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Sample records for acute lumbar spinal

  1. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

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    Yoon S Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5 cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst.

  2. Syringomyelia due to Lumbar Spinal Fluid Drainage in the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report.

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    Machida, Akira; Fujii, Mutsumi; Ishihara, Tasuku; Amano, Eiichiro; Otsu, Shinichi; Fujii, Shoko; Tamada, Natsumi; Kiyokawa, Juri; Yoshimura, Masataka; Hirota, Shin; Yamamoto, Shinji

    2018-01-01

    Lumbar spinal fluid drainage is a common procedure for treating hydrocephalus and alleviating vasospasm by egesting blood in the subarachnoid cavity after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Despite being an effective and safe procedure, cerebrospinal fluid overdrainage might result in serious complications. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old man who suffered from tonsillar herniation with subsequent cervicothoracic syringomyelia in the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to vertebral artery dissection. About 2 weeks after lumbar drainage was switched from external ventricular drainage initiated on the day of subarachnoid hemorrhage, the recovery from the disturbance of consciousness revealed tetraplegia, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated tonsillar herniation and syringomyelia. Removal of the spinal drain and resumption of external ventricular drainage resulted in the restoration of the herniated tonsils to the normal position and the complete disappearance of syringomyelia 11 days later. We should consider that spinal syringomyelia could develop as a complication of lumbar spinal fluid drainage in the acute phase of thick subarachnoid hemorrhage, particularly in the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Traumatic lumbar spinal subdural hematoma

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    William E. Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Our case illustrates rapid resolution of a posttraumatic spinal SDH after treatment with oral corticosteroids. Recognition of blood products on MRI is vital to diagnosis and expedient treatment. There is agreement that prompt laminectomy with evacuation of SDH should be performed before permanent damage to the spinal cord occurs. Including our patient, 4 of 11 reported cases of thoracic or lumbar SDH resolved with conservative treatment.

  4. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

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    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  5. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

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    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. FUNCTIONAL PATHOLOGY OF LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

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    PENNING, L

    This paper deals with the effect of motion upon the stenotic lumbar spinal canal and its contents. A review is presented of personal investigations and relevant data from the literature. The normal spinal canal and its lateral recesses are naturally narrowed by retroflexion and/or axial loading, as

  7. Surgical options for lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Machado, Gustavo C; Ferreira, Paulo H; Yoo, Rafael Ij; Harris, Ian A; Pinheiro, Marina B; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Maher, Christopher G.; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital charges for lumbar spinal stenosis have increased significantly worldwide in recent times, with great variation in the costs and rates of different surgical procedures. There have also been significant increases in the rate of complex fusion and the use of spinal spacer implants

  8. Computed tomographic evaluation of lumbar spinal structures during traction.

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    Sari, Hidayet; Akarirmak, Ulkü; Karacan, Ilhan; Akman, Haluk

    2005-01-01

    In the previous studies, it is reported that traction diminishes the compressive load on intervertebral discs, reduces herniation, stretches lumbar spinal muscle and ligaments, decreases muscle spasm, and widens intervertebral foramina. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of horizontal motorized static traction on spinal anatomic structures (herniated area, spinal canal area, intervertebral disc heights, neural foraminal diameter, and m.psoas diameter) by quantitative measures in patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). At the same time the effect of traction in different localizations (median and posterolateral herniation) and at different levels (L4-L5 and L5-S1) was assessed. Thirty two patients with acute LDH participated in the study. A special traction system was used to apply horizontally-motorized static lumbar traction. Before and during traction a CT- scan was made to observe the changes in the area of spinal canal and herniated disc material, in the width of neural foramina, intervertebral disc heights, and in the thickness of psoas muscle. During traction, the area of protruded disc area, and the thickness of psoas muscle decreased 24.5% (p = 0.0001), and 5.7% (p = 0.0001), respectively. The area of the spinal canal and the width of the neural foramen increased 21.6% (p = 0.0001) and 26.7% (p = 0.0001), respectively. The anterior intervertebral disc height remained unchanged with traction however the posterior intervertebral disc height was significantly expanded. This study is the first to evaluated in detail and quantitatively the effect of motorized horizontal lumbar spinal traction on spinal structures and herniated area. According to detailed measures it was concluded that during traction of individuals with acute LDH there was a reduction of the size of the herniation, increased space within the spinal canal, widening of the neural foramina, and decreased thickness of the psoas muscle.

  9. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

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    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  10. Iliac arteriovenous fistulas after lumbar spinal surgery.

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    Ocal, Osman; Peynircioglu, Bora; Eldem, Gonca; Akpinar, Erhan; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Kabakci, Giray

    2017-09-01

    Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is an unusual and potentially fatal complication of lumbar spinal surgery. The presentation of these injuries is usually late, with symptoms such as leg swelling or cardiac failure. It is crucial to suspect AVF in the patient which presents to emergency with lumbar spinal surgery history. The diagnosis is often based on imaging studies such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. Surgery was the first choice of treatment, but with recent advances in stent technology endovascular approach has become widely popular. We present two cases of AVF secondary to lumbar spinal surgery, one of them presenting with overt heart failure and the other one with leg swelling.

  11. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and lumbar sinus: An uncommon complication of posterior lumbar spinal surgery

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    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tripathy, Pradipta; Das, Pulin Bihari; Mohapatra, Debahuti

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old female presented with the complaint of purulent discharging sinus over posterior lumbar area following one month of lumbar spinal surgery for prolapsed intervertebral disc. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and sinus track formation over posterior lumbar area was diagnosed in magnetic resonance imaging which was confirmed in re- exploration of lumbar spinal operative site.

  12. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

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    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  13. Imaging of current spinal hardware: lumbar spine.

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    Ha, Alice S; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this article are to review the indications for and the materials and designs of hardware more commonly used in the lumbar spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to show examples of hardware complications. Stabilization and fusion of the lumbar spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and newer types of material incorporation are increasingly more common in contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of this spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of fundamental hardware design, physiologic objectives, normal postoperative imaging appearances, and unique complications. Radiologists may have little training and experience with the new and modified types of hardware used in the lumbar spine.

  14. The imaging of lumbar spinal stenosis review

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    Saifuddin, A

    2000-08-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a relatively common condition of varied aetiology which results in chronic compression of the cauda equina. It becomes clinically relevant when giving rise to symptoms of neurogenic claudication or leg pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis can be classified based on anatomy or aetiology and the diagnosis in any single case should include a consideration of both the site and the cause. Plain radiography is of limited value. Myelography with erect lateral flexion/extension views will demonstrate the dynamic component of the stenosis which cannot be appreciated on plain computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, in patients with a good history of symptomatic LSS, and a borderline stenosis on MRI, CT myelography is recommended as the definitive pre-operative imaging investigation. Saifuddin, A. (2000)

  15. Lumbar spinal muscles and spinal canal study by MRI three-dimensional reconstruction in adult lumbar spinal stenosis.

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    Boissière, L; Moal, B; Gille, O; De-Roquefeuil, E; Durieux, M; Obeid, I; Dousset, V; Vital, J-M; Skalli, W

    2017-04-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is degenerative disc disease most common manifestation. If stenosis degree seems poorly related to symptom severity, lumbar muscles role is recognized. Many studies report imaging methods, to analyze muscle volumes and fat infiltration (FI), but remain limited due to the difficulty to represent entire muscle volume variability. Recently a 3D muscle reconstruction protocol (using the deformation of a parametric specific object method (DPSO) and three-point Dixon images) was reported. It offers the ability to evaluate, muscles volumes and muscle FI. To describe, in a lumbar spinal stenosis population, muscle volumes, muscle FI and lumbar spinal canal volume with 3D MRI images reconstructions. Ten adults presenting L4-L5 lumbar stenosis, were included. After specific MRI protocol, three-dimensional, muscle and spinal canal, reconstructions were performed. Muscle (psoas and paraspinal muscles) volumes and fat infiltration (FI), the spinal canal volume, age, and height were correlated one to each other with Spearman correlation factor. An ANOVA was performed to evaluate the intervertebral level influence (P≤0.05). Muscle volumes correlated with height (r=0.68 for psoas). Muscles FI correlated with age (r=0.66 for psoas) and lumbar spinal canal volume (r=0.91). Psoas and paraspinal volumes were maximum at L3-L4 level whereas FI increased from L1-L2 to L5-S1 level. These first results illustrate the importance to consider muscles entirely and report correlations between muscles FI, lumbar spinal canal volume and age; and between muscle volumes and patients height. Muscle degeneration seems more related to muscle FI than muscle volume. 3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. A Rare Case of Pediatric Lumbar Spinal Ependymoma Mimicking Meningitis.

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    Ekuma, Ezeali Mike; Ito, Kiyoshi; Chiba, Akihiro; Hara, Yosuke; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ohaegbulam, Samuel; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from lumbar ependymoma in children is rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed sudden radicular low back pain while playing baseball. He was initially managed conservatively in a local hospital for suspected lumbar disc herniation, but he later developed meningeal symptoms and fever before being referred to our hospital. He underwent a diagnostic lumbar puncture in the emergency department; his cerebrospinal fluid suggested an SAH. Physical examination showed meningeal signs and cauda equina features. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was negative for bacterial meningitis. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass characterized as a hemorrhagic lesion. The patient had an emergent evacuation of the mass through the posterior approach. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely. The histologic diagnosis was, surprisingly, an ependymoma (World Health Organization grade II). This case is particularly interesting because of its rarity in children, and its pattern of presentation. Although bacterial or viral meningitis is the most frequent cause of meningeal features in children, SAH from a hemorrhagic spinal tumor should be considered. Ultimately, a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis.

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    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ng, Karen Ka Man; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Samartzis, Dino; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee

    2017-01-01

    Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS) are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP) bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group) and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group). Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW) as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0), L2 (2.0), L3 (2.2), L4 (2.2), L5 (2.5), and S1 (2.8). This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better cost-saving means for clinical diagnosis or research

  18. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis

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    Jason Pui Yin Cheung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group. Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Results Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0, L2 (2.0, L3 (2.2, L4 (2.2, L5 (2.5, and S1 (2.8. Conclusions This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better

  19. Operated herniated disk and lumbar spinal stenosis in Togolese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Operated herniated disk and lumbar spinal stenosis in Togolese patients: anatomical aspects and results of surgical treatment. AVE Koffi-Tessio, H Fatiga, P Houzou, K Kakpovi, E Fianyo, O Oniankitan, M Mijiyawa ...

  20. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

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    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  1. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

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    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G. (Turku City Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery; Social Insurance Institution, Turku (Finland). Rehabilitation Research Centre; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Orthopaedic and Accident Surgery)

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.).

  2. Lumbar spinal mobility changes among adults with advancing age

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    Ismaila Adamu Saidu

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Using these data, we developed normative values of spinal mobility for each sex and age group. This study helps the clinicians to understand and correlate the restrictions of lumbar spinal mobility due to age and differentiate the limitations due to disease.

  3. Outcomes of acute and chronic patients with magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed symptomatic lumbar disc herniations receiving high-velocity, low-amplitude, spinal manipulative therapy: a prospective observational cohort study with one-year follow-up.

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    Leemann, Serafin; Peterson, Cynthia K; Schmid, Christof; Anklin, Bernard; Humphreys, B Kim

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate patients with low-back pain (LBP) and leg pain due to magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed disc herniation who are treated with high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation in terms of their short-, medium-, and long-term outcomes of self-reported global impression of change and pain levels at various time points up to 1 year and to determine if outcomes differ between acute and chronic patients using a prospective, cohort design. This prospective cohort outcomes study includes 148 patients (between ages of 18 and 65 years) with LBP, leg pain, and physical examination abnormalities with concordant lumbar disc herniations. Baseline numerical rating scale (NRS) data for LBP, leg pain, and the Oswestry questionnaire were obtained. The specific lumbar spinal manipulation was dependent upon whether the disc herniation was intraforaminal or paramedian as seen on the magnetic resonance images and was performed by a doctor of chiropractic. Outcomes included the patient's global impression of change scale for overall improvement, the NRS for LBP, leg pain, and the Oswestry questionnaire at 2 weeks, 1, 3, and 6 months, and 1 year after the first treatment. The proportion of patients reporting "improvement" on the patient's global impression of change scale was calculated for all patients and acute vs chronic patients. Pretreatment and posttreatment NRS scores were compared using the paired t test. Baseline and follow-up Oswestry scores were compared using the Wilcoxon test. Numerical rating scale and Oswestry scores for acute vs chronic patients were compared using the unpaired t test for NRS scores and the Mann-Whitney U test for Oswestry scores. Logistic regression analysis compared baseline variables with "improvement." Significant improvement for all outcomes at all time points was reported (P manipulation reported clinically relevant improvement. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby

  4. OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

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    Samo K. Fokter

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS is a common cause of low back and leg pain in the elderly. Conservative treatment seldom results in sustained improvement.Methods. Fifty-six patients (33 women, 23 men older than 50 years (mean 67 years, range 51 to 82 years and with no prior low back surgery were treated from 1993 to 1999 for clinical and radiologic evidence of DLSS. The goal of this study was to describe the results of decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion in terms of reoperation, severity of back pain, leg pain and patient satisfaction. Answers to Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaires completed before surgery and one to five years afterwards were evaluated. Seven patients (12.5% with degenerative spondylolisthesis, scoliosis and/or more radical facetectomies received fusion.Results. Of the 56 patients in the original cohort, two were deceased and two had undergone reoperation by follow-up. Forty-eight patients answered questionnaires. Average duration of follow-up was 2.5 years. More than 70 percent of the respondents had no or only mild back or buttock pain at follow-up and more than 60 percent were able to walk more than 500 m. Added fusion reduced the incidence of low back pain and pain frequency, and increased walking distance (ANOVA.Conclusions. Eighty-one percent of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery and 87.5% would choose to have the operation again if they had the choice. Decompressive laminectomy for DLSS yields best results if instrumented fusion is included in the procedure.

  5. Modeling trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor pathways

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    Kuck, A.; Stegeman, D. F.; van Asseldonk, E. H. F.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a potential new technique for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). TsDCS aims to facilitate plastic changes in the neural pathways of the spinal cord with a positive effect on SCI recovery. To establish tsDCS as a possible treatment option for SCI, it is essential to gain a better understanding of its cause and effects. We seek to understand the acute effect of tsDCS, including the generated electric field (EF) and its polarization effect on the spinal circuits, to determine a cellular target. We further ask how these findings can be interpreted to explain published experimental results. Approach. We use a realistic full body finite element volume conductor model to calculate the EF of a 2.5 mA direct current for three different electrode configurations. We apply the calculated electric field to realistic motoneuron models to investigate static changes in membrane resting potential. The results are combined with existing knowledge about the theoretical effect on a neuronal level and implemented into an existing lumbar spinal network model to simulate the resulting changes on a network level. Main results. Across electrode configurations, the maximum EF inside the spinal cord ranged from 0.47 V m-1 to 0.82 V m-1. Axon terminal polarization was identified to be the dominant cellular target. Also, differences in electrode placement have a large influence on axon terminal polarization. Comparison between the simulated acute effects and the electrophysiological long-term changes observed in human tsDCS studies suggest an inverse relationship between the two. Significance. We provide methods and knowledge for better understanding the effects of tsDCS and serve as a basis for a more targeted and optimized application of tsDCS.

  6. Conductive neuromagnetic fields in the lumbar spinal canal.

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    Ishii, Senichi; Kawabata, Shigenori; Tomizawa, Shoji; Tomori, Masaki; Sakaki, Kyohei; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Sekihara, Kensuke; Sato, Tomoya; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Okawa, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    To measure neuromagnetic evoked fields in the lumbar spinal canal. Using a newly developed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) fluxmeter, neuromagnetic fields of 5 healthy male volunteers were measured at the surface of the lower back after stimulation of the tibial nerves at the ankles. For validation, we inserted a catheter-type electrode percutaneously in the lumbar epidural space in 2 of the subjects and measured cauda equina action potentials after tibial nerve stimulation. Neuromagnetic fields propagating from the intervertebral foramina into the spinal canal were measured, and the latencies of the magnetic fields corresponded largely with those of the cauda equina action potentials. We successfully measured ascending neuromagnetic fields originating at the nerve root and the cauda equina with high spatial resolution. Future studies will determine whether neuromagnetic field measurement of the lumbar spine can be a useful diagnostic method for the identification of the disordered site in spinal nerves. We successfully measured neuromagnetic fields in the lumbar spinal canal, which have previously been difficult to verify. Future studies will determine whether neuromagnetic field measurement of the lumbar spine can be a useful diagnostic method for identifying disorders of spinal nerves. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal CT scan, 2. Lumbar and sacral spines

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    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ., Aichi (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival.

  8. IMPACT OF SPINAL DECOMPRESSION ON PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LUMBAR DISC PROLAPSE

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    Salwa R. El-Gendy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: DRX9000 spinal decompression is slightly known for treating chronic lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of DRX9000spinal decompression on pain in chroniclumbar disc prolapse (CLDP. Methods: twenty male subjects with chronic lumbar disc prolapse,aged between 40:60 years were included in the study. They were assessed forpain intensity byslump test,straight leg raising test (SLR,modified Oswestery questionnaire (OQ and visual analogue scale (VAS. The study continued forsix weeks, the 20 patients were equally divided into two groups. Group A (experimental received spinal decompression, stability and McKenzie exercises; and ice, at a rate of 3 days per week, the duration of each session was 60 minutes. While group B (control were treated by exercises and ice only. Results: Majority of patients had positive findings in reducing pain clinically; however, statistically there was no significant difference. Conclusion: It can be concluded that spinal decompression has an effect, but not statistically significant in decreasing pain on patients with lumbar disc prolapse. This may be due to limited number of patients. We can recommend increasing the sample size to generalize the results, MRI scan follow up should be done after one year to determine if the effects are permanent or transient, comparing the effects of decompression between acute & chronic cases of lumbar disc prolapse, also male & female patients.

  9. Spinal Anesthesia in Elderly Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Noah L; Edwards, Charles C; Brown, Charles H; Ledford, Emily C; Dean, Clayton L; Lin, Charles; Edwards, Charles C

    2017-03-01

    Spinal anesthesia is increasingly viewed as a reasonable alternative to general anesthesia for lumbar spine surgery. However, the results of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spine decompression and combined decompression and fusion procedures are limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to report a single institution's experience using spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. A retrospective review was conducted using a prospectively collected database of consecutive lumbar spine surgeries performed under spinal anesthesia in patients 70 years or older at a single center between December 2013 and October 2015. A total of 56 patients were included in the study; 27 patients (48%) underwent lumbar decompression and 29 patients (52%) underwent combined decompression and fusion procedures. Mean operative time was 101 minutes (range, 30-210 minutes), and mean operative blood loss was 187 mL (range, 20-700 mL). Mean maximum inpatient postoperative visual analog scale score was 6.2 (range, 1-10). Nausea occurred in 21% (12 of 56) of the patients. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days (range, 1-6 days). No mortality, stroke, permanent loss of function, or pulmonary embolism occurred. None of the cases required conversion to general anesthesia. All of the patients were ambulatory on either the day of the surgery or the next morning. These results demonstrate that spinal anesthesia is a viable method of anesthesia for patients 70 years and older undergoing lumbar spine surgery. They also demonstrate the safety of this method for patients older than 84 years and for surgeries lasting up to 3½ hours. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e317-e322.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Dynamic Stabilization for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Lumbar Spinal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTONARI, Tatsuya; NISHIHARA, Nobuharu; SUWA, Katsuyasu; OTA, Taisei; KOYAMA, Tsunemaro

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted surgical procedure for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar spinal instability in the active age group. However, in elderly patients, it is often questionable whether it is truly necessary to construct rigid fixation for a short period of time. In recent years, we have been occasionally performing posterior dynamic stabilization in elderly patients with such lumbar disorders. Posterior dynamic stabilization was performed in 12 patients (6 women, 70.9 ± 5.6 years old at the time of operation) with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis in whom % slip was less than 20% or instability associated with lumbar disc herniation between March 2011 and March 2013. Movement occurs through the connector linked to the pedicle screw. In practice, 9 pairs of D connector system where the rod moves in the perpendicular direction alone and 8 pairs of Dynamic connector system where the connector linked to the pedicle screw rotates in the sagittal direction were installed. The observation period was 77–479 days, and the mean recovery rate of lumbar Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 65.6 ± 20.8%. There was progression of slippage due to slight loosening in a case with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, but this did not lead to exacerbation of the symptoms. Although follow-up was short, there were no symptomatic adjacent vertebral and disc disorders during this period. Posterior dynamic stabilization may diminish the development of adjacent vertebral or disc disorders due to lumbar interbody fusion, especially in elderly patients, and it may be a useful procedure that facilitates decompression and ensures a certain degree of spinal stabilization. PMID:25169137

  11. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  12. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted. PMID:25276453

  13. Introducing new implants and imaging techniques for lumbar spinal stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Wouter Anton

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to compare bony decompression with implantation of interspinous process devices (IPDs) in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC) caused by lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). A national survey among Dutch spine surgeons is presented about the usual

  14. A Framework for Patient-Specific Spinal Intervention Simulation: Application to Lumbar Spinal Durotomy Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jonathan C; Denning, Lynn; Lownie, Stephen P; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-01-01

    We present a functional and patient-specific lumbar phantom for the training of spinal durotomy and dura closure under microscopic view, consisting of a lumbar model, pressurized dural surrogate, together immersed in a tissue-mimicking layer simulating fat, muscle and skin. The lumbar model was derived from a patient computed tomography scan, preserving the natural shape and curvature of the lumbar column. The inclusion of the simulated soft-tissue layer was critical for preserving the surgical ergonomics and presented a realistic view under the surgical microscope. As the success of dura repair is indicated by the watertight closure of the thecal sac, the dura surrogate was connected to a pressurized and closed-loop water system to provide functional cerebrospinal fluid leakage during durotomy. This functional phantom is inexpensive to construct, provides a realistic tactile and visual environment for spinal durotomy repair, and can be easily extended to simulate other patient-specific spinal interventions.

  15. Isolated lumbar intradural extra medullary spinal cysticercosis simulating tarlov cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sumit; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Kakkar, Aanchal

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is a very uncommon manifestation of neurocysticercosis, which is caused by the larvae of Taenia solium. Here, we present a rare case of isolated lumbar intradural extramedullary neurocysticercosis, initially thought to be Tarlov cyst. A 40-year-old man, presented with low backache for 1-year with radiation of pain to right leg for 3 months. The patient was treated successfully with the surgical removal of the cyst, followed by medical treatment. Spinal neurocysticercosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis in high-risk populations, with new symptoms suggestive of a spinal mass lesion.

  16. LumbSten: The lumbar spinal stenosis outcome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in elderly people. For patients with moderate or severe symptoms different conservative and surgical treatment modalities are recommended, but knowledge about the effectiveness, in particular of the conservative treatments, is scarce. There is some evidence that surgery improves outcome in about two thirds of the patients. The aims of this study are to derive and validate a prognostic prediction aid to estimate the probability of clinically relevant improvement after surgery and to gain more knowledge about the future course of patients treated by conservative treatment modalities. Methods/Design This is a prospective, multi-centre cohort study within four hospitals of Zurich, Switzerland. We will enroll patients with neurogenic claudication and lumbar spinal stenosis verified by Computer Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Participating in the study will have no influence on treatment modality. Clinical data, including relevant prognostic data, will be collected at baseline and the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire will be used to quantify severity of symptoms, physical function characteristics, and patient's satisfaction after treatment (primary outcome. Data on outcome will be collected 6 weeks, and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after inclusion in the study. Applying multivariable statistical methods, a prediction rule to estimate the course after surgery will be derived. Discussion The ultimate goal of the study is to facilitate optimal, knowledge based and individualized treatment recommendations for patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis.

  17. Massive Pulmonary Embolism after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Akar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE is a rare complication that may result in death after lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Although pulmonary embolism mortality rates decreased with early diagnosis and treatment, delays in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism is commonly seen even with advanced diagnostic methods. Even though it is rare, the risk of pulmonary embolism as well as thrombophlebitis and deep vein thrombosis are encountered in patients undergoing spinal surgery. In this case presentation, we discussed the case of pulmonary embolism determined in a young patient developing unconsciousness and then cardiopulmonary arrest following mobilization at the postoperative 12th hour after a lumbar spinal fusion surgery and determined to have severe right ventricular enlargement, leftward deviation of the interatrial septum, severe tricuspid failure at the bedside echocardiography and who was discharged after thrombolytic therapy.

  18. Dorsal column stimulation for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Gilbert S; Nixon, Bruce; Stewart, L Todd; Love, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Surgical decompression has been considered the gold standard for the symptomatic spinal stenotic patient. Thirty thousand decompressive procedures are performed annually and this number is expected to increase as the American population ages. Options are limited for the stenotic patient classified as a "poor surgical risk". Furthermore review of the literature indicates mixed results even in optimal populations. Nonsurgical approaches including epidural steroids and percutaneous adhesiolysis have not been completely evaluated. Spinal cord stimulation has a long safe efficacious history in the treatment of neuropathic extremity pain but has never been evaluated in the treatment of spinal stenosis. This retrospective cohort of 55 patients receiving spinal cord stimulation was selected from a total of 72 patients presenting with spinal stenosis over a 4 year period. Twenty-one underwent subsequent permanent implantation with success rate of 67% at 1.5 years. Twelve elected to not receive implant despite "successful trial". 22 had "failed trial". Verbal pain scores, narcotic intake, and function were monitored. Spinal cord stimulation is a promising nondestructive alternative in the treatment of symptomatic spinal stenosis. Mild-moderate stenosis, predominate leg pain, and "positive" exercise treadmill appear to be positive predictors. Prospective trials with rigorous statistical designs are needed.

  19. Assessment of lumbar spinal canal stenosis by magnetic resonance phlebography

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    Manaka, Masakazu; Komagata, Masashi; Endo, Kenji; Imakiire, Atsuhiro [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    There is evidence to suggest that cauda equina intermittent claudication is caused by local circulatory disturbances in the cauda equina as well as compression of the cauda equina. We evaluated the role of magnetic resonance phlebography (MRP) in identifying circulatory disturbances of the vertebral venous system in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Extensive filling defects of the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus were evident in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (n=53), whereas only milder abnormalities were noted in patients with other lumber diseases (n=16) and none in normal subjects (n=13). The extent of the defect on MRP correlated with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. In patients with lumber spinal canal stenosis, extensive defects of the internal vertebral venous plexus on MRP were noted in the neutral spine position, but the defect diminished with anterior flexion of the spine. This phenomenon correlated closely with the time at which intermittent claudication appeared. Our results highlight the importance of MRP for assessing the underlying mechanism of cauda equina intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and suggest that congestive venous ischemia is involved in the development of intermittent claudication in these patients. (author)

  20. Acute myelopathy selectively involving lumbar anterior horns following intranasal insufflation of ecstasy and heroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Nilo; Riva, Nilo; Morana, Paolo; Cerri, Federica; Gerevini, Simonetta; Amadio, Stefano; Formaglio, Fabio; Comi, Giancarlo; Comola, Mauro; Del Carro, Ubaldo

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient who developed acute myelopathy after intranasal insufflation of amphetamines and heroin. The functional prognosis was very poor; after 4 months, she remained paraplegic. MRI imaging showed selective T2 hyperintensity and intense enhancement confined to the spinal anterior horns and lumbar nerve roots and plexus. This unique MRI pattern, together with neurophysiological data, suggests that the pathological process at the first primary affected spinal anterior horns (SAH), conditioning motoneuron cell death, and then nerve roots and lumbar plexus as a consequence of wallerian degeneration PMID:21686691

  1. Tophaceous gout of the lumbar spine mimicking a spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro da Cunha, Pedro; Peliz, António Judice; Barbosa, Marcos

    2016-11-05

    Although gout is a common metabolic disorder, it usually affects distal joints of the appendicular skeleton. Axial spine involvement is rare, with only 131 cases reported in the literature. The authors report a rare case of lumbar spinal gout mimicking a spinal meningioma. A 77-year-old man with a history of gout presented with chronic low back pain and progressive paraparesis. Imaging revealed a lumbar spine compressive mass lesion with a dural tail signal. The differential diagnosis was thought to be straightforward favoring a spinal meningioma. Tophaceous gout was never considered. The presence of a dural tail associated with the lesion is an interesting detail of this case, that strongly misguided it and to the best of our knowledge it is the first one reported in the literature. The patient underwent surgery and intra-operative findings were surprisingly different from those expected, revealing a chalky white mass lesion firmly adherent and compressing the dural sac. It was completely excised, leaving the dura intact. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of tophaceous gout. The patient was sent to physical therapy and had a complete remission of pain and neurological deficit, regaining his walking capacity. Although spinal gout is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with symptoms of spinal stenosis, a suspicion of neoplastic lesion of the spine, and a previous history of gout. Early diagnosis can ensure proper and timely medical management, perhaps avoiding neurological compromise and the need for surgery.

  2. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Korse, Nina S.; Kruit, Mark C.; Peul, Wilco C.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar...

  3. The association of spinal osteoarthritis with lumbar lordosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapkas Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Careful review of published evidence has led to the postulate that the degree of lumbar lordosis may possibly influence the development and progression of spinal osteoarthritis, just as misalignment does in other joints. Spinal degeneration can ensue from the asymmetrical distribution of loads. The resultant lesions lead to a domino- like breakdown of the normal morphology, degenerative instability and deviation from the correct configuration. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a relationship exists between the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine, as it is expressed by lordosis, and the presence of radiographic osteoarthritis. Methods 112 female subjects, aged 40-72 years, were examined in the Outpatients Department of the Orthopedics' Clinic, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete. Lumbar radiographs were examined on two separate occasions, independently, by two of the authors for the presence of osteoarthritis. Lordosis was measured from the top of L1 to the bottom of L5 as well as from the top of L1 to the top of S1. Furthermore, the angle between the bottom of L5 to the top of S1was also measured. Results and discussion 49 women were diagnosed with radiographic osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine, while 63 women had no evidence of osteoarthritis and served as controls. The two groups were matched for age and body build, as it is expressed by BMI. No statistically significant differences were found in the lordotic angles between the two groups Conclusions There is no difference in lordosis between those affected with lumbar spine osteoarthritis and those who are disease free. It appears that osteoarthritis is not associated with the degree of lumbar lordosis.

  4. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

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    Yoshinori Kadono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression.

  5. A case of acute spinal intradural hematoma due to spinal anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josué M. Avecillas-Chasín

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal intradural hematoma is a rare complication of diagnostic lumbar puncture or spinal anesthesia. This complication could be overlooked with devastating neurological consequences due to a delay in diagnosis. Here, we reported a case of a patient with a lumbar spinal intradural hematoma as a result of a difficult spinal anesthesia.

  6. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

    OpenAIRE

    Hey Hwee Weng; Hee Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Throu...

  7. Characteristics of thoracic and lumbar movements during gait in lumbar spinal stenosis patients before and after decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Wataru; Deie, Masataka; Fujita, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Kazuyoshi; Sunagawa, Toru; Asaeda, Makoto; Nakamura, Haruka; Kono, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-12-01

    Although gait analysis has been previously conducted for lumbar spinal stenosis patients, the vertebral segmental movements, such as of the thoracic and lumbar regions, and whether the spinal movement during gait changes after decompression surgery remain unclear. Ten patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and 10 healthy controls participated. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scale. Spinal kinematic data of the participants during gait were acquired using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The trunk (whole spine), thoracic, and lumbar flexion and pelvic tilting values were calculated. Spinal kinematic data and clinical outcomes were collected preoperatively and 1month postoperatively for the patients. Compared to that observed preoperatively, the clinical outcomes significantly improved at 1month postoperatively. In the standing position, the preoperative lumbar extension of the patients was significantly smaller than that of the controls. Moreover, during gait, the lumbar flexion relative to the standing position of the patients was smaller than that of the controls preoperatively, and increased at 1month postoperatively. The sum of the thoracic and lumbar flexion values during gait negatively correlated with the score for leg pain. The epidural pressure of lumbar spinal stenosis patients is known to be higher than that of normal subjects during gait, and to decrease during walking with lumbar flexion. Preoperatively, smaller thoracic and lumbar flexion movements during gait relative to the standing position cannot decrease epidural pressure; as a result, severe leg pain might be induced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence, clinical presentation, prognosis, and outcome of 17 dogs with spinal shock and acute thoracolumbar spinal cord disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full, Amanda M; Heller, Heidi L Barnes; Mercier, Miyu

    2016-05-01

    To describe the prevalence, signalment, clinical features, etiology, and outcome in dogs with acute thoracolumbar disease and suspected spinal shock. Retrospective clinical case study (2005-2010). Private specialty practice. Medical records of 263 dogs with thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging were reviewed. If decreased or absent withdrawal reflexes were present in 1 or both pelvic limbs, in the absence of a spinal lesion in the lumbosacral intumescence, dogs were diagnosed with spinal shock. Dogs with suspected or confirmed spinal neoplasia, myelomalacia, or meningomyelitis were excluded. Seventeen of 263 dogs (6%) met inclusion criteria. None. Thoracic lesions were significantly more likely to result in spinal shock when compared to lumbar lesions (P = 0.03). Fibrocartilaginous embolism was the most commonly diagnosed etiology (7 of 17 dogs), and was more common in the thoracic spine compared to in the lumbar spine (P = 0.10). Six of 17 dogs (35%) were diagnosed with intervertebral disk herniation; 4 of 17 dogs (24%) with suspected acute noncompressive nucleus pulposus extrusion. Two dogs were lost to follow-up. Fourteen of 15 (93%) dogs had improved or normal reflexes by 60 days post injury. Although the prevalence of spinal shock was low, it should be considered in any dog presenting with an acute history of thoracolumbar spinal injury with reduced or absent reflexes in the pelvic limbs. The presence of spinal shock should not dissuade a veterinarian from pursuing appropriate diagnostic testing and therapy for the underlying etiology. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  9. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection.

  10. Spinal sagittal balance and spinopelvic parameters in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis; a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid Reza; Haghnegahdar, Ali; Rezaee, Hamid; Sharifi Rad, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the spinal sagittal balance and the spinopelvic parameters in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and healthy controls in Iranian population. We performed a case-control study in which 48 patients with lumbar spine stenosis and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects with back pain were eligible for participation. We used INFINITT picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) of the Chamran Hospital for selecting the patients for the study group. The sagittal balance, pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and sacral slope were measured in all the patients and controls using thoracolumbosacral radiographies in the standing position. There was no significant difference between the 2 groups regarding the baseline characteristics. The prevalence of sagittal imbalance was significantly higher in the patients with lumbar spine stenosis in comparison with the controls (31.2% vs. 14.8%; Psagittal imbalance and decreased lumbar lordosis and sacral slope in a sample of the Iranian adult population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation of the lumbar and sacral spinal cord: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sofia R; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; de Carvalho, M; Miranda, Pedro C

    2018-02-09

    Our aim was to perform a computational study of the electric field (E-field) generated by transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) applied over the thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal cord, in order to assess possible neuromodulatory effects on spinal cord circuitry related with lower limb functions. A realistic volume conductor model of the human body consisting of 14 tissues was obtained from available databases. Rubber pad electrodes with a metallic connector and a conductive gel layer were modelled. The finite element method was used to calculate the E-field when a current of 2.5 mA was passed between two electrodes. The main characteristics of the E-field distributions in the spinal grey matter (spinal-GM) and spinal white matter (spinal-WM) were compared for seven montages, with the anode placed either over T10, T8 or L2 spinous processes (s.p.), and the cathode placed over right deltoid (rD), umbilicus (U) and right iliac crest (rIC) areas or T8 s.p. Anisotropic conductivity of spinal-WM and of a group of dorsal muscles near the vertebral column was considered. The average E-field magnitude was predicted to be above 0.15 V/m in spinal cord regions located between the electrodes. L2-T8 and T8-rIC montages resulted in the highest E-field magnitudes in lumbar and sacral spinal segments (> 0.30 V/m). E-field longitudinal component is 3 to 6 times higher than the ventral-dorsal and right-left components in both the spinal-GM and WM. Anatomical features such as CSF narrowing due to vertebrae bony edges or disks intrusions in the spinal canal correlate with local maxima positions. Computational modelling studies can provide detailed information regarding the electric field in the spinal cord during tsDCS. They are important to guide the design of clinical tsDCS protocols that optimize stimulation of application-specific spinal targets. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Acute lumbar paraspinal compartment syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, William; Low, Nelson; Pratt, George

    2018-01-08

    While still a rare entity, acute lumbar paraspinal compartment syndrome has an increasing incidence. Similar to other compartment syndromes, acute lumbar paraspinal compartment syndrome is defined by raised pressure within a closed fibro-osseous space, limiting tissue perfusion within that space. The resultant tissue ischaemia presents as acute pain, and if left untreated, it may result in permanent tissue damage. A literature search of 'paraspinal compartment syndrome' revealed 21 articles. The details from a case encountered by the authors are also included. A common data set was extracted, focusing on demographics, aetiology, clinical features, management and outcomes. There are 23 reported cases of acute compartment syndrome. These are typically caused by weight-lifting exercises, but may also result from other exercises, direct trauma or non-spinal surgery. Pain, tenderness and paraspinal paraesthesia are key clinical findings. Serum creatine kinase, magnetic resonance imaging and intracompartment pressure measurement confirm the diagnosis. Half of the reported cases have been managed with surgical fasciotomy, and these patients have all had good outcomes relative to those managed with conservative measures with or without hyperbaric oxygen therapy. These good outcomes were despite significant delays to operative intervention. The diagnostic uncertainty and subsequent delay to fasciotomy result from the rarity of this disease entity, and a high level of suspicion is recommended in the appropriate setting. This is particularly true in light of the current popularity of extreme weight lifting in non-professional athletes. Operative intervention is strongly recommended in all cases based on the available evidence. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  14. Radiology of lumbar spinal stenosis; Radiologie der lumbalen Wirbelkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, S. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Klinische Neuroradiologie; Forsting, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Klinische Neuroradiologie; Doerfler, A. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Klinische Neuroradiologie; Sartor, A. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Abt. Klinische Neuroradiologie

    1996-07-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is a frequent cause of low back pain. In this paper we discuss both the pathophysiology and clinical symptomatology of the disease. We also discuss advantages and limitations of plain film radiography, myelography, CT and MRI in its diagnosis. Following an analysis of the pertinent literature we try to determine the relative merit of the various radiologic procedures as to their true representation of clinical and intraoperative findings and faithful rendition of postoperative results. Until sufficient statistically valid data regarding the clinical significance of radiological findings have accumulated, surgery of lumbar spinal stenosis can only be performed after critical evaluation of the individual case. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die lumbale Wirbelkanalstenose ist eine haeufige Ursache von Rueckenschmerzen. In dieser Arbeit werden Pathophysiologie und klinische Symptome des Krankheitsbildes vorgestellt. Die Vor- und Nachteile von konventionellen Roentgenaufnahmen, Myelographie, Computertomographie und Magnetresonanztomographie zur Diagnostik der lumbalen Wirbelkanalstenose werden beschrieben. Nach Analyse der relevanten Literatur versuchen wir, den Wert der radiologischen Verfahren hinsichtlich ihrer Korrelation mit den klinischen und intraoperativen Befunden sowie mit den postoperativen Ergebnissen zu bestimmen. Solange nicht genuegend statistisch gesicherte Daten ueber die klinische Bedeutung der radiologischen Befunde vorliegen, hat die chirurgische Therapie der lumbalen Wirbelkanalstenose unter kritischer Betrachtung des Einzelfalles zu erfolgen. (orig.)

  15. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Asadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. Study Design This is a cross-sectional study. Methods This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. Results A total of 50 patients (15.2% were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1% in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4% in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10% in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls ( P < 0.0001. Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. Conclusions There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  16. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system : an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection

  17. Puncture laser microdiscectomy in treatment of large lumbar spinal hernias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorin M.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hernia size influence on final result of PLME in 34 patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome was detected. In medical center "Endoscopic Neurosurgery" from 2006 to 2010 we examined and treated 34 patients with hernia size from 6 to 8 mm by CT data. Patients were from 19 to 49 years of age. Average age was 35.9 ± 1.5 years. Males – 16 (47.1%, females – 18 (52.9%. Disease duration – 5.53 ± 0.44 months with duration of last exacerbation – 1.87 ± 0.21 months. Duration of conservative therapy is 4.6 ± 2.1 weeks. During survey and objec¬tive examination we determined pain syndrome intensity, pain location, degree of spinal static – dynamic function disorder. Neurological examination determined severity of sensory and motor disorders. Pain syndrome intensity, quality of life in patients before and after surgery, surgery effectiveness were determined by common scales: VAS, OSWESTRY, Roland - Morris, McNab. Before PLME we evaluated preoperative spondylograms performed with functional load. Height of intervertebral fissure was determined by these images. By SCT and MRI data we measured hernia size, its shape and location as well as intervertebral disk dehydration degree. For PLME performance we used neodymium laser with aluminum garnet (Dorinyer Fibertom Medilas 4060 with wave-length of 1.06 micrometers. In the next period of observation after PLME its effectiveness was 79%, and in 3-5 years - 76%. At the same time it must be emphasized that 75% of patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome significantly and for a long time improved their life quality avoiding more traumatic surgery. Satisfactory results with PLM use in the nearest future could be obtained in 79% of patients, in the remote term - in 76% of patients with large hernia size.

  18. RELATIONSHIP OF LIGAMENTUM FLAVUM HYPERTROPHY IN LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS WITH TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR β-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Gokpinar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common cause of low back pain in the elderly. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis develops as a result of degenerative changes in the posterior canal including bone proliferation of the facet joints and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. With this study, We aimed to contribute to the literature by demonstrating that ligamentum flavum hypertrophy in lumbar spinal stenosis may be directed by increased concentrations of TGF-β1, at the stenosis site. Materials and Methods: In our study, TGF-βl concentrations in the ligamentum flavum samples taken from patients with lumbar disk hernia and lumbar spinal stenosis during surgical intervention. In addition, thickness of ligamentum flavum in these patients was calculated by averaging the lumbar MRI-tissue thickness, and all these results were statistically compared among the patients. Results: Ligamentum flavum thickness values in two groups were 3.46±1 mm in lumbar disk hernia and 5.63±1.35 mm in lumbar spinal stenosis and the differences were statistically significant (p=0.000. Group averages of Transforming Growth Factor β -1 with standard deviations were 1676.47±642 pg/g in lumbar disk hernia and 6816.68±5147.57 pg/g in lumbar spinal stenosis. The average difference in these results was considered statistically significant (p=0.000. Conclusion: In conclusion, we demonstrated in our study that TGF-β1 has an effect on ligamentum flavum hypertrophy in lumbar spinal stenosis. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 13-16

  19. Tactics of surgical treatment for thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of results of surgical treatment of 154 patients with a vertebral and spinal trauma of chest and lumbar departments of a backbone aged from 16 till 75 years is carried out. All patients were operated in Bryansk city hospital N 1. The volume and sequence of surgeries, and existence were defined with the combined damages, character of an injury of a backbone and a spinal cord or absence free part bone bodies of the injured vertebra compressing a spinal cord defined different accesses on a backbone. So, surgeries at 125 (81,2 % patients were carried out from one back access, at 23 (14,9 % patients - to the combined back and lobbies and at 6 (3,9 % patients - front and back access. In all cases for fixing of a spine implants “Sintez” firm (St. Petersburg were used. Results of treatment were estimated on neurologic dynamics, restoration of an axis of a backbone, a gleam of the vertebral channel and restoration possibility of a support of a backbone. Good results of treatment are received at 87 (56,5 %, satisfactory - at 55 (35,7 % and unsatisfactory - at 12 (7,8 % patients.

  20. Hospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Li, Neill Y; Yang, JaeWon; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-09-04

    Interhospital competition has been shown to influence the adoption of surgical techniques and approaches, clinical patient outcomes, and health-care resource use for select surgical procedures. However, little is known regarding these dynamics as they relate to spine surgery. This investigation sought to examine the relationship between interhospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion. This study used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample dataset, years 2003, 2006, and 2009. Patients were included based on the presence of the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes corresponding to lumbar spinal fusion, as well as on the presence of data on the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). The outcome measures are perioperative complications, defined using an ICD-9-CM coding algorithm. The HHI, a validated measure of competition within a market, was used to assess hospital market competitiveness. The HHI was calculated based on the hospital cachement area. Multiple regression was performed to adjust for confounding variables including patient age, gender, primary payer, severity of illness score, primary versus revision fusion, anterior versus posterior approach, national region, hospital bed size, location or teaching status, ownership, and year. Perioperative clinical outcomes were assessed based on ICD-9-CM codes with modifications. In total, 417,520 weighted patients (87,999 unweighted records) were analyzed. The mean cachement area HHI was 0.31 (range 0.099-0.724). The average patient age was 55.4 years (standard error=0.194), and the majority of patients were female (55.8%, n=232,727). The majority of procedures were primary spinal fusions (92.7%, n=386,998) and fusions with a posterior-only technique (81.5%, n=340,271). Most procedures occurred in the South (42.5%, n=177,509) or the Midwest (27.0%, n=112,758) regions. In the multiple regression analysis, increased hospital

  1. Early Versus Late Initiation of Rehabilitation After Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Christensen, Finn B; Nielsen, Claus V

    2013-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To examine the cost-effectiveness of initiating rehabilitation 6 weeks after surgery as opposed to 12 weeks after surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In a previously reported...... randomized controlled trial, we assessed the impact of timing of rehabilitation after a lumbar spinal fusion and found that a fast-track strategy led to poorer functional ability. Before making recommendations, it seems relevant to address the societal perspective including return to work, quality of life......-based rehabilitation and were instructed in home exercises focusing on active stability training. Outcome parameters included functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index) and quality-adjusted life years. Health care and productivity costs were estimated from national registries and reported in euros. Costs...

  2. Cost Utility Analysis of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Pain of Post-lumbar Surgery Syndrome and Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Helm, Standiford; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Racz, Gabor B

    2015-06-01

    The increase in the number of interventions for the management of chronic pain and associated escalation of healthcare costs has captured the attention of health policymakers, in no small part due to the lack of documentation of efficacy, cost-effectiveness, or cost utility analysis. A recent cost utility analysis of caudal epidural injections in managing chronic low back pain of various pathologies showed a high cost utility with improvement in quality of life years, competitive with various other modalities of treatments. However, there are no analyses derived from high-quality controlled studies related to the cost utility of percutaneous adhesiolysis in the treatment of post-lumbar surgery syndrome or lumbar central spinal stenosis. This analysis is based on 2 previously published controlled studies. To assess the cost utility of percutaneous adhesiolysis procedures in managing chronic low back and lower extremity pain secondary to post-lumbar surgery syndrome and lumbar central spinal stenosis. A private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Two controlled studies were conducted assessing the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis for post-lumbar surgery syndrome and lumbar central spinal stenosis in an interventional pain management setting utilizing contemporary interventional pain management practices. A cost utility analysis was performed with direct payment data for a total of 130 patients in treatment groups over a 2-year period. Various outcome measures were included with significant improvement, defined as at least 50% improvement with reduction in pain and disability status. The results of 2 controlled studies of low back pain with 60 and 70 patients and a 2-year follow-up with the actual reimbursement data showed cost utility for 1 year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of USD $2,652 for post-lumbar surgery syndrome and USD $2,649 for lumbar central spinal stenosis. The results of this

  3. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnett Angus F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. Methods One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx, Upper lumbar (ULx and total lumbar (TLx spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Results Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638, but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p Conclusion This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  4. The sedimentation sign for differential diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Luciana Gazzi; Wang, Yue; Battié, Michele C

    2013-05-01

    Cross-sectional cohort study. To evaluate the diagnostic value of the sedimentation sign further by assessing its performance on the differential diagnosis of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and other lumbar conditions with similar clinical presentations. Recently, a new test using MR imaging, the sedimentation sign, was introduced to aid in the diagnosis of LSS. The initial testing demonstrated that the sign was positive in 100% of patients with LSS with decreased walking ability and dural sac cross-sectional areas (CSA) less than 80 mm, and negative in 94% of patients with nonspecific low back pain, no leg pain or claudication and dural sac CSA greater than 120 mm. Fifty patients with central or combined LSS, 22 with lateral stenosis only and 43 with posterolateral disc herniation with unilateral radiculopathy were included. Using axial MR images of the lumbar spine, the sedimentation sign was assessed by 2 observers independently, without knowledge of participant clinical history or diagnosis. Frequencies of a positive sign in each patient group were calculated. The sedimentation sign was positive in 2% of patients with disc herniation, 23% with lateral stenosis, and 54% with central or combined stenosis. When the analysis included only patients with LSS with dural sac CSA less than 80 mm and walking limitations similar to the original study introducing the sedimentation sign (n = 17), the proportion of patients presenting with a positive sign increased to 82%. The sedimentation sign is more prevalent in patients with the clinical diagnosis of central or combined LSS than in patients with lateral stenosis only or posterolateral disc herniation. Yet, whether it enhances current diagnostic practices remains undetermined.

  5. Fibromyalgia and arachnoiditis presented as an acute spinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Zamzuri; Ghazali, Faizul H; Abdullah, Jafri M

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive arachnoiditis is a chronic, insidious condition that causes debilitating intractable pain and a range of other neurological problems. Its pathophysiology is not well understood. This manuscript discusses its presentations, which can mimic an acute spinal disorder, its hypothetical pathophysiology, treatment, and its relationship with fibromyalgia. The authors present a case of a 47-year-old female who presented with clinical features mimicking an acute spinal disorder but later found to have an adhesive arachnoiditis. She was admitted following a trauma with complaints of back pain and paraplegia. On examination, there was marked tenderness over thoracolumbar spine with lower limbs upper motor neuron weakness. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine revealed multiple lesions at her thoracic and lumbar spinal canals, which did not compress the spinal cord. Therefore, conservative management was initiated. Despite on regular therapies, her back and body pain worsened and little improvement in her limbs power was noted. Laminectomy was pursued and found to have spinal cord arachnoiditis. Subsequently, she was operated by other team members for multiple pelvic masses, which later proved to be benign. After gathering all the clinical information obtained at surgery and after taking detailed history inclusive of cognitive functions, diagnosis of an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome was made. Currently, she is managed by neuropsychologist and pain specialist. This case report highlights the importance of knowing an adhesive arachnoiditis syndrome - a rarely discussed pathology by the neurosurgeon, which discloses a significant relationship between immune and nervous systems.

  6. Objective assessment with establishment of normal values for lumbar spinal range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G K; Wynveen, K J; Rheault, W; Rothschild, B

    1983-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an assessment method, in conjunction with age-related normal values, for lumbar spinal range of motion. Lumbar flexion, lumbar extension, and right and left lateral flexion were measured on 172 subjects by a combination of goniometry and spinal distraction techniques. Normal values are given for six age groups; each group had a range of 10 years. The results demonstrate that a significant decrease in lumbar spinal range of motion is expected with increasing age. The interobserver reliability based on 17 subjects was substantial for the four measurements taken; coefficients ranged from +.76 to +1.0. The information may prove useful to the clinician as an improved method for assessing the lumbar spine.

  7. Interspinous process device versus standard conventional surgical decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Moojen (Wouter); M.P. Arts (Mark); W.C.H. Jacobs (WIlco); E.W. van Zwet (Erik); E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske); B.W. Koes (Bart); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objective To assess whether interspinous process device implantation is more effective in the short term than conventional surgical decompression for patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Design Randomized controlled

  8. Acupuncture-movement therapy for acute lumbar sprain: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin Ruizhu Zhu Ning Liu Jian Li Xinjian Wang Yue Zhang Jie Xi Chaolei

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several studies have reported that acupuncture is effective for treatment of acute lumbar sprain, but they neglected to consider that acupuncture cannot remarkably improve lumbar activity...

  9. Management of Deep Infection after Instrumentation on Lumbar Spinal Surgery in a Single Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Tung Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs are more common complications after spinal surgery. SSIs often require extended hospitalisation and may worsen overall clinical outcomes. A retrospective database review of consecutive patients with traditional open lumbar spinal surgery was performed. SSIs patients were identified and reviewed for clinically relevant details, and postoperative SSIs’ incidence was calculated for the entire cohort as well as for subgroups with or without spinal implants. In 15 years, 1,176 patients underwent open lumbar spinal surgery with spinal implants and 699 without. Thirty-eight developed postoperative SSIs. Total SSI rate for the entire group was 2.03%. The incidence of postoperative SSIs in the nonimplant group was relatively low. Patients received antibiotics, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and wet dressing. We provided the precise rates of postoperative SSIs in traditional open spinal surgery obtained from a single-centre data. Patients with spinal implants had higher SSIs’ incidence than those without.

  10. Sacro-lumbar intersegmental spinal reflex in autonomic pathways mediating female sexual function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shi Yong; Gibbins, Ian L; Zagorodnyuk, Vladimir P; Morris, Judy L

    2011-07-01

    Autonomic neurons in paracervical ganglia mediating vasodilation in the female reproductive tract receive inputs from both midlumbar and sacral spinal levels. However, it is not known how the lumbar pathways are activated. This study tested whether stimulation of pudendal sensory nerve could activate lumbar spinal outflows to paracervical ganglia via a spinal reflex pathway. Isolated spinal cords with attached peripheral nerves were removed from urethane-anesthetized female guinea pigs and perfused via the aorta with physiological salt solution. Spinal pathways to midlumbar preganglionic neurons were tested by recording extracellular compound action potentials (CAPs) in lumbar splanchnic or distal hypogastric nerves after electrical stimulation of thoracic spinal cord or the pudendal nerve. CAPs also were recorded from pelvic nerves after pudendal nerve stimulation. Sensory neurons were retrogradely traced from the pudendal nerve and characterized immunohistochemically. Activation of preganglionic neurons projecting from midlumbar spinal cord to paracervical ganglia following stimulation of pudendal sensory nerves in isolated preparations. Thoracic spinal cord stimulation produced CAPs in hypogastric nerves that were abolished by transection of L3 lumbar splanchnic nerves. Pudendal nerve stimulation produced CAPs in L3 lumbar splanchnic, hypogastric, and pelvic nerves, demonstrating an ascending intersegmental spinal circuit to midlumbar levels in addition to the sacral spinal circuit. These CAPs in hypogastric nerves were enhanced by bicuculline (10 µM), blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 µM) but were not affected by hexamethonium (200 µM). Retrograde axonal tracing revealed four groups of sensory neurons in S3 dorsal root ganglia that were distinguished immunohistochemically.  Midlumbar preganglionic neurons projecting to paracervical ganglia regulating blood flow and motility in the female reproductive tract can be activated by an ascending intersegmental spinal

  11. Lumbar Scoliosis Combined Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Herniation Diagnosed Patient Was Treated with “U” Route Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Binbin Wu; Shaobo Zhang; Qingquan Lian; Haibo Yan; Xianfa Lin; Gonghao Zhan

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to report a case of a 63-year-old man with a history of low back pain (LBP) and left leg pain for 2 years, and the symptom became more serious in the past 5 months. The patient was diagnosed with lumbar scoliosis combined with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at the level of L4-5 that was confirmed using Computerized Topography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The surgical team preformed a novel technique, ?U? route transforaminal percutaneous end...

