Boer, E.; Pieters, R.; Pluijm, S. M. F.; de Jonge, R.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treat

  11. Clopidogrel metabolism related gene polymorphisms in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯广迅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To detect the single nucleotide polymorphisms of clopidogrel metabolism related genes(CYP2C19,ABCB1 and PON1) in Chinese patients with acute coronary syndrome(ACS) by genotype analysis. Methods Genetic analysis was performed in patients admitted to

  12. Global cerebral blood flow and metabolism during acute hyperketonemia in the awake and anesthetized rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Rasmus; Hasselbalch, Steen G.; Topp, Simon;

    2006-01-01

    In the human setting, it has been shown that acute increase in the concentration of ketone bodies by infusion of beta-hydroxybutyrate increased the cerebral blood flow (CBF) without affecting the overall cerebral metabolic activity. The mechanism by which this effect of ketone bodies was mediated...

  13. Effect of acute metabolic acid/base shifts on the human airway calibre.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brijker, F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Heijdra, Y.F.; Bosch, F.H.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Acute metabolic alkalosis (NaHCO(3)), acidosis (NH(4)Cl), and placebo (NaCl) were induced in 15 healthy volunteers (12 females, median age 34 (range 24-56) years) in a double blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the presence of the effects on airway calibre. Acid-base shifts were determined b

  14. Changes in cerebral oxidative metabolism in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, P N; Larsen, F S

    2013-01-01

    concentration, as well as to some of the adenosine triphosphate degradation products. However, clinical observations of cerebral exchange rates of oxygen, glucose, lactate and amino acids challenge the interpretation of these findings. In this review the conflicting data of cerebral metabolism during acute...

  15. VENTROMEDIAL HYPOTHALAMIC REGULATION OF HORMONAL AND METABOLIC RESPONSES TO EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissing, John; Wallace, Jo L.; Scheurink, Anton J.W.; Galbo, Henrik; Steffens, Anton B.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated a neural regulation of hormonal and metabolic responses to exercise. Studies on the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) suggest that the VMH might be involved in neural control of exercise metabolism. We therefore studied 25 rats with or without Marcain-anesthetized VMH (Ma

  16. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina;

    2014-01-01

    ), and iron], muscle enzymes [creatinine kinase (CK) and aspartate transaminase (AST)], and hemoglobin were assessed in 58 Standardbred trotters before and after racing. Hemoglobin levels increased and iron levels decreased 12 to 14 h after racing and haptoglobin concentrations, white blood cell counts......, and iron levels were decreased 2 and/or 7 d after racing. Concentrations of CK, AST, SAA, and fibrinogen were unaltered in response to racing. Acute strenuous exercise did not elicit an acute phase reaction. The observed acute increase in hemoglobin levels and decreases in haptoglobin and iron levels may...

  17. Action of Antiproteases on the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Chia Chen; Sun-Sang Wang; Fa-Yauh Lee

    2007-01-01

    The spectrum of acute pancreatitis ranges from mild edematous disease to a severe necrotizing process which is usually accompanied by local or systemic complications and even mortality. Early deaths (within the first week) due to severe acute pancreatitis are generally caused by massive inflammatory responses which result in multiple organ failure. Although the exact mechanisms which trigger the inflammatory and necrotizing processes are not completely understood, it is generally accepted tha...

  18. The circulatory and metabolic responses to hypoxia in humans - with special reference to adipose tissue physiology and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Heinonen (Ilkka); R. Boushel (Robert); K.K. Kalliokoski (Kari)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAdipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply

  19. Metabolic and cardiovascular responses to epinephrine in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Richter, E; Madsbad, S;

    1987-01-01

    Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction, which is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, is accentuated in patients with autonomic neuropathy. In contrast, responses mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors, including vasodilatation and metabolic changes, have not been evaluated in these patients. ...

  20. Metabolic response to malnutrition: its relevance to enteral feeding.

    OpenAIRE

    Love, A H

    1986-01-01

    Malnutrition results in a wide variety of metabolic responses, depending on circumstances, from reactions to pure deprivation of nutrients to include the added stress of injury and sepsis. Important differences of response exist between adults and children. Weight loss with changes in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism are well documented. Disturbances of fluid and electrolyte balance are newer areas of interest as are changes in requirements for micronutrients such as trace metals. Ma...

  1. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  2. Opposite metabolic responses of shoots and roots to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Sardans, Jordi; Pérez-Trujillo, Míriam; Rivas-Ubach, Albert; Oravec, Michal; Vecerova, Kristyna; Urban, Otmar; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Juergen; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Parella, Teodor; Peñuelas, Josep

    2014-10-01

    Shoots and roots are autotrophic and heterotrophic organs of plants with different physiological functions. Do they have different metabolomes? Do their metabolisms respond differently to environmental changes such as drought? We used metabolomics and elemental analyses to answer these questions. First, we show that shoots and roots have different metabolomes and nutrient and elemental stoichiometries. Second, we show that the shoot metabolome is much more variable among species and seasons than is the root metabolome. Third, we show that the metabolic response of shoots to drought contrasts with that of roots; shoots decrease their growth metabolism (lower concentrations of sugars, amino acids, nucleosides, N, P, and K), and roots increase it in a mirrored response. Shoots are metabolically deactivated during drought to reduce the consumption of water and nutrients, whereas roots are metabolically activated to enhance the uptake of water and nutrients, together buffering the effects of drought, at least at the short term.

  3. The acute impact of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in metabolic homeostasis: an approach combining metabolomics and gene-expression analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Senan-Campos, Oriol; Massucci, Francesco A; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    We explored the acute multifunctional effects of polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa in humans to assess possible consequences on the host's health. The expected dynamic response was studied using a combination of transcriptomics and metabolomics to integrate specific functional pathways through network-based methods and to generate hypotheses established by acute metabolic effects and/or modifications in the expression of relevant genes. Data were obtained from healthy male volunteers after 3 hours of ingestion of an aqueous Hibiscus sabdariffa extract. The data were compared with data obtained prior to the ingestion, and the overall findings suggest that these particular polyphenols had a simultaneous role in mitochondrial function, energy homeostasis and protection of the cardiovascular system. These findings suggest beneficial actions in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidation, which are interrelated mechanisms. Among other effects, the activation of the heme oxygenase-biliverdin reductase axis, the systemic inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system, the inhibition of the angiotensin-converting enzyme, and several actions mirroring those of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists further support this notion. We also found concordant findings in the serum of the participants, which include a decrease in cortisol levels and a significant increase in the active vasodilator metabolite of bradykinin (des-Arg(9)-bradykinin). Therefore, our data support the view that polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa play a regulatory role in metabolic health and in the maintenance of blood pressure, thus implying a multi-faceted impact in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26234931

  4. Protein metabolism in malnourished children with acute lower respiratory infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied 19 subjects and 15 controls from November 1994 to February 1995. HIV infection is common among this population and HIV testing was done by ELISA of most subjects and controls in the course of their routine clinical care. To determine how HIV infection effects protein metabolism all HIV infected subjects and controls were grouped into a third category and compared to the subjects and controls. After the HIV subgrouping we were left with 13 subjects, 13 controls, and 8 HIV positive patients. KIC enrichments were used to calculate protein synthesis and breakdown, as KIC is believed to reflect intracellular leucine concentrations. Of note in Table 2 is the KIC/Leucine ratio is consistently greater than 1, averaging 1.3 over 16 samples. This is an unexpected finding as the KIC/Leucine ratio has been shown to be constant with a value of about 0.75 over a wide range of conditions. Samples for these eight patients have been evaluated under six different GCMS conditions to verify this unexpected observation. This ratio > 1.0 has been consistently found under all of these conditions. We are not certain what biological phenomenon can explain this, but it calls into question the validity of the four compartment model upon which these calculations are based. It is not unreasonable to expect that children with kwashiorkor metabolize ketoacids differently, and this difference could account for the increased KIC/Leucine ratio. 19 refs, 4 tabs

  5. Acute and chronic response of skeletal muscle to resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, P J; Jürimäe, J; Logan, P A; Taylor, A W; Thayer, R E

    1994-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is sensitive to the acute and chronic stresses associated with resistance training. These responses are influenced by the structure of resistance activity (i.e. frequency, load and recovery) as well as the training history of the individuals involved. There are histochemical and biochemical data which suggest that resistance training alters the expression of myosin heavy chains (MHCs). Specifically, chronic exposure to bodybuilding and power lifting type activity produces shifts towards the MHC I and IIb isoforms, respectively. However, it is not yet clear which training parameters trigger these differential expressions of MHC isoforms. Interestingly, many programmes undertaken by athletes appear to cause a shift towards the MHC I isoform. Increments in the cross-sectional area of muscle after resistance training can be primarily attributed to fibre hypertrophy. However, there may be an upper limit to this hypertrophy. Furthermore, significant fibre hypertrophy appears to follow the sequence of fast twitch fibre hypertrophy preceding slow twitch fibre hypertrophy. Whilst some indirect measures of fibre number in living humans suggest that there is no interindividual variation, postmortem evidence suggests that there is. There are also animal data arising from investigations using resistance training protocols which suggest that chronic exercise can increase fibre number. Furthermore, satellite cell activity has been linked to myotube formation in the human. However, other animal models (i.e. compensatory hypertrophy) do not support the notion of fibre hyperplasia. Even if hyperplasia does occur, its effect on the cross-sectional area of muscle appears to be small. Phosphagen and glycogen metabolism, whilst important during resistance activity appear not to normally limit the performance of resistance activity. Phosphagen and related enzyme adaptations are affected by the type, structure and duration of resistance training. Whilst endogenous

  6. Metabolism of biogenic amines in acute cerebral ischemia: Influence of systemic hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin are biogenic amines which are transmitters of the central nervous system. The effects of ischemia on the brain parenchyma depends on many factors, such is the mechanism of blood flow interruption, velocity of the occurring blood flow interruption, duration of an ischemic episode, organization of anatomical structures of the brain blood vessels etc., which all influence the final outcome. During interruption of the brain circulation in experimental or clinical conditions, neurotransmitter metabolism, primarily of biogenic amines, is disturbed. Many researches with various experimental models of complete ischemia reported a decrease in the content of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the CNS tissue. It was proven that hyperglycemia can drastically increase cerebral injury followed by short-term cerebral ischemia. Considering the fact that biogenic amines (dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin influence the size of neurologic damage, as well as the fact that in hyperglycemic conditions infarct size (from the morphological aspect is larger relative to normoglycemic status, the intention was to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in occurrence of damage in conditions of hyperglycemia, i.e. in the case of brain apoplexia in diabetics. Analysis of biogenic amines metabolism in states of acute hyperglycemia, as well as analysis of the effects of reversible and irreversible brain ischemia on metabolism of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, showed that acute hyperglycemia slows down serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine metabolism in the cerebral cortex and n. caudatus. Brain ischemia in normoglycemic animals by itself has no influence on biogenic amines metabolism, but the effect of ischemia becomes apparent during reperfusion. In recirculation, which corresponds to the occurrences in penumbra, release of biogenic amines is uncontrolled and increased. Brain ischemia in acute hyperglycemic animals

  7. Differential effects of acute morphine administrations on polymorphonuclear cell metabolism in various mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, P; Tavazzi, B; Gaziano, R; Lazzarino, G; Casalinuovo, I A; Di Pierro, D; Garaci, E

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows that an acute morphine treatment dose-dependently alters the energetic and oxidative metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocytes obtained from BALB/c and DBA/2 mice, while phagocytic cells from C57BL/6 were not affected. In sensitive mouse strains, i.e. BALB/c and DBA/2, morphine decreased both ATP concentration and energy charge potential. At the same time, ATP catabolic products, i.e. nucleosides (inosine+adenosine) and oxypurines (hypoxanthine+xanthine+uric acid), significantly increased, indicating an imbalance between energy production and consumption. Morphine treatment also induced malondialdehyde and superoxide anions production in leukocyte cells from sensitive mice. The opiate antagonist naloxone blocked morphine-induced modifications by the lower morphine dose. The same parameters in cells from C57BL/6 mice were not affected. These findings confirm that: i) the phagocytic cells are an important target for the in vivo effects of morphine, and ii) the genotype-dependent variation influences the immunological responsiveness to opiates.

  8. Specific responses of monoamine neurotransmitters to various acute stressors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongrong He; Guanyu Lin; Yifang Li; Keiich Abe; Xinsheng Yao; Hiroshi Kurihara

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the composition of histamine, serotonin and dopamine using high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection, and compared the changes in monoamine levels in plasma, the cortex and midbrain of mice exposed to acute stressors, such as blood-drawing stimulation or restraint. Results demonstrated that plasma histamine levels were markedly increased when mice were exposed to blood-drawing stimulation and restraint stress. However, serotonin levels decreased in plasma of mice treated with restraint stress, and dopamine levels in plasma had no significant response to the two acute stressors. The three monoamines (histamine, serotonin and dopamine) increased at different degrees in restraint mice, but not in brain regions of blood-drawing stressed mice. Results indicated that histaminergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic systems have their own specific response to different acute stressors.

  9. Integrating metabolic performance, thermal tolerance, and plasticity enables for more accurate predictions on species vulnerability to acute and chronic effects of global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magozzi, Sarah; Calosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Predicting species vulnerability to global warming requires a comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of sublethal and lethal thermal tolerances. To date, however, most studies investigating species physiological responses to increasing temperature have focused on the underlying physiological traits of either acute or chronic tolerance in isolation. Here we propose an integrative, synthetic approach including the investigation of multiple physiological traits (metabolic performance and thermal tolerance), and their plasticity, to provide more accurate and balanced predictions on species and assemblage vulnerability to both acute and chronic effects of global warming. We applied this approach to more accurately elucidate relative species vulnerability to warming within an assemblage of six caridean prawns occurring in the same geographic, hence macroclimatic, region, but living in different thermal habitats. Prawns were exposed to four incubation temperatures (10, 15, 20 and 25 °C) for 7 days, their metabolic rates and upper thermal limits were measured, and plasticity was calculated according to the concept of Reaction Norms, as well as Q10 for metabolism. Compared to species occupying narrower/more stable thermal niches, species inhabiting broader/more variable thermal environments (including the invasive Palaemon macrodactylus) are likely to be less vulnerable to extreme acute thermal events as a result of their higher upper thermal limits. Nevertheless, they may be at greater risk from chronic exposure to warming due to the greater metabolic costs they incur. Indeed, a trade-off between acute and chronic tolerance was apparent in the assemblage investigated. However, the invasive species P. macrodactylus represents an exception to this pattern, showing elevated thermal limits and plasticity of these limits, as well as a high metabolic control. In general, integrating multiple proxies for species physiological acute and chronic responses to increasing

  10. Acute hypoxia increases the cerebral metabolic rate - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Mark B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Christensen, Søren Just; Law, Ian; Rasmussen, Peter; Olsen, Niels V; Larsson, Henrik Bw

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes in cerebral metabolism by magnetic resonance imaging of healthy subjects during inhalation of 10% O2 hypoxic air. Hypoxic exposure elevates cerebral perfusion, but its effect on energy metabolism has been less investigated. Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to measure global cerebral blood flow and the venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. Global cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified from cerebral blood flow and arteriovenous oxygen saturation difference. Concentrations of lactate, glutamate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine and phosphocreatine were measured in the visual cortex by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Twenty-three young healthy males were scanned for 60 min during normoxia, followed by 40 min of breathing hypoxic air. Inhalation of hypoxic air resulted in an increase in cerebral blood flow of 15.5% (p = 0.058), and an increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen of 8.5% (p = 0.035). Cerebral lactate concentration increased by 180.3% ([Formula: see text]), glutamate increased by 4.7% ([Formula: see text]) and creatine and phosphocreatine decreased by 15.2% (p[Formula: see text]). The N-acetylaspartate concentration was unchanged (p = 0.36). In conclusion, acute hypoxia in healthy subjects increased perfusion and metabolic rate, which could represent an increase in neuronal activity. We conclude that marked changes in brain homeostasis occur in the healthy human brain during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:26661163

  11. PREDICTORS OF INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE RESPONSE TO OZONE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purposes of this study were to identify personal characteristics which predict individual differences in acute response to ozone exposure and to develop a predictive model for decrements in FEV1 as a function of ozone concentration and individual predictors. esponse and predi...

  12. Acute khat use reduces response conflict in habitual users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza S Colzato

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Khat consumption has become a worldwide phenomenon broadening from Eastern Africa and the south west of the Arabian Peninsula to ethnic communities in the rest of the world. So far, the cognitive effects of khat use are poorly understood and no studies have looked into the relation between acute khat use and cognitive control functions, the way we control our thoughts and goal directed behavior.We studied how acute khat use affects the emergence and the resolution of response conflict, a central cognitive control function. Khat users (n=11 and khat-free controls (n=18 were matched in terms of education, sex, alcohol and cannabis consumption. Groups were tested on response conflict, as measured by the Simon task. In one single session, participants worked through two task blocks: the khat group chewed exclusively khat whereas the khat-free group chewed solely a gum.Results showed that in the second block, which reflects the acute impact of khat, the khat group was better than controls in resolving stimulus-induced response conflict as indexed by a smaller Simon effect.These results suggest that the acute intake of khat may improve participants’ ability of handling response conflict.

  13. Intersection of the unfolded protein response and hepatic lipid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ann-Hwee; Glimcher, Laurie H.

    2009-01-01

    The liver plays a central role in whole-body lipid metabolism by governing the synthesis, oxidization, transport and excretion of lipids. The unfolded protein response (UPR) was identified as a signal transduction system that is activated by ER stress. Recent studies revealed a critical role of the UPR in hepatic lipid metabolism. The IRE1/XBP1 branch of the UPR is activated by high dietary carbohydrates and controls the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis....

  14. Metabolic profiling of the response to an oral glucose tolerance test detects subtle metabolic changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Wopereis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight is increasing globally and has become a serious health problem. Low-grade chronic inflammation in overweight subjects is thought to play an important role in disease development. Novel tools to understand these processes are needed. Metabolic profiling is one such tool that can provide novel insights into the impact of treatments on metabolism. METHODOLOGY: To study the metabolic changes induced by a mild anti-inflammatory drug intervention, plasma metabolic profiling was applied in overweight human volunteers with elevated levels of the inflammatory plasma marker C-reactive protein. Liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometric methods were used to detect high and low abundant plasma metabolites both in fasted conditions and during an oral glucose tolerance test. This is based on the concept that the resilience of the system can be assessed after perturbing a homeostatic situation. CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic changes were subtle and were only detected using metabolic profiling in combination with an oral glucose tolerance test. The repeated measurements during the oral glucose tolerance test increased statistical power, but the metabolic perturbation also revealed metabolites that respond differentially to the oral glucose tolerance test. Specifically, multiple metabolic intermediates of the glutathione synthesis pathway showed time-dependent suppression in response to the glucose challenge test. The fact that this is an insulin sensitive pathway suggests that inflammatory modulation may alter insulin signaling in overweight men.

  15. Biofilm shows spatially stratified metabolic responses to contaminant exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, Bulbul; Renslow, Ryan S.; Silvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilms are core to a range of biological processes, including the bioremediation of environmental contaminants. Within a biofilm population, cells with diverse genotypes and phenotypes coexist, suggesting that distinct metabolic pathways may be expressed based on the local environmental conditions in a biofilm. However, metabolic responses to local environmental conditions in a metabolically active biofilm interacting with environmental contaminants have never been quantitatively elucidated. In this study, we monitored the spatiotemporal metabolic responses of metabolically active Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42−) using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) approaches to obtain insights into adaptation in biofilms during biofilm-contaminant interactions. While overall biomass distribution was not significantly altered upon exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI), MRI and spatial mapping of the diffusion revealed localized changes in the water diffusion coefficients in the biofilms, suggesting significant contaminant-induced changes in structural or hydrodynamic properties during bioremediation. Finally, we quantitatively demonstrated that the metabolic responses of biofilms to contaminant exposure are spatially stratified, implying that adaptation in biofilms is custom-developed based on local microenvironments. PMID:22925136

  16. Compared with parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding attenuates the acute phase response and improves disease severity in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Windsor, A; Kanwar, S; Li, A.; Barnes, E.; Guthrie, J; Spark, J; Welsh, F.; Guillou, P; Reynolds, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—In patients with major trauma and burns, total enteral nutrition (TEN) significantly decreases the acute phase response and incidence of septic complications when compared with total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Poor outcome in acute pancreatitis is associated with a high incidence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. 
Aims—To determine whether TEN can attenuate the acute phase response and improve clinical disease severity in patients with ac...

  17. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catoire, Milène; Alex, Sheril; Paraskevopulos, Nicolas;

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercise...

  18. Fatty acid-inducible ANGPTL4 governs lipid metabolic response to exercise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, M.; Alex, S.; Paraskevopulos, N.; Mattijssen, F.; Evers-van Gogh, I.; Schaart, G.; Jeppesen, J.; Kneppers, A.; Mensink, M.; Voshol, P.J.; Olivecrona, G.; Tan, N.S.; Hesselink, M.K.; Berbee, J.F.; Rensen, P.C.; Kalkhoven, E.; Schrauwen, P.; Kersten, S.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity increases energy metabolism in exercising muscle. Whether acute exercise elicits metabolic changes in nonexercising muscles remains unclear. We show that one of the few genes that is more highly induced in nonexercising muscle than in exercising human muscle during acute exercise e

  19. Haemodialysis is an effective treatment in acute metabolic decompensation of maple syrup urine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S. Atwal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease can occur during intercurrent illness and is a medical emergency. A handful of reports in the medical literature describe the use of peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis as therapeutic inventions. We report the only patient from our centre to have haemodialysis performed in this setting. Combined with dietary BCAA restriction and calorific support, haemodialysis allows rapid reduction in plasma leucine concentrations considerably faster than conservative methods.

  20. Effects of acute paroxetine administration on tryptophan metabolism and disposition in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Badawy, A. A.; Morgan, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    1 The effects of acute oral administration of paroxetine on tryptophan metabolism and disposition were examined in the rat. 2 Basal liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity was inhibited by paroxetine in vitro and after oral administration. Maximum inhibition was caused by a 1 mg kg-1 dose. 3 Paroxetine administration also inhibited pyrrolase activity that had previously been enhanced by hormonal induction by cortisol or cofactor activation by haematin. The cortisol induction of the enzyme was, ho...

  1. The central role of hypothalamic inflammation in the acute illness response and cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burfeind, Kevin G; Michaelis, Katherine A; Marks, Daniel L

    2016-06-01

    When challenged with a variety of inflammatory threats, multiple systems across the body undergo physiological responses to promote defense and survival. The constellation of fever, anorexia, and fatigue is known as the acute illness response, and represents an adaptive behavioral and physiological reaction to stimuli such as infection. On the other end of the spectrum, cachexia is a deadly and clinically challenging syndrome involving anorexia, fatigue, and muscle wasting. Both of these processes are governed by inflammatory mediators including cytokines, chemokines, and immune cells. Though the effects of cachexia can be partially explained by direct effects of disease processes on wasting tissues, a growing body of evidence shows the central nervous system (CNS) also plays an essential mechanistic role in cachexia. In the context of inflammatory stress, the hypothalamus integrates signals from peripheral systems, which it translates into neuroendocrine perturbations, altered neuronal signaling, and global metabolic derangements. Therefore, we will discuss how hypothalamic inflammation is an essential driver of both the acute illness response and cachexia, and why this organ is uniquely equipped to generate and maintain chronic inflammation. First, we will focus on the role of the hypothalamus in acute responses to dietary and infectious stimuli. Next, we will discuss the role of cytokines in driving homeostatic disequilibrium, resulting in muscle wasting, anorexia, and weight loss. Finally, we will address mechanisms and mediators of chronic hypothalamic inflammation, including endothelial cells, chemokines, and peripheral leukocytes. PMID:26541482

  2. Acute In Vivo Response to an Alternative Implant for Urogynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiniano Roman Regueros

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate in vivo the acute host response to an alternative implant designed for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI and pelvic organ prolapse (POP. Methods. A biodegradable scaffold was produced from poly-L-lactic acid (PLA using the electrospinning technique. Human and rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated and characterized by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and differentiation assays. PLA scaffolds were seeded and cultured for 2 weeks with human or rat ADSCs. Scaffolds with and without human or rat ADSCs were implanted subcutaneously on the abdominal wall of rats. After 3 and 7 days, 6 animals from each group were sacrificed. Sections from each sample were analyzed by Haematoxylin and Eosin staining, Sirius red staining, and immunohistochemistry for CD68, PECAM-1, and collagen I and III. Results. Animals responded to the scaffolds with an acute macrophage response. After 7 days of implantation, there was extensive host cell penetration, new blood vessel formation, and new collagen deposition throughout the full thickness of the samples without obvious differences between cell-containing and cell-free scaffolds. Conclusions. The acute in vivo response to an alternative implant (both with and without cells for the treatment of SUI and POP showed good acute integration into the host tissues.

  3. Ethanol Metabolism and Osmolarity Modify Behavioral Responses to Ethanol in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaimo, Joseph T.; Davis, Scott J.; Song, Sam S.; Burnette, Christopher R.; Grotewiel, Mike; Shelton, Keith L.; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.; Davies, Andrew G.; Bettinger, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethanol is metabolized by a two-step process in which alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) oxidizes ethanol to acetaldehyde, which is further oxidized to acetate by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Although variation in ethanol metabolism in humans strongly influences the propensity to chronically abuse alcohol, few data exist on the behavioral effects of altered ethanol metabolism. Here, we used the nematode C. elegans to directly examine how changes in ethanol metabolism alter behavioral responses to alcohol during an acute exposure. Additionally, we investigated ethanol solution osmolarity as a potential explanation for contrasting published data on C. elegans ethanol sensitivity. Methods We developed a gas chromatography assay and validated a spectrophotometric method to measure internal ethanol in ethanol-exposed worms. Further, we tested the effects of mutations in ADH and ALDH genes on ethanol tissue accumulation and behavioral sensitivity to the drug. Finally, we tested the effects of ethanol solution osmolarity on behavioral responses and tissue ethanol accumulation. Results Only a small amount of exogenously applied ethanol accumulated in the tissues of C. elegans and consequently their tissue concentrations were similar to those that intoxicate humans. Independent inactivation of an ADH-encoding gene (sodh-1) or an ALDH-encoding gene (alh-6 or alh-13) increased the ethanol concentration in worms and caused hypersensitivity to the acute sedative effects of ethanol on locomotion. We also found that the sensitivity to the depressive effects of ethanol on locomotion is strongly influenced by the osmolarity of the exogenous ethanol solution. Conclusions Our results indicate that ethanol metabolism via ADH and ALDH has a statistically discernable but surprisingly minor influence on ethanol sedation and internal ethanol accumulation in worms. In contrast, the osmolarity of the medium in which ethanol is delivered to the animals has a more substantial effect on

  4. Review of dose-response curves for acute antimigraine drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dose-response curves for efficacy and tolerability are the important determinants for the choice of doses of acute migraine drugs. Areas covered: Dose-response curves for the efficacy of seven triptans (5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists), a 5-HT1F receptor agonist (lasmiditan) and four or......, there are many unmet needs. Although upcoming drugs may not be superior to triptans, migraine patients will potentially benefit greatly from these, especially patients who are triptan non-responders and patients with cardiovascular disease.......INTRODUCTION: Dose-response curves for efficacy and tolerability are the important determinants for the choice of doses of acute migraine drugs. Areas covered: Dose-response curves for the efficacy of seven triptans (5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists), a 5-HT1F receptor agonist (lasmiditan) and four oral......, whereas AEs often increase with increasing doses. The two other groups of drugs also have flat dose-response curves for efficacy. Overall, the triptans still have the most favorable efficacy-tolerability profile. Current acute antimigraine drugs do not fulfill the expectations of the patients, and thus...

  5. Mitochondrial metabolic remodeling in response to genetic and environmental perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinshead, Kate E.R.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are metabolic hubs within mammalian cells and demonstrate significant metabolic plasticity. In oxygenated environments with ample carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid sources, they are able to use the tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of anabolic metabolites and ATP. However, in conditions where oxygen becomes limiting for oxidative phosphorylation, they can rapidly signal to increase cytosolic glycolytic ATP production, while awaiting hypoxia‐induced changes in the proteome mediated by the activity of transcription factors such as hypoxia‐inducible factor 1. Hypoxia is a well‐described phenotype of most cancers, driving many aspects of malignancy. Improving our understanding of how mitochondria change their metabolism in response to this stimulus may therefore elicit the design of new selective therapies. Many of the recent advances in our understanding of mitochondrial metabolic plasticity have been acquired through investigations of cancer‐associated mutations in metabolic enzymes, including succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase. This review will describe how metabolic perturbations induced by hypoxia and mutations in these enzymes have informed our knowledge in the control of mitochondrial metabolism, and will examine what this may mean for the biology of the cancers in which these mutations are observed. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:272–285. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27196610

  6. Mitochondrial metabolic remodeling in response to genetic and environmental perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinshead, Kate E R; Tennant, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are metabolic hubs within mammalian cells and demonstrate significant metabolic plasticity. In oxygenated environments with ample carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid sources, they are able to use the tricarboxylic acid cycle for the production of anabolic metabolites and ATP. However, in conditions where oxygen becomes limiting for oxidative phosphorylation, they can rapidly signal to increase cytosolic glycolytic ATP production, while awaiting hypoxia-induced changes in the proteome mediated by the activity of transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor 1. Hypoxia is a well-described phenotype of most cancers, driving many aspects of malignancy. Improving our understanding of how mitochondria change their metabolism in response to this stimulus may therefore elicit the design of new selective therapies. Many of the recent advances in our understanding of mitochondrial metabolic plasticity have been acquired through investigations of cancer-associated mutations in metabolic enzymes, including succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase. This review will describe how metabolic perturbations induced by hypoxia and mutations in these enzymes have informed our knowledge in the control of mitochondrial metabolism, and will examine what this may mean for the biology of the cancers in which these mutations are observed. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:272-285. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27196610

  7. Metabolomic profiling of drug responses in acute myeloid leukaemia cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Tiziani

    Full Text Available Combined bezafibrate (BEZ and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA exert unexpected antileukaemic activities against acute myeloid leukaemia (AML and these activities are associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS within the tumor cells. Although the generation of ROS by these drugs is supported by preceding studies including our own, the interrelationship between the cellular effects of the drugs and ROS generation is not well understood. Here we report the use of NMR metabolomic profiling to further study the effect of BEZ and MPA on three AML cell lines and to shed light on the underlying mechanism of action. For this we focused on drug effects induced during the initial 24 hours of treatment prior to the onset of overt cellular responses and examined these in the context of basal differences in metabolic profiles between the cell lines. Despite their ultimately profound cellular effects, the early changes in metabolic profiles engendered by these drugs were less pronounced than the constitutive metabolic differences between cell types. Nonetheless, drug treatments engendered common metabolic changes, most markedly in the response to the combination of BEZ and MPA. These responses included changes to TCA cycle intermediates consistent with recently identified chemical actions of ROS. Notable amongst these was the conversion of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinate which was recapitulated by the treatment of cell extracts with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. These findings indicate that the actions of combined BEZ and MPA against AML cells are indeed mediated downstream of the generation of ROS rather than some hitherto unsuspected mechanism. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that metabolite profiles represent highly sensitive markers for genomic differences between cells and their responses to external stimuli. This opens new perspectives to use metabolic profiling as a tool to study the rational redeployment of drugs in new disease

  8. Effect of insulin on the inflammatory and acute phase response after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G; Boehning, Darren F; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N

    2007-09-01

    After a severe burn, the liver plays a pivotal role by modulating inflammatory processes, metabolic pathways, immune functions, and the acute phase response. Therefore, liver integrity and function are important for recovery. A thermal injury, however, causes hepatic damage by inducing hepatic edema, fatty infiltration, hepatocyte apoptosis, and metabolic derangements associated with insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling. In preliminary studies, we found that these pathophysiological processes are related to hepatic inflammation, altered intracellular signaling, and mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesize that modulation of these processes with insulin could improve hepatic structure and function and, therefore, outcome of burned and critically ill patients. Insulin administration improves survival and decreases the rate of infections in severely burned and critically ill patients. Here, we show that insulin administration decreases the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and signal transcription factors and improves hepatic structure and function after a severe burn injury; insulin also restores hepatic homeostasis and improves hepatic dysfunction postburn via alterations in the signaling cascade.

  9. Physiological responses to an acute bout of sprint interval cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Eric C; Gist, Nicholas H; Cureton, Kirk J

    2013-10-01

    Sprint interval training has been shown to improve skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and health outcomes. However, the acute physiological responses to 4-7 maximal effort intervals have not been determined. To determine the V[Combining Dot Above]O2, cardiorespiratory responses, and energy expenditure during an acute bout of sprint interval cycling (SIC), health, college-aged subjects, 6 men and 6 women, completed 2 SIC sessions with at least 7 days between trials. Sprint interval cycling was performed on a cycle ergometer and involved a 5-minute warm-up followed by four 30-second all-out sprints with 4-minute active recovery. Peak oxygen uptake (ml·kg·min) during the 4 sprints were 35.3 ± 8.2, 38.8 ± 10.1, 38.8 ± 10.6, and 36.8 ± 9.3, and peak heart rate (b·min) were 164 ± 17, 172 ± 10, 177 ± 12, and 175 ± 22. We conclude that an acute bout of SIC elicits submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses during each interval that are above 80% of estimated maximal values. Although the duration of exercise in SIC is very short, the high level of V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and cardiorespiratory responses are sufficient to potentially elicit adaptations to training associated with elevated aerobic energy demand.

  10. Expression profiling of skeletal muscle following acute and chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation: implications for hypertrophy, metabolism and circadian rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Gordon S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR agonists has been found to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and significant metabolic changes. In the context of energy homeostasis, the importance of β-AR signaling has been highlighted by the inability of β1-3-AR-deficient mice to regulate energy expenditure and susceptibility to diet induced obesity. However, the molecular pathways and gene expression changes that initiate and maintain these phenotypic modulations are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify differential changes in gene expression in murine skeletal muscle associated with systemic (acute and chronic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol. Results Skeletal muscle gene expression (from murine tibialis anterior was profiled at both 1 and 4 hours following systemic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol, using Illumina 46K mouse BeadArrays. Illumina expression profiling revealed significant expression changes in genes associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, metabolism, circadian rhythm, transcription, histones, and oxidative stress. Differentially expressed genes relevant to the regulation of muscle mass and metabolism (in the context of the hypertrophic phenotype were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR to examine gene expression in response to both acute (1-24 h and chronic administration (1-28 days of formoterol at multiple timepoints. In terms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, attenuation of myostatin signaling (including differential expression of myostatin, activin receptor IIB, phospho-Smad3 etc was observed following acute and chronic administration of formoterol. Acute (but not chronic administration of formoterol also significantly induced the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism, including hexokinase 2, sorbin and SH3 domain containing 1, and uncoupling protein 3. Interestingly, formoterol

  11. Erythropoietin Action in Stress Response, Tissue Maintenance and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO regulation of red blood cell production and its induction at reduced oxygen tension provides for the important erythropoietic response to ischemic stress. The cloning and production of recombinant human EPO has led to its clinical use in patients with anemia for two and half decades and has facilitated studies of EPO action. Reports of animal and cell models of ischemic stress in vitro and injury suggest potential EPO benefit beyond red blood cell production including vascular endothelial response to increase nitric oxide production, which facilitates oxygen delivery to brain, heart and other non-hematopoietic tissues. This review discusses these and other reports of EPO action beyond red blood cell production, including EPO response affecting metabolism and obesity in animal models. Observations of EPO activity in cell and animal model systems, including mice with tissue specific deletion of EPO receptor (EpoR, suggest the potential for EPO response in metabolism and disease.

  12. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor modulates MDMA acute responses and reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    Touri??o Raposo, Clara; Ledent, Catherine; Maldonado, Rafael; Valverde Granados, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Background: 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a popular recreational drug widely abused by young people. The endocannabinoid system is involved in the addictive processes induced by different drugs of abuse. However, the role of this system in the pharmacological effects of MDMA has not been yet clarified. Methods: Locomotion, body temperature and anxiogenic-like responses were evaluated after acute MDMA administration in CB1 knockout mice. Additionally, MDMA rewarding propertie...

  14. Sympathetic neural responses to mental stress during acute simulated microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Durocher, John J.; Schwartz, Christopher E.; Carter, Jason R.

    2009-01-01

    Neural and cardiovascular responses to mental stress and acute 6° head-down tilt (HDT) were examined separately and combined. We hypothesized sympathoexcitation during mental stress, sympathoinhibition during HDT, and an additive neural interaction during combined mental stress and HDT. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded in 16 healthy subjects (8 men, 8 women) in the supine position during three randomized trials: 1) menta...

  15. Acute Stress Reduces Reward Responsiveness: Implications for Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan, Ryan; Pizzagalli, Diego

    2006-01-01

    Background: Stress, one of the strongest risk factors for depression, has been linked to "anbedonic" behavior and dysfunctional reward-related neural circuitry in preclinical models. Methods: To test if acute stress reduces reward responsiveness (i.e., the ability to modulate behavior as a function of past reward), a signal-detection task coupled with a differential reinforcement schedule was utilized. Eighty female participants completed the task under both a stress condition, either threat-...

  16. Investigation of the acute inflammatory response in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    MARKS, D. J. B.

    2006-01-01

    Most theories concerning the primary cause of Crohn's disease focus on over-activation of the immune response. Paradoxically, the defect may instead relate to diminished acute inflammation. Neutrophil accumulation to sites of dermal trauma has been shown to be reduced. Were the same phenomenon to occur in the gut, it might impair bacterial clearance thus provoking granuloma formation. In this thesis, a novel technique demonstrated attenuated neutrophil accumulation following trauma to the bow...

  17. Acute Pulmonary Response in Landscape Workers: Job Redesign

    OpenAIRE

    Sexton, Pauline Lethea

    2003-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made in the study of occupational induced airway diseases. A strong link has been found between worker exposure to organic dust and resulting acute pulmonary spasms. The supporting studies behind this link are primarily in the industries of cotton, animal and swine farming; however, some studies have been related to landscaping type tasks (i.e. mowing, leaf blowing). The relationship between organic dust and pulmonary response is associated with respiratory ir...

  18. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  19. Metabolic changes in concussed American football players during the acute and chronic post-injury phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellemberg Dave

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite negative neuroimaging findings many athletes display neurophysiological alterations and post-concussion symptoms that may be attributable to neurometabolic alterations. Methods The present study investigated the effects of sports concussion on brain metabolism using 1H-MR Spectroscopy by comparing a group of 10 non-concussed athletes with a group of 10 concussed athletes of the same age (mean: 22.5 years and education (mean: 16 years within both the acute and chronic post-injury phases. All athletes were scanned 1-6 days post-concussion and again 6-months later in a 3T Siemens MRI. Results Concussed athletes demonstrated neurometabolic impairment in prefrontal and motor (M1 cortices in the acute phase where NAA:Cr levels remained depressed relative to controls. There was some recovery observed in the chronic phase where Glu:Cr levels returned to those of control athletes; however, there was a pathological increase of m-I:Cr levels in M1 that was only present in the chronic phase. Conclusions These results confirm cortical neurometabolic changes in the acute post-concussion phase as well as recovery and continued metabolic abnormalities in the chronic phase. The results indicate that complex pathophysiological processes differ depending on the post-injury phase and the neurometabolite in question.

  20. IMMUNO-INFLAMATORY RESPONSES IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Oganov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the role of immuno-inflammatory responses in the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS.Material and methods. 93 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, including 60 patients with unstable angina (UA and 33 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI were involved in the study. Comparison group included 83 patients with stable angina and control group - 25 healthy persons. The diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD was verified on the basis of clinical and instrumental data. For assessment of immuno-inflammatory responses levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, pro-inflammatory (interleukins [IL-1β, IL-6], tumor necrosis factor [TNF-α] and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines we determined by ELISA method.Results. There were high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, high CRP level and low levels of anti-inflammatory IL-4, IL-10 cytokines in UA and AMI patients. Insignificant immunological shifts were found in stable angina patients.Conclusion. Destabilization in the IHD course is characterized with more active immuno-inflammatory responses. Activity of these reactions is associated with ACS severity.

  1. IMMUNO-INFLAMATORY RESPONSES IN ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Oganov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the role of immuno-inflammatory responses in the development of acute coronary syndrome (ACS.Material and methods. 93 patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, including 60 patients with unstable angina (UA and 33 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI were involved in the study. Comparison group included 83 patients with stable angina and control group - 25 healthy persons. The diagnosis of ischemic heart disease (IHD was verified on the basis of clinical and instrumental data. For assessment of immuno-inflammatory responses levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, pro-inflammatory (interleukins [IL-1β, IL-6], tumor necrosis factor [TNF-α] and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines we determined by ELISA method.Results. There were high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, high CRP level and low levels of anti-inflammatory IL-4, IL-10 cytokines in UA and AMI patients. Insignificant immunological shifts were found in stable angina patients.Conclusion. Destabilization in the IHD course is characterized with more active immuno-inflammatory responses. Activity of these reactions is associated with ACS severity.

  2. Normal Caloric Responses during Acute Phase of Vestibular Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Uk; Park, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Koo, Ja-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We report a novel finding of caloric conversion from normal responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase of vestibular neuritis (VN). Methods We recruited 893 patients with a diagnosis of VN at Dizziness Clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital from 2003 to 2014 after excluding 28 patients with isolated inferior divisional VN (n=14) and those without follow-up tests despite normal caloric responses initially (n=14). We retrospectively analyzed the neurotological findings in four (0.5%) of the patients who showed a conversion from initially normal caloric responses into unilateral paresis during the acute phase. Results In those four patients, the initial caloric tests were performed within 2 days of symptom onset, and conversion into unilateral caloric paresis was documented 1–4 days later. The clinical and laboratory findings during the initial evaluation were consistent with VN in all four patients except for normal findings in bedside head impulse tests in one of them. Conclusions Normal findings in caloric tests should be interpreted with caution during the acute phase of suspected VN. Follow-up evaluation should be considered when the findings of the initial caloric test are normal, but VN remains the most plausible diagnosis. PMID:26932259

  3. The acute glucocorticoid stress response does not differentiate between rewarding and aversive social stimuli in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwalda, Bauke; Scholte, Jan; de Boer, Sietse F; Coppens, Caroline M; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2012-02-01

    The mere presence of elevated plasma levels of corticosterone is generally regarded as evidence of compromised well-being. However, environmental stimuli do not necessarily need to be of a noxious or adverse nature to elicit activation of the stress response systems. In the present study, the physiological and neuroendocrine responses to repeated social stimuli that can be regarded as emotional opposites, i.e. social defeat and sexual behavior, were compared. Similar corticosterone responses were observed in animals confronted for the first time with either a highly aggressive male intruder or a receptive female, but a decrease was noticed in defeated rats tested during a third interaction. Only if animals are being physically attacked does the corticosterone response remain similar to the one observed during sexual behavior. In addition, the number of activated cells in the parvocellular hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, as visualized by c-Fos immunocytochemistry, shows no difference between rats 1h after the third exposure to defeat or sex. Finally, biotelemetric recordings of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity show a robust response to both social stimuli that is generally, however, higher in animals being confronted with a receptive female. The data clearly indicate that acute plasma corticosterone levels are not reflecting the emotional valence of a salient stimulus. The magnitude of the response seems to be a direct reflection of the behavioral activity and hence of the metabolic requirements of activated tissues. Next to its direct metabolic role, acute increases in plasma corticosterone will have neurobiological and behavioral effects that largely depend on the neural circuitry that is activated by the stimulus that triggered its release. PMID:22210197

  4. Alteration of Plant Primary Metabolism in Response to Insect Herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaoqun; Lou, Yann-Ru; Tzin, Vered; Jander, Georg

    2015-11-01

    Plants in nature, which are continuously challenged by diverse insect herbivores, produce constitutive and inducible defenses to reduce insect damage and preserve their own fitness. In addition to inducing pathways that are directly responsible for the production of toxic and deterrent compounds, insect herbivory causes numerous changes in plant primary metabolism. Whereas the functions of defensive metabolites such as alkaloids, terpenes, and glucosinolates have been studied extensively, the fitness benefits of changes in photosynthesis, carbon transport, and nitrogen allocation remain less well understood. Adding to the complexity of the observed responses, the feeding habits of different insect herbivores can significantly influence the induced changes in plant primary metabolism. In this review, we summarize experimental data addressing the significance of insect feeding habits, as related to herbivore-induced changes in plant primary metabolism. Where possible, we link these physiological changes with current understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the potential fitness benefits that host plants receive from altering their primary metabolism in response to insect herbivory.

  5. Endocrine and metabolic aspects of the acute toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorski, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Toxic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were characterized in male Sprague-Dawley rats in order to elucidate the mechanism of acute toxicity of this potent halogenated hydrocarbon. Studies in TCDD-treated, pair-fed control and ad libitum-fed control rates, as well as in thyroidectomized, adrenalectomized and hypophysectomized, revealed differential hormonal, toxicologic and histophathologic responses suggesting that these manifestations of TCDD exposure are the results of an insult to intermediary metabolism. Tissue specific alterations in de novo fatty acid synthesis were directly related to differential changes observed in thyroid hormone homeostasis. The increased hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis provided a likely mechanism for the documented fact that TCDD-treated rats lose more body weight than corresponding pair-fed controls because de novo fatty acid synthesis represents an energy inefficient metabolic process. Experiments in adrenalectomized and hypophysectomized rats led to the hypothesis that severe hypoglycemia due to inhibition of gluconeogenesis is the cause of TCDD-induced death. A subsequent characterization of gluconeogenesis in TCDD-treated rats confirmed this hypothesis.

  6. Reduced triglyceride secretion in response to an acute dietary fat challenge in obese compared to lean mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki eUchida

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity results in abnormally high levels of triglyceride (TG storage in tissues such as liver, heart and muscle, which disrupts their normal functions. Recently, we found that lean mice challenged with high levels of dietary fat store TGs in cytoplasmic lipid droplets in the absorptive cells of the intestine, enterocytes, and that this storage increases and then decreases over time after an acute dietary fat challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of obesity on intestinal TG metabolism. More specifically we asked whether TG storage in and secretion from the intestine are altered in obesity. We investigated these questions in diet-induced obese (DIO and leptin-deficient (ob/ob mice. We found greater levels of TG storage in the intestine of DIO mice compared to lean mice in the fed state, but similar levels of TG storage after fasting. In addition, we found similar TG storage in the intestine of lean and DIO mice at multiple time points after an acute dietary fat challenge. Surprisingly, we found remarkably lower TG secretion from both DIO and ob/ob mice compared to lean controls in response to an acute dietary fat challenge. Furthermore, we found altered mRNA levels for genes involved in regulation of intestinal TG metabolism in lean and DIO mice at fasting and in response to an acute dietary fat challenge. More specifically, we found that many of the genes related to TG synthesis, chylomicron synthesis, TG storage and lipolysis were induced in response to an acute dietary fat challenge in lean mice, but this induction was not observed in DIO mice. In fact, we found a significant decrease in intestinal mRNA levels of genes related to lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in DIO mice in response to an acute dietary fat challenge. Our findings demonstrate altered TG handling by the small intestine of obese compared to lean mice.

  7. Disparate metabolic response to fructose feeding between different mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, M K; Fiveash, C E; Braude, J P; Osborne, B; Brown, S H J; Mitchell, T W; Turner, N

    2015-12-22

    Diets enriched in fructose (FR) increase lipogenesis in the liver, leading to hepatic lipid accumulation and the development of insulin resistance. Previously, we have shown that in contrast to other mouse strains, BALB/c mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced metabolic deterioration, potentially due to a lack of ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver. In this study we have compared the metabolic response of BALB/c and C57BL/6 (BL6) mice to a fructose-enriched diet. Both strains of mice increased adiposity in response to FR-feeding, while only BL6 mice displayed elevated hepatic triglyceride (TAG) accumulation and glucose intolerance. The lack of hepatic TAG accumulation in BALB/c mice appeared to be linked to an altered balance between lipogenic and lipolytic pathways, while the protection from fructose-induced glucose intolerance in this strain was likely related to low levels of ER stress, a slight elevation in insulin levels and an altered profile of diacylglycerol species in the liver. Collectively these findings highlight the multifactorial nature of metabolic defects that develop in response to changes in the intake of specific nutrients and the divergent response of different mouse strains to dietary challenges.

