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Sample records for acute lumbar spinal

  1. Chiropractic spinal manipulation and the risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a belief elicitation study.

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    Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David; Côté, Pierre; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Jadad, Alejandro R; Tomlinson, George A

    2017-09-18

    Chiropractic spinal manipulation treatment (SMT) is common for back pain and has been reported to increase the risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), but there is no high quality evidence about this. In the absence of good evidence, clinicians can have knowledge and beliefs about the risk. Our purpose was to determine clinicians' beliefs regarding the risk for acute LDH associated with chiropractic SMT. Using a belief elicitation design, 47 clinicians (16 chiropractors, 15 family physicians and 16 spine surgeons) that treat patients with back pain from primary and tertiary care practices were interviewed. Participants' elicited incidence estimates of acute LDH among a hypothetical group of patients with acute low back pain treated with and without chiropractic SMT, were used to derive the probability distribution for the relative risk (RR) for acute LDH associated with chiropractic SMT. Chiropractors expressed the most optimistic belief (median RR 0.56; IQR 0.39-1.03); family physicians expressed a neutral belief (median RR 0.97; IQR 0.64-1.21); and spine surgeons expressed a slightly more pessimistic belief (median RR 1.07; IQR 0.95-1.29). Clinicians with the most optimistic views believed that chiropractic SMT reduces the incidence of acute LDH by about 60% (median RR 0.42; IQR 0.29-0.53). Those with the most pessimistic views believed that chiropractic SMT increases the incidence of acute LDH by about 30% (median RR 1.29; IQR 1.11-1.59). Clinicians' beliefs about the risk for acute LDH associated with chiropractic SMT varied systematically across professions, in spite of a lack of scientific evidence to inform these beliefs. These probability distributions can serve as prior probabilities in future Bayesian analyses of this relationship.

  2. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  3. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

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    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  5. Discopathy in lumbar spinal stenosis.

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    Kłosiński, Piotr; Gilis-Januszewska, Maciej; Serafin, Witold; Płomiński, Daniel

    2004-06-30

    Background. In a group of patients treated surgically for stenosis in the lumbar spine, we compared the pre-operative nature of the pathology of the intervertebral disc as measured by MRI to the treatment outcome. Material and methods. In 30 persons ranging in age from 39 to 68 who reported at least 60% subjective improvement in quality of life after surgery (wide decompression of the spinal canal in the lumbar segment, spondylodesis, transpedicular fixation) the character of the discopathy was evaluated by MRI. Results. In MRI studies from the study group, feature of dehydratation and protrusion of the nucleus pulposus occurred among all patients, while the most common clinical symptom was neurogenic claudication. Non-removal of intervertebral discs protruding less than 6 mm into the lumen of the spinal canal did not cause worse outcome. Conclusion. In this group of patients treated surgically for lumbar stenosis with wide decompression, the fact that a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc (prolapse <6mm) persists after surgery, in the absence of conflict between the disc and nerve elements, has no influence on treatment outcome.

  6. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

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    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  7. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

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    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

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    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  9. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means...... of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...

  10. Amelioration of motor/sensory dysfunction and spasticity in a rat model of acute lumbar spinal cord injury by human neural stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Intraspinal grafting of human neural stem cells represents a promising approach to promote recovery of function after spinal trauma. Such a treatment may serve to: I) provide trophic support to improve survival of host neurons; II) improve the structural integrity of the spinal parenchyma by reducing syringomyelia and scarring in trauma-injured regions; and III) provide neuronal populations to potentially form relays with host axons, segmental interneurons, and/or α-motoneurons. Here we characterized the effect of intraspinal grafting of clinical grade human fetal spinal cord-derived neural stem cells (HSSC) on the recovery of neurological function in a rat model of acute lumbar (L3) compression injury. Methods Three-month-old female Sprague–Dawley rats received L3 spinal compression injury. Three days post-injury, animals were randomized and received intraspinal injections of either HSSC, media-only, or no injections. All animals were immunosuppressed with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and methylprednisolone acetate from the day of cell grafting and survived for eight weeks. Motor and sensory dysfunction were periodically assessed using open field locomotion scoring, thermal/tactile pain/escape thresholds and myogenic motor evoked potentials. The presence of spasticity was measured by gastrocnemius muscle resistance and electromyography response during computer-controlled ankle rotation. At the end-point, gait (CatWalk), ladder climbing, and single frame analyses were also assessed. Syrinx size, spinal cord dimensions, and extent of scarring were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Differentiation and integration of grafted cells in the host tissue were validated with immunofluorescence staining using human-specific antibodies. Results Intraspinal grafting of HSSC led to a progressive and significant improvement in lower extremity paw placement, amelioration of spasticity, and normalization in thermal and tactile pain/escape thresholds at

  11. Minimal Invasive Decompression for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

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    Victor Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition in elderly patients and may lead to progressive back and leg pain, muscular weakness, sensory disturbance, and/or problems with ambulation. Multiple studies suggest that surgical decompression is an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. Although traditional lumbar decompression is a time-honored procedure, minimally invasive procedures are now available which can achieve the goals of decompression with less bleeding, smaller incisions, and quicker patient recovery. This paper will review the technique of performing ipsilateral and bilateral decompressions using a tubular retractor system and microscope.

  12. Tethered spinal cord syndrome with lumbar segmental stenosis treated with XLIF

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    Ettore Carpineta, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Literature review of adults TCS associated with lumbar spinal degenerative disease as lumbar canal stenosis or disc herniation, is reported. Moderate entity of traction of spinal cord may remain asymptomatic in childhood and may result in delayed neurological deficits in adult life. The stretching of conus medullaris and spinal nerves of cauda equina, reduces regional blood flow and causes neural death and fibrous tissue replacement. Sudden or progressive onset of paraparesis with spastic gait, bladder dysfunction and acute low back pain in patient with history of spinal dysraphism must be considered as possible lumbar spinal cord compression caused by low lying cord related to TCS. Surgical decompression should be performed as early as possible to ensure neurological recovery. XLIF approach seems to be safe and fast and represent an excellent surgical option to obtain spinal cord indirect decompression and lumbar interbody fusion.