  12. Does the effectiveness of core stability exercises correlate with the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaxiang; Lin, Zhichao; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Zemin; Tang, Shujie

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether the effectiveness of core stability exercises correlates with the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Forty-two patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis treated in the department of orthopedics of our hospital between May 2013 and January 2016 were included in the study. All the patients performed core stability exercises once daily for six weeks, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and self-reported walking capacity. The anteroposterior osseous spinal canal diameter was measured to evaluate the severity of spinal stenosis. The correlation between the stenosis degree and the differences of Japanese Orthopaedic Association score or self-reported walking capacity at baseline and after treatment were analyzed. The patients were divided into three groups according to the spinal stenosis degree. In the three groups, there was no significant difference in JOA or self-reported walking distance at baseline (p>0.05) and after treatment (p>0.05). The JOA scores and self-reported walking distance were significantly increased after treatment (p0.05) or self-reported walking distance (p>0.05). There was no significantcorrelation between the effectiveness of core stability exercises and the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

  13. Value of spinal computed tomography in diagnosis of herniated lumbar discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachsenheimer, W.; Hamer, J. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neurochirurgie); Mueller, H.A. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer spez. onkologische Diagnostik)

    1982-01-01

    In this study the diagnostic value and topographical accuracy of spinal computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations were tested in 36 patients with surgically proven herniated discs. All patients also underwent metrizamide myelography. CT findings and myelograms were compared and correlated with the surgical observations. Especially in demonstrating exact diagnosis (lateral or more medial protrusion), and in showing the extent of upward and downward displacement of free disc material, CT provides valuable preoperative information. As a non-invasive diagnostic procedure, spinal CT scan may replace lumbar myelography in many patients with radicular lumbar pain.

  14. Acute hyperventilation leading to hypocalcaemia during spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common cause of hypocalcaemia under general anaesthesia is acute mechanical hyperventilation, but hypocalcaemia during spinal anaesthesia has not been reported. This case report describes the development of hypocalcaemia due to hyperventilation in a patient undergoing appendicectomy under spinal ...

  15. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korse, Nina S; Kruit, Mark C; Peul, Wilco C; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A

    2017-01-01

    Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica. MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral) and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area) were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison. 48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002). Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021). This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with a

  16. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Korse

    Full Text Available Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1 evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2 comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica.MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison.48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002. Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021.This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with

  17. Quantitative assessment of the normal adult spinal canal at the fourth lumbar vertebra by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senel, A. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Ondokuz Mayis Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey)); Tanik, A. (Dept. of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis Univ., Samsun (Turkey)); Akan, H. (Dept. of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis Univ., Samsun (Turkey))

    1994-01-01

    We reviewed the computed tomographic (CT) studies of 105 adults with various complaints. Spinal canal diameters were measured by CT using both the conventional and Jones-Thomson (JT) techniques at the level of the fourth lumbar vertebra. The data were statistically assessed in an attempt to define spinal stenosis. (orig.)

  18. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tim; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Burnett, Angus F; Straker, Leon; Smith, Anne

    2008-11-18

    Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP) patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx), Upper lumbar (ULx) and total lumbar (TLx) spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638), but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p postures in sitting and standing were evident. BMI accounted for regional differences found in all sitting and some standing measures. LBP was not associated with differences in regional lumbar spine angles or range of motion, with the exception of maximal backward bending range of motion (F = 5.18, p = 0.007). This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  19. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, A.H. [Department of CT-MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece); Zibis, A.H.; Papaliaga, M.; Georgiou, E.; Rousogiannis, S. [Larissa Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 tabs., 24 refs.

  20. Epidemiology of acute spinal cord injuries in the Groote Schuur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admitted within the first week of injury,. Table 1. Acute spinal cord injury admissions to ASCI Unit, priority scale*. P1. Incomplete acute SCI in need of urgent spinal cord decompression operation/procedure. P2. Acute SCI with unstable cervical spine fracture in need of spinal fusion operation. P3. Acute SCI with unstable ...

  1. The Role of Functional Neuroanatomy of the Lumbar Spinal Cord in Effect of Epidural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Carlos A; Mendez, Aldo A; Islam, Riazul; Calvert, Jonathan S; Grahn, Peter J; Knudsen, Bruce; Pham, Tuan; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the neuroanatomy of the swine lumbar spinal cord, particularly the spatial orientation of dorsal roots was correlated to the anatomical landmarks of the lumbar spine and to the magnitude of motor evoked potentials during epidural electrical stimulation (EES). We found that the proximity of the stimulating electrode to the dorsal roots entry zone across spinal segments was a critical factor to evoke higher peak-to-peak motor responses. Positioning the electrode close to the dorsal roots produced a significantly higher impact on motor evoked responses than rostro-caudal shift of electrode from segment to segment. Based on anatomical measurements of the lumbar spine and spinal cord, significant differences were found between L1-L4 to L5-L6 segments in terms of spinal cord gross anatomy, dorsal roots and spine landmarks. Linear regression analysis between intersegmental landmarks was performed and L2 intervertebral spinous process length was selected as the anatomical reference in order to correlate vertebral landmarks and the spinal cord structures. These findings present for the first time, the influence of spinal cord anatomy on the effects of epidural stimulation and the role of specific orientation of electrodes on the dorsal surface of the dura mater in relation to the dorsal roots. These results are critical to consider as spinal cord neuromodulation strategies continue to evolve and novel spinal interfaces translate into clinical practice.

  2. The Role of Functional Neuroanatomy of the Lumbar Spinal Cord in Effect of Epidural Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Cuellar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the neuroanatomy of the swine lumbar spinal cord, particularly the spatial orientation of dorsal roots was correlated to the anatomical landmarks of the lumbar spine and to the magnitude of motor evoked potentials during epidural electrical stimulation (EES. We found that the proximity of the stimulating electrode to the dorsal roots entry zone across spinal segments was a critical factor to evoke higher peak-to-peak motor responses. Positioning the electrode close to the dorsal roots produced a significantly higher impact on motor evoked responses than rostro-caudal shift of electrode from segment to segment. Based on anatomical measurements of the lumbar spine and spinal cord, significant differences were found between L1-L4 to L5-L6 segments in terms of spinal cord gross anatomy, dorsal roots and spine landmarks. Linear regression analysis between intersegmental landmarks was performed and L2 intervertebral spinous process length was selected as the anatomical reference in order to correlate vertebral landmarks and the spinal cord structures. These findings present for the first time, the influence of spinal cord anatomy on the effects of epidural stimulation and the role of specific orientation of electrodes on the dorsal surface of the dura mater in relation to the dorsal roots. These results are critical to consider as spinal cord neuromodulation strategies continue to evolve and novel spinal interfaces translate into clinical practice.

  3. Lumbar extraforaminal ligaments act as a traction relief and prevent spinal nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, G A; Smit, T H; Hoogland, P V J M; Snijders, C J

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, ligaments that connect the extraforaminal lumbar spinal nerves with the fibrous capsule of the facet joints and the dorsolateral side of the intervertebral disc were described. This anatomical configuration suggests a mechanical role in transferring extraforaminal spinal nerve traction. One embalmed human lumbar spine was dissected from the twelfth thoracic vertebra to the first sacral vertebra to isolate the twelfth thoracic to the fourth lumbar spinal nerves. The spinal nerves from L1 to L4 were pulled at different angles with respect to the axis of the spine. Forces of 1-6N were applied. The displacements of reflective markers glued to the proximal and distal ends of the adjoining ligaments were recorded with a video system. The spinal nerve proximal of the extraforaminal ligaments stays centred in the intervertebral foramen when pulling at an angle. At levels L1-L4 strain reduction by the extraforaminal ligaments was largest when pulling at a wider angle to the spinal axis in the sagittal plane. Proximal to the extraforaminal ligaments less displacement was seen compared to the displacement distal of the extraforaminal ligaments when pulling in longitudinal direction. A graded decrease in the displacement proximal to the extraforaminal ligaments was seen from the levels L1-L4. Extraforaminal ligaments play an important role in the prevention of damage due to spinal nerve traction. The proximal attachments secure a spinal nerve position central in the intervertebral foramen and also reduce longitudinal tension.

  4. The Role of Functional Neuroanatomy of the Lumbar Spinal Cord in Effect of Epidural Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar, Carlos A.; Mendez, Aldo A.; Islam, Riazul; Calvert, Jonathan S.; Grahn, Peter J.; Knudsen, Bruce; Pham, Tuan; Lee, Kendall H.; Lavrov, Igor A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the neuroanatomy of the swine lumbar spinal cord, particularly the spatial orientation of dorsal roots was correlated to the anatomical landmarks of the lumbar spine and to the magnitude of motor evoked potentials during epidural electrical stimulation (EES). We found that the proximity of the stimulating electrode to the dorsal roots entry zone across spinal segments was a critical factor to evoke higher peak-to-peak motor responses. Positioning the electrode close to the dorsal roots produced a significantly higher impact on motor evoked responses than rostro-caudal shift of electrode from segment to segment. Based on anatomical measurements of the lumbar spine and spinal cord, significant differences were found between L1-L4 to L5-L6 segments in terms of spinal cord gross anatomy, dorsal roots and spine landmarks. Linear regression analysis between intersegmental landmarks was performed and L2 intervertebral spinous process length was selected as the anatomical reference in order to correlate vertebral landmarks and the spinal cord structures. These findings present for the first time, the influence of spinal cord anatomy on the effects of epidural stimulation and the role of specific orientation of electrodes on the dorsal surface of the dura mater in relation to the dorsal roots. These results are critical to consider as spinal cord neuromodulation strategies continue to evolve and novel spinal interfaces translate into clinical practice. PMID:29075183

  5. Lumbar spinal fusion patients' demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B; Lauerberg, Ida

    2006-01-01

    -articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients were randomized 3 months post lumbar spinal fusion to either a 'video' group (one-time oral......Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient...... instruction by a physiotherapist and patients were then issued a video for home exercise), or a 'café' group (video regimen with the addition of three café meetings with other fusion-operated patients) or a 'training' group (exercise therapy; physiotherapist-guided; two times a week for 8 weeks). Register...

  6. [Virtual clinical diagnosis support system of degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spinal canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A; Cherkashov, A M; Molodchenkov, A A; Sharamko, T G; Asiutin, D S; Nazarenko, A G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a virtual clinical diagnostic support system of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis on database of spine registry. Choice of criteria's for diagnostic system was made on symptom analysis of 298 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Also was analysed a group of patient with disc herniation's for sensitivity and specify assessment of developed diagnostic support system. Represented clinical diagnostic support system allows identifying patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis on stage of patient's primary visit. System sensitivity and specify are 90 and 71% respectively. "Online" mode of diagnostic system in structure of spine registry provides maximal availability for specialists, regardless of their locations. Development of tools "medicine 2.0" is the actual direction for carrying out further researches with which carrying out the centralized baea collection by means of specialized registers helps.

  7. Treatment of the Moderate Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with an Intespinous Distraction Device IMPALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haso Sefo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was the evaluation of symptom improvements in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis, who consecutively underwent placement of interspinous distraction deviceIMPALA®.Methods: This study included a total of 11 adult patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis. Clinical evaluations were performed preoperatively and 3-months after surgery using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI.Results: The mean preoperative VAS was 7.09 and fell to 2.27 a 3-months after surgery. The mean preoperative ODI was 59.45 fell to 20.72 a 3-months after surgery.Conclusions: Using the IMPALA® device in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis is a minimal invasive, effective and safe procedure. Clinical symptoms were improved 3 months after surgery.

  8. The Influence of Lumbar Spinal Subtype on Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Degeneration in Young and Middle-Aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrie, P A G; McKay, G; Byrne, R; Morris, S A C; Harding, I J

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To identify whether an in vivo correlation exists between lumbar spinal subtype (LSS) and lumbar disc degeneration (LDD) in young adults. Lumbar disc degeneration has largely been ascribed to biomechanical and structural alterations to the disc, which are attributed to aging and pathological physical loading. Sagittal alignment in the asymptomatic spine has also been considered. A biomechanical study by Roussouly and Pinheiro-Franco proposed level-specific patterns in LDD. To date, no in vivo correlation between the LSS and LDD has been established. The authors screened 608 consecutive patients over 5.3 years. Lumbar spinal subtype and pelvic parameters were collected from standing lumbar radiographs and were categorized using the classification of Roussouly and Pinheiro-Franco. Lumbar disc degeneration at all lumbar intervertebral levels was classified using criteria of Pfirrmann et al. A stratified disc degeneration score was derived for each patient. Lumbar disc degeneration in type I, II, and IV LSS was compared using chi-square test. Pelvic incidence was correlated with stratified disc degeneration score using Spearman R, to determine whether a high PI was protective against LDD. Statistical significance was accepted at p < .05. A total of 139 patients were included, with 91 females and a mean age of 32.6 years (range, 13-49 years). For LSS grades I to IV, there were 10 (7.3%), 43 (30.9%), 50 (35.9%), and 36 (25.9%) patients, respectively. The proportion of high-grade (Pfirrmann grades IV and V) LDD increased distally toward the lower intervertebral levels, affecting 2.88%, 2.9%, 5%, 9.4%, 33.1%, and 54% of discs at each sequential lumbar level from T12-L1 to L5-S1, respectively. Age but not gender was statistically significant for higher-grade LDD (p < .0001 and p = .442, respectively). Pelvic incidence across all LSS grades was not significantly correlated with stratified disc degeneration score (Spearman R = 0.0933; p = .335

  9. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  10. The Effect of Early Initiation of Rehabilitation after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Bünger, Cody E

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Study design: A multicenter RCT including 82 patients.Objective: To examine the effect of early initiation of rehabilitation after instrumented lumbar spinal fusion.Summary of Background Data: Lumbar spinal fusion has been performed for more than 70 years. Yet, only few studies have exa...... work. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the groups in terms of differences from baseline to 6 months and 1-year follow-up.Results: According to the ODI, at 1-year follow-up, the 6w-group had a median reduction of -6(-19;4) compared with -20(-30;-7) in the 12w-group (p...

  11. Prognostic Factors for Satisfaction After Decompression Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rune Tendal; Bouknaitir, Jamal Bech; Fruensgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with both short- and long-term benefits with improvements in patient function and pain. Even though most patients are satisfied postoperatively, some studies report that up to one-third of patients are dissatisfied. OBJECTIVE......: To present clinical outcome data and identify prognostic factors related to patient satisfaction 1 yr after posterior decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. METHOD: This multicenter register study included 2562 patients. Patients were treated with various types of posterior decompression. Patients...

  12. Abducens Nerve Palsy after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery with Inadvertent Dural Tearing

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Dae-Chul; Jung, Eul-Soo; Chi, Yong-Chul

    2009-01-01

    Abducens nerve palsy associated with spinal surgery is extremely rare. We report an extremely rare case of abducens nerve palsy after lumbar spinal fusion surgery with inadvertent dural tearing, which resolved spontaneously and completely. A 61-year-old previous healthy man presented with chronic lower back pain of 6 weeks duration and 2 weeks history of bilateral leg pain. He was diagnosed as having isthmic spondylolisthesis at L4-5 and L5-S1, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was conduc...

  13. Functional organization of locomotor interneurons in the ventral lumbar spinal cord of the newborn rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Antri

    Full Text Available Although the mammalian locomotor CPG has been localized to the lumbar spinal cord, the functional-anatomical organization of flexor and extensor interneurons has not been characterized. Here, we tested the hypothesis that flexor and extensor interneuronal networks for walking are physically segregated in the lumbar spinal cord. For this purpose, we performed optical recordings and lesion experiments from a horizontally sectioned lumbar spinal cord isolated from neonate rats. This ventral hemi spinal cord preparation produces well-organized fictive locomotion when superfused with 5-HT/NMDA. The dorsal surface of the preparation was visualized using the Ca(2+ indicator fluo-4 AM, while simultaneously monitoring motor output at ventral roots L2 and L5. Using calcium imaging, we provided a general mapping view of the interneurons that maintained a stable phase relationship with motor output. We showed that the dorsal surface of L1 segment contains a higher density of locomotor rhythmic cells than the other segments. Moreover, L1 segment lesioning induced the most important changes in the locomotor activity in comparison with lesions at the T13 or L2 segments. However, no lesions led to selective disruption of either flexor or extensor output. In addition, this study found no evidence of functional parcellation of locomotor interneurons into flexor and extensor pools at the dorsal-ventral midline of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat.

  14. Comparison of Sagittal Spinopelvic Alignment between Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Degenerative Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae Kwan; Kim, Sung Min

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in sagittal spinopelvic alignment between lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL) and degenerative spinal stenosis (DSS). Seventy patients with DSPL and 72 patients with DSS who were treated with lumbar interbody fusion surgery were included in this study. The following spinopelvic parameters were measured on whole spine lateral radiographs in a standing position : pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis angle (LL), L4-S1 segmental lumbar angle (SLL), thoracic kyphosis (TK), and sagittal vertical axis from the C7 plumb line (SVA). Two groups were subdivided by SVA value, respectively. Normal SVA subgroup and positive SVA subgroup were divided as SVA value (SVA of DSPL was significantly greater than that of DSS (p=0.001). In sub-group analysis between the positive (34.3%) and normal SVA (65.7%), there were significant differences in LL/PI and SLL/PI (pSVA (87.5%), there were significant differences in PT/PI, SS/PI, LL/PI and SLL/PI ratios (p<0.05) in the DSS group. Patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis have the propensity for sagittal imbalance and higher pelvic incidence compared with those with degenerative spinal stenosis. Sagittal imbalance in patients with DSPL is significantly correlated with the loss of lumbar lordosis, especially loss of segmental lumbar lordosis.

  15. Acute Lumbar Hernia: A Case report | Albroumi | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Lumbar Hernia: A Case report. S Albroumi, YA Razek. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  16. Does pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar multifidus muscle predict clinical outcomes following lumbar spinal decompression for symptomatic spinal stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotti, Mario G T; Boas, F Vilas; Clifton, T; Piche, M; Yoon, W W; Freeman, B J C

    2017-10-01

    To investigate whether pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar multifidus muscle (LMM) would predict clinical outcomes following lumbar spinal decompression for symptomatic spinal stenosis. A prospective cohort of patients with symptomatic neurogenic claudication, documented spinal stenosis on pre-operative MRI underwent spinal decompression. All subjects completed standardised outcome measures (Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI v2.1) pre-operatively, 1 and 2 years post-surgery. Surgery was performed using a standardised lumbar spinous process osteotomy for access, followed by a decompression of the central canal, lateral recess and foraminal zones as indicated by the pre-operative MRI. Lumbar MRI scans were evaluated by two independent observers who assessed the axial CSA of the LMM bilaterally and the degree of muscle atrophy according to the Kader classification (2000). Changes in COMI and ODI scores at 1 and 2 years were investigated for statistically significant correlations with CSA of LMM and Kader grading. Statistical analyses utilised Student's t test, kappa coefficient for inter-observer agreement and Bland-Altman Limits of Agreement (BALOA). 66 patients (41 female) aged between 29 and 86 years underwent single-level decompression in 44, two-level decompression in 16 and three-level decompression in 6 cases. No significant correlation was observed between improvements in ODI and COMI relative to age, degree of stenosis, posterior fat thickness or psoas CSA. Those subjects with the greatest LMM atrophy relative to psoas CSA and L5 vertebral body area on pre-operative MRI had the least absolute improvement in both ODI and COMI scores (p = 0.006). Reduced LMM CSA (operative CSA of LMM appeared to be a more reliable predictor of post-operative clinical outcomes compared to the Kader Grading Score. This is the first study to investigate the prognostic value of pre-operative MRI appearance and CSA of

  17. Treatment of multilevel degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis using a combination of microendoscopic discectomy and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Han; Yu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Rui; Gao, Zhong-li

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) has become increasingly common and is characterized by multilevel disc herniation and lumbar spondylolisthesis, which are difficult to treat. The current study aimed to evaluate the short-term clinical outcomes and value of the combined use of microendoscopic discectomy (MED) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the treatment of multilevel DLSS with spondylolisthesis, and to compare the combination with traditio...

  18. Development of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Caused by Lumbar Vertebral Compression Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayet Sarı

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which causes mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots.Diagnosis is made by computerized tomography, myelography, or magnetic resonance (MR imaging. The aim of this case report was to present and discuss a patient with degenerative changes in whom spinal canal stenosis developed due to compression fracture and retropulsion of a fragment into the spinal canal following a simple fall.

  19. Functional Limitations Due to Lumbar Stiffness in Adults With and Without Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Smith, Justin S; Hiratzka, Jayme; Ames, Christopher P; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank J; Lafage, Virginie; Klineberg, Eric O; Burton, Doug; Mundis, Greg M; Line, Breton; Hart, Robert A

    2015-10-15

    Cross-sectional analysis. To compare Lumbar Stiffness Disability Index (LSDI) scores between asymptomatic adults and patients with spinal deformity. The LSDI was designed and validated as a tool to assess functional impacts of lumbar spine stiffness and diminished spinal flexibility. Baseline disability levels of patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD) are high as measured by multiple validated outcome tools. Baseline lumbar stiffness-related disability has not been assessed in adults with and without spinal deformity. The LSDI and Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) were submitted to a group of asymptomatic adult volunteers. Additionally, a multicenter cross-sectional cohort analysis of patients with ASD from 10 centers was conducted. Baseline LSDI and SRS-22r were completed for both operatively and nonoperatively treated patients with deformity. The LSDI was completed by 176 asymptomatic volunteers and 693 patients with ASD. Mean LSDI score for asymptomatic volunteers was 3.4 +/- 6.3 out of a maximum score of 100, with significant correlation between increasing age and higher (worse) LSDI score (r = 0.30, P = 0.0001). Of the patients with spinal deformity undergoing analysis, 301 subsequently underwent surgery and 392 were subsequently treated nonoperatively. Operative patients had significantly higher preoperative LSDI scores than both nonoperative patients and asymptomatic volunteers (29.9 vs. 17.3 vs. 3.4, P spinal deformity.

  20. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey Hwee Weng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure.The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of

  1. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis; Hee, Hwan Tak

    2010-04-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure. The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of choice for

  2. Topacheous gout as a rare cause of spinal stenosis in the lumbar region. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Joseph

    2012-02-03

    Despite the fact that gout is a common metabolic disorder, because its involvement of the axial skeleton is rare the diagnosis is often delayed, even in patients with long-standing gout who present with neurological deficits. The authors report the case of a woman with a history of extensive gout, emphasizing the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of a lumbar spinal stenosis.

  3. Lumbar extraforaminal ligaments act as a traction relief and prevent spinal nerve compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, G.A.; Smit, T.H.; Hoogland, P.V.J.M.; Snijders, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In a previous study, ligaments that connect the extraforaminal lumbar spinal nerves with the fibrous capsule of the facet joints and the dorsolateral side of the intervertebral disc were described. This anatomical configuration suggests a mechanical role in transferring extraforaminal

  4. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra Mohan Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

  5. Lumbar Scoliosis Combined Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Herniation Diagnosed Patient Was Treated with “U” Route Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Lian, Qingquan; Yan, Haibo; Lin, Xianfa

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to report a case of a 63-year-old man with a history of low back pain (LBP) and left leg pain for 2 years, and the symptom became more serious in the past 5 months. The patient was diagnosed with lumbar scoliosis combined with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and lumbar disc herniation (LDH) at the level of L4-5 that was confirmed using Computerized Topography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The surgical team preformed a novel technique, “U” route transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD), which led to substantial, long-term success in reduction of pain intensity and disability. After removing the osteophyte mass posterior to the thecal sac at L4-5, the working channel direction was changed to the gap between posterior longitudinal ligament and thecal sac, and we also removed the herniation and osteophyte at L3-4 with “U” route PELD. The patient's symptoms were improved immediately after the surgical intervention; low back pain intensity decreased from preoperative 9 to postoperative 2 on a visual analog scale (VAS) recorded at 1 month postoperatively. The success of the intervention suggests that “U” route PELD may be a feasible alternative to treat lumbar scoliosis with LSS and LDH patients. PMID:28203471

  6. Lumbar Scoliosis Combined Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Herniation Diagnosed Patient Was Treated with “U” Route Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to report a case of a 63-year-old man with a history of low back pain (LBP and left leg pain for 2 years, and the symptom became more serious in the past 5 months. The patient was diagnosed with lumbar scoliosis combined with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS and lumbar disc herniation (LDH at the level of L4-5 that was confirmed using Computerized Topography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The surgical team preformed a novel technique, “U” route transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD, which led to substantial, long-term success in reduction of pain intensity and disability. After removing the osteophyte mass posterior to the thecal sac at L4-5, the working channel direction was changed to the gap between posterior longitudinal ligament and thecal sac, and we also removed the herniation and osteophyte at L3-4 with “U” route PELD. The patient’s symptoms were improved immediately after the surgical intervention; low back pain intensity decreased from preoperative 9 to postoperative 2 on a visual analog scale (VAS recorded at 1 month postoperatively. The success of the intervention suggests that “U” route PELD may be a feasible alternative to treat lumbar scoliosis with LSS and LDH patients.

  7. The role of minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion in sagittal balance correction and spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Giuseppe; Zoccali, Carmine; Maykowski, Philip; Walter, Christina M; Skoch, Jesse; Baaj, Ali A

    2014-10-01

    The recent proliferation of minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) techniques has drawn attention to potential for these techniques to control or correct sagittal misalignment in adult spinal deformity. We systemically reviewed published studies related to LLIF use in adult spinal deformity treatment with emphasis on radiographic assessment of sagittal balance. A literature review was conducted to examine studies focusing on sagittal balance restoration in adult degenerative scoliosis with the LLIF approach. Fourteen publications, 12 retrospective and 2 prospective, reported data regarding lumbar lordosis correction (1,266 levels in 476 patients) but only two measured global sagittal alignment. LLIF appears to be especially effective when the lumbar lordosis and sagittal balance correction goals are less than 10° and 5 cm, respectively. However, the review demonstrated a lack of consistent reporting on sagittal balance restoration with the MIS LLIF techniques.

  8. Massive lumbar spine hematoma post-spinal tap

    OpenAIRE

    Al Jishi, Ahmed; Murty, Naresh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lumbar puncture is a well-known procedure. The indications for lumbar puncture vary among different medical and surgical disciplines, though obtaining a sample for cerebrospinal fluid analysis is the most common one. A normal coagulation profile is crucial prior to pursing the procedure. Occasionally, an urgent sample is needed to guide an appropriate treatment while the patient's coagulation status is suboptimum. In those specific critical situations, some may accept suboptimal c...

  9. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Due to Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy in a Patient with Multiple Exostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Ižkbali Afsar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary multiple exostosis is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by multiple exostoses (osteochondromas usually affecting the metaphysical regions of long bones, usually of the lower extremity, and seldom occurring in the axial skeleton. In the literature, hereditary multiple exostosis cases that developed spinal canal stenosis due to spinal osteochondromas have been reported. Lumbar spinal stenosis may occur in a hereditary multiple exostosis patient due to ligamentum flavum hypertrophy, which is a hyperosteotic process that differs from exostosis. We discuss one such case, along with pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical features.

  10. Outcome after surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis: the lumbar extension test is not a predictive factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Lars; Hauerberg, John; Springborg, Jacob B

    2009-01-01

    of the lumbar spine has predictive value for the outcome after decompression. The aim of this study was to investigate this theory in a larger group of patients. METHODS: One hundred forty-six consecutive patients surgically treated for LSS were included in the study. The clinical condition was recorded before...... surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery using 3 different scoring systems: Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score, and Oswestry Disability Index. The group of patients with preoperative aggravation of the symptoms by the lumbar extension test, (positive...... extension test), was compared with the group of patients without aggravation by the test, (negative extension test). RESULTS: Before surgery, patients with a positive extension test scored significantly worse on all disability scoring systems than patients with a negative test. However, the extension test...

  11. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  12. Characteristics of lumbar disc herniation with exacerbation of presentation due to spinal manipulative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Li; Liu, Yan-Xi; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Zhang, Ji; Yan, Hong-Wei

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this article was to delineate the characteristics of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with exacerbation of symptoms caused by spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). The main emphasis should be on the prevention of this condition by identifying relevant risk factors. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of a total number of 10 LDH patients with exacerbation of presentation after SMT were reviewed. All the patients underwent neurological and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Laminectomy and discectomy were performed, and follow-up was carried out in all patients. The duration of symptoms in the patients before SMT was 4-15 years. After the therapy, an acute exacerbation of back and radicular pain was observed within 24 h. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that L4-L5 was the most frequently affected level observed (7 patients), and each patient had a large disc fragment in the spinal canal. The disc fragments were classified into 3 types according to their localizations. The time internal between the exacerbation of presentation and surgery was 23.1 days. No perioperative complications were noted. All the patients were relieved of radicular pain a few days after surgery. During postoperative follow-up, all patients regained the ability to walk; one patient received catheterization for 1 month and another for 6 months. Eight patients reported a complete resolution of presentation and the rest 2 patients were significantly improved. SMT should be prohibited in some LDH patients to prevent neurological damages, in whom there are 5 possible risk factors. Surgical results for these patients are encouraging.

  13. Difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with both lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Junya; Ohtori, Seiji; Kishida, Shunji; Nakamura, Junichi; Takeshita, Munenori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Takazawa, Makoto; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    Case series. To present the difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint arthritis. Pain arising from a degenerated hip joint is sometimes localized to the lower leg. Patients with lumbar spinal disease may also show radicular pain corresponding to the lower leg area. If patients present with both conditions and only pain at the lower leg, it is difficult to determine the origin of the pain. We reviewed 420 patients who had leg pain with lumbar spinal stenosis diagnosed by myelography, computed tomography after myelography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Pain only at the ipsilateral lateral aspect of the lower leg but slight low back pain or pain around the hip joint was shown in 4 patients who had lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. The symptoms resolved after L5 spinal nerve block, but remained after lidocaine infiltration into the hip joint. We performed decompression and posterolateral fusion surgery for these 4 patients. Leg pain did not resolve after lumbar surgery in all patients. Conservative treatment was not effective from 6 to 12 months, so ultimately we performed ipsilateral total hip replacement for all patients and they became symptom-free. It is difficult to determine the origin of lower leg pain by spinal nerve block and hip joint block in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. We take this into consideration before surgery.

  14. The pathologic mechanisms underlying lumbar distraction spinal cord injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Ji; Xue, Jing; Huang, Rongrong; Wu, Di; Song, Yueming

    2017-11-01

    A reliable experimental rabbit model of distraction spinal cord injury (SCI) was established to successfully simulate gradable and replicable distraction SCI. However, further research is needed to elucidate the pathologic mechanisms underlying distraction SCI. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathologic mechanisms underlying lumbar distraction SCI in rabbits. This is an animal laboratory study. Using a self-designed spine distractor, the experimental animals were divided into a control group and 10%, 20%, and 30% distraction groups. Pathologic changes to the spinal cord microvessels in the early stage of distraction SCI were identified by perfusion of the spinal cord vasculature with ink, production of transparent specimens, observation by light microscopy, and observation of corrosion casts of the spinal cord microvascular architecture by scanning electron microscopy. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) concentrations in the injured spinal cord tissue were measured after 8 hours. With an increasing degree and duration of distraction, the spinal cord microvessels were only partially filled and had the appearance of spasm until rupture and hemorrhage were observed. The MDA concentration increased and the SOD concentration decreased in the spinal cord tissue. Changes to the internal and external spinal cord vessels led to spinal cord ischemia, which is a primary pathologic mechanism of distraction SCI. Lipid peroxidation mediated by free radicals took part in secondary pathologic damage of distraction SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. PARAMETERS OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN PATIENTS WITH CONGENITAL NARROWING OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELIU HAZAEL MORALES-RANGEL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the morphological parameters of magnetic resonance in patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal with patients with low back pain. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective, observational study was conducted with measurements in the axial and sagittal magnetic resonance sections of the vertebral body and canal of the lumbar spine of 64 patients with diagnosis of low back pain, which were compared with resonance images taken from 31 Mexican patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal. Results: The results show that patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal in the axial sections have a difference in diameters, being L2<13.9 mm, L3<13.3 mm, L4<12.9 mm, L5<13.1 mm, compared with controls L2<20.5 mm, L3<20.5 mm, L4<19.3 mm, L5<18.1 mm with p = 0.000. Conclusions: We found different measurements in the Mexican population compared to those found by similar studies. With the parameters obtained, it would be possible to make the proper diagnosis, surgical planning, and treatment.

  16. Quantitative morphometric analysis of the lumbar vertebral facets and evaluation of feasibility of lumbar spinal nerve root and spinal canal decompression using the Goel intraarticular facetal spacer distraction technique: A lumbar/cervical facet comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoskar, Savni R; Goel, Aimee A; Mehta, Pooja H; Goel, Atul

    2014-10-01

    The authors evaluate the anatomic subtleties of lumbar facets and assess the feasibility and effectiveness of use of 'Goel facet spacer' in the treatment of degenerative spinal canal stenosis. Twenty-five lumbar vertebral cadaveric dried bones were used for the purpose. A number of morphometric parameters were evaluated both before and after the introduction of Goel facet spacers within the confines of the facet joint. The spacers achieved distraction of facets that was more pronounced in the vertical perspective. Introduction of spacers on both sides resulted in an increase in the intervertebral foraminal height and a circumferential increase in the spinal canal dimensions. Additionally, there was an increase in the disc space or intervertebral body height. The lumbar facets are more vertically and anteroposteriorly oriented when compared to cervical facets that are obliquely and transversely oriented. Understanding the anatomical peculiarities of the lumbar and cervical facets can lead to an optimum utilization of the potential of Goel facet distraction arthrodesis technique in the treatment of spinal degenerative canal stenosis.

  17. Prevalence, Spinal Alignment, and Mobility of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with or without Chronic Low Back Pain: A Community-Dwelling Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohisa Miyakoshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS occurs almost universally with aging, little is known regarding its actual prevalence and relationships to chronic low back pain (CLBP in the general population. The presence of CLBP in subjects with LSS may have negative impacts on spinal alignment and mobility. This study evaluated the prevalence of LSS using a self-administered, self-reported history questionnaire in 630 community-dwelling individuals ≥50 years old. Subjects with LSS were further divided into LSS+CLBP and LSS alone groups, and spinal alignment and mobility were compared using a computer-assisted device. Prevalence of LSS was 10.8% in this cohort. Subjects in the LSS+CLBP group (=46 showed a significantly more kyphotic lumbar spinal alignment with limited lumbar extension (<.05, resulting in a stooped trunk compared to subjects in the LSS alone group (=22. However, no significant difference in spinal mobility was seen between groups.

  18. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu (Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)), email: petri.sipola@kuh.fi; Leinonen, Ville (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland)); Niemelaeinen, Riikka (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Clinical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)); Aalto, Timo (Kyyhkylae Rehabilitation Center and Hospital, Mikkeli (Finland)); Airaksinen, Olavi (Kuopio Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine and Univ. of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Kuopio (Finland)); Battie, Michele C. (Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  19. The Influence of Single-level Versus Multilevel Decompression on the Outcome in Multisegmental Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Analysis of the Lumbar Spinal Outcome Study (LSOS) Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Nils H; Burgstaller, Jakob M; Held, Ulrike; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Farshad, Mazda; Pichierri, Giuseppe; Steurer, Johann; Porchet, François

    2017-12-01

    This is prospective multicenter cohort study. To assess whether patients with confirmed multisegmental lumbar spinal stenosis benefit more from a single-level or a multilevel decompression. In multisegmental lumbar spinal stenotic cases, the decision as to how many levels of stenosis need to be operated to achieve the best possible clinical outcome is still unknown and remains a controversy between spine surgeons. Patients of the Swiss Lumbar Stenosis Outcome Study (LSOS) with confirmed multisegmental LSS undergoing first-time decompression without fusion were enrolled in this study. The main outcomes of this study were Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM) symptoms and function over time, measured at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up. Further outcomes of interest were changes in SSM, numeric rating scale, feeling thermometer, the EQ-5D-EL, and the Roland and Morris disability questionnaire from baseline to 6, 12, and 24 months. After 12 months, a total of 141 patients met the inclusion criteria; of these, 33 (23%) underwent a single-level and 108 (77%) a multilevel decompression. Multilevel decompression was associated with a significantly less favorable SSM symptoms and function score, respectively, as compared with single-level decompression. In all further outcomes of interest single-level as well as multilevel patients improved over time. Our study showed that in multisegmental stenotic cases a single-level decompression was associated with a significantly more favorable SSM symptoms and function score, respectively, as compared with multilevel decompression. This study provides evidence that in multisegmental stenotic cases a single-level decompression might be sufficient to improve patient's symptoms and function.

  20. Spinal posture of thoracic and lumbar spine and pelvic tilt in highly trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, José M; López-Miñarro, Pedro A; Alacid, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sagittal thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists when standing on the floor, and sitting on a bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions. A total of 60 elite male cyclists (mean age: 22.95 ± 3.38 years) and 60 master male cyclists (mean age: 34.27 ± 3.05 years) were evaluated. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal thoracic and lumbar curvature in standing on the floor and sitting positions on the bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions (high, medium, and low). The mean values for thoracic and lumbar curvatures and pelvic tilt in the standing position on the floor were 48.17 ± 8.05°, -27.32 ± 7.23°, and 13.65 ± 5.54°, respectively, for elite cyclists and 47.02 ± 9.24°, -25.30 ± 6.29°, and 11.25 ± 5.17° for master cyclists. A high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis in the standing position was observed (58.3% in elite cyclists and 53.3% in master cyclists), whereas predominately neutral values were found in the lumbar spine (88.3% and 76.7% in elite and master cyclists, respectively). When sitting on the bicycle, the thoracic curve was at a lower angle in the three handlebar-hand positions with respect to the standing position on the floor in both groups (p hyperkyphosis is not directly related to positions adopted on the bicycle. Key pointsThis study evaluated thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists while standing and sitting on the bicycle.Elite and master cyclists showed a high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis and neutral lumbar lordosis in standing.Cyclists adopted a significantly lower thoracic kyphosis on the bicycle at the three handlebar positions analysed (upper, middle and lower handlebars) than in standing posture. The lumbar spine showed a kyphotic posture.The high percentage of standing thoracic hyperkyphosis in both groups of cyclists may be related to factors other than the

  1. Spinal hydatidosis mimicking Guillain Barre syndrome: in case of doubt there is no rush to perform lumbar puncture

    OpenAIRE

    Belkouch, Ahmed; Mouhsine, Abdelilah; Sirbou, Rachid; Zidouh, Saad; Bakkali, Taoufik; El Fikri, Abdelghani; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2014-01-01

    Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a challenging pathology which diagnosis is based essentially on the clinical examination and the results of lumbar puncture. Differential diagnosis must be discussed if the clinical picture is not complete. We present the case of a patient who presented to the emergency department with symptoms evoking both GBS and spinal cord compression. The Radiology showed a diffused spinal hydatidosis. The lumbar puncture must be carefully considered. In this case, it wou...

  2. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  3. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  4. Lumbar spinal fusion. Outcome in relation to surgical methods, choice of implant and postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke

    2004-10-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has become one of the most common causes of disability in adults under 45 years of age and is consequently one of the most common reasons for early retirement in industrialised societies. Accordingly, CLBP represents an expensive drain on society's resources and is a very challenging area for which a consensus for rational therapy is yet to be established. The spinal fusion procedure was introduced as a treatment option for CLBP more than 70 years ago. However, few areas of spinal surgery have caused so much controversy as spinal fusion. The literature reveals divergent opinions about when fusion is indicated and how it should be performed. Furthermore, the significance of the role of postoperative rehabilitation following spinal fusion may be underestimated. There exists no consensus on the design of a program specific for rehabilitation. Ideally, for any given surgical procedure, it should be possible to identify not only possible complications relative to a surgical procedure, but also what symptoms may be expected, and what pain behaviour may be expected of a particular patient. The overall aims of the current studies were: 1) to introduce patient-based functional outcome evaluation into spinal fusion treatment; 2) to evaluate radiological assessment of different spinal fusion procedures; 3) to investigate the effect of titanium versus stainless steel pedicle screws on mechanical fixation and bone ingrowth in lumbar spinal fusion; 4) to analyse the clinical and radiological outcome of different lumbar spinal fusion techniques; 5) to evaluate complications and re-operation rates following different surgical procedures; and 6) to analyse the effect of different rehabilitation strategies for lumbar spinal fusion patients. The present thesis comprises 9 studies: 2 clinical retrospective studies, 1 clinical prospective case/reference study, 5 clinical randomised prospective studies and 1 animal study (Mini-pigs). In total, 594 patients

  5. En Bloc Partial Laminectomy and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Foraminal Spinal Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eung-Ha; Kim, Hyung-Tae

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose An en bloc partial laminectomy and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in spinal stenosis patients with severe foraminal narrowing has a shorter operation time, less neural manipulation and allows indirect decompression by restoring the interforaminal height compared to other procedures. This study investigated the efficacy of the procedure. Overview of Literature PLIF is one of the most popular surgery for degenerative spine such as foraminal ...

  6. Characterization of subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzer, Cordula; Urech, Karin; Hügle, Thomas; Benz, Robyn Melanie; Geurts, Jeroen; Schären, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis may be a cause of low back pain in degenerative spine diseases including lumbar spinal stenosis. Subchondral bone is regarded as a potential therapeutic target for osteoarthritis treatment. The goal of this study was to characterize subchondral bone histopathology in osteoarthritic facet joints from lumbar spinal stenosis patients. Fifteen patients with degenerative spinal stenosis scheduled for transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery were recruited for this study. Osteoarthritis severity was graded on T1- and T2-weighted MRI images using Weishaupt scoring system. Dissected osteoarthritic facet joints were subjected to histological and immunohistochemistry analyses to study relative abundance of osteoblast, osteoclasts, and macrophages using van Gieson's, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and CD68-antibody staining, respectively. Presence of nerve fibers was evaluated by PGP9.5-antibody staining. Differential bone histopathology, independent from radiological osteoarthritis grade, was observed in facet joints. Extensive de novo bone formation was found in subchondral bone tissues of eight of fifteen specimens. Regions of bone formation showed high abundance of blood vessels and CD68-positive macrophages, but were devoid of multinucleated osteoclasts. Additional pathological changes in subchondral marrow spaces, including inflammatory infiltration and enhanced osteoclast activity, were characterized by macrophage-rich tissues. PGP9.5-positive nerve fibers were detected near arterioles, but not in regions displaying bone pathology. Individual histopathological parameters did not associate with clinical features or radiological osteoarthritis severity. Subchondral bone histopathology of facet joint osteoarthritis in lumbar spinal stenosis is characterized by marrow infiltration by macrophage-rich tissues and enhanced de novo bone formation. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34

  7. Diagnostic value of multiplanar reconstruction in CT recognition of lumbar spinal disorders

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    Im, S. K.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Sohn, M. H.; Lim, K. Y.; Choi, K. C. [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    The computer tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the lumbar spine. Recently, the multiplanar reconstruction of lumbar spine of CT of significant value for the anatomical localization and for the myelographic and surgical correlation. We observed 177 cases of lumbar spine CT, who complains of spinal symptom, during the period from Dec. 1982 to Aug. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 113 males and 44 females. The CT diagnosis showed 152 cases of herniated lumbar disc, 15 cases of degenerative disease, 5 cases of spine tbc., 3 cases of spine trauma and 2 cases of meningocele. 2. CT findings of herniated disc were as follows: focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, indentation on dural sac in 92 cases (60.5%) soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 85 cases (55.9%), compression or displacement of nerve root sheath in 22 cases(14.4%). 3. Sites of herniated lumbar disc were at L4-L5 level in 100 cases(59.1%) and at L5-S1 level in 65 cases (38.4%). Location of it were central type in 70 cases(41.1%), left-central type in 46 cases (27.2%), right-central type in 44 cases(26.0%) and lateral type in 9 cases (5.1%). 4. The sagittal reconstruction images were helpful in evaluating neural foramina, size of disc bluge into spinal canal, especially at L5-S1, and patients with spondylolisthesis. The coronal reconstruction images were the least informative, although they contributed to the evaluation of lumbar nerve roots of course, the axial CT scans were the most sensitive and specific.

  8. PREVALENCE OF “CONGENITAL LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS” IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compromised further by other pathologies. It is not surprising therefore, that symptomatic disc protrusion is more common in patients with trefoil shaped vertebral .... cause of deformity such as stooping, humping, general shortening and premature aging. The contribution of congenital spinal stenosis to low back pain has not ...

  9. Dynamic biomechanical examination of the lumbar spine with implanted total spinal segment replacement (TSSR) utilizing a pendulum testing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Paller, David J; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanical investigations of spinal motion preserving implants help in the understanding of their in vivo behavior. In this study, we hypothesized that the lumbar spine with implanted total spinal segment replacement (TSSR) would exhibit decreased dynamic stiffness and more rapid energy absorption compared to native functional spinal units under simulated physiologic motion when tested with the pendulum system. Five unembalmed, frozen human lumbar functional spinal units were tested on the pendulum system with axial compressive loads of 181 N, 282 N, 385 N, and 488 N before and after Flexuspine total spinal segment replacement implantation. Testing in flexion, extension, and lateral bending began by rotating the pendulum to 5°; resulting in unconstrained oscillatory motion. The number of rotations to equilibrium was recorded and bending stiffness (N-m/°) was calculated and compared for each testing mode. The total spinal segment replacement reached equilibrium with significantly fewer cycles to equilibrium compared to the intact functional spinal unit at all loads in flexion (p0.18). Lumbar functional spinal units with implanted total spinal segment replacement were found to have similar dynamic bending stiffness, but absorbed energy at a more rapid rate than intact functional spinal units during cyclic loading with an unconstrained pendulum system. Although the effects on clinical performance of motion preserving devices is not fully known, these results provide further insight into the biomechanical behavior of this device under approximated physiologic loading conditions.

  10. Correlation between disability and MRI findings in lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Sigmundsson, Freyr G; Kang, Xiao P; J?nsson, Bo; Str?mqvist, Bj?rn

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose MRI is the modality of choice when diagnosing spinal stenosis but it also shows that stenosis is prevalent in asymptomatic subjects over 60. The relationship between preoperative health-related quality of life, functional status, leg and back pain, and the objectively measured dural sac area in single and multilevel stenosis is unknown. We assessed this relationship in a prospective study. Patients and methods The cohort included 109 consecutive patients with central sp...

  11. Correlation between disability and MRI findings in lumbar spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose MRI is the modality of choice when diagnosing spinal stenosis but it also shows that stenosis is prevalent in asymptomatic subjects over 60. The relationship between preoperative health-related quality of life, functional status, leg and back pain, and the objectively measured dural sac area in single and multilevel stenosis is unknown. We assessed this relationship in a prospective study. Patients and methods The cohort included 109 consecutive patients with central spinal stenosis operated on with decompressive laminectomy or laminotomy. Preoperatively, all patients completed the questionnaires for EQ-5D, SF-36, Oswestry disability index (ODI), estimated walking distance and leg and back pain (VAS). The cross-sectional area of the dural sac was measured at relevant disc levels in mm2, and spondylolisthesis was measured in mm. For comparison, the area of the most narrow level, the number of levels with dural sac area spondylolisthesis were studied. Results Before surgery, patients with central spinal stenosis had low HRLQoL and functional status, and high pain levels. Patients with multilevel stenosis had better general health (p = 0.04) and less leg and back pain despite having smaller dural sac area than patients with single-level stenosis. There was a poor correlation between walking distance, ODI, the SF-36, EQ-5D, and leg and back pain levels on the one hand and dural sac area on the other. Women more often had multilevel spinal stenosis (p = 0.05) and spondylolisthesis (p HRQoL, function, and pain measured preoperatively correlate with morphological changes on MRI to a limited extent. PMID:21434811

  12. Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. A case series

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    Ploumis Avraam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspinous distraction devices (IPDD are indicated as stand-alone devices for the treatment of spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis with a combination of unilateral microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. Methods This is a prospective clinical and radiological study of minimum 2 years follow-up. Twenty-two patients (average age 64.5 years with low-back pain and unilateral sciatica underwent decompressive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. Visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry Disability Index and walking capacity plus radiologic measurements of posterior disc height of the involved level and lumbar lordosis Cobb angle were documented both preoperatively and postoperatively. One-sided posterior subarticular and foraminal decompression was conducted followed by dynamic stabilization of the diseased level with an IPDD (X-STOP. Results The average follow-up time was 27.4 months. Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index improved statistically significantly (p Conclusions The described surgical technique using unilateral microdecompression and IPDD insertion is a clinically effective and radiologically viable treatment method for symptoms of spinal stenosis resistant to non-operative treatment.

  13. Spinal deformity in elderly patients: comparison of two distal termination sites of lumbar curve fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborovskii, Nikita; Ptashnikov, Dmitrii; Mikhaylov, Dmitrii; Smekalenkov, Oleg; Masevnin, Sergei; Lapaeva, Olga; Mooraby, Zabioulah

    2017-01-01

    This report compares the clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes of fusion from thoracolumbar region terminating at L5 or at sacrum and pelvis in elderly patients with spinal deformity. Ninety-four elderly patients who underwent spinal deformity surgery at our institution were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups. The group L included 43 patients who underwent fusion of lumbar curve from thoracolumbar region to L5. The group P consisted of 51 patients who were treated using fusion from lower thoracic region to S1 extending to the pelvis. Radiographic outcomes, health-related to the quality of life (HRQOL) parameters, and complications with a 3-year minimum follow-up were analyzed and compared between two groups. In the group L, the ideal sagittal balance was not achieved. The group P showed a better restoration of global spinal alignments compared with the group L. The HRQOL scores (VAS, ODI, SRS-24) of the patients after 3 years are slightly higher in the group P, but we did not get significant difference between groups. The total number of complications was higher in the group P. The research showed that fusion of lumbar curve extending to the pelvis provided good sagittal balance, global spinal alignments, and likely HRQOL parameters after 3-year follow-up. But, eventually, we obtained higher number of complications.

  14. Noradrenergic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal rat spinal cord

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    Maylis Tartas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that noradrenaline powerfully controls spinal motor networks, few data are available regarding the noradrenergic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons in motor networks. Our work explores the cellular basis of noradrenergic modulation in the rat motor spinal cord. We first show that lumbar motoneurons express the three classes of adrenergic receptors at birth. Using patch-clamp recordings in the newborn rat spinal cord preparation, we characterized the effects of noradrenaline and of specific agonists of the three classes of adrenoreceptors on motoneuron membrane properties. Noradrenaline increases the motoneuron excitability partly via the inhibition of a KIR like current. Methoxamine (α1, clonidine (α2 and isoproterenol (β differentially modulate the motoneuron membrane potential but also increase motoneuron excitability, these effects being respectively inhibited by the antagonists prazosin (α1, yohimbine (α2 and propranolol (β. We show that the glutamatergic synaptic drive arising from the T13-L2 network is enhanced in motoneurons by noradrenaline, methoxamine and isoproterenol. On the other hand, noradrenaline, isoproterenol and clonidine inhibit both the frequency and amplitude of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs while methoxamine increases their frequency. The T13-L2 synaptic drive is thereby differentially modulated from the other glutamatergic synapses converging onto motoneurons and enhanced by presynaptic α1 and β receptor activation. Our data thus show that the noradrenergic system exerts a powerful and complex neuromodulation of lumbar motor networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

  15. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; McManus, Carla D.; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted deli...

  16. Assessment of Effectiveness of Percutaneous Adhesiolysis in Managing Chronic Low Back Pain Secondary to Lumbar Central Spinal Canal Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Laxmaiah Manchikanti, Kimberly A. Cash, Carla D. McManus, Vidyasagar Pampati

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted deli...

  17. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Flores

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe una variada cantidad de alternativas no quirúrgicas para tratar el dolor radicular producido por la raquiestenosis lumbar degenerativa. Los corticoides epidurales se utilizan desde hace varias décadas, sin embargo la eficacia reportada en la literatura es muy variable. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos nueve revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen siete estudios aleatorizados. Realizamos un metanálisis y tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que la inyección de corticoides epidurales probablemente tiene poco o nulo efecto en reducir el dolor radicular por estenorraquis.

  18. Influence of sagittal balance on spinal lumbar loads: a numerical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Costa, Francesco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    Pathological deformities involving the sagittal alignment of the spine may lead to loss of spine stability and imbalance. The effect of different patterns of sagittal balance on the loads acting in the spine was only marginally investigated, although it would be of critical importance in the clinical management of spinal disorders. Optimization-based finite element models of the human spine in the standing position able to predict the loads acting in the lumbar spine and the activation of the spinal muscles were developed and used to explore a wide range of sagittal balance conditions, covering both inter-subject variability and pathological imbalance. 1000 two-dimensional randomized spine models with simplified geometry were generated by varying anatomical parameters such as lumbar lordosis, sacral slope, and C7 plumb line. Muscular loads were calculated by means of an optimization procedure aimed to minimize total muscular stress. The simulation of a physiological spine in the standing position predicted average disk stresses ranging from 0.38 to 0.5MPa, in good agreement with in vivo measurements. The C7 plumb line and the parameters describing the lumbar spine were found to be the strongest determinants of the lumbar loads and muscle activity. Marginal relevance was found concerning the thoracic and cervical parameters. The present modeling approach was found to be able to capture correlations between sagittal parameters and the loads acting in the lumbar spine. The method represents a good platform for future improvements aimed at patient-specific modeling to support pre-operative surgical planning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. SPINAL POSTURE OF THORACIC AND LUMBAR SPINE AND PELVIC TILT IN HIGHLY TRAINED CYCLISTS

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    José M. Muyor

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate sagittal thoracic and lumbar spinal curvatures and pelvic tilt in elite and master cyclists when standing on the floor, and sitting on a bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions. A total of 60 elite male cyclists (mean age: 22.95 ± 3.38 years and 60 master male cyclists (mean age: 34.27 ± 3.05 years were evaluated. The Spinal Mouse system was used to measure sagittal thoracic and lumbar curvature in standing on the floor and sitting positions on the bicycle at three different handlebar-hand positions (high, medium, and low. The mean values for thoracic and lumbar curvatures and pelvic tilt in the standing position on the floor were 48.17 ± 8.05º, -27.32 ± 7.23º, and 13.65 ± 5.54º, respectively, for elite cyclists and 47.02 ± 9.24º, -25.30 ± 6.29º, and 11.25 ± 5.17º for master cyclists. A high frequency of thoracic hyperkyphosis in the standing position was observed (58.3% in elite cyclists and 53.3% in master cyclists, whereas predominately neutral values were found in the lumbar spine (88.3% and 76.7% in elite and master cyclists, respectively. When sitting on the bicycle, the thoracic curve was at a lower angle in the three handlebar-hand positions with respect to the standing position on the floor in both groups (p < 0.01. The lumbar curve adopted a kyphotic posture. In conclusion, cyclists present a high percentage of thoracic hyperkyphotic postures in standing positions on the floor. However, thoracic hyperkyphosis is not directly related to positions adopted on the bicycle

  20. MR imaging of lumbar herniated intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis: Correlation with CT

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    Lee, Won Jae; Park, Kil Sun; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Jip; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    MR imagings obtained in 40 patients with surgically proven lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and/or spinal stenosis were retrospectively analysed and compared with CT scans, in order to evaluate the MR findings of HIVD and spinal stenosis, and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of MR. The MR imaging was performed on a 2.0 T superconducting unit, using multislice spin echo (SE) and gradient echo (GE) techniques. The results were as follows: 1. The texture of vertebral body with spinal stenosis had the tendency to be more heterogeneous than that with HIVD. 2. The signal intensity of the diseased disc was isointense relative to normal disc in 81 % (60/74) and the remainder (19%) was hypointense on both T1 weighted SE and GE images. There was no significant difference in signal intensity among HIVD, HIVD combined with spinal stenosis and spinal stenosis groups, but there was the tendency of lower signal intensity of the diseased disc in patients with severe degenerative change of spine in both T1 weighted SE imaged and GE image. 3. The diagnostic accuracy of MR was 92%, which was similar to that of CT. 4. T1 weighted SE image appears superior to GE image in evaluation of most of the structural differentiation, but as for differentiating between lumina and ligamentum flavum, and for the vacuum phenomenon, GE image seems to be better than T1 weighted SE image. In conclusion, MR appears to be better than CT as a initial imaging modality in evaluation of the patients with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis or HIVD because MR has the capability of demonstrating rupture of anulus fibrosus in sagittal plane.