  8. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  9. The metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Reisi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Isfahan, Iran.
    • METHODS: During a 4-year period (2003 to 2007, 55 children (33 male and 22 female diagnosed with ALL at Unit of Hematology/ Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Science, were enrolled in this crosssectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the modified version of Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III criteria. Insulin resistance was defined based on the homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR.
    • RESULTS: The mean age of participates was 10.4 years (range 6-19 years and the mean interval since completion of chemotherapy was 35 months. Twenty percent (11/55 of survivors (10 male, 1 female met criteria for diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Obesity was observed in one forth of patients and nearly 3/4 of obese patients had metabolic syndrome. High serum insulin levels were found in 16% of participants and in 63% of obese survivors. The mean insulin levels in survivors with metabolic syndrome was three-times more than those without (28.3 mu/l vs. 9.57 mu/l, p = 0.004. Insulin resistance was detected in 72.7% of survivors with metabolic syndrome and it was  ositively correlated with serum triglycerides (0.543, p < 0.001, systolic and diastolic BP (0.348, p = 0.01 and 0.368, p = 006 respectively, insulin levels (0.914, p < 0.001 and blood sugar (0.398, p = 003.
    • CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in survivors of childhood leukemia in Iran is higher than developed countries. Nearly all of the obese patients had metabolic syndrome. Weight control and regular physical exercise are recommended to the survivors.
    • KEYWORDS: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, metabolic syndrome, obesity, children.

  10. Metabolic Response of Pakchoi Leaves to Amino Acid Nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-li; YU Wen-juan; ZHOU Qian; HAN Rui-feng; HUANG Dan-feng

    2014-01-01

    Different nitrogen (N) forms may cause changes in the metabolic profiles of plants. However, few studies have been conducted on the effects of amino acid-N on plant metabolic proifles. The main objective of this study was to identify primary metabolites associated with amino acid-N (Gly, Gln and Ala) through metabolic proifle analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Plants of pakchoi (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis L.), Huawang and Wuyueman cultivars, were grown with different nitrogen forms (i.e., Gly, Gln, Ala, NO3--N, and N starvation) applied under sterile hydroponic conditions. The fresh weight and plant N accumulation of Huawang were greater than those of Wuyueman, which indicates that the former exhibited better N-use efficiency than the latter. The physiological performances of the applied N forms were generally in the order of NO3--N>Gln>Gly>Ala. The metabolic analysis of leaf polar extracts revealed 30 amino acid N-responsive metabolites in the two pakchoi cultivars, mainly consisting of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids. Changes in the carbon metabolism of pakchoi leaves under amino acid treatments occurred via the accumulation of fructose, glucose, xylose, and arabinose. Disruption of amino acid metabolism resulted in accumulation of endogenous Gly in Gly treatment, Pro in Ala treatment, and Asn in three amino acid (Gly, Gln and Ala) treatments. By contrast, the levels of endogenous Gln and Leu decreased. However, this reduction varied among cultivars and amino acid types. Amino acid-N supply also affected the citric acid cycle, namely, the second stage of respiration, where leaves in Gly, Gln and Ala treatments contained low levels of malic, citric and succinic acids compared with leaves in NO3--N treatments. No signiifcant difference in the metabolic responses was observed between the two cultivars which differed in their capability to use N. The response of primary metabolites in pakchoi leaves to amino acid-N supply

  11. S-nitroso-proteome in poplar leaves in response to acute ozone stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Vanzo

    Full Text Available Protein S-nitrosylation, the covalent binding of nitric oxide (NO to protein cysteine residues, is one of the main mechanisms of NO signaling in plant and animal cells. Using a combination of the biotin switch assay and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis, we revealed the S-nitroso-proteome of the woody model plant Populus x canescens. Under normal conditions, constitutively S-nitrosylated proteins in poplar leaves and calli comprise all aspects of primary and secondary metabolism. Acute ozone fumigation was applied to elicit ROS-mediated changes of the S-nitroso-proteome. This treatment changed the total nitrite and nitrosothiol contents of poplar leaves and affected the homeostasis of 32 S-nitrosylated proteins. Multivariate data analysis revealed that ozone exposure negatively affected the S-nitrosylation status of leaf proteins: 23 proteins were de-nitrosylated and 9 proteins had increased S-nitrosylation content compared to the control. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 2 (log2[ozone/control] = -3.6 and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (-3.4, key enzymes catalyzing important steps in the phenylpropanoid and subsequent lignin biosynthetic pathways, respectively, were de-nitrosylated upon ozone stress. Measuring the in vivo and in vitro phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity indicated that the increase of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity in response to acute ozone is partly regulated by de-nitrosylation, which might favor a higher metabolic flux through the phenylpropanoid pathway within minutes after ozone exposure.

  12. Ubiquitin Metabolism Affects Cellular Response to Volatile Anesthetics in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, Darren; Reiner, Thomas; Keeley, Jessica L.; Pizzini, Mark; Keil, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of action of volatile anesthetics, we are studying mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that have altered sensitivity to isoflurane, a widely used clinical anesthetic. Several lines of evidence from these studies implicate a role for ubiquitin metabolism in cellular response to volatile anesthetics: (i) mutations in the ZZZ1 gene render cells resistant to isoflurane, and the ZZZ1 gene is identical to BUL1 (binds ubiquitin ligase), which appears to be invo...

  13. Biofilm Shows Spatially Stratified Metabolic Responses to Contaminant Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Bin; Majors, Paul D.; Ahmed, B.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Sylvia, Crystal P.; Shi, Liang; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the spatiotemporal responses of live S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms to U(VI) (uranyl, UO22+) and Cr(VI) (chromate, CrO42-), important environmental contaminants at DOE contaminated sites. Toward this goal, we applied noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging, diffusion, relaxation and spectroscopy techniques to monitor in situ spatiotemporal responses of S. oneidensis biofilms to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure in terms of changes in biofilm structures, diffusion properties, and cellular metabolism. Exposure to U(VI) or Cr(VI) did not appear to change the overall biomass distribution but caused changes in the physicochemical microenvironments inside the biofilm as indicated by diffusion measurements. Changes in the diffusion properties of the biofilms in response to U(VI) and Cr(VI) exposure imply a novel function of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) affecting the biotransformation and transport of contaminants in the environment. In the presence of U(VI) or Cr(VI), the anaerobic metabolism of lactate was inhibited significantly, although the biofilms were still capable of reducing U(VI) and Cr(VI). Local concentrations of Cr(III)aq in the biofilm suggested relatively high Cr(VI) reduction activities at the top of the biofilm, near the medium-biofilm interface. The depth-resolved metabolic activities of the biofilm suggested higher diversion effects of gluconeogenesis and C1 metabolism pathways at the bottom of the biofilm and in the presence of U(VI). This study provides a noninvasive means to investigate spatiotemporal responses of biofilms, including surface-associated microbial communities in engineering, natural and medical settings, to various environmental perturbations including exposure to environmental contaminants and antimicrobials.

  14. Acute hemodynamic response to vasodilators in primary pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni H

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemodynamic effects of high flow oxygen (O2 inhalation, sublingual isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN, intravenous aminophylline (AMN and sublingual nifedipine (NIF were studied in 32 patients with primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH. In 30 out of 32 patients the basal ratio of pulmonary to systemic vascular resistance (Rp/Rs was > 0.5 (mean = 0.77 +/- 0.20. Oxygen caused significant decrease in the mean resistance ratio to 0.68 +/- 0.20 (p = 0.005. ISDN, AMN and NIF caused increase in the resistance ratio to 0.79 +/- 0.26; 0.78 +/- 0.26; and 0.80 +/- 0.23 respectively. O2, ISDN, AMN and NIF caused a fall of Rp/Rs in 21 (65.6%, 10 (31.2%, 10(31.2% and 9(28.1% patients respectively. Thus, of the four drugs tested high flow O2 inhalation resulted in fall of Rp/Rs in two thirds of patients whereas ISDN, AMN and NIF caused a mean rise in Rp/Rs. One third of patients did respond acutely to the latter three drugs. Acute hemodynamic studies are useful before prescribing vasodilators in patients with PPH since more of the commonly used drugs like ISDN, AMN, NIF could have detrimental hemodynamic responses in some patients. However, great caution should be exercised before performing hemodynamic study as the procedure has definite mortality and morbidity.

  15. Is leptin related to systemic inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrés Duarte-Rojo; Ana Lezama-Barreda; Mar(i)a Teresa Ram(i)rez-lglesias; Mario Peláez Luna; Guillermo Robles-Diaz

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the relationship between leptin and systemic inflammation in acute pancreatitis.METHODS: Consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis were included. Body mass index and serum samples were obtained at admission. Leptin, TNF-α, IL-6, -8and -10 levels were determined by ELISA. Severity was defined according to Atlanta criteria.RESULTS: Fifty-two (29 females) patients were studied.Overall body mass index was similar between mild and severe cases, although women with severe pancreatitis had lower body mass index (P = 0.04) and men showed higher body mass index (P = 0.05). No difference was found in leptin levels regarding the severity of pancreatitis, but higher levels tended to appear in male patients with increased body mass index and severe pancreatitis (P = 0.1). A multivariate analysis showed no association between leptin levels and severity. The strongest cytokine associated with severity was IL-6.Correlations of leptin with another cytokines only showed a trend for IL-8 (P = 0.058).CONCLUSION: High body mass index was associated with severity only in males, which may be related to android fat distribution. Serum leptin seems not to play a role on the systemic inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis and its association with severe outcome in males might represent a marker of increased adiposity.

  16. An acute method to test leptin responsiveness in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Bhavna N.; Ruth B.S. Harris

    2014-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous administration of leptin normalizes blood glucose levels in rodent models of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes independent of changes in food intake, body weight, and plasma insulin. We tested whether an acute intravenous leptin infusion changed blood glucose in normal and diet-induced leptin-resistant rats to determine whether this measure could be used as a marker of leptin sensitivity. Leptin-responsive chow-fed rats and diet-induced leptin-resistant male Sprague-Dawley ra...

  17. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition increases glucose-induced insulin secretion in response to acute restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Júnia R O L; Miranda, Paulo A C; Fóscolo, Rodrigo B; Lemos, Joao P M; Paula, Luciano F; Silveira, Warley C; Santos, Robson A S; Pinheiro, Sérgio V B; Coimbra, Candido C; Ribeiro-Oliveira, Antônio

    2012-12-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting involvement of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in carbohydrate metabolism and its response to stress. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic inhibition of the RAS on glucose and insulin levels during acute restraint stress. Male Holtzman rats were treated with 10 mg/kg per day enalapril solution or vehicle for 14 days. After 14 days, rats were divided into three experimental groups: enalapril + restraint (ER), vehicle + restraint (VR) and enalapril + saline (ES). Rats in the restraint groups were subjected to 30 min restraint stress, whereas rats in the ES groups were given saline infusion instead. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 5, 10, 20 and 30 min restraint stress or saline infusion. After restraint, a hyperglycaemic response was observed in the ER and VR groups that peaked at 20 and 10 min, respectively (P inhibition with enalapril may increase glucose-induced insulin secretion in response to acute restraint. PMID:23734984

  18. Glucose metabolism and glutamate analog acutely alkalinize pH of insulin secretory vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tokuyuki; Hirose, Kenzo; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A; Kimura, Satoshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    We studied acute changes of secretory vesicle pH in pancreatic beta-cells with a fluorescent pH indicator, lysosensor green DND-189. Fluorescence was decreased by 0.66 +/- 0.10% at 149 +/- 16 s with 22.2 mM glucose stimulation, indicating that vesicular pH was alkalinized by approximately 0.016 unit. Glucose-responsive pH increase was observed when cytosolic Ca2+ influx was blocked but disappeared when an inhibitor of glycolysis or mitochondrial ATP synthase was present. Glutamate dimethyl ester (GME), a plasma membrane-permeable analog of glutamate, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at 5 mM without changing cellular ATP content or cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Application of GME at basal glucose concentration decreased DND-189 fluorescence by 0.83 +/- 0.19% at 38 +/- 2 s. These results indicated that the acutely alkalinizing effect of glucose on beta-cell secretory vesicle pH was dependent on glucose metabolism but independent of modulations of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Moreover, glutamate derived from glucose may be one of the mediators of this alkalinizing effect of glucose, which may have potential relevance to the alteration of secretory function by glutamate.

  19. Response-guided induction therapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with excellent remission rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Jonas; Forestier, Erik; Heldrup, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course.......To evaluate the early treatment response in children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a response-guided induction strategy that includes idarubicin in the first course....

  20. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  1. Deciphering hepatocellular responses to metabolic and oncogenic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrina L. Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Each cell type responds uniquely to stress and fractionally contributes to global and tissue-specific stress responses. Hepatocytes, liver macrophages (MΦ, and sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC play functionally important and interdependent roles in adaptive processes such as obesity and tumor growth. Although these cell types demonstrate significant phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, their distinctions enabling disease-specific responses remain understudied. We developed a strategy for the simultaneous isolation and quantification of these liver cell types based on antigenic cell surface marker expression. To demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique, we quantified liver cell-specific responses to high-fat diet (HFD or diethylnitrosamine (DEN, a liver-specific carcinogen, and found that while there was only a marginal increase in hepatocyte number, MΦ and SEC populations were quantitatively increased. Global gene expression profiling of hepatocytes, MΦ and SEC identified characteristic gene signatures that define each cell type in their distinct physiological or pathological states. Integration of hepatic gene signatures with available human obesity and liver cancer microarray data provides further insight into the cell-specific responses to metabolic or oncogenic stress. Our data reveal unique gene expression patterns that serve as molecular “fingerprints” for the cell-centric responses to pathologic stimuli in the distinct microenvironment of the liver. The technical advance highlighted in this study provides an essential resource for assessing hepatic cell-specific contributions to metabolic and oncogenic stress, information that could unveil previously unappreciated molecular mechanisms for the cellular crosstalk that underlies the continuum from metabolic disruption to obesity and ultimately hepatic cancer.

  2. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro- reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationships of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venotis Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). Altered vascular volume had no effect on response relations of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex but did alter the gain of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex (-7.93 q 1.71, -4.36 q 1.38, and -2.56 q 1.59 peripheral resistance units/mmHg for hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic, respectively) independent of shifts in baseline FVR and PVP. These results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulnionary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  3. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

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    Xiaomei Feng

    Full Text Available Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S. aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS and high capacity runner (HCR rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  4. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  5. Targeting aberrant glutathione metabolism to eradicate human acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M; Neering, Sarah J; Lagadinou, Eleni D; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L; O'Dwyer, Kristen M; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A; Becker, Michael W; Jordan, Craig T

    2013-11-22

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34(+)) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34(+) AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34(+) AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34(+) cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34(+) AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34(+) cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  6. Severe metabolic alkalosis and recurrent acute on chronic kidney injury in a patient with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Axel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is common in patients with Crohn's disease and may be accompanied by acid base disorders, most commonly metabolic acidosis due to intestinal loss of bicarbonate. Case Presentation Here, we present a case of severe metabolic alkalosis in a young patient suffering from M. Crohn. The patient had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and suffered from chronic kidney disease. He was now referred to our clinic for recurrent acute kidney injury, the nature of which was pre-renal due to profound volume depletion. Renal failure was associated with marked hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis which only responded to high volume repletion and high dose blockade of gastric hypersecretion. Intestinal failure with stomal fluid losses of up to 5.7 litres per day required port implantation to commence parenteral nutrition. Fluid and electrolyte replacement rapidly improved renal function and acid base homeostasis. Conclusions This case highlights the important role of gastrointestinal function to maintain acid base status in patients with Crohn's disease.

  7. Acute stress responses: A review and synthesis of ASD, ASR, and CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isserlin, Leanna; Zerach, Gadi; Solomon, Zahava

    2008-10-01

    Toward the development of a unifying diagnosis for acute stress responses this article attempts to find a place for combat stress reaction (CSR) within the spectrum of other defined acute stress responses. This article critically compares the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder (ASD), acute stress reaction (ASR), and CSR. Prospective studies concerning the predictive value of ASD, ASR, and CSR are reviewed. Questions, recommendations, and implications for clinical practice are raised concerning the completeness of the current acute stress response diagnoses, the heterogeneity of different stressors, the scope of expected outcomes, and the importance of decline in function as an indicator of future psychological, psychiatric, and somatic distress. PMID:19123763

  8. Relatively spared central multifocal electroretinogram responses in acute quinine toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad Usman; Noonan, Carmel; Hagan, Richard; Brown, Malcolm

    2011-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was investigated with electrodiagnostic testing 4 months after a deliberate quinine overdose. Initially he was admitted to intensive care unit with visual acuity (VA) of perception of light in both eyes. VA recovered to 6/6 right eye and 6/12 left eye, though severely constricted fields were noted. Slow stimulus (base period of 83 ms) multifocal electroretinogram (ERG) showed electronegative responses outside the inner 5 degrees, with a reduced but electropositive response seen in this central area. It appears that in this case of bilaterally negative ERGs that the macula/fovea (which has a vascular supply through the choroid) is relatively spared as is seen in bilateral vascular electronegative ERGs. This may indicate that quinine toxicity to the retina may be secondary to effects similar to vascular occlusion or severe ischemia during the acute phase of quinine poisoning. PMID:22693278

  9. Effect of age on 6-mercaptopurine metabolic profile during the maintenance phase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DZHANGt; AGILBER; KYAKOUBEN; YMEDARD; EVILMER; EJACQZ-AIGRAIN

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is a thiopurine analogue administered for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). It is an inactive pro-drug that undergoes extensive metabolism resulting in the formation of active metabolites 6-thioguanine nucleotides (6-TGN) and inactive 6-mercaptopurine methylated metabolites (6-MMP) under the genetic control of the enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT). 6-MP metabolic profile (6-MMP/6-TGN) was proposed as a tool to

  10. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs, and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0 and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III. Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs, i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor, and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR, due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse

  11. Baroreflex Responses to Acute Changes in Blood Volume in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Tatro, Dana L.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that acute changes in plasma volume affect the stimulus-response relations of high- and low- pressure baroreflexes, eight men (27-44 yr old) underwent measurements for carotid-cardiac and cardiopulmonary baro-reflex responses under the following three volemic conditions: hypovolemic, normovolemic, and hypervolemic. The stimulus- response relation of the carotid-cardiac response curve was generated using a neck cuff device, which delivered pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg in continuous steps of 15 mmHg. The stimulus-response relationship, of the cardio-pulmonary baroreflex were studied by measurements of Forearm Vascular Resistance (FVR) and Peripheral Venous Pressure (PVP) during low levels of lower body negative pressure (O to -20 mmHg). The results indicate greater demand for vasoconstriction for equal reductions in venous pressure during progressive hypovolemia; this condition may compromise the capacity to provide adequate peripheral resistance during severe orthostatic stress. Fluid loading before reentry after spaceflight may act to restore vasoconstrictive capacity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex but may not be an effective countermeasure against potential post- flight impairment of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex.

  12. Thermal sensation and thermophysiological responses with metabolic step-changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goto, Tomonobu; Toftum, Jørn; deDear, Richard;

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on thermal perception and thermophysiological variables of controlled metabolic excursions of various intensities and durations. Twenty-four subjects alternately were seated on a chair or exercised by walking on a treadmill at a temperature predicted to be neutral...... at sedentary activity. In a second experimental series, subjects alternated between rest and exercise as well as between exercise at different intensities at two temperature levels. Measurements comprised skin and oesophageal temperatures, heart rate and subjective responses. Thermal sensation started to rise...... or decline immediately (within one minute) after a change of activity, which means that even moderate activity changes of short duration affect thermal perceptions of humans. After approximately 15-20 min under constant activity subjective thermal responses approximated the steady-state response...

  13. Effect of radiographic contrast agents on leukocyte metabolic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernanz-Schulman, M. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanholder, R.; Waterloos, M.A. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, University Hospital, Gent (Belgium); Hakim, R.; Schulman, G. [Department of Nephrology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Barium, at clinical dilutions, causes a significant increase of baseline ''resting state'' phagocytic activity, which in turn leads to significant blunting of subsequent response to phagocytic challenge and adversely affects the response to all bacteria tested. There is no baseline activation of leukocytes by the water-soluble media, although there was some inhibition (rather than activation) of leukocyte metabolic activity. The effect of the water-soluble media in bacteria was more complex (although inhibition is minor compared to barium). Our data demonstrate that barium is a significat activator of phagocytic cells, which results in deactivation of phagocytic response when challenged; these dsata serve to explain the enhanced adverse effect of barium in cased of fecal peritonitis. (orig.)

  14. Reduced natriuretic response to acute sodium loading in COMT Gene deleted mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uhlén Staffan

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intrarenal natriuretic hormone dopamine (DA is metabolised by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and monoamine oxidase (MAO. Inhibition of COMT, as opposed to MAO, results in a potent natriuretic response in the rat. The present study in anaesthetized homozygous and heterozygous COMT gene deleted mice attempted to further elucidate the importance of COMT in renal DA and sodium handling. After acute intravenous isotonic sodium loading, renal function was followed. Results COMT activity in heterozygous mice was about half of that in wild type mice and was zero in the homozygous mice. MAO activity did not differ between the genotypes. Urinary sodium excretion increased 10-fold after sodium loading in wild type mice. In heterozygous and homozygous mice, the natriuretic effects of sodium loading were only 29 % and 39 %, respectively, of that in wild type mice. Arterial pressure and glomerular filtration rate did not differ between genotypes. Baseline norepinephrine and DA excretions in urine were elevated in the homozygous, but not in heterozygous, COMT gene deleted mice. Urinary DA excretion increased after isotonic sodium loading in the wild type mice but not in the COMT gene deleted mice. Conclusions Mice with reduced or absent COMT activity have altered metabolism of catecholamines and are unable to increase renal DA activity and produce normal natriuresis in response to acute sodium loading. The results support the hypothesis that COMT has an important role in the DA-mediated regulation of renal sodium excretion.

  15. Acute cardiovascular responses while playing virtual games simulated by Nintendo Wii®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gusthavo Augusto Alves; Felipe, Danilo De Souza; Silva, Elisangela; De Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; Higino, Wonder Passoni; Da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; De Carvalho, Wellington Roberto Gomes; Aparecido de Souza, Renato

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the acute cardiovascular responses that occur while playing virtual games (aerobic and balance) emulated by Nintendo Wii®. [Subjects] Nineteen healthy male volunteers were recruited. [Methods] The ergospirometric variables of maximum oxygen consumption, metabolic equivalents, and heart rate were obtained during the aerobic (Obstacle Course, Hula Hoop, and Free Run) and balance (Soccer Heading, Penguin Slide, and Table Tilt) games of Wii Fit Plus® software. To access and analyze the ergospirometric information, a VO2000 analyzer was used. Normalized data (using maximum oxygen consumption and heart rate) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Scheffe’s test. [Results] Significant differences were found among the balance and aerobic games in all variables analyzed. In addition, the Wii exercises performed were considered to be of light (balance games) and moderate (aerobic games) intensity in accordance with American College Sports Medicine exercise stratification. [Conclusion] Physical activity in a virtual environment emulated by Nintendo Wii® can change acute cardiovascular responses, primarily when Wii aerobic games are performed. These results support the use of the Nintendo Wii® in physical activity programs. PMID:26504308

  16. Acute cardiovascular responses while playing virtual games simulated by Nintendo Wii(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gusthavo Augusto Alves; Felipe, Danilo De Souza; Silva, Elisangela; De Freitas, Wagner Zeferino; Higino, Wonder Passoni; Da Silva, Fabiano Fernandes; De Carvalho, Wellington Roberto Gomes; Aparecido de Souza, Renato

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the acute cardiovascular responses that occur while playing virtual games (aerobic and balance) emulated by Nintendo Wii(®). [Subjects] Nineteen healthy male volunteers were recruited. [Methods] The ergospirometric variables of maximum oxygen consumption, metabolic equivalents, and heart rate were obtained during the aerobic (Obstacle Course, Hula Hoop, and Free Run) and balance (Soccer Heading, Penguin Slide, and Table Tilt) games of Wii Fit Plus(®) software. To access and analyze the ergospirometric information, a VO2000 analyzer was used. Normalized data (using maximum oxygen consumption and heart rate) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Scheffe's test. [Results] Significant differences were found among the balance and aerobic games in all variables analyzed. In addition, the Wii exercises performed were considered to be of light (balance games) and moderate (aerobic games) intensity in accordance with American College Sports Medicine exercise stratification. [Conclusion] Physical activity in a virtual environment emulated by Nintendo Wii(®) can change acute cardiovascular responses, primarily when Wii aerobic games are performed. These results support the use of the Nintendo Wii(®) in physical activity programs. PMID:26504308

  17. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Selectively Matches Metabolic Output to Acute Contractile Stress in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jennifer Q; Lu, Xiyuan; Correll, Robert N; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Sargent, Michelle A; York, Allen J; Zhang, Jianyi; Bers, Donald M; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2015-07-01

    In the heart, augmented Ca(2+) fluxing drives contractility and ATP generation through mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading. Pathologic mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload with ischemic injury triggers mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening and cardiomyocyte death. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is primarily mediated by the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Here, we generated mice with adult and cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Mcu, which produced mitochondria refractory to acute Ca(2+) uptake, with impaired ATP production, and inhibited MPTP opening upon acute Ca(2+) challenge. Mice lacking Mcu in the adult heart were also protected from acute ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, resting/basal mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels were normal in hearts of Mcu-deleted mice, and mitochondria lacking MCU eventually loaded with Ca(2+) after stress stimulation. Indeed, Mcu-deleted mice were unable to immediately sprint on a treadmill unless warmed up for 30 min. Hence, MCU is a dedicated regulator of short-term mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading underlying a "fight-or-flight" response that acutely matches cardiac workload with ATP production.

  18. The Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Selectively Matches Metabolic Output to Acute Contractile Stress in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Q. Kwong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the heart, augmented Ca2+ fluxing drives contractility and ATP generation through mitochondrial Ca2+ loading. Pathologic mitochondrial Ca2+ overload with ischemic injury triggers mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP opening and cardiomyocyte death. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is primarily mediated by the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU. Here, we generated mice with adult and cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Mcu, which produced mitochondria refractory to acute Ca2+ uptake, with impaired ATP production, and inhibited MPTP opening upon acute Ca2+ challenge. Mice lacking Mcu in the adult heart were also protected from acute ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, resting/basal mitochondrial Ca2+ levels were normal in hearts of Mcu-deleted mice, and mitochondria lacking MCU eventually loaded with Ca2+ after stress stimulation. Indeed, Mcu-deleted mice were unable to immediately sprint on a treadmill unless warmed up for 30 min. Hence, MCU is a dedicated regulator of short-term mitochondrial Ca2+ loading underlying a “fight-or-flight” response that acutely matches cardiac workload with ATP production.

  19. Metabolic and transcriptomic responses of weaned pigs induced by different dietary amylose and amylopectin ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jun

    Full Text Available Starch is one of the major dietary energy sources for mammals. However, the nutritional value of starch largely depends on its amylose and amylopectin ratio. In this study, the overall metabolic and transcriptomic responses of weaned pigs fed with different dietary starches were assessed. Sixteen weaned pigs were randomly allotted to two experimental diets containing either of pure cassava starch (CS or maize starch (MS as the sole energy source (the amylose-amylopectin ratio were 0.25 and 0.43, respectively. Results indicated that the body weight gain was not affected by different dietary starches. However, a moderate fatty liver was observed in CS-fed group. Long-term ingestion of CS not only increased the total liver fat content, but significantly elevated the liver triglyceride and cholesterol content (P<0.05. In addition, the serum insulin and cholesterol concentrations were both elevated in CS-fed group (P<0.05. Microarray analysis led to the identification of 648 genes differentially expressed in liver (P<0.05, and a lot of them were involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Additionally, pathway analysis indicated that both the insulin and PPAR signaling pathways were acutely affected by dietary amylose-amylopectin ratio. Long-term ingestion of CS activated the transcription of lipogenic genes such as hmgr and fasn, but decreased the expression of lipolytic genes such as aox1, ppara and fbp. The microarray results correlated well with the measurements of several key enzymes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. Our results suggested that both the metabolic and transcriptomic responses of weaned pigs were tightly regulated by dietary starch composition, and a high amylose ratio starch (i.e MS may be more healthful for mammals as the long-term energy source by down-regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and steroidogenesis.

  20. Renal response to acute acid loading--an organ physiological approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Engel, K; Kildeberg, P

    2004-01-01

    , as the extracellular acid-base status would be expected to be the key physiological trigger for renal NAE. The object of this study was to investigate the renal response to acute non-carbonic acid loading using a quantitative organ physiological approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five-h NH4Cl loading studies were...... calculated from measured concentrations of non-metabolizable ions according to Kildeberg. RESULTS: In the steady state (placebo) the rate of renal excretion of NA (=-NB) was close to zero, indicating that the net extrarenal input of NA (endogeneous production, gastrointestinal absorption. skeletal release...... from bone contributed substantially to the current net extrarenal NA input. CONCLUSION: From a physiological point of view, NB can be regarded as the actual substrate for renal acid-base control, and measurement of renal turnover of NB may give a more precise description of renal acid-base metabolism...

  1. Similar metabolic responses in pigs and humans to breads with different contents and compositions of dietary fibers: a metabolomics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirstine Lykke; Hartvigsen, Merete; Hedemann, Mette Skou;

    2014-01-01

    –mass spectrometry metabolomics. Results: We found that the postprandial responses, as reflected in blood metabolomes, are similar in pigs and humans. Twenty-one of 26 identified metabolites that were found to be different between the species were qualitatively similar in response to the test breads, despite...... respond similarly to a nutritional intervention. Using metabolomics, we compared the acute metabolic response to 4 test breads between conventional pigs (growing) and adult human subjects (with the metabolic syndrome). Design: Six catheterized pigs and 15 human subjects were tested in a randomized...... crossover design with 4 breads: white-wheat bread low in dietary fiber, rye bread with whole-rye kernels, and 2 whitewheat breads supplemented with either wheat arabinoxylan or oat b-glucan. Blood samples drawn 215, 30, and 120 min postprandially were analyzed by untargeted liquid chromatography...

  2. The porcine acute phase protein response to acute clinical and subclinical experimental infection with Streptococcus suis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nanna Skall; Tegtmeier, C.; Andresen, Lars Ole;

    2006-01-01

    and apolipoprotein (Apo) A-I. The aim was to elucidate the differences in the acute phase behaviour of the individual APPs during a typical bacterial septicaemic, infection. Pigs were inoculated subcutaneously with live S. suis serotype 2 and blood was sampled before and on various days post inoculation (p...... the experiment with maximum levels around 10 times the day 0-levels, and pig-MAP was elevated on days 1-12 p.i. with peak levels of around seven times the day 0-levels. Apo A-I was decreased from days 1 to 8 and showed minimum levels of about 40% of day 0-levels around 1-2 days p.i. No clear pattern of changes...... signs and no arthritic lesions showed an APP response comparable to that of the other, clinically affected pigs. Thus, both acute clinical and subclinical S. suis infection could be revealed by the measurement of one or more of the APPs CRP, SAA, Hp, pig-MAP and Apo A-I. The combined measurement of two...

  3. Acute Endocrine Responses to Different Strength Exercise Order in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Conceição Rodrigo Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of order of muscle groups’ exercised (larger to smaller muscles vs. smaller to larger muscles on the acute levels of total testosterone, free testosterone and cortisol during resistance training (RT sessions. Healthy male participants (n=8; age: 28.8 ± 6.4 years; body mass: 87.0 ± 10.6 kg; body height: 181.0 ± 0.7 cm; BMI: 26.5 ± 4.1 were randomly separated into two experimental groups. The first group (LG-SM performed an RT session (3 sets of 10 repetitions and a 2 min rest period of the exercises in following order: bench press (BP, lat pulldown (LP, barbell shoulder press (BSP, triceps pushdown (TP and barbell cut (BC. The second group (SM-LG performed an RT session in following order: BC, TP, BSP, LA, BP. Blood was collected at the end of the last repetition of each session. Control samples of blood were taken after 30 min of rest. Significant differences were observed in the concentrations of total testosterone (p < 0.05, free testosterone (p < 0.0001 and cortisol (p < 0.0001 after both RT sessions in comparison to rest. However, when comparing LG-SM and SM-LG, no significant differences were found. The results suggest that, while RT sessions induce an acute change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol, this response is independent of the order of exercising muscle groups.

  4. NMR-based Metabonomic Study on Rat's Urinary Metabolic Response to Dosage of Triptolide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA,Shengan; LIU,Huilang; ZHU,Hang; ZHOU,Zhiming; ZHANG,xu; LIU,Maili

    2009-01-01

    An NMR-based metabonomic approach was used to examine rat's urinary response to dosage of triptolide (TP),a major component responsible for the immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF).The urine samples of Wistar rats were collected at various time intervals before and after dosage of TP (i.p.) and measured using conventional 1 H NMR spectroscopy.The data were statistically analyzed using a principle component analysis (PCA).The results showed that biochemical variation induced by TP was time-related,and the maximal alteration in the metabolites appeared at 16 h,and partially recovered 56 h later after dosage,Increment in relative concentrations of taurine,creatine,trimethylamine N-oxide and decrement in citrate,succinate,2-oxoglutarate and hippurate were observed in the urine after dosage of TP.In addition,2'-deoxycytidine appeared 0-16 h later after the dosage,which may be considered as another biomarker for the acute hepatotoxicity.It suggested that TP may disturb the metabolism of energy and gut microflora,and may cause acute liver lesion and a slight renal impair.These results were also supported by the conventional analysis of clinical plasma chemistry and histopathology.The information observed in this article may be useful for giving insight into mechanism of liver injury induced by TP.

  5. The metabolic responses to aerial diffusion of essential oils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Wu

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and affect a great number of people worldwide. Essential oils, take effects through inhalation or topical application, are believed to enhance physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Although clinical studies suggest that the use of essential oils may have therapeutic potential, evidence for the efficacy of essential oils in treating medical conditions remains poor, with a particular lack of studies employing rigorous analytical methods that capture its identifiable impact on human biology. Here, we report a comprehensive gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS based metabonomics study that reveals the aromas-induced metabolic changes and the anxiolytic effect of aromas in elevated plus maze (EPM induced anxiety model rats. The significant alteration of metabolites in the EPM group was attenuated by aromas treatment, concurrent with the behavioral improvement with significantly increased open arms time and open arms entries. Brain tissue and urinary metabonomic analysis identified a number of altered metabolites in response to aromas intervention. These metabolic changes included the increased carbohydrates and lowered levels of neurotransmitters (tryptophan, serine, glycine, aspartate, tyrosine, cysteine, phenylalanine, hypotaurine, histidine, and asparagine, amino acids, and fatty acids in the brain. Elevated aspartate, carbohydrates (sucrose, maltose, fructose, and glucose, nucleosides and organic acids such as lactate and pyruvate were also observed in the urine. The EPM induced metabolic differences observed in urine or brain tissue was significantly reduced after 10 days of aroma inhalation, as noted with the loss of statistical significance on many of the metabolites in the aroma-EPM group. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the metabonomics approach can capture the subtle metabolic changes resulting from exposure to essential oils

  6. Metabolic Acidosis and Strong Ion Gap in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

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    Cai-Mei Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the influence of physicochemical parameters on survival in metabolic acidosis (MA and acute kidney injury (AKI patients. Materials and Methods. Seventy-eight MA patients were collected and assigned to AKI or non-AKI group. We analyzed the physiochemical parameters on survival at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after AKI. Results. Mortality rate was higher in the AKI group. AKI group had higher anion gap (AG, strong ion gap (SIG, and apparent strong ion difference (SIDa values than non-AKI group. SIG value was higher in the AKI survivors than nonsurvivors and this value was correlated serum creatinine, phosphate, albumin, and chloride levels. SIG and serum albumin are negatively correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV scores. AG was associated with mortality at 1 and 3 months post-AKI, whereas SIG value was associated with mortality at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months post-AKI. Conclusions. Whether high or low SIG values correlate with mortality in MA patients with AKI depends on its correlation with serum creatinine, chloride, albumin, and phosphate (P levels. AG predicts short-term mortality and SIG value predicts both short- and long-term mortality among MA patients with AKI.

  7. Effect of glucocorticoid therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of glucocorticoids therapy upon glucose metabolism in COPD patients with acute exacerbation. Methods: Plasma glucose and insulin levels in COPD patients after intravenous administration of 10 mg dexamethasone daily for 5 days were determined oral with glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin release test (IRT). Results: 1) The levels of basal plasma glucose and insulin were significantly higher in severe hypoxemic group than those in moderate hypoxemic group (p 2 (r = -0.5242, p < 0.05). 2) The levels of plasma glucose in intermediate and severe hypoxemic groups were remarkable higher (p < 0.05) than those in mild group. The two peak times of glucose curve were observed at one and two hour after oral glucose load. 3) After the administration of glucocorticoids, at half an hour and one hour plasma glucose levels were significantly higher than those before, the peak time of glucose levels appeared earlier and the insulin release levels were higher than they were before therapy (p < 0.05). Conclusion: COPD patients with acute exacerbation complicated with hypoxemia had problems of impaired glucose tolerance. The administration of glucocorticoids made the impairment worse

  8. The acute-phase response and serum amyloid a inhibit the inflammatory response to Acinetobacter baumannii pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Renckens; J.J.T.H. Roelofs; S. Knapp; A.F. de Vos; S. Florquin; T. van der Poll

    2006-01-01

    Background. Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging pathogen in nosocomial pneumonia. Trauma and post-surgical patients display a profound acute-phase protein response and are susceptible to pneumonia. Methods. To study the way in which the acute-phase response induced by sterile tissue injury influe

  9. Acute Cardiovascular Response to Sign Chi Do Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol E. Rogers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Safe and gentle exercise may be important for older adults overcoming a sedentary lifestyle. Sign Chi Do (SCD, a novel form of low impact exercise, has shown improved balance and endurance in healthy older adults, and there have been no SCD-related injuries reported. Sedentary older adults are known to have a greater cardiovascular (CV response to physical activity than those who regularly exercise. However their CV response to SCD is unknown. This study explored the acute CV response of older adults to SCD. Cross-sectional study of 34 sedentary and moderately active adults over age 55 with no previous experience practicing SCD. Participants completed a 10 min session of SCD. CV outcomes of heart rate, blood pressure, rate pressure product were recorded at 0, 5, 10 min of SCD performance, and after 10 min of rest. HR was recorded every minute. There was no difference in CV scores of sedentary and moderately active older adults after a session of SCD-related activity. All CV scores increased at 5 min, were maintained at 10 min, and returned to baseline within 10 min post SCD (p < 0.05. SCD may be a safe way to increase participation in regular exercise by sedentary older adults.

  10. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  11. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans – With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  12. Changes in brain oxidative metabolism induced by inhibitory avoidance learning and acute administration of amitriptyline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pardo, Héctor; Conejo, Nélida M; Arias, Jorge L; Monleón, Santiago; Vinader-Caerols, Concepción; Parra, Andrés

    2008-05-01

    The effects of antidepressant drugs on memory have been somewhat ignored, having been considered a mere side effect of these compounds. However, the memory impairment caused by several antidepressants could be considered to form part of their therapeutic effects. Amitriptyline is currently one of the most prescribed tricyclic antidepressants, and exerts marked anticholinergic and antihistaminergic effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning and acute administration of amitriptyline on brain oxidative metabolism. Brain oxidative metabolism was measured in several limbic regions using cytochrome oxidase (CO) quantitative histochemistry. Amitriptyline produced a clear impairment in the IA task. In animals exposed only to the apparatus, amitriptyline decreased CO activity in nine brain regions, without affecting the remaining regions. In animals that underwent the IA training phase, amitriptyline reduced CO activity in only three of these nine regions. In animals treated with saline, IA acquisition increased CO activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, the prelimbic cortex, and the medial mammillary body, and diminished it in the medial septum and the nucleus basalis of Meynert with respect to animals exposed only to the IA apparatus. In animals treated with amitriptyline, IA acquisition did not modify CO activity in any of these regions, but increased it in the anteromedial nucleus of the thalamus, the diagonal band of Broca, and the dentate gyrus. The results reveal a pattern of changes in brain oxidative metabolism induced by IA training in saline-treated animals that was clearly absent in animals submitted to the same behavioural training but treated with amitriptyline. PMID:18313125

  13. Metabolic activity of brown, "beige," and white adipose tissues in response to chronic adrenergic stimulation in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Sébastien M; Caron, Alexandre; Chechi, Kanta; Laplante, Mathieu; Lecomte, Roger; Richard, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Classical brown adipocytes such as those found in interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) represent energy-burning cells, which have been postulated to play a pivotal role in energy metabolism. Brown adipocytes can also be found in white adipose tissue (WAT) depots [e.g., inguinal WAT (iWAT)] following adrenergic stimulation, and they have been referred to as "beige" adipocytes. Whether the presence of these adipocytes, which gives iWAT a beige appearance, can confer a white depot with some thermogenic activity remains to be seen. In consequence, we designed the present study to investigate the metabolic activity of iBAT, iWAT, and epididymal white depots in mice. Mice were either 1) kept at thermoneutrality (30°C), 2) kept at 30°C and treated daily for 14 days with an adrenergic agonist [CL-316,243 (CL)], or 3) housed at 10°C for 14 days. Metabolic activity was assessed using positron emission tomography imaging with fluoro-[(18)F]deoxyglucose (glucose uptake), fluoro-[(18)F]thiaheptadecanoic acid (fatty acid uptake), and [(11)C]acetate (oxidative activity). In each group, substrate uptakes and oxidative activity were measured in anesthetized mice in response to acute CL. Our results revealed iBAT as a major site of metabolic activity, which exhibited enhanced glucose and nonesterified fatty acid uptakes and oxidative activity in response to chronic cold and CL. On the other hand, beige adipose tissue failed to exhibit appreciable increase in oxidative activity in response to chronic cold and CL. Altogether, our results suggest that the contribution of beige fat to acute-CL-induced metabolic activity is low compared with that of iBAT, even after sustained adrenergic stimulation.

  14. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph;

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  15. Determinants to optimize response to clopidogrel in acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Giusti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Betti Giusti, Anna Maria Gori, Rossella Marcucci, Claudia Saracini, Anna Vestrini, Rosanna AbbateDepartment of Medical and Surgical Critical Care, University of Florence, SOD Atherothrombotic Diseases, AOU Careggi, Florence, ItalyAbstract: The inhibition of platelet function by antiplatelet therapy determines the improvement of the survival of patients with clinically evident cardiovascular disease. Clopidogrel in combination with aspirin is the recommended standard of care for reducing the occurrence of cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. However, major adverse cardiovascular events including stent thrombosis occur in patients taking clopidogrel and aspirin. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that high post-treatment platelet reactivity on antiplatelet treatment is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical events. Clopidogrel requires conversion to active metabolite by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes. The active metabolite inhibits ADP-stimulated platelet activation by irreversibly binding to P2Y12 receptors. Recently, the loss-of-function CYP2C19*2 allele has been associated with decreased metabolization of clopidogrel, poor antiaggregant effect, and increased cardiovascular events. In high risk vascular patients, the CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is a strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and particularly of stent thrombosis. Prospective studies evaluating if an antiplatelet treatment tailored on individual characteristics of patients, CYP2C19*2 genotypes, platelet phenotype, drug–drug interaction, as well as traditional and procedural risk factors, are now urgently needed for the identification of therapeutic strategies providing the best benefit for the single subject.Keywords: antiplatelet therapy, clopidogrel, cytochrome P450 2C19 loss-of-function polymorphism, major adverse cardiovascular events, percutaneous coronary interventions

  16. Comprehensive analysis of the renal transcriptional response to acute uranyl nitrate exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argiles Angel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical and radiological toxicities related to uranium acute exposure have been widely studied in nuclear fuel workers and military personnel. It is well known that uranyl nitrate induces acute renal failure (ARF. However, the mechanisms of this metal-induced injury are not well defined at the molecular level. Results Renal function and histology were assessed in mice receiving uranyl nitrate (UN(+ and controls (UN(-. To identify the genomic response to uranium exposure, serial analysis gene expression (SAGE of the kidney was performed in both groups. Over 43,000 mRNA SAGE tags were sequenced. A selection of the differentially expressed transcripts was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. UN(+ animals developed renal failure and displayed the characteristic histological lesions of UN nephropathy. Of the >14,500 unique tags identified in both libraries, 224 had a modified expression level; they are known to participate in inflammation, ion transport, signal transduction, oxidative stress, apoptosis, metabolism, and catabolism. Several genes that were identified had not previously been evaluated within the context of toxic ARF such as translationally controlled tumor protein, insulin like growth factor binding protein 7 and ribosomal protein S29, all apoptosis related genes. Conclusion We report a comprehensive description of the UN induced modifications in gene expression levels, including the identification of genes previously unrelated to ARF. The study of these genes and the metabolisms they control should improve our understanding of toxic ARF and enlighten on the molecular targets for potential therapeutic interventions.

  17. The acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnar, Ronald G; Duplanty, Anthony A; Hill, David W; McFarlin, Brian K; Vingren, Jakob L

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute hormonal response to the kettlebell swing exercise. Ten recreationally resistance trained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 175 ± 6 cm; body mass, 78.7 ± 9.9 kg) performed 12 rounds of 30 seconds of 16 kg kettlebell swings alternated with 30 seconds of rest. Blood samples were collected before (PRE), immediately after (IP), and 15 (P15) and 30 minutes after exercise (P30) and analyzed for testosterone (T), immunoreactive growth hormone, cortisol (C), and lactate concentrations. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were measured at the end of each round. Testosterone was significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) at IP than at PRE, P15, or P30 (PRE: 28 ± 3; IP: 32 ± 4; P15: 29 ± 3; P30: 27 ± 3 nmol·L). Growth hormone was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 0.1 ± 0.1; IP: 1.8 ± 1.2; P15: 2.1 ± 1.1; P30: 1.6 ± 1.3 μg·L). Cortisol was higher at IP and P15 than at PRE and P30 (PRE: 617 ± 266; IP: 894 ± 354; P15: 875 ± 243; P30: 645 ± 285 nmol·L). Lactate was higher at IP, P15, and P30 than at PRE (PRE: 1.1 ± 0.5; IP: 7.0 ± 3.0; P15: 4.0 ± 2.7; P30: 2.5 ± 1.8 mmol·L). Heart rate increased progressively from 57 ± 12 at PRE to 170 ± 10 at IP. The exercise protocol produced an acute increase in hormones involved in muscle adaptations. Thus, the kettlebell swing exercise might provide a good supplement to resistance training programs. PMID:24714543

  18. Effects of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-4α on the Regulation of the Hepatic Acute Phase Response

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhongyan; Burke, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Following injury, a large number of hepatic acute phase genes are rapidly modulated at the transcriptional level to restore metabolic homeostasis an limit tissue damage. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) is a liver-enriched transcription factor that controls embryonic liver development and regulates tissue specific gene expression in adult liver cells. Many genes encoding acute phase proteins contain HNF-4α binding sites in their promoter regions and are transcriptionally regulated by HNF...

  19. Divergent mucosal and systemic responses in children in response to acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, D; Pichichero, M E

    2014-10-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM), induced by respiratory bacteria, is a significant cause of children seeking medical attention worldwide. Some children are highly prone to AOMs, suffering three to four recurrent infections per year (prone). We previously determined that this population of children could have diminished anti-bacterial immune responses in peripheral blood that could fail to limit bacterial colonization in the nasopharynx (NP). Here, we examined local NP and middle ear (ME) responses and compared them to peripheral blood to examine whether the mucosa responses were similar to the peripheral blood responses. Moreover, we examined differences in effector cytokine responses between these two populations in the NP, ME and blood compartments at the onset of an AOM caused by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae. We found that plasma effector cytokines patterned antigen-recall responses of CD4 T cells, with lower responses detected in prone children. ME cytokine levels did not mirror blood, but were more similar to the NP. Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 in the NP were similar in prone and non-prone children, while IL-2 production was higher in prone children. The immune responses diverged in the mucosal and blood compartments at the onset of a bacterial ME infection, thus highlighting differences between local and systemic immune responses that could co-ordinate anti-bacterial immune responses in young children.