  13. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

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    Lee, Jae Chul; Choi, Sung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant contro...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Hajime

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the stenotic condition of the lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelography and with discography in 102 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Various pathologic conditions were studied including 50 cases of herniated nucleus pulposus, 39 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral type or combined type), and 13 cases of spondylolisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, and dysplastic type). High correlation was detected between the T2 weighted mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and the lateral view of a full-column myelogram, but subtle changes such as adhesive changes, or redundancy, or anomalous changes of the nerve roots were more clearly demonstrated on myelograms than on MRI. Actually some of these changes could not be detected on MRI. The degrees of disc degeneration were classified into five grades according to the signal intensity and the irregularity of the disc on the T2-weighted image. The MRI evaluation of disc degeneration in this series was similar to that of the discography. However, MRI could not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI might be the imaging modality for diagnostic screening and for detecting stenotic conditions of the lumbar spinal canal, it will not be able to replace myelography and/or discography for determining indication for surgery and preferred surgical approach. (author)

  15. [Therapeutic progress in lumbar spinal stenosis].

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    Shi, Shao-Yan; Huang, Yan-Sheng; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2017-05-25

    Along with the population aging in China, patients with lumbar spinal stenosis(LSS) caused by recessive change incessantly increase. At present, there is no adequate evidence to recommend any specific nonoperative treatment for LSS, and surgery is still an effective method. The cilincal symptoms of the patients without conservative treatment got improvement after surgery, which is the strongest evidence base. Spinal instability after simple decompression promotes the development of fusion technique, and the accelerated adjacent segment degeneration and no relief in symptoms after fusion lead to dynamic fixation technology emerge as the times require. Patients with spinal canal decompression whether need bone fusion or not is still controversial. For the past few years, the operation of simple decompression for LSS obviously decreased, whereas the decompression plus fusion surgery showed sustainable growth. Decompression complicated with fusion was more and more adopted in LSS, in order to reduce the hidden risk of spinal instability and deformity. Although decompressive operation has determinate effect, now it is still unclear if the therapeutic effect of decompression complicated with fusion is better than simple decompression. This article reviews the current studies to explore whether decompression plus bone fusion is applicable for LSS. To further explore the best choice of surgical treatment for LSS, we focused on evidence-based therapeutic options. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  16. A Rare Case of Pediatric Lumbar Spinal Ependymoma Mimicking Meningitis.

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    Ekuma, Ezeali Mike; Ito, Kiyoshi; Chiba, Akihiro; Hara, Yosuke; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ohaegbulam, Samuel; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from lumbar ependymoma in children is rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed sudden radicular low back pain while playing baseball. He was initially managed conservatively in a local hospital for suspected lumbar disc herniation, but he later developed meningeal symptoms and fever before being referred to our hospital. He underwent a diagnostic lumbar puncture in the emergency department; his cerebrospinal fluid suggested an SAH. Physical examination showed meningeal signs and cauda equina features. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was negative for bacterial meningitis. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass characterized as a hemorrhagic lesion. The patient had an emergent evacuation of the mass through the posterior approach. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely. The histologic diagnosis was, surprisingly, an ependymoma (World Health Organization grade II). This case is particularly interesting because of its rarity in children, and its pattern of presentation. Although bacterial or viral meningitis is the most frequent cause of meningeal features in children, SAH from a hemorrhagic spinal tumor should be considered. Ultimately, a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis.

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    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ng, Karen Ka Man; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Samartzis, Dino; Cheung, Kenneth Man Chee

    2017-01-01

    Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS) are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP) bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group) and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group). Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW) as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0), L2 (2.0), L3 (2.2), L4 (2.2), L5 (2.5), and S1 (2.8). This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better cost-saving means for clinical diagnosis or research

  18. Radiographic indices for lumbar developmental spinal stenosis

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    Jason Pui Yin Cheung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with developmental spinal stenosis (DSS are susceptible to developing symptomatic stenosis due to pre-existing narrowed spinal canals. DSS has been previously defined by MRI via the axial anteroposterior (AP bony spinal canal diameter. However, MRI is hardly a cost-efficient tool for screening patients. X-rays are superior due to its availability and cost, but currently, there is no definition of DSS based on plain radiographs. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop radiographic indices for diagnosing DSS. Methods This was a prospective cohort of 148 subjects consisting of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (patient group and asymptomatic subjects recruited openly from the general population (control group. Ethics approval was obtained from the local institutional review board. All subjects underwent MRI for diagnosing DSS and radiographs for measuring parameters used for creating the indices. All measurements were performed by two independent investigators, blinded to patient details. Intra- and interobserver reliability analyses were conducted, and only parameters with near perfect intraclass correlation underwent receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis to determine the cutoff values for diagnosing DSS using radiographs. Results Imaging parameters from a total of 66 subjects from the patient group and 82 asymptomatic subjects in the control group were used for analysis. ROC analysis suggested sagittal vertebral body width to pedicle width ratio (SBW:PW as having the strongest sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DSS. Cutoff indices for SBW:PW were level-specific: L1 (2.0, L2 (2.0, L3 (2.2, L4 (2.2, L5 (2.5, and S1 (2.8. Conclusions This is the first study to define DSS on plain radiographs based on comparisons between a clinically relevant patient group and a control group. Individuals with DSS can be identified by a simple radiograph using a screening tool allowing for better

  19. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    One of the major clinical issues encountered after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment pathology (ASP) caused by increased mechanical stress at adjacent segments, and resulting in various radiographic changes and clinical symptoms. This condition may require surgical intervention. The incidence of ASP varies with both the definition and methodology adopted in individual studies; various risk factors for this condition have been identified, although a significant controversy still exists regarding their significance. Motion-preserving devices have been developed, and some studies have shown their efficacy of preventing ASP. Surgeons should be aware of the risk factors of ASP when planning a surgery, and accordingly counsel their patients preoperatively. PMID:26435804

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Hajime; Matsui, Norio; Fujiyoshi, Fuminori; Izumida, Makoto; Wakita, Sato; Sekiya, Isato