  1. Analysis of Patients with Myelopathy due to Benign Intradural Spinal Tumors with Concomitant Lumbar Degenerative Diseases Misdiagnosed and Erroneously Treated with Lumbar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kang; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Yang, Chih-Hui; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Chen, Po-Yuan; Chye, Cien-Leong; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Han-Jung

    2017-09-01

    When a cervical or thoracic benign intradural spinal tumor (BIST) coexists with lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), diagnosis can be difficult. Symptoms of BIST-myelopathy can be mistaken as being related to LDD. Worse, an unnecessary lumbar surgery could be performed. This study was conducted to analyze cases in which an erroneous lumbar surgery was undertaken in the wake of failure to identify BIST-associated myelopathy. Cases were found in a hospital database. Patients who underwent surgery for LDD first and then another surgery for BIST removal within a short interval were studied. Issues investigated included why the BISTs were missed, how they were found later, and how the patients reacted to the unnecessary lumbar procedures. Over 10 years, 167 patients received both surgeries for LDD and a cervical or thoracic BIST. In 7 patients, lumbar surgery preceded tumor removal by a short interval. Mistakes shared by the physicians included failure to detect myelopathy and a BIST, and a hasty decision for lumbar surgery, which soon turned out to be futile. Although the BISTs were subsequently found and removed, 5 patients believed that the lumbar surgery was unnecessary, with 4 patients expressing regrets and 1 patient threatening to take legal action against the initial surgeon. Concomitant symptomatic LDD and BIST-associated myelopathy pose a diagnostic challenge. Spine specialists should refrain from reflexively linking leg symptoms and impaired ability to walk to LDD. Comprehensive patient evaluation is fundamental to avoid misdiagnosis and wrong lumbar surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

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    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L. [Centre Hospitalier Vaudois, Service de Rhumatologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  3. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

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    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-10-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction.

  4. Lumbar spinal stenosis: assessment of long-term outcome 12 years after operative and conservative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurri, H; Slätis, P; Soini, J; Tallroth, K; Alaranta, H; Laine, T; Heliövaara, M

    1998-04-01

    The present study focuses on the long-term prognosis of radiographically verified stenosis of the lower lumbar spine. The purpose here was to describe the outcome 12 years after radiographic diagnosis of spinal stenosis and to identify factors predicting disability after operative or conservative treatment. Data were compiled on 75 patients (43 men and 32 women) with changes in functional myelography diagnostic for spinal stenosis. Their mean age at the interview 12 years later was 61 years. The sagittal diameter of the dural sac was measured from baseline myelographs at all intervertebral levels and was corrected for magnification. In the interview, subjective outcome assessment was obtained with a structured questionnaire, and the low-back disorder was scored using the Oswestry disability index. The sagittal diameter of the dural sac was severely stenotic (<7.0 mm) in 32 patients (26 operated), and moderately stenotic (7.0-10.5 mm) in 43 patients (31 operated). The severity of the stenosis significantly predicted disability, even when the effects of age, sex, therapy regimen, and body mass index were adjusted for. For moderate and severe stenosis, the adjusted mean Oswestry indices were 28.4 and 39.1, respectively (p = 0.01). Therapy as such (operative versus nonoperative) did not significantly correlate with later disability. The radiographic severity of lumbar spinal stenosis predicts disability independently of therapy regimen. Randomized clinical trials are needed to establish the indications for surgical and conservative treatment. Radiographic severity of the stenosis should be considered as an effect-modifying or confounding factor in clinical trials and other studies focusing on the outcome of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders; A comparison with myelography and discography

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    Nojiri, Hajime (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    To evaluate the stenotic condition of the lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelography and with discography in 102 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Various pathologic conditions were studied including 50 cases of herniated nucleus pulposus, 39 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral type or combined type), and 13 cases of spondylolisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, and dysplastic type). High correlation was detected between the T2 weighted mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and the lateral view of a full-column myelogram, but subtle changes such as adhesive changes, or redundancy, or anomalous changes of the nerve roots were more clearly demonstrated on myelograms than on MRI. Actually some of these changes could not be detected on MRI. The degrees of disc degeneration were classified into five grades according to the signal intensity and the irregularity of the disc on the T2-weighted image. The MRI evaluation of disc degeneration in this series was similar to that of the discography. However, MRI could not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI might be the imaging modality for diagnostic screening and for detecting stenotic conditions of the lumbar spinal canal, it will not be able to replace myelography and/or discography for determining indication for surgery and preferred surgical approach. (author).

  6. Influence of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures on spinal and pelvic parameters of sagittal balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ould-Slimane, Mourad; Lenoir, Thibaut; Dauzac, Cyril; Rillardon, Ludovic; Hoffmann, Etienne; Guigui, Pierre; Ilharreborde, Brice

    2012-06-01

    Restitution of sagittal balance is important after lumbar fusion, because it improves fusion rate and may reduce the rate of adjacent segment disease. The purpose of the present study was to describe the impact of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) procedures on pelvic and spinal parameters and sagittal balance. Forty-five patients who had single-level TLIF were included in this study. Pelvic and spinal radiological parameters of sagittal balance were measured preoperatively, postoperatively and at latest follow-up. Age at surgery averaged 58.4 (±9.6) years. Mean follow-up was 35.1 months (±4.1). Twenty-nine percent of the patients exhibited anterior imbalance preoperatively, with high pelvic tilt (17.6° ± 7.9°). Of the 32 (71%) patients well balanced before the procedure, 22 (70%) had a large pelvic tilt (>20°), due to retroversion of the pelvis as an adaptive response to the loss of lordosis. Three dural tears (7%) were reported intraoperatively. Interbody cages were more posterior than intended in 27% of the cases. Disc height and lumbar lordosis at fusion level significantly increased postoperatively (p sagittal balance was not significantly modified (p = 0.07). Single-level circumferential fusion helps patients reducing their pelvic compensation, but the amount of correction does not allow for complete correction of sagittal imbalance.

  7. Midbrain stimulation-evoked lumbar spinal activity in the adult decerebrate mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecina, Katinka

    2017-08-15

    Genetic techniques rendering murine models a popular choice for neuroscience research has led to important insights on neural networks controlling locomotor function. Using genetically altered mouse models for in vivo, electrophysiological studies in the adult state could validate key principles of locomotor network organization that have been described in neonatal, in vitro preparations. The experimental model presented here describes a decerebrate, in vivo adult mouse preparation in which focal, electrical midbrain stimulation was combined with monitoring lumbar neural activity and motor output after pre-collicular decerebration and neuromuscular blockade. Lumbar cord dorsum potentials (in 9/10 animals) and motoneuron output (in 3/5 animals) including fictive locomotion, was achieved by focal midbrain stimulation. The stimulation electrode locations could be reconstructed (in 6/7 animals) thereby allowing anatomical identification of the stimulated supraspinal regions. This preparation allows for concomitant recording or stimulation in the spinal cord and in the mid/hindbrain of adult mice. It differs from other methods used in the past with adult mice as it does not require pharmacological manipulation of neural excitability in order to generate motor output. Midbrain stimulation can consistently be used for inducing lumbar neural activity in adult mice under neuromuscular blockade. This model is suited for examination of brain-spinal connectivity and it may benefit a wide range of fields depending on the features of the genetically modified mouse models used in combination with the presented methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dislocation of a primary total hip arthroplasty is more common in patients with a lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, A J; Puvanesarajah, V; Vigdorchik, J; Schwarzkopf, R; Jain, A; Klineberg, E O; Hart, R A; Callaghan, J J; Hassanzadeh, H

    2017-05-01

    Lumbar fusion is known to reduce the variation in pelvic tilt between standing and sitting. A flexible lumbo-pelvic unit increases the stability of total hip arthroplasty (THA) when seated by increasing anterior clearance and acetabular anteversion, thereby preventing impingement of the prosthesis. Lumbar fusion may eliminate this protective pelvic movement. The effect of lumbar fusion on the stability of total hip arthroplasty has not previously been investigated. The Medicare database was searched for patients who had undergone THA and spinal fusion between 2005 and 2012. PearlDiver software was used to query the database by the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedural code for primary THA and lumbar spinal fusion. Patients who had undergone both lumbar fusion and THA were then divided into three groups: 1 to 2 levels, 3 to 7 levels and 8+ levels of fusion. The rate of dislocation in each group was established using ICD-9-CM codes. Patients who underwent THA without spinal fusion were used as a control group. Statistical significant difference between groups was tested using the chi-squared test, and significance set at p dislocation rate in the control group was 1.55%. A higher rate of dislocation was found in patients with a spinal fusion of 1 to 2 levels (2.96%, p dislocation than patients with 1 to 2 levels of fusion (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, p dislocation. Patients with a previous history of lumbar spinal fusion have a significantly higher rate of dislocation of their THA than age- and gender-matched patients without a lumbar spinal fusion. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:585-91. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Improved activation of lumbar multifidus following spinal manipulation: a case report applying rehabilitative ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Alexander K; Gill, Norman W; Buscema, Christopher J; Kiesel, Kyle

    2007-10-01

    Case report. The use of spinal manipulation as a treatment to facilitate neuromuscular control of the paraspinal musculature is not well described in the literature. The use of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) may offer a convenient way to investigate and document possible changes occurring in the lumbar multifidus associated with manipulation intervention. The patient was a 33-year-old male with a 21-year history of low back pain and left posterior thigh pain who presented with lumbar hypomobility and met a previously published clinical prediction rule for spinal manipulation. During examination, the patient was asked to perform a prone upper extremity lifting task to assess activation in the lumbar multifidus during an automatic task. Through palpation the examiner noted a decreased contraction of the left multifidus between L4-S1 compared to the right. To explore this further, a decision was made to assess the multifidus with RUSI, which confirmed the activation deficit noted during palpation. A lumbar regional manipulation was performed with the intention of reducing spinal hypomobility and of assessing changes in multifidus activation. Imaging of the multifidus muscles at the L4-5 and L5-S1 levels were obtained premanipulation, immediately postmanipulation, and 1 day after manipulation. An increased ability to thicken the multifidus during a prone upper extremity lifting task was noted immediately and 1 day after manipulation. Average percent change in thickness at the L4-5 and L5-S1 levels with the prone arm lift was 3.6% premanipulation, 17.2% immediately postmanipulation, and 20.6% approximately 24 hours postmanipulation. Improvements in the thickening of the multifidus muscle during the upper extremity lifting task were greater than 3 standard errors of the measurement. Other changes included immediate palpable improvement in the contraction of the multifidus during the upper extremity lifting task, along with the patient report of increased ease

  10. Rapid recovery and altered neurochemical dependence of locomotor central pattern generation following lumbar neonatal spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Kondratskaya, Elena; Sylte, Camilla B; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-15

    Spinal compression injury targeted to the neonatal upper lumbar spinal cord, the region of highest hindlimb locomotor rhythmogenicity, leads to an initial paralysis of the hindlimbs. Behavioural recovery is evident within a few days and approaches normal function within about 3 weeks. Fictive locomotion in the isolated injured spinal cord cannot be elicited by a neurochemical cocktail containing NMDA, dopamine and serotonin 1 day post-injury, but can 3 days post-injury as readily as in the uninjured spinal cord. Low frequency coordinated rhythmic activity can be elicited in the isolated uninjured spinal cord by NMDA + dopamine (without serotonin), but not in the isolated injured spinal cord. In both the injured and uninjured spinal cord, eliciting bona fide fictive locomotion requires the additional presence of serotonin. Following incomplete compression injury in the thoracic spinal cord of neonatal mice 1 day after birth (P1), we previously reported that virtually normal hindlimb locomotor function is recovered within about 3 weeks despite substantial permanent thoracic tissue loss. Here, we asked whether similar recovery occurs following lumbar injury that impacts more directly on the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). As in thoracic injuries, lumbar injuries caused about 90% neuronal loss at the injury site and increased serotonergic innervation below the injury. Motor recovery was slower after lumbar than thoracic injury, but virtually normal function was attained by P25 in both cases. Locomotor CPG status was tested by eliciting fictive locomotion in isolated spinal cords using a widely used neurochemical cocktail (NMDA, dopamine, serotonin). No fictive locomotion could be elicited 1 day post-injury, but could within 3 days post-injury as readily as in age-matched uninjured control spinal cords. Burst patterning and coordination were largely similar in injured and control spinal cords but there were differences. Notably, in both groups there

  11. The Correlation Between Restoration of Lumbar Lordosis and Surgical Outcome in the Treatment of Low-grade Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Ta; Yang, Stephen S; Chen, Tzu Yung

    2016-02-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To investigate the relationship between the restoration of the lumbar lordosis (LL) and the surgical outcome of patients undergoing spinal fusion for low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Correlation between low back pain and the loss of LL in the treatment of low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis has seldom been reported. Between May 2005 and July 2011, 59 patients with low back pain and neurogenic claudication due to low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent spinal decompression and fusion by a senior surgeon. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. The mean age of the remaining 49 patients (10 men and 39 women) was 64.0 years (range, 47-88 y). Patients were categorized on the basis of the spino-pelvic posture: type 1 [pelvic incidence (PI)60 degrees) (n=13). The LL restoration ratio was calculated by the actual LL divided by the predicted LL. The clinical results were evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the Oswestry Disability Index. Postoperative 36-inch spinal films were used to assess the sagittal balance. The mean follow-up period was 43.2 months (range, 28-62 mo). Forty-eight patients showed significant improvement with respect to visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index regardless of whether the LL was restored higher or lower. Postoperative 36-inch spinal films showed the C7 plumb line to be within an average of 4.4 cm (range, 0.6-5.6 cm) from the posterior-superior corner of the S1 vertebrae. Patients with smaller PI tended to be restored higher, and those patients with a larger PI were more likely to be restored lower. For patients with normal sagittal balance, the surgical outcomes in the treatment of low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal fusion are not correlated with restoration of the LL.

  12. Acute Estrogen Surge Enhances Inflammatory Nociception Without Altering Spinal Fos Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralya, Andrew; McCarson, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a major neurological disorder that can manifest differently between genders or sexes. The complex actions of sex hormones may underlie these differences; previous studies have suggested that elevated estrogen levels can enhance pain perception. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that acute, activational effects of estradiol (E2) increase persistent inflammatory nociception, and anatomically where this modulation occurs. Spinal expression of Fos is widely used as a marker of nociceptive activation. This study used formalin-evoked nociception in ovariectomized (OVX) adult female rats and measured late-phase hindlimb flinching and Fos expression in the spinal cord, and their modification by acute estrogen supplementation similar to a proestrus surge. Six days after ovariectomy, female rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with 10μg/kg E2 or vehicle. Twenty-four hours later, 50 μL of 1.25% or 100 μL of 5% formalin was injected into the right hindpaw; hindlimb flinches were counted, and spinal cords removed two hours after formalin injection. The numbers of Fos-expressing neurons in sections of the lumbar spinal cord were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Formalin-induced inflammation produced a dose-dependent increase in late-phase hindlimb flinching, and E2 pretreatment increased flinching following 5%, but not 1.25% formalin injection. Despite the modification of behavior by E2, the number of spinal Fos-positive neurons was not altered by E2 pretreatment. These findings demonstrate that an acute proestrus-like surge in serum estrogen can produce a stimulus-intensity-dependent increase in inflammation-evoked nociceptive behavior. However, the lack of effect on spinal Fos expression suggests that this enhancement of nociceptive signaling by estrogen is independent of changes in peripheral activation of, expression of the immediate early gene Fos by, or signal throughput of spinal nociceptive neurons. PMID:24861514

  13. Health economic evaluation in lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic literature review anno 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this systematic literature review was to assess the evidence for cost-effectiveness of various surgical techniques in lumbar spinal fusion in conformity with the guidelines provided by the Cochrane Back Review Group. As new technology continuously emerges and divergent directions...... of quality assessment, the methodological quality of three studies was judged credible. Two studies investigated posteolateral fusion (PLF) +/- instrumentation in different populations: one investigated non-specific low back pain and one investigated degenerative stenosis + spondylolisthesis. Both studies...... reflected that cost-effectiveness of instrumentation in PLF is not convincing. The third study concerned the question of circumferential vs anterior lumbar interbody fusion and found a non-significant difference between the techniques. In conclusion, the literature is limited and, in view of the fact...

  14. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  15. The sagittal spinal profile type: a principal precondition for surgical decision making in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerl, Simon Heinrich; Pöhlmann, Florian; Finger, Tobias; Franke, Jörg; Woitzik, Johannes; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Microsurgical decompression (MD) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) shows good clinical results. Nevertheless, 30%-40% of patients do not have a significant benefit after surgery-probably due to different anatomical preconditions. The sagittal profile types (SPTs 1-4) defined by Roussouly based on different spinopelvic parameters have been shown to influence spinal degeneration and surgical results. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the SPT on the clinical outcome in patients with LSS who were treated with MD. METHODS The authors retrospectively investigated 100 patients with LSS who received MD. The patients were subdivided into 4 groups depending on their SPT, which was determined from preoperative lateral spinal radiographs. The authors analyzed pre- and postoperative outcome scales, including the visual analog scale (VAS), walking distance, Oswestry Disability Index, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Odom's criteria, and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey score. RESULTS Patients with SPT 1 showed a significantly worse clinical outcome concerning their postoperative back pain (VASback-SPT 1 = 5.4 ± 2.8; VASback-SPT 2 = 2.6 ± 1.9; VASback-SPT 3 = 2.9 ± 2.6; VASback-SPT 4 = 1.5 ± 2.5) and back pain-related disability. Only 43% were satisfied with their surgical results, compared with 70%-80% in the other groups. CONCLUSIONS A small pelvic incidence with reduced compensation mechanisms, a distinct lordosis in the lower lumbar spine with a high load on dorsal structures, and a long thoracolumbar kyphosis with a high axial load might lead to worse back pain after MD. Therefore, the indication for MD should be provided carefully, fusion can be considered, and other possible reasons for back pain should be thoroughly evaluated and treated.

  16. IPD without bony decompression versus conventional surgical decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: 2-year results of a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Moojen (Wouter); M.P. Arts (Mark); W. Jacobs (Wouter); E.W. van Zwet (Erik); E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske); B.W. Koes (Bart); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Interspinous process devices (IPDs) are implanted to treat patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC) based on lumbar spinal stenosis. It is hypothesized that patients with lumbar spinal stenosis treated with IPD have a faster short-term recovery, an equal outcome

  17. High failure rate of the interspinous distraction device (X-Stop) for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis caused by degenerative spondylolisthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoof, O.J.W.; Bron, J.L.; Wapstra, F.H.; van Royen, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    The X-Stop interspinous distraction device has shown to be an attractive alternative to conventional surgical procedures in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. However, the effectiveness of the X-Stop in symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis caused by

  18. [Effects of ablation of the hindlimb on the organization of the ventral horn of the spinal cord in the lumbar region of green lizard embryos (Lacerta viridis Laur.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, A; Clairambault, P

    1978-01-01

    After extirpation of an hind limb in embryos of Lacerta viridis, numerous motor neuroblasts degenerate on the operated side, in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord and the corresponding motor column is reduced or disappears. The lumbar spinal ganglia are affected and reduced on the operated side.

  19. The effect of decompressive surgery on lumbar paraspinal and biceps brachii muscle function and movement perception in lumbar spinal stenosis: a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kääriäinen, Tommi; Taimela, Simo; Aalto, Timo; Kröger, Heikki; Herno, Arto; Turunen, Veli; Savolainen, Sakari; Kankaanpää, Markku; Airaksinen, Olavi; Leinonen, Ville

    2016-03-01

    Chronic low back pain and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) seem to deteriorate lumbar muscle function and proprioception but the effect of surgery on them remains unclear. This study evaluates the effect of decompressive surgery on lumbar movement perception and paraspinal and biceps brachii (BB) muscle responses during sudden upper limb loading in LSS. Low back and radicular pain intensity (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were measured together with lumbar proprioception and paraspinal and BB muscle responses prior to and 3 and 24 months after surgery in 30 LSS patients. Lumbar proprioception was assessed by a previously validated motorized trunk rotation unit and muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading by surface EMG. Lumbar perception threshold improved after surgery during 3-month follow-up (from 4.6° to 3.1°, P = 0.015) but tend to deteriorate again during 24 months (4.0°, P = 0.227). Preparatory paraspinal and BB muscle responses prior to sudden load as well as paraspinal muscle activation latencies after the load remained unchanged. Impaired lumbar proprioception seems to improve shortly after decompressive surgery but tends to deteriorate again with longer follow-up despite the sustaining favorable clinical outcome. The surgery did not affect either the feed-forward or the feed-back muscle function, which indicates that the abnormal muscle activity in LSS is at least partly irreversible.

  20. Complications and Mortality After Lumbar Spinal Fusion in Elderly Patients With Late Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Hess, Daniel E; Shimer, Adam L; Shen, Francis H; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2016-11-01

    Retrospective database review. To assess complication and mortality rates after lumbar spinal fusion surgery in patients with late stage renal disease. Lumbar spinal fusion surgeries are common in elderly patients who are well-known to have increased comorbidity burden. Elderly patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a population with poorly understood mortality and complication rates after spine surgery. Medicare data from the PearlDiver Database (2005-2012) was queried for patients who underwent primary 1-2 level posterolateral lumbar spine fusion surgeries. This cohort was divided into two study groups: a cohort with a preexisting diagnosis of late stage renal disease (N = 1654) and a control cohort of all other patients (N = 242,085). The control group was matched to the renal disease cohort by age, sex, and comorbidities. Moreover, 90-day complication rates and 90-day and 1-year mortality were assessed. The renal disease cohort had increased rates of all medical complications (21.3 vs. 14.2%; odds ratio, OR, 1.64; 95% confidence intervals, CI, 1.44 -1.85; P renal disease cohort. Both 90-day (1.1 vs. 0.2%; OR 5.05; 95% CI 2.90-8.77; P renal disease group compared with the control group. Elderly patients with late-stage renal disease treated with 1-2 level posterolateral lumbar fusion have 1.6 times increased odds of experiencing a major medical complication within 3 months of surgery and 2.8 times increased odds of 1-year mortality when compared with matched controls. 3.

  1. Interspinous Process Decompression: Expanding Treatment Options for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce D. Nunley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interspinous process decompression is a minimally invasive implantation procedure employing a stand-alone interspinous spacer that functions as an extension blocker to prevent compression of neural elements without direct surgical removal of tissue adjacent to the nerves. The Superion® spacer is the only FDA approved stand-alone device available in the US. It is also the only spacer approved by the CMS to be implanted in an ambulatory surgery center. We computed the within-group effect sizes from the Superion IDE trial and compared them to results extrapolated from two randomized trials of decompressive laminectomy. For the ODI, effect sizes were all very large (>1.0 for Superion and laminectomy at 2, 3, and 4 years. For ZCQ, the 2-year Superion symptom severity (1.26 and physical function (1.29 domains were very large; laminectomy effect sizes were very large (1.07 for symptom severity and large for physical function (0.80. Current projections indicate a marked increase in the number of patients with spinal stenosis. Consequently, there remains a keen interest in minimally invasive treatment options that delay or obviate the need for invasive surgical procedures, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. Stand-alone interspinous spacers may fill a currently unmet treatment gap in the continuum of care and help to reduce the burden of this chronic degenerative condition on the health care system.

  2. In the quest for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis etiology: the Schmorl's nodes model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Janan; Slon, Viviane; Stein, Dan; Peled, Natan; Hershkovitz, Israel; Hamoud, Kamal

    2017-04-20

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) is a common health problem in the elderly and usually associated with three-joint complex degeneration. Schmorl's nodes (SNs) are described as vertical herniation of the disc into the vertebral body through a weakened part of the end plate that can lead to disc degeneration. Since SNs can harm the spine unit stability, the association between DLSS and SNs is expected. The aim of this study is to shed light on the relationship between degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and SNs. Two groups of individuals were studied: the first included 165 individuals with DLSS (age range: 40-88, sex ratio: 80 M/85 F) and the second 180 individuals without spinal stenosis related symptoms (age range: 40-99, sex ratio: 90 M/90 F). The presence or absence of SNs on the cranial and caudal end plate surfaces at the lumbosacral region (from L1 to S1 vertebra) was recorded, using CT images (Brilliance 64 Philips Medical System, Cleveland Ohio, thickness of the sections was 1-3 mm and MAS, 80-250). Chi-Square test was taken to compare the prevalence of SNs between the study groups (control and stenosis) by lumbar disc level, for each gender separately. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was also used to determine the association between DLSS and SNs. The prevalence rate of SNs was significantly greater in the stenosis males (L1-2 to L5-S1) and females (L4-5 and L4-S1) compared to their counterparts in the control (P < 0.001). In addition, the presence of SNs in both males and females was found to increase the likelihood for DLSS. Our results indicate that SNs prevalence is significantly greater in the DLSS group compared to the control. Furthermore, SNs are strongly associated with DLSS.

  3. QUANTITATIVE SIZE ASSESSMENT OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL BY COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Midia Z. Miabi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available By determining normal ranges of spinal canal diameters we can make early diagnosis in persons who have lower diameters of spinal canal. These persons are predisposed to spinal canal stenosis that is a major cause of spinal radiculopathies. In different studies performed in several countries, minimum and maximum ranges of spinal canal diameters were different for each population. In this study, we tried to determine the mean values of normal spinal canal diameters and areas in Tabriz and its suburb. 39 healthy, young to mid-age cases were selected. Our study was focused on L3-L4 and L4-L5. The following parameters were measured: the area of cross-section of the vertebral body, the area of cross-section of the dural sac, interarticular diameter, interligamentous diameter, antero-posterior diameter of the lumbar canal, inter-pedicular diameter, and the area of cross-section of the vertebral canal. A correlation between the parameters studied and the height of subjects was significant for interligamentous diameter (for L3/L4 and L4/L5 and interarticular diameter (only at L3/L4, cross-section area of the vertebrae (both L3 and L4, cross-section area of vertebral canal (only at L5 level, area of dural sac (at L3/L4 and L4. It was suggested that these diameters and areas should be interpreted as a unction of height of the subject. Most of diameters studied had smaller means than those in previous studies. This can be attributed to differences between populations and it can be interpreted as predisposition to spinal canal stenosis in our population.

  4. Comparison of Dynesys posterior stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion for spinal stenosis L4L5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shang-Won; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Ma, Ching-Hou; Wu, Chin-Hsien; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized study was to compare the radiological and clinical outcome after treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis L4L5 with or without spondylolisthesis, with either posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) (26 patients) or Dynesys posterior stabilization (27 patients). Demographic characteristics were comparable in both groups. Dynesys stabilization resulted in significantly higher preservation of motion at the index level (p Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and VAS for back and leg pain improved significantly (p spondylolisthesis.

  5. Chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Barquero, A.; Pinto, J.I. [Univ. Hospital ' ' Marques de Valdecilla' ' , Santander (Spain). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Abascal, F.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Cerezal, L. [Hospital Mompia, Cantabria, (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Figols, F.J. [Univ. Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain). Dept. of Pathology

    2000-10-01

    An uncommon case of chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine in a 75-year-old woman is reported. The patient presented with a 7-month history of low back pain and bilateral sciatica. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled a correct preoperative diagnosis revealing a nodular, well-circumscribed epidural mass with peripheral enhancement and signal intensities consistent with chronic hematoma, which extended from L2 to L3. Laminectomy of L2-L3 was performed and the hematoma was totally resected. Histological examination of the surgical specimen demonstrated a chronic encapsulated hematoma. No evidence of vascular malformation was found. The patient recovered fully after surgical treatment. (orig.)

  6. Associations of self-report measures with gait, range of motion and proprioception in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bryan P; Shokat, Maximilian S; Abbasi, Abdullah Z; Vincent, Heather K; Seay, Amanda; Kennedy, David J

    2013-09-01

    Spinal stenosis is defined as neurogenic claudication due to narrowing of the spinal canal lumen diameter. As the disease progresses, ambulation and gait may be impaired. Self-report measures are routinely used in the clinical setting to capture data related to lumbar pain symptoms, function and perceived disability. The associations between self-report measures and objective measures of physical function in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis are not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between self-reported assessments of function with objective biomechanical measures of function. 25 subjects were enrolled in this study. Subjects completed self-report questionnaires and biomechanical assessments of gait analysis, lumbar 3D ROM and lumbar proprioception. Correlations were determined between self-report measures and biomechanical data. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was strongly correlated with stride length and gait velocity and weakly correlated with base of support. ODI was also weakly correlated with left lateral bending proprioception but not right lateral bending. The SF12 was not significantly correlated with any of the biomechanical measurements. Pain scores were weakly correlated with velocity, and base of support, and had no correlation any of the other biomechanical measures. There is a strong correlation between gait parameters and functional disability as measured with the ODI. Quantified gait analysis can be a useful tool to evaluate patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and to assess the outcomes of treatments on this group of patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress myelography. A new functional examination for diseases of the lumbar spinal canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, M.

    1986-12-01

    To optimize functional diagnostics in lumbar syndromes a new myelographic technique was developed termed 'loading myelography'. During the procedure the patient stands with a 10 kg weight on his out-stretched arms. Based on the law of leverage the load exercised on the vertebral column is more than two and a half times of one-half of the body weight. The author tested the efficacy of the method in 119 patients suffering from disc prolapse, spinal canal stenosis, spondylolisthesis or arachnitis. The results of the conventional myelogram compared with myelography under load conditions demonstrate the value of the method: without load the diagnosis would have remained uncertain in 25% and in 18% load myelogram revealed a pathological finding although conventional myelography was normal. We consider as indications for load myelography: Discrepancy between clinical and conventional myelographic findings; clinically expected multisegmental lesions; spinal canal stenosis; and spondylolisthesis.

  8. [Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, I; Isu, T; Iwasaki, Y; Akino, M; Abe, H; Tashiro, K; Miyasaka, K; Abe, S; Kaneda, K

    1988-10-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Conventional Supine MRI With a Lumbar Pillow-An Alternative to Weight-bearing MRI for Diagnosing Spinal Stenosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt; Hansen, Philip; Grindsted, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate if adding a lumbar pillow in supine position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to standing positional MRI for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The upright standing position...... and especially extension of the lumbar spine seem to worsening symptoms of LSS. However, it is unclear whether a forced lumbar extension by a pillow in the lower back during conventional supine MRI may improve the diagnostics of LSS compared with standing MRI. METHODS: Patients suspected for LSS and referred...... to conventional MRI were included to an additional positional MRI scan (0.25T G-Scan) performed in: (1) conventional supine, (2) standing, (3) supine with a lumbar pillow in the lower back. LSS was evaluated for each position in consensus on a 0 to 3 semi-quantitative grading scale. Independently, L2-S1 lordosis...

  10. Post-surgical functional recovery, lumbar lordosis, and range of motion associated with MR-detectable redundant nerve roots in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinshui; Wang, Juying; Wang, Benhai; Xu, Hao; Lin, Songqing; Zhang, Huihao

    2016-01-01

    T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) can reveal lumbar redundant nerve roots (RNRs), a result of chronic compression and nerve elongation associated with pathogenesis of cauda equina claudication (CEC) in degenerative lumbar canal stenosis (DLCS). The study investigated effects of lumbar lordosis angle and range of motion on functional recovery in lumbar stenosis patents with and without RNRs. A retrospective study was conducted of 93 lumbar spinal stenosis patients who underwent decompressive surgery. Eligible records were assessed by 3 independent blinded radiologists for presence or absence of RNRs on sagittal T2-weighted MR (RNR and non-RNR groups), pre- and post-operative JOA score, lumbar lordosis angle, and range of motion. Of 93 total patients, the RNR group (n=37, 21/37 female) and non-RNR group (n=56; 31/56 female) had similar preoperative conditions (JOA score) and were not significantly different in age (mean 64.19 ± 8.25 vs. 62.8 ± 9.41 years), symptom duration (30.92 ± 22.43 vs. 28.64 ± 17.40 months), or follow-up periods (17.35 ± 4.02 vs. 17.75 ± 4.29 mo) (all p>0.4). The non-RNR group exhibited significantly better final JOA score (p=0.015) and recovery rate (p=0.002). RNR group patients exhibited larger lumbar lordosis angles in the neutral position (p=0.009) and extension (p=0.021) and larger range of motion (p=0.008). Poorer surgical outcomes in patients with RNRs indicated that elevated lumbar lordosis angle and range of motion increased risks of RNR formation, which in turn may cause poorer post-surgical recovery, this information is possibly useful in prognostic assessment of lumbar stenosis complicated by RNRs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Health-related quality of life of patients following selected types of lumbar spinal surgery: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Androwich Ida

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over 500,000 spinal surgeries are performed annually in the United States. Although pain relief and improved health-related quality of life (HRQOL are expectations following lumbar spinal surgery, there is limited research regarding this experience from the individual's perspective. In addition, no studies have examined the HRQOL of persons who have had this surgery using a comprehensive approach. The intent of this study was to address this deficiency by an assessment of both the individual and environmental factors that impact perceived HRQOL using the Wilson and Cleary Model for Health-Related Quality of Life in persons who have undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Methods This was a pilot study of 57 adult patients undergoing elective lumbar spinal surgery for either herniated disk and/or degenerative changes. Individuals completed questionnaires measuring perceived pain, mood, functional status, general health perceptions, social support and HRQOL preoperatively and three months following surgery. Descriptive statistics, dependent t-tests, and MANOVAs were used to describe and compare the differences of the study variables over time. Results Preliminary results indicate overall perceived physical HRQOL was significantly improved postoperatively (t [56] = 6.45, p Conclusion Although perceived physical HRQOL was significantly improved three months postoperatively, fatigue and lack of vigor were issues for subjects postoperatively. Excessive fatigue and low vigor may have implications for successful rehabilitation and return to work for patients following lumbar spinal surgery. Further research is needed with a larger sample size and subgroup analyses to confirm these results.

  12. Spinal Surgeons' Opinions on Pre- and Postoperative Rehabilitation in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Survey-Based Study in the Netherlands and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erp, Reni M A; Jelsma, Jetse; Huijnen, Ivan P J; Lundberg, Mari; Willems, Paul C; Smeets, Rob J E M

    2017-09-06

    A cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands and Sweden. To investigate Dutch and Swedish spinal surgeons' opinions on spinal fusion pre- and postoperative rehabilitation. Lumbar spinal fusion surgery is increasingly provided in patients with chronic low back pain. No guidelines however exist for pre- and postoperative rehabilitation and it is unknown what opinions spinal surgeons currently have about pre- and postoperative rehabilitation. A survey was circulated to Dutch and Swedish spinal surgeons. Reminders were sent after 4 and 8/9 weeks. Data of completed questionnaires of orthopedic- and neurosurgeons currently performing lumbar spinal fusion were included for analysis. Analysis comprised a range of descriptive summaries (numerical, graphical, and tabular). Surveys of 34 Dutch and 48 Swedish surgeons were analyzed. Surgeons provided preoperative information on postoperative mobilization. Spinal fusion techniques varied, but technique did not influence postoperative treatment. Swedish surgeons recommended slightly faster mobilization than Dutch (direct vs. 1-day postoperative), and more activities the first day (sitting, standing, walking). Stair climbing was the most reported discharge criterion; however, time point to start varied. More Swedish surgeons referred to postoperative physiotherapy than Dutch (88% vs. 44%). Time-point to start home activities varied from 1 week to >6 months. Pain increase was allowed for fusion rehabilitation in two European countries, especially in postoperative phase. The study proposes many new research topics and acts as starting point for future research valuable for the spinal community. 3.

  13. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system: an in-vitro mechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H; Veldhuizen, Albert G

    2013-09-18

    Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices (for example: DePuy Spines Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System). The Memory Metal Spinal System of this study consists of a single square spinal rod made of a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connecting transverse bridges and pedicle screws made of Ti-alloy. Nitinol is best known for its shape memory effect, but is also characterized by its higher flexibility when compared to either stainless steel or titanium. A higher fusion rate with less degeneration of adjacent segments may result because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. In addition, the use of a single, unilateral rod may be of great value for a TLIF procedure. Our objective is to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new Memory Metal Spinal System compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. An in-vitro mechanical evaluation of the lumbar Memory Metal Spinal System was conducted. The test protocol followed ASTM Standard F1717-96, "Standard Test Methods for Static and Fatigue for Spinal Implant Constructs in a Corpectomy Model." 1. Static axial testing in a load to failure mode in compression bending, 2. Static testing in a load to failure mode in torsion, 3. Cyclical testing to estimate the maximum run out load value at 5.0 x 10^6 cycles. In the biomechanical testing for static axial compression bending there was no statistical difference between the 2% yield strength and the stiffness of the two types of spinal constructs. In axial compression bending fatigue testing, the Memory Metal Spinal System construct showed a 50% increase in fatigue life compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. In static torsional testing the Memory Metal Spinal System constructs showed an

  14. Assessment of spinal movement reduction by thoraco-lumbar-sacral orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, P J; Bos, R P; Derksen, J C; de Vries, J

    2000-01-01

    Bracing is a common modality in treating spinal fractures. Its objective is to reduce spinal movements and to stabilize the fracture. Until now, factual insight into the movement-reducing properties of Thoraco-Lumbar-Sacral Orthoses (TLSOs) has been missing. Two common TLSOs (e.g., Jewett and Voigt-Bähler) were tested for their movement-reducing properties in two small groups of healthy subjects. In the first study, maximal gross spinal movements, with and without a TLSO, were measured by means of a Portable Posture Registration Set (PPRS) in three different planes. In the second study, maximal segmental vertebral movements in the regions T10 to L4 were measured via X-rays. With few notable exceptions, wearing a TLSO, as measured by the PPRS and X-ray techniques, significantly reduced the segmental as well as gross spinal movements. However, the amount of movement reduction varied greatly from subject-to-subject and was sometimes small. Unfortunately, data are lacking on the amount of movement reduction that is clinically relevant.

  15. Anterior spinal fusion versus posterior spinal fusion for moderate lumbar/thoracolumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yipeng; Fei, Qi; Qiu, Guixing; Lee, Chia I; Shen, Jianxiong; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Hai; Yuan, Suomao

    2008-09-15

    A prospective study. Comparison study of radiologic and clinical outcomes, efficiency, and cost between anterior spinal fusion (ASF) and posterior spine fusion (PSF) in surgical treatment of moderate lumbar/thoracolumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). ASF and PSF indicated for lumbar and thoracolumbar adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgical treatment have respective advantages and disadvantages. However, up until today, a related prospective AIS comparative study has rarely been reported. Thirty-two cases in this prospective study with patients enrolled in either method A or B alternately in a sequence were divided into 2 groups. Group A underwent ASF with single solid rod and single screw constructs, and group B underwent PSF with segmental total pedicle screw system. Inclusion criteria were: (1) AIS diagnosis; (2) diagnosis classification as Lenke5CN type; (3) Cobb angles 35 degrees-60 degrees on anteroposterior view radiographs. Exclusion criteria were: (1) a history of spinal surgery; (2) age younger than 10 years; (3) Risser sign 0 degree; (4) lumbar/thoracolumbar kyphosis. All patients were observed with 2-year minimum follow-up (24-46 months). Clinical and radiologic outcomes of both groups A and B were analyzed. Statistical t test or Mann-Whitney U test demonstrated no significant difference in preoperative age (P = 0.380), Risser sign (P = 0.733), magnitude (P = 0.936), flexibility (P = 0.815), apical vertebra rotation (AVR, P = 0.756), and apical vertebra translation (AVT, P = 0.355) of the lumbar/thoracolumbar curves, trunk shift (TS, P = 0.448), sagittal kyphosis from T5-T12 (P = 0.792) and sagittal lordosis from L1-L5 (P = 0.299). Average coronal correction of thoracolumbar/lumbar curves was 83% after surgery and 77% at follow-up in group A and 87% after surgery and 82% at follow-up in group B (P = 0.236 and P = 0.138). No significant differences were observed regarding correction of sagittal alignment, TS, AVT, AVR and hospitalization days on

  16. Comparison of modic changes in the lumbar and cervical spine, in 3167 patients with and without spinal pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sheng-yun

    Full Text Available There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine.Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis.Retrospective clinical survey.Magnetic resonance images (MRIs were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy only; 2. 1023 patients with neck pain/radiculopathy only; 3. 497 patients with concurrent low-back and neck symptoms; 4. 304 asymptomatic subjects with lumbar MRIs; and 5. 120 asymptomatic subjects with cervical MRIs.The prevalence of MCs was higher in those with spinal pain than in those without, both in the lumbar spine (21.0% vs 10.5% and cervical spine (8.8% vs 3.3%. Type II MCs were most common and Type III were least common in all groups. The prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was little affected by the presence of concurrent neck pain, and the same was true for the prevalence of cervical MCs in people with neck pain with or without concurrent back pain. When symptomatic patients were reclassified into two groups (back pain, neck pain, the prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was greater than that of cervical MCs in people with neck pain. The prevalence of lumbar and cervical MCs increased with age, disc degeneration, (descending spinal level, and increased kyphosis.There is a significantly higher prevalence of MCs in patients with back and neck pain. The reported association with increased kyphosis (flat back is novel.

  17. Surgical treatment for lumbar hyperlordosis after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuya; Yonezawa, Ikuho; Onda, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kei; Takano, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yukitoshi; Okuda, Takatoshi; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    A hyperlordosis deformity of the lumbar spine is relatively rare, and surgical treatment has not been comprehensively addressed. In this case report, we describe the clinical presentation, surgical treatment, and medium-term follow-up of a patient presenting with a progressive lumbar hyperlordosis deformity after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida. The patient was a 20-year-old woman presenting with a progressive hyperlordosis deformity of the lumbar spine associated with significant back pain (visual analog pain score of 89/100 mm), but with no neurological symptoms. The lumbar lordosis (LL), measured on standing lateral view radiographs, was 114°, with a sagittal vertical axis (SVA) of -100 mm. The patient had undergone excision of a lipoma, associated with spina bifida of the lumbar spine, at 7 months of age.She was first evaluated at our hospital at 18 years of age for progressive spinal deformity and lumbago. An in situ fusion, from T5 to S1, using pedicle screws with bone graft obtained from the iliac crest, was performed. Postoperatively, the LL decreased to 93°, and the SVA decreased to -50 mm. The decision to not correct the hyperlordosis deformity fully was intentional. Seven years and 1 month postsurgery, the patient had no limitations in standing and walking and reported a pain score of 8/100 mm; there was no evidence of a loss of correction. Lumbar hyperlordosis after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida is rare. Posterior fixation provided an effective treatment in this case. As the lumbar hyperlordosis deformity is often high, correction can be difficult. In this case, although the correction and fusion were performed in situ, there was no progression of either the deformity or the lumbago. Early detection remains an essential component of effective treatment, allowing correction when the spinal deformity is easily reversible.

  18. Axial loading of the spine during CT and MR in patients with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Danielson, B.I.; Gaulitz, A.; Niklason, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Moelndal (Sweden); Willen, J. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Moelndal (Sweden); Hansson, T.H. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1998-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of compressive axial loading in imaging of the lumbar spine in patients with clinically suspected spinal stenosis. Material and Methods: A total of 84 patients were examined, 50 with CT (after intrathecal contrast administration) and 34 with MR. First the dural sac cross-sectional area (CSA) was determined with the patient in the supine psoas relaxed position (PRP). Then the CSA was determined during supine axial compression in slight extension (ACE), obtained with a specially designed loading device. A measurement error study was performed. Results: A minimum difference in CSA of 15 mm{sup 2} between PRP and ACE was found to be significant. In 40/50 (80%) of CT-examined patients and in 26/34 (76%) of MR-examined patients a significant difference in CSA was found. In 25/84 (30%) of the patients there was a significant difference at more than one level. Conclusion: For an adequate evaluation of the CSA, CT or MR studies should be performed with axial loading in patients who have symptoms of lumbar spinal stenosis. (orig.)

  19. Abducens nerve palsy after lumbar spinal fusion surgery with inadvertent dural tearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dae-Chul; Jung, Eul-Soo; Chi, Yong-Chul

    2009-12-01

    Abducens nerve palsy associated with spinal surgery is extremely rare. We report an extremely rare case of abducens nerve palsy after lumbar spinal fusion surgery with inadvertent dural tearing, which resolved spontaneously and completely. A 61-year-old previous healthy man presented with chronic lower back pain of 6 weeks duration and 2 weeks history of bilateral leg pain. He was diagnosed as having isthmic spondylolisthesis at L4-5 and L5-S1, and posterior lumbar interbody fusion was conducted on L4-5 and L5-S1. During the operation, inadvertent dural tearing occurred, which was repaired with a watertight dural closure. The patient recovered uneventfully from general anesthesia and his visual analogue pain scores decreased from 9 pre-op to 3 immediately after his operation. However, on day 2 he developed headache and nausea, which were severe when he was upright, but alleviated when supine. This led us to consider the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and thus, he was restricted to bed. After an interval of bed rest, the severe headache disappeared, but four days after surgery he experienced diplopia during right gaze, which was caused by right-side palsy of the abducens nerve. Under conservative treatment, the diplopia gradually disappeared and was completely resolved at 5 weeks post-op.

  20. Optimal imaging parameters to visualize lumbar spinal nerve roots in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamato, Hidetada; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Funata, Tomonari; Nitta, Masaru; Nakazawa, Yasuo [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2001-05-01

    Radiculopathy due to lumber spine disorders is diagnosed mainly by radiculography. Recent advances in MRI have enabled non-invasive visualization of the lumbar nerve roots. Fifty normal volunteers were evaluated for optimal imaging angle to visualize the lumbar nerve roots and optimal imaging sequences. Results showed that in the coronal oblique plane, angles that visualized the nerve roots best were L4 17, L5 29.6, and S1 36.8. In the left sagittal oblique plane, the angles were L4 17.9, L5 21.4, and S1 12.6, and in the right sagittal oblique plane, L4 16.3, L5 19.4 and S1 12.6. SPGR showed the best results both in CNR values and visually. In summary, the optimal angle by which to visualize the lumbar spinal nerve roots increased as the roots became more caudal, except for S1 of the sagittal oblique plane, where individual variations were pronounced. SPGR was the best sequence for visualizing the nerve roots. (author)

  1. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

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    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  2. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  3. Sparing of Descending Axons Rescues Interneuron Plasticity in the Lumbar Cord to Allow Adaptive Learning After Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher N; Faw, Timothy D; White, Susan; Buford, John A; Grau, James W; Basso, D Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX). This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI). To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm (ILP). In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days) or late (42 days) after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7 days, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between spared

  4. Epidural Injections for Lumbar Radiculopathy and Spinal Stenosis: A Comparative Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Boswell, Mark V; Kaye, Alan D; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic low back pain and related disability is rapidly increasing as are the myriad treatments, including epidural injections. Even though epidural injections are one of the most commonly performed procedures in managing low back and lower extremity pain, starting in 1901 with local anesthetic alone, conflicting recommendations have been provided, despite the extensive literature. Recently Chou et al performed a technology assessment review for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) part of which was published in Annals of Internal Medicine showing lack of effectiveness of epidural steroid injections in managing lumbar radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. In contrast, multiple other publications have supported the efficacy and use of epidural injections. To assess the efficacy of 3 categories of epidural injections for lumbar and spinal stenosis: performed with saline with steroids, local anesthetic alone, or steroids with local anesthetic and separate facts from opinions. PubMed, Cochrane Library, US National Guideline Clearinghouse, prior systematic reviews, and reference lists. The literature search was performed through August 2015. Randomized trials, either placebo or active control, of epidural injections for lumbar radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. Data extraction and methodological quality assessment were performed utilizing Cochrane review methodologic quality assessment and Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment (IPM-QRB). Evidence was summarized utilizing principles of best evidence synthesis. Thirty-nine randomized controlled trials met inclusion criteria. There were 9 placebo-controlled trials evaluating epidural corticosteroid injections, either with sodium chloride solution or bupivacaine, compared to placebo injections. There were 12 studies comparing local anesthetic alone to local anesthetic with steroid. A meta-analysis of 5 studies utilizing sodium

  5. Lumbar subcutaneous edema and degenerative spinal disease in patients with low back pain: a retrospective MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, C C; Giona, A; Di Martino, A; Gaudino, F; Mallio, C A; Errante, Y; Occhicone, F; Vitali, M A; Zobel, B B; Denaro, V

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the association between LSE, spondylolisthesis, facet arthropathy, lumbar canal stenosis, BMI, radiculopathy and bone marrow edema at conventional lumbar spine MR imaging. This is a retrospective radiological study; 441 consecutive patients with low back pain (224 men and 217 women; mean age 57.3 years; mean BMI 26) underwent conventional lumbar MRI using a 1.5-T magnet (Avanto, Siemens). Lumbar MR images were reviewed by consensus for the presence of LSE, spondylolisthesis, facet arthropathy, lumbar canal stenosis, radiculopathy and bone marrow edema. Descriptive statistics and association studies were conducted using STATA software 11.0. Association studies have been performed using linear univariate regression analysis and multivariate regression analysis, considering LSE as response variable. The overall prevalence of LSE was 40%; spondylolisthesis (p = 0.01), facet arthropathy (p lumbar canal stenosis (p radiculopathy and age were not. LSE is highly associated with spondylolisthesis, facet arthropathy and BMI, suggesting underestimation of its clinical impact as an integral component in chronic lumbar back pain. Longitudinal simultaneous X-ray/MRI studies should be conducted to test the relationship of LSE with lumbar spinal instability and low back pain.

  6. The predictive value of pain drawings in lumbar spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Høy, Kristian W; Helmig, Peter; Niedermann, Bent; Hansen, Ebbe S; Bünger, Cody

    2010-05-01

    Pain drawings have been used extensively in spine surgery. It has been associated with inferior outcome after disc and stenosis surgery. Results regarding the predictive value in fusion surgery have been conflicting. To evaluate the predictive value of pain drawings in relation to outcome after lumbar spinal fusion. To investigate if there are differences between spondylolisthesis patients and patients with degenerative disease as well as between patients with or without radicular pain. Prospective clinical cohort with a minimum of 1-year follow-up. One hundred thirty-five patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion. Fifty-seven men and 78 women, mean age 44 years (range 21-59 years). Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), Low Back Pain Rating Scale (LBPRS) pain index and patient satisfaction. Minimal clinical important difference was defined for the LBPRS score. Pain drawings were classified, using the visual inspection method, as organic or nonorganic and correlated to outcomes. Multivariate adjustment for several possible confounding variables was done using logistic regression analysis. Thirty-three percent of the drawings were classified as nonorganic. Nonorganic drawings were associated with significantly higher DPQ and LBPRS scores preoperatively and at follow-up. Differences between organic and nonorganic drawings were larger in spondylolisthesis patients than in patients with degenerative disorders. Nonorganic pain drawings were associated with poorer outcome in patients with low back pain and radicular symptoms, however, not in patients without radicular symptoms. A nonorganic pain drawing predicted negative patient satisfaction with odds ratio (OR) 3.01 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14-8.55, p=.027) but had no significant predictive value with respect to improvement in the LBPRS pain index OR 1.92 (95% CI: 0.82-4.47, p=.132). A nonorganic pain drawing was a significant risk factor for inferior outcome after spinal fusion surgery. The predictive value did not

  7. Intrathecal transplantation of stem cells by lumbar puncture for thoracic spinal cord injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothe, A J; Bozkurt, G; Catapano, J; Zabojova, J; Wang, X; Keating, A; Tator, C H

    2011-09-01

    Experimental investigation of intrathecal transplantation of stem cells by lumbar puncture (LP) in a rat model that simulates human thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI). To examine the distribution and phenotype of spinal cord-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) following LP transplantation in SCI rats. Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. NSPCs or BMSCs were transplanted via LP at level L3-5 1 week after compression SCI at T8. Rats were killed at 3, 17 and 27 days after LP transplantation and the relative distribution of cells at C4, T8 and L3-5 was quantitated. The phenotype of the NSPC and BMSC was assessed with immunocytochemistry in vitro and following LP transplantation. By 4 weeks, more NSPC migrated to the lesion site relative to BMSC and uninjured animals. However, there was no preferential homing of either of these types of cells into the parenchyma of the injury site, and most of the transplanted cells remained in the intrathecal space. In vitro, spinal cord-derived NSPC proliferated and expressed nestin, but after LP transplantation, NSPC became post-mitotic and primarily expressed oligodendrocyte markers. In contrast, BMSC did not express any neural antigens in vivo. LP is a minimally invasive method of cell transplantation that produces wide dissemination of cells in the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord. This is the first study to report and quantify the phenotype and spatial distribution of LP transplanted NSPC and BMSC in the intact and injured spinal cord.