  20. Tail docking in pigs: acute physiological and behavioural responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, M A; Bryer, P J; Krebs, N; McGlone, J J

    2008-02-01

    Tail docking of piglets is a routine procedure on farms to control tail-biting behaviour; however, docking can cause an acute stress response. The objectives of this research were to determine the stress responses to tail docking in piglets and to compare two methods of tail docking; cautery iron (CAUT) and the more commonly used blunt trauma cutters (BT). At approximately 6 days of age, piglets were tail docked using CAUT (n = 20), BT (n = 20) or sham tail docked with their tails remaining intact (CON; n = 40). Blood samples were taken prior to tail docking and at 30, 60 and 90 min after tail docking to evaluate the effect of tail docking on white blood cell (WBC) measures and cortisol concentrations. The above experiment was repeated to observe behaviour without the periodic blood sampling, so as not to confound the effects of blood sampling on piglet behaviour. Piglet behaviour was recorded in the farrowing crate using 1 min scan-samples via live observations for 60 min prior to and 90 min after tail docking. Total WBC counts were reduced (P > 0.05) among BT and CAUT compared with CON piglets 30 min after tail docking. Cortisol concentrations were higher (P tail docking. Cautery and BT-docked piglets spent more (P tail docking. Piglets tail docked using CAUT and BT tended to spend more (P tail docking. Elevated blood cortisol can be reduced by the use of the CAUT rather than the BT method of tail docking. Although the tail docking-induced rise in cortisol was prevented by using CAUT, the behavioural response to BT and CAUT docking methods was similar. PMID:22445023

  1. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  2. The innate immune response in ischemic acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Hye Ryoun; Rabb, Hamid

    2008-01-01

    Kidney ischemia reperfusion injury is a major cause of morbidity in both allograft and native kidneys. Ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is characterized by early, allo-antigen independent inflammation. Major components of the innate immune system are activated and participate in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury, plus prime the allograft kidney for rejection. Soluble members of innate immunity implicated in acute kidney injury include the complement system, cytokines, an...

  3. Disrupted Nitric Oxide Metabolism from Type II Diabetes and Acute Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley P Pettit

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is an established cause of vascular impairment. Particulate air pollution is known to exacerbate cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, particularly in susceptible populations. This study set out to determine the impact of exposure to traffic pollution, with and without particle filtration, on vascular endothelial function in Type II diabetes. Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO has previously been linked to vascular health. Reactive hyperemia induces a significant increase in plasma nitrite, the proximal metabolite of NO, in healthy subjects, while diabetics have a lower and more variable level of response. Twenty type II diabetics and 20 controls (ages 46-70 years were taken on a 1.5 hr roadway traffic air pollution exposure as passengers. We analyzed plasma nitrite, as a measure of vascular function, using forearm ischemia to elicit a reactive hyperemic response before and after exposure to one ride with and one without filtration of the particle components of pollution. Control subjects displayed a significant increase in plasma nitrite levels during reactive hyperemia. This response was no longer present following exposure to traffic air pollution, but did not vary with whether or not the particle phase was filtered out. Diabetics did not display an increase in nitrite levels following reactive hyperemia. This response was not altered following pollution exposure. These data suggest that components of acute traffic pollution exposure diminish vascular reactivity in non-diabetic individuals. It also confirms that type II diabetics have a preexisting diminished ability to appropriately respond to a vascular challenge, and that traffic pollution exposure does not cause a further measureable acute change in plasma nitrite levels in Type II diabetics.

  4. Metabolic and Transcriptional Response to Cofactor Perturbations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders Koefoed; Blank, L.M.; Oldiges, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic cofactors such as NADH and ATP play important roles in a large number of cellular reactions, and it is of great interest to dissect the role of these cofactors in different aspects of metabolism. Toward this goal, we overexpressed NADH oxidase and the soluble F1-ATPase in Escherichia coli...... of redox and energy metabolism and should help in developing metabolic engineering strategies in E. coli....

  5. BCL6 modulation of acute lymphoblastic leukemia response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, William L; Moses, Blake S; Hare, Ian; Evans, Rebecca; Piktel, Debbie; Gibson, Laura F

    2016-04-26

    The bone marrow niche has a significant impact on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell phenotype. Of clinical relevance is the frequency with which quiescent leukemic cells, in this niche, survive treatment and contribute to relapse. This study suggests that marrow microenvironment regulation of BCL6 in ALL is one factor that may be involved in the transition between proliferative and quiescent states of ALL cells. Utilizing ALL cell lines, and primary patient tumor cells we observed that tumor cell BCL6 protein abundance is decreased in the presence of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts (HOB). Chemical inhibition, or shRNA knockdown, of BCL6 in ALL cells resulted in diminished ALL proliferation. As many chemotherapy regimens require tumor cell proliferation for optimal efficacy, we investigated the consequences of constitutive BCL6 expression in leukemic cells during co-culture with BMSC or HOB. Forced chronic expression of BCL6 during co-culture with BMSC or HOB sensitized the tumor to chemotherapy induced cell death. Combination treatment of caffeine, which increases BCL6 expression in ALL cells, with chemotherapy extended the event free survival of mice. These data suggest that BCL6 is one factor, modulated by microenvironment derived cues that may contribute to regulation of ALL therapeutic response. PMID:27015556

  6. Physiological responses to acute experimental hypoxia in the air-breathing Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ratnesh Kumar Tripathi; Vindhya Mohindra; Akanksha Singh; Rajesh Kumar; Rahasya Mani Mishra; Joy Krushna Jena

    2013-06-01

    With an aim to study the mechanism of adaptation to acute hypoxic periods by hypoxia-tolerant catfish, Clarias batrachus, the mass-specific metabolic rate (VO2) along with its hematological parameters, metabolic response and antioxidant enzyme activities were studied. During progressive hypoxia, C. batrachus was found to be an oxyconformer and showed a steady decline in its aquatic oxygen consumption rate. When C. batrachus was exposed for different periods at experimental hypoxia level (0.98±0.1 mg/L, DO), hemoglobin and hematocrit concentrations were increased, along with decrease in mean cellular hemoglobin concentration, which reflected a physiological adaptation to enhance oxygen transport capacity. Significant increase in serum glucose and lactate concentration as well as lactate dehydrogenase activity was observed. Antioxidant enzymes were found to operate independently of one another, while total glutathione concentration was unaffected in any of the tissues across treatments. These observations suggested that hypoxia resulted in the development of oxidative stress and C. batrachus was able to respond through increase in the oxygen carrying capacity, metabolic depression and efficient antioxidant defense system to survive periods of acute hypoxia.

  7. Relapsing steroid-responsive idiopathic acute interstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, R; Gonzalez, C; Cabezuelo, J B; Lacueva, J; Ruiz, J A; Tovar, J V; Niembro, E

    1993-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman developed acute renal failure secondary to interstitial nephritis. Her clinical history, complementary studies and two renal biopsies could not establish the etiology. She showed signs of incomplete Fanconi syndrome. Treatment with corticosteroids was very effective, though she tended to relapse. We comment briefly on some aspects of idiopathic acute interstitial nephritis.

  8. Anti-irritants I: Dose-response in acute irritation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming; Hedegaard, Kathryn; Petersen, Thomas Kongstad;

    2006-01-01

    acute irritation in healthy volunteers. Each AI was used in 3 concentrations. Acute irritation was induced by occlusive tests with 1% sodium lauryl sulfate and 20% nonanoic acid in N-propanol. The irritant reactions were treated twice daily with AI-containing formulations from the time of removal...

  9. Acute electrophysiological responses of bradykinin-stimulated human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estacion, M

    1991-05-01

    1. Acute responses to bradykinin in human dermal fibroblasts were studied at 20-24 degrees C using both the patch-clamp technique to monitor ion currents and Fura-2 fluorescence to monitor [Ca2+]i. 2. During subconfluent culture, human dermal fibroblasts can express a diversity of ion channels as described in the preceding paper. 3. When GTP (1 mM) was included in the pipette solution, two additional ion channel populations were transiently augmented in response to bradykinin stimulation. 4. The first is a component of outwardly rectifying current which reached maximal induction within 10-15 s after bradykinin addition (1 microM) and then decayed back to near baseline over 60 s. 5. Ion substitution experiments combined with tail current analysis indicate that the outward current is carried predominantly by K+. 6. Video imaging of single-cell Fura-2 fluorescence from both intact cells and patch-clamped cells showed temporal correlation of the K+ current modulation and the Ca2+ transients in response to bradykinin stimulation. 7. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, caused both an increase in intracellular calcium and the augmentation of the outward K+ current. The amount of additional K+ current was correlated with [Ca2+]i levels and could be elicited even without the presence of GTP in the pipette. 8. Apamin, a blocker of Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, inhibited (at 1 microM) the ionomycin-induced modulation of K+ current. 9. In addition, an inward current was transiently induced in response to bradykinin. This current was strictly dependent on the presence of GTP in the pipette solution. This current showed little voltage dependence, as evidenced by a linear current vs. voltage relation, and a reversal potential near but measurably more positive than 0 mV. 10. This current could be decoupled from the Ca2+ transient and be irreversibly induced by including GTP gamma S (100 microM) in the pipette solution. 11. Ion substitution experiments show that this is a non

  10. Acute toxicity, biochemical and histopathological responses of endosulfan in Chanos chanos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Ambasankar, K; Krishnani, K K; Gupta, S K; Bhushan, Shashi; Minhas, P S

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated 96h median lethal concentration of endosulfan (99%, pure α: β ratio of 7:3) by conducting static non-renewable acute toxicity bio-assay in Chanos chanos juvenile with average weight (110±5.65g). Further, the effect of different definitive doses (18.5, 19.5, 20.5, 21.5 and 22.5µg/L) of endosulfan on metabolic, heamato-immunoligcal and histopathological response were probed. Anti-oxidative enzymes CAT, SOD and GST showed significant (p<0.01) increase of activity in the liver, gill and brain during exposure to endosulfan in a dose and time dependent manner. The brain AChE activity showed significant (p<0.01) inhibition from 18.5 to 22.5µg/L exposure of endosulfan than the control group. LDH and MDH activity gradually increased with consequent increasing dose of endosulfan exposure in the liver, gill and brain. Similarly, ALT, AST and G6PDH activities in both liver and gill increased with consequent increases in the dose of endosulfan exposure. Immunological profile such as blood glucose and serum cortisol level significantly enhanced while respiratory burst activity declined with consequent increasing doses of endosulfan exposure. Histopathological alteration in the gill demonstrated curling of secondary lamellae, thickening of primary epithelium, shorting of secondary lamellae, epithelial hyperplasia, fusion of secondary lamellae, aneurism, and collapsed secondary lamellae due to dose dependent exposure of endosulfan. Liver histology illustrated cloudy swelling and necrosis with pyknotic nuclei to the moderate dose of endosulfan, whereas higher dose of endosulfan (21.5µg/L) displayed severe necrosis of hepatic cells. Overall results clearly indicate that acute exposure of endosulfan led to pronounced deleterious alterations on biochemical, heamato-immunological, and histopathological responses of C. chanos juvenile. PMID:27213563

  11. Participation of functionally active plasma cells in acute rejection and response to therapy in renal allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Zeenat Yousuf; Bostwick, David G; Hossain, Deloar; Zeng, Xu

    2014-07-01

    Acute rejection (AR) includes T-cell-mediated and antibody-mediated rejection. The inflammatory infiltrate comprised not only T cells but also varying amounts of B cells (CD20(+)) and plasma cells (CD138(+)). The latter are associated with poor clinical outcomes, but their functional status is not clear. The phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein (p-S6RP) is present in cells that are metabolically active, thus identifying functionally active antibody-secreting plasma cells. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical significance of functionally active p-S6RP plasma cells in AR in renal allografts. Renal allografts with biopsy evidence of AR during 2006-2009 were included. Immunohistochemistry staining for CD20, CD138, and p-S6RP was performed on paraffin-embedded slides and scaled as 0-6. The response to antirejection treatment was assessed by the serum creatinine ratio (CrR) at rejection episode (time 0) and following treatment (4 and 12 weeks). Patients with lower scores (0-2) were compared with a higher scored group (3-6). The T-test was conducted using statistical significance of p<0.05. A total of 28 patients (40.7 ± 14.3 year; M:F=15:13) were diagnosed with acute T-cell-mediated rejection (I and II). The p-S6RP staining in the high-score group had a significantly higher CrR (p<0.05) than the low-score group at the time of biopsy, 4 and 12 weeks following treatment. There was no significant difference in the CrR between groups for CD20 or CD138 staining. Functional antibody-secreting p-S6RP plasma cells are actively participating in AR and associated with poor response to treatment in renal allografts. PMID:24684655

  12. Relation between acute and long-term cognitive decline after surgery: Influence of metabolic syndrome☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambús, P.L; Trocóniz, I.F.; Feng, X.; Gimenez-Milá, M.; Mellado, R.; Degos, V.; Vacas, S.; Maze, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The relationship between persistent postoperative cognitive decline and the more common acute variety remains unknown; using data acquired in preclinical studies of postoperative cognitive decline we attempted to characterize this relationship. Methods Low capacity runner (LCR) rats, which have all the features of the metabolic syndrome, were compared postoperatively with high capacity runner (HCR) rats for memory, assessed by trace fear conditioning (TFC) on the 7th postoperative day, and learning and memory (probe trial [PT]) assessed by the Morris water-maze (MWM) at three months postoperatively. Rate of learning (AL) data from the MWM test, were estimated by non-linear mixed effects modeling. The individual rat's TFC result at postoperative day (POD) 7 was correlated with its AL and PT from the MWM data sets at postoperative day POD 90. Results A single exponential decay model best described AL in the MWM with LCR and surgery (LCR–SURG) being the only significant covariates; first order AL rate constant was 0.07 s−1 in LCR–SURG and 0.16 s−1 in the remaining groups (p<0.05). TFC was significantly correlated with both AL (R = 0.74; p < 0.0001) and PT (R = 0.49; p < 0.01). Conclusion Severity of memory decline at 1 week after surgery presaged long-lasting deteriorations in learning and memory. PMID:26164200

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  14. Cattle temperament influences metabolism: metabolic response to glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests in beef steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick Sanchez, N C; Carroll, J A; Broadway, P R; Hughes, H D; Roberts, S L; Richeson, J T; Schmidt, T B; Vann, R C

    2016-07-01

    Cattle temperament, defined as the reactivity of cattle to humans or novel environments, can greatly influence several physiological systems in the body, including immunity, stress, and most recently discovered, metabolism. Greater circulating concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) found in temperamental cattle suggest that temperamental cattle are metabolically different than calm cattle. Further, elevated NEFA concentrations have been reported to influence insulin sensitivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether cattle temperament would influence the metabolic response to a glucose tolerance test (GTT) and insulin sensitivity test (IST). Angus-cross steers (16 calm and 15 temperamental; 216 ± 6 kg BW) were selected based on temperament score measured at weaning. On day 1, steers were moved into indoor stanchions to allow measurement of individual ad libitum feed intake. On day 6, steers were fitted with indwelling rectal temperature probes and jugular catheters. At 9 AM on day 7, steers received the GTT (0.5-mL/kg BW of a 50% dextrose solution), and at 2 PM on day 7, steers received the IST (2.5 IU bovine insulin/kg BW). Blood samples were collected and serum isolated at -60, -45, -30, -15, 0, 10, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min relative to each challenge. Serum was stored at -80°C until analyzed for cortisol, glucose, NEFA, and blood urea nitrogen concentrations. All variables changed over time (P < 0.01). For the duration of the study, temperamental steers maintained greater (P < 0.01) serum NEFA and less (P ≤ 0.01) serum blood urea nitrogen and insulin sensitivity (calculated using Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index) compared with calm steers. During the GTT, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum glucose, yet decreased (P = 0.03) serum insulin and (P < 0.01) serum insulin: serum glucose compared to calm cattle. During the IST, temperamental steers had greater (P < 0.01) serum

  15. Roles of STAT3 in Protein Secretion Pathways during the Acute-Phase Response

    OpenAIRE

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A.; Mella, Juan R.; Remick, Daniel G.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characteristic of perhaps all infections, including bacterial pneumonia. In conjunction with the acute-phase response, additional biological pathways are induced in the liver and are dependent on the transcription factors STAT3 and NF-κB, but these responses are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that pneumococcal pneumonia and other severe infections increase expression of multiple components of the cellular secretory machinery in the mouse liver, including t...

  16. Inflammatory response in the early prediction of severity in human acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Viedma, J A; M. Pérez-Mateo; Agulló, J.; Domínguez, J E; F. Carballo

    1994-01-01

    The role of the inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis and its relation with the clinical course was examined. This study examined if the serial measurement of polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) elastase/A1PI complex, phospholipase A catalytic activity, C reactive protein, and other acute phase proteins, and the protease inhibitor alpha 2-macroglobulin, provides meaningful information for prognosis. Eighty non-consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis, classified according to their c...

  17. Acute effect of high-dose isoflavones from Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi on lipid and bone metabolism in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hee Joon; Jun, Hee-jin; Lee, Ji Hae; Jia, Yaoyao; Hoang, Minh Hien; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the acute metabolic effects of isoflavones from Pueraria lobata (Willd.) Ohwi (IPL) in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. After 4 weeks of IPL feeding at 500 mg/day/kg body weight (OVX500), plasma 17β-estradiol concentrations were significantly higher (+25%, p menopausal symptoms in mice. Further studies will confirm the effects of IPL in humans. PMID:22422661

  18. Effect of acute negative and positive energy balance on basal very-low density lipoprotein triglyceride metabolism in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bellou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute reduction in dietary energy intake reduces very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride (VLDL-TG concentration. Although chronic dietary energy surplus and obesity are associated with hypertriglyceridemia, the effect of acute overfeeding on VLDL-TG metabolism is not known. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute negative and positive energy balance on VLDL-TG metabolism in healthy women. DESIGN: Ten healthy women (AGE: 22.0±2.9 years, BMI: 21.2±1.3 kg/m(2 underwent a stable isotopically labeled tracer infusion study to determine basal VLDL-TG kinetics after performing, in random order, three experimental trials on the previous day: i isocaloric feeding (control ii hypocaloric feeding with a dietary energy restriction of 2.89±0.42 MJ and iii hypercaloric feeding with a dietary energy surplus of 2.91±0.32 MJ. The three diets had the same macronutrient composition. RESULTS: Fasting plasma VLDL-TG concentrations decreased by ∼26% after hypocaloric feeding relative to the control trial (P = 0.037, owing to decreased hepatic VLDL-TG secretion rate (by 21%, P = 0.023 and increased VLDL-TG plasma clearance rate (by ∼12%, P = 0.016. Hypercaloric feeding increased plasma glucose concentration (P = 0.042 but had no effect on VLDL-TG concentration and kinetics compared to the control trial. CONCLUSION: Acute dietary energy deficit (∼3MJ leads to hypotriglyceridemia via a combination of decreased hepatic VLDL-TG secretion and increased VLDL-TG clearance. On the other hand, acute dietary energy surplus (∼3MJ does not affect basal VLDL-TG metabolism but disrupts glucose homeostasis in healthy women.

  19. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pdevelopment and function, as well as lipid metabolism and molecular transport. These results support the involvement of oxidative stress and effects on protein structure in the mechanism of action of MeHg in the female brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  20. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, Per; Donovan, E R;

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selecti...

  1. Acute lung injury induced by whole gastric fluid: hepatic acute phase response contributes to increase lung antiprotease protection

    OpenAIRE

    Ayala, Pedro; Meneses, Manuel; Olmos, Pablo; Montalva, Rebeca; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Borzone, Gisella

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric contents aspiration in humans is a risk factor for severe respiratory failure with elevated mortality. Although aspiration-induced local lung inflammation has been studied in animal models, little is known about extrapulmonary effects of aspiration. We investigated whether a single orotracheal instillation of whole gastric fluid elicits a liver acute phase response and if this response contributes to enrich the alveolar spaces with proteins having antiprotease activity. Met...

  2. Local and disseminated acute phase response during bacterial respiratory infection in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The acute phase response is playing an important role, aiming to restore the healthy state after tissue injury, inflammation and infection. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate defense reactions remain somewhat elusive. Expression of acute phase...... proteins (APP) outside the liver is increasingly recognized, still little is known of extra-hepatic production of APP in pigs. 14-18 h after experimental infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, causing acute pleuropneumonia in pigs, we studied local APP gene expression changes in different...... differentially expressed between infected and control animals. We demonstrated that acute pleuropneumonia caused by A. pleuropneumoniae leads to a rapid disseminated local intra-lung APP response, also in apparently unaffected areas of the infected lung. Further extrahepatic expression of several acute-phase...

  3. Metabolic Alterations of the Zebrafish Brain after Acute Alcohol Treatment by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Cheol Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the metabolic alterations associated with acute alcohol treatment in zebrafish by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS. The brain metabolism of zebrafish was investigated after acute alcohol treatment (one-hour long exposure of adult fish to 0.00%, 0.25%, 0.50%, or 1.00% ethyl alcohol with whole brain extraction. The results of this study showed that glutamate (Glu was significantly decreased, scyllo-inositol (sIns showed a small apparent increase only in the highest acute treatment dose group, and myoinositol (mIns showed a significant decrease. [Glu]/[tCr] and [mIns]/[tCr] levels were significantly reduced regardless of the alcohol dose, and [sIns]/[tCr] was increased in the highest alcohol treatment dose group. The present NMR study revealed that specific metabolites, such as Glu and mIns, were substantially decreased in case of acute alcohol exposed zebrafish brain.

  4. Effects of chronic kidney disease on platelet response to antiplatelet therapy in acute myocardial infarction patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓捷

    2012-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the effects of dual antiplatelet therapy on platelet response in acute myocardial infarction patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods From September 2011 to June 2012,a total of 195 acute myocardial infarction patients with drug eluting stent implanting were enrolled. Among them,133 cases had normal

  5. Consecutive bouts of diverse contractile activity alter acute responses in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coffey, Vernon G; Pilegaard, Henriette; Garnham, Andrew P;

    2009-01-01

    -activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha mRNA did not reveal an order effect. We conclude that acute responses to diverse bouts of contractile activity are modified by the exercise order. Moreover, undertaking divergent exercise in close proximity influences the acute molecular profile and likely exacerbates...

  6. Presence of acute phase response in coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez Rego, G; Ocio Achaerandio, G; González Cuervo, V; Rodríquez Menéndez, C; Martínez Gonezález, C; Alvarez Alvarez, C

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the role of personal factors in pneumoconiosis, several acute phase proteins were studied in 62 coal miners without acute illnesses and classified as having no pneumoconiosis (n = 19), simple pneumoconiosis (n = 23), or complicated pneumoconiosis with progressive massive fibrosis (n = 20). Groups were similar for age, years of work at high risk jobs, chronic bronchitis, and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). C-reactive protein concentration was significantly higher in ...

  7. Systematic analysis of rice (Oryza sativa) metabolic responses to herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Kabir Md; Hojo, Yuko; Christeller, John T; Fukumoto, Kaori; Isshiki, Ryutaro; Shinya, Tomonori; Baldwin, Ian T; Galis, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Plants defend against attack from herbivores by direct and indirect defence mechanisms mediated by the accumulation of phytoalexins and release of volatile signals, respectively. While the defensive arsenals of some plants, such as tobacco and Arabidopsis are well known, most of rice's (Oryza sativa) defence metabolites and their effectiveness against herbivores remain uncharacterized. Here, we used a non-biassed metabolomics approach to identify many novel herbivory-regulated metabolic signatures in rice. Most were up-regulated by herbivore attack while only a few were suppressed. Two of the most prominent up-regulated signatures were characterized as phenolamides (PAs), p-coumaroylputrescine and feruloylputrescine. PAs accumulated in response to attack by both chewing insects, i.e. feeding of the lawn armyworm (Spodoptera mauritia) and the rice skipper (Parnara guttata) larvae, and the attack of the sucking insect, the brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens, BPH). In bioassays, BPH insects feeding on 15% sugar solution containing p-coumaroylputrescine or feruloylputrescine, at concentrations similar to those elicited by heavy BPH attack in rice, had a higher mortality compared to those feeding on sugar diet alone. Our results highlight PAs as a rapidly expanding new group of plant defence metabolites that are elicited by herbivore attack, and deter herbivores in rice and other plants.

  8. Hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏肇伉; 周成斌; 张海波; 祝忠群

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the hormonal and metabolic responses of fetal lamb during cardiopulmonary bypass.Methods Six pregnant ewes underwent fetal cardiopulmonary bypasses with artificial oxygenators and roller pumps for 30 minutes, which maintained the blood gas value at the fetal physiological level. The fetal blood pressure, heart rate, pH value and blood lactate levels were monitored. The levels of catecholamine, cortisol and insulin were measured pre-bypass and then again 30 minutes later. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels were monitored continuously during the bypass. Fetal hepatic PAS staining was also carried out.Results There were no changes before and during the bypass in fetal blood pressure, heart rate and blood gas. However, pH values decreased and blood lactate levels increased (P<0.05). The fetal catecholamine and cortisol levels increased significantly (P<0.01), while the levels of insulin did not change. The blood glucose and free fatty acid levels increased at the beginning of the bypass (P<0.01), and then gradually slowed down during the bypass. The fetal hepatic PAS staining showed that hepatic glycogen was consumed in large amounts. After 30 minutes of bypass, the fetal lamb would not survive more than 1 hour.Conclusion The fetal lamb has a strong negative reaction to cardiopulmonary bypass.

  9. Human Skeletal Muscle Protein Metabolism Responses to Amino Acid Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, W Kyle; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Phillips, Bethan E; Lund, Jonathan N; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Healthy individuals maintain remarkably constant skeletal muscle mass across much of adult life, suggesting the existence of robust homeostatic mechanisms. Muscle exists in dynamic equilibrium whereby the influx of amino acids (AAs) and the resulting increases in muscle protein synthesis (MPS) associated with the intake of dietary proteins cancel out the efflux of AAs from muscle protein breakdown that occurs between meals. Dysregulated proteostasis is evident with aging, especially beyond the sixth decade of life. Women and men aged 75 y lose muscle mass at a rate of ∼0.7% and 1%/y, respectively (sarcopenia), and lose strength 2- to 5-fold faster (dynapenia) as muscle "quality" decreases. Factors contributing to the disruption of an otherwise robust proteostatic system represent targets for potential therapies that promote healthy aging. Understanding age-related impairments in anabolic responses to AAs and identifying strategies to mitigate these factors constitute major areas of interest. Numerous studies have aimed to identify 1) the influence of distinct protein sources on absorption kinetics and muscle anabolism, 2) the latency and time course of MPS responses to protein/AAs, 3) the impacts of protein/AA intake on muscle microvascular recruitment, and 4) the role of certain AAs (e.g., leucine) as signaling molecules, which are able to trigger anabolic pathways in tissues. This review aims to discuss these 4 issues listed, to provide historical and modern perspectives of AAs as modulators of human skeletal muscle protein metabolism, to describe how advances in stable isotope/mass spectrometric approaches and instrumentation have underpinned these advances, and to highlight relevant differences between young adults and older individuals. Whenever possible, observations are based on human studies, with additional consideration of relevant nonhuman studies. PMID:27422520

  10. Metabolic response to dietary fibre composition in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøkner, C; Austbø, D; Næsset, J A; Blache, D; Bach Knudsen, K E; Tauson, A H

    2016-07-01

    The hypothesis for this study was that a higher dietary proportion of soluble fibre would result in stable and constant plasma metabolite and regulatory hormone concentrations. The study was a 4×4 Latin Square design with a sequence of 17 days adaptation to the ration followed by 8 sampling days. The feed rations consisted of only timothy hay (H), hay plus molassed sugar beet pulp combined with either whole oats (OB) or barley (BB) and hay plus a loose chaff-based concentrate (M). Four horses were fitted with permanent caecal cannulas and liquid caecal content was withdrawn manually and blood was drawn from the jugular vein at 0, 3 and 9 h postprandial. The horses were exercised daily at medium level for about 1 h. Samples were analysed for short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and metabolic traits. Caecal SCFA and propionic acid concentrations increased with increased dietary starch and soluble fibre. The diet highest in soluble fibre (M) resulted in the highest plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in the morning, which then remained stable and constant throughout the day. A strong interaction (P<0.01) between time and diet was measured for plasma urea, glucose, insulin and leptin. The greatest variations in plasma glycaemic and insulinaemic responses were associated with the cereal grain diets (OB and BB). There were indications of a negative energy balance, which was reflected in a significantly higher plasma β-hydroxybutyrate concentration and a numerically higher non-esterified fatty acid concentration. In conclusion, this study found that inclusion of soluble fibre resulted in increased total caecal SCFA and propionic acid concentrations. This consequently resulted in stable and constant plasma glycaemic and insulinaemic responses. Diets with a high content of soluble fibre provided enough energy for horses at medium work level. PMID:26755337

  11. Impact of Ocean Acidification on Energy Metabolism of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas—Changes in Metabolic Pathways and Thermal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bock

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate change with increasing temperature and ocean acidification (OA poses risks for marine ecosystems. According to Pörtner and Farrell [1], synergistic effects of elevated temperature and CO2-induced OA on energy metabolism will narrow the thermal tolerance window of marine ectothermal animals. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of an acute temperature rise on energy metabolism of the oyster, Crassostrea gigas chronically exposed to elevated CO2 levels (partial pressure of CO2 in the seawater ~0.15 kPa, seawater pH ~ 7.7. Within one month of incubation at elevated PCO2 and 15 °C hemolymph pH fell (pHe = 7.1 ± 0.2 (CO2-group vs. 7.6 ± 0.1 (control and PeCO2 values in hemolymph increased (0.5 ± 0.2 kPa (CO2-group vs. 0.2 ± 0.04 kPa (control. Slightly but significantly elevated bicarbonate concentrations in the hemolymph of CO2-incubated oysters ([HCO-3]e = 1.8 ± 0.3 mM (CO2-group vs. 1.3 ± 0.1 mM (control indicate only minimal regulation of extracellular acid-base status. At the acclimation temperature of 15 °C the OA-induced decrease in pHe did not lead to metabolic depression in oysters as standard metabolism rates (SMR of CO2-exposed oysters were similar to controls. Upon acute warming SMR rose in both groups, but displayed a stronger increase in the CO2-incubated group. Investigation in isolated gill cells revealed a similar temperature-dependence of respiration between groups. Furthermore, the fraction of cellular energy demand for ion regulation via Na+/K+-ATPase was not affected by chronic hypercapnia or temperature. Metabolic profiling using 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed substantial changes in some tissues following OA exposure at 15 °C. In mantle tissue alanine and ATP levels decreased significantly whereas an increase in succinate levels was observed in gill tissue. These findings suggest shifts in metabolic pathways following OA-exposure. Our study confirms that OA affects energy metabolism in oysters and

  12. Cysteine Metabolism and Oxidative Processes in the Rat Liver and Kidney after Acute and Repeated Cocaine Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Kowalczyk-Pachel

    Full Text Available The role of cocaine in modulating the metabolism of sulfur-containing compounds in the peripheral tissues is poorly understood. In the present study we addressed the question about the effects of acute and repeated (5 days cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p. administration on the total cysteine (Cys metabolism and on the oxidative processes in the rat liver and kidney. The whole pool of sulfane sulfur, its bound fraction and hydrogen sulfide (H2S were considered as markers of anaerobic Cys metabolism while the sulfate as a measure of its aerobic metabolism. The total-, non-protein- and protein- SH group levels were assayed as indicators of the redox status of thiols. Additionally, the activities of enzymes involved in H2S formation (cystathionine γ-lyase, CSE; 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, 3-MST and GSH metabolism (γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, γ-GT; glutathione S-transferase, GST were determined. Finally, we assayed the concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA as markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In the liver, acute cocaine treatment, did not change concentrations of the whole pool of sulfane sulfur, its bound fraction, H2S or sulfate but markedly decreased levels of non-protein SH groups (NPSH, ROS and GST activity while γ-GT was unaffected. In the kidney, acute cocaine significantly increased concentration of the whole pool of sulfane sulfur, reduced the content of its bound fraction but H2S, sulfate and NPSH levels were unchanged while ROS and activities of GST and γ-GT were reduced. Acute cocaine enhanced activity of the CSE and 3-MST in the liver and kidney, respectively. Repeatedly administered cocaine enhanced the whole pool of sulfane sulfur and reduced H2S level simultaneously increasing sulfate content both in the liver and kidney. After repeated cocaine, a significant decrease in ROS was still observed in the liver while in the kidney, despite unchanged ROS content, a marked

  13. Cysteine Metabolism and Oxidative Processes in the Rat Liver and Kidney after Acute and Repeated Cocaine Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk-Pachel, Danuta; Iciek, Małgorzata; Wydra, Karolina; Nowak, Ewa; Górny, Magdalena; Filip, Małgorzata; Włodek, Lidia; Lorenc-Koci, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The role of cocaine in modulating the metabolism of sulfur-containing compounds in the peripheral tissues is poorly understood. In the present study we addressed the question about the effects of acute and repeated (5 days) cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) administration on the total cysteine (Cys) metabolism and on the oxidative processes in the rat liver and kidney. The whole pool of sulfane sulfur, its bound fraction and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were considered as markers of anaerobic Cys metabolism while the sulfate as a measure of its aerobic metabolism. The total-, non-protein- and protein- SH group levels were assayed as indicators of the redox status of thiols. Additionally, the activities of enzymes involved in H2S formation (cystathionine γ-lyase, CSE; 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase, 3-MST) and GSH metabolism (γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, γ-GT; glutathione S-transferase, GST) were determined. Finally, we assayed the concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) as markers of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In the liver, acute cocaine treatment, did not change concentrations of the whole pool of sulfane sulfur, its bound fraction, H2S or sulfate but markedly decreased levels of non-protein SH groups (NPSH), ROS and GST activity while γ-GT was unaffected. In the kidney, acute cocaine significantly increased concentration of the whole pool of sulfane sulfur, reduced the content of its bound fraction but H2S, sulfate and NPSH levels were unchanged while ROS and activities of GST and γ-GT were reduced. Acute cocaine enhanced activity of the CSE and 3-MST in the liver and kidney, respectively. Repeatedly administered cocaine enhanced the whole pool of sulfane sulfur and reduced H2S level simultaneously increasing sulfate content both in the liver and kidney. After repeated cocaine, a significant decrease in ROS was still observed in the liver while in the kidney, despite unchanged ROS content, a marked increase

  14. A combined clinical and biomarker approach to predict diuretic response in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Valente, Mattia A E; Metra, Marco; Bruno, Noemi; O'Connor, Christopher M; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G; Givertz, Michael M; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Dittrich, Howard C; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L; Damman, Kevin; Voors, Adriaan A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor diuretic response in acute heart failure is related to poor clinical outcome. The underlying mechanisms and pathophysiology behind diuretic resistance are incompletely understood. We evaluated a combined approach using clinical characteristics and biomarkers to predict diuretic resp

  15. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk in the haemodiluted group as compared to the control group.

  16. The negative acute phase response of serum transthyretin following Streptococcus suis infection in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, F.M.; Waterston, M.; Andresen, Lars Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a serum protein which is a negative acute phase reactant in humans and levels of TTR are routinely measured as an indicator of health status. Such tests have yet to be established for the pig. In order to measure serum TTR in the pig during an acute phase response an assay...... in three different age groups from 10 to 25 weeks. Following Streptococcus suis type 2 infection transthyretin showed a negative acute phase response with serum concentrations reaching a significantly lower level at two days following infection....

  17. Immune-Manipulation of the Inflammatory Response in Acute Pancreatitis. What Can Be Expected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinaldesi R

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis still has a high mortality rate and multiple organ failure is considered to be a severe complication of the disease. Activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes have an important role in the development of multiple organ failure which may result from acute pancreatitis and they are an important pathogenetic factor in the severity of this disease. Therefore, a logical therapeutic approach is to limit the organ damage by selective suppression of inflammatory mediators involved in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and protect against systemic complication. In this paper, we review the recent literature data on the possible manipulation of the immune response in acute pancreatitis.

  18. Acute inflammation reduces kisspeptin immunoreactivity at the arcuate nucleus and decreases responsiveness to kisspeptin independently of its anorectic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellano, J M; Bentsen, A H; Romero, M;

    2010-01-01

    Severe inflammatory challenges are frequently coupled to decreased food intake and disruption of reproductive function, the latter via deregulation of different signaling pathways that impinge onto GnRH neurons. Recently, the hypothalamic Kiss1 system, a major gatekeeper of GnRH function......-IR in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) that was not observed under conditions of metabolic stress induced by 48-h fasting. In addition, absolute responses to kisspeptin-10 (Kp-10), in terms of LH and testosterone secretion, were significantly attenuated in LPS-treated males that also displayed a decrease in food intake...... of hypothalamic kisspeptin immunoreactivity (IR) and hormonal responses to kisspeptin during the acute inflammatory phase. LPS injections induced a dramatic but transient drop of serum LH and testosterone levels. Suppression of gonadotropic function was associated with a significant decrease in kisspeptin...

  19. CAFFEINE ATTENUATES ACUTE GROWTH HORMONE RESPONSE TO A SINGLE BOUT OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Hun Wu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine consume on substrate metabolism and acute hormonal responses to a single bout of resistance exercise (RE. Ten resistance-trained men participated in this study. All subjects performed one repetition maximum (1RM test and then performed two protocols: caffeine (CAF, 6 mg·kg-1 and control (CON in counter balanced order. Subjects performed RE (8 exercises, 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1RM after caffeine or placebo ingestion one hour prior to RE. Blood samples collected prior to treatment ingestion (pre-60, immediately prior to RE (pre-exe, and 0, 15, 30 min post to RE (P0, P15, P30 for analysis of insulin, testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acid and lactic acid. Each experiment was separated by seven days. In this study, statistical analysis of a two-way analysis of variance (treatment by time with repeated measures was applied. After ingesting caffeine, the concentrations of free fatty acid (pre- exe, P0, P15, P30 in CAF were significantly higher than CON (p < 0.05. Additionally, the responses of GH (P0, P15, P30 in CAF were significantly lower than CON (p < 0.05, whereas the concentrations of insulin, testosterone and cortisol were not different between CAF and CON (p < 0.05 after RE. The results of this study indicated that caffeine ingestion prior to RE might attenuate the response of GH. This effect might be caused by the elevation in blood FFA concentration at the beginning of RE

  20. Association of polymorphisms of cytosine arabinoside-metabolizing enzyme gene with therapeutic efficacy for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Pei-pei; WANG Xue-mei; XU Ke; Margaret Schultz; CHEN Bao-an; FENG Ji-feng; CHENG Lu; XIA Guo-hua; LI Yu-feng; QIAN Jun; DING Jia-hua; LU Zu-hong

    2012-01-01

    Background The cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-based chemotherapy is the major remedial measure for acute myeloid leukemia (AML).Deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) and cytidine deaminase (CDA) are the key enzymes in the metabolism ofAra-C.Many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of DCK and CDA,which contribute to susceptibility to Ara-C,have been identified in Africans and Europeans.However,there has been no report about the relation among three SNPs in DCK (rs115543896,rs72552079,and rs111454937) and two SNPs in CDA (rs2072671 and rs60369023),and their clinical response to Ara-C for a Chinese population.In this study,we aimed to investigate whether these five SNPs are associated with the therapeutic outcomes of Ara-C-based chemotherapy regimens in patients with AML.Methods A total of 151 Chinese patients with AML were enrolled in our study.SNPs genotyping were performed using the MassARRAY system by means of the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) method.Results The results illustrated that DCKrs111454937 AA genotype was more frequent in patients with higher platelet count,and A allele frequency was significantly higher in the group ≤40 years,lower white blood ceil (WBC) count patients group and the group with platelet counts >60×109/L.Meanwhile,both DCKrs72552079 TC (OR=1.225,95% Cl=1.225-9.851,P=0.0192) and CDArs60369023 GA (OR=9.851,95% Cl=1.31-77.93,P=0.0263) significantly improved Ara-C-based chemotherapy response.While DCKrs11554389 AA (OR=0.147,95% Cl=0.027-0.801,P=0.0267) wasassociated with the decrease of Ara-C-based chemotherapy response.Conclusion It is evident that the DCK and CDA polymorphisms might be the important markers for the AML patients' therapy outcomes in a Chinese population.

  1. The inflammatory response in myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Emmens

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is about myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These are two cardiac diseases in which inflammation of the cardiac muscle occurs. In myocarditis, inflammation results in the elimination of a viral infection of the heart. During AMI, one of the coronary arteries is occluded,

  2. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    infection in pigs. The lung infection was established with the pig specific respiratory pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Quantitative real-time PCR based expression analysis were performed on samples from liver, tracheobronchial lymph node, tonsils, spleen and on blood leukocytes, supplemented......The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other...... with measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...

  3. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Kathleen A Vermeersch; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to b...

  4. Tidal switch on metabolic activity: Salinity induced responses on bacterioplankton metabolic capabilities in a tropical estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thottathil, S.D.; Balachandran, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Gupta, G.V.M.; Nair, S.

    Biolog plates were used to study the changes in the metabolic capabilities of bacterioplankton over a complete tidal cycle in a tropical ecosystem (Cochin Estuary, Kerala, India) along southwest coast of India. The pattern of utilization of carbon...

  5. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  6. Acute phase response induced following tumor treatment by photodynamic therapy: relevance for the therapy outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Stott, Brandon; Cecic, Ivana; Payne, Peter; Sun, Jinghai

    2006-02-01

    Acute phase response is an effector process orchestrated by the innate immune system for the optimal mobilization of the resources of the organism distant from the local insult site needed in the execution of a host-protecting reaction. Our research has shown that mice bearing tumors treated by photodynamic therapy (PDT) exhibit the three major hallmarks of acute phase response: release of acute phase reactants, neutrophilia, and pituitary/adrenal axis activation. Of particular interest in this study were acute phase proteins that have a pivotal role in the clearance of dead cells, since the occurrence of this process in PDT-treated tumors emerges as a critical event in the course of PDT-associated host response. It is shown that this type of acute phase reactants, including complement proteins (C3, C5, C9, mannose-binding lectin, and ficolin A) and related pentraxins (serum amyloid P component and PTX3), are upregulated following tumor PDT and accumulate in the targeted lesions. Based on the recently accumulated experimental evidence it is definitely established that the acute phase response is manifested in the hosts bearing PDT-treated tumors and it is becoming clear that this effector process is an important element of PDT-associated host response bearing in impact on the eventual outcome of this therapy.

  7. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  8. Mitochondrial function and regulation of macrophage sterol metabolism and inflammatory responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annette; Graham; Anne-Marie; Allen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to explore the role of mitochondria in regulating macrophage sterol homeostasis and inflammatory responses within the aetiology of atherosclerosis.Macrophage generation of oxysterol activators of liver X receptors(LXRs),via sterol 27-hydroxylase,is regulated by the rate of flux of cholesterolto the inner mitochondrial membrane,via a complex of cholesterol trafficking proteins.Oxysterols are key signalling molecules,regulating the transcriptional activity of LXRs which coordinate macrophage sterol metabolism and cytokine production,key features influencing the impact of these cells within atherosclerotic lesions.The precise identity of the complex of proteins mediating mitochondrial cholesterol trafficking in macrophages remains a matter of debate,but may include steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and translocator protein.There is clear evidence that targeting either of these proteins enhances removal of cholesterol via LXRα-dependent induction of ATP binding cassette transporters(ABCA1,ABCG1) and limits the production of inflammatory cytokines; interventions which influence mitochondrial structure and bioenergetics also impact on removal of cholesterol from macrophages.Thus,molecules which can sustain or improve mitochondrial structure,the function of the electron transport chain,or increase the activity of components of the protein complex involved in cholesterol transfer,may therefore have utility in limiting or regressing atheroma development,reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction.

  9. Molecular mechanisms governing contraction-induced metabolic responses and skeletal muscle reprogramming

    OpenAIRE

    Glund, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Physical exercise enhances skeletal muscle responsiveness to insulin and regulates metabolism by an insulin-independent mechanism. Elucidation of contraction-mediated molecular mechanisms is imperative for a better understanding of skeletal muscle metabolism and function, and may lead to the identification or validation of possible drug targets for the prevention or treatment of metabolic disorders. This thesis focuses on the role of AMPK and Interleukin (IL)-6 in skeletal m...

  10. Pharmacological stimulation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α facilitates the corticosterone response to a mild acute stressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Constance S.; Rowson, Sydney A.; Neigh, Gretchen N.

    2015-01-01

    While both glucocorticoids (the principal output of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) and oxidative stress have been implicated in outcomes due to an excessive or prolonged stress response, the precise mechanisms linking these two systems remain poorly elucidated. One potential mediator between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and oxidative stress is the Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) pathway. HIF-1 is an oxygen-responsive transcription factor with diverse effects including changes in cellular metabolism. The experiments in this manuscript sought to determine if pharmacological stimulation of HIF-1α via administration of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) would facilitate the corticosterone response to a mild acute stressor. DMOG administration significantly increased plasma corticosterone five minutes after an acute airpuff without changing baseline plasma corticosterone or plasma corticosterone level two hours post-startle. DMOG administration also reduced hippocampal gene expression of the pro-translocation co-chaperone for the glucocorticoid receptor, FKBP4, two hours after airpuff startle. At this same two-hour time point, hippocampal expression of FKBP5, an anti-translocation co-chaperone of glucocorticoid receptor, in the DMOG-treated group was also positively correlated with plasma corticosterone levels. These data indicate that there is significant crosstalk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-axis and the HIF-1 pathway and extend the current knowledge of glucocorticoid and hypoxia interactions in an ethologically relevant stress model. PMID:26037418

  11. Acute hypoxia and cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic drug metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgens, Gesche; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed; Brøsen, Kim;

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on the activity of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes.......Our objective was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on the activity of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes....

  12. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on motor response inhibition: An ERP study using the stop-signal task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Heng Chu

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Acute exercise has a selective and beneficial effect on cognitive function, specifically affecting the motor response inhibition aspect of executive function. Furthermore, acute exercise predominately impacts later stages of information processing during motor response inhibition, which may lead to an increase in attentional resource allocation and confer the ability to successfully withhold a response to achieve motor response inhibition.

  13. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards

  14. The inflammatory response in myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Emmens, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is about myocarditis and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These are two cardiac diseases in which inflammation of the cardiac muscle occurs. In myocarditis, inflammation results in the elimination of a viral infection of the heart. During AMI, one of the coronary arteries is occluded, causing ischemia and damaged cardiac muscle cells. Here, inflammation removes these damaged cells, so that scar formation can occur. However, for both diseases, inflammation also results in additio...

  15. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E;

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...... developed clinical AMS (AMS+) and were more hypoxaemic relative to subjects without AMS (AMS-). A more marked increase in the venous concentration of the ascorbate radical (A(*-)), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and increased susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation was observed during...

  16. Metabolic responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vary with life-history stage in adult male northern elephant seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensminger, David C; Somo, Derek A; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Strong individual and life-history variation in serum glucocorticoids has been documented in many wildlife species. Less is known about variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness and its impact on metabolism. We challenged 18 free-ranging adult male northern elephant seals (NES) with an intramuscular injection of slow-release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) over 3 sample periods: early in the breeding season, after 70+ days of the breeding fast, and during peak molt. Subjects were blood sampled every 30 min for 2h post-injection. Breeding animals were recaptured and sampled at 48 h. In response to the ACTH injection, cortisol increased 4-6-fold in all groups, and remained elevated at 48 h in early breeding subjects. ACTH was a strong secretagogue for aldosterone, causing a 3-8-fold increase in concentration. Cortisol and aldosterone responses did not vary between groups but were correlated within individuals. The ACTH challenge produced elevations in plasma glucose during late breeding and molting, suppressed testosterone and thyroid hormone at 48 h in early breeding, and increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids and ketoacids during molting. These data suggest that sensitivity of the HPA axis is maintained but the metabolic impacts of cortisol and feedback inhibition of the axis vary with life history stage. Strong impacts on testosterone and thyroid hormone suggest the importance of maintaining low cortisol levels during the breeding fast. These data suggest that metabolic adaptations to extended fasting in NES include alterations in tissue responses to hormones that mitigate deleterious impacts of acute or moderately sustained stress responses.

  17. A double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover study of the acute metabolic effects of olanzapine in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance L Albaugh

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics exhibit metabolic side effects including diabetes mellitus and obesity. The adverse events are preceded by acute worsening of oral glucose tolerance (oGTT along with reduced plasma free fatty acids (FFA and leptin in animal models. It is unclear whether the same acute effects occur in humans.A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial was conducted to examine the potential metabolic effects of olanzapine in healthy volunteers. Participants included male (8 and female (7 subjects [18-30 years old, BMI 18.5-25]. Subjects received placebo or olanzapine (10 mg/day for three days prior to oGTT testing. Primary endpoints included measurement of plasma leptin, oral glucose tolerance, and plasma free fatty acids (FFA. Secondary metabolic endpoints included: triglycerides, total cholesterol, high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, heart rate, blood pressure, body weight and BMI. Olanzapine increased glucose Area Under the Curve (AUC by 42% (2808±474 vs. 3984±444 mg/dl·min; P = 0.0105 during an oGTT. Fasting plasma leptin and triglycerides were elevated 24% (Leptin: 6.8±1.3 vs. 8.4±1.7 ng/ml; P = 0.0203 and 22% (Triglycerides: 88.9±10.1 vs. 108.2±11.6 mg/dl; P = 0.0170, whereas FFA and HDL declined by 32% (FFA: 0.38±0.06 vs. 0.26±0.04 mM; P = 0.0166 and 11% (54.2±4.7 vs. 48.9±4.3 mg/dl; P = 0.0184, respectively after olanzapine. Other measures were unchanged.Olanzapine exerts some but not all of the early endocrine/metabolic changes observed in rodent models of the metabolic side effects, and this suggest that antipsychotic effects are not limited to perturbations in glucose metabolism alone. Future prospective clinical studies should focus on identifying which reliable metabolic alterations might be useful as potential screening tools in assessing patient susceptibility to weight gain and diabetes caused by atypical antipsychotics.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00741026.