    1991-01-01

    In order to evaluate the stenotic condition of lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelogram and with discogram in 82 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Pathologic conditions were studied including herniated nucleus pulposus in 36, lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral portion, combined) in 35, and spondylisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, dysplastic) in 11. Correlation between T2 mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and profile view of full-column myelogram was very high, but fine parts such as adhesive change or redundancy or anomalous condition of nerve roots were more clearly observed on myelogram than on MRI. And some of them were not detected on MRI. The stage of disc degeneration was classified in 5 grades according to signal intensity and irregularity of the disc on T2-weighted image. The evaluation of disc degeneration was similar to discogram. But MRI will not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI is the most important imaging modality to diagnostic screening and to post-operative evaluation of the stenotic condition, determination of the strict indication and the method of the operation will need myelogram and/or discogram and so on. (author)

  1. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  2. MANAGEMENT OF LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL STENOSIS

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    Mukhergee G. S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Spinal stenosis is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. It is defined as a narrowing of the spinal canal. The term stenosis is derived from the Greek word for narrow, which is “Stenos”. The first description of this condition is attributed to Antoine portal in 1803. Verbiest is credited with coining the term spinal stenosis and the associated narrowing of the spinal canal as its potential cause. [1-10] Kirkaldy–Willis subsequently described the degenerative cascade in the lumbar spine as the cause for the altered anatomy and pathophysiology in spinal stenosis. [11-15] If compression does not occur, the canal should be described as narrow but not stenotic. Some studies defined lumbar spinal stenosis as a “narrowing of the osteoligamentous vertebral canal and/or the intervertebral foramina causing compression of the thecal sac and/or the caudal nerve roots; at a single vertebral level, narrowing may affect the whole canal or part of it” (Postacchini 1983. This definition distinguished between disc herniation and stenosis. [16] . The most common type of spinal stenosis is caused by degenerative arthritis of the spine. Hypertrophy and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament which usually are confined to the cervical spine, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH syndrome also may result in an acquired form of spinal stenosis. Congenital forms caused by disorders such as achondroplasia and dysplastic spondylolisthesis are much less common. Congenital spinal stenosis usually is central and is evident or imaging studies. Idiopathic congenital narrowing usually involves the anteroposterior dimension of the canal secondary to short pedicles; the patient otherwise is normal. In contrast, in achondroplasia, the canal is narrowed in the anteroposterior plane owing to shortened pedicles and in lateral dimension because of diminished interpedicular distance. Acquired forms of spinal stenosis usually are

  3. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

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    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    Lumbar stenosis has been well discussed recently, especially at the 64th French Orthopaedic Society (SOFCOT: July 1989). The results of different surgical treatments were considered as good, but the indications for surgical treatment were not clear cut. Laminectomy is not the only treatment of spinal stenosis. Laminectomy is an approach with its own rate of complications (dural tear, fibrosis, instability... ).Eight years ago, J. Sénégas described what he called the "recalibrage" (enlargement). His feeling was that, in the spinal canal, we can find two different AP diameters. The first one is a fixed constitutional AP diameter (FCAPD) at the cephalic part of the lamina. The second one is a mobile constitutional AP diameter (MCAPD) marked by the disc and the ligamentum flavum. This diameter is maximal in flexion, minimal in extension. The nerve root proceeds through the lateral part of the canal: first above, between the disc and the superior articular process, then below, in the lateral recess bordered by the pedicle, the vertebral body and the posterior articulation. With the degenerative change the disc space becomes shorter, the superior articular process is worn out with osteophytes. These degenerative events are complicated by inter vertebral instability increasing the stenosis. The idea of the "recalibrage" is to remove only the upper part of the lamina with the ligamentum flavum and to cut the hypertrophied anterior part of the articular process from inside. If needed the disc and other osteophytes are removed. The surgery is finished with a ligamentoplasty reducing the flexion and preventing the extension by a posterior wedge.Our experience in spine surgery especially in scoliosis surgery, showed us that it was possible to cure a radicular compression without opening the canal. The compression is then lifted by the 3D reduction and restoration of an anatomy as normal as possible. Lumbar stenosis is the consequence of a degenerative process. Indeed, hip

  4. Lumbar spinal mobility changes among adults with advancing age

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    Ismaila Adamu Saidu

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Using these data, we developed normative values of spinal mobility for each sex and age group. This study helps the clinicians to understand and correlate the restrictions of lumbar spinal mobility due to age and differentiate the limitations due to disease.

  5. OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR DEGENERATIVE LUMBAR SPINAL STENOSIS

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    Samo K. Fokter

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS is a common cause of low back and leg pain in the elderly. Conservative treatment seldom results in sustained improvement.Methods. Fifty-six patients (33 women, 23 men older than 50 years (mean 67 years, range 51 to 82 years and with no prior low back surgery were treated from 1993 to 1999 for clinical and radiologic evidence of DLSS. The goal of this study was to describe the results of decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion in terms of reoperation, severity of back pain, leg pain and patient satisfaction. Answers to Swiss spinal stenosis questionnaires completed before surgery and one to five years afterwards were evaluated. Seven patients (12.5% with degenerative spondylolisthesis, scoliosis and/or more radical facetectomies received fusion.Results. Of the 56 patients in the original cohort, two were deceased and two had undergone reoperation by follow-up. Forty-eight patients answered questionnaires. Average duration of follow-up was 2.5 years. More than 70 percent of the respondents had no or only mild back or buttock pain at follow-up and more than 60 percent were able to walk more than 500 m. Added fusion reduced the incidence of low back pain and pain frequency, and increased walking distance (ANOVA.Conclusions. Eighty-one percent of patients were satisfied with the results of surgery and 87.5% would choose to have the operation again if they had the choice. Decompressive laminectomy for DLSS yields best results if instrumented fusion is included in the procedure.