  8. Lumbar Muscle Cross-Sectional Areas Do Not Predict Clinical Outcomes in Adults With Spinal Stenosis: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Suri, Pradeep; Rundell, Sean D; Olafsen, Nathan; Carlson, M Jake; Johnson, Steve; Fry, Adrielle; Annaswamy, Thiru M; Gilligan, Christopher; Comstock, Bryan; Heagerty, Patrick; Friedly, Janna; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2017-06-01

    Minimal longitudinal data exist regarding the role of lumbar musculature in predicting back pain and function. In cross-sectional study designs, there is often atrophy of the segmental multifidus muscle in subjects with low back pain compared with matched controls. However, the cross-sectional design of these studies prevents drawing conclusions regarding whether lumbar muscle characteristics predict or modify future back pain or function. The primary objective of this study is to determine whether the cross-sectional area (CSA) of lumbar muscles predict functional status or back pain at 6- or 12-month follow-up in older adults with spinal degeneration. The secondary objective is to evaluate whether these muscle characteristics improve outcome prediction above and beyond the prognostic information conferred by demographic and psychosocial variables. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. A total of 209 adults aged 50 years and older with clinical and radiographic spinal stenosis from the Lumbar Epidural steroid injection for Spinal Stenosis (LESS) trial. Using baseline magnetic resonance images, we calculated CSAs of the lumbar multifidus, psoas, and quadratus lumborum muscles using a standardized protocol by manually tracing the borders of each of the muscles. The relationship between lumbar muscle CSAs and baseline measures was assessed with Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficients. The relationship between lumbar muscle characteristics and 6- and 12-month Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and back pain Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) responses was further evaluated with multivariate linear regression. A hierarchical approach to the regression was performed: a basic model with factors of conceptual importance including age, gender, BMI, and baseline RDQ score formed the first step. The second and third steps evaluated whether psychosocial variables or muscle measures conferred additional prognostic information to the basic model. Function

  9. Increased multiaxial lumbar motion responses during multiple-impulse mechanical force manually assisted spinal manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzburg Robert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulation has been found to create demonstrable segmental and intersegmental spinal motions thought to be biomechanically related to its mechanisms. In the case of impulsive-type instrument device comparisons, significant differences in the force-time characteristics and concomitant motion responses of spinal manipulative instruments have been reported, but studies investigating the response to multiple thrusts (multiple impulse trains have not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine multi-axial segmental and intersegmental motion responses of ovine lumbar vertebrae to single impulse and multiple impulse spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs. Methods Fifteen adolescent Merino sheep were examined. Tri-axial accelerometers were attached to intraosseous pins rigidly fixed to the L1 and L2 lumbar spinous processes under fluoroscopic guidance while the animals were anesthetized. A hand-held electromechanical chiropractic adjusting instrument (Impulse was used to apply single and repeated force impulses (13 total over a 2.5 second time interval at three different force settings (low, medium, and high along the posteroanterior axis of the T12 spinous process. Axial (AX, posteroanterior (PA, and medial-lateral (ML acceleration responses in adjacent segments (L1, L2 were recorded at a rate of 5000 samples per second. Peak-peak segmental accelerations (L1, L2 and intersegmental acceleration transfer (L1–L2 for each axis and each force setting were computed from the acceleration-time recordings. The initial acceleration response for a single thrust and the maximum acceleration response observed during the 12 multiple impulse trains were compared using a paired observations t-test (POTT, alpha = .05. Results Segmental and intersegmental acceleration responses mirrored the peak force magnitude produced by the Impulse Adjusting Instrument. Accelerations were greatest for AX and PA measurement axes. Compared to

  10. Perioperative outcomes, complications, and costs associated with lumbar spinal fusion in older patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kevin L; Auerbach, Joshua D; Lau, Edmund; Schmier, Jordana; Ochoa, Jorge A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the perioperative outcomes, complications, and costs associated with posterolateral spinal fusion (PSF) among Medicare enrollees with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and/or spondylolisthesis by using a national Medicare claims database. A 5% systematic sample of Medicare claims data (2005-2009) was used to identify outcomes in patients who had undergone PSF for a diagnosis of LSS and/or spondylolisthesis. Patients eligible for study inclusion also required a minimum of 2 years of follow-up and a claim history of at least 12 months prior to surgery. A final cohort of 1672 patients was eligible for analysis. Approximately half (50.7%) had LSS only, 10.2% had spondylolisthesis only, and 39.1% had both LSS and spondylolisthesis. The average age was 71.4 years, and the average length of stay was 4.6 days. At 3 months and 1 and 2 years postoperatively, the incidence of spine reoperation was 10.9%, 13.3%, and 16.9%, respectively, whereas readmissions for complications occurred in 11.1%, 17.5%, and 24.9% of cases, respectively. At 2 years postoperatively, 36.2% of patients had either undergone spine reoperation and/or received an epidural injection. The average Medicare payment was $36,230 ± $17,020, $46,840 ± $31,350, and $61,610 ± $46,580 at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery, respectively. The data showed that 1 in 6 elderly patients treated with PSF for LSS or spondylolisthesis underwent reoperation on the spine within 2 years of surgery, and nearly 1 in 4 patients was readmitted for a surgery-related complication. These data highlight several potential areas in which improvements may be made in the effective delivery and cost of surgical care for patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

  11. Cost Utility Analysis of Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation, Central Spinal Stenosis, and Axial or Discogenic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-05-01

    Cost utility or cost effective analysis continues to take center stage in the United States for defining and measuring the value of treatments in interventional pain management. Appropriate cost utility analysis has been performed for caudal epidural injections, percutaneous adhesiolysis, and spinal cord stimulation. However, the literature pertaining to lumbar interlaminar epidural injections is lacking, specifically in reference to cost utility analysis derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a pragmatic approach in a practical setting. To assess the cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic low back pain. Analysis based on 3 previously published randomized trials of effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections assessing their role in disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic pain. A contemporary, private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation, central spinal stenosis, and discogenic or axial low back pain was conducted with data derived from 3 RCTs that included a 2-year follow-up, with inclusion of 360 patients. The primary outcome was significant improvement defined as at least a 50% in pain reduction and disability status. Direct payment data from 2016 was utilized for assessment of procedural costs. Overall costs, including drug costs, were determined by multiplication of direct procedural payment data by a factor of 1.6 to accommodate for indirect payments respectively for disc herniation, spinal stenosis, discogenic pain. The results of 3 RCTs showed direct cost utility for one year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of $2,050.87 for disc herniation, $2,112.25 for axial or discogenic pain without disc herniation

  12. Kambin's Triangle Approach of Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Injection with Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Woong; Nam, Hee Seung; Cho, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Hee Jin; Lee, Byeong Ju; Park, Yongbum

    2011-12-01

    To compare the short-term effect and advantage of transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) performed using the Kambin's triangle and subpedicular approaches. Forty-two patients with radicular pain from lumbar spinal stenosis were enrolled. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups. All procedures were performed using C-arm KMC 950. The frequency of complications during the procedure and the effect of TFESI at 2 and 4 weeks after the procedure between the two groups were compared. Short-term outcomes were measured using a visual numeric scale (VNS) and a five-grade scale. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between possible outcome predictors (Kambin's triangle or subpedicular approach, age, duration of symptoms and sex) and the therapeutic effect. VNS was improved 2 weeks after the injection and continued to improve until 4 weeks in both groups. There were no statistical differences in changes of VNS, effectiveness and contrast spread pattern between these two groups. No correlation was found between the other variables tested and therapeutic effect. Spinal nerve pricking occurred in five cases of the subpedicular and in none of the cases of the Kambin's triangle approach (ptriangle approach is as efficacious as the subpedicular approach for short-term effect and offers considerable advantages (i.e., less spinal nerve pricking during procedure). The Kambin's triangle approach maybe an alternative method for transforaminal epidural steroid injection in cases where needle tip positioning in the anterior epidural space is difficult.

  13. A comparative analysis of static balance between patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and asymptomatic participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Tarnowski, Adam; Górniak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess static balance in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis who qualified for surgical decompression of associated neural structures and compare them with asymptomatic participants. This case-controlled study evaluated a sample of 50 patients with spinal canal stenosis (stenosis group) and 48 participants with no history of clinical symptoms of back pain. Static balance was assessed by conducting quantitative analysis of balance reaction parameters in quiet standing with the eyes closed. Higher values were observed in total length of center of pressure (COP) path, length of COP path in the anterior-posterior plane, mean amplitude of COP projection in the anterior-posterior plane, maximal amplitude between the 2 most distant points in the anterior-posterior plane, mean COP velocity, and sway area marked by the moving COP in the stenosis group compared with the asymptomatic group. This study showed statistically significant differences in static balance parameters between patients with spinal canal stenosis compared with the asymptomatic group. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factor analysis for postoperative urinary retention after surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungjoon; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Yang, Seung Heon; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kang, Soohee; Lee, Ju Hee; Choi, Yunhee

    2017-04-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) may not be considered a major complication after surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. However, improper management of transient POUR leads to bladder overdistension and permanent bladder detrusor damage. Systematic monitoring of POUR may be recommended in vulnerable patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for POUR. This is a retrospective nested case-control study. A total of 284 consecutive patients (M : F=125:159; mean age, 63.3 years) who underwent spine surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis were reviewed. A multivariable logistic model was utilized to identify risk factors. A systematic postoperative voiding care protocol was applied for all patients to monitor them for the development of POUR. An indwelling urethral catheter was inserted intraoperatively and removed in the postanesthesia care unit. The patients were encouraged to void within 6 hours postoperatively and every 4-6 hours thereafter. After each voiding, the postvoid residual urine (PVR) was measured by an ultrasound bladder scan. POUR was defined as the inability to void or having a PVR≥100 mL for more than 2 days after surgery. The incidence of POUR was 27.1% (77/284). Older age (odds ratio, 1.062; 95% confidence interval, 1.029-1.095) and a long duration of surgery (odds ratio, 1.003; 95% confidence interval, 1.001-1.005) were significant risk factors. A formula for determining the probability of POUR was developed, and a probability of ≥0.26 was regarded as the cut-off value (sensitivity of 0.75 and specificity of 0.57; C-statics, 0.684). POUR was a common morbidity after surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. We recommend adopting a systematic postoperative voiding care protocol to prevent bladder overdistension and detrusor damage, especially for elderly patients and those who have undergone longer surgeries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Paraplegia caused by giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk after combined spinal-epidural anesthesia in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Toshiyuki; Nakahira, Junko; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-08-01

    Total paraplegia after epidural or spinal anesthesia is extremely rare. We herein report a case of total paraplegia caused by a giant intradural herniation of a lumbar disk at the L3-L4 level after total hip arthroplasty for coxarthrosis. The patient had no preoperative neurologic abnormalities. Intraoperative anesthetic management involved combined spinal-epidural anesthesia at the L3-L4 level with continuous intravenous propofol administration. Postoperatively, the patient complained of numbness and total paraplegia of the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a giant herniation of a lumbar disk compressing the spinal cord at the L3-L4 level. The intradural herniation was surgically treated, and the patient's symptoms completely resolved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three dimensional analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in individuals with acutely herniated lumbar intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation affects a large number of patients annually and are the most common cause of sciatica. This study was aimed at measuring the spino-pelvic alignment and its relation to the functional limitations in subjects with acutely herniated lumbar disc. Sixteen patients with acute Lumbar Disc Herniation (LDH group) and 16 healthy matched volunteers (healthy group) represented the sample of the study. The patients were recently diagnosed as lumbar disc herniation (L4-5 or L5-S1) with acute sciatica and antalgic posture using magnetic resonance imaging. Spino-pelvic alignment was measured via Rasterstereography. Functional disability among patients was assessed using Oswestry Disability Index Arabic version. Trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic obliquity, pelvic torsion, lordotic and scoliotic angles were significantly different between groups (P ≤ 0.05). A non-significant difference in kyphotic angle was found between the patients and healthy controls. There was no association between the measured postural changes and functional disabilities in patients with lumbar disc herniation (P ≤ 0.05). There are significant postural changes in patients with acutely herniated lumbar disc which has no relation to functional disability. These results support the concept of staying active during acute stage.

  17. Acupuncture-movement therapy for acute lumbar sprain: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruizhu; Zhu, Ning; Liu, Jian; Li, Xinjian; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Jie; Xi, Chaolei

    2016-02-01

    Several studies have reported that acupuncture is effective for treatment of acute lumbar sprain, but they neglected to consider that acupuncture cannot remarkably improve lumbar activity. We performed a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of acupuncture-movement therapy versus conventional acupuncture in the treatment of acute lumbar sprain. Sixty patients were randomized into four groups: the acupuncture-movement (AM) group, sham acupuncture-movement (SAM) group, conventional acupuncture (CA) group, and physical therapy (PT) group. Patients in the AM group were treated with acupuncture at Yintang (EX-HN 3) and exercise of the lumbar region during acupuncture. Patients in the SAM group were treated with sham acupuncture at Yintang (EX-HN 3) and exercise of the lumbar region during sham acupuncture. Conventional acupuncture was performed in the CA group, and physical therapy was applied in the PT group. Each treatment lasted for 20 min. Patients were assessed before and after treatment using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ). The VAS and RMQ scores in the AM group were significantly lower after than before treatment (P lumbar sprain with a persistent pain-relief and remarkable improvement of lumbar activity. Movement, that is, lumbar exercise during acupuncture, enhances the effect of acupuncture.

  18. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress following elective lumbar spinal arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisseroth, Kate; Hart, Robert A

    2012-08-15

    A prospective cohort study with 100% follow-up. To assess incidence and risk factors for development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after elective lumbar arthrodesis. Invasive medical care results in substantial physical and psychological stress to patients. The reported incidence of PTSD after medical care delivery in patients treated for trauma, cancer, and organ transplantation ranges from 5% to 51%. Similar data after elective lumbar spinal arthrodesis have not been reported. A consecutive series of 73 elective lumbar spine arthrodesis patients were evaluated prospectively, using the PTSD checklist-civilian version at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months after surgery. Patient's sex, age, education level, job status, marital status, psychiatric history, prior surgery with general anesthetic, surgical approach, blood loss, postoperative intubation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and occurrence of perioperative complications were analyzed as predictors of PTSD symptoms, using χ analyses. The overall incidence of symptoms of PTSD identified at at least 1 time point was 19.2% (14 of 73). At each time point, the percentage of the population that was positive was 7.5% (6 wk), 11.6% (3 mo), 7.8%, (6 mo), 13.6% (9 mo), and 11.0% (12 mo). The presence of a prior psychiatric diagnosis proved to be the strongest predictor of postarthrodesis symptoms of PTSD (odds ratio [OR] = 7.05, P = 0.002). Occurrence of a complication also proved to be significantly correlated with the development of PTSD symptoms (OR = 4.33, P = 0.04). Age less than 50 years, blood loss of more than 1 L, hospital stay of more than 10 days, and diagnosis trended toward but failed to reach statistical significance. None of the remaining variables approached statistical significance. Positive PTSD symptoms occurred at least once in 19.2% of patients after elective lumbar arthrodesis, with 7.5% to 13.6% of patients experiencing these symptoms at any 1

  19. When is compensation for lumbar spinal stenosis a clinical sagittal plane deformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Aaron J; Vira, Shaleen; Oren, Jonathan H; Lafage, Renaud; Harris, Bradley Y; Spiegel, Matthew A; Diebo, Bassel G; Liabaud, Barthelemy; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Schwab, Frank J; Lafage, Virginie; Errico, Thomas J; Bendo, John A

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative lumbar stenosis (DLS) patients have been reported to lean forward in an attempt to provide neural decompression. Spinal alignment in patients with DLS may resemble that of adult spinal deformity (ASD). No previous studies have compared and contrasted the compensatory mechanisms of DLS and ASD patients. This study aimed to determine the differences in compensatory mechanisms between DLS and ASD patients with increasing severity of sagittal spinopelvic malalignment. Contrasting these compensatory mechanisms may help determine at what severity sagittal malalignment represents a clinical sagittal deformity rather than a compensation for neural compression. This is a retrospective clinical and radiological review. Baseline x-rays in patients without spinal instrumentation, with the clinical radiological and diagnoses of DLS or ASD, were assessed for patterns of spinopelvic compensatory mechanisms. Patients were stratified by sagittal vertical axis (SVA) according to the Scoliosis Research Society-Schwab [SRS-Schwab] classification. Radiographic spinopelvic parameters were measured in the DLS and ASD groups, including SVA, pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch (PI-LL), T1 spinopelvic inclination (T1SPi), T1 pelvic angle (TPA), and pelvic tilt (PT). The two diagnosis cohorts were propensity-matched for PI and age. Each group contained 125 patients and was stratified according to the SRS-Schwab classification. Regional spinopelvic,lower limb, and global alignment parameters were assessed to identify differences in compensatory mechanisms between the two groups with differing degrees of deformity. No funding was provided by any third party in relation to carrying out this study or preparing the manuscript. With mild to moderate malalignment (SRS-Schwab groups "0," or "+" for PT, PI-LL, or SVA), DLS patients permit anterior truncal inclination and recruit posterior pelvic shift instead of pelvic tilt to maintain balance, while providing relief of neurologic

  20. Minimally invasive space shuttle laminotomy for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Asamoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design: Technical note. Objectives: To show microsurgical technique, considering the meticulous anatomy of the ligamentum flavum (LF. Background: Different methods are available for treating lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS. A minimally invasive surgery, namely, space shuttle laminotomy, has recently been proposed. Here, we describe the surgical method for this novel technique. To conduct this surgery accurately, surgeons must have perfect knowledge of anatomy, especially regarding the LF. Materials and Methods and Results: We use this interlaminectomy technique for all cases of LSCS. All patients with LSCS recovered from their neurological deficits in shorter hoslital stays than regular laminectomy. Conclusion: Minimally invasive space shuttle laminotomy (MISSL, which involves a microsurgical technique, is a safe, complication-free procedure.

  1. Increased intraoperative epidural pressure in lumbar spinal stenosis patients with a positive nerve root sedimentation sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Thomas; Melloh, Markus; Staub, Lukas P; Lord, Sarah J; Lange, Jörn; Merk, Harry R

    2014-05-01

    The sedimentation sign (SedSign) has been shown to discriminate well between selected patients with and without lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The purpose of this study was to compare the pressure values associated with LSS versus non-LSS and discuss whether a positive SedSign may be related to increased epidural pressure at the level of the stenosis. We measured the intraoperative epidural pressure in five patients without LSS and a negative SedSign, and in five patients with LSS and a positive SedSign using a Codman(™) catheter in prone position under radioscopy. Patients with a negative SedSign had a median epidural pressure of 9 mmHg independent of the measurement location. Breath and pulse-synchronous waves accounted for 1-3 mmHg. In patients with monosegmental LSS and a positive SedSign, the epidural pressure above and below the stenosis was similar (median 8-9 mmHg). At the level of the stenosis the median epidural pressure was 22 mmHg. A breath and pulse-synchronous wave was present cranial to the stenosis, but absent below. These findings were independent of the cross-sectional area of the spinal canal at the level of the stenosis. Patients with LSS have an increased epidural pressure at the level of the stenosis and altered pressure wave characteristics below. We argue that the absence of sedimentation of lumbar nerve roots to the dorsal part of the dural sac in supine position may be due to tethering of affected nerve roots at the level of the stenosis.

  2. Acute celiac artery compression syndrome after extensive correction of sagittal balance on an adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notani, Naoki; Miyazaki, Masashi; Yoshiiwa, Toyomi; Ishihara, Toshinobu; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2017-05-01

    To describe the first case of a patient who developed acute celiac artery compression syndrome (ACACS) after extensive correction of sagittal balance on an adult spinal deformity. A 77-year-old woman presented with low back pain and spinal kyphosis deformity. We performed a two-stage correction with extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF), and her lumbar lordosis improved from -47° to 53°. However, after surgery, she experienced frequent vomiting and diarrhea. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed marked narrowing of the abdominal aorta at the L1/2 level, and both the celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery were compressed. Therefore, emergency surgery was performed. After laparotomy, we found that the small bowel exhibited an unfavorable color and that peristalsis had stopped. The aorta was compressed from the anterior direction at the upper side of the renal arteries. The median arcuate ligament (MAL) and celiac plexus were responsible for the compression. After the compression was relieved, the small bowel color and peristaltic activity improved. Postoperatively, there was no recurrence of abdominal symptoms. The patient could walk with a walking frame from 3 weeks postoperatively. ACACS is a life-threatening complication, and therefore, it is very important that ACACS is diagnosed and treated early. Spinal deformity surgeons should be aware of the possible occurrence of this condition after extensive correction of sagittal balance on adult spinal deformity.

  3. The relationship between developmental lumbar spinal stenosis and its BMD value : comparison by single energy quantitative CT

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    Kim, Hak Jin; Kim, Kun Il; Song, Keun Sung [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between developmental lumbar spinal stenosis and its BMD value by using the single energy quantitative CT(SEQCT). Eighty normal volunteers(20-60years) were selected as a control group and 28 patients with developmental lumbar spinal stenosis were selected as a disease group. The two groups were divided into a younger (20-39 years) and an older subgroup (40-60 years), and were further divided into male and female subgroups. All the cases showed no evidence of metabolic disease, fracture, herniated nucleus pulposus, degererative spondylosis, infectious disease, tumors or had no history of absolute immobilization of more than two weeks. All underwent lumbar spine CT and SEQCT. we measured bone mineral density(BMD) at the cancellous bone of L1, 2, 3 and obtained the mean and its one standard deviation, and compared the data between each sub-group of the control and the disease group using ANOVA. There was a significant low BMD value in the younger male patient subgroup compared with the control subgroup(p<0.005). Developmental lumbar spinal stenosis in a young male may be a factor of decreasing BMD of the body of the spine.

  4. Preoperative MRI findings predict two-year postoperative clinical outcome in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Kuittinen

    Full Text Available To study the predictive value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings for the two-year postoperative clinical outcome in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.84 patients (mean age 63±11 years, male 43% with symptoms severe enough to indicate LSS surgery were included in this prospective observational single-center study. Preoperative MRI of the lumbar spine was performed with a 1.5-T unit. The imaging protocol conformed to the requirements of the American College of Radiology for the performance of MRI of the adult spine. Visual and quantitative assessment of MRI was performed by one experienced neuroradiologist. At the two-year postoperative follow-up, functional ability was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI 0-100% and treadmill test (0-1000 m, pain symptoms with the overall Visual Analogue Scale (VAS 0-100 mm, and specific low back pain (LBP and specific leg pain (LP separately with a numeric rating scale from 0-10 (NRS-11. Satisfaction with the surgical outcome was also assessed.Preoperative severe central stenosis predicted postoperatively lower LP, LBP, and VAS when compared in patients with moderate central stenosis (p<0.05. Moreover, severe stenosis predicted higher postoperative satisfaction (p = 0.029. Preoperative scoliosis predicted an impaired outcome in the ODI (p = 0.031 and lowered the walking distance in the treadmill test (p = 0.001. The preoperative finding of only one stenotic level in visual assessment predicted less postoperative LBP when compared with patients having 2 or more stenotic levels (p = 0.026. No significant differences were detected between quantitative measurements and the patient outcome.Routine preoperative lumbar spine MRI can predict the patient outcome in a two-year follow up in patients with LSS surgery. Severe central stenosis and one-level central stenosis are predictors of good outcome. Preoperative finding of scoliosis may indicate worse functional ability.

  5. Degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis: intra- and inter-reader agreement for magnetic resonance imaging parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklhofer, Sebastian; Held, Ulrike; Burgstaller, Jakob M; Finkenstaedt, Tim; Bolog, Nicolae; Ulrich, Nils; Steurer, Johann; Andreisek, Gustav; Del Grande, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    To assess the inter- and intra-reader agreement of commonly used quantitative and qualitative image parameters for the assessment of degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this ethical board approved cross-sectional multicenter study, MRI of 100 randomly selected patients (median age 72.5 years, 48 % female) of the prospective Lumbar Stenosis Outcome Study (LSOS) were evaluated by two independent readers. A set of five previously published core imaging parameters as well as nine qualitative and five quantitative additional parameters regarding LSS and degenerative changes of the lumbar spine were assessed to calculate κ and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for the inter-reader agreement. Additional repeated image evaluations were performed by one reader to calculate the intra-reader agreement. κ values for the core image parameters ranged between 0.42 (compromise of the foraminal zone) and 0.77 (relation between fluid and cauda equina) for inter-reader agreement and between 0.59 (compromise of the foraminal zone) and 0.8 (compromise of the central zone) for intra-reader agreement. The inter-reader agreement for the non-core parameters showed κ values of 0.27-0.69 and ICC values of 0.46-0.85. The intra-reader agreement showed κ values of 0.53-0.69 and ICC values of 0.81-0.88. The inter- and intra-reader agreement of commonly used quantitative and qualitative image parameters for the assessment of LSS showed quite a variability with previously defined core parameters having good to excellent inter- and intra-reader agreements.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders; A comparison of myelography, discography, and magnetic resonance imaging

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    Nojiri, Hajime; Matsui, Norio; Fujiyoshi, Fuminori; Izumida, Makoto; Wakita, Sato; Sekiya, Isato (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    In order to evaluate the stenotic condition of lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelogram and with discogram in 82 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Pathologic conditions were studied including herniated nucleus pulposus in 36, lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral portion, combined) in 35, and spondylisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, dysplastic) in 11. Correlation between T2 mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and profile view of full-column myelogram was very high, but fine parts such as adhesive change or redundancy or anomalous condition of nerve roots were more clearly observed on myelogram than on MRI. And some of them were not detected on MRI. The stage of disc degeneration was classified in 5 grades according to signal intensity and irregularity of the disc on T2-weighted image. The evaluation of disc degeneration was similar to discogram. But MRI will not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI is the most important imaging modality to diagnostic screening and to post-operative evaluation of the stenotic condition, determination of the strict indication and the method of the operation will need myelogram and/or discogram and so on. (author).

  7. Long-term results of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slätis, Pär; Malmivaara, Antti; Heliövaara, Markku; Sainio, Päivi; Herno, Arto; Kankare, Jyrki; Seitsalo, Seppo; Tallroth, Kaj; Turunen, Veli; Knekt, Paul; Hurri, Heikki

    2011-07-01

    We randomised a total of 94 patients with long-standing moderate lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) into a surgical group and a non-operative group, with 50 and 44 patients, respectively. The operative treatment comprised undercutting laminectomy of stenotic segments, augmented with transpedicular-instrumented fusion in suspected lumbar instability. The primary outcome was the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the other main outcomes included assessments of leg and back pain and self-reported walking ability, all based on questionnaire data from 85 patients at the 6-year follow-up. At the 6-year follow-up, the mean difference in ODI in favour of surgery was 9.5 (95% confidence interval 0.9-18.1, P-value for global difference 0.006), whereas the intensity of leg or back pain did not differ between the two treatment groups any longer. Walking ability did not differ between the treatment groups at any time. Decompressive surgery of LSS provided modest but consistent improvement in functional ability, surpassing that obtained after non-operative measures.

  8. The MRI finding of the nerve root sedimentation sign: Its clinical validity and operative relativity for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Osama M. Dawood

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The MRI finding of positive sedimentation sign is a good positive sign to rule in lumbar spinal stenosis with high specificity and sensitivity; negative sedimentation sign can be used in postoperative follow up of decompression patients.

  9. Lumbar computed tomography scans are not appropriate surrogates for bone mineral density scans in primary adult spinal deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Eitan M; Nemani, Venu M; Hershman, Stuart; Kang, Daniel G; Kelly, Michael P

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors examined the correlation between lumbar spine CT Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements and bone mineral density measurements in an adult spinal deformity (ASD) population. METHODS Patients with ASD were identified in the records of a single institution. Lumbar CT scans were reviewed, and the mean HU measurements from L1-4 were recorded. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed using femoral neck and lumbar spine dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The number of patients who met criteria for osteoporosis was determined for each imaging modality. RESULTS Forty-eight patients underwent both preoperative DEXA and CT scanning. Forty-three patients were female and 5 were male. Forty-seven patients were Caucasian and one was African American. The mean age of the patients was 62.1 years. Femoral neck DEXA was more likely to identify osteopenia (n = 26) than lumbar spine DEXA (n = 8) or lumbar CT HU measurements (n = 6) (p < 0.001). There was a low-moderate correlation between lumbar spine CT and lumbar spine DEXA (r = 0.463, p < 0.001), and there was poor correlation between lumbar spine CT and femoral neck DEXA (r = 0.303, p = 0.036). CONCLUSIONS Despite the opportunistic utility of lumbar spine CT HU measurements in identifying osteoporosis in patients undergoing single-level fusion, these measurements were not useful in this cohort of ASD patients. The correlation between femoral neck DEXA and HU measurements was poor. DEXA assessment of BMD in ASD patients is essential to optimize the care of these complicated cases.

  10. An analysis of spinopelvic sagittal alignment after lumbar lordosis reconstruction for degenerative spinal diseases: how much balance can be obtained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Li, Sibei; Wang, Jiranru; Wang, Taiping; Yang, Hao; Li, Zemin; Li, Xiang; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2014-12-15

    A retrospective and radiological study of degenerative spinal diseases. To explore the changes in spinopelvic sagittal alignment after lumbar instrumentation and fusion of degenerative spinal diseases. Efforts have been paid to clarify the ideal postoperative sagittal profile for degenerative spinal diseases. However, little has been published about the actual changes of sagittal alignment after lumbar lordosis reconstruction. Radiographical analysis of 83 patients with spinal degeneration was performed by measuring sagittal parameters before and after operations. Comparative studies of sagittal parameters between short (1 level) and long (≥ 2 level) instrumentation and fusion were performed. Different variances (Δ) of these sagittal parameters before and after operations were calculated and compared. Correlative study and linear regression were performed to establish the relationship between variances. No significant changes were shown in the short-fusion group postoperatively. In the long-fusion group, postoperative lumbar lordosis (LL) and sacral slope (SS) were significantly increased; pelvic tilt (PT), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), pelvic incidence minus lumbar lordosis, and PT/SS were significantly decreased. Different variances of ΔLL, ΔSS, ΔPT, ΔSVA, Δ(pelvic incidence - LL), and ΔPT/SS were significantly greater in the long-fusion group than the short-fusion group. Close correlations were mainly shown among ΔLL, ΔPT, and ΔSVA. Linear regression equations could be developed (ΔPT = -0.185 × ΔLL - 7.299 and ΔSVA = -0.152ΔLL - 1.145). In degenerative spinal diseases, long instrumentation and fusion (≥ 2 levels) provides more efficient LL reconstruction. PT, SS, and SVA improve corresponding to LL in a linear regression model. Linear regression equations could be developed and used to predict PT and SVA change after long instrumentation and fusion for LL reconstruction.

  11. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of DTI Indices in the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spinal Cord in Healthy Humans

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    Rachael L. Bosma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize in vivo measurements of diffusion along the length of the entire healthy spinal cord and to compare DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD, between cord regions. The objective is to determine whether or not there are significant differences in DTI indices along the cord that must be considered for future applications of characterizing the effects of injury or disease. A cardiac gated, single-shot EPI sequence was used to acquire diffusion-weighted images of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions of the spinal cord in nine neurologically intact subjects (19 to 22 years. For each cord section, FA versus MD values were plotted, and a k-means clustering method was applied to partition the data according to tissue properties. FA and MD values from both white matter (average FA=0.69, average MD=0.93 × 10−3 mm2/s and grey matter (average FA=0.44, average MD=1.8 × 10−3 mm2/s were relatively consistent along the length of the cord.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

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    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan)); Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku

    1992-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T[sub 2]-weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T[sub 2]-weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T[sub 1]-weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author).

  14. The influence of preoperative spinal sagittal balance on clinical outcomes after microendoscopic laminotomy in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

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    Dohzono, Sho; Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Matsumoto, Tomiya; Suzuki, Akinobu; Terai, Hidetomi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    More information about the association between preoperative anterior translation of the C-7 plumb line and clinical outcomes after decompression surgery in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS) would help resolve problems for patients with sagittal imbalance. The authors evaluated whether preoperative sagittal alignment of the spine affects low-back pain and clinical outcomes after microendoscopic laminotomy. This study was a retrospective review of prospectively collected surgical data. The study comprised 88 patients with LSS (47 men and 41 women) who ranged in age from 39 to 86 years (mean age 68.7 years). All patients had undergone microendoscopic laminotomy at Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine from May 2008 through October 2012. The minimum duration of clinical and radiological follow-up was 6 months. All patients were evaluated by Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for low-back pain, leg pain, and leg numbness before and after surgery. The distance between the C-7 plumb line and the posterior corner of the sacrum (sagittal vertical axis [SVA]) was measured on lateral standing radiographs of the entire spine obtained before surgery. Radiological factors and clinical outcomes were compared between patients with a preoperative SVA ≥ 50 mm (forward-bending trunk [F] group) and patients with a preoperative SVA sagittal plane did not affect JOA scores after microendoscopic laminotomy in patients with LSS. However, low-back pain was worse for patients with preoperative anterior translation of the C-7 plumb line than for those without.

  15. Clinical and radiological characteristics of concomitant peripheral arterial obstructive disease in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

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    Han, Seung-Hwan; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Choo, Ho-Sik; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a typical symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAD). Because both LSS and PAD are predominantly associated with degenerative conditions, concomitant conditions are not uncommon. However, few reports of the demographic, clinical, and radiological characteristics of concomitant LSS and PAD (LSSPAD) have been published. To identify the demographic, clinical, and radiological risk factors for concomitant PAD in LSS. A retrospective matched-control study. This study involved a retrospective cohort of 43 consecutive patients with LSSPAD and a control cohort of 45 age- and gender-matched patients diagnosed with LSS without PAD. Each patient in both groups underwent plain lumbar radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. Demographic and clinical parameters were obtained. The abdominal aorta calcification score (AACS) was evaluated on the lateral lumbar radiographs. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the lower limb was performed to confirm PAD. The mean age of the LSSPAD group was 67.7 ± 10.7 years (52 - 88 years). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) was significantly higher in the LSSPAD group than in the LSS group (P = 0.022). The mean ABI was 0.71 ± 0.22 (0.32 - 0.91) for the LSSPAD group and 0.96 ± 0.18 (0.83 - 1.10) for LSS group (P < 0.001). The prevalence of aortic calcification was significantly higher in the LSSPAD group than in the LSS group (P < 0.001). The mean AACS was 10.2 ± 3.2 (2 - 18) for the LSSPAD group and 3.4 ± 4.1 (0 - 14) for the LSS group (P < 0.001). Retrospective design. We found that concomitant PAD in patients with LSS is associated with old age, DM, the presence of aortic calcification, and ABI < 0.9. When these risk factors exist, further work up is needed to exclude the concomitant PAD.

  16. Treatment of multilevel degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis using a combination of microendoscopic discectomy and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

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    Wu, Han; Yu, Wei-Dong; Jiang, Rui; Gao, Zhong-Li

    2013-02-01

    Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) has become increasingly common and is characterized by multilevel disc herniation and lumbar spondylolisthesis, which are difficult to treat. The current study aimed to evaluate the short-term clinical outcomes and value of the combined use of microendoscopic discectomy (MED) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for the treatment of multilevel DLSS with spondylolisthesis, and to compare the combination with traditional posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). A total of 26 patients with multilevel DLSS and spondylolisthesis underwent combined MED and MI-TLIF surgery using a single cage and pedicle rod-screw system. These cases were compared with 27 patients who underwent traditional PLIF surgery during the same period. Data concerning incision length, surgery time, blood loss, time of bed rest and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score prior to and following surgery were analyzed statistically. Statistical significance was reached in terms of incision length, blood loss and the time of bed rest following surgery (PPLIF.

  17. Five-year durability of stand-alone interspinous process decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Nunley PD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pierce D Nunley,1 Vikas V Patel,2 Douglas G Orndorff,3 William F Lavelle,4 Jon E Block,5 Fred H Geisler6 1Spine Institute of Louisiana, Shreveport, LA, 2The Spine Center, University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, CO, 3Spine Colorado, Mercy Regional Hospital, Durango, CO, 4Upstate Bone and Joint Center, East Syracuse, NY, 5Independent Consultant, San Francisco, CA, 6Independent Consultant, Chicago, IL, USA Background: Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common indication for spine surgery in older adults. Interspinous process decompression (IPD using a stand-alone spacer that functions as an extension blocker offers a minimally invasive treatment option for intermittent neurogenic claudication associated with spinal stenosis.Methods: This study evaluated the 5-year clinical outcomes for IPD (Superion® from a randomized controlled US Food and Drug Administration (FDA noninferiority trial. Outcomes included Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ symptom severity (ss, physical function (pf, and patient satisfaction (ps subdomains, leg and back pain visual analog scale (VAS, and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI.Results: At 5 years, 84% of patients (74 of 88 demonstrated clinical success on at least two of three ZCQ domains. Individual ZCQ domain success rates were 75% (66 of 88, 81% (71 of 88, and 90% (79 of 88 for ZCQss, ZCQpf, and ZCQps, respectively. Leg and back pain success rates were 80% (68 of 85 and 65% (55 of 85, respectively, and the success rate for ODI was 65% (57 of 88. Percentage improvements over baseline were 42%, 39%, 75%, 66%, and 58% for ZCQss, ZCQpf, leg and back pain VAS, and ODI, respectively (all P<0.001. Within-group effect sizes were classified as very large for four of five clinical outcomes (ie, >1.0; all P<0.0001. Seventy-five percent of IPD patients were free from reoperation, revision, or supplemental fixation at their index level at 5 years.Conclusion: After 5 years of follow-up, IPD with a stand-alone spacer provides

  18. Age-related loss of lumbar spinal lordosis and mobility--a study of 323 asymptomatic volunteers.

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    Marcel Dreischarf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The understanding of the individual shape and mobility of the lumbar spine are key factors for the prevention and treatment of low back pain. The influence of age and sex on the total lumbar lordosis and the range of motion as well as on different lumbar sub-regions (lower, middle and upper lordosis in asymptomatic subjects still merits discussion, since it is essential for patient-specific treatment and evidence-based distinction between painful degenerative pathologies and asymptomatic aging. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A novel non-invasive measuring system was used to assess the total and local lumbar shape and its mobility of 323 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 20-75 yrs; BMI 50 yrs compared to the youngest age cohort (20-29 yrs. Locally, these decreases mostly occurred in the middle part of the lordosis and less towards the lumbo-sacral and thoraco-lumbar transitions. The sex only affected the RoE. CONCLUSIONS: During aging, the lower lumbar spine retains its lordosis and mobility, whereas the middle part flattens and becomes less mobile. These findings lay the ground for a better understanding of the incidence of level- and age-dependent spinal disorders, and may have important implications for the clinical long-term success of different surgical interventions.

  19. En bloc partial laminectomy and posterior lumbar interbody fusion in foraminal spinal stenosis.

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    Kim, Eung-Ha; Kim, Hyung-Tae

    2009-12-01

    A retrospective study. An en bloc partial laminectomy and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in spinal stenosis patients with severe foraminal narrowing has a shorter operation time, less neural manipulation and allows indirect decompression by restoring the interforaminal height compared to other procedures. This study investigated the efficacy of the procedure. PLIF is one of the most popular surgery for degenerative spine such as foraminal spinal stenosis, instability spondylolisthesis and discogenic pain. Various techniques for PLIF have their own advantages and disadvantages. But in some severe cases, we need an efficient method of PLIF for decompression and fusion. This study examined 61 patients, who had 85 levels treated with PLIF using an en bloc partial laminectomy and facetectomy, and could be followed up for more than 2 years. The mean age of the patients and mean follow up period was 66 years and 39 months, respectively. The clinical results were evaluated using the MacNab's criteria, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score, and Korea Version Oswestry Disability Index (KODI). The union of the intervertebral space was evaluated using Lenke's criteria. The intervertebral angle and height of the posterior intervertebral disc were also measured. Excellent and good results were obtained in 54 cases (89%) according to MacNab's criteria. The VAS and KODI scores were 8.1 and 34.6, preoperatively, and 3.4, and 14.1, postoperatively. Bone union was A and B grades according to Lenke's criteria in 57 cases. The mean segmental angle and mean height of the posterior disc were respectively, 7.4 degrees and 6.5 mm preoperatively, 9.1 degrees and 10.6 mm postoperatively, and 8.0 degrees and 9.7 mm in the last follow-up. There were 5 cases of postoperative infection, 4 cases of junctional problems and 1 case of screw malposition. En bloc partial laminectomy and PLIF is an effective method for treating severe spinal stenosis with foraminal narrowing.

  20. Regeneration of a spinal ligament after total lumbar disk arthroplasty in primates.

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    Cunningham, Bryan W; Berven, Sigurd H; Hu, Nianbin; Beatson, Helen J; De Deyne, Patrick G; McAfee, Paul C

    2009-01-01

    Total disk arthroplasty (TDA) is a new procedure that replaces the intervertebral disk space with an artificial motion segment and necessitates the resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL). We assessed whether a collagen-based graft made from porcine small-intestine submucosa (SIS) can be used as a regenerative scaffold to restore the function and structure of the ALL in the lumbar spine. A total of 10 mature male baboons underwent TDA at L5-L6 using one of two treatments: (1) TDA only (n = 5) or (2) TDA combined with SIS (n = 5). Six months postoperatively, mock revision surgery was performed to assess tissue adhesions followed by non-destructive multidirectional flexibility testing of the spinal segment. The vertebral segments were then processed for histology. The tissue adhesion score was 2.8 +/- 0.8 in the TDA only group and 1.8 +/- 1.4 in the TDA-SIS group (p = 0.2). Segmental range of motion and the length of the neutral zone were similar in both groups. Histology showed that the SIS scaffold led to an organized ligamentous structure with a significantly (p = 0.027) higher thickness (2.18 +/- 0.25 mm) compared to the connective tissue structure in the TDA-only group (1.66 +/- 0.33 mm). We concluded that using a SIS bioscaffold after TDA did not lead to increased great vessel adhesion while its use facilitated the formation of highly organized ligamentous tissues. However, the SIS- induced and newly formed ligamentous tissue anterior to the spinal segment did not lead to a measurable limitation of spinal extension. 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. [Acute traumatic spinal cord injuries: Epidemiology and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, N; Perrin, F E; Lonjon, M; Fattal, C; Segnarbieux, F; Privat, A; Bauchet, L

    2012-10-01

    Specify the epidemiological data on the acute spinal cord injuries and define a group of patients that could benefit from cellular transplantation therapy designed with the aim of repair and regeneration of damaged spinal cord tissues. Five years monocentric (Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France) retrospective analysis of patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal cord injured-patients, defined as sensory-motor complete, underwent a clinical evaluation following American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and functional type 2 Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM2) scorings as well as radiological evaluation through spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and fifty-seven medical records were reviewed and we selected and re-examined 20 patients with complete thoracic spinal cord lesion. Clinical and radiological evaluations of these patients demonstrated, in 75 % of the cases, an absence of clinical progression after a mean of 49months. Radiological abnormalities were constantly present in the initial (at the admission to hospital) and control (re-evaluation) MRI and no reliable predictive criteria of prognosis had been found. We compare our results to the literature and discuss advantages and limits of cellular transplantation strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Common neural structures activated by epidural and transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation: Elicitation of posterior root-muscle reflexes.

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    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Minassian, Karen

    2018-01-01

    Epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord is currently regaining momentum as a neuromodulation intervention in spinal cord injury (SCI) to modify dysregulated sensorimotor functions and augment residual motor capacity. There is ample evidence that it engages spinal circuits through the electrical stimulation of large-to-medium diameter afferent fibers within lumbar and upper sacral posterior roots. Recent pilot studies suggested that the surface electrode-based method of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (SCS) may produce similar neuromodulatory effects as caused by epidural SCS. Neurophysiological and computer modeling studies proposed that this noninvasive technique stimulates posterior-root fibers as well, likely activating similar input structures to the spinal cord as epidural stimulation. Here, we add a yet missing piece of evidence substantiating this assumption. We conducted in-depth analyses and direct comparisons of the electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of short-latency responses in multiple leg muscles to both stimulation techniques derived from ten individuals with SCI each. Post-activation depression of responses evoked by paired pulses applied either epidurally or transcutaneously confirmed the reflex nature of the responses. The muscle responses to both techniques had the same latencies, EMG peak-to-peak amplitudes, and waveforms, except for smaller responses with shorter onset latencies in the triceps surae muscle group and shorter offsets of the responses in the biceps femoris muscle during epidural stimulation. Responses obtained in three subjects tested with both methods at different time points had near-identical waveforms per muscle group as well as same onset latencies. The present results strongly corroborate the activation of common neural input structures to the lumbar spinal cord-predominantly primary afferent fibers within multiple posterior roots-by both techniques and add to unraveling the basic mechanisms

  3. The Current Testing Protocols for Biomechanical Evaluation of Lumbar Spinal Implants in Laboratory Setting: A Review of the Literature

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    Sabrina A. Gonzalez-Blohm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro biomechanical investigations have become a routinely employed technique to explore new lumbar instrumentation. One of the most important advantages of such investigations is the low risk present when compared to clinical trials. However, the best use of any experimental data can be made when standard testing protocols are adopted by investigators, thus allowing comparisons among studies. Experimental variables, such as the length of the specimen, operative level, type of loading (e.g., dynamic versus quasistatic, magnitude, and rate of load applied, are among the most common variables controlled during spinal biomechanical testing. Although important efforts have been made to standardize these protocols, high variability can be found in the current literature. The aim of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review of the literature to identify the current trends in the protocols reported for the evaluation of new lumbar spinal implants under laboratory setting.

  4. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part I: Biology of spinal fusion.

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    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C; Chen, M I

    1995-12-15

    The histology of lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion was studied in an experimental model in rabbits. To qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the sequential histology of spinal fusion using a previously validated animal model. Few previous studies have described the sequential histology during the posterolateral spinal fusion healing process using autogenous bone, and a basic understanding of the biology of this repair process is lacking. Fourteen adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent single-level posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process arthrodesis with autogenous iliac bone graft. Animals were killed 1-10 weeks after surgery, and the fusion masses were analyzed histologically and quantitated using a semiautomated image analysis system. Three distinct phases of healing were identified (inflammatory, reparative, and remodeling) and occurred in sequence but in a delayed fashion in the central zone of the fusion mass compared with the outer transverse process zones. Membraneous bone formation, evident first at the ends of the fusion eminating from the decorticated transverse processes, was the predominant mechanism of healing. The central zone was somewhat different in that there was a period of endochondral bone formation during weeks 3 and 4 in this zone where cartilage formed and was converted to bone. Remodeling in the central zone had equilibrated with the transverse process zones by 10 weeks. Lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion is a complex process from a spatial and temporal standpoint. When autogenous bone is used as the graft material, this process critically depends on a variety of factors from the decorticated host bone and exposed marrow. The persistence of a central cartilage zone may be related to some types of nonunions and deserves future investigation. This enhanced understanding of the biology of spinal fusion with autogenous bone graft will provide a foundation for optimizing the use of osteoinductive bone growth

  5. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

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    Paul J Austin

    Full Text Available Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular

  6. Transforaminal epidural steroid injection in lumbar spinal stenosis: an observational study with two-year follow-up.

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    Davis, Niel; Hourigan, Patrick; Clarke, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is recognised as a treatment for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation, whilst surgical decompression is generally thought to be the most effective treatment option for lumbar spinal stenosis. There is little available literature examining the effect of TFESI on symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. To evaluate the use of TFESI as an alternative to surgery in patients with symptomatic stenosis. An observational study which took place between May 2010 and July 2013. All patients were seen by the Extended Scope Physiotherapist (ESP) injection service. A total of 68 consecutive patients were included. Thirty-one were male and 37 were female. The average age was 75 years. The primary outcome measure was the avoidance of decompressive surgery. Patients with radicular leg pain were seen by an ESP in an Outpatient setting. Concordant clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging were required for diagnosis. Peri-radicular bupivacaine hydrochloride 0.25% (3 ml) and triamcinolone (40 mg) were then injected. Outcome measures were recorded at 6 weeks, 1 year and 2 years. Of 68 patients with spinal stenosis, 22 (32%) had opted for surgery at two year follow-up. Thirty (44%) patients were satisfied with non-surgical management at 2 years, required no further treatment, and were discharged. Of the remaining 24%, nine patients were referred for further injection, four declined surgery but were referred to the Pain Relief Clinic, two still had a similar level of pain but declined surgery and one had died. Our study reports a considerably lower percentage patients opting for surgery than previously demonstrated by the available literature. TFESI is a reasonable treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis and can result in long-term relief from symptoms in a high proportion of patients.

  7. An investigation into the onset, pattern, and effects of pain relief on lumbar extensor electromyography in people with acute and chronic low back pain.

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    Williams, Jonathan M; Haq, Inam; Lee, Raymond Y

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use an experimental pain relief model to determine the effect of pain relief on lumbar muscle function in people with low back pain. A test-retest design was used with all data collection being completed within a therapy setting. Twenty people with acute and 20 with chronic low back pain were recruited from general practitioner and therapist referrals. Participants completed spinal movements and lifting. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure the pattern of muscle activity, onset of muscle activation, and peak activation of bilateral lumbar multifidus and iliocostalis. Movements were investigated before and after pain relief, through the self-administration of oral analgesia. Electromyography profiles and peak values were reliable across 3 trials, and EMG profiles correlated well with kinematic profiles. Specific EMG profiles were commonly associated with specific kinematic values, and on the whole, the EMG profiles were unaffected by pain relief. Muscle onset times and peak muscle amplitudes were not affected by pain relief in either acute or chronic low back pain. This study showed that the EMG activities from the lumbar region, including lumbar multifidus and iliocostalis, are reliable, and specific EMG profiles are identifiable. Pain relief as achieved in this study did not affect the pattern of EMG activity, onset of muscle activation, or peak activation values. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oblique retroperitoneal approach for lumbar interbody fusion from L1 to S1 in adult spinal deformity.

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    Kim, Ki-Tack; Jo, Dae-Jean; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Eun-Min

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, with advancements in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the lateral lumbar interbody fusion is being used increasingly as an alternative procedure to anterior approach. In this study, we illustrated a oblique retroperitoneal approach for lumbar interbody fusion with one incision site and tilting of the operation table in adult spinal deformity and evaluate the radiographical findings and clinical outcomes of patients treated using this technique. This study included 32 patients scheduled to undergo anterior and posterior long-level fusions for lumbar degenerative kyphosis or degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Data collected included blood loss, operative time, incision size, and perioperative complications. Pre- and postoperative radiographic parameters and clinical outcome measures were assessed. Mean follow-up time was 26.1 months. The mean blood losses were 107.4 and 102.4 ml, and the mean operative times were 116, 97, and 82 min for the patients within five levels (4 cases), four levels (18 cases), and three levels (10 cases). The mean incision sizes were 14.63, 13.82, and 12.5 cm in the patients with five, four, and three levels. The mean pelvic incidence was 50.3°. The mean preoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) was + 13.66 cm, and the last follow-up SVA was + 2.94 cm. The preoperative lumbar lordosis (LL) was 5.79°, and the last follow-up LL was 46.54°. The mean correction angle was 41°. The mean Cobb angle decreased from a preoperative value of 21.55° to 9.6°at the last follow-up. An oblique retroperitoneal approach is very safe, allowing reproducible access from L1 to S1 for lumbar interbody fusion in adult spinal deformity.

  9. Current trends in spinal arthroplasty: an assessment of surgeon practices and attitudes regarding cervical and lumbar disk replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Peter G; Simpson, Andrew K; Rechtine, Glenn; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2009-02-01

    Survey study involving orthopedic and neurosurgical spine surgeons. To report the current practices and opinions of spine surgeons regarding cervical and lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) as alternatives to arthrodesis for the treatment of degenerative conditions of the spine. TDA represents an alternative surgical treatment for degenerative spinal conditions that may avoid the deleterious effects associated with fusion. Unfortunately, the prevailing opinions of surgeons about TDA have not been well characterized and the patterns of its utilization have not been documented previously in the literature. A questionnaire was developed to record the attitudes of spine surgeons regarding cervical and lumbar TDA and to assess their utilization of this technology. This survey was distributed to all of the surgeons attending the 2007 "Contemporary Update on Disorders of the Spine" meeting in Whistler, British Columbia. One hundred thirteen of the 133 surgeons present at the meeting completed the questionnaire, corresponding to a return rate of 85%. The percentage of surgeons who had performed lumbar TDA was significantly higher than that for cervical TDA (42% vs. 30%, P=0.05). However, 81% of respondents stated that they were more likely to perform cervical TDA now compared with 1 year ago, whereas 64% indicated that they were less likely to perform lumbar TDA. The most frequently cited reasons for not performing both cervical and lumbar TDA were questions concerning long-term outcomes and perceived difficulties with obtaining financial compensation from insurance companies; in addition, surgeons were also concerned about revising lumbar TDA cases. Although the results of this study confirm that the enthusiasm for TDA was shared by many of these respondents, it is clear that additional long-term, prospective, comparative data are required before this technology may be considered as a replacement for more traditional spinal fusion procedures.

  10. Cost utility analysis of caudal epidural injections in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation, axial or discogenic low back pain, central spinal stenosis, and post lumbar surgery syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Falco, Frank J E; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Cash, Kimberly A; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2013-01-01

    In this era of escalating health care costs and the questionable effectiveness of multiple interventions, cost effectiveness or cost utility analysis has become the cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, and has an influence coverage decisions. Even though multiple cost effectiveness analysis studies have been performed over the years, extensive literature is lacking for interventional techniques. Cost utility analysis studies of epidural injections for managing chronic low back pain demonstrated highly variable results including a lack of cost utility in randomized trials and contrasting results in observational studies. There has not been any cost utility analysis studies of epidural injections in large randomized trials performed in interventional pain management settings. To assess the cost utility of caudal epidural injections in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation, axial or discogenic low back pain, lumbar central spinal stenosis, and lumbar post surgery syndrome. This analysis is based on 4 previously published randomized trials. A private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Four randomized trials were conducted assessing the clinical effectiveness of caudal epidural injections with or without steroids for lumbar disc herniation, lumbar discogenic or axial low back pain, lumbar central spinal stenosis, and post surgery syndrome. A cost utility analysis was performed with direct payment data for a total of 480 patients over a period of 2 years from these 4 trials. Outcome included various measures with significant improvement defined as at least a 50% improvement in pain reduction and disability status. The results of 4 randomized controlled trials of low back pain with 480 patients with a 2 year follow-up with the actual reimbursement data showed cost utility for one year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of $2,206 for disc herniation, $2,136 for axial or discogenic pain without

  11. Value of additional cervicothoracic sagittal T2- weighted images in elderly patients with symptoms suggestive of lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Park, Sung Hee; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Guen Young; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence and predictive factors of tandem cervical spinal stenosis (CSS) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) based on MR. From January to May of 2011, 140 consecutive patients (36 men, 94 women; mean age, 68.9 years; age range, 60-87 years) were included for the analysis. All patients were at least 60 years old, had undergone lumbar spine MRI including additional cervicothoracic sagittal T2-weighted images, and were clinically suspected of LSS. Two spine radiologists evaluated the risk factors for CSS, considering the possible risk factors such as age, sex, alignment disorder of the lumbar spine, number of levels of LSS, and severity of LSS, based on MR. Of the 140 patients, 42 (30%) patients had tandem spinal stenosis. CSS was more common among patients with LSS (42 of 61, 69%) than among patients without LSS (27 of 79, 34%) (p = 0.000). Grade 2 or 3 CSS was more commonly observed among patients with grade 2 or 3 LSS (15 of 53, 28%), than among patients with grade 0 or 1 LSS (8 of 87, 9%) (p = 0.003). Only the severity of LSS showed a significant association with the severity of CSS (p = 0.045). Tandem CSS is common in LSS, and the severity of LSS is a risk factor of CSS.

  12. Acute cervical fracture or congenital spinal deformity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Sharan, Ashwini; Ratliff, John; Flanders, Adam; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Falowski, Stephen; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    There are few reports of developmental or congenital cervical spinal deformities. Such cases may be mistaken for traumatically induced fractures, and additional treatment may ensue. A retrospective analysis was performed to identify patients with congenital cervical spine deformities. These patients were matched with a confirmed traumatic spinal fracture population with similar demographic features. Patients were analyzed for age, gender, imaging findings (plain roentgenograms including dynamic flexion and extension views, computed tomography scan, and MRI), neurologic status, and subjective complaints of pain. Thirty-six individuals were included in the final analysis, 7 with congenital abnormalities and 29 with radiographically confirmed traumatic injuries. Patients with congenital abnormalities had significantly less soft-tissue swelling compared with the population with traumatic fractures (P spinal deformity (congenital vs traumatic).

  13. Acute Cervical Fracture or Congenital Spinal Deformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Sharan, Ashwini; Ratliff, John; Flanders, Adam; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Falowski, Stephen; Vaccaro, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: There are few reports of developmental or congenital cervical spinal deformities. Such cases may be mistaken for traumatically induced fractures, and additional treatment may ensue. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to identify patients with congenital cervical spine deformities. These patients were matched with a confirmed traumatic spinal fracture population with similar demographic features. Patients were analyzed for age, gender, imaging findings (plain roentgenograms including dynamic flexion and extension views, computed tomography scan, and MRI), neurologic status, and subjective complaints of pain. Results: Thirty-six individuals were included in the final analysis, 7 with congenital abnormalities and 29 with radiographically confirmed traumatic injuries. Patients with congenital abnormalities had significantly less soft-tissue swelling compared with the population with traumatic fractures (P spinal deformity (congenital vs traumatic). PMID:18533417

  14. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  15. Does the type of sagittal spinal shape influence the clinical results of lumbar disc arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouissat, F; Scemama, C; Delécrin, J

    2016-10-01

    It has been suggested that the indication for lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) takes into account the local parameters, such as the type of disc disease demonstrated on MRI and the presence or absence of facet joint osteoarthritis. The type of preoperative sagittal curvature could also be taken into account. This study reports the clinical results of LTDRs depending on the type of sagittal spinal alignment. Eighty patients were included in this prospective study, with a mean age of 41.7years (range, 27-56years). The clinical analysis took into account the lumbar VAS, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and the preoperative frequency of painkiller use, at 1year and at the last follow-up. The satisfaction index, return to work, and willingness to undergo the same treatment were also collected. The radiological study included the analysis of lumbar-pelvic parameters to distribute the patients according to the Roussouly classification. The mean follow-up was 59.1months (range, 14-96months). The type 1 group included four cases. Reduction of the VAS, the ODI score, and the frequency of painkiller use at the last follow-up were significant in type 2 and 3 patients, and non-significant for type 4. Eighty-five percent of type 2 patients and 87.5% of type 3 patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the surgery versus only 68% of the type 4 patients. In addition, 63% of the type 4 patients declared they would be willing to undergo the same treatment again versus 85% of the type 2 patients and 82.5% of the type 3 patients. It should also be noted that 67% of the patients in this series returned to work. This study underscores the influence of the type of sagittal curvature on the clinical results of LTDR, with type 4 patients showing inferior clinical results because of a higher rate of residual lower back pain. The indication in LTDR should be reconsidered for discogenic lower back pain in type 4 patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute transient spinal paralysis and cardiac symptoms following an accidental epidural potassium infusion – a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzträger, Martin; Kopp, Marcel A; Liebscher, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background To describe a case of an accidental epidural potassium infusion leading to an acute transient spinal paralysis and cardiac symptoms and review the literature on that topic. Case presentation We report the case of an accidental infusion of 900 mg potassium chloride 7.45% (KCl) into the epidural space, which occurred during epidural analgesia in a 74-year-old patient suffering from immobilization due to lumbar back pain as well as from a paralytic Ileus. The event was resulting in ve...