  18. Whole-body CO2 production as an index of the metabolic response to sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole-body carbon dioxide (CO2) production (RaCO2) is an index of substrate oxidation and energy expenditure; therefore, it may provide information about the metabolic response to sepsis. Using stable isotope techniques, we determined RaCO2 and its relationship to protein and glucose metabolism in m...

  19. Conventional and homeopathic treatments in late pregnant goats: effects on metabolic status and immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ronchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at assessing the effects of conventional and homeopathic treatments on metabolic status and immune response in late pregnant goats. Administration of an antichetogenic preparation and of Echinacea purpurea in homeopathic dilution did not exert unequivocal effects on metabolic status, but improved some immunological parameters of periparturient goats.

  20. Conventional and homeopathic treatments in late pregnant goats: effects on metabolic status and immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Ronchi; Umberto Bernabucci; Nicola Lacetera; Pier Paolo Danieli

    2010-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the effects of conventional and homeopathic treatments on metabolic status and immune response in late pregnant goats. Administration of an antichetogenic preparation and of Echinacea purpurea in homeopathic dilution did not exert unequivocal effects on metabolic status, but improved some immunological parameters of periparturient goats.

  1. Prenatal and acute cocaine exposure affects neural responses and habituation to visual stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Brooke Riley

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulants have many effects on visual function, from adverse, following acute and prenatal exposure to therapeutic, on attention deficit. To determine the impact of prenatal and acute cocaine exposure on visual processing, we studied neuronal responses to visual stimuli in two brain regions of a transgenic larval zebrafish expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP-HS. We found that both red light (LF and dark (DF flashes elicited similar responses in the optic tectum neuropil (TOn, while the dorsal telencephalon (dTe responded only to LF. Acute cocaine (0.5 μM reduced neuronal responses to LF in both brain regions but did not affect responses to DF. Repeated stimulus presentation led to habituation of dTe neurons to LF. Acute cocaine prevented habituation. TOn habituated to DF, but not LF, and DF habituation was not modified by cocaine. Remarkably, prenatal cocaine exposure prevented the effects of acute cocaine on LF response amplitude and habituation later in development in both brain regions, but did not affect DF responses. We discovered that, in spite of similar neural responses to LF and DF in the TO (superior colliculus in mammals, responses to LF are more complex, involving dTe (homologous to the cerebral cortex, and are more vulnerable to cocaine. Our results demonstrate that acute cocaine exposure affects visual processing differentially by brain region, and that prenatal cocaine exposure modifies zebrafish visual processing in multiple structures in a stimulus-dependent manner. These findings are in accordance with the major role that the optic tectum and cerebral cortex play in sustaining visual attention, and support the hypothesis that modification of these areas by prenatal cocaine exposure may be responsible for visual deficits noted in humans. This model offers new methodological approaches for studying the adverse and therapeutic effects of psychostimulants on attention, and for the development of new pharmacological

  2. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette; Poulsen, Karin T.; Campbell, Fiona M; Eckersall, P. David; Heegaard, Peter M.H.

    2009-01-01

    International audience The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we st...

  3. Size matters: plasticity in metabolic scaling shows body-size may modulate responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Nicholas; Sigwart, Julia D

    2014-08-01

    Variability in metabolic scaling in animals, the relationship between metabolic rate ( R: ) and body mass ( M: ), has been a source of debate and controversy for decades. R: is proportional to MB: , the precise value of B: much debated, but historically considered equal in all organisms. Recent metabolic theory, however, predicts B: to vary among species with ecology and metabolic level, and may also vary within species under different abiotic conditions. Under climate change, most species will experience increased temperatures, and marine organisms will experience the additional stressor of decreased seawater pH ('ocean acidification'). Responses to these environmental changes are modulated by myriad species-specific factors. Body-size is a fundamental biological parameter, but its modulating role is relatively unexplored. Here, we show that changes to metabolic scaling reveal asymmetric responses to stressors across body-size ranges; B: is systematically decreased under increasing temperature in three grazing molluscs, indicating smaller individuals were more responsive to warming. Larger individuals were, however, more responsive to reduced seawater pH in low temperatures. These alterations to the allometry of metabolism highlight abiotic control of metabolic scaling, and indicate that responses to climate warming and ocean acidification may be modulated by body-size. PMID:25122741

  4. Mechanisms of the Hepatic Acute-Phase Response during Bacterial Pneumonia▿

    OpenAIRE

    Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Robson, Bryanne E.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characterized by increased circulating levels of acute-phase proteins (APPs) generated by the liver. During bacterial pneumonia, APPs correlate with the severity of disease, serve as biomarkers, and are functionally significant. The kinetics and regulatory mechanisms of APP induction in the liver during lung infection have yet to be defined. Here we show that APP mRNA transcription is induced in the livers of mice whose lungs are infected with either Escherichia co...

  5. Acute phase protein response in an experimental model of ovine caseous lymphadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lang Tamara L; Waterston Mary M; Bence Laura; Lawson Fraser P; Eckersall Peter D; Donachie William; Fontaine Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA) is a disease of small ruminants caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The pathogenesis of CLA is a slow process, and produces a chronic rather than an acute disease state. Acute phase proteins (APP) such as haptoglobin (Hp) serum amyloid A (SAA) and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) are produced by the liver and released into the circulation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. The concentration of Hp in serum increases in experimental CL...

  6. METABOLIC AND HORMONAL RESPONSES TO ADRENOCEPTOR ANTAGONISTS IN EXERCISING RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BENTHEM, L; VANDERLEEST, J; STEFFENS, AB; ZIJLSTRA, WG

    1995-01-01

    alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors play a key role in the regulation of nutrient supply to working muscles during exercise. To assess their influence in the regulation of substrate utilization, rats were studied during alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Energy metabolism was studied by means of indire

  7. Flexibly combined optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle system for comprehensive imaging of hemodynamic and metabolic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Qin, Jia; An, Lin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-03-01

    We have proposed and developed a multi-modal non-invasive biomedical optical imager. It was combined from the subsystems of optical microangiography and dual-wavelength laser speckle contrast imaging. The system was designed to maintain the performances of both subsystems. It was capable of simultaneously imaging the hemodynamic and metabolic responses in tissue environment in vivo. To achieve such requirements, we utilized unique optical setup, such as paired dichroic mirrors to compensate dispersion, additional relay lens to increase working distance and translational sample probe to freely select imaging area and focal plane. The multi-functionality of the system was demonstrated in an investigation of hemodynamic and metabolic responses on an acute wound healing model in mouse pinna in vivo. The microvasculature, blood flow and hemoglobin concentration from millimeter down to capillary level were comprehensively visualized. The captured instantaneous responses to wound onset differed greatly between localized areas; after that blood flow had a rebalance tendency, and hemoglobin concentration dynamically recovered to baseline situation.

  8. Muscle metabolic remodelling in response to endurance exercise in salmonids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Morash

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle is relevant to swimming performance and metabolism in fishes, especially those that undergo extreme locomotory feats, such as seasonal migration. However, the influence of endurance exercise and the molecular mechanisms coordinating this remodelling are not well understood. The present study examines muscle metabolic remodelling associated with endurance exercise in fed rainbow trout as compared to migrating salmon. Trout were swum for 4 weeks at 1.5BL/s, a speed similar to that of migrating salmon and red and white muscles were sampled after each week. We quantified changes in key enzymes in aerobic and carbohydrate metabolism (citrate synthase (CS, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HOAD, hexokinase (HK and changes in mRNA expression of major regulators of metabolic phenotype (AMPK, PPARs and lipid (carnitine palmitoyltransferase, CPT I, protein (aspartate aminotransferase, AST and carbohydrate (HK oxidation pathways. After one week of swimming substantial increases were seen in AMPK and PPARα mRNA expression and of their downstream target genes, CPTI and HK in red muscle. However, significant changes in CS and HK activity occurred only after 4 weeks. In contrast, there were few changes in mRNA expression and enzyme activities in white muscle over the 4-weeks. Red muscle results mimic those found in migrating salmon suggesting a strong influence of exercise on red muscle phenotype. In white muscle, only changes in AMPK and PPAR expression were similar to that seen with migrating salmon. However, in contrast to exercise alone, in natural migration HK decreased while AST increased suggesting that white muscle plays a role in supplying fuel and intermediates possibly through tissue breakdown during prolonged fasting. Dissecting individual and potentially synergistic effects of multiple stressors will enable us to determine major drivers of the metabolic phenotype and their impacts on whole animal

  9. Targeting amino acid metabolism in cancer growth and anti-tumor immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elitsa; Ananieva

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in amino acid metabolism have revealed that targeting amino acid metabolic enzymes in cancer therapy is a promising strategy for the development of novel therapeutic agents. There are currently several drugs in clinical trials that specifically target amino acid metabolic pathways in tumor cells. In the context of the tumor microenvironment,however,tumor cells form metabolic relationships with immune cells,and they oftencompete for common nutrients. Many tumors evolved to escape immune surveillance by taking advantage of their metabolic flexibility and redirecting nutrients for their own advantage. This review outlines the most recent advances in targeting amino acid metabolic pathways in cancer therapy while giving consideration to the impact these pathways may have on the anti-tumor immune response.

  10. Hepatic autophagy contributes to the metabolic response to dietary protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henagan, Tara M; Laeger, Thomas; Navard, Alexandra M; Albarado, Diana; Noland, Robert C; Stadler, Krisztian; Elks, Carrie M; Burk, David; Morrison, Christopher D

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular response which acts to release stored cellular substrates during nutrient restriction, and particularly plays a key role in the cellular response to amino acid restriction. However, there has been limited work testing whether the induction of autophagy is required for adaptive metabolic responses to dietary protein restriction in the whole animal. Here, we found that moderate dietary protein restriction led to a series of metabolic changes in rats, including increases in food intake and energy expenditure, the downregulation of hepatic fatty acid synthesis gene expression and reduced markers of hepatic mitochondrial number. Importantly, these effects were also associated with an induction of hepatic autophagy. To determine if the induction of autophagy contributes to these metabolic effects, we tested the metabolic response to dietary protein restriction in BCL2-AAA mice, which bear a genetic mutation that impairs autophagy induction. Interestingly, BCL2-AAA mice exhibit exaggerated responses in terms of both food intake and energy expenditure, whereas the effects of protein restriction on hepatic metabolism were significantly blunted. These data demonstrate that restriction of dietary protein is sufficient to trigger hepatic autophagy, and that disruption of autophagy significantly alters both hepatic and whole animal metabolic response to dietary protein restriction. PMID:27173459

  11. Predictors of acute stress disorder in response to bank robbery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maj Hansen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Research has shown that robberies in the workplace, in particular those in the bank sector are traumatising events for many employees. However, research in the acute sequelae of bank robberies is limited. Objective and design : The present study explores the prevalence and predictors of acute stress disorder (ASD in a questionnaire survey of bank employees following a bank robbery. Results : Results show that 14.5% (n=22 of participants (N=152 suffered from probable ASD, which is similar to the ASD prevalence found in other interpersonal assault studies. In addition, a number of associations were found between ASD severity, gender, age, social support, previous trauma, and trauma severity. In the final hierarchical multiple regression model, which included 12 variables, 66% of the variance in ASD symptom level was accounted for by two peri-trauma variables (perceived helplessness and perceived life threat and one post-trauma variable (perceived safety after the robbery. Conclusions : The present study yielded some promising results with regards to the influential role of peri-traumatic and post-traumatic variables in predicting ASD after a bank robbery—in particular perceived safety. Although there may be different paths to developing ASD and PTSD, a common core feature may be perceived safety. Furthermore, the results also supported the inclusion of perceived helplessness in the A2 criterion of the DSM-IV ASD diagnosis.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online

  12. Prognostic value of metabolic response in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today's clinical diagnostic tools are insufficient for giving accurate prognosis to breast cancer patients. The aim of our study was to examine the tumor metabolic changes in patients with locally advanced breast cancer caused by neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), relating these changes to clinical treatment response and long-term survival. Patients (n = 89) participating in a randomized open-label multicenter study were allocated to receive either NAC as epirubicin or paclitaxel monotherapy. Biopsies were excised pre- and post-treatment, and analyzed by high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR MAS MRS). The metabolite profiles were examined by paired and unpaired multivariate methods and findings of important metabolites were confirmed by spectral integration of the metabolite peaks. All patients had a significant metabolic response to NAC, and pre- and post-treatment spectra could be discriminated with 87.9%/68.9% classification accuracy by paired/unpaired partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) (p < 0.001). Similar metabolic responses were observed for the two chemotherapeutic agents. The metabolic responses were related to patient outcome. Non-survivors (< 5 years) had increased tumor levels of lactate (p = 0.004) after treatment, while survivors (≥ 5 years) experienced a decrease in the levels of glycine (p = 0.047) and choline-containing compounds (p ≤ 0.013) and an increase in glucose (p = 0.002) levels. The metabolic responses were not related to clinical treatment response. The differences in tumor metabolic response to NAC were associated with breast cancer survival, but not to clinical response. Monitoring metabolic responses to NAC by HR MAS MRS may provide information about tumor biology related to individual prognosis

  13. Dose-response relationships of acute exposure to sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute toxicity effects of sulphur dioxide are reviewed, and the derivation of a dose-lethality curve (presented as LC50 vs. time) for human exposure to sulphur dioxide is attempted for periods ranging from ten seconds to two hours. As an aid to assessment of the hazards involved in operating heavy water manufacturing facilities, the fact that sulphur dioxide would be produced by the combustion of hydrogen sulphide was briefly considered in an appendix. It is suggested that sulphuric acid, a much more toxic substance than sulphur dioxide, may also be formed in such an event. It is concluded, therefore, that an overall hazard evaluation may have to address the contributory effects of sulphuric acid. (author)

  14. Effects of acute changes in neonatal leptin levels on food intake and long-term metabolic profiles in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, Miriam; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Díaz, Francisca; Mela, Virginia; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2011-11-01

    In rodents there is a rise in serum leptin levels between postnatal days (PND) 5 and 14, with this neonatal leptin surge reported to modulate the maturation of hypothalamic circuits involved in appetite regulation. We hypothesized that acute changes in neonatal leptin levels have different long-term metabolic effects depending on how and when this surge is modified. To advance the timing of the normal leptin peak, male Wistar rats were injected with leptin (sc, 3 μg/g) on PND 2. To ablate the leptin peak on PND 10, a pegylated leptin antagonist (sc, 9 μg/g) was injected. Controls received vehicle. All rats were allowed to eat ad libitum until PND 150. Increased leptin on PND 2 reduced food intake (P<0.01) after 3 months of age with no effect on body weight. Levels of total ghrelin were reduced (P<0.001) and acylated ghrelin increased (P<0.05), with no other modifications in metabolic hormones. In contrast, treatment with the leptin antagonist on PND 9 did not affect food intake but reduced body weight beginning around PND 60 (P<0.02). This was associated with a reduction in fat mass, insulin (P<0.01), and leptin (P<0.007) levels and an increase in testosterone levels (P<0.01). Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (P<0.05) and leptin receptor (P<0.005) mRNA levels were reduced, whereas mRNA levels for uncoupling protein 2 (P<0.005) were increased in visceral fat, which may indicate an increase in energy expenditure. In conclusion, acute changes in neonatal leptin levels induce different metabolic profiles depending on how and when leptin levels are modified.

  15. Skeletal muscle PGC-1a is required for maintaining an acute LPS-induced TNFa response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jesper; Larsson, Signe; Iversen, Ninna;

    2012-01-01

    Many lifestyle-related diseases are associated with low-grade inflammation and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ¿ coactivator (PGC)-1a has been suggested to be protective against low-grade inflammation. However, whether these anti-inflammatory properties affect acute inflammation...... does not exert anti-inflammatory effects during acute inflammation. Lack of skeletal muscle PGC-1a seems however to impair the acute TNFa response, which may reflect a phenotype more susceptible to infections as also observed in type 2 diabetes patients....... is not known. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the role of muscle PGC-1a in acute inflammation. Quadriceps muscles were removed from 10-week old whole body PGC-1a knockout (KO), muscle specific PGC-1a KO (MKO) and muscle-specific PGC-1a overexpression mice (TG), 2 hours after...

  16. Calcium-dependent behavioural responses to acute copper exposure in Oncorhynchus mykiss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S.B.; Svendsen, Jon Christian; Aarestrup, Kim;

    2014-01-01

    Using rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, the present study demonstrated that: (1) calcium (Ca) increased the range of copper (Cu) concentrations that O. mykiss avoided; (2) Ca conserved the maintenance of pre-exposure swimming activity during inescapable acute (10 min) Cu exposure. Data showed...... their spontaneous swimming speed, whereas no response was observed in O. mykiss acclimated and tested at high Ca concentration. Collectively, the data support the conclusion that in O. mykiss the behavioural responses to acute Cu exposure are Ca-dependent....

  17. Hematological and acute-phase responses to diet-induced obesity in IL-6 KO mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pini, Maria; Rhodes, Davina H.; Fantuzzi, Giamila

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation and elevated levels of IL-6. The role of IL-6 in induction of acute-phase proteins and modulation of haematological responses has been demonstrated in models of inflammation and aging, but not in obesity. We hypothesized that IL-6 is necessary to regulate the acute-phase response and hematological changes associated with diet-induced obesity (DIO) in mice. Feeding a 60% kcal/fat diet for 13 weeks to C57BL6 WT male mice induced a significant incr...

  18. Metabolic response in type I and type II muscle fibers during a 30-s cycle sprint in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, M; Sundberg, C J; Norman, B; Jansson, E

    1999-10-01

    The acute metabolic response to sprint exercise was studied in 20 male and 19 female students. We hypothesized that the reduction of muscle glycogen content during sprint exercise would be smaller in women than in men and that a possible gender difference in glycogen reduction would be higher in type II than in type I fibers. The exercise-induced increase in blood lactate concentration was 22% smaller in women than in men. A considerable reduction of ATP (50%), phosphocreatine (83%), and glycogen (35%) was found in type II muscle fibers, and it did not differ between the genders. A smaller reduction of ATP (17%) and phosphocreatine (78%) was found in type I fibers, and it did not differ between the genders. However, the exercise-induced reduction in glycogen content in type I fibers was 50% smaller in women than in men. The hypothesis was indeed partly confirmed: the exercise-induced glycogen reduction was attenuated in women compared with men, but the gender difference was in type I rather than in type II fibers. Fiber-type-specific and gender-related differences in the metabolic response to sprint exercise might have implications for the design of training programs for men and women.

  19. Metabolic response to dietary fibre composition in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøkner, C.; Austbø, D.; Næsset, J. A.;

    2016-01-01

    . The feed rations consisted of only timothy hay (H), hay plus molassed sugar beet pulp combined with either whole oats (OB) or barley (BB) and hay plus a loose chaff-based concentrate (M). Four horses were fitted with permanent caecal cannulas and liquid caecal content was withdrawn manually and blood...... was drawn from the jugular vein at 0, 3 and 9 h postprandial. The horses were exercised daily at medium level for about 1 h. Samples were analysed for short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and metabolic traits. Caecal SCFA and propionic acid concentrations increased with increased dietary starch and soluble fibre...... energy for horses at medium work level....

  20. Clarithromycin attenuates mastectomy-induced acute inflammatory response

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Louis W. C.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Wei, William I.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the observation that administration of clarithromycin led to an attenuation of the inflammatory response induced by surgical trauma in a guinea pig model, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of clarithromycin on the local and systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing mastectomy in an open-label prospective study. During a 16-month period, 54 patients who underwent mastectomy were randomly divided into two groups. In one group, the patients received oral clari...

  1. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  2. Metabolic profiling of the tissue-specific responses in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-08-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish distributing widely along the coast in north China. In this work, we studied the differential metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in digestive gland and gill tissues from M. galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics. The differential metabolic responses in the two tissue types were detected, except the similarly altered taurine and betaine. These metabolic responses suggested that V. harveyi mainly induced osmotic disruption and reduced energy demand via the metabolic pathways of glucose synthesis and ATP/AMP conversion in mussel digestive gland. In mussel gill tissues, V. harveyi basically caused osmotic stress and possible reduced energy demand as shown by the elevated phosphocholine that is involved in one of the metabolic pathways of ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphocholine. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (superoxide dismutase with copper and zinc, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear oxidative and immune stresses in both digestive gland and gill tissues. However, the mRNA expression levels of both lysozyme and defensin in digestive gland were more significantly up-regulated than those in gill from V. harveyi-challenged mussel M. galloprovincialis, meaning that the immune organ, digestive gland, was more sensitive than gill. Overall, our results indicated that V. harveyi could induce tissue-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis.

  3. Novel quantitative metabolomic approach for the study of stress responses of plant root metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kefeng; Wang, Xu; Pidatala, Venkataramana R; Chang, Chi-Peng; Cao, Xiaohong

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative metabolomics (qMetabolomics) is a powerful tool for understanding the intricate metabolic processes involved in plant abiotic stress responses. qMetabolomics is hindered by the limited coverage and high cost of isotopically labeled standards. In this study, we first selected 271 metabolites which might play important roles in abiotic stress responses as the targets and established a comprehensive LC-MS/MS based qMetabolomic method. We then developed a novel metabolic labeling method using E. coli-Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-step cultivation for the production of uniformly (13)C-labeled metabolites as internal standards. Finally, we applied the developed qMetabolomic method to investigate the influence of Pb stress on maize root metabolism. The absolute concentration of 226 metabolites in maize roots was accurately quantified in a single run within 30 min. Our study also revealed that glycolysis, purine, pyrimidine, and phospholipids were the main metabolic pathways in maize roots involved in Pb stress response. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive qMetabolomic method for plant metabolomics thus far. We developed a simple and inexpensive metabolic labeling method which dramatically expanded the availability of uniformly (13)C labeled metabolites. Our findings also provided new insights of maize metabolic responses to Pb stress.

  4. Endocrine responses in the rhesus monkey during acute cold exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L. (Naval Aerospace Medical Research Lab., Pensacola, FL (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The authors studied five young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), 3.4 to 6.7 kg, to determine the relationship between fluid balance hormones and urine production during acute, dry cold exposure. Each monkey served as its own control in duplicate experimental sessions at 6C or 26C. A 6-h experimental session consisted of 120 min equilibration at 26C, 120 min experimental exposure, and 120 min recovery at 26C. Urinary and venous catheters were inserted on the morning of a session. Rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures were monitored continuously. Blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of exposure, and at 60 min postexposure. Plasma was analyzed for arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and osmolality. Urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, electrolytes, and creatinine. Mean Tre was 1.6C lower after 120 min at 6C than at 26C. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by cold exposure, as they are in humans and rats. Vasopressin and PA increased sharply, with mean plasma levels in monkeys exposed to cold more than threefold and tenfold, respectively, the levels in monkeys exposed at 26C. In contrast, ANF, PRA, and plasma osmolality were not significantly changed by cold exposure. The absence of a cold-induced diuresis in the monkey may be related to the marked increase in plasma AVP level.

  5. Hormonal and metabolic response in middle-aged women to moderate physical effort during aerobics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmas, Małgorzata; Opaszowski, Benedykt H; Charmas, Robert; Rózańska, Dorota; Jówko, Ewa; Sadowski, Jerzy; Dorofeyeva, Lena

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the metabolic and hormone response in middle-aged women to acute physical aerobic exercise accompanied by music, the so-called "aerobics." The experiment (single 60-minute aerobics session) included 11 women aged between 30 and 50. The following variables were determined in blood samples collected from the participants four times (in fasting state [I], before exercise [II], after exercise [III], and after 12 hours of rest [IV]): concentration of lactic acid, glucose, free fatty acids, leptin, insulin, growth hormone, testosterone, and cortisol. Furthermore, the measurements included body mass before and after the exercise, and body temperature was taken in the auditory canal and on the forehead. The heart rate was registered during the exercise on a continuous basis. In all cases, the heart rate did not reach its maximum level, and on average, it amounted to approximately 70% of the maximum pulse rate. Therefore, this effort can be considered as submaximal. In all cases, we observed loss of body mass (from 0.2 to 0.7 kg) (p > 0.02) increase in the temperature measured on forehead. Significantly, accompanied by nonsignificant increase in the temperature measured on the tympanic membrane was registered. Single loading gives rise to change in hormone and metabolic profiles. Furthermore, a decrease in blood concentration of glucose before and after aerobics (p > 0.001) could be observed, and if the determination taken at measurement IV of glucose in blood is taken into consideration, then the value taken in measurement I is significantly the highest in relation to other measurements. Concentration of free fatty acids were increased (p > 0.002) after exercise and remained on the same level until the following day. The levels of insulin were significantly decreased, but growth hormone levels were increased. The exercise had no impact on testosterone concentration, whereas average blood concentration of leptin in the successive

  6. Disturbances of serine and glycine metabolism as a cause of episodic acute polymorphous psychoses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Pepplinkhuizen (Lolke)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractPsychiatrists are frequently confronted with psychoses that are difficult to classify. Many forms of these atypical psychoses have been described in European literature. They often have an acute onset and a tendency towards complete remission, albeit with an episodic course. Rich, multif

  7. Combined administration of hyperbaric oxygen and hydroxocobalamin improves cerebral metabolism after acute cyanide poisoning in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M B; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Hyldegaard, O

    2013-01-01

    -to-pyruvate ratio in rat brain by means of microdialysis during acute CN poisoning. Anesthetized rats were allocated to three groups: 1) vehicle (1.2 ml isotonic NaCl intra-arterially); 2) potassium CN (5.4 mg/kg intra-arterially); 3) potassium CN, OHCob (100 mg/kg intra-arterially) and subsequent HBOT (284 k...

  8. Acute hypoxic exercise does not alter post-exercise iron metabolism in moderately trained endurance athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govus, A.D.; Abbiss, C.R.; Garvican-Lewis, L.A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Laarakkers, C.M.; Gore, C.J.; Peeling, P.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study measured the influence of acute hypoxic exercise on Interleukin-6 (IL-6), hepcidin, and iron biomarkers in athletes. METHODS: In a repeated measures design, 13 moderately trained endurance athletes performed 5 x 4 min intervals at 90 % of their peak oxygen consumption velocity (v

  9. Quantifying phenotypic flexibility as the response to a high-fat challenge test in different states of metabolic health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Erk, M.J. van; Dutman, A.E.; Stroeve, J.H.M.; Steeg, E. van de; Bijlsma, S.; Kooistra, T.; Ommen, B. van; Wopereis, S.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism maintains homeostasis at chronic hypercaloric conditions, activating postprandial response mechanisms, which come at the cost of adaptation processes such as energy storage, eventually with negative health consequences. This study quantified the metabolic adaptation capacity by studying c

  10. Effects of anabolic steroids on acute phase responses in intra-abdominal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mealy

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute phase response is an important adaptive response to sepsis and injury. As anabolic steroids increase protein synthesis we postulated that these agents might also increase hepatic acute phase protein synthesis. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with testosterone or danazol for 48 h prior to caecal ligation and puncture (CLP. Thirty-six h following surgery the animals were killed and blood taken for full blood count, total protein, albumin, α, β and γ globulin fractions on serum electrophoresis, complement C3 and transferrin levels. Danazol increased the α1, α2 and β1 globulin serum protein fractions in comparison with no surgery and CLP alone groups. These results indicate that danazol increases plasma acute phase proteins, as measured by electrophoresis, in this model of intra-abdominal sepsis.

  11. Dose dependency and individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide-induced bovine acute phase protein response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Andersen, P.H.; Tølbøll, T.;

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the dose dependency and the individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase protein response in cattle, 8 nonlactating, nonpregnant Danish Holstein cows were challenged 3 times each by intravenous injection of increasing doses (10, 100, and 1000 ng....../kg, consecutively) of Escherichia coli LPS with 3-wk intervals. All 3 LPS doses resulted in a rapid increase in serum concentrations of haptoglobin and serum amyloid A (SAA) and a decrease in serum concentrations of albumin in all 8 cows. Serum concentrations of acute phase proteins (APP) remained altered...... and haptoglobin concentrations in either of the challenges, which suggests that the synthesis of haptoglobin and SAA are regulated in different ways. In conclusion, cattle are highly susceptible to LPS, as very low doses of LPS elicited acute phase albumin, SAA, and haptoglobin responses. Concentrations of APP...

  12. The effect of environmental temperature on immune response and metabolism of the young chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henken, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of environmental temperature on immune response and metabolism was studied in young chickens. Immunization was performed by injecting intramuscularly 0.5 ml packed SRBC (sheep red blood cells) in both thighs of 32 days old pullets ( WarrenSSL ). The ensueing immune response

  13. ''Ecstasy''-induced changes of cerebral glucose metabolism and their correlation to acute psychopathology. A 18-FDG PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the acute effects of the 'Ecstasy' analogue MDE (3,4-methylene dioxyethamphetamine) on cerebral glucose metabolism (rMRGlu) of healthy volunteers and to correlate neurometabolism with acute psychopathology. In a radomized double-blind trial, 15 healthy volunteers without a history of drug abuse were examined with fluorine-18-deoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) 110-120 min after oral administration of 2 mg/kg MDE (n=7) or placebo (n=8). Two minutes prior to radiotracer injection, constant cognitive stimulation was started and maintained for 32 min using a word repetition paradigm to ensure constant and comparable mental conditions during cerebral glucose uptake. Individual brain anatomy was represented using T1-weighted 3D flash magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), followed by manual regionalization into 108 regions of interest and PET/MRI overlay. After absolute quantification of rMR-Glu and normalization to global metabolism, normalized rMRGlu under MDE was compared to placebo using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Acute psychopathology was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and rMRGlu was correlated to PANSS scores according to Spearman. MDE subjects showed significantly decreased rMRGlu in the bilateral frontal cortex: left frontal posterior (-7.1%, P<0.05) and right prefrontal superior (-4.6%, P<0.05). On the other hand, rMR-Glu was significantly increased in the bilateral cerebellum (right: +10.1%, P<0.05; left: +7.6%, P<0.05) and in the right putamen (+6.2%, P<0.05). There were positive correlations between rMRGlu in the middle right cingulate and grandiosity (r=0.87; P<0.05), both the right amygadala (r=0.90, P<0.01) and the left posterior cingulate (r=0.90, P<0.01) to difficulties in abstract thinking, and the right frontal inferior (r=0.85, P<0.05), right anterior cingulate (r=0.93, P<0.01), and left anterior cingulate (r=0.85, P<0.05) to attentional deficits. A negative

  14. Effect of pre-weaning concentrate supplementation on peripheral distribution of leukocytes, functional activity of neutrophils, acute phase protein and behavioural responses of abruptly weaned and housed beef calves

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch Eilish M; McGee Mark; Doyle Sean; Earley Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The effect of pre-weaning concentrate supplementation on peripheral distribution of leukocytes, functional activity of neutrophils, acute phase protein response, metabolic and behavioural response, and performance of abruptly weaned and housed beef calves was investigated. Calves were grazed with their dams until the end of the grazing season when they were weaned and housed (day (d) 0) in a concrete slatted floor shed, and offered grass silage ad libitum plus supplementar...

  15. Abnormal glucose metabolism in acute myocardial infarction: influence on left ventricular function and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høfsten, Dan E; Løgstrup, Brian B; Møller, Jacob E;

    2009-01-01

    to be particularly attributable to an increased incidence of post-infarction congestive heart failure. A relationship between glucose metabolism and LV function could potentially explain this excess mortality. METHODS: In patients without known diabetes, glucose metabolism was determined using an oral glucose...... atrial volume index) and by measuring plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels. RESULTS: After adjustment for age and gender, a linear relationship between the degree of abnormal glucose metabolism was observed for each marker of LV dysfunction (p(trend) ... atrial volume index (p = 0.10). During a median follow-up of 21 months, 32 patients died, and 39 patients met the secondary end point of death or hospitalization for heart failure. After adjustment for differences in LV function, as well as other relevant characteristics, newly detected, as well as known...

  16. Metabolic Regulation and Coordination of the Metabolism in Bacteria in Response to a Variety of Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms have sophisticated but well-organized regulation system. It is important to understand the metabolic regulation mechanisms in relation to growth environment for the efficient design of cell factories for biofuels and biochemicals production. Here, an overview is given for carbon catabolite regulation, nitrogen regulation, ion, sulfur, and phosphate regulations, stringent response under nutrient starvation as well as oxidative stress regulation, redox state regulation, acid-shock, heat- and cold-shock regulations, solvent stress regulation, osmoregulation, and biofilm formation, and quorum sensing focusing on Escherichia coli metabolism and others. The coordinated regulation mechanisms are of particular interest in getting insight into the principle which governs the cell metabolism. The metabolism is controlled by both enzyme-level regulation and transcriptional regulation via transcription factors such as cAMP-Crp, Cra, Csr, Fis, P(II)(GlnB), NtrBC, CysB, PhoR/B, SoxR/S, Fur, MarR, ArcA/B, Fnr, NarX/L, RpoS, and (p)ppGpp for stringent response, where the timescales for enzyme-level and gene-level regulations are different. Moreover, multiple regulations are coordinated by the intracellular metabolites, where fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) play important roles for enzyme-level regulation as well as transcriptional control, while α-ketoacids such as α-ketoglutaric acid (αKG), pyruvate (PYR), and oxaloacetate (OAA) play important roles for the coordinated regulation between carbon source uptake rate and other nutrient uptake rate such as nitrogen or sulfur uptake rate by modulation of cAMP via Cya.

  17. Metabolic Regulation and Coordination of the Metabolism in Bacteria in Response to a Variety of Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms have sophisticated but well-organized regulation system. It is important to understand the metabolic regulation mechanisms in relation to growth environment for the efficient design of cell factories for biofuels and biochemicals production. Here, an overview is given for carbon catabolite regulation, nitrogen regulation, ion, sulfur, and phosphate regulations, stringent response under nutrient starvation as well as oxidative stress regulation, redox state regulation, acid-shock, heat- and cold-shock regulations, solvent stress regulation, osmoregulation, and biofilm formation, and quorum sensing focusing on Escherichia coli metabolism and others. The coordinated regulation mechanisms are of particular interest in getting insight into the principle which governs the cell metabolism. The metabolism is controlled by both enzyme-level regulation and transcriptional regulation via transcription factors such as cAMP-Crp, Cra, Csr, Fis, P(II)(GlnB), NtrBC, CysB, PhoR/B, SoxR/S, Fur, MarR, ArcA/B, Fnr, NarX/L, RpoS, and (p)ppGpp for stringent response, where the timescales for enzyme-level and gene-level regulations are different. Moreover, multiple regulations are coordinated by the intracellular metabolites, where fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) play important roles for enzyme-level regulation as well as transcriptional control, while α-ketoacids such as α-ketoglutaric acid (αKG), pyruvate (PYR), and oxaloacetate (OAA) play important roles for the coordinated regulation between carbon source uptake rate and other nutrient uptake rate such as nitrogen or sulfur uptake rate by modulation of cAMP via Cya. PMID:25712586

  18. Acute Alcohol Intoxication Decreases Glucose Metabolism but Increases Acetate Uptake in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Gene-Jack; Alexoff, David; Logan, Jean; Muench, Lisa; Shea, Colleen; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wong, Christopher; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol intoxication results in marked reductions in brain glucose metabolism, which we hypothesized reflect not just its GABAergic enhancing effects but also metabolism of acetate as an alternative brain energy source. To test this hypothesis we separately assessed the effects of alcohol intoxication on brain glucose and acetate metabolism using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). We found that alcohol intoxication significantly decreased whole brain glucose metabolism (measured with FDG) with the largest decrements in cerebellum and occipital cortex and the smallest in thalamus. In contrast, alcohol intoxication caused a significant increase in [1-11C]acetate brain uptake (measured as standard uptake value, SUV), with the largest increases occurring in cerebellum and the smallest in thalamus. In heavy alcohol drinkers [1-11C]acetate brain uptake during alcohol challenge trended to be higher than in occasional drinkers (p <0.06) and the increases in [1-11C]acetate uptake in cerebellum with alcohol were positively associated with the reported amount of alcohol consumed (r=0.66, p<0.01). Our findings corroborate a reduction of brain glucose metabolism during intoxication and document an increase in brain acetate uptake. The opposite changes observed between regional brain metabolic decrements and regional increases in [1-11C]acetate uptake support the hypothesis that during alcohol intoxication the brain may rely on acetate as an alternative brain energy source and provides preliminary evidence that heavy alcohol exposures may facilitate the use of acetate as an energy substrate. These findings raise the question of the potential therapeutic benefits that increasing plasma acetate concentration (ie ketogenic diets) may have in alcoholics undergoing alcohol detoxification. PMID:22947541

  19. Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: The Muscular Metabolic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Jaussaud

    2011-01-01

    245±140 seconds (=.01. Peak VO2, VE/VCO2, peak circulatory power and NYHA were improved after CRT (13±4 to16±5 ml/kg/min (<.05, 45±16 to 39±13 (<.01, 1805±844 to 2225±1171 mmHg.ml/kg/min (<.01 and 3±0.35 to 1.88±0.4 (=.01. In addition, left ventricular ejection fraction and end-systolic volumes were improved from 24±8 to 29±7% (<.01 and from 157±69 to 122±55 ml (<.01. Conclusion. We suggest that CRT leads to an increase in oxidative muscular metabolism and postponed anaerobic threshold reducing exaggerated hyperventilation during exercise.

  20. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on motor response inhibition: An ERP study using the stop-signal task

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Heng Chu; Alderman, Brandon L.; Gao-Xia Wei; Yu-Kai Chang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of acute exercise on motor response inhibition using both behavioral and electrophysiological approaches. Methods: The P3 and N1 event-related potential (ERP) components were recorded while performing a stop-signal task in 21 college students following a moderately intense acute exercise bout for 30 min and a sedentary control session that involved reading. Results: Acute exercise induced a shorter stop signal response time...

  1. Metabolic abnormalities in patients with prolactinoma: response to treatment with cabergoline

    OpenAIRE

    Nazir A. Pala; Laway, Bashir A.; Raiz A Misgar; Rayees A Dar

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperprolactinemia has been associated with changes in body composition and metabolic abnormalities. Normalization of prolactin (PRL) with dopamine agonists has been found to reverse these abnormalities. This study was designed to assess the anthropometric and metabolic alterations associated with prolactinoma and response of these abnormalities to cabergoline treatment. Methods In a non-randomised matched prospective design, 19 consecutive patients with prolactinoma (median PRL 11...

  2. Cytokine responses in acute and persistent human parvovirus B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, A; Lundqvist, A; Lindblom, A;

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the proinflammatory and T helper (Th)1/Th2 cytokine responses during acute parvovirus B19 (B19) infection and determine whether an imbalance of the Th1/Th2 cytokine pattern is related to persistent B19 infection. Cytokines were quantified by multiplex beads...

  3. Diuretic response in acute heart failure-an analysis from ASCEND-HF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Dunning, Allison M.; Valente, Mattia A. E.; Damman, Kevin; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Califf, Robert M.; Starling, Randall C.; van der Meer, Peter; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Testani, Jeffrey M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diuretic unresponsiveness often occurs during hospital admission for acute heart failure (AHF) and is associated with adverse outcome. This study aims to investigate determinants, clinical outcome, and the effects of nesiritide on diuretic response early after admission for AHF. Methods D

  4. Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years After Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-10

    Dr. Mike Miller reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases' synopsis, Progress in Global Surveillance and Response Capacity 10 Years after Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome.  Created: 4/10/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/11/2013.

  5. Anti-CD163-dexamethasone conjugate inhibits the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Møller, Holger Jon; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of a new anti-CD163-dexamethasone conjugate targeting activated macrophages on the hepatic acute phase response in rats. METHODS: Wistar rats were injected intravenous with either the CD163 targeted dexamethasone-conjugate (0.02 mg/kg) or free dexamethasone (0.02 or 1 mg/...

  6. Lay Public's Knowledge and Decisions in Response to Symptoms of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytryn, Kayla N.; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Cimino, James J.; Patel, Vimla L.

    2009-01-01

    Despite public health initiatives targeting rapid action in response to symptoms of myocardial infarction (MI), people continue to delay in going to a hospital when experiencing these symptoms due to lack of recognition as cardiac-related. The objective of this research was to characterize lay individuals' knowledge of symptoms of acute myocardial…

  7. Glucose intolerance induced by blockade of central FGF receptors is linked to an acute stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Rojas

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The effect of acute inhibition of central FGFR signaling to impair glucose tolerance likely involves a stress response associated with pronounced, but transient, sympathoadrenal activation and an associated reduction of insulin secretion. Whether this effect is a true consequence of FGFR blockade or involves an off-target effect of the FGFR inhibitor requires additional study.

  8. Clinical value of MRI and acute madopar responsiveness test in diagnosing progressive supranuclear palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiao-hong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the MRI abnormalities and acute madopar responsiveness test in diagnosing progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP and Parkinson's disease (PD. Methods Seventeen patients with PSP and 17 gender and age matched patients with PD were studied with cranial MRI examinations and results of acute madopar responsiveness test, and the clinical manifestations of PSP were summarized. Results The atrophy of the midbrain tegmentum and hummingbird sign was demonstrated in all of the PSP patients in our study, but was not observed in the PD patients. The areas of the midbrain on mid-sagittal MRI in PSP patients [(77.35 ± 15.30 mm2] were significantly smaller than that in those with PD [(142.35 ± 31.49 mm2]. The average ratio of the area of the midbrain to the area of pons in the patients with PSP [(14.31 ± 2.47%] was significantly smaller than that in those with PD [(24.08 ± 4.73%; P = 0.000, for all]. According to the result of acute madopar responsiveness test, the maximum Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS Ⅲ improvement rate of 2 patients with PSP and 16 patients with PD was more than 30% (χ2 = 23.142, P = 0.000. Conclusion The assessment of the mid-sagittal MRI and acute madopar responsiveness test may be a useful method to differentiate PSP from PD.

  9. No inflammatory gene-expression response to acute exercise in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Fredberg, Ulrich; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer;

    2013-01-01

    Although histology data favour the view of a degenerative nature of tendinopathy, indirect support for inflammatory reactions to loading in affected tendons exists. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate whether inflammatory signalling responses after acute mechanical loading were more...

  10. Inner ocular blood flow responses to an acute decrease in blood pressure in resting humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether inner ocular vessels have an autoregulatory response to acute fluctuations in blood pressure is unclear. We tried to examine the validity of acute hypotension elicited by thigh-cuff release as to assess the dynamic autoregulation in the ocular circulation. Blood flow velocity in the superior nasal and inferior temporal retinal arterioles, and in the retinal and choroidal vasculature were measured with the aid of laser speckle flowgraphy before and immediately after an acute decrease in blood pressure in 20 healthy subjects. Acute hypotension was induced by a rapid release of bilateral thigh occlusion cuffs that had been inflated to 220 mmHg for 2 min. The ratio of the relative change in retinal and choroidal blood flow velocity to the relative change in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was calculated. Immediately after cuff release, the MAP and blood flows in the all ocular target vessels decreased significantly from the baseline values obtained before thigh-cuff release. The ratio of the relative change in inner ocular blood flow velocity to that in the MAP exceeded 1% / %mmHg. An explicit dynamic autoregulation in inner ocular vessels cannot be demonstrated in response to an acute hypotension induced by the thigh-cuff release technique. (paper)

  11. Regulation of urea synthesis during the acute-phase response in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Andreas Buch;

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is a catabolic event involving increased waste of amino-nitrogen (N) via hepatic urea synthesis, despite an increased need for amino-N incorporation into acute-phase proteins. This study aimed to clarify the regulation of N elimination via urea during different phases...... of the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced acute-phase response in rats. We used four methods to study the regulation of urea synthesis: We examined urea cycle enzyme mRNA levels in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, the in vivo capacity of urea-N synthesis (CUNS), and known humoral...... regulators of CUNS at 1, 3, 24, and 72 h after TNF-α injection (25 μg/kg iv rrTNF-α) in rats. Serum acute-phase proteins and their liver mRNA levels were also measured. The urea cycle enzyme mRNA levels acutely decreased and then gradually normalized, whereas the urea cycle enzyme proteins remained...

  12. Effect of moderate intakes of different tea catechins and caffeine on acute measures of energy metabolism under sedentary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N.T.; Bitz, C.; Krog-Mikkelsen, I.;

    2009-01-01

    Green tea may stimulate energy metabolism; however, it is unclear if acute effects are caused by specific catechins, caffeine or their combination. The objective of the present study was to examine the separate and combined effects of different catechins and caffeine on energy expenditure (EE......) and fat oxidation over a single day. Fifteen healthy, normal-weight males received capsules containing placebo, caffeine alone (150mg), or caffeine plus a catechin mixture (600 mg) enriched in either epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin or a mix of catechins, in a randomised cross......-over double-blinded design. On each test day EE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and substrate oxidation were measured under sedentary conditions in a respiratory chamber for 13.5h. We found no significant treatment effect on EE (P=0.20) or RQ (P=0.68). EGCG with caffeine insignificantly raised EE and fat oxidation...

  13. Estimation of the effect of the acute phase response on indicators of micronutrient status in Indonesian infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.T.; Dijkhuizen, M.A.; West, C.E.; Northrop-Clewes, C.A.; Muhilal,

    2002-01-01

    Many indicators of micronutrient status change during infection because of the acute phase response. In this study, relationships between the acute phase response, assessed by measuring concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), and indicato

  14. Synergistic effects of anethole and ibuprofen in acute inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski-Rebecca, Edirlene S; Rocha, Bruno A; Wiirzler, Luiz A M; Cuman, Roberto K N; Velazquez-Martinez, Carlos A; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the effect of the combination of anethole and ibuprofen in comparison with monotherapy by either drug alone, using two in vivo inflammatory models, namely the pleurisy and paw edema in rats. We also measured the levels of the TNF protein in plasma, and the ability of anethole to inhibit, in vitro, the activity of the cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes. The test drugs (anethole; ibuprofen; anethole + ibuprofen), at different doses, were administered once (p.o.) 60 min before the induction of the inflammatory response. The association of anethole + ibuprofen inhibited the development of the inflammatory response in both models used. This effect can be partially explained by the inhibitory action on the production of TNF and of COX isoforms. The isobologram analysis evidenced a synergistic effect between ibuprofen and anethole, because the combination of drugs showed a higher inhibitory potential than either drug alone.

  15. Reduced Acute Inflammatory Responses to Microgel Conformal Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, Amanda W.; Singh, Neetu; Burns, Kellie L.; Babensee, Julia E.; Lyon, L. Andrew; García, Andrés J.

    2008-01-01

    Implantation of synthetic materials into the body elicits inflammatory host responses that limit medical device integration and biological performance. This inflammatory cascade involves protein adsorption, leukocyte recruitment and activation, cytokine release, and fibrous encapsulation of the implant. We present a coating strategy based on thin films of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel microparticles (i.e. microgels) cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate. These particles we...

  16. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury: Current State and Emerging Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    R, Namas; A, Ghuma; L, Hermus; R, Zamora; DO Okonkwo; TR, Billiar; Y, Vodovotz

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a finely tuned, dynamic, highly-regulated process that is not inherently detrimental, but rather required for immune surveillance, optimal post-injury tissue repair, and rege...

  17. Pulse pressure variation and volume responsiveness during acutely increased pulmonary artery pressure: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Daudel, Fritz; Tüller, David; Krähenbühl, Stefanie; Jakob, Stephan M; Takala, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We found that pulse pressure variation (PPV) did not predict volume responsiveness in patients with increased pulmonary artery pressure. This study tests the hypothesis that PPV does not predict fluid responsiveness during an endotoxin-induced acute increase in pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular loading. Methods Pigs were subjected to endotoxemia (0.4 μg/kg/hour lipopolysaccharide), followed by volume expansion, subsequent hemorrhage (20% of estimated blood volume), ...

  18. Identifying patterns in treatment response profiles in acute bipolar mania: a cluster analysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Houston John P; Lipkovich Ilya A; Ahl Jonna

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients with acute mania respond differentially to treatment and, in many cases, fail to obtain or sustain symptom remission. The objective of this exploratory analysis was to characterize response in bipolar disorder by identifying groups of patients with similar manic symptom response profiles. Methods Patients (n = 222) were selected from a randomized, double-blind study of treatment with olanzapine or divalproex in bipolar I disorder, manic or mixed episode, with or w...