  6. Modeling trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor pathways

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    Kuck, A.; Stegeman, D. F.; van Asseldonk, E. H. F.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a potential new technique for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). TsDCS aims to facilitate plastic changes in the neural pathways of the spinal cord with a positive effect on SCI recovery. To establish tsDCS as a possible treatment option for SCI, it is essential to gain a better understanding of its cause and effects. We seek to understand the acute effect of tsDCS, including the generated electric field (EF) and its polarization effect on the spinal circuits, to determine a cellular target. We further ask how these findings can be interpreted to explain published experimental results. Approach. We use a realistic full body finite element volume conductor model to calculate the EF of a 2.5 mA direct current for three different electrode configurations. We apply the calculated electric field to realistic motoneuron models to investigate static changes in membrane resting potential. The results are combined with existing knowledge about the theoretical effect on a neuronal level and implemented into an existing lumbar spinal network model to simulate the resulting changes on a network level. Main results. Across electrode configurations, the maximum EF inside the spinal cord ranged from 0.47 V m-1 to 0.82 V m-1. Axon terminal polarization was identified to be the dominant cellular target. Also, differences in electrode placement have a large influence on axon terminal polarization. Comparison between the simulated acute effects and the electrophysiological long-term changes observed in human tsDCS studies suggest an inverse relationship between the two. Significance. We provide methods and knowledge for better understanding the effects of tsDCS and serve as a basis for a more targeted and optimized application of tsDCS.

  7. [Lumbar spinal surgery in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Rivas, P; Sola, R G; Pallares-Fernández, J M; Pintor-Escobar, A

    In the geriatric population, pain with sciatic irradiation requires a differential diagnosis to enable a distinction to be made mainly between a herniated disc, lateral recess stenosis or lumbar stenosis. In addition, in many cases the degenerative problems are often associated with lumbar listhesis or instability. Furthermore, these patients present very diverse associated cardiovascular, pulmonary or metabolic pathologies which can make surgery complicated and, above all, prolong post-operative recovery, as well as increasing morbidity and mortality. We reviewed a group of 50 patients aged between 70 and 87 who had been submitted to surgery between 1997 and 2003; 27 were females and 23 males. 76% of them presented associated systemic pathologies and 22% had a history of previous spinal surgery. In 15 cases clinical symptoms were gait disorders involving claudication, there were three cases of paraparesis with cauda equina syndrome, 19 lumbagos with bilateral sciatica and 16 cases of lumbago with unilateral sciatica. Unilateral decompression hemilaminectomy was performed in 16 patients (group I) with microdiscectomy in 13 cases, laminectomy of one or several vertebrae (group II) was carried out in 17 patients and another 17 patients were submitted to decompression laminectomy plus arthrodesis with transpedicular instrumentation (group III). Overall a significant improvement was observed in 86% of patients. Detected complications involved two serious deep infections (4%), one of which was secondary to cerebrospinal fluid fistula, and the other occurred in an instrumented patient. No instabilities secondary to the laminectomy were observed in non-instrumented patients. No intraoperative anaesthetic or surgical complications were produced. Patients are followed up simultaneously during the post-operative period by both Internal Medicine and Neurosurgery. In the geriatric population there is a high incidence of degenerative problems, not only involving canal stenosis

  8. Spinal CT scan, 2. Lumbar and sacral spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ., Aichi (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival.

  9. IMPACT OF SPINAL DECOMPRESSION ON PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LUMBAR DISC PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa R. El-Gendy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: DRX9000 spinal decompression is slightly known for treating chronic lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of DRX9000spinal decompression on pain in chroniclumbar disc prolapse (CLDP. Methods: twenty male subjects with chronic lumbar disc prolapse,aged between 40:60 years were included in the study. They were assessed forpain intensity byslump test,straight leg raising test (SLR,modified Oswestery questionnaire (OQ and visual analogue scale (VAS. The study continued forsix weeks, the 20 patients were equally divided into two groups. Group A (experimental received spinal decompression, stability and McKenzie exercises; and ice, at a rate of 3 days per week, the duration of each session was 60 minutes. While group B (control were treated by exercises and ice only. Results: Majority of patients had positive findings in reducing pain clinically; however, statistically there was no significant difference. Conclusion: It can be concluded that spinal decompression has an effect, but not statistically significant in decreasing pain on patients with lumbar disc prolapse. This may be due to limited number of patients. We can recommend increasing the sample size to generalize the results, MRI scan follow up should be done after one year to determine if the effects are permanent or transient, comparing the effects of decompression between acute & chronic cases of lumbar disc prolapse, also male & female patients.

  10. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type, operative time, blood loss, and drainage time were independent predictors of acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  11. Dynamic Stabilization for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Lumbar Spinal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTONARI, Tatsuya; NISHIHARA, Nobuharu; SUWA, Katsuyasu; OTA, Taisei; KOYAMA, Tsunemaro

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar interbody fusion is a widely accepted surgical procedure for patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and lumbar spinal instability in the active age group. However, in elderly patients, it is often questionable whether it is truly necessary to construct rigid fixation for a short period of time. In recent years, we have been occasionally performing posterior dynamic stabilization in elderly patients with such lumbar disorders. Posterior dynamic stabilization was performed in 12 patients (6 women, 70.9 ± 5.6 years old at the time of operation) with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis in whom % slip was less than 20% or instability associated with lumbar disc herniation between March 2011 and March 2013. Movement occurs through the connector linked to the pedicle screw. In practice, 9 pairs of D connector system where the rod moves in the perpendicular direction alone and 8 pairs of Dynamic connector system where the connector linked to the pedicle screw rotates in the sagittal direction were installed. The observation period was 77–479 days, and the mean recovery rate of lumbar Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was 65.6 ± 20.8%. There was progression of slippage due to slight loosening in a case with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, but this did not lead to exacerbation of the symptoms. Although follow-up was short, there were no symptomatic adjacent vertebral and disc disorders during this period. Posterior dynamic stabilization may diminish the development of adjacent vertebral or disc disorders due to lumbar interbody fusion, especially in elderly patients, and it may be a useful procedure that facilitates decompression and ensures a certain degree of spinal stabilization. PMID:25169137

  12. Operated herniated disk and lumbar spinal stenosis in Togolese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the anatomical aspects and results of surgical treatment of herniated disk and lumbar spinal stenosis observed in the Rheumatology unit of CHU SO of Lomé. Patients and methods: This was a transversal study conducted on a series of patients cases admitted to the Rheumatology Unit of CHU SO of ...

  13. Early Versus Late Initiation of Rehabilitation After Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Christensen, Finn B; Nielsen, Claus V

    2013-01-01

    , and costs. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis and a cost-utility analysis were conducted. Eighty-two patients undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion due to degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis (grade I or II) were randomized to an identical protocol of 4 sessions of group...