  17. Nerve cells culture from lumbar spinal cord on surfaces modified by plasma pyrrole polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga-Aguilar, E; Olayo, R; Ramírez-Fernández, O; Morales, J; Godínez, R

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are several techniques for modified cell culture surfaces under research to improve cell growth and adhesion. Recently, different methods have been used for surface coating, using biomolecules that enhance cell attachment and growth of nerve cells from spinal cord, such as the use of Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin. Plasma-polymerized pyrrole (PPy)-treated surfaces have showed improvement on surfaces biocompatibility with the cells in culture since they do not interfere with any of the biological cell functions. In the present work, we present a novel mouse nerve cell culture technique, using PPy-treated cell culture surfaces. A comparative study of cell survival using Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-treated surfaces was performed. Our results of cell survival when compared with data already reported by other investigators, show that cells cultured on the PPy-modified surface increased survival up to 21 days when compared with Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-coated culture, where 8 days cell survival was obtained. There were electrical and morphological differences in the nerve cells grown in the different surfaces. By comparing the peak ion currents of Poly-DL-Ornithine/Laminin-seeded cells for 8 days with cells grown for 21 days on PPy, an increase of 516% in the Na(+) current and 127% in K(+) currents in cells seeded on PPy were observed. Immunofluorescence techniques showed the presence of cell synapses and culture viability after 21 days. Our results then showed that PPy-modified surfaces are an alternative culture method that increases nerve cells survival from lumbar spinal cord cell culture by preserving its electrical and morphological features.

  18. Quantification of cavitation and gapping of lumbar zygapophyseal joints during spinal manipulative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gregory D; Ross, Kim; Raju, P K; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Cantu, Joe A; Bora, Preetam; Dexheimer, Jennifer M; McKinnis, Ray; Habeck, Adam R; Selby, Scott; Pocius, Judith D; Gregerson, Douglas

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use previously validated methods to quantify and relate 2 phenomena associated with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT): (1) cavitation and (2) the simultaneous gapping (separation) of the lumbar zygapophyseal (Z) joint spaces. This was a randomized, controlled, mechanistic clinical trial with blinding. Forty healthy participants (18-30 years old) without a history of low-back pain participated. Seven accelerometers were affixed to the skin overlying the spinous processes of L1 to L5 and the S1 and S2 sacral tubercles. Two additional accelerometers were positioned 3 cm left and right lateral to the L4/L5 interspinous space. Participants were randomized into group 1, side-posture SMT (n = 30), or group 2, side-posture positioning (SPP, n = 10). Cavitations were determined by accelerometer recordings during SMT and SPP (left side = upside for both groups); gapping (gapping difference) was determined by the difference between pre- and postintervention magnetic resonance imaging scan joint space measurements. Results of mean gapping differences were compared. Upside SMT and SPP joints gapped more than downside joints (0.69 vs -0.17 mm, P manipulative therapy upside joints gapped more than SPP upside joints (0.75 vs 0.52 mm, P = .03). Spinal manipulative therapy upside joints gapped more in men than in women (1.01 vs 0.49 mm, P < .002). Overall, joints that cavitated gapped more than those that did not (0.56 vs 0.22 mm, P = .01). No relationship was found between the occurrence of cavitation and gapping with upside joints alone (P = .43). Zygapophyseal joints receiving chiropractic SMT gapped more than those receiving SPP alone; Z joints of men gapped more than those of women, and cavitation indicated that a joint had gapped but not how much a joint had gapped. Copyright © 2012 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Associations Between Physical Therapy and Long-Term Outcomes for Individuals with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in the SPORT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M.; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Whitman, Julie M.; Delitto, Anthony; Brennan, Gerard P.; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context A period of non-surgical management is advocated prior to surgical treatment for most patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Currently, little evidence is available to define optimal non-surgical management. Physical therapy is often used, however its use and effectiveness relative to other non-surgical strategies has not been adequately explored. Purpose Describe the utilization of physical therapy and other non-surgical interventions by patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and examine the relationship between physical therapy and long-term prognosis. Study Design Secondary analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) combining data from randomized and observational studies. Setting 13 spine clinics in 11 states in the United States. Patient Sample Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis receiving non-surgical management including those who did or did not receive physical therapy within 6 weeks of enrollment. Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures included cross-over to surgery, the bodily pain and physical function scales changes from the Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36), and the modified Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were patient satisfaction and the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index. Methods Baseline characteristics and rates of cross-over to surgery were compared between patients who did or did not receive physical therapy. Baseline factors predictive of receiving physical therapy were examined with logistic regression. Mixed effects models were used to compare outcomes between groups at 3 and 6 months, and 1 year after enrollment adjusted for baseline severity and patient characteristics. Results Physical therapy was used in the first 6 weeks by 90 of 244 patients (37%) and was predicted by the absence of radiating pain and being single instead of married. Physical therapy was associated with a reduced likelihood of cross-over to surgery after 1 year (21% vs 33%, p=0.045), and greater reductions on the SF-36

  20. Lumbar puncture in acute admissions to an adult medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspected multiple sclerosis - very rare in. Africa. Methods. From January t6 June 1986, 1,908 patients were admitted to the adult medical wards,. Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe. Lumbar puncture was considered necessary in 15 I, patients because of a clinical suspicion' of meningitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage. A.

  1. Management of sagittal balance in adult spinal deformity with minimally invasive anterolateral lumbar interbody fusion: a preliminary radiographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwaring, Jotham C; Bach, Konrad; Ahmadian, Amir A; Deukmedjian, Armen R; Smith, Donald A; Uribe, Juan S

    2014-05-01

    Minimally invasive (MI) fusion and instrumentation techniques are playing a new role in the treatment of adult spinal deformity. The open pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO) are proven segmental methods for improving regional lordosis and global sagittal parameters. Recently the MI anterior column release (ACR) was introduced as a segmental method for treating sagittal imbalance. There is a paucity of data in the literature evaluating the alternatives to PSO and SPO for sagittal balance correction. Thus, the authors conducted a preliminary retrospective radiographic review of prospectively collected data from 2009 to 2012 at a single institution. The objectives of this study were to: 1) investigate the radiographic effect of MI-ACR on spinopelvic parameters, 2) compare the radiographic effect of MI-ACR with PSO and SPO for treatment of adult spinal deformity, and 3) investigate the radiographic effect of percutaneous posterior spinal instrumentation on spinopelvic parameters when combined with MI transpsoas lateral interbody fusion (LIF) for adult spinal deformity. Patient demographics and radiographic data were collected for 36 patients (9 patients who underwent MI-ACR and 27 patients who did not undergo MI-ACR). Patients included in the study were those who had undergone at least a 2-level MI-LIF procedure; adequate preoperative and postoperative 36-inch radiographs of the scoliotic curvature; a separate second-stage procedure for the placement of posterior spinal instrumentation; and a diagnosis of degenerative scoliosis (coronal Cobb angle > 10° and/or sagittal vertebral axis > 5 cm). Statistical analysis was performed for normality and significance testing. Percutaneous transpedicular spinal instrumentation did not significantly alter any of the spinopelvic parameters in either the ACR group or the non-ACR group. Lateral MI-LIF alone significantly improved coronal Cobb angle by 16°, and the fractional curve significantly

  2. 3D interactive model of lumbar spinal structures of anesthetic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats-Galino, Alberto; Reina, Miguel A; Mavar Haramija, Marija; Puigdellivol-Sánchez, Anna; Juanes Méndez, Juan A; De Andrés, José A

    2015-03-01

    A 3D model of lumbar structures of anesthetic interest was reconstructed from human magnetic resonance (MR) images and embedded in a Portable Document Format (PDF) file, which can be opened by freely available software and used offline. The MR images were analyzed using a specific 3D software platform for biomedical data. Models generated from manually delimited volumes of interest and selected MR images were exported to Virtual Reality Modeling Language format and were presented in a PDF document containing JavaScript-based functions. The 3D file and the corresponding instructions and license files can be downloaded freely at http://diposit.ub.edu/dspace/handle/2445/44844?locale=en. The 3D PDF interactive file includes reconstructions of the L3-L5 vertebrae, intervertebral disks, ligaments, epidural and foraminal fat, dural sac and nerve root cuffs, sensory and motor nerve roots of the cauda equina, and anesthetic approaches (epidural medial, spinal paramedial, and selective nerve root paths); it also includes a predefined sequential educational presentation. Zoom, 360° rotation, selective visualization, and transparency graduation of each structure and clipping functions are available. Familiarization requires no specialized informatics knowledge. The ease with which the document can be used could make it valuable for anatomical and anesthetic teaching and demonstration of patient information. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Lumbar spinal anesthesia with cervical nociceptive blockade. Critical review of a series of 1,330 procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percio Ramón Becker Benitez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The manufacture of minimally traumatic needles and synthesis of pharmacological adjuncts with safe and effective action on inhibitory and neuromodulatory synapses distributed along the nociceptive pathways were crucial for a new expansion phase of spinal anesthesia. The objectives of this paper are present our clinical experience with 1330 lumbar spinal anesthesia performed with purposeful nociceptive blockade of the thoracic and cervical spinal nerves corresponding to dermatomes C4 or C3; warn about the method pathophysiological risks, and emphasize preventive standards for the safe application of the technique. CONTENT: Review of the historical background and anatomical spinal anesthesia with cervical levels of analgesia. Description of the technique used in our institution; population anesthetized; and surgery performed with the described method. Critical exposition of the physiological, pathophysiological, and clinical effects occurred and registered during anesthesia-surgery and postoperative period. CONCLUSION: Spinal anesthesia with nociceptive blockade to dermatome C4, or C3, is an effective option for surgery on somatic structures distal to the metamer of the third cervical spinal nerve, lasting no more than four or five hours. The method safety depends on the unrestricted respect for the essential rules of proper anesthesia.

  4. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation.

  5. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelmers, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new.

  6. Muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique for treating long segmental lumbar spinal stenosis: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yang; De Cheng, Wang; Wei, Wang Zong; Hui, Li

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel surgical technique with the traditional median approach.In the Orthopedics Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine Hospital, Tongzhou District, Beijing, 68 cases of lumbar spinal canal stenosis underwent surgery using the muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique and a median approach between September 2013 and February 2016. Both approaches adopted lumbar spinal canal decompression, intervertebral disk removal, cage implantation, and pedicle screw fixation. The operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage volume, and preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score and Japanese Orthopedics Association score (JOA) were compared between the 2 groups.All patients were followed up for more than 1 year. No significant difference between the 2 groups was found with respect to age, gender, surgical segments. No diversity was noted in the operation time, intraoperative bleeding volume, preoperative and 1 month after the operation VAS score, preoperative and 1 month after the operation JOA score, and 6 months after the operation JOA score between 2 groups (P > .05). The amount of postoperative wound drainage (260.90 ± 160 mL vs 447.80 ± 183.60 mL, P gap approach group than in the median approach group (P gap approach under a minimally invasive channel group, the average drainage volume was reduced by 187 mL, and the average VAS score 6 months after the operation was reduced by an average of 0.48.The muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique is a feasible method to treat long segmental lumbar spinal canal stenosis. It retains the integrity of the posterior spine complex to the greatest extent, so as to reduce the adjacent spinal segmental degeneration and soft tissue trauma. Satisfactory short-term and long-term clinical results were obtained.

  7. Overexpression of BDNF increases excitability of the lumbar spinal network and leads to robust early locomotor recovery in completely spinalized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Ziemlińska

    Full Text Available Strategies to induce recovery from lesions of the spinal cord have not fully resulted in clinical applications. This is a consequence of a number of impediments that axons encounter when trying to regrow beyond the lesion site, and that intraspinal rearrangements are subjected to. In the present study we evaluated (1 the possibility to improve locomotor recovery after complete transection of the spinal cord by means of an adeno-associated (AAV viral vector expressing the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in lumbar spinal neurons caudal to the lesion site and (2 how the spinal cord transection and BDNF treatment affected neurotransmission in the segments caudal to the lesion site. BDNF overexpression resulted in clear increases in expression levels of molecules involved in glutamatergic (VGluT2 and GABAergic (GABA, GAD65, GAD67 neurotransmission in parallel with a reduction of the potassium-chloride co-transporter (KCC2 which contributes to an inhibitory neurotransmission. BDNF treated animals showed significant improvements in assisted locomotor performance, and performed locomotor movements with body weight support and plantar foot placement on a moving treadmill. These positive effects of BDNF local overexpression were detectable as early as two weeks after spinal cord transection and viral vector application and lasted for at least 7 weeks. Gradually increasing frequencies of clonic movements at the end of the experiment attenuated the quality of treadmill walking. These data indicate that BDNF has the potential to enhance the functionality of isolated lumbar circuits, but also that BDNF levels have to be tightly controlled to prevent hyperexcitability.

  8. Overexpression of BDNF increases excitability of the lumbar spinal network and leads to robust early locomotor recovery in completely spinalized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemlińska, Ewelina; Kügler, Sebastian; Schachner, Melitta; Wewiór, Iwona; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita; Skup, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to induce recovery from lesions of the spinal cord have not fully resulted in clinical applications. This is a consequence of a number of impediments that axons encounter when trying to regrow beyond the lesion site, and that intraspinal rearrangements are subjected to. In the present study we evaluated (1) the possibility to improve locomotor recovery after complete transection of the spinal cord by means of an adeno-associated (AAV) viral vector expressing the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in lumbar spinal neurons caudal to the lesion site and (2) how the spinal cord transection and BDNF treatment affected neurotransmission in the segments caudal to the lesion site. BDNF overexpression resulted in clear increases in expression levels of molecules involved in glutamatergic (VGluT2) and GABAergic (GABA, GAD65, GAD67) neurotransmission in parallel with a reduction of the potassium-chloride co-transporter (KCC2) which contributes to an inhibitory neurotransmission. BDNF treated animals showed significant improvements in assisted locomotor performance, and performed locomotor movements with body weight support and plantar foot placement on a moving treadmill. These positive effects of BDNF local overexpression were detectable as early as two weeks after spinal cord transection and viral vector application and lasted for at least 7 weeks. Gradually increasing frequencies of clonic movements at the end of the experiment attenuated the quality of treadmill walking. These data indicate that BDNF has the potential to enhance the functionality of isolated lumbar circuits, but also that BDNF levels have to be tightly controlled to prevent hyperexcitability.

  9. Bilateral acute foot drop following lumbar disc herniation--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Kalra, Samir Kumar; Vaid, Vivek Kumar; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Cauda equina compression and acute unilateral foot drop are commonly described associations with prolapsed intervertebral lumbar disc. The bilateral acute foot drop however is a rare occurrence. A 45-year-old adult male labourer presented with 1 month history of low backache, with acute exacerbation 1 day later. He developed acute bilateral foot drop and urinary retention within 2 hours. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed large central disc prolapse at L3-L4 level with significant canal stenosis. He was operated on emergent basis following which he had progressive neurological improvement.

  10. [Clinical Trials for Treatment of Acute Lumbar Sprain by Acupuncture Stimulation of "Yaotong" and Local Ashi-points in Combination with Patients' Lumbar Movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Li; Lu, Jing; Ma, Hui-Fang

    2017-02-25

    To observe the clinical effect of acupuncture stimulation of "Yaotong"-point (one acupoint of balance acupuncture therapy) and Ashi-points combined with patients' lumbar movement in the treatment of acute lumbar sprain. Forty-six acute lumbar sprain patients were randomized into treatment group (26 cases) and control group (20 cases) using a random number table. The patients of the treatment group were treated by acupuncture stimulation of "Yaotong"-point[above Yintang (EX-HN 3)] and local Ashi-points for 20 min, and were asked to move the waist simultaneously during acupuncture stimulation. The treatment was conducted once every other day, 3 times a week, one week in total. Those of the control group were treated by oral administration of loxoprofen sodium tablets (60 mg, twice a day, for one week). The pain severity of lumbago and motor function were assessed by using visual analogue scale(VAS) and present pain intensity(PPI)and lumbar range of motion(ROM) separately. Following the treatment, of the 20 and 26 acute lumbar sprain patients in the control and treatment groups, 6(30.0%)and 14(53.8%)were cured, 9 (45.0%) and 11 (42.4%) experienced an improvement in their symptoms, 5 (25.0%) and 1 (3.8%) was invalid, with the effective rates being 75.0% and 96.2%, respectively. Compared with pre-treatment, the ROM and VAS scores were significantly decreased in both the control and treatment groups post-treatment (Plumbar motion function and in pain relief (Plumbar movement is effective in reducing lumbar pain and improving lumbar motor function in the treatment of acute lumbar sprain.

  11. Association of low back pain with muscle stiffness and muscle mass of the lumbar back muscles, and sagittal spinal alignment in young and middle-aged medical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Aoyama, Tomoki; Murakami, Takashi; Yanase, Ko; Ji, Xiang; Tateuchi, Hiroshige; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-11-01

    Muscle stiffness of the lumbar back muscles in low back pain (LBP) patients has not been clearly elucidated because quantitative assessment of the stiffness of individual muscles was conventionally difficult. This study aimed to examine the association of LBP with muscle stiffness assessed using ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE) and muscle mass of the lumbar back muscle, and spinal alignment in young and middle-aged medical workers. The study comprised 23 asymptomatic medical workers [control (CTR) group] and 9 medical workers with LBP (LBP group). Muscle stiffness and mass of the lumbar back muscles (lumbar erector spinae, multifidus, and quadratus lumborum) in the prone position were measured using ultrasonic SWE. Sagittal spinal alignment in the standing and prone positions was measured using a Spinal Mouse. The association with LBP was investigated by multiple logistic regression analysis with a forward selection method. The analysis was conducted using the shear elastic modulus and muscle thickness of the lumbar back muscles, and spinal alignment, age, body height, body weight, and sex as independent variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle and body height were significant and independent determinants of LBP, but that muscle mass and spinal alignment were not. Muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle in the LBP group was significantly higher than that in the CTR group. The results of this study suggest that LBP is associated with muscle stiffness of the lumbar multifidus muscle in young and middle-aged medical workers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Location of Radicular Spinal Arteries in the Lumbar Spine from Analysis of CT Angiograms of the Abdomen and Pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jeremy I; McAuliffe, Matthew; Smoger, David

    2016-01-01

    Reports of catastrophic neurologic injuries following lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections are rare but serious potential complications. The traditional method of performing lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections is in the "safe triangle" to avoid contact to the spinal nerve. Some authors advocate an alternative approach by placing the needle inferiorly in a region referred to as "Kambin's triangle" to avoid incurring arteries. This study aimed to determine the location of arteries within the L1-L4 intervertebral foramen in vivo, specifically if they lie within or in close proximity to the "safe triangle" or Kambin's triangle using CT angiograms of the abdomen and pelvis. The authors retrospectively evaluated the location in vivo of arterial vessels in the intervertebral foramen from L1 to L4 in patients who underwent abdominopelvic CT angiograms for aortic vascular disease. The data were reanalyzed to confirm inter-rater reliability. Arteries were found in both the safe triangle and Kambin's triangle at a statistically significant rate (P triangle or in Kambin's triangle frequently, suggesting the location of these arteries can be quite variable. Physicians performing these procedures should use universal precautions to avoid inadvertent injection into the lumbar spinal arteries and minimize potential complications regardless of the approach. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Lumbar disc herniation and cauda equina syndrome following spinal manipulative therapy: a review of six court decisions in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Pierre; Robidoux, Sébastien

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to expand practitioners' knowledge on areas of liability when treating low back pain patients. Six cases where chiropractors in Canada were sued for allegedly causing or aggravating lumbar disc herniation after spinal manipulative therapy were retrieved using the CANLII search database. The case series involves 4 men and 2 women with an average age of 37.3 years (range, 31-48 years). Trial courts' decisions were rendered between 2000 and 2011. This study highlights the following conclusions from Canadian courts: 1) informed consent is an ongoing process that cannot be entirely delegated to office personnel; 2) when the patient's history reveals risk factors for lumbar disc herniation the chiropractor has the duty to rule out disc pathology as an etiology for the symptoms presented by the patients before beginning anything but conservative palliative treatment; 3) lumbar disc herniation may be triggered by spinal manipulative therapy on vertebral segments distant from the involved herniated disc such as the thoracic spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Kim, Stefan S.

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot) concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level. PMID:25552866

  15. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

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    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level.

  16. Repeat Lumbar Puncture: CSF Lactic Acid Levels are Predictive of Cure with Acute Bacterial Meningitis

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    Burke A. Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A common clinical problem concerns the utility of repeat lumbar puncture (LP in adults with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM, e.g., pneumococcal meningitis [1]. An LP is initially done for diagnostic purposes in patients with suspected ABM, i.e., diagnostic lumbar puncture (DLP. A repeat LP (RLP may be done 1–3 days after the initial DLP, if the patient shows no improvement. If a patient with ABM is not doing well after three days, adequacy of antimicrobial therapy is the main concern. Other reasons for RLP is to detect possible intracranial complications of ABM unrelated to adequacy of therapy [1–2].

  17. Mapping of neural pathways that influence diaphragm activity and project to the lumbar spinal cord in cats.

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    Rice, C D; Weber, S A; Waggoner, A L; Jessell, M E; Yates, B J

    2010-05-01

    During breathing, the diaphragm and abdominal muscles contract out of phase. However, during other behaviors (including vomiting, postural adjustments, and locomotion) simultaneous contractions are required of the diaphragm and other muscle groups including abdominal muscles. Recent studies in cats using transneuronal tracing techniques showed that in addition to neurons in the respiratory groups, cells in the inferior and lateral vestibular nuclei (VN) and medial pontomedullary reticular formation (MRF) influence diaphragm activity. The goal of the present study was to determine whether neurons in these regions have collateralized projections to both diaphragm motoneurons and the lumbar spinal cord. For this purpose, the transneuronal tracer rabies virus was injected into the diaphragm, and the monosynaptic retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG) was injected into the Th13-L1 spinal segments. A large fraction of MRF and VN neurons (median of 72 and 91%, respectively) that were infected by rabies virus were dual-labeled by FG. These data show that many MRF and VN neurons that influence diaphragm activity also have a projection to the lumbar spinal cord and thus likely are involved in coordinating behaviors that require synchronized contractions of the diaphragm and other muscle groups.

  18. Bloodletting acupuncture of the engorged vein around Bl-40 (Wei-Chung) for acute lumbar sprain.

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    Chen, C J; Tsai, W C; Yen, J H; Tsai, J J; Ou, T T; Lin, C C; Liu, H W

    2001-01-01

    Bloodletting acupuncture is one of the most classic methods of acupuncture therapy, and is still popularly used to treat acute lumbar sprain in the oriental world. However, most physicians in the western world are not familiar with bloodletting acupuncture, though they may know ordinary acupuncture well. Furthermore based on the literature reviewed, there have been few studies which have investigated the effect of bloodletting acupuncture upon acute lumbar sprain. In this study, we tried to determine if bloodletting acupuncture is effective for acute lumbar sprain. In total, twelve patients were enrolled for analysis. Five patients were treated with ordinary acupuncture upon the contralateral SI-3 (Hou-Hsi) point alone. Seven patients were first treated with bloodletting acupuncture to the engorged vein around the ipisilateral Bl-40 (Wei-Chung), and then followed by ordinary acupuncture upon the contralateral SI-3. It was demonstrated that bloodletting acupuncture to the engorged vein around the ipisilateral Bl-40 followed by ordinary acupuncture upon the contralateral SI-3 had more pain relief than ordinary acupuncture upon the contralateral SI-3 alone (83 +/- 23% vs. 44 +/- 28%) (P lumbar sprain.

  19. Minimally invasive treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with a novel interspinous spacer

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    Shabat S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Shay Shabat1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block3, Reuven Gepstein11Spinal Care Unit, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E Block, PhD, Inc, San Francisco, CA, USAPurpose: To assess the safety and effectiveness of a novel, minimally invasive interspinous spacer in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.Methods: A total of 53 patients (mean age, 70 ± 11 years; 45% female with intermittent neurogenic claudication secondary to moderate LSS, confirmed on imaging studies, were treated with the Superion® Interspinous Spacer (VertiFlex, Inc, San Clemente, CA and returned for follow-up visits at 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years. Study endpoints included axial and extremity pain severity with an 11-point numeric scale, Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ, back function with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, health-related quality of life with the Physical Component Summary (PCS and Mental Component Summary (MCS scores from the SF-12, and adverse events.Results: Axial and extremity pain each decreased 54% (both P < 0.001 over the 2-year follow-up period. ZCQ symptom severity scores improved 43% (P < 0.001 and ZCQ physical function improved 44% (P < 0.001 from pre-treatment to 2 years post-treatment. A statistically significant 50% improvement (P < 0.001 also was noted in back function. PCS and MCS each improved 40% (both P < 0.001 from pre-treatment to 2 years. Clinical success rates at 2 years were 83%–89% for ZCQ subscores, 75% for ODI, 78% for PCS, and 80% for MCS. No device infection, implant breakage, migration, or pull-out was observed, although two (3.8% patients underwent explant with subsequent laminectomy.Conclusion: Moderate LSS can be effectively treated with a minimally invasive interspinous spacer. This device is appropriate for select patients who have failed nonoperative treatment measures for LSS and meet strict anatomical criteria.Keywords: Superion, axial

  20. Interspinous process devices versus standard conventional surgical decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: cost-utility analysis.

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    van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Moojen, Wouter A; Arts, Mark P; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Peul, Wilco C

    2016-06-01

    In the 1980s, a new implant was developed to treat patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication caused by lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). This implant is now widely used. The objective of this study is to determine whether a favorable cost-effectiveness for interspinous process devices (IPDs) compared with conventional bony decompression is attained. Cost-utility analysis was performed alongside a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Five neurosurgical centers (including one academic and four secondary level care centers) included participants for this study. One hundred fifty-nine patients with LSS were treated with the implantation of IPD and with bony decompression. Eighty participants received an IPD, and seventy-nine participants underwent spinal bony decompression. Outcome measures were quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and societal costs in the first year (estimated per quarter), estimated from patient-reported utilities (US and The Netherlands EuroQol 5D [EQ-5D] and EuroQol visual analog scale) and diaries on costs (health-care costs, patient costs, and productivity costs). All analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. Given the statistical uncertainty of differences between costs and QALYs, cost-effectiveness acceptability curves graph the probability that a strategy is cost effective, as a function of willingness to pay. Paradigm Spine funded this trial but did not have any part in data analysis or the design and preparation of this article. According to the EQ-5D, the valuation of quality of life after IPD and decompression was not different. Mean utilities during all four quarters were, not significantly, less favorable after IPD according to the EQ-5D with a decrease in QALYs according to the US EQ-5D of 0.024 (95% confidence interval, -0.031 to 0.079). From a health-care perspective, the costs of IPD treatment were higher (difference €3,030 per patient, 95% confidence interval, €561-€5,498). This significant difference is

  1. Surgical or nonoperative treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmivaara, Antti; Slätis, Pär; Heliövaara, Markku; Sainio, Päivi; Kinnunen, Heikki; Kankare, Jyrki; Dalin-Hirvonen, Nina; Seitsalo, Seppo; Herno, Arto; Kortekangas, Pirkko; Niinimäki, Timo; Rönty, Hannu; Tallroth, Kaj; Turunen, Veli; Knekt, Paul; Härkänen, Tommi; Hurri, Heikki

    2007-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial. To assess the effectiveness of decompressive surgery as compared with nonoperative measures in the treatment of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. No previous randomized trial has assessed the effectiveness of surgery in comparison with conservative treatment for spinal stenosis. Four university hospitals agreed on the classification of the disease, inclusion and exclusion criteria, radiographic routines, surgical principles, nonoperative treatment options, and follow-up protocols. A total of 94 patients were randomized into a surgical or nonoperative treatment group: 50 and 44 patients, respectively. Surgery comprised undercutting laminectomy of the stenotic segments in 10 patients augmented with transpedicular fusion. The primary outcome was based on assessment of functional disability using the Oswestry Disability Index (scale, 0-100). Data on the intensity of leg and back pain (scales, 0-10), as well as self-reported and measured walking ability were compiled at randomization and at follow-up examinations at 6, 12, and 24 months. Both treatment groups showed improvement during follow-up. At 1 year, the mean difference in favor of surgery was 11.3 in disability (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3-18.4), 1.7 in leg pain (95% CI, 0.4-3.0), and 2.3(95% CI, 1.1-3.6) in back pain. At the 2-year follow-up, the mean differences were slightly less: 7.8 in disability (95% CI, 0.8-14.9) 1.5 in leg pain (95% CI, 0.3-2.8), and 2.1 in back pain (95% CI, 1.0-3.3). Walking ability, either reported or measured, did not differ between the two treatment groups. Although patients improved over the 2-year follow-up regardless of initial treatment, those undergoing decompressive surgery reported greater improvement regarding leg pain, back pain, and overall disability. The relative benefit of initial surgical treatment diminished over time, but outcomes of surgery remained favorable at 2 years. Longer follow-up is needed to determine if these

  2. Differences in Gait Characteristics of Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis (L4 Radiculopathy) and Those with Osteoarthritis of the Hip.

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    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    It is important to differentially diagnose thigh pain from lumbar spinal stenosis (particularly lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy) and osteoarthritis of the hip. In this study, using a treadmill and a motion analysis method, gait characteristics were compared between these conditions. Patients with lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy had increased physiological knee flexion immediately after foot-ground contact, possibly owing to a slight decrease in the muscle strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip had decreased range of motion of the hip joint probably due to anatomically limited mobility as well as gait strategy to avoid pain resulting from increased internal pressure on the hip joint during its extension. Our facile and noninvasive method can be useful for the differential diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis from osteoarthritis of the hip.

  3. Differences in Gait Characteristics of Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis (L4 Radiculopathy and Those with Osteoarthritis of the Hip.

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    Noriaki Yokogawa

    Full Text Available It is important to differentially diagnose thigh pain from lumbar spinal stenosis (particularly lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy and osteoarthritis of the hip. In this study, using a treadmill and a motion analysis method, gait characteristics were compared between these conditions. Patients with lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy had increased physiological knee flexion immediately after foot-ground contact, possibly owing to a slight decrease in the muscle strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip had decreased range of motion of the hip joint probably due to anatomically limited mobility as well as gait strategy to avoid pain resulting from increased internal pressure on the hip joint during its extension. Our facile and noninvasive method can be useful for the differential diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis from osteoarthritis of the hip.

  4. Association between history and physical examination factors and change in lumbar multifidus muscle thickness after spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L.; Fritz, Julie M.; Hebert, Jeffrey J.; Kawchuk, Greg N.; Parent, Eric C.; Gill, Norman W.; Childs, John D.; Teyhen, Deydre S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the clinical characteristics of patients with low back pain (LBP) who display improved lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle function after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) may provide insight into a potentially synergistic interaction between SMT and exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the baseline historical and physical examination factors associated with increased contracted LM muscle thickness one week after SMT. Eighty-one participants with LBP underwent a baseline physical examination and ultrasound imaging assessment of the LM muscle during submaximal contraction before and one week after SMT. The relationship between baseline examination variables and 1-week change in contracted LM thickness was assessed using correlation analysis and hierarchical multiple linear regression. Four variables best predicted the magnitude of increases in contracted LM muscle thickness after SMT. When combined, these variables suggest that patients with LBP, (1) that are fairly acute, (2) have at least a moderately good prognosis without focal and irritable symptoms, and (3) exhibit signs of spinal instability, may be the best candidates for a combined SMT and LSE treatment approach. PMID:22516351

  5. Transcriptomic evidence of a para-inflammatory state in the middle aged lumbar spinal cord.

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    Galbavy, William; Lu, Yong; Kaczocha, Martin; Puopolo, Michelino; Liu, Lixin; Rebecchi, Mario J

    2017-01-01

    We have previously reported elevated expression of multiple pro-inflammatory markers in the lumbar spinal cord (LSC) of middle-aged male rats compared to young adults suggesting a para-inflammatory state develops in the LSC by middle age, a time that in humans is associated with the greatest pain prevalence and persistence. The goal of the current study was to examine the transcriptome-wide gene expression differences between young and middle aged LSC. Young (3 month) and middle-aged (17 month) naïve Fisher 344 rats (n = 5 per group) were euthanized, perfused with heparinized saline, and the LSC were removed. ~70% of 31,000 coding sequences were detected. After normalization, ~ 1100 showed statistically significant differential expression. Of these genes, 353 middle-aged annotated genes differed by > 1.5 fold compared to the young group. Nearly 10% of these genes belonged to the microglial sensome. Analysis of this subset revealed that the principal age-related differential pathways populated are complement, pattern recognition receptors, OX40, and various T cell regulatory pathways consistent with microglial priming and T cell invasion and modulation. Many of these pathways substantially overlap those previously identified in studies of LSC of young animals with chronic inflammatory or neuropathic pain. Up-modulation of complement pathway, microglial priming and activation, and T cell/antigen-presenting cell communication in healthy middle-aged LSC was found. Taken together with our previous work, the results support our conclusion that an incipient or para-inflammatory state develops in the LSC in healthy middle-aged adults.

  6. Physical therapy interventions for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review.

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    Macedo, Luciana Gazzi; Hum, Abraham; Kuleba, Laura; Mo, Joey; Truong, Linda; Yeung, Mankeen; Battié, Michele C

    2013-12-01

    Physical therapy is commonly prescribed for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS); however, little is known about its effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to systematically review randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled trials, and cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of physical therapy for LSS. Studies were searched on electronic databases to January 2012. Inclusion criteria were: clinical diagnosis of LSS with confirmatory imaging, evaluation of physical therapy treatment, presence of a comparison group, and outcomes of pain, disability, function, or quality of life. Outcomes were extracted and, when possible, pooled using RevMan 5, a freely available review program from the Cochrane Library. Ten studies were included: 5 RCTs, 2 controlled trials, 2 mixed-design studies, and 1 longitudinal cohort study. Pooled effects of 2 studies revealed that the addition of a physical therapy modality to exercise had no statistically significant effect on outcome. Pooled effects results of RCTs evaluating surgery versus physical therapy demonstrated that surgery was better than physical therapy for pain and disability at long term (2 years) only. Other results suggested that exercise is significantly better than no exercise, that cycling and body-weight-supported treadmill walking have similar effects, and that corsets are better than no corsets. The limitations of this review include the low quality and small number of studies, as well as the heterogeneity in outcomes and treatments. No conclusions could be drawn from the review regarding which physical therapy treatment is superior for LSS. There was low-quality evidence suggesting that modalities have no additional effect to exercise and that surgery leads to better long-term (2 years) outcomes for pain and disability, but not walking distance, than physical therapy in patients with LSS.

  7. Scoping review to develop common data elements for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Allen; Raad, Jason; Akuthota, Venu; Segal, Neil; Nitsch, Kristian P; Rho, Monica; Chan, Leighton; Casey, Ellen; Press, Joel; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Moore, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Common data elements (CDE) represent an important tool for understanding and classifying health outcomes across settings. Although CDEs have been developed for a number of disorders, to date CDEs for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) have not been fully developed. To facilitate the identification of CDEs and measures to assess them, this technical study leverages the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), peer-reviewed research, and a panel of experts to identify CDEs specific to LSS. The study aimed to define CDEs for disease characteristics and outcomes of LSS using the World Health Organization's ICF taxonomy, and to facilitate the selection of assessment instruments for research and clinical care. This is a scoping review using a modified Delphi approach with a technical expert panel composed of clinicians and scientists representing the academia, policy and advocacy stakeholders, and professional associations with expertise in LSS. This is a scoping review to identify measures that assess LSS symptoms. Thirty-one subject matter experts (SMEs) prioritized ICF codes and evaluated instruments measuring specific domains. We used a modified Delphi technique to evaluate item-level content and achieve consensus. SMEs prioritized 53 ICF codes; 3 received 100% endorsement, 27 received ≥90% endorsement, whereas the remaining 23 received ≥80% endorsement. Prioritized ICF codes represent diverse domains, including pain, activities and participation, and emotional well-being. The review yielded 58 instruments; we retained 24 for content analysis. The retained instruments adequately represent the ICFs activities and participation, and body function domains. Body structure and environmental factors were assessed infrequently. Adoption of these CDEs may guide clinical decision making and facilitate comparative effectiveness trials for interventions focused on LSS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2%) patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4%) had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7%) had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS. PMID:20698999

  9. Association between changes in abdominal and lumbar multifidus muscle thickness and clinical improvement after spinal manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Fritz, Julie M; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Kawchuk, Greg N; Childs, John D; Parent, Eric C; Gill, Norman W; Teyhen, Deydre S

    2011-06-01

    Prospective case series. To examine the relation between improved disability and changes in abdominal and lumbar multifidus (LM) thickness using ultrasound imaging following spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) in patients with low back pain (LBP). Although there is a growing body of literature demonstrating physiologic effects following the application of SMT, few studies have attempted to correlate these changes with clinically relevant outcomes. Eighty-one participants with LBP underwent 2 thrust SMT treatments and 3 assessment sessions within 1 week. Transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and LM muscle thickness was assessed during each session, using ultrasound imaging of the muscles at rest and during submaximal contractions. The Modified Oswestry Disability Index was used to quantify participants' improvement in LBP-related disability. Stepwise hierarchical multiple linear regression and repeated-measures analysis of variance were performed to examine the multivariate relationship between change in muscle thickness and clinical improvement over time. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, and body mass index, change in contracted LM muscle thickness was predictive of improved disability at 1 week (P = .02). As expected, larger increases in contracted LM muscle thickness at 1 week were associated with larger improvements in LBP-related disability. Contrary to our hypothesis, significant decreases in both contracted TrA and IO muscle thickness were observed immediately following SMT; but these changes were transient and unrelated to whether participants experienced clinical improvements. These findings provide evidence that clinical improvement following SMT is associated with increased thickening of the LM muscle during a submaximal task. Prognosis, level 4.

  10. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

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    Ahn Kang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS. Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2% patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS.

  11. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction.

  12. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION WITH TRANSFORAMINAL NERVE ROOT BLOCK

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    EMILIANO NEVES VIALLE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of anesthetic transforaminal nerve root block in patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation through a prospective observational study. Methods: The study included 176 patients from a private clinic undergoing transforaminal injection performed by a single spinal surgeon. The patients were assessed after two weeks, three months and six months regarding to the improvement of the pain radiating to the lower limbs. In case of persistent symptoms, patients could choose to perform a new nerve root block and maintenance of physical therapy or be submitted to conventional microdiscectomy. Results: By the end of six-month follow-up of the 176 patients, 116 had a favorable outcome (95 after one block and 21 after two blocks, and only 43 required surgery. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest a positive effect of transforaminal block for the treatment of sciatica in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

  13. High-Force Versus Low-Force Lumbar Traction in Acute Lumbar Sciatica Due to Disc Herniation: A Preliminary Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Dufour, Stéphane Pascal; Schaeffer, Michael; Sauleau, Erik; Vautravers, Philippe; Lecocq, Jehan; Dupeyron, Arnaud

    This study compared the effects of high-force versus low-force lumbar traction in the treatment of acute lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation. A randomized double blind trial was performed, and 17 subjects with acute lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation were assigned to high-force traction at 50% body weight (BW; LT50, n = 8) or low force traction at 10% BW (LT10, n = 9) for 10 sessions in 2 weeks. Radicular pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), lumbo-pelvic-hip complex motion (finger-to-toe test), lumbar-spine mobility (Schöber-Macrae test), nerve root compression (straight-leg-raising test), disability (EIFEL score), drug consumption, and overall evaluation of each patient were measured at days 0, 7, 1, 4, and 28. Significant (P traction treatment was independent of the level of medication. During the 2-week follow-up at day 28, only the LT10 group improved (P lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation who received 2 weeks of lumbar traction reported reduced radicular pain and functional impairment and improved well-being regardless of the traction force group to which they were assigned. The effects of the traction treatment were independent of the initial level of medication and appeared to be maintained at the 2-week follow-up. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis: a prospective, randomized study comparing decompressive laminectomy and arthrodesis with and without spinal instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischgrund, J S; Mackay, M; Herkowitz, H N; Brower, R; Montgomery, D M; Kurz, L T

    1997-12-15

    This prospective study analyzed the influence of transpedicular instrumented on the operative treatment of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. To determine whether the addition of transpedicular instrumented improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterolateral fusion after decompression for spinal stenosis with concomitant degenerative spondylolisthesis. Decompression is often necessary in the treatment of symptomatic patients who have degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Results of recent studies demonstrated that outcomes are significantly improved if posterolateral arthrodesis is performed at the listhesed level. A meta-analysis of the literature concluded that adjunctive spinal instrumentation for this procedure can enhance the fusion rate, although the effect on clinical outcome remains uncertain. Seventy-six patients who had symptomatic spinal stenosis associated with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis were prospectively studied. All patients underwent posterior decompression with concomitant posterolateral intertransverse process arthrodesis. The patients were randomized to a segmental transpedicular instrumented or noninstrumented group. Sixty-seven patients were available for a 2-year follow-up. Clinical outcome was excellent or good in 76% of the patients in whom instrumentation was placed and in 85% of those in whom no instrumentation was placed (P = 0.45). Successful arthrodesis occurred in 82% of the instrumented cases versus 45% of the noninstrumented cases (P = 0.0015). Overall, successful fusion did not influence patient outcome (P = 0.435). In patients undergoing single-level posterolateral fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis, the use of pedicle screws may lead to a higher fusion rate, but clinical outcome shows no improvement in pain in the back and lower limbs.

  15. Lumbar spondylosis, lumbar spinal stenosis, knee pain, back muscle strength are associated with the locomotive syndrome: Rural population study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Daisuke; Tsuda, Eiichi; Wada, Kanichiro; Kumagai, Gentaro; Sasaki, Eiji; Nawata, Atsushi; Nakagomi, Sho; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To comprehensively investigate the clinical and physical factors associating with locomotive syndrome (Loc-S); the locomotorium-disability for daily life. 647 volunteers participated (247 males, 400 females, Age: 58.4 ± 11.0, BMI: 22.5 ± 3.3). Three self-assessment questionnaires were administered: 1) "25-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale" (GFLS-25) for evaluating Loc-S (GLFS-25 ≥ 16 defined as Loc-S); 2) "diagnostic support tool for LSS" (LSS-DST) for evaluating the prevalence of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS); 3) Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Plain radiographs of the bilateral knees and lumbar spine were evaluated, and the severity of lumbar spondylosis (LS) and knee osteoarthritis (KOA) defined by Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Bone status was evaluated by using the osteo-sono assessment index (OSI) at the calcaneus. Isometric muscle strength of trunk and leg (Nm/kg, both extension and flexion) were evaluated. Linear regression analysis was performed to elucidate the factors concerned with GFLS-25 including age, sex, and BMI. Thirty-nine subjects (6.0%, 13 males, 26 females) were defined as having Loc-S. Single regression model showed that age, height, BMI, skeletal muscle mass, OSI, LSS, KOOS, the severity of LS and KOA, and trunk- and leg-muscle strength were correlated with the degree of GLFS-25. Stepwise multiple regression model showed that sex, height, LSS, KOOS, the severity of LS, and back muscle strength were significantly correlated with that of GLFS-25. In this cross-sectional study, pain status associated with LSS and knee joint, structural severity for LS, and back muscle strength primarily affected the degree of GFLS-25. For managing Loc-S, we must pay more intensive attention to these factors. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Improved activation of lumbar multifidus following spinal manipulation: a case report applying rehabilitative ultrasound imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brenner, Alexander K; Gill, Norman W; Buscema, Christopher J; Kiesel, Kyle

    2007-01-01

    .... The use of rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) may offer a convenient way to investigate and document possible changes occurring in the lumbar multifidus associated with manipulation intervention...

  17. Fixed lumbar apical vertebral rotation predicts spinal decompensation in Lenke type 3C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behensky, Hannes; Cole, Ashley A; Freeman, Brian J C; Grevitt, Michael P; Mehdian, Hossein S; Webb, John K

    2007-10-01

    Retrospective radiographic review of surgically treated double major curves (Lenke type 3C) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. To evaluate the role of selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion in double major curves with third generation instrumentation and to identify preoperative radiographic parameters that predict postoperative coronal spinal decompensation. Traditionally the surgical treatment of double major curves consists of fusion of both the thoracic and the lumbar curve. Few attempt to perform selective thoracic fusion in this curve pattern because of the potential to create spinal imbalance. Thirty-six patients with Lenke type 3C curves underwent a selective posterior thoracic correction and fusion with either Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation or the Universal Spine System. Radiographs were evaluated to assess coronal and sagittal balance, curve flexibility, and curve correction at a minimum follow up of 2 years. Postoperative coronal spinal decompensation was investigated with respect to preoperative radiographic parameters on standing anteroposterior (AP), standing lateral radiographs, thoracic and lumbar supine side-bending radiographs. Coronal spinal decompensation was defined as plumbline deviation of C7 of more than 2 cm with respect to the centre sacral vertical line (CSVL) within 2 years of surgery. Twenty-six patients (72%) showed satisfactory frontal plane alignment patients (28%) showed coronal spinal decompensation. Significant group differences, however, were identified for lumbar apical vertebral rotation, measured according to Perdriolle (La scoliose. Son êtude tridimensionnelle. Maloine, Paris, pp 179, 1979) (A 16 degrees , B 22 degrees , P = 0.02), percentage correction (derotation) of lumbar apical vertebrae in lumbar supine side-bending films in comparison to standing AP radiographs (A 49%, B 27%, P = 0.002) and thoracic curve flexibility (A 43%, B 25%, P = 0.03). High correlation was noted between postoperative

  18. Limited usefulness of traction-compression films in the radiographic diagnosis of lumbar spinal instability. Comparison with flexion-extension films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, M; Manninen, H I; Lindgrer, K A; Turunen, M; Airaksinen, O

    1997-01-15

    A prospective, within-patient comparison of two methods for functional radiography of lumbar spine with consecutive patients. To evaluate the usefulness of traction-compression radiography compared with conventional flexion-extension radiography in diagnosis of lumbar spinal instability. Flexion-extension radiography generally is used and widely recognized as an effective method for diagnosis of segmental lumbar spinal instability, but the usefulness and findings of traction-compression films are less well known. Flexion-extension and traction-compression radiography were performed on 306 consecutive patients (mean age, 43 years; range, 14-68 years) with clinically suspected lumbar spinal instability. Radiography was performed of each patient in an upright position. Axial traction was accomplished by letting the patient hang by his or her hands from a horizontal bar. Compression views were taken when the patient had sandbags of approximately 30% of the his or her weight on the shoulders. Main interest was translational forward and backward displacement of one vertebra on another. Signs of translational instability were present on the functional radiographs of 27% (84 of 306) of the patients. In diagnosis of instability, the overall agreement of flexion-extension and traction-compression films was only 0.786, and also statistic Kappa remained poor (0.05). Flexion-extension films more frequently revealed signs of instability than traction-compression films: 81 versus seven patients. Traction-compression films seem to be of questionable value in diagnosis of lumbar spinal instability.

  19. Outcome of the L5-S1 segment after posterior instrumented spinal surgery in degenerative lumbar diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei; Niu, Chi-Chien

    2009-01-01

    Posterior decompression, instrumentation, and posterolateral fusion are surgical procedures for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases. Solid fusion usually causes adjacent problems. This study investigated the clinical outcome and radiographic fate of the L5-S1 segment in patients who underwent posterior instrumented surgery for degenerative lumbar diseases. From January 1999 to December 2000, 181 patients (average age 59.4 years, range 45-79 years) underwent posterior decompression, posterior instrumentation, and posterolateral fusion for degenerative lumbar diseases (including degenerative spondylolisthesis and degenerative lumbar scoliosis) with spinal stenosis. Modified Brodsky's criteria and the Oswestry disability index were used to evaluate patients before surgery and at the final followup. Degenerative changes in the L5-S1 intervertebral disc were evaluated with the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) grading scale. Adjacent L5-S1 segmental instability was defined as the appearance of retrolisthesis, anterolisthesis, or lateral listhesis in the static or dynamic radiographs at the final follow-up. Only 1 of these 181 patients developed inferior adjacent instability, but there were no symptoms related to this instability. The mean pre-operative L5-S1 disc degenerative score was 1.73 -/+ 0.66 and at the last follow-up, 1.87 -/+ 0.72 (p = 0.006). There was no symptomatic disc degeneration necessitating further L5-S1 fusion during follow-up. One hundred fifty-six patients (86%) exhibited satisfactory results (good or excellent). The mean Oswestry score was 21.8 -/+ 6.0 preoperatively, which improved to 9.6 -/+ 7.4 at the last follow-up (p = 0.001). The L5-S1 disc degenerated more after posterolateral lumbar floating fusion. However, there was no symptomatic inferior adjacent instability or symptomatic L5-S1 disc degeneration requiring further L5-S1 fusion at a mean 5.1 years follow-up.

  20. Spinal sagittal balance status affects postoperative actual falls and quality of life after decompression and fusion in-situ surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Ho; Park, Jin-Oh; Kim, Hak-Sun; Suk, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Moon, Seong-Hwan

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that good spinal sagittal alignment reduces the risk of fall and positive sagittal balance is the radiographic parameter that is most highly correlated with adverse health outcomes. However, no reports have demonstrated a change in risk of falling in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to sagittal balance status. From September 2013 to October 2014, 141 patients who underwent lumbar spine surgery, including decompression and fusion in-situ for LSS, were enrolled in this study. Based on sagittal balance status, patients were divided into sagittal balance (SB) and sagittal imbalance (SI) groups. Four functional mobility tests were used to evaluate the risk of falling, and a fall diary, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the Euro-QoL 5D(EQ-5D) visual analogue scale (VAS) were utilized to assess clinical improvement. The mean patient age was 70.1 years in the SB group (N=46) and 70.9 years in the SI group (N=95) (not significant). The mean C7PL was 7.9mm in the SB group and 66.1mm in the SI group preoperatively (psagittal balance during follow-up significantly affected ODI, EQ-VAS, functional mobility tests. (psagittal balance status might be important to attain better surgical and functional outcomes and decrease the incidence of actual falls after surgical treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Conventional Supine MRI With a Lumbar Pillow-An Alternative to Weight-bearing MRI for Diagnosing Spinal Stenosis?: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt; Hansen, Philip; Grindsted, Jacob; Rasti, Zoreh; Bliddal, Henning; Riis, Robert G C; Boesen, Mikael

    2017-05-01

    Cross-sectional study. To investigate if adding a lumbar pillow in supine position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is superior to standing positional MRI for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The upright standing position and especially extension of the lumbar spine seem to worsening symptoms of LSS. However, it is unclear whether a forced lumbar extension by a pillow in the lower back during conventional supine MRI may improve the diagnostics of LSS compared with standing MRI. Patients suspected for LSS and referred to conventional MRI were included to an additional positional MRI scan (0.25T G-Scan) performed in: (1) conventional supine, (2) standing, (3) supine with a lumbar pillow in the lower back. LSS was evaluated for each position in consensus on a 0 to 3 semi-quantitative grading scale. Independently, L2-S1 lordosis angle, spinal cross-sectional diameter (SCSD), dural cross-sectional diameter (DCSD), and dural cross-sectional diameter (DCSA) were measured. The smallest dural diameter was defined as stenosis level and the largest control level for comparison. Twenty-seven patients (60.6 years; ±9.4) were included. The lordosis angle increased significantly from supine to standing (3.2° CI: 1.2-5.2) and with the lumbar pillow (12.8° CI: 10.3-15.3). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences between positions (P pillow. A difference in the semi-quantitative grades was only found between standing and supine with a lumbar pillow, and the scan with a lumbar pillow was significantly more painful. Standing MRI and supine MRI with a lumbar pillow resulted in equal changes in the lumbar spine, although standing MRI may be more sensitive in the assessment of patients suspected for LSS. 2.

  2. Reversibility of nerve root sedimentation sign in lumbar spinal stenosis patients after decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Christian; Melloh, Markus; Staub, Lukas P; Lord, Sarah J; Merk, Harry R; Barz, Thomas

    2017-02-04

    The nerve root sedimentation sign (SedSign) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sign for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). It is included in the assessment of LSS to help determine whether decompression surgery is indicated. Assessment of the reversibility of the SedSign after surgery may also have clinical implications for the decision about whether or not a secondary operation or revision is needed. This study investigated if lumbar decompression leads to a reversal of the SedSign in patients with LSS and a positive SedSign pre-operatively; and if a reversal is associated with more favourable clinical outcomes. If reversal of the SedSign is usual after sufficient decompression surgery, a new positive SedSign could be used as an indicator of new stenosis in previously operated patients. A prospective cohort study of 30 LSS patients with a positive pre-operative SedSign undergoing decompression surgery with or without instrumented fusion was undertaken to assess the presence of nerve root sedimentation (=negative SedSign) on MRI at 3 months post-operation. Functional limitation (Oswestry Disability Index, ODI), back and leg pain (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS), and treadmill walking distance were also compared pre- and 3 months post-operatively. The short follow-up period was chosen to exclude adjacent segment disease and the potential influence of surgical technique on clinical outcomes at longer follow-up times. 30 patients [median age 73 years (interquartile range (IQR) 65-79), 16 males] showed a median pre-operative ODI of 66 (IQR 52-78), a median VAS of 8 (IQR 7-9), and a median walking distance of 0 m (IQR 0-100). Three months post-operation 27 patients had a negative SedSign. In this group, we found improved clinical outcomes at follow-up: median post-operative ODI of 21 (IQR 12-26), median VAS of 2 (IQR 2-4), and median walking distance of 1000 m (IQR 500-1000). These changes were all statistically significant (p < 0.001). Three patients

  3. Seven years follow-up for total lumbar facet joint replacement (TOPS) in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekstein, Yoram; Floman, Yizhar; Smorgick, Yossi; Rand, Nahshon; Millgram, Michael; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical improvement of a total posterior arthroplasty system in the surgical management of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and or spinal stenosis. During a 1-year period (June 2006 to July 2007), ten patients were enrolled in a non-randomized prospective clinical study. The primary indication was neurogenic claudication due to spinal stenosis with single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were evaluated with X-rays and MRI scans, visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability questionnaire, and the SF-36 health survey preoperatively, at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and at 1, 2, 3 and 7 years postoperatively. The VAS score for back pain dropped from 56.2 preoperatively to 12.5 at 6 weeks and 19 at 7 years follow-up. The VAS score for worse leg pain dropped from 83.5 before surgery to 13 at 6 weeks and 8.8 at 7 years follow-up. The ODI dropped from 49.1 preoperatively to 13.5 at 6 weeks and 7.8 at 7 years follow-up. MRI examination at 7 years after surgery did not demonstrate stenosis adjacent to the stabilized segment. Spondylolisthesis did not progress in any of the cases. One patient had a symptomatic L3-L4 far lateral disc herniation 5 years after surgery whose symptoms resolved with non-operative treatment. In one patient, conversion to posterolateral fusion was performed due to an early device malfunction. In patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, decompression and posterior arthroplasty with the TOPS System can maintain clinical improvement and radiologic stability over time.