  19. THE RATE OF CLINICAL RESPONSE OF ORAL LOADING SODIUM VALPROATE IN ACUTELY MANLC PATIENT

    OpenAIRE

    K SHAFIEE; M BAREKATEYN; N BASHARDOOST; Mahmoudi, J

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Acheiving accelerated clinical response is desirable in patients with acute manic episode. We conducted a prospective study to compare the rate of clinical response of oral loading sodium valproate versus standard dose titration. Methods: Fourty - two patients who met DSM - IV critevia for current manic episode and who had a "Young mania rating scale "score between 20 and 50 were randomly assigned on a double blind basis to recieve valproate oral "loading"(N = 21) at a dose...

  20. An Explanation for the Paradoxical Induction and Suppression of an Acute Phase Response by Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Pruett, Brandon S.; Pruett, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    Binge ethanol (EtOH) consumption suppresses inflammatory responses and resistance to infection, but paradoxically it is associated with increased levels of acute phase proteins (which are indicators of inflammation) and an increased risk of inflammation mediated pathologies such as cardiovascular disease and cirrhosis of the liver. The latter effect may be mediated by increased translocation of bacteria leading to activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In this study, the dose-response and...

  1. Acute Activation of Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway as First-Line Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Andreas; Emmert, Hila; Soehle, Joern; Winnefeld, Marc; Fischer, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Terstegen, Lara; Lucius, Ralph; Hildebrand, Janosch; Zamboni, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Integrity of human skin is endangered by exposure to UV irradiation and chemical stressors, which can provoke a toxic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. Since oxidation of proteins and metabolites occurs virtually instantaneously, immediate cellular countermeasures are pivotal to mitigate the negative implications of acute oxidative stress. We investigated the short-term metabolic response in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes to H2O2 and UV exposure. In time-resolved metabolomics experiments, we observed that within seconds after stress induction, glucose catabolism is routed to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and nucleotide synthesis independent of previously postulated blocks in glycolysis (i.e., of GAPDH or PKM2). Through ultra-short (13)C labeling experiments, we provide evidence for multiple cycling of carbon backbones in the oxidative PPP, potentially maximizing NADPH reduction. The identified metabolic rerouting in oxidative and non-oxidative PPP has important physiological roles in stabilization of the redox balance and ROS clearance.

  2. Effect of emodin and sandostatin on metabolism of eicosanoids in acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Xin Wu; Jia Yu Xu; Yao Zong Yuan

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION In order to study the therapeutic mechanisms of emodin, an extract of Rhubarb (Rhizoma et Radix Rhei, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine), and sandostatin in the treatment of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), we used the two drugs in rat models of the disease and observed the changes of plasma thromboxane-2 (TXB2),6-ketoprostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α) and prostaglandin E2 (PEG2).

  3. A resposta metabólica ao trauma cranioencefálico é autolimitada? Análise das proteínas de fase aguda e glicemia Is the metabolic response self-limited in head trauma? Analysis of acute phase proteins and glycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTHUR O. SCHELP

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos tem havido referências à limitação da resposta metabólica nas duas primeiras semanas após trauma cranioencefálico (TCE. Foi feita proposta de estudo a partir de experimento clínico em pacientes com trauma encefálico grave, que foram avaliados por volta de 7 dias após a lesão (M1. A segunda avaliação ocorreu 4 dias após (M2, e a terceira 3 a 4 dias após (M3. Em um período de 2 anos, foram selecionados 28 pacientes do sexo masculino, com trauma encefálico grave, escala de gravidade de Glasgow entre 4 e 6. Dentre os 28 pacientes, 6 completaram o estudo proposto. Os pacientes foram acompanhados clinicamente durante toda a fase do experimento. Em cada um dos momentos de análise, foram feitas análises da excreção nitrogenada e proteínas de fase aguda. Da mesma forma foram feitas determinações da glicemia plasmática, N-amínico e triglicerídeos. Os resultados do estudo demonstraram não haver modificações no balanço nitrogenado, normalização da proteína-C-reativa e redução relativa da glicemia ao final do experimento. Os autores tecem considerações sobre os possíveis mecanismos envolvidos na modulação da resposta metabólica e concluem que o hipermetabolismo, a basear-se na análise da glicemia e das proteínas de fase aguda, não persiste além do 13° dia do período de recuperação pós-trauma. São feitas sugestões de estudos futuros que possam elucidar os mecanismos envolvidos na normalização do hipercatabolismo e hipermetabolismo observados nas duas primeiras semanas após TCE.There are many reports supporting a self-limitation mechanism involved with hypermetabolic response after severe cranial injury. It was proposed a study with severe head injury patients, in three stages of the evolution. The first 7 days after admission (moment 1- M1, the second three days latter (M2 and the last 7 days after the first (M3. Among male patients with severe head injury, attended between January 1992

  4. Endocrine, metabolic and cardiovascular responses to adrenaline after abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Wilken-Jensen, Charlotte; Birch, K;

    1990-01-01

    Adrenaline-induced changes in heart rate, blood pressure, plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline, cortisol, glucagon, insulin, cAMP, glucose lactate, glycerol and beta-hydroxybutyrate were studied preoperatively and 4 and 24 h after skin incision in 8 patients undergoing elective cholecystectomy. Late...... postoperative responses of blood glucose, plasma cAMP, lactate and glycerol to adrenaline infusion were reduced, whereas other responses were unaffected. Blood glucose appearance and disappearance rate as assessed by [3H]3-glucose infusion was unchanged pre- and postoperatively. The increase in glucose...... appearance rate following adrenaline was similar pre- and postoperatively. These findings suggest that several beta-receptor-mediated responses to adrenaline are reduced after abdominal surgery....

  5. Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Alexander N.; Foong, Rachel E.; Bozanich, Elizabeth M.; Berry, Luke J.; Garratt, Luke W.; Gualano, Rosa C.; Jones, Jessica E.; Dousha, Lovisa F.; Zosky, Graeme R.; Sly, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Larcombe et al. (2011) Sexual dimorphism in lung function responses to acute influenza A infection. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 334–342. Background  Males are generally more susceptible to respiratory infections; however, there are few data on the physiological responses to such infections in males and females. Objectives  To determine whether sexual dimorphism exists in the physiological/inflammatory responses of weanling and adult BALB/c mice to influenza. Methods  Weanling and adult mice of both sexes were inoculated with influenza A or appropriate control solution. Respiratory mechanics, responsiveness to methacholine (MCh), viral titre and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellular inflammation/cytokines were measured 4 (acute) and 21 (resolution) days post‐inoculation. Results  Acute infection impaired lung function and induced hyperresponsiveness and cellular inflammation in both sexes at both ages. Males and females responded differently with female mice developing greater abnormalities in tissue damping and elastance and greater MCh responsiveness at both ages. BAL inflammation, cytokines and lung viral titres were similar between the sexes. At resolution, all parameters had returned to baseline levels in adults and weanling males; however, female weanlings had persisting hyperresponsiveness. Conclusions  We identified significant differences in the physiological responses of male and female mice to infection with influenza A, which occurred in the absence of variation in viral titre and cellular inflammation. PMID:21668688

  6. Probing soil C metabolism in response to temperature: results from experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, P.; Dalder, J.; Blankinship, J.; Selmants, P. C.; Schwartz, E.; Koch, G. W.; Hart, S.; Hungate, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    C use efficiency (CUE) is one of the least understood aspects of soil C cycling, has a very large effect on soil respiration and C sequestration, and decreases with elevated temperature. CUE is directly related to substrate partitioning over energy production and biosynthesis. The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We have developed a new stable isotope approach using position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers to measure these fundamental metabolic processes in intact soil communities (1). We use this new approach, combined with models of soil metabolic flux patterns, to analyze the response of microbial energy production, biosynthesis, and CUE to temperature. The method consists of adding small but precise amounts of position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is iteratively solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and information on microbial precursor demand under different temperatures. This new method enables direct study of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, C use efficiency, and soil organic matter formation in response to temperature. (1) Dijkstra P, Blankinship JC, Selmants PC, Hart SC, Koch GW, Schwarz E and Hungate BA. Probing metabolic flux patterns of soil microbial communities using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology and Biochemistry (accepted)

  7. Decrease in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose after high-dose methotrexate in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured changes in the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography for the assessment of neurotoxicity in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) therapy. We studied 8 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (mean age: 9.6 years) treated with HD-MTX (200 mg/kg or 2,000 mg/M2) therapy. CMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy was most reduced (40%) in the patient who had central nervous system leukemia and was treated with the largest total doses of both intrathecal MTX (IT-MTX) and HD-MTX. CMRGlu in the whole brain after HD-MTX therapy was reduced by an average of 21% (P less than 0.05). The reductions of CMRGlu in 8 patients were correlated with total doses of both IT-MTX (r = 0.717; P less than 0.05) and systemic HD-MTX (r = 0.784; P less than 0.05). CMRGlu of the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal and occipital cortex, was reduced more noticeably than that of the basal ganglia and white matter. We suggest that the measurement of changes in rCMRGlu after HD-MTX therapy is useful for detecting accumulated MTX neurotoxicity

  8. Low levels of physical activity increase metabolic responsiveness to cold in a rat (Rattus fuscipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Seebacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical activity modulates expression of metabolic genes and may therefore be a prerequisite for metabolic responses to environmental stimuli. However, the extent to which exercise interacts with environmental conditions to modulate metabolism is unresolved. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that even low levels of physical activity are beneficial by improving metabolic responsiveness to temperatures below the thermal neutral zone, thereby increasing the capacity for substrate oxidation and energy expenditure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used wild rats (Rattus fuscipes to avoid potential effects of breeding on physiological phenotypes. Exercise acclimation (for 30 min/day on 5 days/week for 30 days at 60% of maximal performance at 22°C increased mRNA concentrations of PGC1α, PPARδ, and NRF-1 in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue compared to sedentary animals. Lowering ambient temperature to 12°C caused further increases in relative expression of NRF-1 in skeletal muscle, and of PPARδ of brown adipose tissue. Surprisingly, relative expression of UCP1 increased only when both exercise and cold stimuli were present. Importantly, in sedentary animals cold acclimation (12°C alone did not change any of the above variables. Similarly, cold alone did not increase maximum capacity for substrate oxidation in mitochondria (cytochrome c oxidase and citrate synthase activities of either muscle or brown adipose tissue. Animals that exercised regularly had higher exercise induced metabolic rates in colder environments than sedentary rats, and temperature induced metabolic scope was greater in exercised rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Physical activity is a necessary prerequisite for the expression of transcriptional regulators that influence a broad range of physiological functions from energy metabolism to cardiovascular function and nutrient uptake. A sedentary lifestyle leads to decreased daily energy expenditure because of a

  9. Response of Brazilian native trees to acute ozone dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Bárbara Baêsso; de Souza, Sílvia Ribeiro; Alves, Edenise Segala

    2014-03-01

    Ozone (O3) is a toxic secondary pollutant able to cause an intense oxidative stress that induces visual symptoms on sensitive plant species. Controlled fumigation experiment was conducted with the aim to verify the O3 sensibility of three tropical species: Piptadenia gonoachanta (Mart.) Macbr. (Fabaceae), Astronium graveolens Jacq. (Anacardiaceae), and Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae). The microscopical features involved in the oxidative stress were recognized based on specific histochemical analysis. The three species showed visual symptoms, characterized as necrosis and stippling between the veins, mostly visible on the adaxial leaf surface. All the studied species presented hypersensitive-like response (HR-like), and peroxide hydrogen accumulation (H2O2) followed by cell death and proanthocyanidin oxidation in P. gonoachanta and A. graveolens. In P. gonoachanta, a decrease in chlorophyll autofluorescence occurred on symptomatic tissues, and in A. graveolens and C. floribundus, a polyphenol compound accumulation occurred. The responses of Brazilian native species were similar to those described for sensitive species from temperate climate, and microscopical markers may be useful for the detection of ozone symptoms in future studies in the field. PMID:24297466

  10. Acute infection by hepatitis E virus with a slight immunoglobulin M antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Imanishi, Mamiko; Ishige, Kazunori; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody response is generally regarded as a useful marker for diagnosing primary infection. However, in some cases, this antibody is not detected during the acute phase of infection. An 81-year-old man with stable membranous nephropathy who presented with asymptomatic acute liver dysfunction came to our hospital. HEV RNA of genotype 3 was detected in his serum, and he was diagnosed with acute hepatitis E. According to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, high-level positivity for anti-HEV IgG and IgA antibodies was observed, but the assay was negative for IgM antibody throughout the clinical course of infection. The patient was not immunosuppressed. We further investigated the presence of IgM antibody using two other polyclonal antibodies against human IgM as secondary antibodies and another recombinant ORF2 protein of genotype 3 as an immobilized antigen. IgM was weakly detected in the serum during the acute phase only by the test with the antigen of genotype 3. Multi-genotype antigens can detect a slight IgM antibody response; however, anti-HEV IgA is more useful in diagnosing primary HEV infection, particularly in cases with a low IgM antibody response. PMID:26215116

  11. Central metabolic responses to the overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lian; Xiao, Yi; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos; Zhang, Fuzhong; Antoniewiez, Maciek R; Tang, Yinjie J; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    We engineered a fatty acid overproducing Escherichia coli strain through overexpressing tesA (“pull”) and fadR (“push”) and knocking out fadE (“block”). This “pull-push-block” strategy yielded 0.17 g of fatty acids (C12–C18) per gram of glucose (equivalent to 48% of the maximum theoretical yield) in batch cultures during the exponential growth phase under aerobic conditions. Metabolic fluxes were determined for the engineered E. coli and its control strain using tracer ([1,2-13C]glucose) experiments and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. Cofactor (NADPH) and energy (ATP) balances were also investigated for both strains based on estimated fluxes. Compared to the control strain, fatty acid overproduction led to significant metabolic responses in the central metabolism: (1) Acetic acid secretion flux decreased 10-fold; (2) Pentose phosphate pathway and Entner–Doudoroff pathway fluxes increased 1.5- and 2.0-fold, respectively; (3) Biomass synthesis flux was reduced 1.9-fold; (4) Anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation flux decreased 1.7-fold; (5) Transhydrogenation flux converting NADH to NADPH increased by 1.7-fold. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the engineered strain increased the transcription levels of pntA (encoding the membrane-bound transhydrogenase) by 2.1-fold and udhA (encoding the soluble transhydrogenase) by 1.4-fold, which is in agreement with the increased transhydrogenation flux. Cofactor and energy balances analyses showed that the fatty acid overproducing E. coli consumed significantly higher cellular maintenance energy than the control strain. We discussed the strategies to future strain development and process improvements for fatty acid production in E. coli.

  12. COMT polymorphism modulates the resting-state EEG alpha oscillatory response to acute nicotine in male non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, H; Smith, D; de la Salle, S; Choueiry, J; Impey, D; Philippe, T; Dort, H; Millar, A; Daigle, M; Albert, P R; Beaudoin, A; Knott, V

    2015-07-01

    Performance improvements in cognitive tasks requiring executive functions are evident with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, and activation of the underlying neural circuitry supporting these cognitive effects is thought to involve dopamine neurotransmission. As individual difference in response to nicotine may be related to a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that strongly influences cortical dopamine metabolism, this study examined the modulatory effects of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on the neural response to acute nicotine as measured with resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations. In a sample of 62 healthy non-smoking adult males, a single dose (6 mg) of nicotine gum administered in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was shown to affect α oscillatory activity, increasing power of upper α oscillations in frontocentral regions of Met/Met homozygotes and in parietal/occipital regions of Val/Met heterozygotes. Peak α frequency was also found to be faster with nicotine (vs. placebo) treatment in Val/Met heterozygotes, who exhibited a slower α frequency compared to Val/Val homozygotes. The data tentatively suggest that interindividual differences in brain α oscillations and their response to nicotinic agonist treatment are influenced by genetic mechanisms involving COMT. PMID:26096691

  13. Late Metabolic Acidosis Caused by Renal Tubular Acidosis in Acute Salicylate Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Norihiro; Hirose, Yasuo; Sato, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Daisuke; Shimada, Yuko; Hori, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    A 16-year-old man was transferred to our emergency department seven hours after ingesting 486 aspirin tablets. His blood salicylate level was 83.7 mg/dL. He was treated with fluid resuscitation and sodium bicarbonate infusion, and his condition gradually improved, with a decline in the blood salicylate level. However, eight days after admission, he again reported nausea, a venous blood gas revealed metabolic acidosis with a normal anion gap. The blood salicylate level was undetectable, and a urinalysis showed glycosuria, proteinuria and elevated beta-2 microglobulin and n-acetyl glucosamine levels, with a normal urinary pH despite the acidosis. We diagnosed him with relapse of metabolic acidosis caused by renal tubular acidosis. PMID:27181539

  14. Acute naphthalene toxicity presenting with metabolic acidosis:a rare complication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karthick C Annamalai; Shrikiran A; Suneel C Mundkur; Chaitanya Varma PV

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene moth ball poisoning in children can present with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. A 2 year old boy who had accidentally consumed unknown number of moth balls presented 3 d later with vomiting, seizures, methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia and altered sensorium. He was managed with red blood cell transfusion, IV Methylene blue and Sodium bicarbonate. Clinical and laboratory parameters normalized. We describe this case as ingestional naphthalene poisoning with rare manifestation of metabolic acidosis, with a good outcome after treatment.

  15. Acute phase response to surgery of varying intensity in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Nielsen, Jon Vedding; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postoperative inflammatory response of horses to elective surgery of varying intensity. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study. ANIMALS: Horses referred to 2 hospitals for either arthroscopic removal of a unilateral osteochondritic lesion in the tibiotarsal joint...... (minimal surgical trauma, n=11), correction of recurrent laryngeal neuropathy by laryngoplasty and ventriculectomy (intermediate surgical trauma, n=10) or removal of an ovarian tumor by laparotomy (major surgical trauma, n=5). METHODS: Horses had a thorough clinical examination every day. White blood cell....... RESULTS: Postoperative concentrations of SAA and fibrinogen were significantly higher in horses that had laparotomy and ovariectomy than in horses that had laryngoplasty and ventriculectomy, or arthroscopy. Iron concentrations decreased to lower levels after intermediate and major surgical trauma than...

  16. Jasmonate-responsive transcription factors regulating plant secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Meiliang; Memelink, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce a large variety of secondary metabolites including alkaloids, glucosinolates, terpenoids and phenylpropanoids. These compounds play key roles in plant-environment interactions and many of them have pharmacological activity in humans. Jasmonates (JAs) are plant hormones which induce biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites. JAs-responsive transcription factors (TFs) that regulate the JAs-induced accumulation of secondary metabolites belong to different families including AP2/ERF, bHLH, MYB and WRKY. Here, we give an overview of the types and functions of TFs that have been identified in JAs-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and highlight their similarities and differences in regulating various biosynthetic pathways. We review major recent developments regarding JAs-responsive TFs mediating secondary metabolite biosynthesis, and provide suggestions for further studies. PMID:26876016

  17. Effects of acute exhaustive physical exercise upon glutamine metabolism of lymphocytes from trained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Caperuto, Erico Chagas; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira

    2007-01-16

    Transitory immunosupression is reported after intense exercise, especially after an increase in training overload and in overtraining. The influence of intense exercise on plasma hormones and glutamine concentration may contribute to this effect. However, the effect of such exercise-induced changes upon lymphocyte and glutamine metabolism is not known. We compared glutamine metabolism in lymphocytes in sedentary (SED) and trained rats. Rats from the moderate group (MOD) swam for 6 weeks, 1 h/day, in water at 32+/-1 degrees C, with a load of 5.5% body weight attached to the tail. Animals from the exhaustive group (EXT) trained like MOD, with training increasing to 3 times 1 h a day during the last week, with 150 min rest between each bout. Animals were killed immediately after the last training bout. We observed reduced concentrations of plasma glucose (pglutamine (pglutamine (pglutamine consumption (pglutamine consumption (pexercise promoted decreased glutamine plasma concentration and changes in glutamine metabolism that did not impair lymphocyte proliferation in exhaustive trained rats. PMID:17123550

  18. Erythropoietin Action in Stress Response, Tissue Maintenance and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Yuanyuan Zhang; Li Wang; Soumyadeep Dey; Mawadda Alnaeeli; Sukanya Suresh; Heather Rogers; Ruifeng Teng; Constance Tom Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) regulation of red blood cell production and its induction at reduced oxygen tension provides for the important erythropoietic response to ischemic stress. The cloning and production of recombinant human EPO has led to its clinical use in patients with anemia for two and half decades and has facilitated studies of EPO action. Reports of animal and cell models of ischemic stress in vitro and injury suggest potential EPO benefit beyond red blood cell production including vas...

  19. Acute marijuana effects on response-reinforcer relations under multiple variable-interval schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S D; Cherek, D R; Pietras, C J; Tcheremissine, O V

    2004-07-01

    Acute marijuana administration may alter response-reinforcer relationships via a change in reinforcer efficacy, but may also impair coordination and motor function. One approach to evaluating drug effects on both motor function and reinforcer efficacy involves fitting the matching law equation to data obtained under multiple variable interval (VI) schedules. The present report describes an experiment that examined the effects of acute marijuana on response properties using this approach. Six human subjects responded under a multiple VI schedule for monetary reinforcers after smoking placebo and two active doses of marijuana. The low marijuana dose produced unsystematic changes in responding. As measured by the matching law equation parameters (k and rB), at the high dose five subjects showed a decrease-motor-related properties of response rate and four subjects' responding indicated a decrease in reinforcer efficacy. These data raise the possibility that, at high doses, marijuana administration alters both motor function and reinforcer efficacy.

  20. Glycolytic metabolism and tumour response to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To study whether pre-therapeutic lactate or pyruvate predict for tumour response to fractionated irradiation and to identify possible coherencies between intermediates of glycolysis and expression levels of selected proteins. Materials and methods: Concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, glucose and ATP were quantified via bioluminescence imaging in tumour xenografts derived from 10 human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) lines. Tumours were irradiated with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Expression levels of the selected proteins in tumours were measured at the mRNA and protein level. Tumour-infiltrating leucocytes were quantified after staining for CD45. Results: Lactate but not pyruvate concentrations were significantly correlated with tumour response to fractionated irradiation. Lactate concentrations in vivo did not reflect lactate production rates in vitro. Metabolite concentrations did not correlate with GLUT1, PFK-L or LDH-A at the transcriptional or protein level. CD45-positive cell infiltration was low in the majority of tumours and did not correlate with lactate concentration. Conclusions: Our data support the hypothesis that the antioxidative capacity of lactate may contribute to radioresistance in malignant tumours. Non-invasive imaging of lactate to monitor radiation response and testing inhibitors of glycolysis to improve outcome after fractionated radiotherapy warrant further investigations.

  1. Cephalic phase metabolic responses in normal weight adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, D G; Storlien, L H; Furler, S M; Chisholm, D J

    1987-08-01

    The presence and physiologic importance of cephalic phase insulin release in humans remains controversial. The aim of these studies was to determine whether cephalic phase insulin release could be demonstrated in normal weight subjects and whether it would be associated with changes in blood glucose, free fatty acid, and pancreatic polypeptide levels. The studies were followed by a hyperglycemic clamp to determine whether cephalic responses would alter overall glucose disposal or glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In all, 17 subjects were studied on two occasions with and without (control study) presentation of food stimuli. Tease-feeding alone (n = 6), or the administration of a sweet taste alone (aspartame, n = 5) failed to stimulate cephalic responses. However, the presentation of the combined stimuli (tease meals plus sweet taste, n = 7) resulted in a significant fall (P less than .005) in blood glucose levels and a variable rise in serum insulin (% insulin rise 38 +/- 15%, P less than .05) and C-peptide levels (7 +/- 6%, NS) within five minutes of the food presentation when compared with control studies, with no change seen in free fatty acid or pancreatic polypeptide levels. The blood glucose fall correlated strongly (r = .90, P less than .01) with a score of the subjective response to the food and taste.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3298939

  2. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem.

  3. Changes in autophagy, proteasome activity and metabolism to determine a specific signature for acute and chronic senescent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Stefania; Alessio, Nicola; Squillaro, Tiziana; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Melone, Mariarosa A; Cipollaro, Marilena; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2015-11-24

    A sharp definition of what a senescent cell is still lacking since we do not have in depth understanding of mechanisms that induce cellular senescence. In addition, senescent cells are heterogeneous, in that not all of them express the same genes and present the same phenotype. To further clarify the classification of senescent cells, hints may be derived by the study of cellular metabolism, autophagy and proteasome activity. In this scenario, we decided to study these biological features in senescence of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC). These cells contain a subpopulation of stem cells that are able to differentiate in mesodermal derivatives (adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteocytes). In addition, they can also contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of many organs, hence, their senescence could be very deleterious for human body functions. We induced MSC senescence by oxidative stress, doxorubicin treatment, X-ray irradiation and replicative exhaustion. The first three are considered inducers of acute senescence while extensive proliferation triggers replicative senescence also named as chronic senescence. In all conditions, but replicative and high IR dose senescence, we detected a reduction of the autophagic flux, while proteasome activity was impaired in peroxide-treated and irradiated cells. Differences were observed also in metabolic status. In general, all senescent cells evidenced metabolic inflexibility and prefer to use glucose as energy fuel. Irradiated cells with low dose of X-ray and replicative senescent cells show a residual capacity to use fatty acids and glutamine as alternative fuels, respectively. Our study may be useful to discriminate among different senescent phenotypes. PMID:26540573

  4. Monocytes in systematic inflammatory response syndrome: Differences between sepsis and acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vassilios Koussoulas; Michalis Tzivras; Vassiliki Karagianni; Ekaterini Spyridaki; Diamantis Plachouras; Helen Giamarellou; Evangelos J Giamarellos-Bourboulis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To unravel the differences between systematic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) of acute pancreatitis compared to the same syndrome in sepsis.METHODS: Twenty-five patients were enrolled, 12 with sepsis and 13 acute pancreatitis. After diagnosis 20 mL blood was sampled. Half were assayed for isolation of monocytes and 10 mL was centrifuged for serum test of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6(IL-6). Half of monocytes were incubated in the presence of patients' serum and supernatants were collected. The other half was treated for estimation of optical photometry under caspase-3 inhibition. TNFα and IL-6 were estimated by an enzyme immunoassay.RESULTS: median ± SE of serum IL-6 in septic patients and acute pancreatitis patients was 192.30 ± 35.40 ng/L and 21.00 ± 16.05 ng/L, respectively (P < 0.01). Respective values of caspase-3 were 0.94 ± 0.17 pmol/min 104 cells and 0.34 ± 0.09 pmol/min 104 cells (P < 0.05).IL-6 of monocyte supernatants of patients with sepsis was significantly increased after addition of patients' serum, while that of patients with acute pancreatitis did not show significant difference.CONCLUSION: The data have shown that monocyte activity is different between acute pancreatitis and sepsis. This phenomenon might be explained as a different pathway to the pro-inflammatory cytokines release or could be a novel anti-inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis.

  5. Metabolic responses in Candida tropicalis to complex inhibitors during xylitol bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizeng; Li, Hao; Fan, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Jingkun; Tang, Pingwah; Yuan, Qipeng

    2015-09-01

    During xylitol fermentation, Candida tropicalis is often inhibited by inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysate. The mechanisms involved in the metabolic responses to inhibitor stress and the resistances to inhibitors are still not clear. To understand the inhibition mechanisms and the metabolic responses to inhibitors, a GC/MS-based metabolomics approach was performed on C. tropicalis treated with and without complex inhibitors (CI, including furfural, phenol and acetic acid). Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to determine the metabolic variability between CI-treated groups and control groups, and 25 metabolites were identified as possible entities responsible for the discrimination caused by inhibitors. We found that xylose uptake rate and xylitol oxidation rate were promoted by CI treatment. Metabolomics analysis showed that the flux from xylulose to pentose phosphate pathway increased, and tricarboxylic acid cycle was disturbed by CI. Moreover, the changes in levels of 1,3-propanediol, trehalose, saturated fatty acids and amino acids showed different mechanisms involved in metabolic responses to inhibitor stress. The increase of 1,3-propanediol was considered to be correlated with regulating redox balance and osmoregulation. The increase of trehalose might play a role in protein stabilization and cellular membranes protection. Saturated fatty acids could cause the decrease of membrane fluidity and make the plasma membrane rigid to maintain the integrity of plasma membrane. The deeper understanding of the inhibition mechanisms and the metabolic responses to inhibitors will provide us with more information on the metabolism regulation during xylitol bioconversion and the construction of industrial strains with inhibitor tolerance for better utilization of bioresource. PMID:26127015

  6. Acute responses of American kestrels to methyl parathion and fenvalerate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Franson, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological and toxicological effects of p.o, methyl parathion (0.375-3.0 mg/kg) or fenvalerate (1000-4000 mg/kg) were examined over a 10 h period in American kestrels (Falco sparverius) maintained in thermoneutral (22?.C) and cold (-5?.C) environments. Methyl parathion was highly toxic (LD50=3.08 mg/kg, 95% confidence limits=2.29-4.l4 mg/kg, producing overt intoxication (abnormal posture, ataxia, paresis), dose-dependent inhibition (26-67%) of brain acetylcholinesterase activity, hyperglycemia, and elevated plasma corticosterone concentration. Transient but pronounced hypothermia was associated with plasma cholinesterase inhibition in excess of 50% (2 h after intubation), although this response was highly variable (plasma ChE inhibition vs. A cloacal temperature, r=-0.60). Fenvalerate, at doses far exceeding those encountered in the environment, caused mild intoxication (irregular head movement) and elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but did not alter cloacal temperature, plasma activities of CK, U-HBDH, and LDK, or concentrations of corticosterone, glucose, triiodothyronine, and uric acid. Cold exposure intensified methyl parathion toxicity, but did not affect that of fenvalerate. It would thus appear that the organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion poses far greater hazard than the pyrethroid fenvalerate to raptorial birds.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  8. Acute mechano-electronic responses in twisted phosphorene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Woosun; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a striking difference in the change in the carrier effective mass as a function of torque angle (and thus, the corresponding change in carrier mobility) between the zigzag and armchair directions in these TPNRs. The accompanied tunable band-gap energies for the hydrogen-passivated zigzag TPNRs may then be exploited for various key opto-electronic nanodevices.Many different forms of mechanical and structural deformations have been employed to alter the electronic structure of various modern two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials. Given the recent interest in the new class of 2D nanomaterials - phosphorene, here we investigate how the rotational strain-dependent electronic properties of low-dimensional phosphorene may be exploited for technological gain. Here, using first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the mechanical stability of twisted one-dimensional phosphorene nanoribbons (TPNR) by measuring their critical twist angle (θc) and shear modulus as a function of the applied mechanical torque. We find a strong anisotropic, chirality-dependent mechano-electronic response in the hydrogen-passivated TPNRs upon vortical deformation, resulting in a

  9. Does Fasciola hepatica infection modify the response of acute hepatitis C virus infection to IFN-α treatment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Sahin; Mehmet Isler; Altug Senol; Mustafa Demirci; Zeynep Dilek Aydin

    2005-01-01

    Immunologic response to acute hepatitis C is mainly a Th1 response, whereas fasciolopsiasis is associated with a diverse T-cell response. Interferon-alpha has immunomodulatory effects and enhances Th1 immune response. Fasciola infection could theoretically interfere with the Th1 immune response, even when acquired after an initial response to interferon-alpha treatment for acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report here the case of a male patient who acquired Fasciola hepatica infection after an initial response to IFN-alpha therapy with a favorable outcome

  10. Social stress modulates the cortisol response to an acute stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, J D; Gollock, M J; Gilmour, K M

    2014-01-15

    In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) of subordinate social status, circulating cortisol concentrations were elevated under resting conditions but the plasma cortisol and glucose responses to an acute stressor (confinement in a net) were attenuated relative to those of dominant trout. An in vitro head kidney preparation, and analysis of the expression of key genes in the stress axis prior to and following confinement in a net were then used to examine the mechanisms underlying suppression of the acute cortisol stress response in trout experiencing chronic social stress. With porcine adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) as the secretagogue, ACTH-stimulated cortisol production was significantly lower for head kidney preparations from subordinate trout than for those from dominant trout. Dominant and subordinate fish did not, however, differ in the relative mRNA abundance of melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) within the head kidney, although the relative mRNA abundance of these genes was significantly higher in both dominant and subordinate fish than in sham trout (trout that did not experience social interactions but were otherwise treated identically to the dominant and subordinate fish). The relative mRNA abundance of all three genes was significantly higher in trout exposed to an acute net stressor than under control conditions. Upstream of cortisol production in the stress axis, plasma ACTH concentrations were not affected by social stress, nor was the relative mRNA abundance of the binding protein for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-BP). The relative mRNA abundance of CRF in the pre-optic area of subordinate fish was significantly higher than that of dominant or sham fish 1h after exposure to the stressor. Collectively, the results indicate that chronic social stress modulates cortisol production at the level of the interrenal cells, resulting in an attenuated

  11. The mortality and response rate after FLANG regimen in patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali A Mehrzad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oncologists today are greatly concerned about the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute leukemia. FLANG regimen, combination of novantron, cytarabine, fludarabine, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, has been used in treatment of refractory/relapsed acute leukemia since 1990s. The present study has evaluated mortality and response rate of this regimen. Materials and Methods: In this study, 25 patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia aged 15-55 years underwent FLANG regimen at Seyed-Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran during 2008-2009. One month later, bone marrow samples were taken to evaluate the responsiveness to treatment. Participants were followed for a year. The data was analyzed by student-t and chi-square tests, logistic, and Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves in SPSS 19. Results: Out of the 25 patients, 8 patients (32% had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5 refractory and 3 relapsed cases and 17 subjects had acute myeloid leukemia (7 refractory and 10 relapsed cases. According to the bone marrow biopsies taken one month after FLANG regimen, 10 patients (40% had responded to treatment. Five patients of the 10 responders underwent successful bone marrow transplantation (BMT. On the other hand, 13 patients (52%, who had not entered the CR period, died during the follow-up. Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any significant associations between disease type and responsiveness to treatment. Conclusion: This study indicated higher rates of unresponsiveness to treatment while its mortality rate was comparable with other studies. Overall, according to limitations for BMT (as the only chance for cure in Iran, it seems that FLANG therapy is an acceptable choice for these patients.

  12. Role of Metabolism by Intestinal Bacteria in Arbutin-Induced Suppression of Lymphoproliferative Response in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Jeong; Ha, Hyun Woo; Kim, Ghee Hwan; Lee, Sang Kyu; Ahn, Young Tae; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2012-01-01

    Role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in arbutin-induced immunotoxicity was investigated in splenocyte cultures. Following an incubation of arbutin with 5 different intestinal bacteria for 24 hr, its aglycone hydroquinone could be produced and detected in the bacterial culture media with different amounts. Toxic effects of activated arbutin by intestinal bacteria on lymphoproliferative response were tested in splenocyte cultures from normal mice. Lipopolysaccharide and concanavalin A were used as mitogens for B- and T-cells, respectively. When bacteria cultured medium with arbutin was treated into the splenocytes for 3 days, the medium cultured with bacteria producing large amounts of hydroquinone induced suppression of lymphoproliferative responses, indicating that metabolic activation by intestinal bacteria might be required in arbutin-induced toxicity. The results indicated that the present testing system might be applied for determining the possible role of metabolism by intestinal bacteria in certain chemical-induced immunotoxicity in animal cell cultures. PMID:24116295

  13. Differential metabolism of acrylonitrile to cyanide is responsible for the greater sensitivity of male vs female mice: role of CYP2E1 and epoxide hydrolases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acrylonitrile (AN) is a potent toxicant and a known rodent carcinogen. AN epoxidation to cyanoethylene oxide (CEO) via CYP2E1 and its subsequent metabolism via epoxide hydrolases (EH) to yield cyanide is thought to be responsible for the acute toxicity and mortality of AN. Recent reports showed that male mice are more sensitive than females to the acute toxicity/mortality of AN. The present work was undertaken to assess the metabolic and enzymatic basis for the greater sensitivity of male vs female mice to AN toxicity. Male and female wild-type and CYP2E1-null mice received AN at 0, 2.5, 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg by gavage. Cyanide concentrations were measured at 1 or 3 h after dosing. Current data demonstrated that cyanide levels in blood and tissues of AN-treated wild-type mice of both sexes were significantly greater than in vehicle-treated controls and increased in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, cyanide levels in AN-treated CYP2E1-null mice were not statistically different from those measured in vehicle-treated controls. Furthermore, higher levels of cyanide were detected in male wild-type mice vs females in association with greater sensitivity of males to the acute toxicity/mortality of this chemical. Using Western blot analysis, negligible difference in CYP2E1 expression with higher levels of soluble and microsomal EH (sEH and mEH) was detected in the liver of male vs female mice. In kidneys, male mice exhibited higher expression of both renal CYP2E1 and sEH than did female mice. In conclusion, higher blood and tissue cyanide levels are responsible for the greater sensitivity of male vs female mice to AN. Further, higher expression of CYP2E1 and EH in male mice may contribute to greater formation of CEO and its subsequent metabolism to yield cyanide, respectively

  14. Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy D; Donaldson, Michael R; Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Drenner, S Matthew; Lotto, Andrew; Cooke, Steven J; Hinch, Scott G; Patterson, David A; Farrell, Anthony P

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is building to suggest that both chronic and acute warm temperature exposure, as well as other anthropogenic perturbations, may select for small adult fish within a species. To shed light on this phenomenon, we investigated physiological and anatomical attributes associated with size-specific responses to an acute thermal challenge and a fisheries capture simulation (exercise+air exposure) in maturing male coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Full-size females were included for a sex-specific comparison. A size-specific response in haematology to an acute thermal challenge (from 7 to 20 °C at 3 °C h(-1)) was apparent only for plasma potassium, whereby full-size males exhibited a significant increase in comparison with smaller males ('jacks'). Full-size females exhibited an elevated blood stress response in comparison with full-size males. Metabolic recovery following exhaustive exercise at 7 °C was size-specific, with jacks regaining resting levels of metabolism at 9.3 ± 0.5 h post-exercise in comparison with 12.3 ± 0.4 h for full-size fish of both sexes. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption scaled with body mass in male fish with an exponent of b = 1.20 ± 0.08. Jacks appeared to regain osmoregulatory homeostasis faster than full-size males, and they had higher ventilation rates at 1 h post-exercise. Peak metabolic rate during post-exercise recovery scaled with body mass with an exponent of b~1, suggesting that the slower metabolic recovery in large fish was not due to limitations in diffusive or convective oxygen transport, but that large fish simply accumulated a greater 'oxygen debt' that took longer to pay back at the size-independent peak metabolic rate of ~6 mg min(-1) kg(-1). Post-exercise recovery of plasma testosterone was faster in jacks compared with full-size males, suggesting less impairment of the maturation trajectory of smaller fish. Supporting previous studies, these findings suggest that environmental change and non

  15. Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Clark

    Full Text Available Evidence is building to suggest that both chronic and acute warm temperature exposure, as well as other anthropogenic perturbations, may select for small adult fish within a species. To shed light on this phenomenon, we investigated physiological and anatomical attributes associated with size-specific responses to an acute thermal challenge and a fisheries capture simulation (exercise+air exposure in maturing male coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch. Full-size females were included for a sex-specific comparison. A size-specific response in haematology to an acute thermal challenge (from 7 to 20 °C at 3 °C h(-1 was apparent only for plasma potassium, whereby full-size males exhibited a significant increase in comparison with smaller males ('jacks'. Full-size females exhibited an elevated blood stress response in comparison with full-size males. Metabolic recovery following exhaustive exercise at 7 °C was size-specific, with jacks regaining resting levels of metabolism at 9.3 ± 0.5 h post-exercise in comparison with 12.3 ± 0.4 h for full-size fish of both sexes. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption scaled with body mass in male fish with an exponent of b = 1.20 ± 0.08. Jacks appeared to regain osmoregulatory homeostasis faster than full-size males, and they had higher ventilation rates at 1 h post-exercise. Peak metabolic rate during post-exercise recovery scaled with body mass with an exponent of b~1, suggesting that the slower metabolic recovery in large fish was not due to limitations in diffusive or convective oxygen transport, but that large fish simply accumulated a greater 'oxygen debt' that took longer to pay back at the size-independent peak metabolic rate of ~6 mg min(-1 kg(-1. Post-exercise recovery of plasma testosterone was faster in jacks compared with full-size males, suggesting less impairment of the maturation trajectory of smaller fish. Supporting previous studies, these findings suggest that environmental change and non

  16. Metabolic consequences of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade for the acutely ischemic dog myocardium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westera, G.; Hollander, W. den; Wall, E.E. van der; Eenige, M.J. van; Scholtalbers, S.; Visser, F.C.; Roos, J.P.

    1984-02-01

    In an experimental study in 50 dogs the myocardial uptake of free fatty acids (FFAs) after beta-blockade was determined using radioiodinated heptadecanoic acid as a metabolic tracer. All 4 beta-blockers used (metoprolol, timolol, propranolol and pindolol) lowered the uptake of FFAs in the normal canine heart. Uptake of FFAs was also diminished after coronary artery occlusion per se, but administration of beta-blockers exerted little additional influence on the uptake of FFAs. This observation was qualitatively parallelled by the uptake of /sup 201/Tl in concomitant experiments. Plasma FFA levels were increased by pindolol (non-selective with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity), not changed by metoprolol (a cardioselective betablocking agent) and lowered by timolol and propranolol (both non-selective compounds). The extent of ischemic tissue, as reflected by uptake of iodoheptadecanoic acid and /sup 201/Tl, was diminished by metoprolol but not by other beta-blockers. Regional distribution of both tracers, as shown in the endo-epicardial uptake ratios, was hardly influenced by beta-blockade, except for a small increase of /sup 201/Tl uptake in non-occluded endocardium. Uptake of /sup 201/Tl as well as of iodoheptadecanoic acid in the ischemic area was increased by metoprolol, timolol and propranolol and decreased by pindolol. We conclude that beta-blocking agents confer different effects on myocardial uptake and metabolism of FFAs which might possibly be related to their different inherent properties.

  17. STAT3 Activation in Skeletal Muscle Links Muscle Wasting and the Acute Phase Response in Cancer Cachexia

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Bonetto; Tufan Aydogdu; Noelia Kunzevitzky; Guttridge, Denis C.; Sawsan Khuri; Koniaris, Leonidas G.; Teresa A Zimmers

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cachexia, or weight loss despite adequate nutrition, significantly impairs quality of life and response to therapy in cancer patients. In cancer patients, skeletal muscle wasting, weight loss and mortality are all positively associated with increased serum cytokines, particularly Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and the presence of the acute phase response. Acute phase proteins, including fibrinogen and serum amyloid A (SAA) are synthesized by hepatocytes in response to IL-6 as part of the i...

  18. Increased Serum Phospholipase A2 Activity in Advanced Chronic Liver Disease as an Expression of the Acute Phase Response

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Pirisi; Carlo Fabris; Maria Piera Panozzo; Giorgio Soardo; Pierluigi Toniutto; Ettore Bartou

    1993-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) modifications were investigated in patients with acute and chronic liver diseases, PLA2 variations were related to indices of liver function as well as to parameters of the acute phase response. Serum PLA2 activity modifications were f1uorimetrically measured in 105 patients affected by acute and chronic liver diseases or extra-hepatic diseases. One-way ANOV A demonstrated a significant difference among groups (F= 4.53, P

  19. Cholinergic modulation of the cerebral metabolic response to citalopram in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Gwenn S.; Kramer, Elisse; Ma, Yilong; Hermann, Carol R.; Dhawan, Vijay; Chaly, Thomas; Eidelberg, David

    2009-01-01

    Pre-clinical and human neuropharmacological evidence suggests a role of cholinergic modulation of monoamines as a pathophysiological and therapeutic mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. The present study measured the effects of treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitor and nicotinic receptor modulator, galantamine, on the cerebral metabolic response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram. Seven probable Alzheimer's disease patients and seven demographically comparable contro...

  20. Cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses to graded exercise in juvenile diabetics with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Galbo, H; Christensen, N J

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen juvenile diabetics were studied in order to determine if decreased beat-to-beat variation during deep respiration, indicating abnormal autonomic nerve function, imply that cardiovascular, hormonal and metabolic responses are impaired. Patients with decreased beat-to-beat variation had to...

  1. The unfolded protein response mediates reversible tau phosphorylation induced by metabolic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harg, J. M.; Nolle, A.; Zwart, R.; Boerema, A. S.; van Haastert, E. S.; Strijkstra, A. M.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Scheper, W.

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) in close connection with early stages of tau pathology. Metabolic disturbances are strongly associated with increased risk for AD and are a potent inducer of the UPR. Here, we demonstra

  2. The structure of wheat bread influences the postprandial metabolic response in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelderink, Coby; Noort, Martijn W. J.; Sozer, Nesli; Koehorst, Martijn; Holst, Jens J.; Deacon, Carolyn F.; Rehfeld, Jens F.; Poutanen, Kaisa; Vonk, Roel J.; Oudhuis, Lizette; Priebe, Marion G.

    2015-01-01

    Postprandial high glucose and insulin responses after starchy food consumption, associated with an increased risk of developing several metabolic diseases, could possibly be improved by altering food structure. We investigated the influence of a compact food structure; different wheat products with

  3. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  4. Physiological and metabolic responses of gestating Brahaman cows to repeated transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to examine physiological and metabolic responses to repeated transportation of gestating Brahman cows, previously classified as mature cows into temperament groups of Calm, Intermediate, or Temperamental. Brahman cows (n = 48) were subjected to 2 hours of transport (TRA...

  5. Identification of a metabolic biomarker panel in rats for prediction of acute and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinchun; Slavov, Svetoslav; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Ando, Yosuke; Greenhaw, James; Yang, Xi; Salminen, William; Mendrick, Donna L; Beger, Richard

    2014-07-01

    It has been estimated that 10% of acute liver failure is due to "idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity". The inability to identify such compounds with classical preclinical markers of hepatotoxicity has driven the need to discover a mechanism-based biomarker panel for hepatotoxicity. Seven compounds were included in this study: two overt hepatotoxicants (acetaminophen and carbon tetrachloride), two idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (felbamate and dantrolene), and three non-hepatotoxicants (meloxicam, penicillin and metformin). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were orally gavaged with a single dose of vehicle, low dose or high dose of the compounds. At 6 h and 24 h post-dosing, blood was collected for metabolomics and clinical chemistry analyses, while organs were collected for histopathology analysis. Forty-one metabolites from previous hepatotoxicity studies were semi-quantified and were used to build models to predict hepatotoxicity. The selected metabolites were involved in various pathways, which have been noted to be linked to the underlying mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. PLS models based on all 41 metabolite or smaller subsets of 6 (6 h), 7 (24 h) and 20 (6 h and 24 h) metabolites resulted in models with an accuracy of at least 97.4% for the hold-out test set and 100% for training sets. When applied to the external test sets, the PLS models predicted that 1 of 9 rats at both 6 h and 24 h treated with idiosyncratic liver toxicants was exposed to a hepatotoxic chemical. In conclusion, the biomarker panel might provide information that along with other endpoint data (e.g., transcriptomics and proteomics) may diagnose acute and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in a clinical setting.

  6. Identification of a metabolic biomarker panel in rats for prediction of acute and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinchun Sun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that 10% of acute liver failure is due to “idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity”. The inability to identify such compounds with classical preclinical markers of hepatotoxicity has driven the need to discover a mechanism-based biomarker panel for hepatotoxicity. Seven compounds were included in this study: two overt hepatotoxicants (acetaminophen and carbon tetrachloride, two idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (felbamate and dantrolene, and three non-hepatotoxicants (meloxicam, penicillin and metformin. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were orally gavaged with a single dose of vehicle, low dose or high dose of the compounds. At 6 h and 24 h post-dosing, blood was collected for metabolomics and clinical chemistry analyses, while organs were collected for histopathology analysis. Forty-one metabolites from previous hepatotoxicity studies were semi-quantified and were used to build models to predict hepatotoxicity. The selected metabolites were involved in various pathways, which have been noted to be linked to the underlying mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. PLS models based on all 41 metabolite or smaller subsets of 6 (6 h, 7 (24 h and 20 (6 h and 24 h metabolites resulted in models with an accuracy of at least 97.4% for the hold-out test set and 100% for training sets. When applied to the external test sets, the PLS models predicted that 1 of 9 rats at both 6 h and 24 h treated with idiosyncratic liver toxicants was exposed to a hepatotoxic chemical. In conclusion, the biomarker panel might provide information that along with other endpoint data (e.g., transcriptomics and proteomics may diagnose acute and idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in a clinical setting.