  14. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Suescun, M.; Rovira Canellas, A.; Coll Masfarre, S.; Castano Duque, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  15. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  16. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted. PMID:25276453

  17. LumbSten: The lumbar spinal stenosis outcome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most frequent reason for spinal surgery in elderly people. For patients with moderate or severe symptoms different conservative and surgical treatment modalities are recommended, but knowledge about the effectiveness, in particular of the conservative treatments, is scarce. There is some evidence that surgery improves outcome in about two thirds of the patients. The aims of this study are to derive and validate a prognostic prediction aid to estimate the probability of clinically relevant improvement after surgery and to gain more knowledge about the future course of patients treated by conservative treatment modalities. Methods/Design This is a prospective, multi-centre cohort study within four hospitals of Zurich, Switzerland. We will enroll patients with neurogenic claudication and lumbar spinal stenosis verified by Computer Tomography or Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Participating in the study will have no influence on treatment modality. Clinical data, including relevant prognostic data, will be collected at baseline and the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire will be used to quantify severity of symptoms, physical function characteristics, and patient's satisfaction after treatment (primary outcome. Data on outcome will be collected 6 weeks, and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after inclusion in the study. Applying multivariable statistical methods, a prediction rule to estimate the course after surgery will be derived. Discussion The ultimate goal of the study is to facilitate optimal, knowledge based and individualized treatment recommendations for patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis.

  18. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  19. Enlargement of lumbar spinal canal in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Evaluation with three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishi, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that enlargement of the lumbar spinal canal is one of the effective surgical procedures for the treatment of the lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and provides a good result. In the present study, we have evaluated the long-term outcome of the enlargement of the lumbar canal without fusion in thirty eight patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) The improvement rate was excellent in 80% of the patients (mean improvement ratio, 83%) according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system. We found that the sufficient enlargement of the canal was obtained by the surgery and maintained for a long period of time. The results from 3D-CT suggested that a round shape was maintained in the canal after the surgery because of pressures of the dura mater against to the bony canal. None of patients showed lumbar instability. In conclusion, enlargement of lumbar canal without fusion is useful for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and the enlarged canal has been maintained for a long period of time after the surgery. The results demonstrated the clinical utility of 3D-CT to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative shape of the spine. (author)

  20. Amelioration of motor/sensory dysfunction and spasticity in a rat model of acute lumbar spinal cord injury by human neural stem cell transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    van Gorp, S.; Leerink, M.; Kakinohana, O.; Platoshyn, O.; Santucci, C.; Galik, J.; Joosten, E. A.; Hruška-Plocháň, Marian; Goldberg, D.; Marsala, S.; Johe, K.; Ciacci, J. D.; Marsala, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 57 (2013) ISSN 1757-6512 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : spinal cord injury * human neural stem cells * spinal grafting * functional recovery * rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.634, year: 2013

  1. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Korse, Nina S.; Kruit, Mark C.; Peul, Wilco C.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar...

  2. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kadono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging of lumbar spinal fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafetz, N.; Hunter, J.C.; Cann, C.E.; Morris, J.M.; Ax, L.; Catterling, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    Using a Cemax 1000 three-dimensional (3D) imaging computer/workstation, the author evaluated 15 patients with lumbar spinal fusions (four with pseudarthrosis). Both axial images with sagittal and coronal reformations and 3D images were obtained. The diagnoses (spinal stenosis and psuedarthrosis) were changed in four patients, confirmed in six patients, and unchanged in five patients with the addition of the 3D images. The ''cut-away'' 3D images proved particularly helpful for evaluation of central and lateral spinal stenosis, whereas the ''external'' 3D images were most useful for evaluation of the integrity of the fusion. Additionally, orthopedic surgeons found 3D images superior for both surgical planning and explaining pathology to patients

  4. Complication with Removal of a Lumbar Spinal Locking Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Crawford

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of locking plate technology for anterior lumbar spinal fusion has increased stability of the vertebral fusion mass over traditional nonconstrained screw and plate systems. This case report outlines a complication due to the use of this construct. Case. A patient with a history of L2 corpectomy and anterior spinal fusion presented with discitis at the L4/5 level and underwent an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF supplemented with a locking plate placed anterolaterally for stability. Fifteen months after the ALIF procedure, he returned with a hardware infection. He underwent debridement of the infection site and removal of hardware. Results. Once hardware was exposed, removal of the locking plate screws was only successful in one out of four screws using a reverse thread screw removal device. Three of the reverse thread screw removal devices broke in attempt to remove the subsequent screws. A metal cutting drill was then used to break hoop stresses associated with the locking device and the plate was removed. Conclusion. Anterior locking plates add significant stability to an anterior spinal fusion mass. However, removal of this hardware can be complicated by the inherent properties of the design with significant risk of major vascular injury.

  5. Intracranial epidural hemorrhage during lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajo, Yasuaki; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nishida, Norihiro; Goto, Hisaharu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a case of intracranial epidural hemorrhage (ICEH) during spinal surgery. We could not find ICEH, though we recorded transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TcMEPs). A 35-year-old man was referred for left anterior thigh pain and low back pain that hindered sleep. Sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural tumor at L3-L4 vertebral level. We performed osteoplastic laminectomy and en bloc tumor resection. TcMEPs were intraoperatively recorded at the bilateral abductor digiti minimi (ADM), quadriceps, tibialis anterior and abductor hallucis. When we closed a surgical incision, we were able to record normal TcMEPs in all muscles. The patient did not fully wake up from the anesthesia. He had right-sided unilateral positive ankle clonus 15 min after surgery in spite of bilateral negative of ankle clonus preoperatively. Emergent brain computed tomography scans revealed left epidural hemorrhage. The hematoma was evacuated immediately via a partial craniotomy. There was no restriction of the patient's daily activities 22 months postoperatively. We should pay attention to clinical signs such as headache and neurological findgings such as DTR and ankle clonus for patients with durotomy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. Spine surgeons should know that it was difficult to detect ICEH by monitoring with TcMEPs.