  4. Anatomical study of preganglionic spinal nerve and disc relation at different lumbar levels: Special aspect for microscopic spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Wolfram; Boudelal, Redouane; Zirke, Sonja; von Schulze Pellengahr, Christoph; Wiese, Matthias; Lahner, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar microdiscectomy is a widespread popular method of treatment. One major challenge is the spine level dependent different anatomy and the limited sight on the nerve root during the surgical procedure. The aim was to analyze the specific anatomic relation of nerve root, intervertebral disc and intervertebral ganglion under determination of the specific nerve distances. Furthermore the relation between the disc and the corresponding nerve root was evaluated. Regular human lumbar spine specimens of body donors were included in the study. Microscopic assisted dissection was performed. The topographical distances between a defined disc measurement point (DP) and the corresponding nerve root shoulder (NS) were measured. The preganglionic distance from the caudal axilla point (AP) of the spinal nerve root and the center point (CG) of the spinal ganglion in the intervertebral foramen were determined. The AP-CG distance increased gradually in the caudal direction from L1 (7.25 ± 2.72 mm right side, 7.30 ± 2.85 mm left side) to a maximum for L5 (16.00 ± 3.39 mm right side, 16.50 ± 3.58 mm left side, plumbar segment and demands therefore an exact preoperative planning using this specific knowledge to perform a successful microscopic spine surgery. The results of the study support a better understanding of the relevant anatomy and help to reduce incomplete herniated disc removal and to avoid surgical complications.

  5. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  6. The prevalence of depressive symptoms before and after surgery and its association with disability in patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlman, Marko; Häkkinen, Arja; Dekker, Joost; Marttinen, Ilkka; Vihtonen, Kimmo; Neva, Marko H

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and disability pre-operatively, at 3 months and at 1 year after lumbar spine fusion surgery. Data was extracted from a dedicated lumbar spine fusion register, giving 232 patients (mean age 62 years, 158 females) who had undergone instrumented lumbar spine fusion. The frequency of depressive symptoms and disability was evaluated using the Depression Scale (DEPS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Depressive symptoms were found in 34, 13, and 15 % of the patients pre-operatively, at 3 months and at 1 year after surgery, respectively. The mean DEPS score decreased from 16.2 to 8.6 (p chronic back pain undergoing spinal fusion had depressive symptoms pre-operatively. The prevalence of depressive symptoms decreased after surgery. Although disability remained higher in those patients who had reported depressive symptoms pre-operatively, disability did decrease significantly in both groups post-operatively. Thus, there is no need to exclude depressive patients from operation, but screening measures and appropriate treatment practises throughout both pre-operative and post-operative periods are encouraged.

  7. Assessment of effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar central spinal canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic persistent low back and lower extremity pain secondary to central spinal stenosis is common and disabling. Lumbar surgical interventions with decompression or fusion are most commonly performed to manage severe spinal stenosis. However, epidural injections are also frequently performed in managing central spinal stenosis. After failure of epidural steroid injections, the next sequential step is percutaneous adhesiolysis and hypertonic saline neurolysis with a targeted delivery. The literature on the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing central spinal stenosis after failure of epidural injections has not been widely studied. A prospective evaluation. An interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center, a private practice setting in the United States. To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain with lumbar central spinal stenosis. Seventy patients were recruited. The initial phase of the study was randomized, double-blind with a comparison of percutaneous adhesiolysis with caudal epidural injections. The 25 patients from the adhesiolysis group continued with follow-up, along with 45 additional patients, leading to a total of 70 patients. All patients received percutaneous adhesiolysis and appropriate placement of the Racz catheter, followed by an injection of 5 mL of 2% preservative-free lidocaine with subsequent monitoring in the recovery room. In the recovery room, each patient also received 6 mL of 10% hypertonic sodium chloride solution, and 6 mg of non-particulate betamethasone, followed by an injection of 1 mL of sodium chloride solution and removal of the catheter. Multiple outcome measures were utilized including the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), the Oswestry Disability Index 2.0 (ODI), employment status, and opioid intake with assessment at 3, 6, and 12, 18 and 24 months post treatment. The primary outcome measure was 50% or more

  8. Effect of a pain diary use on recovery from acute low back (lumbar) sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a daily pain diary on recovery from acute low back sprain. Pain diaries are often recommended to or used by patients suffering with acute lumbar (low back) sprain. Diaries have been shown to be associated, however, with a slower rate of recovery after whiplash (neck) injury. The effect of diary use on recovery from low back injury is unknown. Subjects with acute lumbar (low back) sprain were randomly assigned to one of the two groups: a diary group and control group. A total of 58 out of 62 initially recruited subjects were seen in follow-up 3-month post-injury, 29 in the diary group, and 29 in the control group. Data were gathered within 1 week of injury on sex, age, and Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) scores. The diary group was asked then to keep a record of their overall pain experience, rating their pain on a scale of 1-10 on a daily basis for 4 weeks. At the outset, both groups had similar mean age, sex distribution, and mean ODQ scores. After 4 weeks of pain diary use, fewer diary group subjects reported recovery at 3 months compared with the control group (52 vs. 79 %, respectively, p lumbar sprain subjects is associated with a reduced rate of recovery.

  9. Clinical validity of the nerve root sedimentation sign in patients with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Thomas; Staub, Lukas P; Melloh, Markus; Hamann, Gregor; Lord, Sarah J; Chatfield, Mark D; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Lange, Joern; Merk, Harry R

    2014-04-01

    The nerve root sedimentation sign in transverse magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to discriminate well between selected patients with and without lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), but the performance of this new test, when used in a broader patient population, is not yet known. To evaluate the clinical performance of the nerve root sedimentation sign in detecting central LSS above L5 and to determine its potential significance for treatment decisions. Retrospective cohort study. One hundred eighteen consecutive patients with suspected LSS (52% women, median age 62 years) with a median follow-up of 24 months. Oswestry disability index (ODI) and back and leg pain relief. We performed a clinical test validation study to assess the clinical performance of the sign by measuring its association with health outcomes. Subjects were patients referred to our orthopedic spine unit from 2004 to 2007 before the sign had been described. Based on clinical and radiological diagnostics, patients had been treated with decompression surgery or nonsurgical treatment. Changes in the ODI and pain from baseline to 24-month follow-up were compared between sedimentation sign positives and negatives in both treatment groups. Sixty-nine patients underwent surgery. Average baseline ODI in the surgical group was 54.7%, and the sign was positive in 39 patients (mean ODI improvement 29.0 points) and negative in 30 (ODI improvement 28.4), with no statistically significant difference in ODI and pain improvement between groups. In the 49 patients of the nonsurgical group, mean baseline ODI was 42.4%; the sign was positive in 18 (ODI improvement 0.6) and negative in 31 (ODI improvement 17.7). A positive sign was associated with a smaller ODI and back pain improvement than negative signs (both psedimentation sign does not appear to predict surgical outcome. In nonsurgically treated patients, a positive sign is associated with more limited improvement. In these cases, surgery might be effective

  10. Surgery versus conservative treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Urrútia, Gerard; Alarcón, José Domingo

    2011-09-15

    Systematic review. To compare the effectiveness of surgery versus conservative treatment on pain, disability, and loss of quality of life caused by symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). LSS is the most common reason for spine surgery in persons older than 65 years in the United States. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any form of conservative and surgical treatment were searched in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and TripDatabase databases until July 2009, with no language restrictions. Additional data were requested from the authors of the original studies. The methodological quality of each study was assessed independently by two reviewers, following the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Only data from randomized cohorts were extracted. A total of 739 citations were reviewed. Eleven publications corresponding to five RCTs were included. All five scored as high quality despite concerns deriving from heterogeneity of treatment, lack of blinding, and potential differences in the size of the placebo effect across groups. They included a total of 918 patients in whom conservative treatments had failed for 3 to 6 months, and included orthosis, rehabilitation, physical therapy, exercise, heat and cold, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasounds, analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and epidural steroids. Surgical treatments included the implantation of a specific type of interspinous device and decompressive surgery (with and without fusion, instrumented or not). In all the studies, surgery showed better results for pain, disability, and quality of life, although not for walking ability. Results of surgery were similar among patients with and without spondylolisthesis, and slightly better among those with neurogenic claudication than among those without it. The advantage of surgery was noticeable at 3 to 6 months and remained for up to 2 to 4 years, although at the end of that period differences tended to be

  11. Acute longitudinal ligament rupture following acute spinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Hansom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL rupture in a 47- year-old gentleman following a bicycle accident. The ALL is a continuous band of a variable thickness that acts as a primary spinal stabiliser. Stress, strain or rupture of the ALL usually occurs as a result of hyperextension, with the primary perpetrator being whiplash injuries. Such injuries have been shown to result in cervical spine instability during extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending modes. Spine radiographs of such patients may be routinely assessed as normal, therefore this specific type of injury does not lend itself to identification by traditional imaging methods. This account demonstrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion of a ligamentous neck injury in the setting of normal plain radiographs but abnormal clinical examination.

  12. Monoamine Release in the Cat Lumbar Spinal Cord during Fictive Locomotion Evoked by the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Noga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord neurons active during locomotion are innervated by descending axons that release the monoamines serotonin (5-HT and norepinephrine (NE and these neurons express monoaminergic receptor subtypes implicated in the control of locomotion. The timing, level and spinal locations of release of these two substances during centrally-generated locomotor activity should therefore be critical to this control. These variables were measured in real time by fast-cyclic voltammetry in the decerebrate cat’s lumbar spinal cord during fictive locomotion, which was evoked by electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR and registered as integrated activity in bilateral peripheral nerves to hindlimb muscles. Monoamine release was observed in dorsal horn (DH, intermediate zone/ventral horn (IZ/VH and adjacent white matter (WM during evoked locomotion. Extracellular peak levels (all sites increased above baseline by 138 ± 232.5 nM and 35.6 ± 94.4 nM (mean ± SD for NE and 5-HT, respectively. For both substances, release usually began prior to the onset of locomotion typically earliest in the IZ/VH and peaks were positively correlated with net activity in peripheral nerves. Monoamine levels gradually returned to baseline levels or below at the end of stimulation in most trials. Monoamine oxidase and uptake inhibitors increased the release magnitude, time-to-peak (TTP and decline-to-baseline. These results demonstrate that spinal monoamine release is modulated on a timescale of seconds, in tandem with centrally-generated locomotion and indicate that MLR-evoked locomotor activity involves concurrent activation of descending monoaminergic and reticulospinal pathways. These gradual changes in space and time of monoamine concentrations high enough to strongly activate various receptors subtypes on locomotor activated neurons further suggest that during MLR-evoked locomotion, monoamine action is, in part, mediated by extrasynaptic

  13. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Prospective Study on the Outcome of Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Treated With Open Laminotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wong Chung-Ting

    2012-12-01

    Result: There were significant improvement of mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association lumbar score, Oswestry Disability Index(ODI, and visual analogue scale (VAS. Male had significantly better result in ODI and VAS. There was no significant difference regarding to older age (>65 or the presence of preexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. One patient was found to have increased lumbar instability after operation. The overall reoperation rate was 6.9%.

  15. Development of a Novel Translational Model of Vibration Injury to the Spine to Study Acute Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    a higher prevalence of low back pain and are three-times more susceptible to acute herniated lumbar discs than work- ers whose occupations do not...Hardy RJ. 1975. Driving of motor vehicles as a risk factor for acute herniated lumbar intervertebral disc . Am J Epidemiol 102:63–73. 6. Panjabi MM...brain, cervical and lumbar spinal cord enlargement, cervical and lumbar discs , paraspinal muscles in both regions of the spine and the gastrocnemius

  16. A novel synthetic material for spinal fusion: a prospective clinical trial of porous bioactive titanium metal for lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Neo, Masashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Doi, Kenji; Ito, Tatsuya; Shimizu, Akira; Nakamura, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the efficacy and safety of porous bioactive titanium metal for use in a spinal fusion device, based on a prospective human clinical trial. A high-strength spinal interbody fusion device was manufactured from porous titanium metal. A bioactive surface was produced by simple chemical and thermal treatment. Five patients with unstable lumbar spine disease were treated surgically using this device in a clinical trial approved by our Ethics Review Committee and the University Hospital Medical Information Network. Clinical and radiological results were reported at the minimum follow-up period of 1 year. The optimal mechanical strength and interconnected structure of the porous titanium metal were adjusted for the device. The whole surface of porous titanium metal was treated uniformly and its bioactive ability was confirmed before clinical use. Successful bony union was achieved in all cases within 6 months without the need for autologous iliac crest bone grafting. Two specific findings including an anchoring effect and gap filling were evident radiologically. All clinical parameters improved significantly after the operation and no adverse effects were encountered during the follow-up period. Although a larger and longer-term follow-up clinical study is mandatory to reach any firm conclusions, the study results show that this porous bioactive titanium metal is promising material for a spinal fusion device.

  17. EARLY AND LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE THORACIC AND LUMBAR VERTEBRAL AND SPINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates the outcomes of operative treatment of 190 patients with spinal cord injuryof thoracic and lumbar spine for 10 years. Associated injuries were revealed in 96 patients, the mean ISS score being27.5. All patients underwent decompressive and stabilizing interventions using a transpedicular system of “Synthes” production (Saint Petersburg. Ventral interventions were performed in 27 (14.2% patients. In all cases, decompression of the spinal canalcontents at the level of damage was achieved. In those patients who were operated within two weeks after trauma, transpedicular system allowed for recovery of a form and size of the spinal canal and the damaged vertebral body. The fractures of transpedicular system were observed in patients operated both with only rear and with combined access. The errors and complications, which happened during surgery, did not influence the outcomes of treatment. The outcomes of treatment were assessed according to the neurological statusdynamics (ASIA score, recovery of support ability of the spine, the presence of pain, and patients’ recovery (Е Denis score. Favorable outcomes were achieved in 114 (61.3% patients, satisfactoryin 53 (28.5%,and poor in 19 (10.2 %.

  18. A Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0191 TITLE: A Multicenter, Randomnized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury ...CSFD and elevation of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in patients with acute spinal cord injury . This study is currently screening and enrolling patients...in Tucson and the University of Alabama in Birmingham. Steps have been initiated to add a high-volume spinal cord injury site from the East Coast to

  19. [Clinical observation of different needle retention times for acute lumbar sprain treated with float needle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junqing; Guo, Yanming; Liang, Yongying

    2015-09-01

    To observe the difference of the clinical effects of different needle retention times for acute lumbar sprain treated with float needle. One hundred and twenty patients with acute lumbar sprain were randomly divided into a 6 h group, a 12 h group, a 24 h group and a western medication group, 30 cases in each one. In the three float needle groups, plastic hose was detained near the pressure pain point on the lumbar after subcutaneous scattering with float needle. The needle retention time was 6 h, 12 h and 24 h respectively. In the western medication group, 75 mg voltaren tablet was adopted orally every day and the treatment was given for four days. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry dysfunction index (ODI) about low back pain were observed before and after treatment. Also, the comprehensive effect was assessed after treatment. After treatment, the VAS scores and the ODI scores were improved obviously than those before treatment in all groups (all P0. 05). The effective rate in the 6 h, 12 h and 24 h group was 93. 3% (28/30), 90. 0% (27/30) and 93. 3% (28/30) respectively, which were better than 73. 3% (22/30) in the western medication group (all Plumbar sprain is better than voltaren, and there is no apparent difference in retention times.

  20. Radiographic and MRI characteristics of lumbar disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and spondylosis deformans in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togni, A; Kranenburg, H J C; Morgan, J P; Steffen, F

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate clinical signs, describe lesions and differences in the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of spinal new bone formations classified as disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and/or spondylosis deformans on radiographs and compare degeneration status of the intervertebral discs using the Pfirrmann scale. Retrospective analysis of 18 dogs presented with spinal disorders using information from radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. All dogs were found to be affected with both disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and spondylosis deformans. Neurological signs due to foraminal stenosis associated with disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis were found in two dogs. Spondylosis deformans was associated with foraminal stenosis and/or disc protrusion in 15 cases. The Pfirrmann score on magnetic resonance imaging was significantly higher in spondylosis deformans compared with disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and signal intensity of new bone due to disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis was significantly higher compared to spondylosis deformans. Differences between disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and spondylosis deformans found on magnetic resonance imaging contribute to an increased differentiation between the two entities. Clinically relevant lesions in association with disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis were rare compared to those seen with spondylosis deformans. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  2. Both unilateral and bilateral pedicle screw fixation are effective for lumbar spinal fusion—A meta-analysis-based systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaquan Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation in lumbar spinal fusion, but there is still controversy about which one is more superior. We performed a meta-analysis to more accurately estimate the effectiveness of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation in lumbar spinal fusion. Studies on the comparison between unilateral and bilateral pedicle screw fixation in lumbar spinal fusion were identified from PubMed, SpringerLink, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, the Wanfang database and the China Biology Medical literature database (CBM and related references were searched. The included trials were screened according to the criteria of inclusion and exclusion. The quality of included trials was evaluated. Data were extracted by two reviewers independently. RevMan 5.1.1 was used for data analysis. The fixed or random effect model was selected based on the heterogeneity test among studies evaluated using the I2 statistic. A total of nine studies involving 567 patients were included in the analyses for the effectiveness of unilateral versus bilateral pedicle screw fixation in lumbar spinal fusion. Unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed in 287 patients and bilateral pedicle screw fixation in 280 patients. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that statistically significant differences were observed between the two fixation procedures with regard to mean operation time and amount of bleeding. There were no differences in hospitalisation days, fusion rate, complication rate, and excellent and good rates. This meta-analysis suggested that both unilateral and bilateral pedicle screw fixation are effective in one or two segmental lumbar spinal fusion. In comparison with bilateral fixation, unilateral fixation can shorten the operation time, reduce the amount of bleeding, and reduce medical expenses. There were similar effects with regard to

  3. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  4. Lumbar extraforaminal entrapment: performance characteristics of detecting the foraminal spinal angle using oblique coronal MRI. A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Wakao, Norimitsu; Kamiya, Mitsuhiro; Hirasawa, Atsuhiko; Osuka, Koji; Joko, Masahiro; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    Previous conventional magnetic resonance imaging reports on extraforaminal entrapment (e-FE) on L5-S1 have been problematic because of their complexity or lack of sensitivity and specificity. In this study, we propose a simple diagnostic method for e-FE. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of using the difference in the foraminal spinal nerve (FSN) angle of the L5 nerve, as determined by oblique coronal T2-weighted imaging (OC-T2WI), for diagnosing L5-S1 unilateral e-FE. The study design involves diagnostic accuracy with retrospective case-control study. Seventy consecutive patients with unilateral L5 radiculopathy who underwent unilateral L5-S1 extraspinal canal decompression for e-FE or 4/5 intraspinal canal decompression for lumbar spinal canal stenosis between 2009 and 2013 were included. The Japanese Orthopedic Association score, Visual Analog Scale score for leg pain, and OC-T2WI for the FSN angle of the L5 nerve were examined. The 70 patients were divided into two groups: Group A (n=21) with unilateral L5-S1 e-FE and Group B (n=49) with intraspinal canal L4-L5. Group C (n=44) comprised the control group, which included only patients with back pain without leg radiculopathy. All patients underwent OC-T2WI, and the differences in the FSN angle of the fifth lumbar spinal nerve between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides (ΔFSN angle) were examined and compared among the groups. There were no significant differences in the patient characteristics among the three groups. The ΔFSN angle was 17° in Group A, 4.8° in Group B, and 6.4° in Group C, and the laterality was significantly larger in Group A than in the other two groups. A receiver-operating characteristic curve showed areas under the curve between groups A and B and between groups A and C of 0.93 and 0.97, respectively. In addition, the cutoff value of the ΔFSN angle (10°) indicated diagnostic accuracies of 94% and 91% (sensitivity and specificity) and of 93

  5. Comparing cost-effectiveness of X-Stop with minimally invasive decompression in lumbar spinal stenosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønne, Greger; Johnsen, Lars Gunnar; Aas, Eline; Lydersen, Stian; Andresen, Hege; Rønning, Roar; Nygaard, Øystein P

    2015-04-15

    Randomized clinical trial with 2-year follow-up. To compare the cost-effectiveness of X-stop to minimally invasive decompression in patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common indication for operative treatment in elderly. Although surgery is more costly than nonoperative treatment, health outcomes for more than 2 years were shown to be significantly better. Surgical treatment with minimally invasive decompression is widely used. X-stop is introduced as another minimally invasive technique showing good results compared with nonoperative treatment. We enrolled 96 patients aged 50 to 85 years, with symptoms of neurogenic intermittent claudication within 250-m walking distance and 1- or 2-level lumbar spinal stenosis, randomized to either minimally invasive decompression or X-stop. Quality-adjusted life-years were based on EuroQol EQ-5D. The hospital unit costs were estimated by means of the top-down approach. Each cost unit was converted into a monetary value by dividing the overall cost by the amount of cost units produced. The analysis of costs and health outcomes is presented by the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The study was terminated after a midway interim analysis because of significantly higher reoperation rate in the X-stop group (33%). The incremental cost for X-stop compared with minimally invasive decompression was &OV0556;2832 (95% confidence interval: 1886-3778), whereas the incremental health gain was 0.11 quality-adjusted life-year (95% confidence interval: -0.01 to 0.23). Based on the incremental cost and effect, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was &OV0556;25,700. The majority of the bootstrap samples displayed in the northeast corner of the cost-effectiveness plane, giving a 50% likelihood that X-stop is cost-effective at the extra cost of &OV0556;25,700 (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio) for a quality-adjusted life-year. The significantly higher cost of X-stop is mainly due to

  6. Minimally invasive decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative scoliosis: Predictive factors of radiographic and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Akihito; Yoshida, Munehito; Iwahashi, Hiroki; Simpson, Andrew K; Yamada, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Shunji; Kagotani, Ryohei; Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Sasaki, Takahide; Shinto, Kazunori; Deguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2017-05-01

    There is ongoing controversy regarding the most appropriate surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) with concurrent degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS): decompression alone, decompression with limited spinal fusion, or long spinal fusion for deformity correction. The coexistence of degenerative stenosis and deformity is a common scenario; Nonetheless, selecting the appropriate surgical intervention requires thorough understanding of the patients clinical symptomatology as well as radiographic parameters. Minimally invasive (MIS) decompression surgery was performed for LSS patients with DLS. The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the clinical outcomes of MIS decompression surgery in LSS patients with DLS, and (2) to identify the predictive factors for both radiographic and clinical outcomes after MIS surgery. 438 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. Inclusion criteria was evidence of LSS and DLS with coronal curvature measuring greater than 10°. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rate, low back pain (LBP), and radiographic features were evaluated preoperatively and at over 2 years postoperatively. Of the 438 patients, 122 were included in final analysis, with a mean follow-up of 2.4 years. The JOA recovery rate was 47.6%. LBP was significantly improved at final follow-up. Cobb angle was maintained for 2 years postoperatively (p = 0.159). Clinical outcomes in foraminal stenosis patients were significantly related to sex, preoperative high Cobb angle and progression of scoliosis (p = 0.008). In the severe scoliosis patients, the JOA recovery was 44%, and was significantly depended on progression of scoliosis (Cobb angle: preoperation 29.6°, 2-years follow-up 36.9°) and mismatch between the pelvic incidence (PI) and the lumbar lordosis (LL) (preoperative PI-LL 35.5 ± 21.2°) (p = 0.028). This study investigated clinical outcomes of MIS decompression surgery in LSS patients with DLS. The predictive

  7. Diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for detecting lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangming; Chen, Ruiqiang; Xie, Peigen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Rong, Limin

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a relatively new radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis. The literature search was based on PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database up to March 2014. A total of 120 articles were identified. Seven studies involving 1,182 patients were included. The quality of the methodology of the seven studies was good. Overall, the pooled weighted value showed that the sedimentation sign had moderate sensitivity of 0.80 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83] and high specificity of 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.98). The area under the curve was 0.76. Subgroup analysis showed that the degree of morphological spinal stenosis was responsible for the heterogeneity. In the patients with severe morphological lumbar spinal stenosis, the sedimentation sign had even higher sensitivity and specificity: 0.899 (95 % CI 0.87-0.92) and 0.99 (95 % CI 0.98-1.00), respectively. The area under the curve was 0.96. In the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis without definition of morphological stenosis, there was a notable threshold effect and significant heterogeneity. The area under the curve was 0.63. Current evidence suggests that the sedimentation sign has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing severe lumbar spinal stenosis. Its performance in diagnosing moderate and mild spinal stenosis, however, has yet to be corroborated in properly designed studies.

  8. Diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for detecting lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liangming; Chen, Ruiqiang; Xie, Peigen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Rong, Limin [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-11-28

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a relatively new radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis. The literature search was based on PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database up to March 2014. A total of 120 articles were identified. Seven studies involving 1,182 patients were included. The quality of the methodology of the seven studies was good. Overall, the pooled weighted value showed that the sedimentation sign had moderate sensitivity of 0.80 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83] and high specificity of 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.98). The area under the curve was 0.76. Subgroup analysis showed that the degree of morphological spinal stenosis was responsible for the heterogeneity. In the patients with severe morphological lumbar spinal stenosis, the sedimentation sign had even higher sensitivity and specificity: 0.899 (95 % CI 0.87-0.92) and 0.99 (95 % CI 0.98-1.00), respectively. The area under the curve was 0.96. In the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis without definition of morphological stenosis, there was a notable threshold effect and significant heterogeneity. The area under the curve was 0.63. Current evidence suggests that the sedimentation sign has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing severe lumbar spinal stenosis. Its performance in diagnosing moderate and mild spinal stenosis, however, has yet to be corroborated in properly designed studies. (orig.)

  9. A 3D map of the hindlimb motor representation in the lumbar spinal cord in Sprague Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Jordan A.; Frost, Shawn B.; Peterson, Jeremy; Nudo, Randolph J.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological trauma with a prevalence of about 282 000 people living with an SCI in the United States in 2016. Advances in neuromodulatory devices hold promise for restoring function by incorporating the delivery of electrical current directly into the spinal cord grey matter via intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). In such designs, detailed topographic maps of spinal cord outputs are needed to determine ISMS locations for eliciting hindlimb movements. The primary goal of the present study was to derive a topographic map of functional motor outputs in the lumbar spinal cord to hindlimb skeletal muscles as defined by ISMS in a rat model. Approach. Experiments were carried out in nine healthy, adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats. After a laminectomy of the T13-L1 vertebrae and removal of the dura mater, a four-shank, 16-channel microelectrode array was inserted along a 3D (200 µm) stimulation grid. Trains of three biphasic current pulses were used to determine evoked movements and electromyographic (EMG) activity. Via fine wire EMG electrodes, stimulus-triggered averaging (StTA) was used on rectified EMG data to determine response latency. Main results. Hindlimb movements were elicited at a median current intensity of 6 µA, and thresholds were significantly lower in ventrolateral sites. Movements typically consisted of whole leg, hip, knee, ankle, toe, and trunk movements. Hip movements dominated rostral to the T13 vertebral segment, knee movements were evoked at the T13-L1 vertebral junction, while ankle and digit movements were found near the rostral L1 vertebra. Whole leg movements spanned the entire rostrocaudal region explored, while trunk movements dominated medially. StTAs of EMG activity demonstrated a latency of ~4 ms. Significance. The derived motor map provides insight into the parameters needed for future neuromodulatory devices.

  10. Spinal Tap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It? A spinal tap (also called a lumbar puncture) is a medical test that involves taking a small sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for examination. Cerebrospinal fluid is a clear, colorless liquid that delivers nutrients to the brain and spinal ...

  11. Clinical and neuropsychiatric correlates of lumbar spinal surgery in older adults: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jordan F; McGovern, Jonathan; Marron, Megan M; Gerszten, Peter; Weiner, Debra K; Okonkwo, David; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-11-01

    To improve selection of older lumbar surgical candidates, we surveyed correlates of functioning and satisfaction with surgery. Prospective sample at lumbar spine surgery clinic. Patients (n = 48) were evaluated before surgery and after 3 months. Dependent variables were functioning and surgical satisfaction. Baseline variables associated with disability at 3 months included cognitive status and widespread pain. There was clinically significant improvement with moderate effects sizes for anxiety and depression at follow-up. Patients with at least a 30% improvement in disability had better physical health-related quality of life and were less likely to report widespread pain before surgery. Although preliminary, two novel potential predictors of lumbar surgery outcome include diminished cognitive functioning and widespread pain. Further study of these variables on post-surgical functioning and satisfaction may improve patient selection.

  12. The effect of the X-Stop implantation on intervertebral foramen, segmental spinal canal length and disc space in elderly patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zongmiao; Wang, Shaobai; Kozanek, Michal; Xia, Qun; Mansfield, Frederick L; Lü, Guohua; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical effect of the X-Stop device on the intervertebral foramen (IVF) and segmental spinal canal length (SSCL), as well as the intervertebral disc space at the implanted and the adjacent segments in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Eight elderly patients with LSS, scheduled for X-stop implantation, were CT or MRI scanned to construct 3D vertebral models (L2-S1). Before and after the surgery, each patient was also imaged using a dual-fluoroscopic image system during weight-bearing standing and maximum extension-flexion. The positions of the vertebrae were then determined using an established 2D-3D model matching method. The data revealed that the postoperative IVF area was significantly increased by 32.9% (or 32 mm2) (pspace of the implanted level was significantly decreased from 8.0 to 6.6 mm during standing. The X-Stop implantation efficiently enlarged the IVF area in the elderly patients with LSS at the operated level with little biomechanical effect immediately on the superior and inferior adjacent levels. However, it reduced the anterior disc space at the implanted level.

  13. Early versus late initiation of rehabilitation after lumbar spinal fusion: economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Christensen, Finn B; Nielsen, Claus V; Bünger, Cody E; Fruensgaard, Soeren; Sogaard, Rikke

    2013-11-01

    Economic evaluation conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up. To examine the cost-effectiveness of initiating rehabilitation 6 weeks after surgery as opposed to 12 weeks after surgery. In a previously reported randomized controlled trial, we assessed the impact of timing of rehabilitation after a lumbar spinal fusion and found that a fast-track strategy led to poorer functional ability. Before making recommendations, it seems relevant to address the societal perspective including return to work, quality of life, and costs. A cost-effectiveness analysis and a cost-utility analysis were conducted. Eighty-two patients undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion due to degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis (grade I or II) were randomized to an identical protocol of 4 sessions of group-based rehabilitation and were instructed in home exercises focusing on active stability training. Outcome parameters included functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index) and quality-adjusted life years. Health care and productivity costs were estimated from national registries and reported in euros. Costs and effects were transformed into net benefit. Bootstrapping was used to estimate 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The fast-track strategy tended to be costlier by €6869 (95% CI, -4640 to 18,378) while at the same time leading to significantly poorer outcomes of functional disability by -9 points (95% CI, -18 to -3) and a tendency for a reduced gain in quality-adjusted life years by -0.04 (95% CI, -0.13 to 0.01). The overall probability for the fast-track strategy being cost-effective does not reach 10% at conventional thresholds for cost-effectiveness. Initiating rehabilitation at 6 weeks as opposed to 12 weeks after surgery is on average more costly and less effective. The uncertainty of this result did not seem to be sensitive to methodological issues, and clinical managements who have already adapted fast-track rehabilitation

  14. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part II: Study of dose, carrier, and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C

    1995-12-15

    Efficacy of a bovine-derived osteoinductive growth factor was studied in a rabbit model and in a nonhuman primate model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. To determine the minimum effective dose of growth factor and the influence of different carrier material on the outcome of intertransverse process lumbar fusion. Bone morphogenetic proteins and related growth factors are becoming increasingly available in purified extract or genetically engineered forms and are capable of inducing new bone formation in vivo. Osteoinductive growth factors to enhance lumbar spinal infusion have not been well studied in models of posterolateral intertransverse process fusion. Because of the diminished potential of bone regeneration in primates (including humans) compared with phylogenetically lower animals, extrapolations regarding dose and efficacy cannot be made directly from results obtained in experiments performed on phylogenetically lower animals. Experiments on non-human primates are a critical step before attempting to use these growth factors on humans. METHODS. One hundred fifteen adult New Zealand white rabbits and 10 adult rhesus macaques underwent single level posterolateral intertransverse process lumbar spinal arthrodesis to evaluate different doses and carrier materials for a bovine-derived osteoinductive bone protein extract. Rabbit fusion masses were evaluated 5 weeks after arthrodesis by manual palpation, radiography, biomechanical testing, and light microscopy. Monkey fusion masses were evaluated 12 weeks after arthrodesis by radiography and light microscopy. Successful posterolateral intertransverse process spinal fusions were achieved in the rabbit models using an osteoinductive growth factor with three different carriers (autogenous iliac bone, demineralized allogeneic bone matrix, and natural coral). There was a dose-dependent response to the osteoinductive growth factor in the rabbit model, indicating that a threshold must be overcome before bone

  15. Neuronal regeneration after acute spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Nan, Guoxin

    2016-12-01

    The most common causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) are traumatic traffic accidents, falls, and violence. Spinal cord injury greatly affects a patient's mental and physical conditions and causes substantial economic impact to society. There are many methods, such as high doses of corticosteroids, surgical stabilization, decompression, and stem cell transplantation, for functional recovery after SCI, but the effect is still not satisfactory. This study investigated the role of neuronal regeneration and the location of the neuronal regeneration after SCI in rats. This is an experimental animal study of acute spinal cord injury investigating the neuronal regeneration after SCI. Double immunofluorescence staining of NF-200 and BrdU was performed to detect the location of the neuronal regeneration. Forty-five adult Wistar rats were tested. Allen hit model (10 g) induced acute SCI sites targeted at the T10 segments. Nestin expression was detected via immunohistochemistry. Double immunofluorescence staining of neurofilament 200 (NF-200) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was performed 10 mm away from the spinal cord center. Neural functional recovery was determined using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) score and electro-physiological examination. The study was funded by the Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, 81272172). The funder of this study had no capacity to influence the scholarly conduct of the research, interpretation of results, or dissemination of study outcomes. BrdU- and NF-200-positive cells were rarely detected and absent at 3 weeks and 4 weeks, respectively. We also detected the BrdU and NF-200 co-expressed cells are at 3 to 5 mm away from the injured site, and no co-expressed cells were detected at the injured site in this SCI model. The BBB score and electro-physiological examination of the nervous system were significantly different at 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that neurons are regenerated 3 to

  16. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P sagittal balance parameters was seen between patients treated with PLF + ALIF or posterolateral fusion alone. Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  17. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis : a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boogert, Hugo F.; Keers, Joost C.; Oterdoom, D. L. Marinus; Kuijlen, Jos M. A.

    OBJECT The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two

  18. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, H.F.; Keers, J.C.; Oterdoom, D.L. Marinus; Kuijlen, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two

  19. The Sagittal Balance Does not Influence the 1 Year Clinical Outcome of Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Without Obvious Instability After Microsurgical Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerl, Simon Heinrich; Pöhlmann, Florian; Finger, Tobias; Onken, Julia; Franke, Jörg; Czabanka, Marcus; Woitzik, Johannes; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-07-01

    A retrospective study with retrospective and prospective inclusion of 100 patients. To determine whether the sagittal balance (SB) influences the clinical outcome of patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, who underwent microsurgical decompression. The SB has become a critical factor for clinical decision making in the surgical treatment of spinal degenerative diseases. However, a frequently recommended sagittal realignment of elderly, multimorbid patients is accompanied by a significant rate of complications. The influence of SB on the clinical outcome of patients with degenerative spinal stenosis, who undergo decompressive surgery is not well understood. The aim of this study was to explore whether the clinical outcome of these patients is related to the SB and whether patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative sagittal imbalance necessitate restoration of the SB in addition to microsurgical decompression. One hundred patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, who received microsurgical decompression, were retrospectively identified and classified according to the severity of sagittal imbalance: (1) normal balance group, (2) minor loss of balance group, and (3) major loss of balance group. Sagittal parameters were determined from preoperative lateral spinal radiographs. As outcome parameters, we analyzed pre- and postoperative visual analogue scales for leg and back pain, walking distance, Oswestry disability index, Roland and Morris disability questionnaire, Odom's criteria, and the SF-36 score. All groups significantly benefited from surgery concerning leg pain, back pain, and disability in every day's life. There was no difference in patients with decompensated sagittal imbalance compared to patients with normal SB regarding life quality 6 to 24 months after microsurgical decompression. Patients with symptomatic degenerative spinal stenosis and excluded major instability significantly benefit from microsurgical decompression regardless of their

  20. Osteological features in pure-bred dogs predisposing to thoracic or lumbar spinal cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, S

    2002-08-01

    Consistent with those vertebral sites most commonly clinically affected by spinal cord compression, body size normalised midsagittal diameters of the caudal vertebral foramen limits T10-T12 were significantly (Pdogs.

  1. Preservation or Restoration of Segmental and Regional Spinal Lordosis Using Minimally Invasive Interbody Fusion Techniques in Degenerative Lumbar Conditions: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Myhre, Sue Lynn; Youssef, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    A literature review. The purpose of this study was to review lumbar segmental and regional alignment changes following treatment with a variety of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) interbody fusion procedures for short-segment, degenerative conditions. An increasing number of lumbar fusions are being performed with minimally invasive exposures, despite a perception that minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion procedures are unable to affect segmental and regional lordosis. Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 23 articles were identified that reported alignment following minimally invasive lumbar fusion for degenerative (nondeformity) lumbar spinal conditions to examine aggregate changes in postoperative alignment. Of the 23 studies identified, 28 study cohorts were included in the analysis. Procedural cohorts included MIS ALIF (two), extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) (16), and MIS posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (P/TLIF) (11). Across 19 study cohorts and 720 patients, weighted average of lumbar lordosis preoperatively for all procedures was 43.5° (range 28.4°-52.5°) and increased 3.4° (9%) (range -2° to 7.4°) postoperatively (P < 0.001). Segmental lordosis increased, on average, by 4° from a weighted average of 8.3° preoperatively (range -0.8° to 15.8°) to 11.2° at postoperative time points (range -0.2° to 22.8°) (P < 0.001) in 1182 patient from 24 study cohorts. Simple linear regression revealed a significant relationship between preoperative lumbar lordosis and change in lumbar lordosis (r = 0.413; P = 0.003), wherein lower preoperative lumbar lordosis predicted a greater increase in postoperative lumbar lordosis. Significant gains in both weighted average lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis were seen following MIS interbody fusion. None of the segmental lordosis cohorts and only two of the 19 lumbar lordosis cohorts showed decreases in lordosis postoperatively. These results suggest that

  2. Description and design considerations of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of a multidisciplinary cognitive-behavioural intervention for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolving, Nanna; Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen; Willert, Morten Vejs; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Blumensaat, Frank; Bünger, Cody; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2014-03-03

    The ideal rehabilitation strategy following lumbar spinal fusion surgery has not yet been established. This paper is a study protocol, describing the rationale behind and the details of a cognitive-behavioural rehabilitation intervention for lumbar spinal fusion patients based on the best available evidence. Predictors of poor outcome following spine surgery have been identified to provide targets for the intervention, and the components of the intervention were structured in accordance with the cognitive-behavioural model. The study aims to compare the clinical and economical effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural rehabilitation strategy to that of usual care for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. The study is a randomized clinical trial including 96 patients scheduled for lumbar spinal fusion surgery due to degenerative disease or spondylolisthesis. Patients were recruited in the period October 2011 to July 2013, and the follow-up period is one year from date of surgery. Patients are allocated on a 1:2 ratio (control: intervention) to either treatment as usual (control group), which implies surgery and the standard postoperative rehabilitation, or in addition to this, a patient education focusing on pain behaviour and pain coping (intervention group). It takes place in a hospital setting, and consists of six group-based sessions, managed by a multidisciplinary team of health professionals.The primary outcomes are disability (Oswestry Disability Index) and sick leave, while secondary outcomes include coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire), fear-avoidance belief (Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire), pain (Low Back Pain Rating Scale, pain index), mobility during hospitalization (Cumulated Ambulation Score), generic health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) and resource use. Outcomes are measured using self report questionnaires, medical records and national registers. It is expected that the intervention can provide better functional outcome, less

  3. [Acute lumbar sprain treated with massage combined with acupuncture at different distal acupoints: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Yueqiu

    2015-05-01

    To observe treatment efficacy of acupuncture at different distal acupoints for acute lumbar sprain after massage. One hundred and fifty patients with acute lumbar sprain were randomly divided into a Yaotongdian (Extra) group, a Houxi (SI 3) group, a Weizhong (BL 40) group, a Chengshan (BL 57) group and a Shuigou (GV 26) group, total 5 groups, 30 cases in each one. After the same massage treatment and based on groups divided, different distal acupoints above-mentioned were selected to be acupunctured. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, lumbar activity and treatment efficacy of patients in 5 groups were evaluated. With acupuncture at distal acupoints after massage,VAS scores of patients in 5 groups were decreased compared with those after massage treatment (all Plumbar activity was all obviously improved (all Plumbar activity and cured and markedly effective rates were not statistically significant(all P>0.05). Based on massage treatment, acupuncture at distal acupoints could further improve the treatment efficacy for acute lumbar sprain, but there is no obvious effective difference among every distal acupoint. As long as choosing acupoints with lower pain threshold and stimulating enough, good efficacy could be acquired for acute lumbar sprain.

  4. Minimally invasive laminectomy for lumbar spinal stenosis in patients with and without preoperative spondylolisthesis: clinical outcome and reoperation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Marjan; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Pyo, Se Young; Paulo, Danika; Härtl, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surgical decompression is the intervention of choice for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) when nonoperative treatment has failed. Standard open laminectomy is an effective procedure, but minimally invasive laminectomy through tubular retractors is an alternative. The aim of this retrospective case series was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of this procedure in patients who underwent LSS and to compare outcomes in patients with and without preoperative spondylolisthesis. Patients with LSS without spondylolisthesis and with stable Grade I spondylolisthesis who had undergone minimally invasive tubular laminectomy between 2004 and 2011 were included in this analysis. Demographic, perioperative, and radiographic data were collected. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores, as well as Macnab's criteria. Among 110 patients, preoperative spondylolisthesis at the level of spinal stenosis was present in 52.5%. At a mean follow-up of 28.8 months, scoring revealed a median improvement of 16% on the ODI, 2.75 on the VAS back, and 3 on the VAS leg, compared with the preoperative baseline (p spondylolisthesis had no significant differences in their clinical outcome or reoperation rate. Minimally invasive laminectomy is an effective procedure for the treatment of LSS. Reoperation rates for instability are lower than those reported after open laminectomy. Functional improvement is similar in patients with and without preoperative spondylolisthesis. This procedure can be an alternative to open laminectomy. Routine fusion may not be indicated in all patients with LSS and spondylolisthesis.

  5. Successful management of aortic thrombi resulting in spinal cord infarction in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manabu Izumi, Shoko Teraoka, Keisuke Yamashita, Kenji Matsumoto, Tomohiro Muronoi, Yoshimitsu Izawa, Chikara Yonekawa, Masaki Ano, Masayuki SuzukawaDepartment of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: A 74-year-old man with coronary artery disease was suffering from acute nonobstructive cholecystitis and was admitted to a nearby hospital. Dual antiplatelet (aspirin and ticlopidine therapy was discontinued before preparation for surgical resection of the gall bladder. During his time in hospital he was aware of lumbar pain and weakness in both legs. He was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and therapy. Diffuse intra-aortic thrombi were revealed by computed tomography with contrast media, and magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord infarction. However, computed tomography scans of the descending aorta obtained 4 months before admission exhibited no signs of atherosclerotic plaques or intra-aortic thrombi. Laboratory data suggest that antiphospholipid antibody syndrome might have caused these acute multiple intra-arterial thrombi. By restarting dual antiplatelet therapy and increasing the dose of heparin (from 10,000 IU/day to 15,000 IU/day we successfully managed the patient's clinical condition and symptoms. It is important to understand that stopping antiplatelet therapy may rapidly grow thrombi in patients with a hypercoagulative state.Keywords: intra-aortic thrombus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, spinal cord infarction

  6. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Christian A; Kundu, Bornali; Hawryluk, Gregory W J

    2016-06-01

    Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI). MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS's status as a historical standard of care.

  7. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Bowers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI. MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS′s status as a historical standard of care.

  8. Anesthetic considerations for patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-ping Bao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesiologists work to prevent or minimize secondary injury of the nervous system and improve the outcome of medical procedures. To this end, anesthesiologists must have a thorough understanding of pathophysiology and optimize their skills and equipment to make an anesthesia plan. Anesthesiologists should conduct careful physical examinations of patients and consider neuroprotection at preoperative interviews, consider cervical spinal cord movement and compression during airway management, and suggest awake fiberoptic bronchoscope intubation for stable patients and direct laryngoscopy with manual in-line immobilization in emergency situations. During induction, anesthesiologists should avoid hypotension and depolarizing muscle relaxants. Mean artery pressure should be maintained within 85–90 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa; vasoactive drug selection and fluid management. Normal arterial carbon dioxide pressure and normal blood glucose levels should be maintained. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a useful option. Anesthesiologists should be attentive to postoperative respiratory insufficiency (carefully considering postoperative extubation, thrombus, and infection. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should carefully plan the treatment of patients with acute cervical spinal cord injuries to protect the nervous system and improve patient outcome.

  9. [Correlation of lumbar disc degeneration and spinal-pelvic sagittal balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Shrivastava, Shilabant Rajesh; Zheng, Zhao-min; Wang, Jian-ru; Yang, Hao; Li, Ze-min; Wang, Tai-ping; Wang, Hua; Utsab, Shrestha

    2013-04-16

    To elucidate the relationship between spino-pelvic sagittal balance parameters and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration of each segment through retrospective analysis in lumbar degeneration patients. Retrospective analysis was conducted for the follow-up data in 126 patients with lumbar degenerative disease from July 2009 to June 2012. There were 38 cases with whole spine plates and 88 cases with lumbar plates. All of them received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Through software Image J, the following spino-pelvic sagittal balance parameters were measured: sagittal vertical axis (SVA, distance between C7 plumb line and posterior upper corner of S1 endplate), thoracic kyphosis (TK, T5-T12 Cobb angle), thoracolumbar kyphosis (TLK, T10-L2 Cobb angle), lumbar lordosis (LL, L1-L5 Cobb angle), pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), T1 spino-pelvic inclination (T1-SPI), T9 spino-pelvic inclination (T9-SPI), spino-sacral angle (SSA), spino-pelvic angle (SPA) and C7 tilt (C7T). Based on the grading system of Pfirrmann et al, the intervertebral disc degeneration grades were acquired for each lumbar segment. According to the normal range of previous studies, each spino-pelvic sagittal balance parameter was classified into 3 groups, i.e. Group A (less than normal), Group B (normal) and Group C (more than normal). All statistical analyses were performed to compare the differences of each lumbar segment/intervertebral disc degeneration among groups by one-way ANOVA test via SPSS 18.0. And P-value sagittal balance. Among 57 cases of large PI, LL, PT, SS, SVA, C7T, SPA in L5/S1 of mild-to-moderate and severe degeneration groups was 36.91 ± 14.93 and 29.71 ± 11.30 (P = 0.045), 18.82 ± 8.27 and 25.18 ± 10.19 (P = 0.012), 39.45 ± 8.82 and 34.57 ± 8.88 (P = 0.042), 23.04 ± 26.63 and 62.15 ± 33.82 (P = 0.002), 88.85 ± 3.13 and 83.98 ± 4.62 (P = 0.003), 157.88 ± 11.20 and 147.75 ± 13.98 (P = 0.043) respectively. TLK in L1/L2 with mild

  10. Survey of integrative lumbar spinal stenosis treatment in Korean medicine doctors: preliminary data for clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-Riong; Ahn, Yong-Jun; Shin, Ye-Sle; Park, Ki Byung; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Joo-Hee; Cho, Jae-Heung; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2017-08-29

    Considering that large variations exist amongst practitioners in lumbar disorder management and the significant costs that lumbar disorders incur, determining clinical practice patterns to provide preliminary data for standardization should be given higher priority. Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is commonly treated using integrative non-surgical methods by Korean medicine doctors (KMDs) in Korea, and this is the first study to assess current Korean medicine practice trends for LSS. A survey on KMD diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and decision-making in LSS treatment was developed in a 3-step procedure of preliminary drafting, revision based on extramural expert opinion, and final editing. The survey was conducted at the internal conference of a spine-specialty Korean medicine hospital on January 25th, 2015. The response rate was high at 79.19% (n = 118/149). Participants replied that they treated 7.3 ± 6.8 LSS patients/day using a multimodal treatment method consisting of acupuncture, pharmacopuncture, herbal medicine, Chuna manipulation, and electroacupuncture. Acupuncture mainly used Ashi points and MSAT, and pharmacopuncture mainly Shinbaro solution. The most frequently prescribed herbal medicine was Chungpa-jun, and the most commonly applied Chuna techniques were sidelying lumbar extension dysfunction correction technique, and prone lumbosacral joint distraction method. Radiological findings were mainly referred to for diagnosis, and clinical symptoms, age, radiological findings, and medical history were regarded to be important for prognosis. Participants replied that 7.8 ± 3.3 weeks were required for 50% reduction in pain, and 16.1 ± 7.7 weeks for 80% reduction. These results suggest that KMDs in Korea combine a conventional approach to LSS and a Korean medicine approach to low back pain for integration of empirical- and evidence-based diagnosis and treatment. The findings may contribute in bridging the divide between evidence and clinical practice

  11. Radilogic evaluation of pedicle lumbar and spinal canal dimensions in north-west of Iran using computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfinia I

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Pedicular screws are currently the gold standard of internal fixation of spinal column. Pedicular screws have their own complications, however the surgeon should be aware of morphometery of pedicles, as well as the anatomy of surrounding neural structures to minimize these risks. No national study has ever examined the physical characteristics of lumbar pedicles and this study is unique for this purpose."n"nMethods: This study covers the patients undergoing lumbar spinal CT-scanning due to variable causes. 25 vertebrae were selected in either gender, 18 years or older and E-Film computer software was employed to measure different diameters of pedicle and the results were analyzed with p≤0.05 regarded as significant."n"nResults: L5 pedicle was the widest (16.8 mm, while L1 was the narrowest (8.25 mm. this figure was 8.82, 10.48 and 12.86 mm for L2, L3, L4 respectively. Longitudinal depth of pedicle was 47.98, 48.68, 50.42, 48.32 and 47.8 mm for L1, L2, L3, L4, L5 respectively. Statistically significant differences were found between some dimensions detected in our study and similar studies."n"nConclusions: The advantages of pedicular screws and rods to stabilize spinal column are well known. To avoid

  12. Observations on Lumbar Spinal Cord Recovery after Lesion in Lizards Indicates Regeneration of a Cellular and Fibrous Bridge Reconnecting the Injured Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Alibardi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The lumbar spinal cords of lizards were transected, but after the initial paralysis most lizards recovered un-coordinated movements of hind limbs. At 25-45 days post-lesion about 50% of lizards were capable of walking with a limited coordination. Histological analysis showed that the spinal cord was transected and the ependyma of the central canal formed two enlargements to seal the proximal and distal ends of the severed spinal cord. Glial and few small neurons were formed while bridge axons crossed the gap between the proximal and the distal stumps of the transected spinal cord as was confirmed by retrograde tract-tracing technique. The bridging fibers likely derived from interneurons located in the central and dorsal grey matter of the proximal spinal cord stump suggesting they belong to the local central locomotory pattern generator circuit. The limited recovery of hind limb movements may derive from the regeneration or sprouting of short proprio-spinal axons joining the two stumps of the transected spinal cord. The present observations indicate that the study on spinal cord regeneration in lizards can give insights on the permissive conditions that favor nerve regeneration in amniotes.

  13. Influence of spinal disc translational stiffness on the lumbar spinal loads, ligament forces and trunk muscle forces during upper body inclination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Rizwan; Zander, Thomas; Bashkuev, Maxim; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    Inverse dynamic musculoskeletal human body models are commonly used to predict the spinal loads and trunk muscle forces. These models include rigid body segments, mechanical joints, active and passive structural components such as muscles, tendons and ligaments. Several studies used simple definition of lumbar spinal discs idealized as spherical joints with infinite translational stiffness. The aim of the current sensitivity study was to investigate the influence of disc translational stiffness (shear and compressive stiffness) on the joint kinematics and forces in intervertebral discs (L1-L5), trunk muscles and ligaments for an intermediately flexed position (55°). Based on in vitro data, a range of disc shear stiffness (100-200N/mm) and compressive stiffness (1900-2700N/mm) was considered in the model using the technique of force dependent kinematics (FDK). Range of variation in spinal loads, trunk muscle forces and ligaments forces were calculated (with & without load in hands) and compared with the results of reference model (RM) having infinite translational stiffness. The discs' centers of rotation (CoR) were computed for L3-L4 and L4-L5 motion segments. Between RM and FDK models, maximum differences in compressive forces were 7% (L1-L2 & L2-L3), 8% (L3-L4) and 6% (L4-L5) whereas in shear forces 35% (L1-L2), 47% (L2-L3), 45% (L3-L4) and more than 100% in L4-L5. Maximum differences in the sum of global and local muscle forces were approximately 10%, whereas in ligament forces were 27% (supraspinous), 40% (interspinous), 56% (intertransverse), 58% (lig. flavum) and 100% (lig. posterior). The CoRs were predicted posteriorly, below (L3-L4) and in the disc (L4-L5). FDK model predicted lower spinal loads, ligament forces and varied distribution of global and local muscle forces. Consideration of translational stiffnesses influenced the model results and showed increased differences with lower stiffness values. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  14. A systematic literature review of time to return to work and narcotic use after lumbar spinal fusion using minimal invasive and open surgery techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Borgman, Benny; Vertuani, Simona; Nilsson, Jonas

    2017-06-27

    Chronic low back pain is a common health problem for adult workers and causes an enormous economic burden. With the improvement of minimally invasive surgical techniques (MIS) in spinal fusion and the development of fusion devices, more lumbar operations are today being performed through a less invasive technique. When compared with open surgeries (OS), MIS has demonstrated better clinical outcomes including operation time, blood loss, complication rates and length of hospital stay. The aim of this review was to identify and summarize evidence on the time to return to work and the duration of post-operation narcotic use for patients who had lumbar spinal fusion operations using MIS and OS techniques. A systematic literature review was performed including studies identified from PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Collaboration, and the Centre for Review and Dissemination (CRD) (January 2004–April 2014) for publications reporting on time to return to work and post-operation narcotic use after MIS or OS lumbar spinal fusion surgeries. Out of a total of 36 included studies, 28 reported on the time to return to work and 17 on the narcotic use after MIS or OS. Four studies described the time to return to work directly comparing MIS and OS. Three studies, from the US, directly compared the duration of narcotic use between MIS- transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and OS-TLIF. In addition to the time to return to work, 23 studies reported on the rate of return to work and the employment rate before and after surgery, and two Swedish studies presented sick leave data. There is a gap of good quality data describing the time to return to work and narcotic use after lumbar spinal fusion operations using MIS or OS techniques. However, the current systematic literature review indicates that patients who have lumbar spinal fusion operations, with the MIS procedure, generally return to work after surgery more quickly and require less post-operation narcotics for pain control

  15. Does obesity preclude lumbar puncture with a standard spinal needle? The use of computed tomography to measure the skin to lumbar subarachnoid space distance in the general hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, Darragh

    2013-06-05

    OBJECTIVES: Failed lumbar puncture (LP) is a common indication for referral for radiologically guided LP. This study aims to evaluate what percentage of the hospital population would fail an LP using a standard 9-cm needle because of obesity and a skin to subarachnoid space distance greater than 9 cm. METHODS: Images of 402 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis were reviewed. Skin to subarachnoid space distance was calculated using sagittal images. A survey was conducted among junior hospital doctors to assess their experience of performing lumbar puncture in obese patients. RESULTS: Four hundred patients were included. Fifty-five patients (13.8 %) had a skin to subarachnoid space distance greater than 9 cm. Intra-abdominal fat, subcutaneous fat and abdominal girth correlated with distance between the skin and subarachnoid space. Among junior doctors, 68.3 % (n = 41) reported LP failure on an obese patient; 78.4 % (n = 47) were unaware of the existence of a longer needle and 13.3 % (n = 8) had experience using a longer needle. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of the hospital population will fail LP with a standard length spinal needle. Selecting a longer needle may be sufficient to successfully complete LP in obese patients. KEY POINTS : • Lumbar puncture failure commonly leads to referral for an image-guided procedure • Standard lumbar puncture may fail in 13.8 % of patients due to obesity • 78.4 % of trainee doctors are unaware of the existence of longer spinal-needles • Using longer spinal needles may allow successful LP in obese patients.