  7. Arm crank vs handrim wheelchair propulsion: metabolic and cardiopulmonary responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P A; Glaser, R M; Petrofsky, J S; Underwood, P D; Smith, G B; Richard, J J

    1983-06-01

    The handrim propulsion system of most manual wheelchairs has been shown to be inefficient and stressful to the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Arm crank propulsion has been suggested to reduce these stresses. In order to compare conventional handrim wheelchair propulsion to arm crank type wheelchair propulsion, 16 volunteers (9 able-bodied, 7 wheelchair-dependent) operated both wheelchairs over level tiled and carpeted test courses at 3km.hr-1. The arm crank propelled wheelchair was operated in 3 gear ratios: low, medium and high. Exercise bouts were 5 minutes in duration. During the final minute of each test, oxygen uptake (VO2), net locomotive energy cost (NLEC), pulmonary ventilation (VE) and heart rate (HR) were monitored. Subjects exhibited significantly lower magnitude of these physiologic responses during arm crank wheelchair propulsion relative to handrim wheelchair propulsion for all gear drive ratios. Average percent differences were 30% and 32% for VO2; 50% and 50% for NLEC; 27% and 34% for VE; and 16% and 19% for HR on the tiled and carpeted test surfaces, respectively. From these data we conclude that arm crank wheelchair propulsion is less strenuous than conventional handrim wheelchair propulsion and that arm crank propulsion systems should be considered as a possible means to improve wheelchair design. PMID:6860094

  8. Plant 9-lox oxylipin metabolism in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ocampo, Juan A.; García Garrido, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal symbiotic interaction (MA) is a successful strategy to substantially promote plant growth, development and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the recognition and establishment of symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, the jasmonates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed upregulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and point a key regulatory feature for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly these derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX). In this mini-review we highlight recent progress understanding the function of oxylipins in the establishment of the AM symbiosis and hypothesize that the activation of the 9-LOX pathway might be part of the activation of host defense responses which will then contribute to both, the control of AM fungal spread and the increased resistance to fungal pathogens in mycorrhizal plants. PMID:23073021

  9. Calcium-Dependent Physiologic and Pathologic Stimulus-Metabolic Response Coupling in Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspers, Lawrence D.; Mémin, Elisabeth; Thomas, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent paradigm in calcium signaling is the coordination of the target response of the calcium signal with activation of metabolic energy production to support that response. This occurs in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle where contractile activity and ATP production are coordinately regulated by the frequency and amplitude of calcium transients, endocrine and exocrine cells that use calcium to drive the secretory process, and hepatocytes where the downstream targets ...

  10. Fructose modifies the hormonal response and modulates lipid metabolism in aerobic exercise after glucose supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Juan Marcelo; Da Silva-Grigoletto, Marzo Edir; Ruano-Ruiz, Juan; Caballero-Villarraso, Javier; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Tunez-Fiñana, Isaac; Tasset-Cuevas, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martinez, Pablo; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The metabolic response, when aerobic exercise is performed after the ingestion of glucose plus fructose, is unclear. To compare the hormonal and lipid responses provoked by the ingestion of glucose plus fructose in relation to glucose alone, during aerobic exercise and the recovery phase, we administered two beverages containing glucose plus fructose or glucose in a randomised crossover design, to twenty healthy, aerobically trained volunteers. After a 15-minute resting pe...

  11. Lung Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) Response and Regulation During Acute and Chronic Lung Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F.;

    2013-01-01

    lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized......BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in...... three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. METHODS: Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. RESULTS: In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in...

  12. Metabolic responses at various intensities relative to critical swimming velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubekis, Argyris G; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2013-06-01

    To avoid any improper training load, the speed of endurance training needs to be regularly adjusted. Both the lactate threshold (LT) velocity and the velocity corresponding to the maximum lactate steady state (MLSS) are valid and reliable indices of swimming aerobic endurance and commonly used for evaluation and training pace adjustment. Alternatively, critical velocity (CV), defined as the velocity that can be maintained without exhaustion and assessed from swimming performance of various distances, is a valid, reliable, and practical index of swimming endurance, although the selection of the proper distances is a determinant factor. Critical velocity may be 3-6 and 8-11% faster compared with MLSS and LT, respectively. Interval swimming at CV will probably show steady-lactate concentration when the CV has been calculated by distances of 3- to 15-minute duration, and this is more evident in adult swimmers, whereas increasing or decreasing lactate concentration may appear in young and children swimmers. Therefore, appropriate corrections should be made to use CV for training pace adjustment. Findings in young and national level adult swimmers suggest that repetitions of distances of 100-400 m, and velocities corresponding to a CV range of 98-102% may be used for pacing aerobic training, training at the MLSS, and possibly training for improvement of VO2max. Calculation of CV from distances of 200-400, 50-100-200-400, or 100-800 m is an easy and practical method to assess aerobic endurance. This review intends to study the physiological responses and the feasibility of using CV for aerobic endurance evaluation and training pace adjustment, to help coaches to prescribe training sets for different age-group swimmers.

  13. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees. PMID:27030776

  14. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees.

  15. Divergent responses of inflammatory mediators within the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex to acute psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Haley A; Gandhi, Chaitanya P; Gray, J Megan; Morena, Maria; Hassan, Kowther I; Hill, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    There is now a growing body of literature that indicates that stress can initiate inflammatory processes, both in the periphery and brain; however, the spatiotemporal nature of this response is not well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an acute psychological stress on changes in mRNA and protein levels of a wide range of inflammatory mediators across a broad temporal range, in key corticolimbic brain regions involved in the regulation of the stress response (amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus, medial prefrontal cortex). mRNA levels of inflammatory mediators were analyzed immediately following 30min or 120min of acute restraint stress and protein levels were examined 0h through 24h post-termination of 120min of acute restraint stress using both multiplex and ELISA methods. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that exposure to acute psychological stress results in an increase in the protein level of several inflammatory mediators in the amygdala while concomitantly producing a decrease in the protein level of multiple inflammatory mediators within the medial prefrontal cortex. This pattern of changes seemed largely restricted to the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex, with stress producing few changes in the mRNA or protein levels of inflammatory mediators within the hippocampus or hypothalamus. Consistent with previous research, stress resulted in a general elevation in multiple inflammatory mediators within the circulation. These data indicate that neuroinflammatory responses to stress do not appear to be generalized across brain structures and exhibit a high degree of spatiotemporal specificity. Given the impact of inflammatory signaling on neural excitability and emotional behavior, these data may provide a platform with which to explore the importance of inflammatory signaling within the prefrontocortical-amygdala circuit in the regulation of the neurobehavioral responses to stress.

  16. Does Prior Training Affect Acute O2 Supply Responses During Exercise in Desaturator COPD Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Delample, Delphine; Sabate, Meritxell; Préfaut, Christian; Durand, Fabienne

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the effects of a prior individualized training program (TP) on the response to acute oxygen supply during exercise in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients showing exercise-induced desaturation. Methods: Twenty-two COPD patients (mean [SD] FEV1 = 52.1 [3]% predicted) who desaturated on exercise participated in a TP. Exercise tolerance while breathing compressed air or oxygen was assessed using a walking test (WT) before and after TP. Oxygen ...

  17. Nitric Oxide Response to Acute Exercise in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Ayşem; Arat-Özkan, Alev; Köner, Özge; Balcı, Huriye; Abacı, Okay; Gürmen, Tevfik; Küçükoğlu, Serdar; Yiğit, Zerrin

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been identified as a vasodilatory substance released from the endothelium which decreases in the presence of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to evaluate the systemic NO response to acute exercise in untrained diabetic and nondiabetic patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). This is a prospective, clinical study consisting of three groups. Group A (n=50) consisted of nondiabetic CAD patients,group B (n=20) consisting of diabetic, CAD patients and gro...

  18. Clinical features and early treatment response of central nervous system involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Mette; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains a therapeutic challenge. PROCEDURE: To explore leukemia characteristics of patients with CNS involvement at ALL diagnosis, we analyzed clinical features and early treatment response of 744....... Symptoms or clinical findings were present among 27 of 54 patients with CNS3 versus only 7 of 39 patients with CNS2 and 15 of 75 patients with TLP+ (P bone marrow residual disease level did...

  19. Markers of acute-phase response in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiane Martins; Antônio Carlos de Castro Gama; Daniela Valcarenghi; Anna Paula de Borba Batschauer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:Tuberculosis promotes an acute phase response with an increase of blood reactants, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), among others, which are associated with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR).Objective:Evaluate the ESR and the CRP as markers for diagnosis and monitoring cases of pulmonary tuberculosis.Method:Research on patients with clinical, laboratory, and imaging diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, from Itajaí-SC; in which CRP and ESR were analyzed in three diffe...

  20. Acute Phase Response of Rabbit to HgCl2 and CdCl2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NinaGHOSH; SHELLEYBHATTACHARYA

    1993-01-01

    A variety of changes occur in the rabbit under metal stress which include the appearance of the acute phase protein,C-reactive protein in the serum and significant reduction in the serum titres of albumin and acetylcholinesterase.The phospholipid profile is postively correlated with the higher degree of tissue necrosis encountered in mercury treated rabbit.Cadmium and mercury treatments evoke a similar response pattern in rabbit differing only in the degree of change.

  1. Odorant metabolism catalyzed by olfactory mucosal enzymes influences peripheral olfactory responses in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Thiebaud

    Full Text Available A large set of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs, such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs, esterases and transferases, are highly expressed in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM. These enzymes are known to catalyze the biotransformation of exogenous compounds to facilitate elimination. However, the functions of these enzymes in the olfactory epithelium are not clearly understood. In addition to protecting against inhaled toxic compounds, these enzymes could also metabolize odorant molecules, and thus modify their stimulating properties or inactivate them. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro biotransformation of odorant molecules in the rat OM and assessed the impact of this metabolism on peripheral olfactory responses. Rat OM was found to efficiently metabolize quinoline, coumarin and isoamyl acetate. Quinoline and coumarin are metabolized by CYPs whereas isoamyl acetate is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases. Electro-olfactogram (EOG recordings revealed that the hydroxylated metabolites derived from these odorants elicited lower olfactory response amplitudes than the parent molecules. We also observed that glucurono-conjugated derivatives induced no olfactory signal. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the local application of a CYP inhibitor on rat olfactory epithelium increased EOG responses elicited by quinoline and coumarin. Similarly, the application of a carboxylesterase inhibitor increased the EOG response elicited by isoamyl acetate. This increase in EOG amplitude provoked by XME inhibitors is likely due to enhanced olfactory sensory neuron activation in response to odorant accumulation. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that biotransformation of odorant molecules by enzymes localized to the olfactory mucosa may change the odorant's stimulating properties and may facilitate the clearance of odorants to avoid receptor saturation.

  2. Exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate boosts acclimatization in rats exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia: assessment of haematological and metabolic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Chawla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The physiological challenges posed by hypobaric hypoxia warrant exploration of pharmacological entities to improve acclimatization to hypoxia. The present study investigates the preclinical efficacy of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P to improve acclimatization to simulated hypobaric hypoxia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Efficacy of intravenously administered S1P in improving haematological and metabolic acclimatization was evaluated in rats exposed to simulated acute hypobaric hypoxia (7620 m for 6 hours following S1P pre-treatment for three days. MAJOR FINDINGS: Altitude exposure of the control rats caused systemic hypoxia, hypocapnia (plausible sign of hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis due to suboptimal renal compensation indicated by an overt alkaline pH of the mixed venous blood. This was associated with pronounced energy deficit in the hepatic tissue along with systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. S1P pre-treatment improved blood oxygen-carrying-capacity by increasing haemoglobin, haematocrit, and RBC count, probably as an outcome of hypoxia inducible factor-1α mediated erythropoiesis and renal S1P receptor 1 mediated haemoconcentation. The improved partial pressure of oxygen in the blood could further restore aerobic respiration and increase ATP content in the hepatic tissue of S1P treated animals. S1P could also protect the animals from hypoxia mediated oxidative stress and inflammation. CONCLUSION: The study findings highlight S1P's merits as a preconditioning agent for improving acclimatization to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure. The results may have long term clinical application for improving physiological acclimatization of subjects venturing into high altitude for occupational or recreational purposes.

  3. Acute phase protein response in an experimental model of ovine caseous lymphadenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Tamara L

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caseous lymphadenitis (CLA is a disease of small ruminants caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. The pathogenesis of CLA is a slow process, and produces a chronic rather than an acute disease state. Acute phase proteins (APP such as haptoglobin (Hp serum amyloid A (SAA and α1 acid glycoprotein (AGP are produced by the liver and released into the circulation in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. The concentration of Hp in serum increases in experimental CLA but it is not known if SAA and AGP respond in parallel or have differing response profiles. Results The concentration in serum of Hp, SAA and AGP in 6 sheep challenged with 2 × 105 cells of C. pseudotuberculosis showed significant increases (P C. pseudotuberculosis became detectable at 11 days p.i. and continued to rise throughout the experiment. Conclusion The serum concentrations of Hp, SAA and AGP were raised in sheep in an experimental model of CLA. An extended response was found for AGP which occurred at a point when the infection was likely to have been transforming from an acute to a chronic phase. The results suggest that AGP could have a role as a marker for chronic conditions in sheep.

  4. A medical costs study of older patients with acute myocardial infarction and metabolic syndrome in hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan GQ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guan-qi Fan,1 Kai-li Fu,1 Cheng-wei Jin,1 Xiao-zhen Wang,2 Lu Han,1 Hui Wang,1 Ming Zhong,1 Yun Zhang,1 Wei Zhang,1 Zhi-hao Wang1,3 1Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Department of Cardiology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, 2Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3Department of Geriatric Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Ji’nan, People’s Republic of China Background: Older patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI usually have a poor prognosis, but whether this poor prognosis leads to high hospital costs remains unclear. This study investigated the clinical outcomes of and costs incurred by older patients with AMI and metabolic syndrome (MS in hospital.Methods and results: Patients with AMI seen at Qilu Hospital of Shandong University between January 2011 and May 2013 were separated into four groups: young non-MS patients (n=282, older non-MS patients (n=324, young MS patients (n=217, and older MS patients (n=174. We found that advanced age was significantly associated with worse clinical outcomes, and that the clinical outcomes in patients with AMI and MS are also worsened. At the same cost (RMB¥10,000, older patients with and without MS had a markedly increased number of cardiovascular incidences compared with younger patients without MS. In a comparison of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of percutaneous coronary intervention, older patients without MS had a lower ICER for cardiovascular incidences and a higher ICER for cardiac event-free survival rate when compared with young patients without MS, but a lower ICER for cardiovascular incidences and a higher ICER for cardiac event-free survival rate when compared with older MS patients. Conclusion: Older AMI patients have poor clinical outcomes and their treatment is not cost-effective; however, the results are worse in patients with

  5. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Alleviates Acute Inflammation and Promotes Lipid Mobilization During the Inflammatory Response in White Adipose Tissue of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Gao, Shixing; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    Recently, white adipose tissue has been shown to exhibit immunological activity, and may play an important role in host defense and protection against bacterial infection. Αlpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) has been demonstrated to function as an anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant agent. However, its influence on the inflammatory response and metabolic changes in white adipose tissue remains unknown. We used male C57BL/6 mice as models to study the effect of α-LA on the inflammatory response and metabolic changes in white adipose tissue after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The non-esterified fatty acid content was measured by an automatic biochemical analyzer. The expression of inflammation-, lipid- and energy metabolism-related genes and proteins was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The results indicated that α-LA significantly decreased the epididymis fat weight index and the non-esterified fatty acid content in plasma compared with the control group. LPS significantly increased the expression of inflammation genes and α-LA reduced their expression. The LPS-induced expression of nuclear factor-κB protein was decreased by α-LA. Regarding lipid metabolism, α-LA significantly counteracted the inhibitory effects of LPS on the expression of hormone-sensitive lipase gene and protein. α-LA evidently increased the gene expression of fatty acid transport protein 1 and cluster of differentiation 36. Regarding energy metabolism, α-LA significantly increased the expression of most of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes compared with the control and LPS group. Accordingly, α-LA can alleviate acute inflammatory response and this action may be related with the promotion of lipid mobilization in white adipose tissue.

  6. Macroautophagy and Cell Responses Related to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Lipid Metabolism and Unconventional Secretion of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Arnould

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Macroautophagy has important physiological roles and its cytoprotective or detrimental function is compromised in various diseases such as many cancers and metabolic diseases. However, the importance of autophagy for cell responses has also been demonstrated in many other physiological and pathological situations. In this review, we discuss some of the recently discovered mechanisms involved in specific and unspecific autophagy related to mitochondrial dysfunction and organelle degradation, lipid metabolism and lipophagy as well as recent findings and evidence that link autophagy to unconventional protein secretion.

  7. Increased insulin sensitivity and responsiveness of glucose metabolism in adipocytes from female versus male rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Guerre-Millo, M.; Leturque, A.; Girard, J.; Lavau, M

    1985-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine whether there were sex-associated differences in the action of insulin on glucose metabolism in adipocytes. Insulin binding and the dose-response curves for glucose transport (assessed by measuring the cell-associated radioactivity after 15-s incubation with 50 microM [6-14C]glucose) and [U-14C]glucose (5 mM) metabolism into CO2 and lipids were compared in retroperitoneal adipocytes from age-matched (84 d) male and female rats. In addition, the activity of...

  8. Metabolic response to exogenous ethanol in yeast: An in vivo statistical total correlation NMR spectroscopy approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maso Ricci; Marianna Aggravi; Claudia Bonechi; Silvia Martini; Anna Maria; Claudio Rossi

    2012-09-01

    In vivo NMR spectroscopy, together with selectively 13C-labelled substrates and ‘statistical total correlation spectroscopy’ analysis (STOCSY), are valuable tools to collect and interpret the metabolic responses of a living organism to external stimuli. In this study, we applied this approach to evaluate the effects of increasing concentration of exogenous ethanol on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentative metabolism. We show that the STOCSY analysis correctly identifies the different types of correlations among the enriched metabolites involved in the fermentation, and that these correlations are quite stable even in presence of a stressing factor such as the exogenous ethanol.

  9. Macroautophagy and Cell Responses Related to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, Lipid Metabolism and Unconventional Secretion of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demine, Stéphane; Michel, Sébastien; Vannuvel, Kayleen; Wanet, Anaïs; Renard, Patricia; Arnould, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Macroautophagy has important physiological roles and its cytoprotective or detrimental function is compromised in various diseases such as many cancers and metabolic diseases. However, the importance of autophagy for cell responses has also been demonstrated in many other physiological and pathological situations. In this review, we discuss some of the recently discovered mechanisms involved in specific and unspecific autophagy related to mitochondrial dysfunction and organelle degradation, lipid metabolism and lipophagy as well as recent findings and evidence that link autophagy to unconventional protein secretion. PMID:24710422

  10. Metabolic and fibrinolytic response to changed insulin sensitivity in users of oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kresten R.; Christiansen, Erik; Madsbad, Sten;

    1999-01-01

    systems, are relevant in the evaluation of the risk of developing vascular disorders or diabetes in OC users. We studied insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), glucose effectiveness (S(g)), and insulin response in young, healthy women by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after......The fundamental role of insulin resistance for metabolic changes linked to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes is increasingly recognized. Oral contraceptives (OC) may affect insulin sensitivity, and a detailed characterization hereof, as well as the secondary effects on related metabolic...

  11. Changes in energy metabolism in response to 48 h of overfeeding and fasting in Caucasians and Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyer, C; Vozarova, B; Ravussin, E;

    2001-01-01

    Differences in the metabolic response to overfeeding and starvation may confer susceptibility or resistance to obesity in humans. To further examine this hypothesis, we assessed the changes in 24 h energy metabolism in response to short-term overfeeding and fasting in Caucasians (C) and Pima Indi...

  12. A Pilot Metabolic Profiling Study of Patients With Neonatal Jaundice and Response to Phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, A; Qi, S; Su, Z; Shen, H; Yang, Y; Cai, W; Dai, Y

    2016-08-01

    Phototherapy has been widely used in treating neonatal jaundice, but detailed metabonomic profiles of neonatal jaundice patients and response to phototherapy have not been characterized. Our aim was to depict the serum metabolic characteristics of neonatal jaundice patients relative to controls and changes in response to phototherapy. A (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic approach was employed to study the metabolic profiling of serum from healthy infants (n = 25) and from infants with neonatal jaundice (n = 30) pre- and postphototherapy. The acquired data were processed by multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The PLS-DA and OPLS-DA model identified nine metabolites capable of distinguishing patients from controls. In addition, 28 metabolites such as β-glucose, α-glucose, valine, and pyruvate changed in response to phototherapy. This study offers useful information on metabolic disorders in neonatal jaundice patients and the effects of phototherapy on lipids, amino acid, and energy metabolism. PMID:27306191

  13. Sexually dimorphic myeloid inflammatory and metabolic responses to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C; Lanzetta, N; Eter, L; Singer, K

    2016-08-01

    It is well known in clinical and animal studies that women and men have different disease risk as well as different disease physiology. Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic and cardiovascular disease compared with postmenopausal women and men. Most murine studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of similar protection in female mice. We have investigated dietary obesity in a mouse model and have directly compared inflammatory responses in males and females. In this review we will summarize what is known about sex differences in diet-induced inflammation and will summarize our data on this topic. It is clear that sex differences in high-fat diet-induced inflammatory activation are due to cell intrinsic differences in hematopoietic responses to obesogenic cues, but further research is needed to understand what leads to sexually dimorphic responses. PMID:27252473

  14. Metabolic history impacts mammary tumor epithelial hierarchy and early drug response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montales, Maria Theresa E; Melnyk, Stepan B; Liu, Shi J; Simmen, Frank A; Liu, Y Lucy; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2016-09-01

    The emerging links between breast cancer and metabolic dysfunctions brought forth by the obesity pandemic predict a disproportionate early disease onset in successive generations. Moreover, sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents may be influenced by the patient's metabolic status that affects the disease outcome. Maternal metabolic stress as a determinant of drug response in progeny is not well defined. Here, we evaluated mammary tumor response to doxorubicin in female mouse mammary tumor virus-Wnt1 transgenic offspring exposed to a metabolically compromised environment imposed by maternal high-fat diet. Control progeny were from dams consuming diets with regular fat content. Maternal high-fat diet exposure increased tumor incidence and reduced tumor latency but did not affect tumor volume response to doxorubicin, compared with control diet exposure. However, doxorubicin-treated tumors from high-fat-diet-exposed offspring demonstrated higher proliferation status (Ki-67), mammary stem cell-associated gene expression (Notch1, Aldh1) and basal stem cell-like (CD29(hi)CD24(+)) epithelial subpopulation frequencies, than tumors from control diet progeny. Notably, all epithelial subpopulations (CD29(hi)CD24(+), CD29(lo)CD24(+), CD29(hi)CD24(+)Thy1(+)) in tumors from high-fat-diet-exposed offspring were refractory to doxorubicin. Further, sera from high-fat-diet-exposed offspring promoted sphere formation of mouse mammary tumor epithelial cells and of human MCF7 cells. Untargeted metabolomics analyses identified higher levels of kynurenine and 2-hydroxyglutarate in plasma of high-fat diet than control diet offspring. Kynurenine/doxorubicin co-treatment of MCF7 cells enhanced the ability to form mammosphere and decreased apoptosis, relative to doxorubicin-only-treated cells. Maternal metabolic dysfunctions during pregnancy and lactation may be targeted to reduce breast cancer risk and improve early drug response in progeny, and may inform clinical management of disease

  15. Gender-specific metabolic responses in hepatopancreas of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis challenged by Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Sun, Hushan; Wang, Yiyan; Ma, Mengwen; Zhang, Yuemei

    2014-10-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish and frequently studied in shellfish immunology. In this work, the gender-specific metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in hepatopancreas from M. galloprovincialis were characterized using NMR-based metabolomics. In details, V. harveyi challenge increased the levels of amino acids including (valine, leucine, isoleucine, threonine, alanine, arginine and tyrosine) and ATP, and decreased the level of glucose in male mussel hepatopancreas. In V. harveyi-challenged female mussel hepatopancreas, both threonine and AMP were significantly elevated, and choline, phoshphocholine, sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, taurine, betaine and ATP were depleted. Obviously, only threonine was similarly altered to that in V. harveyi-challenged male mussel hepatopancreas. These findings confirmed the gender-specific metabolic responses in mussels challenged by V. harveyi. Overall, V. harveyi induced an enhanced energy demand through activated glycolysis and immune response indicated by increased BCAAs in male mussel hepatopancreas. In female mussel hepatopancreas, V. harveyi basically caused disturbances in both osmotic regulation and energy metabolism through the metabolic pathways of conversions of phosphocholine and ADP to choline and ATP, and sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and H2O into choline and sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (Cu/Zn-SOD, HSP90, lysozyme and defensin) suggested that V. harveyi induced obvious oxidative and immune stresses in both male and female mussel hepatopancreas. This work demonstrated that V. harveyi could induce gender-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis hepatopancreas using NMR-based metabolomics.

  16. Effects of gender on neuroendocrine and metabolic counterregulatory responses to exercise in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S N; Galassetti, P; Wasserman, D H; Tate, D

    2000-01-01

    Significant, sexual dimorphisms exist in counterregulatory responses to commonly occurring stresses, such as hypoglycemia, fasting, and cognitive testing. The question of whether counterregulatory responses differ during exercise in healthy men and women remains controversial. The aim of this study was to determine whether a sexual dimorphism exists in neuroendocrine, metabolic, or cardiovascular responses to prolonged moderate exercise. Sixteen healthy (eight men and eight women) subjects matched for age (28+/-2 yr), body mass index (22+/-1 kg/m2), nutrient intake, and spectrum of physical fitness were studied in a randomized fashion during 90 min of exercise on a cycle ergometer at 80% of their anaerobic threshold (approximately 50% VO2 max). Respiratory quotient and oxygen consumption relative to body weight were identical in men and women. Glycemia was equated (5.3+/-0.2 mmol/L) during exercise via an exogenous glucose infusion. Gender had significant effects on counterregulatory responses during exercise. Arterialized epinephrine (1.05+/-0.2 vs. 0.45+/-0.04 nmol/L), norepinephrine (9.2+/-1.1 vs. 5.8+/-1.1 nmol/L), and pancreatic polypeptide (52+/-6 vs. 37+/-6 pmol/L) were significantly (Psystem (SNS) drive, lipolytic responses were increased in women. Arterialized blood glycerol (215+/-30 vs. 140+/-20 micromol/L), beta-hydroxybutyrate (54+/-9 vs. 25+/-10 micromol/L), and plasma nonesterified fatty acids (720+/-56 vs. 469+/-103 micromol/L) were significantly (Psexual dimorphism exists in neuroendocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular counterregulatory responses to prolonged moderate exercise in man. We conclude that during exercise, men have increased autonomic nervous system (epinephrine, norepinephrine, pancreatic polypeptide), cardiovascular (systolic, mean arterial pressure) and certain metabolic (carbohydrate oxidation) counterregulatory responses, but that women have increased lipolytic (glycerol, nonesterified fatty acids) and ketogenic (beta

  17. Acute responses of blood pressure, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Giovanni García Cardona

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare acute responsesin arterial blood pressure (BP, heartrate (HR and rating of perceived exertion scale(PES during a variable-resistance weight-liftingcircuit (WC versus submaximal aerobicexercise in cycloergometer (AE in individualswith hypertension scaled I and II.Methods: 21 subjects with controlled hypertensionscaled I and II (8 males and 13 females,15 actives and 6 sedentary, age 56±5.9 yearswere evaluated. All the participants receivedtraining about warm-up, use of PES, and respiratoryand weight lifting machines techniquesin exercise. All underwent a single session ofWC in six stations at 50% 1RM and a singlesession of AE at 70%-80% FCmax, in intervalsof one week. BP, HR and PES was measured inboth exercises.Results: To compare responses in both typesof exercise, at Test was used. It found a lowerresponse of HR (p<0.001, systolic BP (p<0.005and PES (p<0.005 during WC. Greater diastolicBP response was found in WC, although it wasnot significative (p=0.139. Sedentary subjectsshowed greater increases. Responses of variableswere similar between stations in WC.Conclusion: This study evidenced a similarbehavior of acute cardiovascular responses and PESduring WC versus AE in hypertensive subjects. Itshowed a lower pressure response during WC insubjects with previous aerobic training.

  18. Role of Glucocorticoids in the Response to Unloading of Muscle Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Intact control (weight bearing) and suspended rats gained weight at a similar rate during a 6 day period. Adrenaectomized (adx) weight bearing rats gained less weight during this period while adrenalectomized suspended rats showed no significant weight gain. Cortisol treatment of both of these groups of animals caused a loss of body weight. Results from these studies show several important findings: (1) Metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating gluccorticoids; (2) Metabolic changes in the soleus due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of receptors; and (3) Not all metabolic responses in the unloaded soleus muscle are due to direct action of elevated glucocorticoids or increased sensitivity to these hormones.

  19. Effect of Yuxingeng Fluid(愈心梗液)on Myocardial Energy Metabolism in Wistar Rats with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董国菊; 刘剑刚; 史大卓

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of Yuxingeng fluid (愈心梗液, YXGF) on myocardial energy metabolism in Wistar rats with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) by observing the ultrastructure of mitochondria and the enzyme activities of rat myocardial adenosine triphosphate (ATP), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the content of glycogen. Methods: AMI models were established by ligature of left anterior descending coronary artery and then the rats with AMI were randomly divided into 7 groups: namely, blank group, model group, sham-operated group, captopil group, high-dose YXGF group, middle-dose YXGF group and Iow-dose YXGF group. From the next day after modeling, the rats were given YXGF through gastrogavage which lasted for 4 weeks. And then, the ultrastructure of mitochondria was observed by electronic microscope and the enzyme activities of ATP, SDH,ACP, ALP and the content of glycogen were determined. Results: Compared with model group, the other three groups of high-dose YXGF, middle-dose YXGF, Iow-dose YXGF and captopril group could protect the ultrastructure of mitochondria and significantly increase enzyme activities of ATP, SDH, ACP, ALP and the content of glycogen (P<0.01). Conclusion: YXGF can protect mitochondria and increase myocardial enzyme activities and the content of glycogen, which may be one of the mechanisms intervening in the pathological course of the early ventricular remodeling in rats with AMI.

  20. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  1. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, C. Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R.; Moran, Molly C.; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E.; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Methods Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. Results A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Conclusion Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF. PMID:27483465

  2. Bronchodilator response following methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction predicts acute asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Heung-Woo; Song, Woo-Jung; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Cho, Sang-Heon; Datta, Soma; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G

    2016-07-01

    Methacholine bronchial provocation test provides the concentration of methacholine causing a 20% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from baseline (PC20). The dose-response slope (DRS), and other continuous indices of responsiveness (CIR; the percentage decline from the post-diluent baseline FEV1 after the last dose of methacholine), and per cent recovery index (PRI; the percentage increase from the maximally reduced FEV1 after bronchodilator inhalation) are alternative measures. The clinical relevance of these indices in predicting acute asthma exacerbations has not been fully evaluated.In two prospective cohorts of childhood and elderly asthmatics, baseline PC20, DRS, CIR and PRI were measured and evaluated as predictors of acute asthma exacerbations.We found that PRI was significantly related to the presence of asthma exacerbations during the first year of follow-up in both cohorts of childhood (p=0.025) and elderly asthmatics (p=0.003). In addition, PRI showed a significant association with the total number of steroid bursts during 4.3 years of follow-up in the cohort of childhood asthmatics (p=0.04).We demonstrated that PRI, an index of reversibility following methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction, was a good clinical predictor of acute exacerbations of asthma in both childhood and elderly asthmatics. PMID:27076579

  3. Acute Phase Proteins in Response to Dictyocaulus viviparus Infection in Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waller K Persson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments were carried out to examine the acute phase response, as measured by the acute phase proteins (APP haptoglobin, serum amyloid A (SAA and fibrinogen, in calves infected with lungworm, Dictyocaulus vivparus. In addition, eosinophil counts were analysed. Three different dose models were used in 3 separate experiments: I 250 D. viviparus infective third stage larvae (L3 once daily for 2 consecutive days, II 100 D. viviparus L3 once daily for 5 consecutive days, and III 2000 L3 once. All 3 dose regimes induced elevated levels of haptoglobin, SAA and fibrinogen, although there was considerable variation both between and within experiments. A significant increase was observed in all 3 APP at one or several time points in experiment I and III, whereas in experiment II, the only significant elevation was observed for fibrinogen at one occasion. The eosinophil numbers were significantly elevated in all 3 experiments. The results show that lungworm infection can induce an acute phase response, which can be monitored by the selected APP. Elevated APP levels in combination with high numbers of eosinophils in an animal with respiratory disease may be used as an indicator of lung worm infection, and help the clinician to decide on treatment. However, high numbers of eosinophils and low levels of APP do not exclude a diagnosis of lungworm. Thus, lungworm infection may not be detected if measurements of APP are used to assess calf health in herds or individual animals.

  4. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis. PMID:25016451

  5. The implicit affiliation motive moderates cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Mirko; Schüler, Julia; Budde, Henning

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously shown that the implicit affiliation motive - the need to establish and maintain friendly relationships with others - leads to chronic health benefits. The underlying assumption for the present research was that the implicit affiliation motive also moderates the salivary cortisol response to acute psychological stress when some aspects of social evaluation and uncontrollability are involved. By contrast we did not expect similar effects in response to exercise as a physical stressor. Fifty-nine high school students aged M=14.8 years were randomly assigned to a psychosocial stress (publishing the results of an intelligence test performed), a physical stress (exercise intensity of 65-75% of HRmax), and a control condition (normal school lesson) each lasting 15min. Participants' affiliation motives were assessed using the Operant Motive Test and salivary cortisol samples were taken pre and post stressor. We found that the strength of the affiliation motive negatively predicted cortisol reactions to acute psychosocial but not to physical stress when compared to a control group. The results suggest that the affiliation motive buffers the effect of acute psychosocial stress on the HPA axis.

  6. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjølhede, T; Dalgas, U; Gade, A B; Bjerre, M; Stenager, E; Petersen, T; Vissing, K

    2016-07-01

    Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying attention to the medical treatments of the patient. At present, PwMS are routinely enrolled in immunosuppressive medication, but exercise-induced immunomodulatory effects have not been investigated under these circumstances. The objective of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic cytokines responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ were measured before and after 24 weeks of PRT. The acute effect was evaluated following standardized single-bout resistance exercise in the untrained and the trained state. No changes were observed in resting cytokine levels after PRT. However, an indication of reduced IL-17F secretion following resistance exercise was observed in the trained compared with the untrained state. This study suggests little acute and chronic effect of PRT on cytokine levels in IFN-treated PwMS. PMID:26105554

  7. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jackson, Petra;

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction...... epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk...

  8. Purine and pyrimidine metabolism: Convergent evidence on chronic antidepressant treatment response in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Ik; Dournes, Carine; Sillaber, Inge; Uhr, Manfred; Asara, John M.; Gassen, Nils C.; Rein, Theo; Ising, Marcus; Webhofer, Christian; Filiou, Michaela D.; Müller, Marianne B.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used drugs for the treatment of psychiatric diseases including major depressive disorder (MDD). For unknown reasons a substantial number of patients do not show any improvement during or after SSRI treatment. We treated DBA/2J mice for 28 days with paroxetine and assessed their behavioral response with the forced swim test (FST). Paroxetine-treated long-time floating (PLF) and paroxetine-treated short-time floating (PSF) groups were stratified as proxies for drug non-responder and responder mice, respectively. Proteomics and metabolomics profiles of PLF and PSF groups were acquired for the hippocampus and plasma to identify molecular pathways and biosignatures that stratify paroxetine-treated mouse sub-groups. The critical role of purine and pyrimidine metabolisms for chronic paroxetine treatment response in the mouse was further corroborated by pathway protein expression differences in both mice and patients that underwent chronic antidepressant treatment. The integrated -omics data indicate purine and pyrimidine metabolism pathway activity differences between PLF and PSF mice. Furthermore, the pathway protein levels in peripheral specimens strongly correlated with the antidepressant treatment response in patients. Our results suggest that chronic SSRI treatment differentially affects purine and pyrimidine metabolisms, which may explain the heterogeneous antidepressant treatment response and represents a potential biosignature. PMID:27731396

  9. Proteomics reveals a core molecular response of Pseudomonas putida F1 to acute chromate challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCarthy Andrea T

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida is a model organism for bioremediation because of its remarkable metabolic versatility, extensive biodegradative functions, and ubiquity in contaminated soil environments. To further the understanding of molecular pathways responding to the heavy metal chromium(VI [Cr(VI], the proteome of aerobically grown, Cr(VI-stressed P. putida strain F1 was characterized within the context of two disparate nutritional environments: rich (LB media and minimal (M9L media containing lactate as the sole carbon source. Results Growth studies demonstrated that F1 sensitivity to Cr(VI was impacted substantially by nutrient conditions, with a carbon-source-dependent hierarchy (lactate > glucose >> acetate observed in minimal media. Two-dimensional HPLC-MS/MS was employed to identify differential proteome profiles generated in response to 1 mM chromate under LB and M9L growth conditions. The immediate response to Cr(VI in LB-grown cells was up-regulation of proteins involved in inorganic ion transport, secondary metabolite biosynthesis and catabolism, and amino acid metabolism. By contrast, the chromate-responsive proteome derived under defined minimal growth conditions was characterized predominantly by up-regulated proteins related to cell envelope biogenesis, inorganic ion transport, and motility. TonB-dependent siderophore receptors involved in ferric iron acquisition and amino acid adenylation domains characterized up-regulated systems under LB-Cr(VI conditions, while DNA repair proteins and systems scavenging sulfur from alternative sources (e.g., aliphatic sulfonates tended to predominate the up-regulated proteome profile obtained under M9L-Cr(VI conditions. Conclusions Comparative analysis indicated that the core molecular response to chromate, irrespective of the nutritional conditions tested, comprised seven up-regulated proteins belonging to six different functional categories including transcription, inorganic ion

  10. The Impact of Acute and Chronic Weight Restriction and Weight Regulation practices on Physiological, Osteogenic, Metabolic and Cognitive Function in Elite Jockeys

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Eimear

    2010-01-01

    Horse racing is a weight category sport. One of the key challenges facing jockeys is the pressure of “making weight” throughout the protracted racing season. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a chronically weight restrictive lifestyle and acute weight loss practices on aspects of physiological, osteogenic, metabolic and cognitive function in jockeys. Methods: The primary aim was achieved through the completion of four related studies. Study One: The effect of a 4% reduct...

  11. Metabolic responses to fasting and refeeding in lean and genetically obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, N J; Saville, M E; Stock, M J

    1983-05-01

    Injection of norepinephrine (NE) (25 micrograms/100 g body wt) caused a similar rise in metabolic rate in lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats, but 3-day fasting suppressed the response in lean rats and enhanced the rise in obese mutants. Triiodothyronine (T3) injection (10 micrograms/100 g body wt) caused a significantly greater rise in oxygen consumption (Vo2) in obese than lean rats, but the response was attenuated by fasting in all animals. The thermic response to a single meal of either mixed composition, carbohydrate, or protein (40 kJ) was much smaller in obese rats than lean, but the response to the mixed nutrient meal was similar for all rats after a 3-day fast. Refeeding 3-day fasted lean rats with a single carbohydrate meal (40 kJ) caused a rise in plasma T3 levels after 3 h and a delayed increase in metabolic rate 24 h later. Injection of NE instead of refeeding caused a similar delayed rise in metabolic rate. Carbohydrate refeeding had no effect on plasma T3 levels or oxygen consumption in 3-day fasted obese Zuckers, but injection of NE did produce a significant increase in metabolic rate after 24 h. Refeeding 3-day fasted rats with protein (40 kJ) caused a rise in oxygen consumption 24 h later in lean animals but had no effect in obese animals. The data from lean Zucker rats confirm previous findings in Sprague-Dawley rats and suggest that the thermic response to refeeding involves a complex interaction between the sympathetic nervous system and thyroid hormones. Obese Zuckers responded normally to NE and T3, indicating that their reduced thermogenesis after food may be due to insensitivity to nutrient availability or an inability to activate the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:6846570

  12. Agent-based modeling of endotoxin-induced acute inflammatory response in human blood leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inflammation is a highly complex biological response evoked by many stimuli. A persistent challenge in modeling this dynamic process has been the (nonlinear nature of the response that precludes the single-variable assumption. Systems-based approaches offer a promising possibility for understanding inflammation in its homeostatic context. In order to study the underlying complexity of the acute inflammatory response, an agent-based framework is developed that models the emerging host response as the outcome of orchestrated interactions associated with intricate signaling cascades and intercellular immune system interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An agent-based modeling (ABM framework is proposed to study the nonlinear dynamics of acute human inflammation. The model is implemented using NetLogo software. Interacting agents involve either inflammation-specific molecules or cells essential for the propagation of the inflammatory reaction across the system. Spatial orientation of molecule interactions involved in signaling cascades coupled with the cellular heterogeneity are further taken into account. The proposed in silico model is evaluated through its ability to successfully reproduce a self-limited inflammatory response as well as a series of scenarios indicative of the nonlinear dynamics of the response. Such scenarios involve either a persistent (noninfectious response or innate immune tolerance and potentiation effects followed by perturbations in intracellular signaling molecules and cascades. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ABM framework developed in this study provides insight on the stochastic interactions of the mediators involved in the propagation of endotoxin signaling at the cellular response level. The simulation results are in accordance with our prior research effort associated with the development of deterministic human inflammation models that include transcriptional dynamics, signaling, and physiological

  13. Restoration of glucose metabolism in leptin-resistant mouse hearts after acute myocardial infarction through the activation of survival kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witham, William; Yester, Keith; O'Donnell, Christopher P; McGaffin, Kenneth R

    2012-07-01

    In the normal heart, leptin modulates cardiac metabolism. It is unknown, however, what effect leptin has on cardiac metabolism and outcomes in acute myocardial infarction (MI). This study was performed to test the hypothesis that leptin signaling increases glucose metabolism and attenuates injury in the acutely infarcted heart. Mice with (ObR(+/+)) and without (ObR(-/-)) cardiomyocyte specific expression of leptin receptor (ObR) were randomly assigned to experimental MI or sham procedure, and studied 3 days later. ObR(+/+) and ObR(-/-) sham mice were not significantly different in any measured outcome. However, after MI, ObR(-/-) mice had greater cardiac dysfunction, left ventricular dilation, and levels of oxidative stress. These worse indices of cardiac injury in ObR(-/-) mice were associated with attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt signaling, decreased malonyl CoA content, and reduced mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase and electron transport Complex I, II and IV activities. Furthermore, ObR(-/-) mice maintained high rates of cardiac fatty acid oxidation after MI, whereas ObR(+/+) mice demonstrated a switch away from fatty acid oxidation to glucose metabolism. Restoration of cardiac STAT3, PI3K and Akt activity and mitochondrial function in ObR(-/-) mice post-MI was accomplished by ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), an established STAT3 activator, administered immediately after MI. Moreover, CNTF therapy resulted in mitigation of cardiac structural and functional injury, attenuated levels of oxidative stress, and rescued glucose metabolism in the infarcted ObR(-/-) heart. These data demonstrate that impaired cardiac leptin signaling results in metabolic inflexibility for glucose utilization in the face of cardiac stress, and greater morbidity after MI. Further, these studies show that cardiac glucose metabolism can be restored in leptin-resistant hearts by CNTF-mediated activation

  14. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  15. Divergent metabolic responses of Apostichopus japonicus suffered from skin ulceration syndrome and pathogen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yina; Li, Chenghua; Ou, Changrong; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Yali; Su, Xiurong; Li, Ye; Li, Taiwu

    2013-11-13

    Skin ulceration syndrome (SUS) is the main limitation in the development of Apostichopus japonicus culture industries, in which Vibrio splendidus has been well documented as one of the major pathogens. However, the intrinsic mechanisms toward pathogen challenge and disease outbreak remain largely unknown at the metabolic level. In this work, the metabolic responses were investigated in muscles of sea cucumber among natural SUS-diseased and V. splendidus-challenged samples. The pathogen did not induce obvious biological effects in A. japonicus samples after infection for the first 24 h. An enhanced energy storage (or reduced energy demand) and immune responses were observed in V. splendidus-challenged A. japonicus samples at 48 h, as marked by increased glucose and branched chain amino acids, respectively. Afterward, infection of V. splendidus induced significant increases in energy demand in A. japonicus samples at both 72 and 96 h, confirmed by decreased glucose and glycogen, and increased ATP. Surprisingly, high levels of glycogen and glucose and low levels of threonine, alanine, arginine, glutamate, glutamine, taurine and ATP were founded in natural SUS-diseased sea cucumber. Our present results provided essential metabolic information about host-pathogen interaction for sea cucumber, and informed that the metabolic biomarkers induced by V. splendidus were not usable for the prediction of SUS disease in practice. PMID:24127639

  16. Carbohydrate restriction improves the features of Metabolic Syndrome. Metabolic Syndrome may be defined by the response to carbohydrate restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinman Richard D

    2005-11-01

    conclusion is probably not surprising but has not been explicitly stated before. The known effects of CHO-induced hypertriglyceridemia, the HDL-lowering effect of low fat, high CHO interventions and the obvious improvement in glucose and insulin from CHO restriction should have made this evident. In addition, recent studies suggest that a subset of MetS, the ratio of TAG/HDL, is a good marker for insulin resistance and risk of CVD, and this indicator is reliably reduced by CHO restriction and exacerbated by high CHO intake. Inability to make this connection in the past has probably been due to the fact that individual responses have been studied in isolation as well as to the emphasis of traditional therapeutic approaches on low fat rather than low CHO. We emphasize that MetS is not a disease but a collection of markers. Individual physicians must decide whether high LDL, or other risk factors are more important than the features of MetS in any individual case but if MetS is to be considered it should be recognized that reducing CHO will bring improvement. Response of symptoms to CHO restriction might thus provide a new experimental criterion for MetS in the face of on-going controversy about a useful definition. As a guide to future research, the idea that control of insulin metabolism by CHO intake is, to a first approximation, the underlying mechanism in MetS is a testable hypothesis.