  6. Postural stability disorders in rural patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Aleksandra Truszczyńska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hard work in farming may lead to lumbar spinal stenosis, and consequently, to pain. The pain and neurological disorders may lead to disability and postural disorders. Objective. The aim of the presented study was to analyse postural stability and its correlation with functional disability of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis living in rural areas. Materials and methods. The study population consisted of 30 rural patients with lumbar spinal stenosis; mean age: 51.40 (±12.92; mean BMI: 28.60 (±3.77. The control group consisted of 30 rural inhabitants without spinal disorders. Postural stability was tested on the Biodex Balance System. The patients were also evaluated according to the ODI, the Rolland- Morris disability questionnaire, and VAS. Results. The mean results of the patients studied were as follows: 49.37 (±17.39 according to ODI, 15 (±6.19 according to the Rolland-Morris disability scale, and pain intensity of 7 (±1.93 according to the VAS. The following statistically significant differences were found: the mean balance index result was 1.8 (±1.88 and 0.64 (±0.41 in the control group. The mean centre of mass deviation in the A/P plane was 1.39 (±1.88 and 0.46 (±0.41 in the control group. The mean centre of mass deviation in the M/L plane was 0.8 (±0.51 and 0.32 (±0.22 in the control group. The balance in the studied population correlated significantly with the Rolland-Morris disability questionnaire and the VAS. Conclusions: 1 Serious disability was found in rural patients with spinal stenosis. There was a statistically significant correlation between the disability and postural stability disorders. 2 Most of the patients (84% were overweight. 3 Postural stability disorders were statistically significant for both the stability index and the A/P plane deviation.

  7. Acute lumbar spondylolysis in intercollegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jeremy Hunter; Guin, Patrick D; Theiss, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    A retrospective case series. The purpose of this study was to describe a unique group of intercollegiate athletes who are skeletally mature and who developed symptomatic acute lumbar spondylolysis and to study long-term return to play outcome of nonoperative and surgical repair of L3 and L4 spondylolysis in skeletally mature athletes. Traditionally, symptomatic acute lumbar spondylolysis is a defect found in skeletally immature athletes, most commonly in the pars interarticularis of L5, less commonly in the L3/L4 region, and even less commonly in skeletally mature athletes as described in this group. Eight intercollegiate athletes (2 women and 6 men, ages ranging from 19 to 21 y) with acute lumbar spondylolysis were diagnosed by means of computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission-CT bone scan. L3 lesions were present in 5 patients, and L4 lesions were present in 3 patients. All patients were treated initially nonoperatively with a protocol of bracing and activity modification. The healing progress was assessed through repeat CT scan. Patients who failed to respond to nonoperative procedures underwent direct repair of their pars defect through variable angle pedicle screw and sublaminar hook. Outcomes were measured by completion of the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (mean follow-up 6.5 y) and return to athletic participation. All patients successfully returned to full athletic competition. Two patients showed radiographic healing and resolution of pain following 3 months of nonoperative treatment. Five patients required surgical repair of the pars defect. All of these patients eventually returned to unrestricted participation in athletics. This study shows that this subgroup will generally respond well to surgical correction of the pars defect and return to uninhibited competition following conservative treatment and/or surgical repair.

  8. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: correlation with Oswestry Disability Index and MR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sirvanci, Mustafa; Bhatia, Mona; Ganiyusufoglu, Kursat Ali; Duran, Cihan; Tezer, Mehmet; Ozturk, Cagatay; Aydogan, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2008-01-01

    Because neither the degree of constriction of the spinal canal considered to be symptomatic for lumbar spinal stenosis nor the relationship between the clinical appearance and the degree of a radiologically verified constriction is clear, a correlation of patient’s disability level and radiographic constriction of the lumbar spinal canal is of interest. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the degree of radiologically established anatomical stenosis and the severity o...

  9. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system : an in-vitro mechanical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection

  10. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Asadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. Study Design This is a cross-sectional study. Methods This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. Results A total of 50 patients (15.2% were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1% in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4% in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10% in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls ( P < 0.0001. Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. Conclusions There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  11. Puncture laser microdiscectomy in treatment of large lumbar spinal hernias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorin M.M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Degree of hernia size influence on final result of PLME in 34 patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome was detected. In medical center "Endoscopic Neurosurgery" from 2006 to 2010 we examined and treated 34 patients with hernia size from 6 to 8 mm by CT data. Patients were from 19 to 49 years of age. Average age was 35.9 ± 1.5 years. Males – 16 (47.1%, females – 18 (52.9%. Disease duration – 5.53 ± 0.44 months with duration of last exacerbation – 1.87 ± 0.21 months. Duration of conservative therapy is 4.6 ± 2.1 weeks. During survey and objec¬tive examination we determined pain syndrome intensity, pain location, degree of spinal static – dynamic function disorder. Neurological examination determined severity of sensory and motor disorders. Pain syndrome intensity, quality of life in patients before and after surgery, surgery effectiveness were determined by common scales: VAS, OSWESTRY, Roland - Morris, McNab. Before PLME we evaluated preoperative spondylograms performed with functional load. Height of intervertebral fissure was determined by these images. By SCT and MRI data we measured hernia size, its shape and location as well as intervertebral disk dehydration degree. For PLME performance we used neodymium laser with aluminum garnet (Dorinyer Fibertom Medilas 4060 with wave-length of 1.06 micrometers. In the next period of observation after PLME its effectiveness was 79%, and in 3-5 years - 76%. At the same time it must be emphasized that 75% of patients with discogenic neurocompressive lumbar spinal syndrome significantly and for a long time improved their life quality avoiding more traumatic surgery. Satisfactory results with PLM use in the nearest future could be obtained in 79% of patients, in the remote term - in 76% of patients with large hernia size.