  16. The Role of Sonographic Examination of the Inferior Vena Cava in the Diagnosis of Pseudoclaudication in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya.V. Fischenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 63 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis, it was defined the relationship of sonographic parameters of the inferior vena cava and pseudoclaudication. Evaluated fluctuating data of volumetric blood flow rate driven by provocation test in patients with pseudoclaudication showed the average value of the sensitivity of this method (0.64, but overdiagnosis rate reaches significant levels (0.71 that requires additional verification tests to confirm a causal relationships.

  17. Decompression Surgery Alone Versus Decompression Plus Fusion in Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Swiss Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study With 3 Years of Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Nils H; Burgstaller, Jakob M; Pichierri, Giuseppe; Wertli, Maria M; Farshad, Mazda; Porchet, François; Steurer, Johann; Held, Ulrike

    2017-09-15

    Retrospective analysis of a prospective, multicenter cohort study. To estimate the added effect of surgical fusion as compared to decompression surgery alone in symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis patients with spondylolisthesis. The optimal surgical management of lumbar spinal stenosis patients with spondylolisthesis remains controversial. Patients of the Lumbar Stenosis Outcome Study with confirmed DLSS and spondylolisthesis were enrolled in this study. The outcomes of this study were Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM) symptoms (score range 1-5, best-worst) and function (1-4) over time, measured at baseline, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months follow-up. In order to quantify the effect of fusion surgery as compared to decompression alone and number of decompressed levels, we used mixed effects models and accounted for the repeated observations in main outcomes (SSM symptoms and SSM function) over time. In addition to individual patients' random effects, we also fitted random slopes for follow-up time points and compared these two approaches with Akaike's Information Criterion and the chi-square test. Confounders were adjusted with fixed effects for age, sex, body mass index, diabetes, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale musculoskeletal disorders, and duration of symptoms. One hundred thirty-one patients undergoing decompression surgery alone (n = 85) or decompression with fusion surgery (n = 46) were included in this study. In the multiple mixed effects model the adjusted effect of fusion compared with decompression alone surgery on SSM symptoms was 0.06 (95% confidence interval: -0.16-0.27) and -0.07 (95% confidence interval: -0.25-0.10) on SSM function, respectively. Among the patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis our study confirms that in the two groups, decompression alone and decompression with fusion, patients distinctively benefited from surgical treatment. When adjusted for confounders, fusion surgery was not associated with a more

  18. Effectiveness of Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, G.C.; Ferreira, P.H.; Harris, I.A.; Pinheiro, M.B.; Koes, B.W.; van Tulder, M.; Rzewuska, M.; Maher, C.G.; Ferreira, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The management of spinal stenosis by surgery has increased rapidly in the past two decades, however, there is still controversy regarding the efficacy of surgery for this condition. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of surgery in the management of

  19. Effectiveness of surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machado, G.C. (Gustavo C.); P.H. Ferreira (P.); I. Harris (Ian); Pinheiro, M.B. (Marina B.); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); Rzewuska, M. (Magdalena); C. Maher (Chris); M.L. Ferreira (Manuela L.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The management of spinal stenosis by surgery has increased rapidly in the past two decades, however, there is still controversy regarding the efficacy of surgery for this condition. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and comparative effectiveness of surgery in the

  20. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Danner

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we

  1. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M; Krenn, Matthias; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Toth, Andrea; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals) biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we recommend conducting

  2. A Meta-Analysis on the Clinical Significance of Redundant Nerve Roots in Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin; Zhu, Yue; Yan, Qi; Tu, Guanjun

    2017-09-01

    Symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), which leads to severe socioeconomic consequences and places a heavy burden on global healthcare system, is a relatively frequent spine disorder. Redundant nerve roots (RNRs) are a relatively common finding in which slender, serpiginous, or tortuous nerve roots are found in the subarachnoid space of the lumbar spine. Previous studies that evaluated the prognostic assessment of RNRs in patients with symptomatic LSS are composed of doubtful results. Therefore, the clinical significance of RNRs in symptomatic LSS is still uncertain. The aim of this meta-analysis is a systematic assessment of the clinical significance of RNR syndrome in symptomatic LSS. This study used a highly sensitive search strategy to identify all published studies in multiple databases up to January 1, 2017. All identified trials were systematically evaluated using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cochrane methodology was also applied to the results of this study. This study identified 4 relevant studies involving 297 patients. Compared with a non-RNR group, the RNR group results included worse clinical outcomes that were assessed using the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery (weighted mean difference [WMD], -0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.26 to -0.29; P = 0.002; I(2) = 0%), for recovery rate (WMD, -9.87; 95% CI, -15.07 to -4.67; P = 0.0002; I(2) = 0%), and for older age (WMD, 2.51; 95% CI, 0.45-4.57; P = 0.02; I(2) = 43%). RNR is an entity in association with symptomatic LSS, which may be viewed as a potentially powerful prognostic indicator of worse postoperative functional recovery for symptomatic LSS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Multicenter, Randomnized Controlled Trial of Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage in Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB...combination of CSFD and elevation of mean arterial pressure (MAP) in patients with acute spinal cord injury. This study is currently screening and...University of Alabama in Birmingham. 15. SUBJECT TERMS acute spinal cord injury, cerebrospinal fluid drainage, mean arterial pressure, intrathecal pressure

  4. Effectiveness of lumbar traction with routine conservative treatment in acute herniated disc syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanatharn, Rattana; Sanjaroensuttikul, Nopawan; Anadirekkul, Preeyanuch; Chaivisate, Rungtip; Wannasetta, Wanthanee

    2004-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of lumbar traction with routine conservative treatment in acute herniated disc syndrome. Randomized double-blind controlled trial. Outpatient clinic of physical medicine and rehabilitation. 120 participants who met the diagnostic criteria of acute herniated disc syndrome were randomized into two groups. The study group received treated traction, and the control group received sham traction. All patients had routine conservative treatments (consisting of NSAIDs, instruction of proper back activity and precaution, back exercise, and heat modality). The main outcome measurement was the Oswestry score, which was collected on the first day and at the 4th week of the treatment. At the end of the study, all patients recorded global improvement and satisfaction. Of 120 patients divided into two groups equally, 12 and 6 cases in the control and intervention groups dropped out of the study. The mean (SD) change of the Oswestry score were 19.25 (15.9) and 25.25 (16.68) in control and intervention groups respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups with the p-value of 0.067 and 95%CI of - 0.42-12.43. Approximately 89% of patients in each group had improvement of their symptoms, and 90% in each group were satisfied with lumbar traction. Co-intervention with heat modality, NSAIDs use and back exercise did not differ between the two groups. The data do not support the benefit of traction for patients with acute herniated disc syndrome. The patient can be conservatively treated at home with proper instruction.

  5. Acute diagnosis of spinal trauma; Akutdiagnostik des Wirbelsaeulentraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, M.; Mallouhi, A.; Jaschke, W. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Innsbruck (Austria); El Attal, R.; Kathrein, A.; Knop, C.; Blauth, M. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-06-15

    Most traumatic spinal injuries result from a high-energy process and are accompanied by other injuries. Following the CCSPR study, the presence of all low-risk factors (simple trauma mechanism, fully conscious, ambulatory at any time since trauma, neck rotation exceeding 45 bilaterally) obviates the need to acutely image the cervical spine. Imaging is indicated in all other patients. Emergency spiral CT should be performed as the first imaging method in high-risk and moderate-risk patients; only in low-risk patients should conventional radiography be performed and trusted as the sole modality. The AO classification according to Magerl et al. is used for the subaxial spine, whereas the upper cervical spine should be classified separately because the anatomy is different at each level. Radiological evaluation of traumatic spinal injuries should be done systematically using the ''ABCS'' scheme. (orig.) [German] Wirbelsaeulentraumen entstehen zumeist infolge hochenergetischer Mechanismen und sind haeufig von weiteren Verletzungen begleitet. Auf eine Diagnostik der Wirbelsaeule kann laut CCSPR-Studie nur dann verzichtet werden, wenn alle Niedrigrisikofaktoren (bewusstseinsklar, gehfaehig, ausreichender Bewegungsumfang, einfacher Unfallmechanismus) erfuellt sind. Alle anderen Patienten muessen radiologisch abgeklaert werden. Dabei sollten Patienten mit einer hohen und mittleren Verletzungswahrscheinlichkeit primaer computertomographisch untersucht werden, nur bei einer geringen Verletzungswahrscheinlichkeit kann der konventionellen Diagnostik vertraut werden. Die Frakturen der subaxialen Wirbelsaeule werden nach der Magerl-AO-Klassifikation eingeteilt, wohingegen fuer die obere HWS separate Einteilungen angewandt werden. Die radiologische Beurteilung des Wirbelsaeulentraumas sollte systematisch anhand des ''ABCS''-Schemas erfolgen. (orig.)

  6. Impact of sagittal spinopelvic alignment on clinical outcomes after decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis without coronal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Kota; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-10-01

    The object of this study was to investigate correlations between sagittal spinopelvic alignment and improvements in clinical and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes after lumbar decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LCS) without coronal imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients treated for LCS with decompression surgery in the period from 2009 through 2011. They examined correlations between preoperative or postoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and radiological parameters, clinical outcomes, and health-related (HR)QOL scores in patients divided according to SVA. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Health-related QOL was evaluated using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). One hundred nine patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. Compared to patients with normal sagittal alignment prior to surgery (Group A: SVA SVA ≥ 50 mm) had significantly smaller lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles and larger pelvic tilt. In Group B, there was a significant decrease in postoperative SVA compared with the preoperative SVA (76.3 ± 29.7 mm vs. 54.3 ± 39.8 mm, p = 0.004). The patients in Group B with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual sagittal imbalance after surgery (82.8 ± 41.6 mm). There were no significant differences in clinical and HRQOL outcomes between Groups A and B. Compared to patients with normal postoperative SVA (Group C: SVA SVA ≥ 50 mm (Group D) had significantly lower JOABPEQ scores, both preoperative and postoperative, for walking ability (preop: 36.6 ± 26.3 vs. 22.7 ± 26.0, p = 0.038, respectively; postop: 71.1 ± 30.4 vs. 42.5 ± 29.6, p SVA value in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance; however, the patients with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual imbalance

  7. Enthesitis of lumbar spinal ligaments in clinically suspected spondyloarthritis: value of gadolinium-enhanced MR images in comparison to STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Zubler, Veronika; Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Weiss, Bettina [Balgrist University Hospital, Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    To compare detection of spinal ligament enthesitis between gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1+Gd) and STIR sequences in patients with suspected spondyloarthritis. Sixty-eight patients (37 males, 42 ± 14 years) with a sacroiliac-joint (SIJ) and lumbar spine MRI for suspected spondyloarthritis were prospectively included. Sagittal T1+Gd and STIR images of the lumbar spine were assessed by two readers for enthesitis of interspinous/supraspinous ligaments, and for capsulitis of facet-joints between T12-S1. Patients' MRI were grouped according to ASAS (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society) criteria in positive (group A) or negative (group B) SIJs. Enthesitis/capsulitis were compared between groups. Interreader agreement was assessed. Enthesitis/capsulitis per patient was statistically significantly more frequent with T1+Gd compared to STIR (p ≤ 0.007), except for interspinous ligaments for reader 1 (p = 0.455). Interspinous enthesitis, supraspinous enthesitis, and capsulitis were present with T1+Gd(STIR) in 64.7 %(72.1 %), 60.3 %(17.7 %), and 61.8 %(29.4 %) for reader 1, and 51.5 %(41.2 %), 45.6 %(7.4 %), and 91.2 %(45.5 %) for reader 2. There were 76.5 %(52/68) patients in group A and 23.5 %(16/68) in group B. Total number of enthesitis/capsulitis on T1+Gd was statistically significantly higher in group A than B (4.96 vs. 2.94, p = 0.026; 8.12 vs. 5.25, p = 0.041 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). Interreader agreement showed mixed results for interspinous/supraspinous/capsulitis but was higher on T1+Gd (ICC = 0.838/0.783/0.367; p ≤ 0.001) compared to STIR (ICC = 0.652/0.298/0.224; p ≤ 0.032). In patients with suspected spondyloarthritis, enthesitis/capsulitis in the lumbar spine are common findings and more frequently/reliably detected with T1+Gd than STIR. In patients with positive SIJ-MRI, the total number of enthesitis/capsulitis in T1+Gd was higher compared to patients with

  8. Historical perspective milestones in the evolution of lumbar spinal postural health in seating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynt, Jenny; Higgs, Joy; Mackey, Martin

    2002-10-01

    The best knowledge on seated posture before the Enlightenment was not scientific, but influenced by sociocultural, economic, and manufacturing factors. Although the pursuit of knowledge related to spinal postural health was advanced with the advent of empirico-analytic research, academic opinion continued to be influenced by unsubstantiated information, often resulting in incorrect advice to the public. Only in the past decade has advice on "correct" seated posture, spanning the time from the Hippocratic texts to the present, been brought into question by evidence-based research. By exploring seating from 3100 B.C to the present, this article discusses key influences that have an impact on seating functional to spinal postural health. Emphasis is placed on the role of medical opinion.

  9. MRT atlas of the lumbar spine. Herniated disk - stenosis of the spinal canal - CT-controlled injection techniques; MRT-Atlas der Lendenwirbelsaeule. Bandscheibenvorfall - Spinalkanalstenose - mit einem Beitrag zur CT-gesteuerten Injektionstechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, J.; Koester, O.; Kraemer, R.; Schmid, G.

    2001-07-01

    Two thirds of all degenerative diseases of the spinal cord are located in the lumbar spinal cord. Magnetic resonance tomography has a key role in diagnosis and therapy. This atlas contains 78 examples of different diseases. More than 450 impressive images of common and infrequent findings are to improve the user's diagnostic abilities. Next to the MRT findings, also the clinical findings and the history of the disease are reported in each case, so that typical correlations are established between clinical and imaging findings. The value of diagnostic imaging techniques is characterized in order to provide comprehensive information on selective imaging of the lumbar spinal cord. (orig.)

  10. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis with neurogenic intermittent claudication and treatment with the Aperius PercLID System: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Marcelo; Fabrizi, Anthony P; Maina, Raffaella; Gazzeri, Roberto; Martínez-Lage, Juan F

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether clinical improvement is noticeable after a minimally invasive procedure such as that used with the Aperius PercLID System in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) and neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC). The patients were treated with the aforementioned system at 3 different centers. The initial requirement to be included in the study was a minimum follow-up of 12 months. The authors studied 40 cases of DLSS in patients with NIC (age 72.7 +/- 8.08 years). Symptom severity, physical function, quality of life, and self-rated pain were assessed preoperatively and at the 12-month follow-up using the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) and a visual analog scale. The procedure was conducted under spinal (35 patients) or local (5 patients) anesthesia, using biplanar fluoroscopy for visualization. Single-level treatment was performed in 28 patients and 2-level treatment was performed in 12 patients. Based on time recordings in 24 cases, the mean procedural time was 19.9 +/- 5.0 minutes. The mean pain visual analog scale score improved significantly from 8.1 +/- 2.19 at baseline to 3.44 +/- 2.89 at the 1-year follow-up. The ZCQ score for patient satisfaction showed 90% of the patients being satisfied with the procedure. The mean rates of improvement in ZCQ score for symptom severity and physical function at 1 year were 38.7 +/- 33.3% and 33.8 +/- 29.7%, respectively, and both proved to be statistically significant. Most improvement was seen in mobility, pain/discomfort, and ability for self-care. In this preliminary study, the Aperius system provided clinically significant improvement after 1 year of follow-up in patients older than 65 years with DLSS and NIC.

  11. Validation and Reliability Analysis of the Spinal Deformity Study Group Classification for L5-S1 Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hongda; Yan, Peng; Zhu, Weiguo; Bao, Mike; Li, Yang; Zhang, Zhen; Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Feng

    2015-11-01

    An intra- and interobserver reliability study. To assess the intra- and interobserver reliability of the Spinal Deformity Study Group (SDSG) system for classifying adolescent and adult L5-S1 spondylolisthesis. Reliability of the SDSG classification has only been previously validated in adolescent patients as performed by the SDSG study group investigators. A total of 80 patients with L5-S1 spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Only dysplastic and isthmic spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Long-cassette standing lateral radiographs of the spine and pelvis were obtained. All 80 cases were classified according to the SDSG classification by four observers. After a 2-week interval, the same classification was independently repeated by each observer with the cases in a different randomly assigned order. The Fleiss' κ coefficient was calculated to test the intra- and interobserver reliabilities of the SDSG classification. The present study included all six types of SDSG classification. Overall intra- and interobserver agreements were 86.6% (κ: 0.830) and 73.3% (κ: 0.648), respectively. The intra- and interobserver agreements and repeatability associated with slip grade were 89.7% (κ: 0.824) and 87.7% (κ: 0.721), respectively. Regarding sacropelvic and spinal balance, intra- and interobserver agreements and repeatability were 83.7% (κ: 0.735) and 77.5% (κ: 0.602) for low-grade slips, and 90.75% (κ: 0.883) and 90.4% (κ: 0.851) for high-grade slips, respectively. Substantial intra- and interobserver reliability was found for the SDSG classification in L5-S1 lumbar spondylolisthesis. SDSG classification system is a simple and clear classification scheme incorporating spinopelvic parameters, which provides significant clinical utility. 3.

  12. Effect of electroacupuncture on muscle state and infrared thermogram changes in patients with acute lumbar muscle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuanzhi; Wu, Yaochi

    2015-10-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on force-displacement value (FDV) of muscle state and the temperature index of infrared thermogram in patients with acute lumbar muscle sprain. Patients with acute lumbar muscle sprain were randomly divided into a medication group and an EA group. The medication group (n = 60) were treated with diclofenac sodium dual release enteric-coated capsules, 75 mg per day for 7 days. The EA group (n = 60) received EA at bilateral Houxi (SI 3), Jiaji (EX-B2), and Ashi points, at 20-30 mm depth and 10-25 Hz frequency for 20 min daily for 7 days. Muscle states were determined by measuring FDVs of the bilateral lumbar muscle with a Myotonometer fast muscle state detector. The temperature index of the lumbar skin was measured before and after treatment with a Fluke Ti30 non-refrigerated focal plane infrared thermal imaging detector. There were no significant pre-treatment differences between the medication group and the EA group in mean FDV (P = 0.052) or temperature index of the lumbar skin (P = 0.25). The cure rate was 63.3% in the EA group and 53.3% in the medication group. The total efficacy in the EA group (93.3 %) was not significantly different from that in the medication group (86.6 %, P = 0.204). After treatment, the mean FDV of the lumbar muscle significantly increased in both groups (P lumbar sprain, but EA better improved the rehabilitation and regeneration of FDVs and temperature index of infrared thermogram of the muscle.

  13. A poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid) based bone graft extender for lumbar spinal fusion: in vivo assessment in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hile, David D; Kandziora, Frank; Lewandrowski, Kai-Uwe; Doherty, Stephen A; Kowaleski, Michael P; Trantolo, Debra J

    2006-06-01

    An animal model of posterolateral intertransverse process lumbar spinal fusion compared fusion rates amongst autologous bone (group 1), a porous, bioabsorbable, scaffold based on the biopolymer, poly(propylene glycol-co-fumaric acid) (PPF) (group 2), and a combination of autograft and the bioabsorbable scaffold (group 3). To evaluate the feasibility of augmenting spinal fusion with an osteoconductive and bioabsorbable scaffold as an alternative or as an adjunct, i.e., an extender, to autograft. There is little preclinical data on applications of bioabsorable bone graft extenders in spinal fusion. New Zealand White rabbits underwent single-level lumbar posterolateral intertransverse process fusion. Animals were treated with one of three materials: autologous bone (group 1), a bioabsorable material based on PPF (group 2), and the PPF biopolymer scaffold with autologous bone graft (group 3). Animals were evaluated at 6 weeks, and fusion was evaluated by manual palpation, and radiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses. Radiographic and manual palpation showed evidence of fusion in all three groups. Histomorphometric measurement of bone ingrowth showed the highest quantity of new bone in group 3 (91%), followed by group 1 (72%) and group 2 (53%). Results of this study suggested that osteoconductive bioabsorbable scaffolds prepared from PPF might be used as an autograft extender when applied as an adjunct to spinal fusion.

  14. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Matsudaira

    Full Text Available To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment.In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms had an odds ratio (OR of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50-7.31; absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13-5.65; <1-year duration of illness had an OR of 3.81 (95% CI: 1.46-9.98; and hypertension had an OR of 2.09 (95% CI: 0.92-4.78.The predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment in LSS patients were the presence of only radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year.

  15. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Ko; Hara, Nobuhiro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kunogi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Atsushi, Seichi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years) for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment. In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms) had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50-7.31); absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13-5.65); radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year.

  16. Effect of Acupuncture on Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadianfard, Mohammad J; Aminlari, Ali; Daneshian, Arghavan; Safarpour, Ali R

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a major cause of debilitation in adults, and acupuncture is a recommended treatment. We assessed the effect of acupuncture on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. Twenty-four patients with LSS who had symptoms of neurogenic claudication were randomly selected and underwent 10 sessions of acupuncture. Pain and quality of life were evaluated before and immediately after the intervention and 6 weeks later using a visual analogue scale and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Paired t tests and repeated measure tests were used to analyze the data. The mean age of the patients was 48.2 ± 10.8 years. The mean visual analogue scale scores before and immediately after intervention (7.9 ± 1.3 and 4.3 ± 2.1) were statistically different (p emotions, vitality, general health, bodily pain, and physical well-being. Therefore, acupuncture had a significant short-term effect on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effect of Acupuncture on Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Hadianfard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS is a major cause of debilitation in adults, and acupuncture is a recommended treatment. We assessed the effect of acupuncture on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. Twenty-four patients with LSS who had symptoms of neurogenic claudication were randomly selected and underwent 10 sessions of acupuncture. Pain and quality of life were evaluated before and immediately after the intervention and 6 weeks later using a visual analogue scale and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Paired t tests and repeated measure tests were used to analyze the data. The mean age of the patients was 48.2 ± 10.8 years. The mean visual analogue scale scores before and immediately after intervention (7.9 ± 1.3 and 4.3 ± 2.1 were statistically different (p < 0.001, as was the mean score (3.08 ± 2.3 6 weeks later (p = 0.01. Five aspects of the Short Form-36 Health Survey score were associated with significant improvements immediately after acupuncture (p < 0.05. Comparisons of the scores before and 6 weeks after intervention showed significant improvements in emotions, vitality, general health, bodily pain, and physical well-being. Therefore, acupuncture had a significant short-term effect on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS.

  18. Complications and Rates of Subsequent Lumbar Surgery Following Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty and Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasberg, Claire D; Kelly, Michael P; Ajiboye, Remi M; SooHoo, Nelson F

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective analysis. To examine complications and rates of subsequent surgery following lumbar spinal fusion (LF) and lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) at up to 5-year follow-up. LF is commonly used in the management of degenerative disc disease causing pain refractory to nonoperative management. Lumbar TDA was developed as an alternative to fusion with the theoretical advantage of reducing rates of adjacent segment pathology and reoperation. Most prior reports comparing these 2 interventions have come from industry-sponsored investigational device exemption trials and no large-scale administrative database comparisons exist. The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database was queried for patients aged 18 to 65 years undergoing lumbar TDA and LF for degenerative disc disease from 2004 to 2010. Patient characteristics were collected, and rates of complications and readmission were identified. Rates of repeat lumbar surgery were calculated at 90-day and 1-, 3-, and 5-year follow-up intervals. A total of 52,877 patients met the inclusion criteria (LF = 50,462, TDA = 2415). Wound infections were more common following LF than TDA (1.03% vs. 0.25%, P TDA than LF (90-day-TDA: 2.94% vs. LF: 4.01%, P = 0.007; 1-yr-TDA: 3.46% vs. LF: 4.78%, P = 0.009). However, there were no differences in rates of subsequent lumbar surgery between the 2 groups at 3-year and 5-year follow-up. Lumbar TDA was associated with fewer early reoperations, though beyond 1 year, rates of reoperation were similar. Lumbar TDA may be associated with fewer acute infections, though this may be approach related and unrelated to the device itself. 3.

  19. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury : Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...with acute spinal cord injury at risk of pressure ulcers. This project will investigate potential linkages between skeletal muscle tissue...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0618 TITLE: Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury

  20. Decompression and paraspinous tension band: a novel treatment method for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J N Alastair; Depreitere, Bart; Pflugmacher, Robert; Schnake, Klaus J; Fielding, Louis C; Alamin, Todd F; Goffin, Jan

    2015-03-02

    Prior studies have demonstrated the superiority of decompression and fusion over decompression alone for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis. More recent studies have investigated whether nonfusion stabilization could provide durable clinical improvement after decompression and fusion. To examine the clinical safety and effectiveness of decompression and implantation of a novel flexion restricting paraspinous tension band (PTB) for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. A prospective clinical study. Forty-one patients (7 men and 34 women) aged 45 to 83 years (68.2 ± 9.0) were recruited with symptomatic spinal stenosis and Meyerding Grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis at L3-L4 (8) or L4-L5 (33). Self-reported measures included visual analog scale (VAS) for leg, back, and hip pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Physiologic measures included quantitative and qualitative radiographic analysis performed by an independent core laboratory. Patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and stenosis were prospectively enrolled at four European spine centers with independent monitoring of data. Clinical and radiographic outcome data collected preoperatively were compared with data collected at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. This study was sponsored by the PTB manufacturer (Simpirica Spine, Inc., San Carlos, CA, USA), including institutional research support grants to the participating centers totaling approximately US $172,000. Statistically significant improvements and clinically important effect sizes were seen for all pain and disability measurements. At 24 months follow-up, ODI scores were reduced by an average of 25.4 points (59%) and maximum leg pain on VAS by 48.1 mm (65%). Back pain VAS scores improved from 54.1 by an average of 28.5 points (53%). There was one postoperative wound infection (2.4%) and an overall reoperation rate of 12%. Eighty-two percent patients available for 24 months

  1. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The outcome and survival of palliative surgery in thoraco-lumbar spinal metastases: contemporary retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemelc, R.M.; Stadhouder, A.; van Royen, B.J.; Jiya, T.U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate outcome and survival and to identify prognostic variables for patients surgically treated for spinal metastases. Methods A retrospective study was performed on 86 patients, surgically treated for spinal metastases. Preoperative analyses of the ASIA and spinal instability

  3. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, with massive necrosis of the spinal cord, probably due to antitetanus serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. A.; Ramsden, F.

    1962-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings are described of a fatal case of acute haemorrhagic leucoencephalitis and disseminated encephalomyelitis with acute necrosis of the white matter of the spinal cord. It is suggested that the reaction was a severe immunological response of an allergic nature, probably due to antitetanus serum. Images PMID:14473939

  4. Efficacy of Early Fusion With Local Bone Graft and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Followed Over 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Junki; Matsushita, Tadashi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. Many oral surgeons use platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for bone defects, but the efficacy of PRP for spinal arthrodesis remains uncertain. The objective was to compare the efficacy of autologous local bone graft and PRP with local bone graft alone for promotion of bony union in posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) surgery, with investigation of the safety of PRP over 10 years. A prospective study was conducted in 29 consecutive patients who underwent one-level PLF at L4/5 for degenerative lumbar disease. Local bone on the left (control) side and local bone with PRP on the right side were grafted. The fusion area and absorption of grafted bone at 58 regions were determined using computed tomography at 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Average bone fusion areas on the PRP side were significantly wider at 3 and 6 months after surgery (P < .05). Average absorption values were significantly lower on the PRP side than on the control side at 3 and 6 months after surgery (P < .05). The PRP/control ratio was significantly different at 3 and 6 months compared to that at 2 weeks (P < .005). No adverse events related to PRP occurred with good clinical outcome over 10 years follow-up. Local application of PRP combined with autologous local bone graft has a positive impact on early fusion for lumbar arthrodesis with no adverse events over 10 years, and thus is a safe and low cost autologous option in spinal fusion.

  5. Radiological outcome of postoperative sagittal balance on standing radiographs in comparison to intraoperative radiographs in prone position when performing lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greimel, Felix; Wolkerstorfer, Stefanie; Spörrer, Jan-Frederik; Zeman, Florian; Hoffstetter, Patrick; Grifka, Joachim; Benditz, Achim

    2017-10-01

    Aim of this study is to show the outcome of postoperatively measured lumbar lordosis in upright position in comparison to the intraoperatively estimated lumbar lordosis in prone position, as the lumbar lordosis is one of the most important factors for the clinical outcome after spinal fusion. Eighty-two patients, receiving lumbar fusion were included in this retrospective study. Intraoperative radiographs were scanned. Then radiographs of the whole spine pre- and postoperatively, as well as 1 year after surgery were measured by a spine surgeon and a radiologist. The visible segment lordosis angles were measured and compared (L2-S1, L3-S1, L4-S1, L5-S1). In addition, the pelvic parameters pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt and sacral slope were measured pre- and postoperatively. The intraobserver reliability was almost perfect. The mean lordosis angle L4-S1 was 32.6° ± 7.8° intraoperatively and 29° ± 10.8° postoperatively. A linear correlation of these two measurements can be seen. In mean, the postoperative lordosis is 4° smaller than intraoperatively. This trend can also be seen in the level L3-S1. In levels L2-S1 and L5-S1 the postoperative values were slightly higher than intraoperatively, but without any significance. Also, 1 year after surgery there were no significant changes in global lumbar lordosis. Measuring lordosis angles intraoperatively resulted in almost the same values as measurements in standing plane radiographs postoperatively, despite prone position. These findings could especially be shown for the level L4-S1. The intraobserver reliability was almost perfect for both, intra- and postoperative measurements. In conclusion, the intraoperative measurement of a lumbar lordosis angle can perfectly predict the postoperative result.

  6. Effect of lidocaine on spinal cord lipid peroxide levels after acute spinal cord trauma in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, A.S.; Özer, F.; Pamir, N.; Emerk, K.

    1991-01-01

    A standard spinal cord trauma was performed on control and lidocaine-treated (5 mg/kg. i.p.) rats. Spinal cord lipid peroxide levels in the lidocaine-trcaled group were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant difference was observed in plasma lipid peroxide levels. Our results suggest a protective role of lidocaine against lipid peroxidation after experimental spinal cord trauma in rats.

  7. Patient-reported outcome of surgical treatment for lumbar spinal epidural lipomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlic, Peter W; Mannion, Anne F; Jeszenszky, Deszö; Porchet, François; Fekete, Tamás F; Kleinstück, Frank; Haschtmann, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) is a rare condition characterized by an excessive accumulation of fat tissue in the spinal canal that can have a compressive effect, leading to clinical symptoms. This condition has a distinct pathology from spinal stenosis associated with degeneration of the intervertebral discs, ligaments, and facet joints. Several different conservative and surgical treatment strategies have been proposed for SEL, but its treatment remains controversial. There is a lack of evidence documenting the success of surgical decompression in SEL, and no previous studies have reported the postoperative outcome from the patient's perspective. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patient-rated outcome after surgical decompression in SEL. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was carried out. A total of 22 patients (19 males; age: 68.2±9.9 years) who had undergone spine surgery for SEL were identified from our local Spine Surgery Outcomes Database, which includes a total of 10,028 spine surgeries recorded between 2005 and 2012. Inclusion criteria were epidural lipomatosis confirmed by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and subsequent decompression surgery without spinal fusion. The Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) was used to assess patient-rated outcome. The COMI includes the domains pain (separate 0-10 scales for back and leg pain), back-specific function, symptom-specific well-being, general quality of life (QOL), work disability, and social disability. The questionnaires were completed preoperatively and at 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Surgical data were retrieved from the patient charts and from our local Spine Surgery Outcomes Database, which we operate in connection with the International Spine Tango Registry. Differences between pre- and postoperative scores were analyzed using paired t tests and repeated measures analysis of variance. At 3-months follow-up, the COMI score and scores for leg

  8. Success and failure of minimally invasive decompression for focal lumbar spinal stenosis in patients with and without deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Michael O; Timlin, Marcus; Persaud, Oma; Rampersaud, Yoga Raja

    2010-09-01

    Observational cohort study. Retrospective review of prospectively collected outcomes data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of minimally invasive (MIS) decompression for focal lumbar spinal stenosis (FLSS) in patients with and without deformity. MIS, facet-preserving decompression has the potential of offering a significantly less morbid alternative to decompression and fusion in patients with leg dominant symptoms from degenerative spondylolisthesis and/or scoliosis. Single surgeon, consecutive series (n=75), evaluated over 5 years. All patients had MIS lumbar laminoplasty (bilateral decompression from a unilateral approach) for FLSS (1-2 level). Patients had leg dominant, claudicant/radicular pain. Patients were divided into 4 groups: (A) stenosis with no deformity, n=22; (B) stenosis with spondylolisthesis only, n=25; (C) stenosis with scoliosis, n=16; and (D) stenosis combined with spondylolisthesis and scoliosis, n=12. The primary clinical outcome measures were the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and surgical revision rate. Preoperative and postoperative standing radiographs were assessed. The average age was 68 years (40-89) with a mean time from surgery of 36.5 months (18-68). Average clinical improvement in ODI was 49.5% to 23.9% [mean postoperative follow-up of 31.8 months (24-72): group A=mean of 34.6; B=28.9; C=32.7; D=30 months]. Incidence of preoperative grade I spondylolisthesis was 46%. Spondylolisthesis progression (mean=8.4%) occurred in 9 patients and 2 patients developed spondylolisthesis. Overall revision rate was 10% [repeat decompression alone (n=2) and decompression and fusion (n=6)]. Subgroup analysis of preoperative and postoperative ODI and revision rate revealed (A) 48% to 18.7%, 0%; (B) 48% to 24.6%, 4%; (C) 50.7% to 31.5%; 25%; and (D) 53% to 22%, 25%, respectively. The revision rate for patient with scoliosis (C+D) was significant (P=0.0035) compared with those without. Six of the 8 revised patients had a

  9. The Memory Metal Spinal System in a Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF) Procedure: A Prospective, Non-Comparative Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, D; Grevitt, M; Wapstra, Fh; Veldhuizen, Ag

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, non-comparative study of 27 patients to evaluate the safety and performance of the Memory Metal Spinal System used in a PLIF procedure in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD). To evaluate the clinical performance, radiological outcome and safety of the Memory Metal Spinal System, used in a PLIF procedure, in the treatment of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease in human subjects. Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylosis or degenerative disc disease, use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices. The Memory Metal Spinal System consists of a single square spinal rod made from a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connection devices. Nitinol is characterized by its shape memory effect and is a more flexible material than either stainless steel or titanium. With current systems there is loss of achieved reposition due to the elastic properties of the spine. By using a memory metal in this new system the expectation was that this loss of reposition would be overcome due to the metal's inherent shape memory properties. Furthermore, we expect a higher fusion rate because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. Twenty-seven subjects with primary diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, symptomatic spinal stenosis or degenerative disc disease (DDD) were treated with the Memory Metal Spinal System in conjunction with the Brantigan IF® Cage in two consecutive years. Clinical performance of the device was evaluated over 2 years using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) and pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores. Safety was studied by collection of adverse events intra-operative and during the followup. Interbody fusion status was

  10. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal injury patients ...

  11. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-17

    Apr 17, 2014 ... Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal.

  12. Radiographic versus direct measurements of the spinal canal at lumbar vertebrae L3-L5 and their relations to age and body stature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiviskae, T.; Videman, T.; Nurminen, T.; Troup, J.D.G.

    The role of the narrow lumbar spinal canal in back and sciatic pain is well established. The accuracy of measurements obtained from lumbar radiographs was therefore analyzed in lumbar spine specimens taken from 132 male cadavers. After removal of soft tissues, the same distances were measured on the bones of 80 specimens. Comparisons were made after correction for magnification, the radiographic measurements of interpedicular distances being, on average, 2 mm greater at L3 than the osteologic ones and 4 mm greater at L5. Interarticular distances, midsagittal diameters, and pedicular lengths were, on average, 1 mm greater and foraminal anteroposterior measurements 1 mm less than the osteologic ones. Body stature correlated with interpedicular and interarticular distances, pedicular length, and foraminal anteroposterior measurements. In older age groups, the midsagittal diameter tended to be reduced. A number of correlations were found between the five measurements, e.g. between the anteroposterior diameter of the intervertebral foramen and the pedicular length. Measurements in the transverse plane were independent of those in the anteroposterior plane. These results confirm and amplify preliminary observations and indicate the potential value of simple measurements on lumbar spine films as an alternative to more sophisticated and expensive radiologic investigations. (orig.).

  13. Numerical evaluation of the correlation between the normal variation in the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine and the spinal loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Costa, Francesco; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2014-04-01

    We present a numerical approach to reproduce various patterns of spino-pelvic organization. We wanted to predict the spinal loads in two static conditions (standing and holding a weight in the hands) based on parameters describing the shape of the lumbar spine: type following Roussouly classification, sacral slope, apex, inflection point and lumbar lordosis. Four hundred eighty finite element models including trunk muscles and representing the entire range of normal variability were created. The models predicted that, in the case of a moderate external load of 50 N, a lordotic and well balanced spine (e.g., type 3) could reduce the muscle activation in comparison with a more lordotic (type 4) spine, with negligible differences compared to a more straight spine (type 2). However, such a sagittal configuration was not correlated with a minimization of the loading state in the intervertebral discs, especially regarding anteroposterior shear loads. In the standing posture without any additional load, a less lordotic and more vertical spine (e.g., types 1 and 2) was sufficient to ensure a condition of minimal spinal loads. Despite a number of limitations, inverse statics numerical models of spine biomechanics including trunk muscles appear to be a promising tool to fill the knowledge gap between the clinical observations of the correlations between the spino-pelvic organization and the consequent spinal disorders. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment. Part VI: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M; Rundell, Sean D; Dougherty, Paul; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Morone, Natalia E; Naga Raja, Srinivasa; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Shega, Joseph; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-03-01

    . To present the sixth in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), the most common condition for which older adults undergo spinal surgery. . The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a five-member content expert panel and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The illustrative clinical case was taken from the clinical practice of a contributor's colleague (SR). . We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with LSS, a condition that occurs not uncommonly in those with CLBP. The case illustrates the importance of function-focused management and a rational approach to conservative care. . Lumbar spinal stenosis exists not uncommonly in older adults with CLBP and management often can be accomplished without surgery. Treatment should address all conditions in addition to LSS contributing to pain and disability. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Impact of spinal anaesthesia vs. general anaesthesia on peri-operative outcome in lumbar spine surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, T; Zhong, Z; Meng, L

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar spinal surgery is most commonly performed under general anaesthesia. However, spinal anaesthesia has also been used. We aimed to systematically review the comparative evidence. We only included randomised, controlled trials in this meta-analysis and calculated the risk ratio or standardised mean difference for haemodynamics, blood loss, surgical time, analgesic requirement, nausea and/or vomiting, and length of hospital stay. Eight studies with a total of 625 patients were included. These were considered to be at high risk of bias. Compared with general anaesthesia, the risk ratio (95% CI) with spinal anaesthesia for intra-operative hypertension was 0.31 (0.15-0.64), I2 = 0% (p = 0.002); for intra-operative tachycardia 0.51 (0.30-0.84), I2 = 0% (p = 0.009); for analgesic requirement in the postanaesthesia care unit 0.32 (0.24-0.43), I2 = 0% (p anaesthesia appears to offer advantages over general anaesthesia for lumbar spine surgery. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  16. Usefulness of a cognitive behavioural and rehabilitative approach to enhance long lasting benefit after lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis surgery. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, M; Giovanazzi, E

    2008-12-01

    Most spine-surgically treated patients are considered eligible for rehabilitative treatment. Unfortunately, an evidence-based consensus on the best postsurgical conservative treatment is not mentioned. In absence of a shared pathway, physical therapies, exercises, back schools, massages and other manual therapies are sometimes recommended by surgeons and clinicians. Like common low back pain, spinal problems in the postsurgical phase should be reconsidered through a bio-psycho-social model, advocating comprehensive evaluations and broader answers to patient-perceived pain, disability, and quality of life needs. The Authors report the clinical case of a 60-year-old woman, operated for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and L4-L5 degenerative spondylolisthesis, early entered in a Rehabilitation Hospital Unit, undergoing rehabilitative and cognitive behavioural therapy. Physical and psychological evaluation, outcome measures, physical and psychological therapies are here illustrated. The obtained results are encouraging for pain, disability and quality of life, assessing usefulness of a bio-psycho-social approach for spine-operated patients. A randomized controlled trial for rehabilitative and cognitive behavioural postsurgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis is advocated to provide further evidence to approaches and results. Proper outcome measures, correct clinical relevance evaluation and adequate follow-ups are needed.

  17. Spinal Cord Injury Level Influences Acute Plasma Caffeine Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Paulson, Terri Susan; Paulson, Thomas Andrew William; Perret, Claudio; Tolfrey, Keith; Cordery, Philip; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria Louise

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the absorption curve and acute effects of caffeine at rest in individuals with no spinal cord injury (SCI), paraplegia (PARA), and tetraplegia (TETRA). Twenty-four healthy males (eight able-bodied [AB], eight PARA, and eight TETRA) consumed 3 mg·kg caffeine anhydrous (CAF) in a fasted state. Plasma caffeine [CAF], glucose, lactate, free fatty acid, and catecholamine concentrations were measured during a 150-min rest period. Peak [CAF] was greater in TETRA (21.5 μM) compared with AB (12.2 μM) and PARA (15.1 μM), and mean peak [CAF] occurred at 70, 80, and 80 min, respectively. Moderate and large effect sizes were revealed for TETRA compared with PARA and AB (-0.55 and -1.14, respectively) for the total area under the [CAF] versus time curve. Large interindividual responses were apparent in SCI groups. The change in plasma catecholamine concentrations after CAF did not reach significance (P > 0.05); however, both adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations were lowest in TETRA. Significant increases in free fatty acid were seen over time (P 0.05). The level of SCI influenced the caffeine absorption curve, and there was large interindividual variation within and between groups. Individual curves should be considered when using caffeine as an ergogenic aid in athletes with an SCI. The results indicate TETRA should trial low doses in training and PARA may consider consuming caffeine greater than 60 min before exercise performance. The study also supports caffeine's direct effect on adipose tissue, which is not secondary to catecholamine release.

  18. The Impact of Kidney Disease on Acute Tubular Necrosis and Surgical Site Infection After Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhla, Jonathan; de la Garza Ramos, Rafael; Bhashyam, Niketh; Kobets, Andrew; Nasser, Rani; Echt, Murray; Lang, Gernot; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Jada, Ajit; Kinon, Merritt; Yassari, Reza

    2017-09-01

    Kidney disease in spine surgery can be associated with serious complications. To investigate the rate of acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and surgical site infection (SSI) after lumbar fusion in patients with kidney disease. A review of the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2011 was performed to identify patients who underwent lumbar fusion for degenerative spine disease or disk herniation. Four groups were established: no kidney disease, chronic kidney disease (CKD), end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and posttransplant. A multivariate analysis was performed to control for age, sex, and comorbidities. A total of 268,158 patients met the criteria; 263,757 with no kidney disease (98.4%), 3576 with CKD (1.3%), 586 with ESRD (0.2%), and 239 posttransplant (0.1%). Rates of ATN were 0.1%, 2.9%, 3.6%, and 0.0% for the 4 groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Rates of SSI were 0.3%, 0.4%, 1.0%, and 0.0%, respectively (P = 0.002). After controlling for patient age, sex, and medical comorbidities, patients with CKD (odds ratio [OR], 5.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.14-7.09; P < 0.001) and ESRD (OR, 6.32; 95% CI, 3.89-10.33; P < 0.001) were significantly more likely to develop ATN compared with patients without kidney disease. However, CKD (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.20-3.12; P = 0.754) or ESRD (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.38-10.00; P = 0.415) did not increase the risk for SSI on multivariate analysis. The rate of ATN significantly increases based on severity of kidney disease. However, patients with transplants have ATN and SSI rates comparable with patients without kidney disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Appraise operative outcome for acute central cervical spinal cord injuries without fracture and dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-yuan; Ma, Xin; Lü, Fei-zhou; Xu, Zheng-feng

    2007-03-15

    To evaluate the surgical outcome for acute central cervical spinal cord injuries without fracture and dislocation. A retrospective study was performed on 52 patients with acute central cervical cord injuries without fracture and dislocation from 2000 to 2005. All of patients underwent cervical anterior or posterior decompression, fusion and inter fixation. Spinal function was evaluated by ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) guidelines. Pre- and post-operation ASIA scores were analyzed using liner correlation and regression. The neurological function was recorded during followed-up. The average follow-up was 29 months (range, 12 to 42). After operation, the ASIA scores increased significantly (P<0.01). Finally, ASIA motor, pin pricking and light touching scores of the 41 patients were 91 +/- 7, 107 +/- 6 and 107 +/- 6 respectively. Decompression and inter fixation for injured segment can make a stable and broad space for spinal cord, promoting early neurological recovery and long-term improvement.

  20. Spinal aneurysmal bone cyst causing acute cord compression without vertebral collapse: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Monica S.M.; Wong, Yiu-Chung; Yuen, Ming-Keung [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hongkong (China); Lam, Dicky [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hongkong (China)

    2002-08-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the spine can cause acute spinal cord compression in young patients. We report the CT and MRI findings in a histology-proven case of spinal ABC presenting with sudden paraplegia. Typical features of a spinal ABC at the thoracic level with considerable extension into the posterior epidural space and cord compression were demonstrated. Special note was made of the disproportionately large longitudinal extent of the epidural component of the lesion. Associated vertebral collapse was absent. A fracture of the overlying cortex had probably allowed the lesion to decompress and track along the epidural space without significantly jeopardizing integrity of the osseous structures. This case illustrates a less frequently recognised mechanism of acute spinal cord compression by ABC. (orig.)

  1. Quality of life in preoperative patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction is at least as depressed as in other lumbar spinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Daniel Joseph; Reckling, W Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Pain from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an under-recognized cause of low back pain. The degree to which SIJ pain decreases quality of life has not been directly compared to other more familiar conditions of the lumbar spine. Multivariate regression analysis of individual patient data from two prospective multicenter clinical trials of SIJ fusion and three prospective multicenter clinical trials of surgical treatments for degenerative lumbar spine conditions. Controlling for baseline demographic parameters as well as a validated disability score, quality of life scores (EuroQOL 5-D and SF-36) were, in most cases, lower in the SIJ cohorts compared to the three other spine surgery cohorts. Patients with SIJ dysfunction considering surgery have decrements in quality of life as or more severe compared to patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and intervertebral disc herniation.

  2. Impact of pain on function and health related quality of life in lumbar spinal stenosis. A register study of 14,821 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, Freyr Gauti; Jönsson, Bo; Strömqvist, Björn

    2013-07-01

    Descriptive register study. To describe preoperative levels of leg and back pain in patients operated for lumbar spinal stenosis, and to obtain information on how 3 different pain constellations (back pain leg pain, back pain = leg pain) correlate to health related quality of life (HRQoL) and function in different morphological types of stenosis. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis is considered a poorly defined clinical syndrome and knowledge of what uniquely characterizes the different morphological types of stenosis is lacking. Using the Swedish Spine Register, we studied (1) the pain characteristics of patients with central spinal stenosis (CSS), lateral recess stenosis, and spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis (2) how HRQoL and function correlate to leg and back pain. Grading leg pain higher than back pain was the most common pain constellation (49%) followed by grading back pain more than leg pain (39%). Twelve percent had the same intensity of leg and back pain. The type of stenosis grading the highest burden of back pain was spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis (ratio = 0.93; [95% confidence interval, CI] = 0.92-0.95), followed by central spinal stenosis (ratio = 0.88; [95% CI] = 0.88-0.89). Lateral recess stenosis had the lowest burden of back pain (ratio = 0.85; [95% CI] = 0.83-0.87). The lowest HRQoL and function was found in spinal stenosis with spondylolisthesis (back pain = leg pain group) where 55% ([95% CI] = 50-59) of patients could not walk more than 100 m. Patients with lateral recess stenosis had better self-estimated walking distance. Back pain is generally experienced to a high extent by patients scheduled for spinal stenosis surgery. HRQoL and function are low preoperatively irrespective of whether back or leg pain is predominant. In this large patient material patients who grade their back and leg pain as likeworthy have significantly lower values for HRQoL and function compared to patients reporting predominant leg or back pain but the

  3. Preliminary results of a soft novel lumbar intervertebral prothesis (DIAM) in the degenerative spinal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariottini, A; Pieri, S; Giachi, S; Carangelo, B; Zalaffi, A; Muzii, F V; Palma, L

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a series of 43 patients suffering from lower limb pain, almost constantly associated with chronic or acute backpain, treated by microsurgical nerve root decompression and by implantation of a soft intervertebral prothesis (DIAM). Satisfying results were obtained in 97% of cases, inducing the authors to consider the device a reliable tool for curing low-back pain and sciatica. Selection criteria are exposed and discussed.

  4. Understanding inhibitory mechanisms of lumbar spinal manipulation using H-reflex and F-wave responses: a methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, J Donald; Weber, Kenneth A; Corbin, Roger L; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2012-09-30

    The purpose of this research was to characterize unique neurophysiologic events following a high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation (SM) procedure. Descriptive time series analysis techniques of time plots, outlier detection and autocorrelation functions were applied to time series of tibial nerve H-reflexes that were evoked at 10-s intervals from 100 s before the event until 100 s after three distinct events L5-S1 HVLA SM, or a L5-S1 joint pre-loading procedure, or the control condition. Sixty-six subjects were randomly assigned to three procedures, i.e., 22 time series per group. If the detection of outliers and correlograms revealed a pattern of non-randomness that was only time-locked to a single, specific event in the normalized time series, then an experimental effect would be inferred beyond the inherent variability of H-reflex responses. Tibial nerve F-wave responses were included to determine if any new information about central nervous function following a HVLA SM procedure could be ascertained. Time series analyses of H(max)/M(max) ratios, pre-post L5-S1 HVLA SM, substantiated the hypothesis that the specific aspects of the manipulative thrust lead to a greater attenuation of the H(max)/M(max) ratio as compared to the non-specific aspects related to the postural perturbation and joint pre-loading. The attenuation of the H(max)/M(max) ratio following the HVLA SM procedure was reliable and may hold promise as a translational tool to measure the consistency and accuracy of protocol implementation involving SM in clinical trials research. F-wave responses were not sensitive to mechanical perturbations of the lumbar spine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of abdominal muscle thickness changes after spinal manipulation in patients who meet a clinical prediction rule for lumbar stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konitzer, Lisa N; Gill, Norman W; Koppenhaver, Shane L

    2011-09-01

    Prospective case series. To investigate changes in abdominal muscle thickness with ultrasound imaging, after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), in a subgroup of patients with low back pain (LBP) who meet a proposed clinical prediction rule for lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE). The characteristics of a subgroup of patients with LBP who respond clinically to LSE has been proposed. Although the pathoanatomical characteristics of this subgroup have not been determined, clinicians often assume that this type of LBP is related, in part, to neuromuscular deficits of the lateral abdominal muscles. Recent evidence suggests that SMT may facilitate abdominal muscle activity and, therefore, enhance exercises targeting these deficits. Nineteen patients (mean age ± SD, 32.5 ± 7.8 years; 11 female) with LBP, who met the criteria for LSE, underwent ultrasound imaging of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles before, immediately after, and 3 to 4 days after lumbopelvic SMT. Measurements of resting thickness, contracted thickness during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, and percent thickness change from rest to contraction of the TrA and IO muscles were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Numeric pain rating scale and Oswestry Disability Index data were also collected. No significant differences in resting, contracted, or percent thickness change in the TrA or IO were found over the 3 time periods. There were statistically significant reductions in numeric pain rating scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores, but mean differences failed to meet the minimal clinically important difference. The results provide preliminary evidence that TrA and IO muscle resting and contracted thicknesses do not change post-SMT in patients with LBP in the LSE subgroup. In addition, while reductions in pain and disability were noted, they were not clinically meaningful.

  6. Prognostic Factors for Recovery After Anterior Debridement/Bone Grafting and Posterior Instrumentation for Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Zhang, Huiyu; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Tang, Yu; Zhou, Yue

    2017-08-01

    Anterior debridement/bone grafting/posterior instrumentation is a common selection for the treatment of lumbar spinal tuberculosis (LST). To date, no study has focused on the prognostic factors for recovery after this surgery. We included 144 patients who experienced anterior debridement/bone grafting/posterior instrumentation for LST. The recovery rate based on the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was used to assess recovery. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to identify the prognostic factors for recovery postoperatively. For the prognostic factors worth further consideration, the changes in JOA scores within the 24-month follow-up period were identified by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Paralysis/nonparalysis, duration of symptoms (≥3/2/≤2), and posterior open/percutaneous instrumentation were identified as prognostic factors for recovery postoperatively. The prognostic factor of open/percutaneous instrumentation was then further compared for potential clinical application. Patients in the percutaneous instrumentation group achieved higher JOA scores than those in the open instrumentation group in the early stages postoperatively (1-3 months), but this effect equalized at 6 months postoperatively. Patients in the open instrumentation group experienced longer operation time and less cost than those in the percutaneous instrumentation group. Nonparalysis, shorter symptom duration, fewer involved vertebrae, and posterior percutaneous instrumentation (compared with open instrumentation) are considered favorable prognostic factors. Patients in the percutaneous instrumentation group achieved higher JOA scores than those in the open instrumentation group in the early stages postoperatively (1-3 months), but no significant difference was observed in long-term JOA scores (6-24 months). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, Jan T. [University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. Radiology

    2010-07-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  8. Acute presentation of solitary spinal epidural cavernous angioma in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Hamidi, Mehrdokht; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2013-05-01

    Solitary spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are rare lesions, especially in paediatric age group. They are infrequently considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural masses in children. We report a case of solitary epidural cavernous angioma of the thoracic spine in a child presenting with acute onset of back pain and myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine demonstrated a posterior epidural mass at T6-T8 levels with compression of the spinal cord. Using microsurgical technique and bipolar coagulation, total excision of the lesion was achieved. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. At the five-year follow-up, there was no recurrence of the tumour.

  9. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation: Experience of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they "awaited the result of surgery", and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of rehabilitation may have encouraged beneficial pain coping

  10. The use of PRV-Bartha to define premotor inputs to lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal spinal cord of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Jovanovic

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The neonatal mouse has become a model system for studying the locomotor function of the lumbar spinal cord. However, information about the synaptic connectivity within the governing neural network remains scarce. A neurotropic pseudorabies virus (PRV Bartha has been used to map neuronal connectivity in other parts of the nervous system, due to its ability to travel trans-neuronally. Its use in spinal circuits regulating locomotion has been limited and no study has defined the time course of labelling for neurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons.Here we investigated the ability of PRV Bartha, expressing green and/or red fluorescence, to label spinal neurons projecting monosynaptically to motoneurons of two principal hindlimb muscles, the tibialis anterior (TA and gastrocnemius (GC. As revealed by combined immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, 24-32 h after the viral muscle injection the label was restricted to the motoneuron pool while at 32-40 h the fluorescence was seen in interneurons throughout the medial and lateral ventral grey matter. Two classes of ipsilateral interneurons known to project monosynaptically to motoneurons (Renshaw cells and cells of origin of C-terminals were consistently labeled at 40 h post-injection but also a group in the ventral grey matter contralaterally. Our results suggest that the labeling of last order interneurons occurred 8-12 h after motoneuron labeling and we presume this is the time taken by the virus to cross one synapse, to travel retrogradely and to replicate in the labeled cells.The study establishes the time window for virally-labelling monosynaptic projections to lumbar motoneurons following viral injection into hindlimb muscles. Moreover, it provides a good foundation for intracellular targeting of the labeled neurons in future physiological studies and better understanding the functional organization of the lumbar neural networks.