  17. Default in plasma and intestinal IgA responses during acute infection by simian immunodeficiency virus

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    Chaoul Nada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting results regarding changes in mucosal IgA production or in the proportions of IgA plasma cells in the small and large intestines during HIV-infection have been previously reported. Except in individuals repeatedly exposed to HIV-1 but yet remaining uninfected, HIV-specific IgAs are frequently absent in mucosal secretions from HIV-infected patients. However, little is known about the organization and functionality of mucosal B-cell follicles in acute HIV/SIV infection during which a T-dependent IgA response should have been initiated. In the present study, we evaluated changes in B-cell and T-cell subsets as well as the extent of apoptosis and class-specific plasma cells in Peyer’s Patches, isolated lymphoid follicles, and lamina propria. Plasma levels of IgA, BAFF and APRIL were also determined. Results Plasma IgA level was reduced by 46% by 28 days post infection (dpi, and no IgA plasma cells were found within germinal centers of Peyer’s Patches and isolated lymphoid follicles. This lack of a T-dependent IgA response occurs although germinal centers remained functional with no sign of follicular damage, while a prolonged survival of follicular CD4+ T-cells and normal generation of IgG plasma cells is observed. Whereas the average plasma BAFF level was increased by 4.5-fold and total plasma cells were 1.7 to 1.9-fold more numerous in the lamina propria, the relative proportion of IgA plasma cells in this effector site was reduced by 19% (duodemun to 35% (ileum at 28 dpi. Conclusion Our data provide evidence that SIV is unable to initiate a T-dependent IgA response during the acute phase of infection and favors the production of IgG (ileum or IgM (duodenum plasma cells at the expense of IgA plasma cells. Therefore, an early and generalized default in IgA production takes place during the acute of phase of HIV/SIV infection, which might impair not only the virus-specific antibody response but also IgA responses

  18. Dose-response curve to salbutamol during acute and chronic treatment with formoterol in COPD

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    La Piana GE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Emanuele La Piana¹, Luciano Corda², Enrica Bertella¹, Luigi Taranto Montemurro¹, Laura Pini¹, Claudio Tantucci¹¹Cattedra di Malattie dell'Apparato Respiratorio, Università di Brescia, ²Prima Divisione di Medicina Interna, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyBackground: Use of short-acting ß2-agonists in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD during treatment with long-acting ß2-agonists is recommended as needed, but its effectiveness is unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess the additional bronchodilating effect of increasing doses of salbutamol during acute and chronic treatment with formoterol in patients with COPD.Methods: Ten patients with COPD underwent a dose-response curve to salbutamol (until 800 µg of cumulative dose after a 1-week washout (baseline, 8 hours after the first administration of formoterol 12 µg (day 1, and after a 12-week and 24-week period of treatment with formoterol (12 µg twice daily by dry powder inhaler. Peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, forced vital capacity, and inspiratory capacity were measured at the different periods of treatment and at different steps of the dose-response curve.Results: Despite acute or chronic administration of formoterol, maximal values of peak expiratory flow, FEV1, and forced vital capacity after 800 µg of salbutamol were unchanged compared with baseline. The baseline FEV1 dose-response curve was steeper than that at day 1, week 12, or week 24 (P < 0.0001. Within each dose-response curve, FEV1 was different only at baseline and at day 1 (P < 0.001, when FEV1 was still greater at 800 µg than at 0 µg (P < 0.02. In contrast, the forced vital capacity dose-response curves were similar at the different periods, while within each dose-response curve, forced vital capacity was different in all instances (P < 0.001, always being higher at 800 µg than at 0 µg (P < 0.05.Conclusion: In patients with stable COPD, the maximal effect

  19. Acute bronchodilator responsiveness and health outcomes in COPD patients in the UPLIFT trial

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    Decramer Marc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debate continues as to whether acute bronchodilator responsiveness (BDR predicts long-term outcomes in COPD. Furthermore, there is no consensus on a threshold for BDR. Methods At baseline and during the 4-year Understanding Potential Long-term Improvements in Function with Tiotropium (UPLIFT® trial, patients had spirometry performed before and after administration of ipratropium bromide 80 mcg and albuterol 400 mcg. Patients were split according to three BDR thresholds: ≥12% + ≥200 mL above baseline (criterion A, ≥15% above baseline (criterion B; and ≥10% absolute increase in percent predicted FEV1 values (criterion C. Several outcomes (pre-dose spirometry, exacerbations, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire [SGRQ] total score were assessed according to presence or absence of BDR in the treatment groups. Results 5783 of 5993 randomized patients had evaluable pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry at baseline. Mean age (SD was 64 (8 years, with 75% men, mean post-bronchodilator FEV1 1.33 ± 0.44 L (47.6 ± 12.7% predicted and 30% current smokers. At baseline, 52%, 66%, and 39% of patients had acute BDR using criterion A, B, and C, respectively. The presence of BDR was variable at follow-up visits. Statistically significant improvements in spirometry and health outcomes occurred with tiotropium regardless of the baseline BDR or criterion used. Conclusions A large proportion of COPD patients demonstrate significant acute BDR. BDR in these patients is variable over time and differs according to the criterion used. BDR status at baseline does not predict long-term response to tiotropium. Assessment of acute BDR should not be used as a decision-making tool when prescribing tiotropium to patients with COPD.

  20. Eletriptan in the management of acute migraine: an update on the evidence for efficacy, safety, and consistent response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capi, Matilde; Curto, Martina; Lionetto, Luana; de Andrés, Fernando; Gentile, Giovanna; Negro, Andrea; Martelletti, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Migraine is a multifactorial, neurological and disabling disorder, also characterized by several autonomic symptoms. Triptans, selective serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonists, are the first-line treatment option for moderate-to-severe headache attacks. In this paper, we review the recent data on eletriptan clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and potential clinically relevant interactions with other drugs. Among triptans, eletriptan shows a consistent and significant clinical efficacy and a good tolerability profile in the treatment of migraine, especially for patients with cardiovascular risk factors without coronary artery disease. It shows the most favorable clinical response, together with sumatriptan injections, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan. Additionally, eletriptan shows the most complex pharmacokinetic/dynamic profile compared with the other triptans. It is metabolized primarily by the CYP3A4 hepatic enzyme and therefore the concomitant administration of CYP3A4-potent inhibitors should be carefully evaluated. A relatively low risk of serotonin syndrome is given by the co-administration with serotoninergic drugs. No clinically relevant interaction has been found with drugs used for migraine prophylactic treatment or other acute drugs, with the exception of ergot derivatives that should not be co-administered with eletriptan. PMID:27582896

  1. Eletriptan in the management of acute migraine: an update on the evidence for efficacy, safety, and consistent response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capi, Matilde; Curto, Martina; Lionetto, Luana; de Andrés, Fernando; Gentile, Giovanna; Negro, Andrea; Martelletti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a multifactorial, neurological and disabling disorder, also characterized by several autonomic symptoms. Triptans, selective serotonin 5-HT1B/1D agonists, are the first-line treatment option for moderate-to-severe headache attacks. In this paper, we review the recent data on eletriptan clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and potential clinically relevant interactions with other drugs. Among triptans, eletriptan shows a consistent and significant clinical efficacy and a good tolerability profile in the treatment of migraine, especially for patients with cardiovascular risk factors without coronary artery disease. It shows the most favorable clinical response, together with sumatriptan injections, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan. Additionally, eletriptan shows the most complex pharmacokinetic/dynamic profile compared with the other triptans. It is metabolized primarily by the CYP3A4 hepatic enzyme and therefore the concomitant administration of CYP3A4-potent inhibitors should be carefully evaluated. A relatively low risk of serotonin syndrome is given by the co-administration with serotoninergic drugs. No clinically relevant interaction has been found with drugs used for migraine prophylactic treatment or other acute drugs, with the exception of ergot derivatives that should not be co-administered with eletriptan. PMID:27582896

  2. Metabolic responses to high protein diet in Korean elite bodybuilders with high-intensity resistance exercise

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    Choue Ryowon

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High protein diet has been known to cause metabolic acidosis, which is manifested by increased urinary excretion of nitrogen and calcium. Bodybuilders habitually consumed excessive dietary protein over the amounts recommended for them to promote muscle mass accretion. This study investigated the metabolic response to high protein consumption in the elite bodybuilders. Methods Eight elite Korean bodybuilders within the age from 18 to 25, mean age 21.5 ± 2.6. For data collection, anthropometry, blood and urinary analysis, and dietary assessment were conducted. Results They consumed large amounts of protein (4.3 ± 1.2 g/kg BW/day and calories (5,621.7 ± 1,354.7 kcal/day, as well as more than the recommended amounts of vitamins and minerals, including potassium and calcium. Serum creatinine (1.3 ± 0.1 mg/dl and potassium (5.9 ± 0.8 mmol/L, and urinary urea nitrogen (24.7 ± 9.5 mg/dl and creatinine (2.3 ± 0.7 mg/dl were observed to be higher than the normal reference ranges. Urinary calcium (0.3 ± 0.1 mg/dl, and phosphorus (1.3 ± 0.4 mg/dl were on the border of upper limit of the reference range and the urine pH was in normal range. Conclusions Increased urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and creatinine might be due to the high rates of protein metabolism that follow high protein intake and muscle turnover. The obvious evidence of metabolic acidosis in response to high protein diet in the subjects with high potassium intake and intensive resistance exercise were not shown in this study results. However, this study implied that resistance exercise with adequate mineral supplementation, such as potassium and calcium, could reduce or offset the negative effects of protein-generated metabolic changes. This study provides preliminary information of metabolic response to high protein intake in bodybuilders who engaged in high-intensity resistance exercise. Further studies will be needed to determine the effects of the intensity

  3. The miRNA plasma signature in response to acute aerobic exercise and endurance training.

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    Søren Nielsen

    Full Text Available MiRNAs are potent intracellular posttranscriptional regulators and are also selectively secreted into the circulation in a cell-specific fashion. Global changes in miRNA expression in skeletal muscle in response to endurance exercise training have been reported. Therefore, our aim was to establish the miRNA signature in human plasma in response to acute exercise and chronic endurance training by utilizing a novel methodological approach. RNA was isolated from human plasma collected from young healthy men before and after an acute endurance exercise bout and following 12 weeks of endurance training. Global miRNA (742 miRNAs measurements were performed as a screening to identify detectable miRNAs in plasma. Using customized qPCR panels we quantified the expression levels of miRNAs detected in the screening procedure (188 miRNAs. We demonstrate a dynamic regulation of circulating miRNA (ci-miRNA levels following 0 hour (miR-106a, miR-221, miR-30b, miR-151-5p, let-7i, miR-146, miR-652 and miR-151-3p, 1 hour (miR-338-3p, miR-330-3p, miR-223, miR-139-5p and miR-143 and 3 hours (miR-1 after an acute exercise bout (P<0.00032. Where ci-miRNAs were all downregulated immediately after an acute exercise bout (0 hour the 1 and 3 hour post exercise timepoints were followed by upregulations. In response to chronic training, we identified seven ci-miRNAs with decreased levels in plasma (miR-342-3p, let-7d, miR-766, miR-25, miR-148a, miR-185 and miR-21 and two miRNAs that were present at higher levels after the training period (miR-103 and miR-107 (P<0.00032. In conclusion, acute exercise and chronic endurance training, likely through specific mechanisms unique to each stimulus, robustly modify the miRNA signature of human plasma.

  4. Metabolic responses to pyruvate kinase deletion in lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum

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    Wittmann Christoph

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyruvate kinase is an important element in flux control of the intermediate metabolism. It catalyzes the irreversible conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate into pyruvate and is under allosteric control. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, this enzyme was regarded as promising target for improved production of lysine, one of the major amino acids in animal nutrition. In pyruvate kinase deficient strains the required equimolar ratio of the two lysine precursors oxaloacetate and pyruvate can be achieved through concerted action of the phosphotransferase system (PTS and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, whereby a reduced amount of carbon may be lost as CO2 due to reduced flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In previous studies, deletion of pyruvate kinase in lysine-producing C. glutamicum, however, did not yield a clear picture and the exact metabolic consequences are not fully understood. Results In this work, deletion of the pyk gene, encoding pyruvate kinase, was carried out in the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum lysCfbr, expressing a feedback resistant aspartokinase, to investigate the cellular response to deletion of this central glycolytic enzyme. Pyk deletion was achieved by allelic replacement, verified by PCR analysis and the lack of in vitro enzyme activity. The deletion mutant showed an overall growth behavior (specific growth rate, glucose uptake rate, biomass yield which was very similar to that of the parent strain, but differed in slightly reduced lysine formation, increased formation of the overflow metabolites dihydroxyacetone and glycerol and in metabolic fluxes around the pyruvate node. The latter involved a flux shift from pyruvate carboxylase (PC to PEPC, by which the cell maintained anaplerotic supply of the TCA cycle. This created a metabolic by-pass from PEP to pyruvate via malic enzyme demonstrating its contribution to metabolic flexibility of C. glutamicum on glucose. Conclusion The metabolic

  5. Bimodal dynamics of primary metabolism-related responses in tolerant potato-Potato virus Y interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Stare, Tjaša; Ramšak, Živa; Blejec, Andrej; Stare, Katja; Turnšek, Neža; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Vodnik, Dominik; Gruden, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Potato virus Y (PVY) is a major pathogen that causes substantial economic losses in worldwide potato production. Different potato cultivars differ in resistance to PVY, from severe susceptibility, through tolerance, to complete resistance. The aim of this study was to better define the mechanisms underlying tolerant responses of potato to infection by the particularly aggressive PVYNTN strain. We focused on the dynamics of the primary metabolism-related processes during PVYNTN infe...

  6. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    OpenAIRE

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-01-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas p...

  7. Metabolism of Albumin after Continuous Venovenous Hemofiltration in Patients with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Chen; Jianan Ren; Xiaodong Qin; Guanwei Li; Bo Zhou; Guosheng Gu; Zhiwu Hong; JiYe Aa; Jieshou Li

    2015-01-01

    Background. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is characterized by a hypercatabolic state induced by inflammatory mediators. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) stabilizes the internal environment but also aggravates loss of amino acids. The effect of CVVH on protein dynamics is largely unknown. We adopted the stable isotopic tracer technology to investigate how CVVH changed serum albumin metabolism. Methods. Twenty SIRS patients were randomized into low- (2000 mL/h) a...

  8. Fever and acute phase response induced in dwarf goats by endotoxin and bovine and human recombinant tumour necrosis factor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Miert, A S; van Duin, C T; Wensing, T

    1992-12-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), a polypeptide produced by mononuclear phagocytes, has been implicated as an important mediator of inflammatory processes and of clinical manifestations in acute infectious diseases. To study further the potential role of TNF in infectious diseases, recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) derived human (r.HuTNF-alpha) and bovine TNF (r.BoTNF-alpha) were intravenously (i.v.) administered in dwarf goats. Rectal temperature, heart rate, rumen motility, plasma zinc and iron concentrations, and certain other blood biochemical and haematological values were studied and compared with the changes seen after E. coli endotoxin (LPS) was administered (dose: 0.1 microgram/kg i.v.). Following a single injection of 4 micrograms/kg of r.BoTNF-alpha, shivering and biphasic febrile response were observed, accompanied by tachycardia, inhibition of rumen contractions, drop in plasma zinc and iron concentrations, lymphopenia, and neutropenia followed by neutrophilia. The i.v. administration of a single injection of 4 micrograms/kg r.HuTNF-alpha induced shivering and biphasic febrile responses, accompanied by anorexia and a similar drop in plasma trace metal concentrations when compared with r.BoTNF-alpha-treated goats. The TNF-alpha-induced symptoms were essentially the same as those that occurred after LPS administration. However, the time of onset of these changes after the injection of TNF-alpha was significantly shorter than after LPS. Moreover, the r.BoTNF-alpha induced a longer lasting neutrophilic leucopenia, less neutrophilia, and a more persistent lymphopenia than after LPS injection. Neither r.BoTNF-alpha nor LPS caused severe haemo-concentration. Furthermore, no cross-tolerance between r.BoTNF-alpha and LPS could be demonstrated. We conclude that both r.BoTNF-alpha and r.HuTNF-alpha induce many of the physiologic, haematologic and metabolic changes that characterize the acute phase response to LPS. The overlapping biological activities of r

  9. Exercise electrocardiographic responses and serum cystatin C levels among metabolic syndrome patients without overt diabetes mellitus

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    Tanindi A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Asli Tanindi1 Hilal Olgun1 Ayse Tuncel2 Bulent Celik3 Hatice Pasaoglu2 Bulent Boyaci11Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Statistics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Gazi University, Ankara, TurkeyObjectives: An impaired heart rate response during exercise (chronotropic incompetence and an impaired heart rate recovery (HRR after exercise are predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality. Cystatin C is a novel marker for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate exercise electrocardiographic responses in patients with metabolic syndrome who were without overt diabetes mellitus, in addition to the association of serum cystatin C levels with the exercise electrocardiographic test results.Method: Forty-three consecutive patients admitted to a cardiology outpatient clinic without angina pectoris were recruited if they met criteria for metabolic syndrome but did not have overt diabetes mellitus. Serum cystatin C levels were measured, and all participants underwent exercise electrocardiographic testing. Patients who were found to have ischemia had a coronary angiography procedure.Results: The mean cystatin C level of patients was higher in metabolic syndrome group than healthy controls (610.1 ± 334.02 vs 337.3 ± 111.01 µg/L; P < 0.001. The percentage of patients with ischemia confirmed by coronary angiography was 13.9% in the metabolic syndrome group. Cystatin C levels in the ischemic patients of the metabolic syndrome group were higher than that in nonischemic patients (957.00 ± 375.6 vs 553.8 ± 295.3 µg /L; P = 0.005. Chronotropic incompetence was observed in 30.2% of the patients with metabolic syndrome compared with 16.7% in the control group (P = 0.186. Chronotropic response indices were 0.8 ± 0.18 versus 0.9 ± 0.10 for the two groups, respectively (P = 0.259. HRR was significantly lower in the metabolic syndrome patients compared with the controls (20.1 ± 8.01 vs 25.2

  10. MR spectroscopy-based brain metabolite profiling in propionic acidaemia: metabolic changes in the basal ganglia during acute decompensation and effect of liver transplantation

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    McKiernan Patrick J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propionic acidaemia (PA results from deficiency of Propionyl CoA carboxylase, the commonest form presenting in the neonatal period. Despite best current management, PA is associated with severe neurological sequelae, in particular movement disorders resulting from basal ganglia infarction, although the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The role of liver transplantation remains controversial but may confer some neuro-protection. The present study utilises quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to investigate brain metabolite alterations in propionic acidaemia during metabolic stability and acute encephalopathic episodes. Methods Quantitative MRS was used to evaluate brain metabolites in eight children with neonatal onset propionic acidaemia, with six elective studies acquired during metabolic stability and five studies during acute encephalopathic episodes. MRS studies were acquired concurrently with clinically indicated MR imaging studies at 1.5 Tesla. LCModel software was used to provide metabolite quantification. Comparison was made with a dataset of MRS metabolite concentrations from a cohort of children with normal appearing MR imaging. Results MRI findings confirm the vulnerability of basal ganglia to infarction during acute encephalopathy. We identified statistically significant decreases in basal ganglia glutamate+glutamine and N-Acetylaspartate, and increase in lactate, during encephalopathic episodes. In white matter lactate was significantly elevated but other metabolites not significantly altered. Metabolite data from two children who had received liver transplantation were not significantly different from the comparator group. Conclusions The metabolite alterations seen in propionic acidaemia in the basal ganglia during acute encephalopathy reflect loss of viable neurons, and a switch to anaerobic respiration. The decrease in glutamine + glutamate supports the hypothesis that they are consumed to

  11. Capturing the dynamic nascent transcriptome during acute cellular responses: The serum response

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    Killeen S. Kirkconnell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic regulation of gene expression via signal transduction pathways is of fundamental importance during many biological processes such as cell state transitioning, cell cycle progression and stress responses. In this study we used serum stimulation as a cell response paradigm to apply the nascent RNA Bru-seq technique in order to capture early dynamic changes in the nascent transcriptome. Our data provides an unprecedented view of the dynamics of genome-wide transcription during the first two hours of serum stimulation in human fibroblasts. While some genes showed sustained induction or repression, other genes showed transient or delayed responses. Surprisingly, the dynamic patterns of induction and suppression of response genes showed a high degree of similarity, suggesting that these opposite outcomes are triggered by a common set of signals. As expected, early response genes such as those encoding components of the AP-1 transcription factor and those involved in the circadian clock were immediately but transiently induced. Surprisingly, transcription of important DNA damage response genes and histone genes were rapidly repressed. We also show that RNA polymerase II accelerates as it transcribes large genes and this was independent of whether the gene was induced or not. These results provide a unique genome-wide depiction of dynamic patterns of transcription of serum response genes and demonstrate the utility of Bru-seq to comprehensively capture rapid and dynamic changes of the nascent transcriptome.

  12. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging

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    Heather M Buechel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/ stress hormone/ allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation, and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 mo. and aged (21 mo. male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress groups (n = 9-12/ group. We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the three hour restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 hours after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  13. Aged rats are hypo-responsive to acute restraint: implications for psychosocial stress in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechel, Heather M; Popovic, Jelena; Staggs, Kendra; Anderson, Katie L; Thibault, Olivier; Blalock, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive processes associated with prefrontal cortex and hippocampus decline with age and are vulnerable to disruption by stress. The stress/stress hormone/allostatic load hypotheses of brain aging posit that brain aging, at least in part, is the manifestation of life-long stress exposure. In addition, as humans age, there is a profound increase in the incidence of new onset stressors, many of which are psychosocial (e.g., loss of job, death of spouse, social isolation), and aged humans are well-understood to be more vulnerable to the negative consequences of such new-onset chronic psychosocial stress events. However, the mechanistic underpinnings of this age-related shift in chronic psychosocial stress response, or the initial acute phase of that chronic response, have been less well-studied. Here, we separated young (3 month) and aged (21 month) male F344 rats into control and acute restraint (an animal model of psychosocial stress) groups (n = 9-12/group). We then assessed hippocampus-associated behavioral, electrophysiological, and transcriptional outcomes, as well as blood glucocorticoid and sleep architecture changes. Aged rats showed characteristic water maze, deep sleep, transcriptome, and synaptic sensitivity changes compared to young. Young and aged rats showed similar levels of distress during the 3 h restraint, as well as highly significant increases in blood glucocorticoid levels 21 h after restraint. However, young, but not aged, animals responded to stress exposure with water maze deficits, loss of deep sleep and hyperthermia. These results demonstrate that aged subjects are hypo-responsive to new-onset acute psychosocial stress, which may have negative consequences for long-term stress adaptation and suggest that age itself may act as a stressor occluding the influence of new onset stressors.

  14. Plasticity of the systemic inflammatory response to acute infection during critical illness: development of the riboleukogram.

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    Jonathan E McDunn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of acute infection in the critically ill remains a challenge. We hypothesized that circulating leukocyte transcriptional profiles can be used to monitor the host response to and recovery from infection complicating critical illness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A translational research approach was employed. Fifteen mice underwent intratracheal injections of live P. aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa endotoxin, live S. pneumoniae, or normal saline. At 24 hours after injury, GeneChip microarray analysis of circulating buffy coat RNA identified 219 genes that distinguished between the pulmonary insults and differences in 7-day mortality. Similarly, buffy coat microarray expression profiles were generated from 27 mechanically ventilated patients every two days for up to three weeks. Significant heterogeneity of VAP microarray profiles was observed secondary to patient ethnicity, age, and gender, yet 85 genes were identified with consistent changes in abundance during the seven days bracketing the diagnosis of VAP. Principal components analysis of these 85 genes appeared to differentiate between the responses of subjects who did versus those who did not develop VAP, as defined by a general trajectory (riboleukogram for the onset and resolution of VAP. As patients recovered from critical illness complicated by acute infection, the riboleukograms converged, consistent with an immune attractor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we present the culmination of a mouse pneumonia study, demonstrating for the first time that disease trajectories derived from microarray expression profiles can be used to quantitatively track the clinical course of acute disease and identify a state of immune recovery. These data suggest that the onset of an infection-specific transcriptional program may precede the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia in patients. Moreover, riboleukograms may help explain variance in the host response due to differences in ethnic

  15. Sleep quality but not sleep quantity effects on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress.

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    Bassett, Sarah M; Lupis, Sarah B; Gianferante, Danielle; Rohleder, Nicolas; Wolf, Jutta M

    2015-01-01

    Given the well-documented deleterious health effects, poor sleep has become a serious public health concern and increasing efforts are directed toward understanding underlying pathways. One potential mechanism may be stress and its biological correlates; however, studies investigating the effects of poor sleep on a body's capacity to deal with challenges are lacking. The current study thus aimed at testing the effects of sleep quality and quantity on cortisol responses to acute psychosocial stress. A total of 73 college-aged adults (44 females) were investigated. Self-reported sleep behavior was assessed via the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and salivary cortisol responses to the Trier Social Stress Test were measured. In terms of sleep quality, we found a significant three-way interaction, such that relative to bad sleep quality, men who reported fairly good or very good sleep quality showed blunted or exaggerated cortisol responses, respectively, while women's stress responses were less dependent on their self-reported sleep quality. Contrarily, average sleep duration did not appear to impact cortisol stress responses. Lastly, participants who reported daytime dysfunctions (i.e. having trouble staying awake or keeping up enthusiasm) also showed a trend to blunted cortisol stress responses compared to participants who did not experience these types of daytime dysfunctions. Overall, the current study suggests gender-specific stress reactivity dysfunctions as one mechanism linking poor sleep with detrimental physical health outcomes. Furthermore, the observed differential sleep effects may indicate that while the body may be unable to maintain normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal functioning in an acute psychosocial stress situation after falling prey to low sleep quality, it may retain capacities to deal with challenges during extended times of sleep deprivation.

  16. Role of metabolic CO2 production in ventilatory response to steady-state exercise.

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    Phillipson, E A; Bowes, G.; Townsend, E. R.; Duffin, J; Cooper, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the role of metabolic CO2 production in the hyperpnea of muscular exercise by comparing the response of alveolar ventilation to moderate levels of exercise with the response to venous infusion of CO2 at rest. Studies were performed in four awake sheep that were trained to run on a treadmill. The sheep had been cannulated for veno-venous extracorporeal perfusion so that CO2 could be infused into the peripheral venous blood through membrane lungs in the perfusion circuit. The sheep ...

  17. L-carnitine: a partner between immune response and lipid metabolism ?

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    Giuseppe Famularo

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrated that in vivo administered L-carnitine strongly ameliorated the immune response in both healthy individuals receiving Intralipid and ageing subjects with cardiovascular diseases, as shown by the enhancement of mixed lymphocyte reaction. Notably, in the latter group L-carnitine treatment also resulted in a significant reduction of serum levels of both cholesterol and triglycerides. Therefore, the hypothesis is that L-carnitine supplementation could ameliorate both the dysregulated immune response and the abnormal lipid metabolism in several conditions.

  18. THE RATE OF CLINICAL RESPONSE OF ORAL LOADING SODIUM VALPROATE IN ACUTELY MANLC PATIENT

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    K SHAFIEE

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acheiving accelerated clinical response is desirable in patients with acute manic episode. We conducted a prospective study to compare the rate of clinical response of oral loading sodium valproate versus standard dose titration. Methods: Fourty - two patients who met DSM - IV critevia for current manic episode and who had a "Young mania rating scale "score between 20 and 50 were randomly assigned on a double blind basis to recieve valproate oral "loading"(N = 21 at a dose of 20 mg/kg in divided doses for 7 days and valproate "non -loading" at a starting dose of 10 mg/kg followed by standard titration which at day 6 , they recieved 20 mg/kg valproate. Patients were scored at day 0, 3, 5 and 7 by a blindraterusing YMRS. Results: There was no significat differences between the groups in advers events and useing of adjunctive tranquilizer .The efficacy of valproate in both two groups was similar but " the rate of improvement on YMRS" over the first 3 days was significantly greater in loading group. Conclusion: Valproate oral loading with sodium valproate can induced a more rapid clinical response in acutely manic patient.

  19. Cytogenetically Unrelated Clones in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Showing Different Responses to Chemotherapy

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    Kohei Kasahara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with two cytogenetically unrelated clones. The patient was a 45-year-old male who was diagnosed with acute monoblastic leukemia (AMoL. Initial G-band analysis showed 51,XY,+6,+8,inv(9(p12q13c,+11,+13,+19[12]/52,idem,+Y[8], but G-band analysis after induction therapy showed 45,XY,-7,inv(9(p12q13c[19]/46,XY,inv(9(p12q13c[1]. Retrospective FISH analysis revealed a cryptic monosomy 7 clone in the initial AML sample. The clone with multiple trisomies was eliminated after induction therapy and never recurred, but a clone with monosomy 7 was still detected in myelodysplastic marrow with a normal blast percentage. Both clones were successfully eliminated after related peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, but the patient died of relapsed AML with monosomy 7. We concluded that one clone was de novo AMoL with chromosome 6, 8, 11, 13, and 19 trisomy and that the other was acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MRC with chromosome 7 monosomy showing different responses to chemotherapy. Simultaneous onset of cytogenetically unrelated hematological malignancies that each have a different disease status is a rare phenomenon but is important to diagnose for a correct understanding of the disease status and for establishing an appropriate treatment strategy.

  20. Acute phase response in two consecutive experimentally induced E. coli intramammary infections in dairy cows

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    Saatsi Johanna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute phase proteins haptoglobin (Hp, serum amyloid A (SAA and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP have suggested to be suitable inflammatory markers for bovine mastitis. The aim of the study was to investigate acute phase markers along with clinical parameters in two consecutive intramammary challenges with Escherichia coli and to evaluate the possible carry-over effect when same animals are used in an experimental model. Methods Mastitis was induced with a dose of 1500 cfu of E. coli in one quarter of six cows and inoculation repeated in another quarter after an interval of 14 days. Concentrations of acute phase proteins haptoglobin (Hp, serum amyloid A (SAA and lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP were determined in serum and milk. Results In both challenges all cows became infected and developed clinical mastitis within 12 hours of inoculation. Clinical disease and acute phase response was generally milder in the second challenge. Concentrations of SAA in milk started to increase 12 hours after inoculation and peaked at 60 hours after the first challenge and at 44 hours after the second challenge. Concentrations of SAA in serum increased more slowly and peaked at the same times as in milk; concentrations in serum were about one third of those in milk. Hp started to increase in milk similarly and peaked at 36–44 hours. In serum, the concentration of Hp peaked at 60–68 hours and was twice as high as in milk. LBP concentrations in milk and serum started to increase after 12 hours and peaked at 36 hours, being higher in milk. The concentrations of acute phase proteins in serum and milk in the E. coli infection model were much higher than those recorded in experiments using Gram-positive pathogens, indicating the severe inflammation induced by E. coli. Conclusion Acute phase proteins would be useful parameters as mastitis indicators and to assess the severity of mastitis. If repeated experimental intramammary

  1. Influence of acute pancreatitis on the in vitro responsiveness of rat mesenteric and pulmonary arteries

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    Antunes Edson

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by local tissue injury and systemic inflammatory response leading to massive nitric oxide (NO production and haemodynamic disturbances. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the vascular reactivity of pulmonary and mesenteric artery rings from rats submitted to experimental pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: saline (SAL; tauracholate (TAU and phospholipase A2 (PLA2. Pancreatitis was induced by administration of TAU or PLA2 from Naja mocambique mocambique into the common bile duct of rats, and after 4 h of duct injection the animals were sacrificed. Concentration-response curves to acetylcholine (ACh, sodium nitroprusside (SNP and phenylephrine (PHE in isolated mesenteric and pulmonary arteries were obtained. Potency (pEC50 and maximal responses (EMAX were determined. Blood samples were collected for biochemical analysis. Results In mesenteric rings, the potency for ACh was significantly decreased from animals treated with TAU (about 4.2-fold or PLA2 (about 6.9-fold compared to saline group without changes in the maximal responses. Neither pEC50 nor EMAX values for Ach were altered in pulmonary rings in any group. Similarly, the pEC50 and the EMAX values for SNP were not changed in both preparations in any group. The potency for PHE was significantly decreased in rat mesenteric and pulmonary rings from TAU group compared to SAL group (about 2.2- and 2.69-fold, for mesenteric and pulmonary rings, respectively. No changes were seen in the EMAX for PHE. The nitrite/nitrate (NOx- levels were markedly increased in animals submitted to acute pancreatitis as compared to SAL group, approximately 76 and 68% in TAU and PLA2 protocol, respectively. Conclusion Acute pancreatitis provoked deleterious effects in endothelium-dependent relaxing response for ACh in mesenteric rings that were strongly associated with high plasma NOx- levels as

  2. Vasopressin, renin, and cortisol responses to hemorrhage during acute blockade of cardiac nerves in conscious dogs

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    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) on the increases in plasma renin activity (PRA), arginine vasopressin (AVP), and cortisol in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage was determined in conscious dogs (n = 9). Procaine was infused into the pericardial space to produce acute reversible CNB, or saline was infused in the control hemorrhage. Blood was removed from the inferior vena cava at a rate of 1 ml.kg-1.min-1. In the control hemorrhage, plasma AVP increased from 1.8 +/- 0.3 to 219 +/- 66 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.63 +/- 0.20 to 3.08 +/- 0.91 ng angiotensin I (ANG I).ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.4 +/- 0.2 to 4.0 +/- 0.7 micrograms/dl. When the hemorrhage was repeated during acute CNB, plasma AVP increased from 2.8 +/- 1.6 to 185 +/- 59 pg/ml, PRA increased from 0.44 +/- 0.14 to 2.24 +/- 0.27 ng ANG I.ml-1.3 h-1, and cortisol increased from 1.9 +/- 0.3 to 5.4 +/- 0.6 micrograms/dl, and none of the increases differed significantly from the responses during the control hemorrhage. Left atrial pressure fell significantly after removal of 6 ml/kg of blood, but mean arterial pressure was maintained at control levels until blood loss reached 20 ml/kg during pericardial infusion of either saline or procaine. The declines in MAP at the 30 ml/kg level of hemorrhage in both treatments were similar. These results demonstrate that acutely blocking input from cardiac receptors does not reduce the increases in plasma AVP, cortisol, and PRA in response to a 30 ml/kg hemorrhage. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that input from cardiac receptors is required for a normal AVP response to hemorrhage and suggest that other receptors, presumably arterial baroreceptors, can stimulate AVP and cortisol secretion in the absence of signals from the heart.

  3. Cytosine arabinoside-metabolizing enzyme genes are underexpressed in children with MLL gene-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    J.F. Mata

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (IALL is characterized by mixed lineage leukemia (MLL gene rearrangements, unique gene expression profiles, poor prognosis, and drug resistance. One exception is cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C to which IALL cells seem to be more sensitive. We quantified mRNA expression of Ara-C key enzymes in leukemic lymphoblasts from 64 Brazilian ALL children, 15 of them presenting MLL gene rearrangement, and correlated it with clinical and biological features. The diagnosis was based on morphological criteria and immunophenotyping using monoclonal antibodies. MLL gene rearrangements were detected by conventional cytogenetic analysis, RT-PCR and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization. The DCK and HENT1 expression levels were determined by real-time quantitative PCR using SYBR Green I. Relative quantification was made by the standard curve method. The results were analyzed by Mann-Whitney and Fisher exact tests. A P value of £0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. DCK and HENT1 expression levels were significantly lower in children with MLL gene-rearranged ALL compared to children with MLL germ line ALL (P = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively. Our results differ from previous ones concerning HENT1 mRNA expression that observed a higher expression level in MLL gene-rearranged leukemias. In conclusion, the expression of the genes related to Ara-C metabolism was lower in MLL-positive children in the sample studied, suggesting the presence of population differences in the expression profile of these genes especially for HENT1.

  4. Is there an increased risk of metabolic syndrome among childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors? A developing country experience.

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    Mohapatra, Sonali; Bansal, Deepak; Bhalla, A K; Verma Attri, Savita; Sachdeva, Naresh; Trehan, Amita; Marwaha, R K

    2016-03-01

    Data on metabolic syndrome (MS) in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from developing countries are lacking. The purpose of this single-center, uncontrolled, observational study was to assess the frequency of MS in our survivors. The survivors of ALL ≤15 years at diagnosis, who had completed therapy ≥2 years earlier, were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements (weight, height, waist circumference), biochemistry (glucose, insulin, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL], thyroid function tests, C-reactive protein [CRP], magnesium), measurement of blood pressure, and Tanner staging were performed. MS was defined by International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and the National Cholesterol Education Program Third Adult Treatment Panel guidelines (NCEP ATP III) criteria, modified by Cook et al. (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2003;157:821-827) and Ford et al. (Diabetes Care. 2005;28:878-881). The median age of 76 survivors was 11.9 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 9.6-13.5). Twenty-four (32%) survivors were obese or overweight. The prevalence of insulin resistance (17%), hypertension (7%), hypertriglyceridemia (20%), and low HDL (37%) was comparable to the prevalence in children/adolescents in historical population-based studies from India. The prevalence of MS ranged from 1.3% to 5.2%, as per different defining criteria. Cranial radiotherapy, age at diagnosis, sex, or socioeconomic status were not risk factors for MS. The prevalence of MS in survivors of childhood ALL, at a median duration of 3 years from completion of chemotherapy, was comparable to the reference population. The prevalence of being obese or overweight was, however, greater than historical controls. PMID:26984439

  5. Metabolic responses of primary and transformed cells to intracellular Listeria monocytogenes.

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    Nadine Gillmaier

    Full Text Available The metabolic response of host cells, in particular of primary mammalian cells, to bacterial infections is poorly understood. Here, we compare the carbon metabolism of primary mouse macrophages and of established J774A.1 cells upon Listeria monocytogenes infection using (13C-labelled glucose or glutamine as carbon tracers. The (13C-profiles of protein-derived amino acids from labelled host cells and intracellular L. monocytogenes identified active metabolic pathways in the different cell types. In the primary cells, infection with live L. monocytogenes increased glycolytic activity and enhanced flux of pyruvate into the TCA cycle via pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, while in J774A.1 cells the already high glycolytic and glutaminolytic activities hardly changed upon infection. The carbon metabolism of intracellular L. monocytogenes was similar in both host cells. Taken together, the data suggest that efficient listerial replication in the cytosol of the host cells mainly depends on the glycolytic activity of the hosts.

  6. Attenuated acute salivary α-amylase responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid in thin children.

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    Chen, Long Hui; Yang, Ze Min; Chen, Wei Wen; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao Rong; Zhao, Ling Bo

    2015-04-14

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) is responsible for the 'pre-digestion' of starch in the oral cavity and accounts for up to 50 % of salivary protein in human saliva. An accumulating body of literature suggests that sAA is of nutritional importance; however, it is still not clear how sAA is related to individual's nutritional status. Although copy number variations (CNV) of the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) are associated with variation in sAA levels, a significant amount of sAA variation is not explained by AMY1 CNV. To measure sAA responses to gustatory stimulation with citric acid, we used sAA ratio (the ratio of stimulated sAA levels to those of resting sAA) and investigated acute sAA responses to citric acid in children with normal (Normal-BMI, n 22) and low (Low-BMI, n 21) BMI. The AMY1 gene copy number was determined by quantitative PCR. We, for the first time, demonstrated attenuated acute sAA responses (decreased sAA ratio) to gustatory stimulation in Low-BMI (thinness grade 3) children compared with the Normal-BMI children, which suggest that sAA responses to gustatory stimulation may be of nutritional importance. However, child's nutritional status was not directly related to their resting or stimulated sAA levels, and it was not associated with AMY1 gene copy number. Finally, AMY1 CNV might influence, but did not eventually determine, sAA levels in children. PMID:25784372

  7. Changes on metabolic parameters induced by acute cannabinoid administration (CBD, THC in a rat experimental model of nutritional vitamin A deficiency

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    Loubna El Amrani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitamin A deficiency can result from malnutrition, malabsorption of vitamin A, impaired vitamin metabolism associated with liver disease, or chronic debilitating diseases like HIV infection or cancer. Background & aims: Cannabis administration has been described as a palliative symptom management therapy in such pathological stages. Therefore, this research aimed to study the effects of acute administration of cannabidiol (CBD or thetrahydrocannabinol (THC on the levels of retinol in plasma and in the liver, and biochemical parameters related to lipid and glucose metabolism (cholesterolaemia, triglyceridemia and glycemia in a rat experimental model of vitamin A deficiency. Methods: The experimental animal model of Vitamin A deficiency was developed during a 50-day experimental period in which rats consumed a vitamin A-free diet. Cannabidiol (10 mg/kg body weight or thetrahydrocannabinol (5 mg/kg body weight were administered intraperitoneally 2 hours prior to sacrifice of the animals. Results: The nutritional deficiency caused a significant decrease in plasmatic and liver contents of retinol and biochemical parameters of glycemic, lipidic, and mineral metabolism. Acute intraperitoneal administration of Cannabidiol and thetrahydrocannabinol did not improve the indices of vitamin A status in either control or vitamin A-deficient rats. However, it had a significant effect on specific biochemical parameters such as glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Conclusion: Under our experimental conditions, the reported effects of cannabinoid administration on certain signs of nutritional vitamin A deficiency appeared to be mediated through mechanisms other than changes in retinol metabolism or its mobilization after the acute administration of such compounds.

  8. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    Studies performed at space flights and earth-based simulation models detected the plasma indices of acute phase reaction (APR), i.e. the increase of APR cytokine mediators and alterations in the production of blood acute phase proteins (APP) at the initial stages of adaptation to altered gravity conditions. Acute phase response is the principal constituent of the functional activity of innate immunity system. Changes in plasma APPs contents are considered to serve the restoration of homeostasis state. According to trends of their concentration shifts at the evolving of acute phase reaction APPs are denoted as positive, neutral, or negative. Plasma concentrations of positive acute phase proteins α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AGP), α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), and neutral α2-macroglobulin (α2-M) were measured in human study at 12-hour antiorthostatic position (AOP) with 15° head down tilt and hypoxia experiments at 14% oxygen in pressure chamber. Both of these impacts were shown to produce alterations in the APP levels indicative for acute phase response. Nevertheless, in AOP experiment noticeable decrease in α1-AGP concentration occurred by hour 12, and even more pronounced decline of α1-AGP and α1-AT were found on hypoxia hours 12 and 36. Acute phase proteins α1-AGP and α2-M possess the features of proteinase inhibitors. This function is implemented by the formation of complexes with the molecules of proteolytic enzymes which subsequently are removed from the blood flow. Transient decrease in plasma concentrations of protease inhibitors on early phases of APR development was reported to result from the growth of plasma protease activity due to cathepsin release from activated leukocytes, which had not yet been compensated by enhanced APP synthesis. Being a carrier protein for positively charged and neutral substances, α1-AGP shows pronounced elevation in its blood content during APR development. As assumed, it is required for the transportation of the increased

  9. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drath, D.B.; Shorey, J.M.; Huber, G.L.

    1981-10-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke.

  10. Functional and metabolic properties of alveolar macrophages in response to the gas phase of tobacco smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drath, D B; Shorey, J M; Huber, G L

    1981-10-01

    The effect of whole tobacco smoke and the gas phase of tobacco smoke on the metabolism and phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages was monitored over a 30-day exposure period. It was demonstrated that both the gas phase and whole tobacco smoke induced a weight loss in exposed rats. Alveolar macrophage oxygen consumption was markedly increased by both exposure regimens. Superoxide generation was not affected by whole tobacco smoke exposure but was increased in response to the filtered gas phase. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was not altered by either treatment. When metabolic alterations were seen in response to the separate exposures, they were seen only after a phagocytic challenge to the macrophage and not when the cell was unchallenged. Neither whole tobacco smoke nor the gas phase had any significant effect on the ability of alveolar macrophages to phagocytize a viable challenge of Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that many of the metabolic and functional effects of tobacco smoke on alveolar macrophages can be attributed to the gas-phase component of whole tobacco smoke. PMID:6271676

  11. Mathematical model of cycad cones' thermogenic temperature responses: inverse calorimetry to estimate metabolic heating rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, R B; Booth, D; Bhavsar, A A; Walter, G H; Terry, L I

    2012-12-21

    A mathematical model based on conservation of energy has been developed and used to simulate the temperature responses of cones of the Australian cycads Macrozamia lucida and Macrozamia. macleayi during their daily thermogenic cycle. These cones generate diel midday thermogenic temperature increases as large as 12 °C above ambient during their approximately two week pollination period. The cone temperature response model is shown to accurately predict the cones' temperatures over multiple days as based on simulations of experimental results from 28 thermogenic events from 3 different cones, each simulated for either 9 or 10 sequential days. The verified model is then used as the foundation of a new, parameter estimation based technique (termed inverse calorimetry) that estimates the cones' daily metabolic heating rates from temperature measurements alone. The inverse calorimetry technique's predictions of the major features of the cones' thermogenic metabolism compare favorably with the estimates from conventional respirometry (indirect calorimetry). Because the new technique uses only temperature measurements, and does not require measurements of oxygen consumption, it provides a simple, inexpensive and portable complement to conventional respirometry for estimating metabolic heating rates. It thus provides an additional tool to facilitate field and laboratory investigations of the bio-physics of thermogenic plants.

  12. Metabolic response of Geobacter sulfurreducens towards electron donor/acceptor variation

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    Lovley Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geobacter sulfurreducens is capable of coupling the complete oxidation of organic compounds to iron reduction. The metabolic response of G. sulfurreducens towards variations in electron donors (acetate, hydrogen and acceptors (Fe(III, fumarate was investigated via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. We examined the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids obtained from G. sulfurreducens cultured with 13C-acetate. Results Using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, we observed that donor and acceptor variations gave rise to differences in gluconeogenetic initiation, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, and amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Culturing G. sulfurreducens cells with Fe(III as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor resulted in pyruvate as the primary carbon source for gluconeogenesis. When fumarate was provided as the electron acceptor and acetate as the electron donor, the flux analysis suggested that fumarate served as both an electron acceptor and, in conjunction with acetate, a carbon source. Growth on fumarate and acetate resulted in the initiation of gluconeogenesis by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and a slightly elevated flux through the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle as compared to growth with Fe(III as the electron acceptor. In addition, the direction of net flux between acetyl-CoA and pyruvate was reversed during growth on fumarate relative to Fe(III, while growth in the presence of Fe(III and acetate which provided hydrogen as an electron donor, resulted in decreased flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Conclusions We gained detailed insight into the metabolism of G. sulfurreducens cells under various electron donor/acceptor conditions using 13C-based metabolic flux analysis. Our results can be used for the development of G. sulfurreducens as a chassis for a variety of applications including bioremediation and renewable biofuel production.

  13. Visceral response to acute retrograde gastric electrical stimulation in healthy human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Kun Yao; Mei-Yun Ke; Zhi-Feng Wang; Da-Bo Xu; Yan-Li Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the visceral response to acute retrograde gastric electrical stimulation (RGES) in healthy humans and to derive optimal parameters for treatment of patients with obesity.METHODS: RGES with a series of effective parameters were performed via a bipolar mucosal electrode implanted along the great curvature 5 cm above pylorus of stomach in 12 healthy human subjects. Symptoms associated with dyspepsia and other discomfort were observed and graded during RGES at different settings, including long pulse and pulse train. Gastric myoelectrical activity at baseline and during different settings of stimulation was recorded by a multi-channel electrogastrography.RESULTS: The gastric slow wave was entrained in all the subjects at the pacing parameter of 9 cpm in frequency, 500 ms in pulse width, and 5 mA in amplitude.The frequently appeared symptoms during stimulation were satiety, bloating, discomfort, pain, sting, and nausea. The total symptom score for each subject significantly increased as the amplitude or pulse width was adjusted to a higher scale in both long pulse and pulse train. There was a wide diversity of visceral responses to RGES among individuals.CONCLUSION: Acute RGES can result in a series of symptoms associated with dyspepsia, which is beneficial to the treatment of obesity. Optimal parameter should be determined according to the individual sensitivity to electrical stimulation.

  14. Dopaminergic signaling mediates the motivational response underlying the opponent process to chronic but not acute nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, Taryn E; Sellings, Laurie H; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; Siu, Eric C; Tyndale, Rachel F; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-03-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is implicated in the processing of the positive reinforcing effect of all drugs of abuse, including nicotine. It has been suggested that the dopaminergic system is also involved in the aversive motivational response to drug withdrawal, particularly for opiates, however, the role for dopaminergic signaling in the processing of the negative motivational properties of nicotine withdrawal is largely unknown. We hypothesized that signaling at dopaminergic receptors mediates chronic nicotine withdrawal aversions and that dopaminergic signaling would differentially mediate acute vs dependent nicotine motivation. We report that nicotine-dependent rats and mice showed conditioned place aversions to an environment paired with abstinence from chronic nicotine that were blocked by the DA receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol (alpha-flu) and in DA D(2) receptor knockout mice. Conversely, alpha-flu pretreatment had no effect on preferences for an environment paired with abstinence from acute nicotine. Taken together, these results suggest that dopaminergic signaling is necessary for the opponent motivational response to nicotine in dependent, but not non-dependent, rodents. Further, signaling at the DA D(2) receptor is critical in mediating withdrawal aversions in nicotine-dependent animals. We suggest that the alleviation of nicotine withdrawal primarily may be driving nicotine motivation in dependent animals. PMID:20032966

  15. Tail biting induces a strong acute phase response and tail-end inflammation in finishing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Mari; Orro, Toomas; Kokkonen, Teija; Munsterhjelm, Camilla; Peltoniemi, Olli; Valros, Anna

    2010-06-01

    The extent of inflammation associated with tail biting in finishing pigs was evaluated. Tail histopathology, carcass condemnation and the concentration of three acute phase proteins (APPs), C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid-A (SAA) and haptoglobin (Hp), were examined in 12 tail-bitten and 13 control pigs. The median concentrations of APPs were higher (Ppigs (CRP 65.7mg/L, 28.4-180.4; SAA 6.2mg/L, 6.2-21.4; Hp 1.2g/L, 0.9-1.5). There was a tendency for APP concentrations to rise with the histopathological score but the differences were only statistically significant between some of the scores. Five (42%) bitten cases and one (8%) control pig had partial carcass condemnations owing to abscesses (P=0.07). The results show that tail biting induces an inflammatory response in the tail end leading to an acute phase response and formation of carcass abscesses. PMID:19398209

  16. Dopaminergic signaling mediates the motivational response underlying the opponent process to chronic but not acute nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, Taryn E; Sellings, Laurie H; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; Siu, Eric C; Tyndale, Rachel F; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-03-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is implicated in the processing of the positive reinforcing effect of all drugs of abuse, including nicotine. It has been suggested that the dopaminergic system is also involved in the aversive motivational response to drug withdrawal, particularly for opiates, however, the role for dopaminergic signaling in the processing of the negative motivational properties of nicotine withdrawal is largely unknown. We hypothesized that signaling at dopaminergic receptors mediates chronic nicotine withdrawal aversions and that dopaminergic signaling would differentially mediate acute vs dependent nicotine motivation. We report that nicotine-dependent rats and mice showed conditioned place aversions to an environment paired with abstinence from chronic nicotine that were blocked by the DA receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol (alpha-flu) and in DA D(2) receptor knockout mice. Conversely, alpha-flu pretreatment had no effect on preferences for an environment paired with abstinence from acute nicotine. Taken together, these results suggest that dopaminergic signaling is necessary for the opponent motivational response to nicotine in dependent, but not non-dependent, rodents. Further, signaling at the DA D(2) receptor is critical in mediating withdrawal aversions in nicotine-dependent animals. We suggest that the alleviation of nicotine withdrawal primarily may be driving nicotine motivation in dependent animals.