  12. Diagnosis of lumbar central spinal stenosis by plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilkko, E.

    1989-01-01

    The usefulness of plain radiography in the diagnosis of lumbar central spinal stenosis was studied in 116 patients using computed tomography (CT) as a reference. The most significant signs found in central spinal stenosis were short pedicles, high narrow intervertebral foramina, small interlaminar windows and deep posterior concavity of the vertebral bodies. The sensitivity of plain radiography in the diagnosis of central spinal stenosis as compared to CT was 66%, the specificity was 93% and the accuracy was 86%. The midsagittal and interpedicular diameters were measured from plain radiograms and were compared with corresponding CT diameters. In approximately half of the cases, the sagittal diameters were compatible. The maximum error was 6 mm. On average, the interpedicular distances were measured as too wide. The reliability of CT measurements were established by taking the measurements from the vertebral column of a moose calf, and then comparing these to the real measurements obtained with a calibrated ruler. The maximal differences were 2 mm. (author). 24 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Tactics of surgical treatment for thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of results of surgical treatment of 154 patients with a vertebral and spinal trauma of chest and lumbar departments of a backbone aged from 16 till 75 years is carried out. All patients were operated in Bryansk city hospital N 1. The volume and sequence of surgeries, and existence were defined with the combined damages, character of an injury of a backbone and a spinal cord or absence free part bone bodies of the injured vertebra compressing a spinal cord defined different accesses on a backbone. So, surgeries at 125 (81,2 % patients were carried out from one back access, at 23 (14,9 % patients - to the combined back and lobbies and at 6 (3,9 % patients - front and back access. In all cases for fixing of a spine implants “Sintez” firm (St. Petersburg were used. Results of treatment were estimated on neurologic dynamics, restoration of an axis of a backbone, a gleam of the vertebral channel and restoration possibility of a support of a backbone. Good results of treatment are received at 87 (56,5 %, satisfactory - at 55 (35,7 % and unsatisfactory - at 12 (7,8 % patients.

  14. Hospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Johnson, Joseph R; Li, Neill Y; Yang, JaeWon; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-09-04

    Interhospital competition has been shown to influence the adoption of surgical techniques and approaches, clinical patient outcomes, and health-care resource use for select surgical procedures. However, little is known regarding these dynamics as they relate to spine surgery. This investigation sought to examine the relationship between interhospital competitive intensity and perioperative outcomes following lumbar spinal fusion. This study used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample dataset, years 2003, 2006, and 2009. Patients were included based on the presence of the International Classification of Disease, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes corresponding to lumbar spinal fusion, as well as on the presence of data on the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI). The outcome measures are perioperative complications, defined using an ICD-9-CM coding algorithm. The HHI, a validated measure of competition within a market, was used to assess hospital market competitiveness. The HHI was calculated based on the hospital cachement area. Multiple regression was performed to adjust for confounding variables including patient age, gender, primary payer, severity of illness score, primary versus revision fusion, anterior versus posterior approach, national region, hospital bed size, location or teaching status, ownership, and year. Perioperative clinical outcomes were assessed based on ICD-9-CM codes with modifications. In total, 417,520 weighted patients (87,999 unweighted records) were analyzed. The mean cachement area HHI was 0.31 (range 0.099-0.724). The average patient age was 55.4 years (standard error=0.194), and the majority of patients were female (55.8%, n=232,727). The majority of procedures were primary spinal fusions (92.7%, n=386,998) and fusions with a posterior-only technique (81.5%, n=340,271). Most procedures occurred in the South (42.5%, n=177,509) or the Midwest (27.0%, n=112,758) regions. In the multiple regression analysis, increased hospital

  15. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  16. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnett Angus F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. Methods One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx, Upper lumbar (ULx and total lumbar (TLx spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Results Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638, but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p Conclusion This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  17. Objective assessment with establishment of normal values for lumbar spinal range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G K; Wynveen, K J; Rheault, W; Rothschild, B

    1983-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an assessment method, in conjunction with age-related normal values, for lumbar spinal range of motion. Lumbar flexion, lumbar extension, and right and left lateral flexion were measured on 172 subjects by a combination of goniometry and spinal distraction techniques. Normal values are given for six age groups; each group had a range of 10 years. The results demonstrate that a significant decrease in lumbar spinal range of motion is expected with increasing age. The interobserver reliability based on 17 subjects was substantial for the four measurements taken; coefficients ranged from +.76 to +1.0. The information may prove useful to the clinician as an improved method for assessing the lumbar spine.

  18. Interspinous process device versus standard conventional surgical decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Moojen (Wouter); M.P. Arts (Mark); W.C.H. Jacobs (Wilco); E.W. van Zwet (Erik); M.E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske); B.W. Koes (Bart); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objective To assess whether interspinous process device implantation is more effective in the short term than conventional surgical decompression for patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Design Randomized controlled

  19. Modified fenestration with restorative spinoplasty for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Ko; Yamazaki, Takashi; Seichi, Atsushi; Hoshi, Kazuto; Hara, Nobuhiro; Ogiwara, Satoshi; Terayama, Sei; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Takeshita, Katsushi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2009-06-01

    The authors developed an original procedure, modified fenestration with restorative spinoplasty (MFRS) for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. The first step is to cut the spinous process in an L-shape, which is caudally reflected. This procedure allows easy access to the spinal canal, including lateral recesses, and makes it easy to perform a trumpet-style decompression of the nerve roots without violating the facet joints. After the decompression of neural tissues, the spinous process is anatomically restored (spinoplasty). The clinical outcomes at 2 years were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale and patients' satisfaction. Radiological follow-up included radiographs and CT. Between January 2000 and December 2002, 109 patients with neurogenic intermittent claudication with or without mild spondylolisthesis underwent MFRS. Of these, 101 were followed up for at least 2 years (follow-up rate 93%). The average score on the self-administered JOA scale in 89 patients without comorbidity causing gait disturbance improved from 13.3 preoperatively to 22.9 at 2 years' follow-up. Neurogenic intermittent claudication disappeared in all cases. The patients' assessment of treatment satisfaction was "satisfied" in 74 cases, "slightly satisfied" in 12, "slightly dissatisfied" in 2, and "dissatisfied" in 1 case. In 16 cases (18%), a minimum progression of slippage occurred, but no symptomatic instability or recurrent stenosis was observed. Computed tomography showed that the lateral part of the facet joints was well preserved, and the mean residual ratio was 80%. The MFRS technique produces an adequate and safe decompression of the spinal canal, even in patients with narrow and steep facet joints in whom conventional fenestration is technically demanding.