  11. Low sense of coherence interferes with lumbar spinal stenosis patients' postoperative recovery: a prospective one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinikallio, Sanna; Lehto, Soili M; Aalto, Timo; Airaksinen, Olavi; Viinamäki, Heimo

    2011-07-01

    In a prospective observational study (N = 97) we examined the changes in the SOC score after a surgical intervention for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and the factors associated with low and high SOC scores. Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the predictors for the lowest SOC tertile. The post-surgical recovery among the low SOC group halted on three-month follow-up, whereas in the high SOC group a steady improvement was detected up to one year postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative depressive symptoms were highly pertinent to the SOC of LSS patients, both as an indicator and a predictor of a low one-year SOC.

  12. In vivo intracellular recordings from spinal lumbar motoneurones in P0-deficient mice indicate an activity-dependent axonal conduction failure in otherwise functional motoneurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnhoff, Janna; Moldovan, Mihai; Hedegaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    dysmyelination remains poorly understood. In this study, in vivo electrophysiological recordings were used to assess the function of both central and axonal components of spinal lumbar motoneurones in adult P0-/- mice.Three month old P0-/- mice (n=7) and wild type (WT) littermate controls (n=5) were...... monitoring of the heart rate. Intracellular recordings with sharp microelectrodes were made from identified spinal motoneurones (for detailed methods see Meehan et al. 2010). After end experiments, animals received an overdose of anesthesia and were perfused intracardially with 4% paraformaldehyde. Mean...... with axonal dysfunction rather than axonal loss. Recordings from motoneurone cell bodies of P0-/- mice did show some abnormalities: The amplitude of the post-spike after-hyperpolarization was increased (WT: 2.07±1.02mV (n=25), P0-/-: 2.50±0.65mV (n=22), Mann-Whitney: P=0.0311). There was also an earlier onset...

  13. Multiple myeloma presenting with acute bony spinal cord compression and mechanical instability successfully managed nonoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokaraju, Kishan; Butler, Joseph S; Benton, Adam; Suarez-Huerta, Maria L; Selvadurai, Susanne; Molloy, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) with spinal involvement may present with spinal cord or cauda equina compression, with or without neurological impairment. This occurs when a soft-tissue myelomatous mass extends into the epidural space (Barron et al., 1959 [1]). The mainstay of management for such lesions in patients with normal neurology is chemotherapy and radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone, but those with neurological compromise require surgical decompression with adjuvant therapy (Patchell et al., 2005 [2]). Infrequently, patients with MM present with spinal cord compression and neurological impairment due to bony encroachment from vertebral translation and kyphosis where significant lytic bone disease has rendered the spine mechanically unstable. The standard management for these patients is surgical decompression and internal fixation. This study aimed to report a high-risk myeloma patient with a mechanically unstable spine, acute spinal cord compression, and neurologic deficit that was treated successfully using nonoperative means. Case report. A 37-year-old male patient with MM was referred to our tertiary referral spinal unit with acute bony spinal cord compression and neurological impairment. Computer tomography revealed lytic lesions of T2 and T3 and anterolisthesis of T1 on T2 producing mechanical instability and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed extension of disease into the epidural space and cord compression. This was successfully managed with nonoperative treatment using a brace. Management in a brace restored clinical and radiological stability and normal neurological function. Certain high-risk myeloma patients with a mechanically unstable spine, acute spinal cord compression and neurologic deficit can be treated effectively in an appropriate brace when managed by a tertiary referral spinal unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Smith–Petersen osteotomy combined with anterior debridement and allografting for active thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with kyphotic deformity in young children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Yakefu; Liang, Wei-Dong; Maimaiti, Maierdan; Sheng, Wei-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy and safety of Smith–Petersen osteotomy combined with anterior debridement and allogenic strut bone grafting for the treatment of active thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis with kyphotic deformity in young children. Spinal tuberculosis is more destructive in young children and often causes severe kyphosis and paraplegia. Despite much progress has been made, surgical treatment is still controversial and technically challenging. From October 2010 to August 2014, 25 children (11 males, 14 females; aged under 6 years) with active thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis treated by Smith–Petersen osteotomy combined with anterior debridement and allogenic strut bone grafting were enrolled in this study. The pre- and postoperative data, follow-up medical records, imaging studies, and laboratory data were collected prospectively. Clinical outcomes were evaluated on the basis of kyphotic angle and the Frankel motor score system. The changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), clinical symptoms, and complications were investigated. Graft fusion was evaluated using the Bridwell grading criteria. The mean age was 3.5 ± 1.76 years (range, 1–6 years). All patients were followed up for 25 to 45 months (average, 34.3 ± 5.86 months). The average kyphotic angle was changed significantly from a preoperative value of 44.1 ± 10.8° to a postoperative value of 11.4 ± 3.9°, with an average correction rate of 74% (P spinal tuberculosis, Smith–Petersen osteotomy combined with anterior debridement and allogenic strut bone grafting is a safe and simple procedure to achieve sufficient kyphosis correction, good neurological recovery, and reliable anterior column reconstruction. PMID:28796043

  15. Spinal distribution of c-Fos activated neurons expressing enkephalin in acute and chronic pain models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini, Mehdi; Duraku, Liron S; Kohli, Somesh K; Jongen, Joost L M; Holstege, Jan C

    2014-01-16

    The endogenous opioid enkephalin is known to inhibit spinal nociceptive transmission. Here we investigated activation of spinal enkephalinergic neurons by determining the proportions of c-Fos expressing (activated) spinal neurons that were enkephalinergic after different acute and chronic peripheral nociceptive stimuli. The number of c-Fos-activated neurons in the dorsal horn was increased after hind paw injection of capsaicin, formalin or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 1.5 hrs - 4 days). The numbers of these neurons that were enkephalinergic increased after paraformaldehyde, and at 20 hrs, but not 1.5 hrs or 4 days post-CFA as compared to saline. In the spared nerve injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain, c-Fos expression was increased acutely (2 hrs) and chronically (2 weeks), and a greater number of these were enkephalinergic in the nerve-injured animals acutely compared to controls (sham-SNI). Combining all acute (=2 hrs) versus chronic (≥20 hrs) treatment groups, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of activated neurons that were enkephalinergic in superficial layers, but a significant increase in the deeper layers of the dorsal horn in the chronic treatment group. It is concluded that the overall percentage of c-Fos activated neurons that contained enkephalin was not significantly different between acute and chronic pain phases. However, the shift in localization of these neurons within the spinal dorsal horn indicates a noxious stimulus directed activation pattern. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The Transcriptional Response of Neurotrophins and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors in Lumbar Sensorimotor Circuits to Spinal Cord Contusion is Affected by Injury Severity and Survival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougland, M. Tyler; Harrison, Benjamin J.; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) results in changes to the anatomical, neurochemical, and physiological properties of cells in the central and peripheral nervous system. Neurotrophins, acting by binding to their cognate Trk receptors on target cell membranes, contribute to modulation of anatomical, neurochemical, and physiological properties of neurons in sensorimotor circuits in both the intact and injured spinal cord. Neurotrophin signaling is associated with many post-SCI changes including maladaptive plasticity leading to pain and autonomic dysreflexia, but also therapeutic approaches such as training-induced locomotor improvement. Here we characterize expression of mRNA for neurotrophins and Trk receptors in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord after two different severities of mid-thoracic injury and at 6 and 12 weeks post-SCI. There was complex regulation that differed with tissue, injury severity, and survival time, including reversals of regulation between 6 and 12 weeks, and the data suggest that natural regulation of neurotrophins in the spinal cord may continue for months after birth. Our assessments determined that a coordination of gene expression emerged at the 12-week post-SCI time point and bioinformatic analyses address possible mechanisms. These data can inform studies meant to determine the role of the neurotrophin signaling system in post-SCI function and plasticity, and studies using this signaling system as a therapeutic approach. PMID:23316162

  17. Third-Degree Hindpaw Burn Injury Induced Apoptosis of Lumbar Spinal Cord Ventral Horn Motor Neurons and Sciatic Nerve and Muscle Atrophy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hua Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Severe burns result in hypercatabolic state and concomitant muscle atrophy that persists for several months, thereby limiting patient recovery. However, the effects of burns on the corresponding spinal dermatome remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether burns induce apoptosis of spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons (VHMNs and consequently cause skeletal muscle wasting. Methods. Third-degree hindpaw burn injury with 1% total body surface area (TBSA rats were euthanized 4 and 8 weeks after burn injury. The apoptosis profiles in the ventral horns of the lumbar spinal cords, sciatic nerves, and gastrocnemius muscles were examined. The Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve were marked with S100. The gastrocnemius muscles were harvested to measure the denervation atrophy. Result. The VHMNs apoptosis in the spinal cord was observed after inducing third-degree burns in the hindpaw. The S100 and TUNEL double-positive cells in the sciatic nerve increased significantly after the burn injury. Gastrocnemius muscle apoptosis and denervation atrophy area increased significantly after the burn injury. Conclusion. Local hindpaw burn induces apoptosis in VHMNs and Schwann cells in sciatic nerve, which causes corresponding gastrocnemius muscle denervation atrophy. Our results provided an animal model to evaluate burn-induced muscle wasting, and elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  18. The prevalence of depressive symptoms before and after surgery and its association with disability in patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahlman, M.; Hakkinen, A.; Dekker, J.; Marttinen, I.; Vihtonen, K.; Neva, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of depressive symptoms and disability preoperatively, at 3 months and at 1 year after lumbar spine fusion surgery. Methods: Data was extracted from a dedicated lumbar spine fusion register, giving 232 patients (mean age 62 years, 158

  19. Outcomes of early surgical management versus late or no surgical intervention after acute spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, William; Meade, Michelle A; Kirshblum, Steven; Barnard, Barbara

    2004-11-01

    To compare neurologic, medical, and functional outcomes of patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI) undergoing early (72 h) surgical spine intervention versus those treated nonsurgically. Retrospective case series comparing outcomes by surgical and nonsurgical groups during acute care, rehabilitation, and at 1-year follow-up. Multicenter National Spinal Cord Injury Database. Consecutive patients with acute, nonpenetrating, traumatic SCI from 1995 to 2000, admitted in the first 24 hours after injury. Surgical spinal intervention was likely secondary to nature of injury and the need for spinal stabilization. Interventions Not applicable. Changes in neurologic outcomes (motor and sensory levels, motor index score, American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale [AIS]), medical complications (pneumonia and atelectasis, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, pressure ulcers, autonomic dysreflexia, rehospitalization), and functional outcomes (acute and rehabilitation length of stay [LOS], hospital charges, FIM instrument score, FIM motor efficiency scores). Subjects in the early surgery group were more likely ( P <.05) to be women, have paraplegia, and have SCI caused by motor vehicle collisions. The nonsurgical group was more likely ( P <.05) to have an older mean age and more incomplete injuries. ASIA motor index improvements (from admission to 1-y follow-up) were more likely ( P <.05) in the nonsurgical groups, as compared with the surgical groups. Those with late surgery had significantly ( P <.05) increased acute care and total LOS and hospital charges along with higher incidence of pneumonia and atelectasis. No differences between groups were found for changes in neurologic levels, AIS grade, or FIM motor efficiency. ASIA motor index improvements were noted in the nonsurgery group, though likely related to increased incompleteness of injuries within this group. Early versus late spinal surgery was associated with shorter LOS and reduced

  20. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects...

  1. Recruitment methods and costs for a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of chiropractic care for lumbar spinal stenosis: a single-site pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Dexheimer, Jennifer M; Chang, Mabel; Cramer, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the methods for recruitment in a clinical trial on chiropractic care for lumbar spinal stenosis. This randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study investigated the efficacy of different amounts of total treatment dosage over 6 weeks in 60 volunteer subjects with lumbar spinal stenosis. Subjects were recruited for this study through several media venues, focusing on successful and cost-effective strategies. Included in our efforts were radio advertising, newspaper advertising, direct mail, and various other low-cost initiatives. Of the 1211 telephone screens, 60 responders (5.0%) were randomized into the study. The most successful recruitment method was radio advertising, generating more than 64% of the calls (776 subjects). Newspaper and magazine advertising generated approximately 9% of all calls (108 subjects), and direct mail generated less than 7% (79 subjects). The total direct cost for recruitment was $40 740 or $679 per randomized patient. The costs per randomization were highest for direct mail ($995 per randomization) and lowest for newspaper/magazine advertising ($558 per randomization). Success of recruitment methods may vary based on target population and location. Planning of recruitment efforts is essential to the success of any clinical trial. Copyright 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.).

  3. A prospective randomized multi-center study for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with the X STOP interspinous implant: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucherman, J F; Hsu, K Y; Hartjen, C A; Mehalic, T F; Implicito, D A; Martin, M J; Johnson, D R; Skidmore, G A; Vessa, P P; Dwyer, J W; Puccio, S; Cauthen, J C; Ozuna, R M

    2004-02-01

    Patients suffering from neurogenic intermittent claudication secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis have historically been limited to a choice between a decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion or a regimen of non-operative therapies. The X STOP Interspinous Process Distraction System (St. Francis Medical Technologies, Concord, Calif.), a new interspinous implant for patients whose symptoms are exacerbated in extension and relieved in flexion, has been available in Europe since June 2002. This study reports the results from a prospective, randomized trial of the X STOP conducted at nine centers in the U.S. Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study and 191 were treated; 100 received the X STOP and 91 received non-operative therapy (NON OP) as a control. The Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) was the primary outcomes measurement. Validated for lumbar spinal stenosis patients, the ZCQ measures physical function, symptom severity, and patient satisfaction. Patients completed the ZCQ upon enrollment and at follow-up periods of 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Using the ZCQ criteria, at 6 weeks the success rate was 52% for X STOP patients and 10% for NON OP patients. At 6 months, the success rates were 52 and 9%, respectively, and at 1 year, 59 and 12%. The results of this prospective study indicate that the X STOP offers a significant improvement over non-operative therapies at 1 year with a success rate comparable to published reports for decompressive laminectomy, but with considerably lower morbidity.

  4. Quality of life in preoperative patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction is at least as depressed as in other lumbar spinal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cher DJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Joseph Cher, W Carlton RecklingSI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USABackground: Pain from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ is an under-recognized cause of low back pain. The degree to which SIJ pain decreases quality of life has not been directly compared to other more familiar conditions of the lumbar spine.Methods: Multivariate regression analysis of individual patient data from two prospective multicenter clinical trials of SIJ fusion and three prospective multicenter clinical trials of surgical treatments for degenerative lumbar spine conditions.Results: Controlling for baseline demographic parameters as well as a validated disability score, quality of life scores (EuroQOL 5-D and SF-36 were, in most cases, lower in the SIJ cohorts compared to the three other spine surgery cohorts.Conclusion: Patients with SIJ dysfunction considering surgery have decrements in quality of life as or more severe compared to patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and intervertebral disc herniation.Keywords: spine surgery, disability, low back pain, sacroiliac joint pain, lumbar stenosis, intervertebral disc herniation, degenerative spondylolisthesis, sacroiliac joint fusion

  5. A non-surgical approach to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis: A prospective observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz Eric L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is widely held that non-surgical management should be the first line of approach in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, little is known about the efficacy of non-surgical treatments for this condition. Data are needed to determine the most efficacious and safe non-surgical treatment options for patients with LSS. The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical outcomes of a novel approach to patients with LSS that focuses on distraction manipulation (DM and neural mobilization (NM. Methods This is a prospective consecutive case series with long term follow up (FU of fifty-seven consecutive patients who were diagnosed with LSS. Two were excluded because of absence of baseline data or failure to remain in treatment to FU. Disability was measured using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RM and pain intensity was measured using the Three Level Numerical Rating Scale (NRS. Patients were also asked to rate their perceived percentage improvement. Results The mean patient-rated percentage improvement from baseline to the end to treatment was 65.1%. The mean improvement in disability from baseline to the end of treatment was 5.1 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. Clinically meaningful improvement in disability from baseline to the end of treatment was seen in 66.7% of patients. The mean improvement in "on average" pain intensity was 1.6 points. This did not reach the threshold for clinical meaningfulness. The mean improvement in "at worst" pain was 3.1 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. The mean duration of FU was 16.5 months. The mean patient-rated percentage improvement from baseline to long term FU was 75.6%. The mean improvement in disability was 5.2 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. Clinically meaningful improvement in disability was seen in 73.2% of patients. The mean improvement in "on average" pain intensity from baseline to long

  6. Effects of segmental traction therapy on lumbar disc herniation in patients with acute low back pain measured by magnetic resonance imaging: A single arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Noureddin; Akbarov, Parvin; Rahnama, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) is considered as one of the most frequent disorders, which about 80% of adults experience in their lives. Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a cause for acute LBP. Among conservative treatments, traction is frequently used by clinicians to manage LBP resulting from LDH. However, there is still a lack of consensus about its efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of segmental traction therapy on lumbar discs herniation, pain, lumbar range of motion (ROM), and back extensor muscles endurance in patients with acute LBP induced by LDH. Fifteen patients with acute LBP diagnosed by LDH participated in the present study. Participants undertook 15 sessions of segmental traction therapy along with conventional physiotherapy, 5 times a week for 3 weeks. Lumbar herniated mass size was measured before and after the treatment protocol using magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, pain, lumbar ROM and back muscle endurance were evaluated before and after the procedure using clinical outcome measures. Following the treatment protocol, herniated mass size and patients' pain were reduced significantly. In addition, lumbar flexion ROM showed a significant improvement. However, no significant change was observed for back extensor muscle endurance after the treatment procedure. The result of the present study showed segmental traction therapy might play an important role in the treatment of acute LBP stimulated by LDH.

  7. 9 Expression in Rats with Acute Spinal Cord Injury by Cantharidin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the anti-apoptotic effects of cantharidin in mice with acute spinal cord injury. (ASCI). Methods: In total, 30 male Sprague-Dawley mice were divided into three groups of 10 animals each. ASCI was induced in two of the groups using a modified Allen's method, consisting of treatment with 10.

  8. Decision making in surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: the performance of prognostic tests to select patients for lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is one of the main causes of disability in the western world with a huge economic burden to society. As yet, no specific underlying anatomic cause has been identified for CLBP. Imaging often reveals degenerative findings of the disc or facet joints of one or more lumbar motion segments. These findings, however, can also be observed in asymptomatic people. It has been suggested that pain in degenerated discs may be caused by the ingrowth of nerve fibers into tears or clefts of the annulus fibrosus or nucleus pulposus, and by reported high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. As this so-called discogenic pain is often exacerbated by mechanical loading, the concept of relieving pain by spinal fusion to stabilise a painful spinal segment, has been developed. For some patients lumbar spinal fusion indeed is beneficial, but its results are highly variable and hard to predict for the individual patient. To identify those CLBP patients who will benefit from fusion, many surgeons rely on tests that are assumed to predict the outcome of spinal fusion. The three most commonly used prognostic tests in daily practice are immobilization in a lumbosacral orthosis, provocative discography and trial immobilization by temporary external transpedicular fixation. Aiming for consensus on the indications for lumbar fusion and in order to improve its results by better patient selection, it is essential to know the role and value of these prognostic tests for CLBP patients in clinical practice. The overall aims of the present thesis were: 1) to evaluate whether there is consensus among spine surgeons regarding the use and appreciation of prognostic tests for lumbar spinal fusion; 2) to verify whether a thoracolumbosacral orthosisis (TLSO) truly minimises lumbosacral motion; 3) to verify whether a TLSO can predict the clinical outcome of fusion for CLBP; 4) to assess whether provocative discography of adjacent segments actually predicts the long-term clinical

  9. BokSmart: medical management of suspected serious acute spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Injury to the spinal cord with paralysis during rugby is rare but remains an emotionally charged issue, especially at schoolboy level. The game has evolved over the years with rule changes to reduce injury risk. Scrums were originally perceived as the high-risk phase of play and rule changes in the early 1990s have reduced ...

  10. Spinal manipulative therapy for acute low-back pain (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Terwee, C.B.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Boer, M.R.M. de; Tulder, M.W. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many therapies exist for the treatment of low-back pain including spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), which is a worldwide, extensively practised intervention. This report is an update of the earlier Cochrane review, first published in January 2004 with the last search for studies up to

  11. deep venous thrombosis in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Deep vein thrombosis, Pulmonary embolism, Traumatic spinal cord injury, Wells score,. D-dimer assays ... Thromboembolic events are a major ..... and diet. Race alone may not be a strong factor. Blacks. (African Americans) who are living in the United States have the same or higher prevalence of DVT with the.

  12. Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    .... This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine...

  13. Biomechanical comparison of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and bilateral laminotomy for spinal stenosis syndrome – an experimental study in porcine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lih-Huei

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association of lumbar spine instability between laminectomy and laminotomy has been clinically studied, but the corresponding in vitro biomechanical studies have not been reported. We investigated the hypothesis that the integrity of the posterior complex (spinous process-interspinous ligament-spinous process plays an important role on the postoperative spinal stability in decompressive surgery. Methods Eight porcine lumbar spine specimens were studied. Each specimen was tested intact and after two decompression procedures. All posterior components were preserved in Group A (Intact. In Group B (Bilateral laminotomy, the inferior margin of L4 lamina and superior margin of L5 lamina were removed, but the L4–L5 supraspinous ligament was preserved. Fenestrations were made on both sides. In Group C (Laminectomy the lamina and spinous processes of lower L4 and upper L5 were removed. Ligamentum flavum and supraspinous ligament of L4–L5 were removed. A hydraulic testing machine was used to generate an increasing moment up to 8400 N-mm in flexion and extension. Intervertebral displacement at decompressive level L4–L5 was measured by extensometer Results The results indicated that, under extension motion, intervertebral displacement between the specimen in intact form and at two different decompression levels did not significantly differ (P > 0.05. However, under flexion motion, intervertebral displacement of the laminectomy specimens at decompression level L4–L5 was statistically greater than in intact or bilateral laminotomy specimens (P = 0.0000963 and P = 0.000418, respectively. No difference was found between intact and bilateral laminotomy groups. (P > 0.05. Conclusion We concluded that a lumbar spine with posterior complex integrity is less likely to develop segment instability than a lumbar spine with a destroyed anchoring point for supraspinous ligament.

  14. Predicting Recruitment Feasibility for Acute Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Trials in Canada Using National Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Rivers, Carly S; Bailey, Christopher S; Tsai, Eve C; Drew, Brian; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F; Kuerban, Dilinuer; Kwon, Brian K; Christie, Sean D

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a significant burden of illness, but it is relatively uncommon and heterogeneous, making it challenging to achieve sufficient subject enrollment in clinical trials of therapeutic interventions for acute SCI. The Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) is a national SCI Registry that enters patients with SCI from acute-care centers across Canada. To predict the feasibility of conducting clinical trials of acute SCI within Canada, we have applied the inclusion/exclusion criteria of six previously conducted SCI trials to the RHSCIR data set and generated estimates of how many Canadian persons would have been eligible theoretically for enrollment in these studies. Data for SCI cases were prospectively collected for RHSCIR at 18 acute and 13 rehabilitation sites across Canada. RHSCIR patients enrolled between 2009-2013 who met the following key criteria were included: non-penetrating traumatic SCI; received acute care at a RHSCIR site; age more than 18, less than 75 years, and had complete admission single neurological level of injury data. Inclusion and exclusion criteria for the Minocycline in Acute Spinal Cord injury (Minocycline), Riluzole, Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS), Cethrin, Nogo antibody study (NOGO), and Sygen studies were applied retrospectively to this data set. The numbers of patients eligible for each clinical trial were determined. There were 2166 of the initial 2714 patients (79.8%) who met the key criteria and were included in the data set. Projected annual numbers of eligible patients for each trial were: Minocycline, 117; Riluzole, 62; STASCIS, 109; Cethrin, 101; NOGO, 82; and Sygen, 70. An additional 8.0% of the sample had a major head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤12) and would have been excluded from the trials. RHSCIR provides a comprehensive national data set that may serve as a useful tool in the planning of multicenter clinical SCI trials.

  15. Experience and nursing needs of school-age children undergoing lumbar puncture during the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a descriptive and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Anwei; Shan, Yuying; Niu, Mei E; Chen, Yi; Wang, Xiya

    2017-11-01

    To describe experiences and nursing needs of school-age Chinese children undergoing lumbar puncture for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Lumbar puncture is an invasive procedure, causing psychological changes and physical discomfort in patients. In a previous study, it was proved that distraction intervention, such as music therapy, relieves pain and anxiety. There is limited evidence regarding the experience and needs of school-age children during lumbar puncture after being diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. To minimise their anxiety and pain during the procedure, it is important to collect information directly from these children. A descriptive qualitative research. Twenty-one school-age children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia participated in semi-structured interviews at a Children's Hospital in China. Data were collected by an experienced and trained interviewer. Qualitative content analysis was chosen to describe experiences of children undergoing lumbar puncture. While undergoing lumbar puncture for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, school-age Chinese children experienced complex psychological feelings (fear, tension, helplessness, sadness and anxiety). They also experienced physical discomfort. They had multipolar needs, such as information, communication, respect, self-actualisation, environment and equipment. This study identified important areas that must be closely monitored by healthcare staff, performing lumbar puncture on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia children. Thus, a successful and smooth procedure can be performed on these patients, and their quality of life can be improved. The experiences described in this study contribute to a better understanding of the needs of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia children undergoing lumbar puncture. They also provide valuable information to professional medical care staff that develops future nursing assessments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Semi-Circumferential Decompression: Microsurgical Total en-bloc Ligamentum Flavectomy to Treat Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Grade I Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun Cheol; Oh, Sang Hun; Park, Sub Ri; Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Nam Ik

    2015-01-01

    Background To describe and assess clinical outcomes of the semi-circumferential decompression technique for microsurgical en-bloc total ligamentum flavectomy with preservation of the facet joint to treat the patients who have a lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic outcomes of 19 patients who have a spinal stenosis with Meyerding grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. They were treated using the "semi-circumferential decompression" method. We evaluated improvements in back and radiating pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). We also evaluated occurrence of spinal instability on radiological exam using percentage slip and slip angle. Results The mean VAS score for back pain decreased significantly from 6.3 to 4.3, although some patients had residual back pain. The mean VAS for radiating pain decreased significantly from 8.3 to 2.5. The ODI score improved significantly from 25.3 preoperatively to 10.8 postoperatively. No significant change in percentage slip was observed (10% preoperatively vs. 12.2% at the last follow-up). The dynamic percentage slip (gap in percentage slip between flexion and extension X-ray exams) did not change significantly (5.2% vs. 5.8%). Slip angle and dynamic slip angle did not change (3.2° and 8.2° vs. 3.6° and 9.2°, respectively). Conclusions The results suggested that semi-circumferential decompression is a clinically recommendable procedure that can improve pain. This procedure does not cause spinal instability when treating patients who have a spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:26640630

  17. Myelography, CT and MRI in leukaemic infiltration of the lumbar theca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, W.C. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, S.K. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Ho, Y.J. (Dept. of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China)); Lee, K.R. (Inst. of Life Science, National TsingHua Univ. (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-08-01

    A 25-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, while in remission, developed paraparesis, with faecal and urinary incontinence. CT demonstrated increased density of the lumbar theca and enlargement of the nerve roots. Myelography showed complete obstruction below the L3 level. MRI showed increased signal intensity in the lumbar sac on T1 weighting, and the cauda equina enhanced with gadolinium-DTPA. Lymphoblasts were seen in the lumbar spinal fluid. After chemoterhapy, these abnormalities resolved, as did the paraparesis and incontinence. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord perfusion by using contrast-enhanced ultrasound in a porcine model with acute spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, L; Lin, X; Tang, Y; Yang, R; Li, A-H; Ye, J-C; Chen, K; Wang, P; Shen, H-Y

    2013-03-01

    To quantify spinal cord perfusion by using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in a porcine model with acute spinal cord injury. Microcirculatory changes of acute spinal cord injury were shown by CEUS in a porcine model with spinal cord contusion at three selected time points, coupling with conventional ultrasound (US) and Color Doppler US (CDFI). Time-intensity curves and perfusion parameters were also obtained by autotracking contrast quantification (ACQ) software in the epicenter of contusion site, adjacent region and distant region, respectively. Neurologic and histologic examinations were used to confirm the severity of injury. Conventional US revealed the spinal cord was hypoechoic and homogeneous, whereas the dura mater, pia mater and cerebral aqueduct were hyperechoic. On CDFI intramedullary blood vessels were displayed as segmental and columnar. It was homogeneous on CEUS. After spinal cord contusion, the injured region on gray scale US was hyperechoic. CDFI demonstrated intramedullary blood vessels of adjacent region had increased and dilated during the observation period. On CEUS the epicenter of contusion site was hypoperfusion, whereas its adjacent region was hyperperfusion compared with the distant region. Quantitative analysis showed that peak intensity decreased in epicenters of contusion but increased in adjacent regions significantly at all time points (P<0.05). Evaluation of neurological function for post-contusion demonstrated significantly deterioration in comparison before injury (P<0.05). CEUS is a practical technique that provides overall views for evaluating microcirculatory pattern in spinal cord injury. Quantitative analysis shows the efficacy in assessment of perfusion changes after spinal cord injury.

  19. Spinal spondylosis and acute intervertebral disc prolapse in a European brown bear (Ursus arctos arctos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W M; Hartley, M P; Duncan, N M; Barrows, M G

    2005-06-01

    A 22-year-old male European brown bear (Ursus arctos arctos) was presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital after an acute onset of hind limb paralysis 4 days earlier. Previous radiographs revealed marked degenerative joint disease of the stifles, tarsi and digits. The clinical findings were consistent with acute disc prolapse. Lateral radiographs of the entire vertebral column were made as well as ventrodorsal pelvic radiographs. The latter were within normal limits. The vertebral column revealed multiple lesions consistent with chronic and acute disc herniations. Lateral compression of the caudal lumbar nerve roots could not be ruled out. Owing to multiple significant findings of the vertebral column and the poor prognosis for full recovery after surgery, the bear was euthanased. The diagnosis of an acute disc prolapse and multiple chronic disc herniations was confirmed on necropsy.

  20. A modified collagen scaffold facilitates endogenous neurogenesis for acute spinal cord injury repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Caixia; Li, Xing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Yannan; Liang, Hui; Wang, Bin; Han, Sufang; Li, Xiaoran; Xu, Bai; Wang, Nuo; Liu, Sumei; Xue, Weiwei; Dai, Jianwu

    2017-03-15

    Due to irreversible neuronal loss and glial scar deposition, spinal cord injury (SCI) ultimately results in permanent neurological dysfunction. Neuronal regeneration of neural stem cells (NSCs) residing in the spinal cord could be an ideal strategy for replenishing the lost neurons and restore function. However, many myelin-associated inhibitors in the SCI microenvironment limit the ability of spinal cord NSCs to regenerate into neurons. Here, a linearly ordered collagen scaffold was used to prevent scar deposition, guide nerve regeneration and carry drugs to neutralize the inhibitory molecules. A collagen-binding EGFR antibody Fab fragment, CBD-Fab, was constructed to neutralize the myelin inhibitory molecules, which was demonstrated to promote neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth under myelin in vitro. This fragment could also specifically bind to the collagen and undergo sustained release from collagen scaffold. Then, the scaffolds modified with CBD-Fab were transplanted into an acute rat SCI model. The robust neurogenesis of endogenous injury-activated NSCs was observed, and these NSCs could not only differentiate into neurons but further mature into functional neurons to reconnect the injured gap. The results indicated that the modified collagen scaffold could be an ideal candidate for spinal cord regeneration after acute SCI. A linearly ordered collagen scaffold was specifically modified with collagen-binding EGFR antibody, allowed for sustained release of this EGFR neutralizing factor, to block the myelin associated inhibitory molecules and guide spinal cord regeneration along its linear fibers. Dorsal root ganglion neurons and neural stem cells induced by CBD-Fab exhibited enhanced neurite outgrowth and neuronal differentiation rate under myelin in vitro. Transplantation of the modified collagen scaffold with moderate EGFR neutralizing proteins showed greatest advantage on endogenous neurogenesis of injury-activated neural stem cells for acute

  1. Acute sports-related spinal cord injury: contemporary management principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David H; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Berta, Scott C

    2003-07-01

    Improvements in helmet and equipment design have led to significant decreases in overall injury incidence, but no available helmet can prevent catastrophic injury to the neck and cervical spine. The most effective strategy for preventing this type of injury appears to be careful instruction, training, and regulations designed to eliminate head-first contact. The incidence of football-related quadriplegia has decreased from a peak of 13 cases per one million players between 1976 and 1980 to 3 per million from 1991 to 1993, mostly as a result of systematic research and an organized effort to eliminate high-risk behavior. An episode of transient quadriparesis does not appear to be a risk factor for catastrophic spinal cord injury. Torg reported that 0 of 117 quadriplegics in the National Football Head and Neck Injuries Registry recalled a prior episode of transient quadriparesis, and 0 of the 45 patients originally studied in his transient quadriparesis cohort have subsequently suffered quadriplegia. The significance of developmental spinal stenosis is unclear. Plain radiographic identification of a narrow spinal canal in a player sustaining cervical cord neurapraxia warrants further evaluation by MRI to rule out functional stenosis. The presence of actual cord deformation or compression on MRI should preclude participation in high-risk contact or collision sports.

  2. Acute phase complications following traumatic spinal cord injury in Dutch level 1 trauma centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weert, Karin C M; Schouten, Evert J; Hofstede, José; van de Meent, Henk; Holtslag, Herman R; van den Berg-Emons, Rita J G

    2014-10-01

    To assess the number and nature of complications during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury and to explore the relationship between number of complications and length of hospital stay. Multi-centre prospective cohort study. A total of 54 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, referred to 3 level 1 trauma centres in The Netherlands. The number and nature of complications were registered weekly from September 2009 to December 2011. A total of 32 patients (59%) had 1 or more medical complications. The most common complications were pressure ulcers (17 patients, 31%) and pulmonary complications (15 patients, 28%). PATIENTS with 3 or 4 complications had significantly (p < 0.01) longer hospital stays (58.5 [32.5] days) compared with those with 1 or 2 complications (33.1 [14.8] days) or no complications (21.5 [15.6] days). Complications, particularly pressure ulcers and pulmonary complications, occurred frequently during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury. More complications were associated with longer hospital stays. Despite the existence of protocols, more attention is needed to prevent pressure ulcers during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury for patients in The Netherlands.

  3. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually easy to diagnose and is known as sciatica. Sciatica usually causes back pain that shoots down one leg along the path of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica can happen any time, not just when you ...

  4. Three-dimensional spinal motion measurements. Part 2: A noninvasive assessment of lumbar brace immobilization of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalter, D; Kahanovitz, N; Viola, K; Dorsky, S; Nordin, M

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the limitation of motion as well as comfort provided by four different types of lumbar braces. The four braces were the Raney jacket, the Camp lace-up corset, a molded-polypropylene thoracolumbar-sacral orthosis (TLSO), and a common elastic corset. The data revealed that all braces significantly restrict free lumbar and thoracic motion in the sagittal and frontal planes. All braces restricted lumbar motion more in the frontal than in the sagittal plane. The rigid TLSO and Raney jackets were most restrictive when compared with the Camp corset and the elastic corset. Axial rotation in the lumbar spine is normally minimal and further limitation by a brace would be negligible. All braces restricted thoracic motion despite the fact that lumbar braces were used. The elastic corset was rated the most comfortable and the Raney jacket the least comfortable. This verifies that there is an inverse relationship between a brace's ability to restrict motion and comfort.

  5. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  6. Validation of the Polish language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosiński, Michał; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Kłosiński, Piotr; Skrzat, Janusz; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires have become the standard measure for treatment effectiveness after spinal surgery. One of the most widely used generic PROs is the SF-36 Health Survey. The aim of this study was to specifically focus on validating the SF-36 Health Survey to confirm that the tool is an acceptable and psychometrically robust measure to collect HRQoL data in Polish patients with spinal stenosis. Patients were eligible if they were above 18 years of age and had been qualified for spine surgery of the lumbar region due to either discopathy or non-traumatic spinal stenosis. All patients filled-in the Polish version of the SF-36 and a demographic questionnaire. Standard validity and reliability analyses were performed. 192 patients (83 women--43.2%) agreed to take part in the study (mean age: 57.5±11.4 years). In 47 patients (24.5%), using MRI, ossification of the ligamenta flava were found. Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed positive internal consistency (0.70-0.92). Interclass correlations for the SF-36 ranged from 0.72-0.86 and proved appropriate test-retest reliability. Satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity in multi-trait scaling analyses was seen. The Polish version of the SF-36 is a reliable and valid tool for measuring HRQoL in patients with spinal stenosis. It can be recommended for use in clinical and epidemiological settings in the Polish population. However, caution is warranted when interpreting the results of the 'role limitations due to physical health problems' and the 'role limitations due to emotional problems' scales because of floor and ceiling effects.

  7. Oral steroids for acute radiculopathy due to a herniated lumbar disk: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Harley; Firtch, William; Tyburski, Mark; Pressman, Alice; Ackerson, Lynn; Hamilton, Luisa; Smith, Wayne; Carver, Ryan; Maratukulam, Annu; Won, Lawrence A; Carragee, Eugene; Avins, Andrew L

    2015-05-19

    = .001) greater improvement in the SF-36 PCS score at 3 weeks, no difference in the SF-36 PCS score at 52 weeks (mean, 2.5; 95% CI, -0.3 to 5.4; P = .08), no change in the SF-36 MCS score at 3 weeks (mean, 2.2; 95% CI, -0.4 to 4.8; P = .10), and an adjusted 3.6-point (95% CI, 0.6-6.7; P = .02) greater improvement in the SF-36 MCS score at 52 weeks. There were no differences in surgery rates at 52-week follow-up. Having 1 or more adverse events at 3-week follow-up was more common in the prednisone group than in the placebo group (49.2% vs 23.9%; P < .001). Among patients with acute radiculopathy due to a herniated lumbar disk, a short course of oral steroids, compared with placebo, resulted in modestly improved function and no improvement in pain. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00668434.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant extradural tumors with acute spinal cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Heimdal, K. (Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Medical Oncology Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1990-03-01

    Thirty-six cancer patients with extradural spinal metastatic disease and acute symptoms of spinal cord compression underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T. Cord involvement was found in all 36, 7 of whom had lesions at 2 different sites. Vertebral metastases in addition to those corresponding to the cord compressions were detected in 27 patients, and 18 of these had widespread deposits. MR displayed the extent of the tumors in the craniocaudal and lateral directions. The ability to identify multiple sites of cord and vertebral involvement and to delineate tumor accurately makes MR the examination of choice in cancer patients with suspected spinal cord compression. It obviates the need for myelography and postmyelography CT in this group of patients. (orig.).

  9. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may...... stabilizing lumbar surgery with metallic implants. The SPECT/CT findings were compared with observations from subsequent surgical reexploration. RESULTS: In 6 of 9 patients, the SPECT/CT fully or partially detected the vertebral level of loose pedicle screws. Of 9 cases, 2 were considered inconclusive...

  10. Comparing the effects of epidural methylprednisolone acetate injected in patients with pain due to lumbar spinal stenosis or herniated disks: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharibi F

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jafar Mobaleghi1, Faramarz Allahdini2, Karim Nasseri3, Behzad Ahsan3, Shoaleh Shami4, Mansour Faizi5, Fardin Gharibi51Department of Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Anesthesia, 4Faculty of Nursing, 5Faculty of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, IranObjective: Satisfactory results have been seen with epidural steroid injections (ESI in patients with herniated disks (HD, but the role in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS has been less investigated. We compared long-term effects of ESI in HD and LSS patients.Methods: In a prospective, single-blind uncontrolled study, 60 patients with radicular pain due to HD (n = 32 or LSS (n = 28 were enrolled over a 9-month period. Methylprednisolone acetate 80 mg plus 0.5% bupivacaine 10 mg were diluted in normal saline up to a total volume of 10 mL, and injected into the epidural space. The amount of pain based on numeric pain score, level of activity, and subjective improvement were reported by patients after 2 and 6 months by telephone. Demographic data were analyzed with the chi-square test. The differences in numeric pain scale scores between the two groups at different times were analyzed with the t-test.Results: There were no differences between HD and LSS patients regarding age, sex, and average duration of pain prior to ESI. The degree of pain was significantly higher in LSS patients in comparison with HD patients in the pre-injection period. The amount of pain was significantly reduced in both groups 2 months after injection. This pain reduction period lasted for 6 months in the HD group, but to a lesser extent in LSS patients (P < 0.05.Discussion: Epidural methylprednisolone injection has less analgesic effect in LSS, with less permanent effect in comparison with HD.Keywords: methylprednisolone acetate, lumbar spinal stenosis, herniated disk

  11. Minimally Invasive Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Spinal Deformity: Clinical and Radiological Efficacy with Minimum Two Years Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung-Youl; Ha, Kee-Yong; Kim, Young-Hoon; Chang, Dong-Gune; Kim, Sang-Il; Lee, Jae-Won; Ahn, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Bin

    2017-12-05

    A retrospective cohort study OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the clinical and radiological efficacies of supplementing minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) with open posterior spinal fusion (PSF) in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Minimally invasive techniques have been increasingly applied for surgery of ASD. Few reports have been published that directly compare LLIF combined with PSF to conventional PSF for ASD. To evaluate the advantages of minimally invasive LLIF for ASD, patients that underwent minimally invasive LLIF followed by open PSF (combined group) were compared with patients that only underwent PSF (only PSF group). The clinical outcome and radiological outcome for deformity correction and indirect decompression were assessed. The occurrence of proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) and proximal junctional failure (PJF) were also evaluated. No significant differences were observed in the clinical outcomes of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale (VAS), and major complications including reoperations between the groups. No additional advantage was found for coronal deformity correction, and the restoration of lumbar lordosis in the combined group was significantly higher postoperatively (15.3° vs. 8.87°, p = 0.003) and last follow-up (6.69° vs. 1.02°, p = 0.029) compared to that of the only PSF group. In the subgroup analysis for indirect decompression for the combined group, a significant increase of canal area (104 mm vs. 122 mm) and foraminal height (16.2 mm vs. 18.5 mm) was noted. The occurrence of PJK or PJF was significantly higher in the combined group than in the only PSF group (p = 0.039). LLIF has advantages of indirect decompression and greater improvements of sagittal correction compared to only posterior surgery. LLIF should be conducted considering the above mentioned benefits and complications including PJK or PJF in ASD. 4.

  12. Markovian Analysis of the Sequential Behavior of the Spontaneous Spinal Cord Dorsum Potentials Induced by Acute Nociceptive Stimulation in the Anesthetized Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mario; Béjar, Javier; Esposito, Gennaro; Chávez, Diógenes; Contreras-Hernández, Enrique; Glusman, Silvio; Cortés, Ulises; Rudomín, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study we developed a Machine Learning procedure for the automatic identification and classification of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs). This study further supported the proposal that in the anesthetized cat, the spontaneous CDPs recorded from different lumbar spinal segments are generated by a distributed network of dorsal horn neurons with structured (non-random) patterns of functional connectivity and that these configurations can be changed to other non-random and stable configurations after the noceptive stimulation produced by the intradermic injection of capsaicin in the anesthetized cat. Here we present a study showing that the sequence of identified forms of the spontaneous CDPs follows a Markov chain of at least order one. That is, the system has memory in the sense that the spontaneous activation of dorsal horn neuronal ensembles producing the CDPs is not independent of the most recent activity. We used this markovian property to build a procedure to identify portions of signals as belonging to a specific functional state of connectivity among the neuronal networks involved in the generation of the CDPs. We have tested this procedure during acute nociceptive stimulation produced by the intradermic injection of capsaicin in intact as well as spinalized preparations. Altogether, our results indicate that CDP sequences cannot be generated by a renewal stochastic process. Moreover, it is possible to describe some functional features of activity in the cord dorsum by modeling the CDP sequences as generated by a Markov order one stochastic process. Finally, these Markov models make possible to determine the functional state which produced a CDP sequence. The proposed identification procedures appear to be useful for the analysis of the sequential behavior of the ongoing CDPs recorded from different spinal segments in response to a variety of experimental procedures including the changes produced by acute nociceptive stimulation. They are

  13. Variation in eligibility criteria from studies of radiculopathy due to a herniated disc and of neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis: A structured literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevay, S.; Atlas, S.J.; Katz, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A structured literature review. Summary of the Background Data Widely recognized classification criteria for rheumatologic disorders have resulted in well-defined patient populations for clinical investigation. Objectives We sought to determine whether similar criteria were needed for back pain disorders by examining variability in eligibility criteria in published studies Methods Studies involving radiculopathy due to lumbar herniated disc (HD) and for neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) were identified. Randomized controlled trials published between January 1, 2006 and October 1, 2008 in select peer reviewed journals were retrieved, their eligibility criteria were identified and categorized. Results Twelve eligible HD studies were identified. Thirteen unique categories of eligibility criteria were identified with a mean of 3.9 (+/−2.0) and a range from 0 to 8 categories per study. More categories were present for studies that included nonsurgical (5.6 +/− 2.5) treatment for studies with only surgical treatment (2.6 +/− 1.7) p= 0.04). Seven LSS studies met eligibility criteria, and 9 unique categories were identified. A mean of 5.0 (+/−2.2) categories with a range from 2 to 7 was used per study. Conclusion Wide variation in the number and type of eligibility criteria from randomized clinical trials of well defined back pain syndromes was identified. These results support the need for developing and disseminating international classification criteria for these clinical conditions. PMID:20228710

  14. MiR-21 promotes fibrosis and hypertrophy of ligamentum flavum in lumbar spinal canal stenosis by activating IL-6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Tian, Jiwei; Liu, Xinhui; Guan, Guoping

    2017-08-26

    The molecular mechanism underlying the fibrosis of ligamentum flavum(LF) in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis(LSCS) remains unknown. MicroRNAs are reported to play important roles in regulating fibrosis in different organs. The present study aimed to identify fibrosis related miR-21 expression profile and investigate the pathological process of miR-21 in the fibrosis of LF hypertrophy and associated regulatory mechanisms. 15 patients with LSCS underwent surgical treatment were enrolled in this study. For the control group, 11 patients with lumbar disc herniation(LDH) was included. The LF thickness was measured on MRI. LF samples were obtained during the surgery. Fibrosis score was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. The expression of miR-21 in LF tissues were determined by RT-PCR. Correlation among LF thickness, fibrosis score, and miR-21 expression was analyzed. In addition, Lentiviral vectors for miR-21 mimic were constructed and transfected into LF cells to examine the role of miR-21 in LF fibrosis. Types I and III collagen were used as indicators of fibrosis. IL-6 expression in LF cells after transfection was investigated by RT-PCR and ELISA. Patients in two groups showed similar outcomes regarding age, gender, level of LF tissue. The thickness and fibrosis score of LF in the LSCS group were significantly greater than those in LDH group (all P hypertrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Regression of lumbar disc herniation by physiotherapy. Does non-surgical spinal decompression therapy make a difference? Double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Aynur; Yorubulut, Mehmet; Ergun, Nevin

    2017-09-22

    The aim of the study determining whether or not Non-invasive Spinal Decompression Therapy (NSDT) was effective in resorption of herniation, increasing disc height in patients with lumbar disc herniation (LHNP). A total of twenty patients diagnosed as LHNP and suffering from pain at least 8 weeks were enrolled to the study. Patients were allocated in study (SG) and control groups (CG) randomly. Both groups received combination of electrotherapy, deep friction massage and stabilization exercise for fifteen session. SG received additionally NSDT different from CG. Numeric Anolog Scale, Straight leg raise test, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were applied at baseline and after treatment. Disc height and herniation thickness were measured on Magnetic Resonance Imagination which performed at baseline and three months after therapy. Both treatments had positive effect for improving pain, functional restoration and reduction in thickness of herniation. Although reduction of herniation size was higher in SG than CG, no significant differences were found between groups and any superiority to each other (p> 0.05). This study showed that patients with LHNP received physiotherapy had improvement based on clinical and radiologic evidence. NSDT can be used as assistive agent for other physiotherapy methods in treatment of lumbar disc herniation.

  16. The role of stenosis ratio as a predictor of surgical satisfaction in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis: a receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hassanreza R; Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate independent factors that predict surgical satisfaction in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) patients. Patients who underwent surgery were grouped based on the age, gender, duration of symptoms, walking distance, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score (NCOS) and the stenosis ratio (SR) described by Lurencin. We recorded on 2-year patient satisfaction using standardized measure. The optimal cut-off points in SR, NCOS and walking distance for predicting surgical satisfaction were estimated from sensitivity and specificity calculations and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. One hundred fifty consecutive patients (51 male, 99 female, mean age 62.4±10.9 years) were followed up for 34±13 months (range 24-49). One, two, three and four level stenosis was observed in 10.7%, 39.3%, 36.0 % and 14.0% of patients, respectively. Post-surgical satisfaction was 78.5% at the 2 years follow up. In ROC curve analysis, the asymptotic significance is less than 0.05 in SR and the optimal cut-off value of SR to predict worsening surgical satisfaction was measured as more than 0.52, with 85.4% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity (AUC 0.798, 95% CI 0.73-0.90; Ppatients with degenerative lumbar stenosis considered for surgical treatment. Using a ROC curve analysis, a radiological feature, the SR, demonstrated superiority in predicting patient satisfaction, compared to functional and clinical characteristics such as walking distance and NCOS.

  17. A Large Cohort Study of 18F Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Uptake in Normal Spinal Cord: Quantitative Assessment of the Contamination From Adjacent Vertebral Marrow Uptake and Validity of Normalizing the Cord Uptake Against the Lumbar Thecal Sac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neema J; Gupta, Vivek; Vibhute, Prasanna G; Jain, Manoj K; Accurso, Joseph M

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed (1) to assess the influence of age, sex, blood glucose, and body mass index on the F fluoro-deoxy-glucose (F-FDG) uptake in normal spinal cord; (2) to quantitatively evaluate contamination of the spinal cord SUVmax by the adjacent vertebral marrow activity; and (3) to investigate the validity of normalizing spinal cord SUVmax against lumbar thecal sac SUVmax. Two hundred positron emission tomography-computed tomography examinations of subjects with normal spinal cord were retrospectively reviewed. SUVmax of spinal cord and vertebral body was obtained at C2, C5, T6, T12, and L3 levels. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) were obtained at each level between spinal cord SUVmax and vertebral marrow SUVmax, age, body mass index, and blood glucose. Cord to background ratio (CTB) was calculated as the ratio between SUVmax of spinal cord and SUVmax of L3 thecal sac. The coefficient of variation (CV) of spinal cord SUVmax was compared with the CV of CTB. Spinal cord SUVmax was highest at C2 (mean, 1.76) and lowest at T6 (mean, 1.37) with SD of 0.32 to 0.36 SUV. Sex (P > 0.45), age (r: -0.25 to -0.06), body mass index (r: 0.19 to 0.27), and blood glucose (r: -0.17 to 0.22) had no impact on the spinal cord SUVmax. A moderate to strong positive correlation (r: 0.66-0.80) was found between spinal cord SUVmax and the corresponding vertebral marrow SUVmax. The CV of CTB was greater (0.28-0.32) than the CV of spinal cord SUVmax (0.19-0.25) across all levels. Of the variables studied, only contamination from adjacent vertebral marrow activity significantly affected the SUVmax of spinal cord. This contamination should be corrected for when reporting spinal cord FDG uptake. Lumbar thecal sac is not a valid reference for normalizing spinal cord FDG uptake.

  18. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may be u...

  19. Does experimental low back pain change posteroanterior lumbar spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity? A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Prasad, Narasimha; Huang, Christopher; Chan, K Ming; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2016-05-01

    While some patients with low back pain demonstrate increased spinal stiffness that decreases as pain subsides, this observation is inconsistent. Currently, the relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of experimental low back pain on temporal changes in posteroanterior spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle activity. In separate sessions five days apart, nine asymptomatic participants received equal volume injections of hypertonic or isotonic saline in random order into the L3-L5 interspinous ligaments. Pain intensity, spinal stiffness (global and terminal stiffness) at the L3 level, and the surface electromyographic activity of six trunk muscles were measured before, immediately after, and 25-minute after injections. These outcome measures under different saline conditions were compared by generalized estimating equations. Compared to isotonic saline injections, hypertonic saline injections evoked significantly higher pain intensity (mean difference: 5.7/10), higher global (mean difference: 0.73N/mm) and terminal stiffness (mean difference: 0.58N/mm), and increased activity of four trunk muscles during indentation (Ppain subsided. While previous clinical research reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between spinal stiffness and low back pain, our study revealed that experimental pain caused temporary increases in spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle co-contraction during indentation, which helps explain the temporal relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain observed in some clinical studies. Our results substantiate the role of spinal stiffness assessments in monitoring back pain progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Rare spinal cord infarction in a patient with acute type B aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Yuji; Nishina, Takeshi; Ueda, Yuichi

    2017-06-01

    A 69-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute epigastric discomfort and subsequent paraplegia. Computed tomography revealed acute type B aortic dissection with a thrombosed false lumen. Magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal spinal cord infarction. Paraplegia resolved completely within 1 h. However, on the following day, the patient developed motor impairment in the left leg, sensory disorder of the bilateral legs and urinary retention. The symptoms gradually improved with conservative medical therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging on hospitalization Day 20 revealed spinal cord infarction limited to the right posterior area at level T7/T8 and the conus medullaris. The patient was discharged 44 days after admission. The presented case is notable for its atypical presentation of spinal cord infarction resulting from acute aortic dissection. The aetiology of neurological symptoms, especially that of lower extremity monoplegia, remained undiagnosed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiologic strains in the lumbar spinal ligaments. An in vitro biomechanical study 1981 Volvo Award in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Goel, V K; Takata, K

    1982-01-01

    For understanding of the mechanical causes of low-back pain, knowledge of the biomechanics of the various spinal elements is essential. In this in vitro biomechanical study, in situ behavior of spinal ligaments of the L3-4 and L4-5 functional spinal units during physiologic activities was studied in a three-stage procedure. First, 72 load-displacement curves were obtained to determine the three-dimensional flexibility characteristics of the spinal units. Second, three-dimensional morphometric measurements were made of all the spinal ligament attachment points. Finally, a mathematical model was constructed to combine the flexibility and morphometric data and compute the ligament length changes and strains as functions of various spinal movements. In flexion movement, the interspinous and supra-spinous ligaments were found to be subjected to the highest strains, followed by the capsular ligaments and the ligamentum flavum. During extension, it is the anterior longitudinal ligament that has the maximum strain. In lateral bending, the contralateral transverse ligaments carried the highest strains, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were relatively unstrained. In rotation, the capsular ligaments were by far the most strained ligaments.

  2. Transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder with metastasis in lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an ocelot(Leopardus pardalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y.R. Nakagaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of nonpapillary and infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder with metastasis of lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an adult female ocelot (Leopardus pardalis, from the Mato Grosso state, Brazil. The ocelot had pelvic limb paralysis and skin ulcers in the posterior region of the body and was submitted to euthanasia procedure. At necropsy was observed a multilobulated and irregular shaped, yellowish to white nodule in the urinary bladder. The nodule had a soft consistency and arised from the mucosa of the urinary bladder extending throughout the muscular layers and the serosa. Nodules of similar appearance infiltrating the vertebral column the at L6 and L7 vertebrae with corresponding spinal canal invasion were also observed. The histological evaluation showed epithelial neoplastic proliferation in the urinary bladder with characteristics of nonpapillary and infiltrative TCC, with positive immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin, and strong immunostaining for cytokeratin of low molecular weight, and weak or absent labeling for high molecular weight cytokeratin. This is the first report of TCC of urinary bladder in ocelot in Brazil.