  17. Study on Blood Cell Immune Response in Water Buffaloes Infected Acutely with F. hepatica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Long; MAO Xin-zhi; WANG Bing-yun; Award Daugschies; J. Gonzalez-Gallego

    2002-01-01

    Action mechanism of blood cell immune response in water buffaloes against acute infection with F. Hepatica was studied. The results showed that after water buffaloes were infected, the total levels of WBC surpassed control group during whole infection period; Eosinophiles (%) of DC were higher than control group at the 2nd week until 19th week, and then dropped and was close to control group; Neutrophiles(%)was low or significantly lower than control group within the 5 - 16th weeks; The total levels of lymphocytes (%) was lower than control group during the whole infection period; T-lymphocytes (%) dropped significantly, but B-lymphocytes(%) had opposite changes from the first week of infection, and they were close to the control group after 11 weeks; RBC-CR1 and RBC-IC rosette rates dropped and rose during 2 - 16 and 2- 18 weeks, respectively, and then approached the same between both groups. It was suggested that the violent changes of specific and nonspecific immune responses in water buffaloes with acute F. hepatica infection are related with the mechanism against infection with F. hepatica together.

  18. The inflammatory response in blood and in remote organs following acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Højberg-Holm, Jimmy;

    2014-01-01

    In patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) mortality remains high, despite the fact that the patients are treated with continuous renal replacement therapy. The interaction between the kidney and the immune system might explain the high mortality observed in AKI. In order to elucidate the...... interaction between the kidney and immune system we developed a two-hit model of AKI and endotoxemia. Our hypothesis was that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) of the kidney simultaneously with endotoxemia would generate a more extensive inflammatory response compared to I/R of the hind legs. Our expectation was....... The neutrophil infiltration of distant organs measured by the levels of MPO in the lung and liver also showed a significantly higher level in renal I/R compared to hind leg I/R. Renal I/R is associated with a more pronounced inflammatory response in blood and distant organs. The high cytokine levels...

  19. Acute and chronic cytokine responses to resistance exercise and training in people with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Tue; Dalgas, Ulrik; Brolin Gade, Anne;

    2015-01-01

    necrosis factor-α and IFN-γ were measured before and after 24 weeks of PRT. The acute effect was evaluated following standardized single-bout resistance exercise in the untrained and the trained state. No changes were observed in resting cytokine levels after PRT. However, an indication of reduced IL-17F......Exercise is a well-established part of rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and it has been hypothesized to stimulate an anti-inflammatory environment that might be disease modifying. Yet, investigations on exercise-induced immune responses are scarce and generally not paying...... responses to resistance exercise training in medicated PwMS. Thirty-five people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with interferon (IFN)-β, were randomized to a 24-week progressive resistance training (PRT) or control group. Plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-10, IL-17F, IL-23, tumor...

  20. Full-breadth analysis of CD8+ T-cell responses in acute hepatitis C virus infection and early therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Georg M; Lucas, Michaela; Timm, Joerg; Ouchi, Kei; Kim, Arthur Y; Day, Cheryl L; Schulze Zur Wiesch, Julian; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Sheridan, Isabelle; Casson, Deborah R; Reiser, Markus; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Li, Bin; Allen, Todd M; Chung, Raymond T; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D

    2005-10-01

    Multispecific CD8(+) T-cell responses are thought to be important for the control of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but to date little information is actually available on the breadth of responses at early time points. Additionally, the influence of early therapy on these responses and their relationships to outcome are controversial. To investigate this issue, we performed comprehensive analysis of the breadth and frequencies of virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses on the single epitope level in eight acutely infected individuals who were all started on early therapy. During the acute phase, responses against up to five peptides were identified. During therapy, CD8(+) T-cell responses decreased rather than increased as virus was controlled, and no new specificities emerged. A sustained virological response following completion of treatment was independent of CD8(+) T-cell responses, as well as CD4(+) T-cell responses. Rapid recrudescence also occurred despite broad CD8(+) T-cell responses. Importantly, in vivo suppression of CD3(+) T cells using OKT3 in one subject did not result in recurrence of viremia. These data suggest that broad CD8(+) T-cell responses alone may be insufficient to contain HCV replication, and also that early therapy is effective independent of such responses. PMID:16189000

  1. Effects of Dietary Protein Source and Quantity during Weight Loss on Appetite, Energy Expenditure, and Cardio-Metabolic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Li; Armstrong, Cheryl L.H.; Campbell, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    Higher protein meals increase satiety and the thermic effect of feeding (TEF) in acute settings, but it is unclear whether these effects remain after a person becomes acclimated to energy restriction or a given protein intake. This study assessed the effects of predominant protein source (omnivorous, beef/pork vs. lacto-ovo vegetarian, soy/legume) and quantity (10%, 20%, or 30% of energy from protein) on appetite, energy expenditure, and cardio-metabolic indices during energy restriction (ER)...

  2. Metabolic response to an inflammatory challenge in pigs divergently selected for residual feed intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlot, E; Gilbert, H; Le Floc'h, N

    2016-02-01

    Selection for residual feed intake (RFI), which is used to select animals for feed efficiency, also influences nutrient partitioning between growth and maintenance functions. This study was designed to investigate if selection for reduced RFI can alter the trade-off between growth and immunity and contributes to differences in metabolic responses to an inflammatory challenge. Piglets from 2 lines divergently selected on RFI (low: RFI, = 10, and high: RFI, = 11) were challenged at 55 d of age (on d 0) with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to induce a noninfectious pneumonia. Plasma haptoglobin and nutrient concentrations (in fasted state and 2 h after feeding) were determined from d -1 to d 7, and tissue protein metabolism was determined on d 8. Haptoglobin concentrations were greater from d 1 to d 7 relative to d -1 ( RFI pigs, glucose concentration was greater on d 1 than on d 3, 5, and 7 ( RFI than RFI pigs at fed state, whereas Ala and Gly were less in RFI pigs at fasted and fed states ( RFI than RFI pigs in the fasted state, whereas Asp was greater in RFI pigs in both fasted and fed states ( RFI than RFI pigs. Liver and LM proteasome did not differ between lines ( 0.1). The metabolic differences between lines were not associated with differences in feed intake, ADG between d -1 and d 8, and haptoglobin concentration ( 0.1). Thus, it seems that that, using different metabolic strategies, both lines coped similarly with the CFA challenge. Contrary to our hypothesis, this experiment showed, in young pigs, no advantage of RFI animals in response to an inflammatory challenge. PMID:27065126

  3. Remodeling lipid metabolism and improving insulin responsiveness in human primary myotubes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M Sparks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Disturbances in lipid metabolism are strongly associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. We hypothesized that activation of cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways in cultured human myotubes would provide further insight into regulation of lipid storage, lipolysis, lipid oxidation and insulin responsiveness. METHODS: Human myoblasts were isolated from vastus lateralis, purified, cultured and differentiated into myotubes. All cells were incubated with palmitate during differentiation. Treatment cells were pulsed 1 hour each day with forskolin and ionomycin (PFI during the final 3 days of differentiation to activate the cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways. Control cells were not pulsed (control. Mitochondrial content, (14C lipid oxidation and storage were measured, as well as lipolysis and insulin-stimulated glycogen storage. Myotubes were stained for lipids and gene expression measured. RESULTS: PFI increased oxidation of oleate and palmitate to CO(2 (p<0.001, isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis (p = 0.01, triacylglycerol (TAG storage (p<0.05 and mitochondrial DNA copy number (p = 0.01 and related enzyme activities. Candidate gene and microarray analysis revealed increased expression of genes involved in lipolysis, TAG synthesis and mitochondrial biogenesis. PFI increased the organization of lipid droplets along the myofibrillar apparatus. These changes in lipid metabolism were associated with an increase in insulin-mediated glycogen storage (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of cAMP/PKA and calcium signaling pathways in myotubes induces a remodeling of lipid droplets and functional changes in lipid metabolism. These results provide a novel pharmacological approach to promote lipid metabolism and improve insulin responsiveness in myotubes, which may be of therapeutic importance for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  4. Placebo response in antipsychotic trials of patients with acute mania : Results of an individual patient data meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welten, C C M; Koeter, M W J; Wohlfarth, T; Storosum, J G; van den Brink, W; Gispen-de Wied, C C; Leufkens, H G M; Denys, D A J P

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of placebo response in acute mania trials. Specifically, whether placebo response: (1) predicts treatment effect, (2) can be predicted by patient and study characteristics, and (3) can be predicted by a parsimonious model. We performed a meta-analysis of individual patient data

  5. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  6. Characterization and novel analyses of acute stress response patterns in a population-based cohort of young adults: influence of gender, smoking, and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, Carly E; Henley, David; Marsh, Julie; Atkinson, Helen; Newnham, John P; Matthews, Stephen G; Lye, Stephen J; Pennell, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the biological stress response system has been implicated in the development of psychological, metabolic, and cardiovascular disease. Whilst changes in stress response are often quantified as an increase or decrease in cortisol levels, three different patterns of stress response have been reported in the literature for the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) (reactive-responders (RR), anticipatory-responders (AR) and non-responders (NR)). However, these have never been systematically analyzed in a large population-based cohort. The aims of this study were to examine factors that contribute to TSST variation (gender, oral contraceptive use, menstrual cycle phase, smoking, and BMI) using traditional methods and novel analyses of stress response patterns. We analyzed the acute stress response of 798, 18-year-old participants from a community-based cohort using the TSST. Plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone, plasma cortisol, and salivary cortisol levels were quantified. RR, AR, and NR patterns comprised 56.6%, 26.2%, and 17.2% of the cohort, respectively. Smokers were more likely to be NR than (RR or AR; adjusted, p stress-response patterns, in addition to other parameters vary with gender, smoking, and BMI. The distribution of these patterns has the potential to vary with adult health and disease and may represent a biomarker for future investigation.

  7. Cortisol response to acute stress in asthma: Moderation by depressive mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueba, Ana F; Simon, Erica; Auchus, Richard J; Ritz, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    Both individuals with asthma and depression show signs of a dysregulated hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, little is known about the cortisol response to stress in the context of co-occurring asthma and depressive mood. Thirty-nine individuals with asthma and 41 healthy controls underwent a combined speech and mental arithmetic stressor. During the course of the laboratory session, salivary cortisol was collected 5 times, with 1 sample at 0min before the stressor and 4 samples at 0, 15, 30 and 45min after the stressor. Depressive mood in the past week was assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the beginning of the session. Depressive symptoms moderated cortisol response to the acute stressor, but only among asthmatic patients. Higher depressive mood was associated with a significant increase in cortisol, whereas low depressive mood was associated with no cortisol response. In healthy participants, depressive mood had no substantial effect on cortisol response to the stressor. These findings suggest that depressive mood and chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma can interact to augment cortisol response to stress.

  8. Primary and secondary genetic responses after folic acid-induced acute renal injury in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, J P; Chadwick, L J

    1994-12-01

    Folic acid-induced acute renal injury results in dramatic changes in gene expression. Among the genes affected by folic acid treatment are the primary response genes, c-fos and c-myc, which are thought to function to initiate cell cycle events. In this report, changes in the expression of three other genes in response to folic acid injury have been investigated: ornithine decarboxylase, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2). Renal injury was found to cause a rapid decrease in EGF mRNA, which remained absent for several days after the initial injury, gradually returning to normal levels over an approximately 3-wk regeneration and recovery period. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA showed a similar decrease. In contrast, folic acid caused a rapid increase in SGP-2 mRNA, which peaked several days after treatment, decreasing to normal levels over the 3-wk period. The mRNAs for the primary response genes were superinduced in the injured kidneys in the presence of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. In contrast, the changes in EGF and SGP-2 mRNA levels were blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that these responses required new protein synthesis during the first few hours after folic acid injury. The opposite but parallel responses in the expression of the EGF and SGP-2 genes suggest that their regulation is coupled to the initial injury-induced dedifferentiation and subsequent return to the fully differentiated state.

  9. Acquisition of a Biomedical Database of Acute Responses to Space Flight during Commercial Personal Suborbital Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2010-01-01

    There is currently too little reproducible data for a scientifically valid understanding of the initial responses of a diverse human population to weightlessness and other space flight factors. Astronauts on orbital space flights to date have been extremely healthy and fit, unlike the general human population. Data collection opportunities during the earliest phases of space flights to date, when the most dynamic responses may occur in response to abrupt transitions in acceleration loads, have been limited by operational restrictions on our ability to encumber the astronauts with even minimal monitoring instrumentation. The era of commercial personal suborbital space flights promises the availability of a large (perhaps hundreds per year), diverse population of potential participants with a vested interest in their own responses to space flight factors, and a number of flight providers interested in documenting and demonstrating the attractiveness and safety of the experience they are offering. Voluntary participation by even a fraction of the flying population in a uniform set of unobtrusive biomedical data collections would provide a database enabling statistical analyses of a variety of acute responses to a standardized space flight environment. This will benefit both the space life sciences discipline and the general state of human knowledge.

  10. Adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is responsible for Escherichia coli endotoxin-induced acute vascular dysfunction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Johannes; Heere-Ress, Elisabeth; Langenberger, Herbert; Sieder, Anna E; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Mittermayer, Fritz; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Böhm, Johannes; Jansen, Burkhard; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Impaired response to catecholamines contributes to the altered hemodynamics in sepsis, which has been attributed to excessive NO formation. We have studied the systemic hemodynamic and local forearm responses and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression during experimental endotoxemia in humans. Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) was administered at doses of 1 or 2 ng/kg to healthy volunteers. In 10 subjects, the systemic pressor effect of phenylephrine was assessed before and after the administration of LPS. In 9 further subjects, forearm blood flow responses to intra-arterial noradrenaline, acetylcholine, glyceryl trinitrate, and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were studied at baseline and after LPS administration. Peripheral blood was collected and analyzed for iNOS mRNA and protein. Four hours after LPS, the response of systolic blood pressure (P<0.0005) and heart rate (P<0.05) to phenylephrine was significantly reduced. In the forearm, noradrenaline-induced vasoconstriction was also reduced by approximately 50% (P<0.01), but L-NMMA responsiveness was unchanged. iNOS mRNA or protein was not increased. Marked vascular adrenoceptor hyporeactivity is detectable in the absence of increased NO activity or iNOS expression in endotoxemia, arguing against major involvement of vascular iNOS activity in the acute systemic vasodilation to LPS.

  11. Transcriptomic and metabolic responses of Staphylococcus aureus exposed to supra-physiological temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proctor Richard A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evaluation by different molecular and physiological assays of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus responses to heat shock exposure yielded a still fragmentary view of the mechanisms determining bacterial survival or death at supra-physiological temperatures. This study analyzed diverse facets of S. aureus heat-shock adjustment by recording global transcriptomic and metabolic responses of bacterial cultures shifted for 10 min from 37°C to a sub-lethal (43°C or eventually lethal (48°C temperature. A relevant metabolic model of the combined action of specific stress response mechanisms with more general, energy-regulating metabolic pathways in heat-shocked S. aureus is presented. Results While S. aureus cultures shifted to 43°C or left at 37°C showed marginal differences in growth and survival rates, bacterial cultures exposed to 48°C showed a rapid growth arrest followed by a subsequent decline in viable counts. The most substantial heat shock-induced changes at both 43°C and 48°C occurred in transcript levels of HrcA- and CtsR-regulated genes, encoding classical chaperones DnaK and GroESL, and some Hsp100/Clp ATPases components, respectively. Other metabolic pathways up-regulated by S. aureus exposure at 48°C included genes encoding several enzymes coping with oxidative stress, and DNA damage, or/and impaired osmotic balance. Some major components of the pentose phosphate cycle and gluconeogenesis were also up-regulated, which reflected depletion of free glucose by bacterial cultures grown in Mueller-Hinton broth prior to heat shock. In contrast, most purine- and pyrimidine-synthesis pathway components and amino acyl-tRNA synthetases were down-regulated at 48°C, as well as arginine deiminase and major fermentative pathway components, such as alcohol, lactate and formate dehydrogenases. Despite the heat-induced, increased requirements for ATP-dependent macromolecular repair mechanisms combined with declining

  12. Metabolic responses to water deficit in two Eucalyptus globulus clones with contrasting drought sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvaleva, A L; Costa E Silva, F; Breia, E; Jouve, J; Hausman, J F; Almeida, M H; Maroco, J P; Rodrigues, M L; Pereira, J S; Chaves, M M

    2006-02-01

    We compared the metabolic responses of leaves and roots of two Eucalyptus globulus Labill. clones differing in drought sensitivity to a slowly imposed water deficit. Responses measured included changes in concentrations of soluble and insoluble sugars, proline, total protein and several antioxidant enzymes. In addition to the general decrease in growth caused by water deficit, we observed a decrease in osmotic potential when drought stress became severe. In both clones, the decrease was greater in roots than in leaves, consistent with the observed increases in concentrations of soluble sugars and proline in these organs. In roots of both clones, glutathione reductase activity increased significantly in response to water deficit, suggesting that this enzyme plays a protective role in roots during drought stress by catalyzing the catabolism of reactive oxygen species. Clone CN5 has stress avoidance mechanisms that account for its lower sensitivity to drought compared with Clone ST51.

  13. Variations in insulin responsiveness in rat fat cells are due to metabolic differences rather than insulin binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn Mølgård; Nilsson, Poul; Sonne, Ole;

    1983-01-01

    Insulin resistance was studied by comparing insulin response and insulin binding in four groups of rats. Glucose metabolism in isolated fat cells from male Wistar rats weighing 340 g was less responsive to a supramaximal dose of insulin than glucose metabolism in fat cells from rats weighing 200 g...... to fat cells. Insulin binding was not correlated to the plasma insulin level which however was reflected in the lipoprotein lipase activity in the adipose tissue. In conclusion, these results indicate that variations in insulin responsiveness in fat cells are due to alterations in cellular metabolism....... Induction of streptozotocin-diabetes in rats weighing 200 g resulted in a marked decrease in the insulin responsiveness of fat cells. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions of 340 g rats had the opposite effect and restored the insulin responsiveness of fat cells. The responsiveness in the four groups was...

  14. Cortico-limbic-striatal contribution after response and reversal learning: a metabolic mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, J L

    2011-01-12

    Learning of arbitrary stimulus-response associations is an adaptive behavior essential for species survival in an ever-changing environment. Particular subdivisions of the striatum have been shown to be critical for both motor-response learning and reversal learning. However, recent evidence suggests that different cortical and subcortical brain regions may be involved in response learning, a kind of learning more complex than previously thought. In fact, many brain regions subserving response learning seem to be also related to reversal learning, traditionally ascribed to the prefrontal cortex. The present study examined the role of different subdivisions of the rat prefrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala and the ventral tegmental area on both response and reversal learning evaluated in the water T-maze. Increased neuronal metabolic activity, as measured by cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry, was found in most brain regions after training rats in a response learning task as compared to yoked controls. Reversal learning was associated with a return to baseline CO activity levels except for the orbitofrontal cortex and the ventral tegmental area. Analysis of functional connectivity among brain regions showed significant correlations in CO activity between particular cortical and striatal subdivisions in the reversal learning group. These findings suggest that the interaction of specific frontal and subcortical regions is required for reversal but not for response learning. However, our findings support the involvement of a cortico-limbic-striatal circuit in both types of learning. PMID:21036158

  15. Metabolic response to subacute and subchronic iron overload in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adham, Khadiga G; Farhood, Manal H; Daghestani, Maha H; Aleisa, Nadia A; Alkhalifa, Ahlam A; El Amin, Maha H; Virk, Promy; Al-Obeid, Mai A; Al-Humaidhi, Eman M H

    2015-12-01

    One of the common causes of iron overload is excessive iron intake in cases of iron-poor anemia, where iron saccharate complex (ISC) is routinely used to optimize erythropoiesis. However, non-standardized ISC administration could entail the risk of iron overload. To induce iron overload, Wistar rats were intraperitoneally injected with subacute (0.2 mg kg⁻¹) and subchronic (0.1 mg kg⁻¹) overdoses of ISC for 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Iron status was displayed by an increase in transferrin saturation (up to 332%) and serum and liver iron burden (up to 19.3 μmol L⁻¹ and 13.2 μmol g⁻¹ wet tissue, respectively) together with a drop in total and unsaturated iron binding capacities "TIBC, UIBC" as surrogate markers of transferrin activity. Iron-induced leukocytosis (up to 140%), along with the decline in serum transferrin markers (up to 43%), respectively, mark positive and negative acute phase reactions. Chemical stress was demonstrated by a significant rise (p > 0.05) in indices of the hemogram (erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, leukocytes) and stress metabolites [corticosterone (CORT) and lactate]. Yet, potential causes of the unexpected decline in serum activities of ALT, AST and LDH (p > 0.05) might include decreased hepatocellular enzyme production and/or inhibition or reduction of the enzyme activities. The current findings highlight the toxic role of elevated serum and liver iron in initiating erythropoiesis and acute phase reactions, modifying iron status and animal organ function, changing energy metabolism and bringing about accelerated glycolysis and impaired lactate clearance supposedly by decreasing anaerobic threshold and causing premature entering to the anaerobic system. PMID:26616369

  16. Botanical and biological pesticides elicit a similar Induced Systemic Response in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretali, Luca; Bernardo, Letizia; Butterfield, Timothy S; Trevisan, Marco; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Natural pesticides have attracted substantial interest due to the increase in organic agriculture and enhanced attention to environmental pollution. Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB) are applied for both disease control and growth enhancement; PGPBs are known to elicit Induced Systemic Response (ISR) in plants. However, less is known about the effect of botanical pesticides, such as the azadirachtin-containing neem extracts, on plant metabolism. This study aimed to investigate the effects of foliar application of the above-mentioned natural pesticides on the metabolic profiling of tomato. Leaf application of Bacillus subtilis fostered Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) in treated plants via the Jasmonic acid pathway, and enhanced production of secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, phytoalexins and auxins. Changes in sterols and terpenes, as well as an increase in glucosinolates were also observed. Interestingly, azadirachtin-treated tomatoes also showed an increase in ISR and our results revealed that most of the enriched metabolites are shared with a B. subtilis treatment, suggesting conserved biochemical responses. These (un)expected findings indicate that plants are not insensitive to application of natural pesticide and while Azadirachtin is applied as a direct pesticide, it also stimulates a defense response in tomatoes very similar to B. subtilis induced ISR. PMID:27251587

  17. Increased response to insulin of glucose metabolism in the 6-day unloaded rat soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Tischler, Marc E.; Johnson, David G.

    1986-01-01

    Hind leg muscles of female rats were unloaded by tail cast suspension for 6 days. In the fresh-frozen unloaded soleus, the significantly greater concentration of glycogen correlated with a lower activity ratio of glycogen phosphorylase (p less than 0.02). The activity ratio of glycogen synthase also was lower (p less than 0.001), possibly due to the higher concentration of glycogen. In isolated unloaded soleus, insulin (0.1 milliunit/ml) increased the oxidation of D(U-C-14) glucose, release of lactate and pyruvate, incorporation of D-(U-C-14) glucose into glycogen, and the concentration of glucose 6-phosphate more (p less than 0.05) than in the weight-bearing soleus. At physiological doses of insulin, the percent of maximal uptake of 2-deoxy-D-(1,2-H-3) glucose/muscle also was greater in the unloaded soleus. Unloading of the soleus increased, by 50 percent the concentration of insuling receptors, due to no decrease in total receptor number during muscle atrophy. This increase may account for the greater response of glucose metabolism to insulin in this muscle. The extensor digitorum longus, which generally shows little response to unloading, displayed no differential response of glucose metabolism to insulin.

  18. Dynamics of uptake and metabolism of small molecules in cellular response systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Werner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proper cellular function requires uptake of small molecules from the environment. In response to changes in extracellular conditions cells alter the import and utilization of small molecules. For a wide variety of small molecules the cellular response is regulated by a network motif that combines two feedback loops, one which regulates the transport and the other which regulates the subsequent metabolism. RESULTS: We analyze the dynamic behavior of two widespread but logically distinct two-loop motifs. These motifs differ in the logic of the feedback loop regulating the uptake of the small molecule. Our aim is to examine the qualitative features of the dynamics of these two classes of feedback motifs. We find that the negative feedback to transport is accompanied by overshoot in the intracellular amount of small molecules, whereas a positive feedback to transport removes overshoot by boosting the final steady state level. On the other hand, the negative feedback allows for a rapid initial response, whereas the positive feedback is slower. We also illustrate how the dynamical deficiencies of one feedback motif can be mitigated by an additional loop, while maintaining the original steady-state properties. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis emphasizes the core of the regulation found in many motifs at the interface between the metabolic network and the environment of the cell. By simplifying the regulation into uptake and the first metabolic step, we provide a basis for elaborate studies of more realistic network structures. Particularly, this theoretical analysis predicts that FeS cluster formation plays an important role in the dynamics of iron homeostasis.

  19. Acute Phase Response, Inflammation and Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers of Libby Asbestos Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. Objective: We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help ...

  20. Acute Phase Response and Metabolic Syndrome Biomarkers of Libby Asbestos Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the disease diagnosis and environmental health risk assessment. Exposure to Libby amphibole (LA) has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that rats exposed to LA would present a unique serum proteomic pro...

  1. Measurement of metabolic responses to an orbital-extravehicular work-simulation exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Renee; Webbon, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a new system designed to simulate orbital EVA work and measure metabolic responses to these space-work exercises. The system incorporates an experimental protocol, a controlled-atmosphere chamber, an EVA-work exercise device, the instrumentation, and a data acquisition system. Engineering issues associated with the design of the proposed system are discussed. This EVA-work simulating system can be used with various types of upper-body work, including task boards, rope pulling, and arm ergometry. Design diagrams and diagrams of various types of work simulation are included.

  2. Growth, metabolism and physiological response of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus Selenka during periods of inactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rongbin; Zang, Yuanqi; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin

    2013-03-01

    The growth, metabolism and physiological response of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, were investigated during periods of inactivity. The body weight, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), activities of acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and content of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the body wall and coelomic fluid of A. japonicus were measured during starvation, experimental aestivation and aestivation. The results showed that the body weight of sea cucumber in the three treatments decreased significantly during the experimental period ( P japonicus is complex and may not be attributed to the elevated temperature only.

  3. Metabolic response of Taxus baccata L. to Pestalotipsis funerea Desm. in dependence of environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kozłowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the reasons of yew shoot blight observed in the garden and park plantations was the infection with Pestalotiopsis funerea fungus. Leaves with extensive disease symptoms have been found to have metabolic disturbances induced by this pathogen. Activation of oxidative stress enzymes, i.e. catalase and peroxidase, points to the possibility of inducing defense responses. Among factors modifying the degree of plant affection under natural conditions, the level of nitric nutrition as well as light conditions may play an important role.

  4. Metabolic changes and tissue responses to selection on residual feed intake in growing pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Le Naou, Thierry; Le Floc'H, Nathalie; Louveau, Isabelle; Gilbert, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Previous selection experiments using residual feed intake (RFI) to select pigs with a high feed efficiency have reported that a low RFI was associated with a reduced body fat content and a greater muscle glycogen content. In the current study, growing Large White female piglets from 2 lines divergently selected for RFI were used to determine the changes in energy and protein metabolisms in key tissues and their cross talks in response to selection. Pigs of low RFI (RFI(-); n = 26) or high RFI...

  5. Sex differences in renal and metabolic responses to a high-fructose diet in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nikhil; Li, Lijun; Ecelbarger, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    High fructose intake has been associated with increased incidences of renal disease and hypertension, among other pathologies. Most fructose is cleared by the portal system and metabolized in the liver; however, systemic levels of fructose can rise with increased consumption. We tested whether there were sex differences in the renal responses to a high-fructose diet in mice. Two-month-old male and female C57BL6/129/SV mice (n = 6 mice per sex per treatment) were randomized to receive control ...

  6. Drug-Related Hyponatremic Encephalopathy: Rapid Clinical Response Averts Life-Threatening Acute Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Arthur J.; Forte, Sophie S.; Bhatti, Nasir A.; Gelda, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 63 Final Diagnosis: Drug-induced hyponatremic encephalopathy Symptoms: Seizures • coma Medication: Hypertonic 3% saline infusion Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Drug-induced hyponatremia characteristically presents with subtle psychomotor symptoms due to its slow onset, which permits compensatory volume adjustment to hypo-osmolality in the central nervous system. Due mainly to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), this condition readily resolves following discontinuation of the responsible pharmacological agent. Here, we present an unusual case of life-threatening encephalopathy due to adverse drug-related effects, in which a rapid clinical response facilitated emergent treatment to avert life-threatening acute cerebral edema. Case Report: A 63-year-old woman with refractory depression was admitted for inpatient psychiatric care with a normal physical examination and laboratory values, including a serum sodium [Na+] of 144 mEq/L. She had a grand mal seizure and became unresponsive on the fourth day of treatment with the dual serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor [SNRI] duloxetine while being continued on a thiazide-containing diuretic for a hypertensive disorder. Emergent infusion of intravenous hypertonic (3%) saline was initiated after determination of a serum sodium [Na+] of 103 mEq/L with a urine osmolality of 314 mOsm/kg H20 and urine [Na+] of 12 mEq/L. Correction of hyposmolality in accordance with current guidelines resulted in progressive improvement over several days, and she returned to her baseline mental status. Conclusions: Seizures with life-threatening hyponatremic encephalopathy in this case likely resulted from co-occurring SIADH and sodium depletion due to duloxetine and hydrochlorothiazide, respectively. A rapid clinical response expedited diagnosis and emergent treatment to reverse life-threatening acute cerebral edema

  7. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Limited inflammatory response in rats after acute exposure to a silicon carbide nanoaerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhalation represents the major route of human exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). Assessments are needed about the potential risks of NMs from inhalation on different tissues and organs, especially the respiratory tract. The aim of this limited study is to determine the potential acute pulmonary toxicity in rats exposed to a dry nanoaerosol of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles (NPs) in a whole-body exposure (WBE) model. The SiC nanoaerosol is composed of a bimodal size distribution of 92.8 and 480 nm. The exposure concentration was 4.91 mg/L, close to the highest recommended concentration of 5 mg/L by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Rats were exposed for 6 h to a stable and reproducible SiC nanoaerosol under real-time measurement conditions. A control group was exposed to the filtered air used to create the nanoaerosol. Animals were sacrificed immediately, 24 or 72 h after exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rat lungs was recovered. Macrophages filled with SiC NPs were observed in the rat lungs. The greatest load of SiC and macrophages filled with SiC were observed on the rat lungs sacrificed 24 h after acute exposure. A limited acute inflammatory response was found up to 24 h after exposure characterized by a lactate dehydrogenase and total protein increase or presence of inflammatory cells in pulmonary lavage. For this study a WBE model has been developed, it allows the simultaneous exposure of six rats to a nanoaerosol and six rats to clean-filtered air. The nanoaerosol was generated using a rotating brush system (RBG-1000) and analyzed with an electrical low pressure impactor in real time

  9. The Effect of Oxandrolone on the Endocrinologic, Inflammatory, and Hypermetabolic Responses During the Acute Phase Postburn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Suman, Oscar E.; Kulp, Gabriela; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Herndon, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective and Summary Background Data: Postburn long-term oxandrolone treatment improves hypermetabolism and body composition. The effects of oxandrolone on clinical outcome, body composition, endocrine system, and inflammation during the acute phase postburn in a large prospective randomized single-center trial have not been studied. Methods: Burned children (n = 235) with >40% total body surface area burn were randomized (block randomization 4:1) to receive standard burn care (control, n = 190) or standard burn care plus oxandrolone for at least 7 days (oxandrolone 0.1 mg/kg body weight q.12 hours p.o, n = 45). Clinical parameters, body composition, serum hormones, and cytokine expression profiles were measured throughout acute hospitalization. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test, or ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction with significance accepted at P < 0.05. Results: Demographics and clinical data were similar in both groups. Length of intensive care unit stay was significantly decreased in oxandrolone-treated patients (0.48 ± 0.02 days/% burn) compared with controls (0.56 ± 0.02 days/% burn), (P < 0.05). Control patients lost 8 ± 1% of their lean body mass (LBM), whereas oxandrolone-treated patients had preserved LBM (+9 ± 4%), P < 0.05. Oxandrolone significantly increased serum prealbumin, total protein, testosterone, and AST/ALT, whereas it significantly decreased α2-macroglobulin and complement C3, P < 0.05. Oxandrolone did not adversely affect the endocrine and inflammatory response as we found no significant differences in the hormone panels and cytokine expression profiles. Conclusions: In this large prospective, double-blinded, randomized single-center study, oxandrolone shortened length of acute hospital stay, maintained LBM, improved body composition and hepatic protein synthesis while having no adverse effects on the endocrine axis postburn, but was associated with an increase in AST and ALT. PMID:17717439

  10. Limited inflammatory response in rats after acute exposure to a silicon carbide nanoaerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laloy, J., E-mail: julie.laloy@unamur.be [University of Namur (UNamur), Department of Pharmacy, Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences NARILIS (Belgium); Lozano, O. [University of Namur (UNamur), Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre NNC, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences NARILIS (Belgium); Alpan, L.; Masereel, B. [University of Namur (UNamur), Department of Pharmacy, Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences NARILIS (Belgium); Toussaint, O. [University of Namur (UNamur), Laboratory of Cellular Biochemistry and Biology (URBC), Namur Nanosafety Centre NNC, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences NARILIS (Belgium); Dogné, J. M. [University of Namur (UNamur), Department of Pharmacy, Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences NARILIS (Belgium); Lucas, S. [University of Namur (UNamur), Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre NNC, Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences NARILIS (Belgium)

    2015-08-15

    Inhalation represents the major route of human exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (NMs). Assessments are needed about the potential risks of NMs from inhalation on different tissues and organs, especially the respiratory tract. The aim of this limited study is to determine the potential acute pulmonary toxicity in rats exposed to a dry nanoaerosol of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles (NPs) in a whole-body exposure (WBE) model. The SiC nanoaerosol is composed of a bimodal size distribution of 92.8 and 480 nm. The exposure concentration was 4.91 mg/L, close to the highest recommended concentration of 5 mg/L by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Rats were exposed for 6 h to a stable and reproducible SiC nanoaerosol under real-time measurement conditions. A control group was exposed to the filtered air used to create the nanoaerosol. Animals were sacrificed immediately, 24 or 72 h after exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rat lungs was recovered. Macrophages filled with SiC NPs were observed in the rat lungs. The greatest load of SiC and macrophages filled with SiC were observed on the rat lungs sacrificed 24 h after acute exposure. A limited acute inflammatory response was found up to 24 h after exposure characterized by a lactate dehydrogenase and total protein increase or presence of inflammatory cells in pulmonary lavage. For this study a WBE model has been developed, it allows the simultaneous exposure of six rats to a nanoaerosol and six rats to clean-filtered air. The nanoaerosol was generated using a rotating brush system (RBG-1000) and analyzed with an electrical low pressure impactor in real time.

  11. Reproductive experience alters neural and behavioural responses to acute oestrogen receptor α activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, E M; Casey, K; Carini, L M; Bridges, R S

    2013-12-01

    demonstrate that reproductive experience alters the behavioural response to acute ERα activation. Moreover, the findings suggest that central regulation of the hypothalamic-adrenal-pituitary axis is modified as a consequence of reproductive experience.

  12. Functional role of monocytes and macrophages for the inflammatory response in acute liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning W Zimmermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Different etiologies such as drug toxicity, acute viral hepatitis B or acetaminophen poisoning can cause acute liver injury (ALI or even acute liver failure (ALF. Excessive cell death of hepatocytes in the liver is known to result in a strong hepatic inflammation. Experimental murine models of liver injury highlighted the importance of hepatic macrophages, so-called Kupffer cells, for initiating and driving this inflammatory response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-1-beta or monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, CCL2 as well as activating other non-parenchymal liver cells, e.g. endothelial or hepatic stellate cells (HSC. Many of these proinflammatory mediators can trigger hepatocytic cell death pathways, e.g. via caspase activation, but also activate protective signaling pathways, e.g. via nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB. Recent studies in mice demonstrated that these macrophage actions largely depend on the recruitment of monocytes into the liver, namely of the inflammatory Ly6c+ (Gr1+ monocyte subset as precursors of tissue macrophages. The chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligand MCP-1/CCL2 promote monocyte subset infiltration upon liver injury. In contrast, the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 and its ligand fractalkine (CX3CL1 are important negative regulators of monocyte infiltration by controlling their survival and differentiation into functionally diverse macrophage subsets upon injury. The recently identified cellular and molecular pathways for monocyte subset recruitment, macrophage differentiation and interactions with other hepatic cell types in the injured liver may therefore represent interesting novel targets for future therapeutic approaches in ALF.

  13. Renal Handling of Sclerostin in Response to Acute Glomerular Filtration Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakareko, K; Rydzewska-Rosolowska, A; Brzosko, S; Gozdzikiewicz-Lapinska, J; Koc-Zorawska, E; Samocik, P; Kozlowski, R; Mysliwiec, M; Naumnik, B; Hryszko, T

    2016-07-01

    Deterioration of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is associated with alterations of bone metabolism. It translates clinically to bone fragility and increased fractures rate among patients with impaired GFR. Recently, sclerostin (SCL) gained much attention as an important factor in pathogenesis of mineral and bone disturbances in patients with renal diseases. There is no data about SCL behaviour in patients with acute GFR decline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the renal handling of SCL. This is a prospective, single-centre observational study in patients undergoing nephrectomy due to urological indications. Serum and urinary SCL levels were measured prior and after nephrectomy. 25 patients were enrolled. After surgery, eGFR significantly declined (from 87.4±19.7 to 67.7±25.7 ml/min/1.73 m(2), presults suggest that increased serum SCL concentrations at moderately reduced GFR are not due to diminished renal clearance. At more severely decreased GFR, elevated SCL concentration results from both increased production and reduced renal elimination. PMID:27214309

  14. SUPPRESSION OF ANGⅡ AFTER ACUTE SALINE LOAD ASSOCIATED WITH THE CHANGES OF PLASMA ANP AND SODIUM METABOLISM IN SALT-SENSITIVE HYPERTENSION PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永兴; 刘治全; 刘艳; 侯嵘; 叶涛

    2003-01-01

    Objective To observe the changes of plasma AngⅡ,ANP and their relationship with urine sodium excretion in salt sensitive hypertension. Methods The salt sensitivity was determined by acute saline loading test in 173 primary hypertensives of Stage Ⅰ or Stage Ⅱ. Plasma AngⅡand ANP was determined by radioimmunoassay. Results After acute salt load, AngⅡ was suppressed inadequately. The plasma ANP secretion was not increased. The urine sodiun excretion was delayed, Na+ in RBC was increased in salt sensitive subjects. The plasma ANP was decreased in the salt sensitive subjects without AngⅡ suppressed. The 24 hours urine sodium excretion was lower than those AngⅡ suppressed.Conclusion The changes of plasma RAS are not homogeneous after salt load. Those without the plasma AngⅡ suppressed have more severe sodium metabolism abnormalities and the endogenous ANP secretion is impaired in salt sensitive patients.

  15. Developmental Programming in Response to Intrauterine Growth Restriction Impairs Myoblast Function and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Yates

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal adaptations to placental insufficiency alter postnatal metabolic homeostasis in skeletal muscle by reducing glucose oxidation rates, impairing insulin action, and lowering the proportion of oxidative fibers. In animal models of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, skeletal muscle fibers have less myonuclei at birth. This means that myoblasts, the sole source for myonuclei accumulation in fibers, are compromised. Fetal hypoglycemia and hypoxemia are complications that result from placental insufficiency. Hypoxemia elevates circulating catecholamines, and chronic hypercatecholaminemia has been shown to reduce fetal muscle development and growth. We have found evidence for adaptations in adrenergic receptor expression profiles in myoblasts and skeletal muscle of IUGR sheep fetuses with placental insufficiency. The relationship of β-adrenergic receptors shifts in IUGR fetuses because Adrβ2 expression levels decline and Adrβ1 expression levels are unaffected in myofibers and increased in myoblasts. This adaptive response would suppress insulin signaling, myoblast incorporation, fiber hypertrophy, and glucose oxidation. Furthermore, this β-adrenergic receptor expression profile persists for at least the first month in IUGR lambs and lowers their fatty acid mobilization. Developmental programming of skeletal muscle adrenergic receptors partially explains metabolic and endocrine differences in IUGR offspring, and the impact on metabolism may result in differential nutrient utilization.

  16. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein and male gender are independently related to the severity of coronary disease in patients with metabolic syndrome and an acute coronary event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.C. Monteiro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with metabolic syndrome are at high-risk for development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. The objective of this study was to examine the major determinants of coronary disease severity, including those coronary risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, during the early period after an acute coronary episode. We tested the hypothesis that inflammatory markers, especially highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP, are related to coronary atherosclerosis, in addition to traditional coronary risk factors. Subjects of both genders aged 30 to 75 years (N = 116 were prospectively included if they had suffered a recent acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina pectoris requiring hospitalization and if they had metabolic syndrome diagnosed according to the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III. Patients were submitted to a coronary angiography and the burden of atherosclerosis was estimated by the Gensini score. The severity of coronary disease was correlated (Spearman’s or Pearson’s coefficient with gender (r = 0.291, P = 0.008, age (r = 0.218, P = 0.048, hsCRP (r = 0.256, P = 0.020, ApoB/ApoA ratio (r = 0.233, P = 0.041, and carotid intima-media thickness (r = 0.236, P = 0.041. After multiple linear regression, only male gender (P = 0.046 and hsCRP (P = 0.012 remained independently associated with the Gensini score. In this high-risk population, male gender and high levels of hsCRP, two variables that can be easily obtained, were associated with more extensive coronary disease, identifying patients with the highest potential of developing new coronary events.

  17. Differential response of high-elevation planktonic bacterial community structure and metabolism to experimental nutrient enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig E Nelson

    Full Text Available Nutrient enrichment of high-elevation freshwater ecosystems by atmospheric deposition is increasing worldwide, and bacteria are a key conduit for the metabolism of organic matter in these oligotrophic environments. We conducted two distinct in situ microcosm experiments in a high-elevation lake (Emerald Lake, Sierra Nevada, California, USA to evaluate responses in bacterioplankton growth, carbon utilization, and community structure to short-term enrichment by nitrate and phosphate. The first experiment, conducted just following ice-off, employed dark dilution culture to directly assess the impact of nutrients on bacterioplankton growth and consumption of terrigenous dissolved organic matter during snowmelt. The second experiment, conducted in transparent microcosms during autumn overturn, examined how bacterioplankton in unmanipulated microbial communities responded to nutrients concomitant with increasing phytoplankton-derived organic matter. In both experiments, phosphate enrichment (but not nitrate caused significant increases in bacterioplankton growth, changed particulate organic stoichiometry, and induced shifts in bacterial community composition, including consistent declines in the relative abundance of Actinobacteria. The dark dilution culture showed a significant increase in dissolved organic carbon removal in response to phosphate enrichment. In transparent microcosms nutrient enrichment had no effect on concentrations of chlorophyll, carbon, or the fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter, suggesting that bacterioplankton responses were independent of phytoplankton responses. These results demonstrate that bacterioplankton communities in unproductive high-elevation habitats can rapidly alter their taxonomic composition and metabolism in response to short-term phosphate enrichment. Our results reinforce the key role that phosphorus plays in oligotrophic lake ecosystems, clarify the nature of bacterioplankton nutrient

  18. Immune response and mitochondrial metabolism are commonly deregulated in DMD and aging skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Baron

    Full Text Available Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD is a complex process involving multiple pathways downstream of the primary genetic insult leading to fatal muscle degeneration. Aging muscle is a multifactorial neuromuscular process characterized by impaired muscle regeneration leading to progressive atrophy. We hypothesized that these chronic atrophying situations may share specific myogenic adaptative responses at transcriptional level according to tissue remodeling. Muscle biopsies from four young DMD and four AGED subjects were referred to a group of seven muscle biopsies from young subjects without any neuromuscular disorder and explored through a dedicated expression microarray. We identified 528 differentially expressed genes (out of 2,745 analyzed, of which 328 could be validated by an exhaustive meta-analysis of public microarray datasets referring to DMD and Aging in skeletal muscle. Among the 328 validated co-expressed genes, 50% had the same expression profile in both groups and corresponded to immune/fibrosis responses and mitochondrial metabolism. Generalizing these observed meta-signatures with large compendia of public datasets reinforced our results as they could be also identified in other pathological processes and in diverse physiological conditions. Focusing on the common gene signatures in these two atrophying conditions, we observed enrichment in motifs for candidate transcription factors that may coordinate either the immune/fibrosis responses (ETS1, IRF1, NF1 or the mitochondrial metabolism (ESRRA. Deregulation in their expression could be responsible, at least in part, for the same transcriptome changes initiating the chronic muscle atrophy. This study suggests that distinct pathophysiological processes may share common gene responses and pathways related to specific transcription factors.

  19. Immune response and mitochondrial metabolism are commonly deregulated in DMD and aging skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Daniel; Magot, Armelle; Ramstein, Gérard; Steenman, Marja; Fayet, Guillemette; Chevalier, Catherine; Jourdon, Philippe; Houlgatte, Rémi; Savagner, Frédérique; Pereon, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a complex process involving multiple pathways downstream of the primary genetic insult leading to fatal muscle degeneration. Aging muscle is a multifactorial neuromuscular process characterized by impaired muscle regeneration leading to progressive atrophy. We hypothesized that these chronic atrophying situations may share specific myogenic adaptative responses at transcriptional level according to tissue remodeling. Muscle biopsies from four young DMD and four AGED subjects were referred to a group of seven muscle biopsies from young subjects without any neuromuscular disorder and explored through a dedicated expression microarray. We identified 528 differentially expressed genes (out of 2,745 analyzed), of which 328 could be validated by an exhaustive meta-analysis of public microarray datasets referring to DMD and Aging in skeletal muscle. Among the 328 validated co-expressed genes, 50% had the same expression profile in both groups and corresponded to immune/fibrosis responses and mitochondrial metabolism. Generalizing these observed meta-signatures with large compendia of public datasets reinforced our results as they could be also identified in other pathological processes and in diverse physiological conditions. Focusing on the common gene signatures in these two atrophying conditions, we observed enrichment in motifs for candidate transcription factors that may coordinate either the immune/fibrosis responses (ETS1, IRF1, NF1) or the mitochondrial metabolism (ESRRA). Deregulation in their expression could be responsible, at least in part, for the same transcriptome changes initiating the chronic muscle atrophy. This study suggests that distinct pathophysiological processes may share common gene responses and pathways related to specific transcription factors.

  20. Effect of fasting on the metabolic response of liver to experimental burn injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Orman

    Full Text Available Liver metabolism is altered after systemic injuries such as burns and trauma. These changes have been elucidated in rat models of experimental burn injury where the liver was isolated and perfused ex vivo. Because these studies were performed in fasted animals to deplete glycogen stores, thus simplifying quantification of gluconeogenesis, these observations reflect the combined impact of fasting and injury on liver metabolism. Herein we asked whether the metabolic response to experimental burn injury is different in fed vs. fasted animals. Rats were subjected to a cutaneous burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, or to similar procedures without administering the burn, hence a sham-burn. Half of the animals in the burn and sham-burn groups were fasted starting on postburn day 3, and the others allowed to continue ad libitum. On postburn day 4, livers were isolated and perfused for 1 hour in physiological medium supplemented with 10% hematocrit red blood cells. The uptake/release rates of major carbon and nitrogen sources, oxygen, and carbon dioxide were measured during the perfusion and the data fed into a mass balance model to estimate intracellular fluxes. The data show that in fed animals, injury increased glucose output mainly from glycogen breakdown and minimally impacted amino acid metabolism. In fasted animals, injury did not increase glucose output but increased urea production and the uptake of several amino acids, namely glutamine, arginine, glycine, and methionine. Furthermore, sham-burn animals responded to fasting by triggering gluconeogenesis from lactate; however, in burned animals the preferred gluconeogenic substrate was amino acids. Taken together, these results suggest that the fed state prevents the burn-induced increase in hepatic amino acid utilization for gluconeogenesis. The role of glycogen stores and means to increase and/or maintain internal sources of glucose to prevent increased hepatic amino acid