  20. Does the effectiveness of core stability exercises correlate with the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chaxiang; Lin, Zhichao; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Zemin; Tang, Shujie

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether the effectiveness of core stability exercises correlates with the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Forty-two patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis treated in the department of orthopedics of our hospital between May 2013 and January 2016 were included in the study. All the patients performed core stability exercises once daily for six weeks, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and self-reported walking capacity. The anteroposterior osseous spinal canal diameter was measured to evaluate the severity of spinal stenosis. The correlation between the stenosis degree and the differences of Japanese Orthopaedic Association score or self-reported walking capacity at baseline and after treatment were analyzed. The patients were divided into three groups according to the spinal stenosis degree. In the three groups, there was no significant difference in JOA or self-reported walking distance at baseline (p>0.05) and after treatment (p>0.05). The JOA scores and self-reported walking distance were significantly increased after treatment (p0.05) or self-reported walking distance (p>0.05). There was no significantcorrelation between the effectiveness of core stability exercises and the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

  1. Association of Neuromuscular Attributes With Performance-Based Mobility Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Catherine T; Ward, Rachel E; Suri, Pradeep; Kiely, Dan K; Ni, Pengsheng; Anderson, Dennis E; Bean, Jonathan F

    2017-07-01

    To identify differences in health factors, neuromuscular attributes, and performance-based mobility among community-dwelling older adults with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis; and to determine which neuromuscular attributes are associated with performance-based measures of mobility. Cross-sectional; secondary data analysis of a cohort study. Outpatient rehabilitation center. Community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years with self-reported mobility limitations and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (N=54). Not applicable. Short Physical Performance Battery score, habitual gait speed, and chair stand test. Symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis was classified using self-reported symptoms of neurogenic claudication and imaging. Among 430 community-dwelling older adults, 54 (13%) met criteria for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Compared with participants without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis, those with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis had more comorbidities, higher body mass index, greater pain, and less balance confidence. Participants with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis had greater impairment in trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion range of motion (ROM), knee extension ROM, and ankle ROM compared with participants without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Five neuromuscular attributes were associated with performance-based mobility among participants with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis: trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion ROM, and knee extension ROM asymmetry. Community-dwelling older adults with self-reported mobility limitations and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis exhibit poorer health characteristics, greater neuromuscular impairment, and worse mobility when compared with those without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Poorer trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion ROM, and knee extension ROM asymmetry

  2. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korse, Nina S; Kruit, Mark C; Peul, Wilco C; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A

    2017-01-01

    Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica. MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral) and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area) were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison. 48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002). Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021). This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with a

  3. Spinal reflex excitability changes after lumbar spine passive flexion mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbulian, Ronald; Burke, Jeanmarie; Dishman, J Donald

    2002-10-01

    Flexion distraction has gained increased credibility as a therapeutic modality for treatment of low back pain. Although important work in the area has elucidated the intradiskal pressure profiles during flexion distraction, the accompanying neural responses have yet to be described. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess neural reflex responses to motion with 3 degrees of freedom applied to the lumbar spine and to evaluate H-reflex responses of the soleus. Subjects (n = 12) were measured for H-maximum reflexes determined from stimulus response recruitment curves measured in neutral prone position. The mean of 10 evoked H-waves (at H-maximum stimulus intensity) were measured in neutral position, flexion, left and right lateral flexion, and axial rotation of the trunk on an adjusting table. H-reflexes were expressed as a percentage of maximal M-wave for the criterion measure. Spinal range of motion was quantified by digitization. The data showed variation in some movement ranges, notwithstanding identical table positioning for all subjects. Mean H-reflex amplitude was decreased (15.2 +/- 5.8 mV to 13.8 +/- 5.8 mV), and the H/M ratio was also decreased in flexion compared with neutral (55.0% +/- 19.1% to 50.3% +/- 19.4%; P <.05). Trunk flexion is accompanied by inhibition of the motor neuron pool. Slight perturbations in numerous afferent receptors are known to significantly alter the H-reflex. The absence of measurable changes in lateral flexion and trunk rotation may indicate that both slow- and fast-adapting receptors could be involved in lumbar motion. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further dynamic motion studies of the flexion distraction neurophysiologic condition.

  4. Imaging of thoracic and lumbar spinal extradural arachnoid cysts: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimmelin, A.; Clouet, P.L.; Salatino, S.; Kehrli, P.; Maitrot, D.; Stephan, M.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Extradural arachnoid cysts are uncommon expanding lesions in the spinal canal which may communicate with the subarachnoid space. Usually in the lower thoracic spine, they may cause symptoms by compressing the spinal cord or nerve roots. We report cases of thoracic and lumbar arachnoid cysts studied by cystography, myelography, CT and MRI. These techniques showed extradural cystic lesions containing cerebrospinal fluid, with variable communication with the subarachnoid space, causing anterior displacement and flattening of the spinal cord. (orig.)

  5. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation.Methods: Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reco...

  6. Nationwide trends in the surgical management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyun W; Rajaee, Sean S; Kanim, Linda E

    2013-05-15

    Retrospective analysis using national administrative data. This study presents US nationwide trends in the surgical management of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) with and without coexisting spondylolisthesis and scoliosis from 2004 to 2009. Lack of consensus and wide variability exists in surgical decision making for patients with LSS. Data were obtained from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a database developed as part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. All discharged patients with a primary diagnosis of LSS were identified. Three subgroups were studied: (1) LSS alone, (2) LSS with spondylolisthesis, and (3) LSS with scoliosis. Surgical treatment was divided into 3 groups: (1) decompression only (laminectomy, discectomy), (2) simple fusion (1-2 disc levels, single approach), and (3) complex fusion (>2 disc levels or a combined posterior and anterior approach). Between 2004 and 2009, national estimates for the annual number of discharged inpatients with a primary diagnosis of LSS increased from 94,011 (population rate, [the age adjusted population rate per 100,000] 32.1) to 102,107 (population rate, 33.3). The rate of decompressions decreased from 58.5% to 49.2% for discharged patients with LSS from 2004 to 2009 (P spondylolisthesis and 67.6% of patients with coexisting scoliosis underwent a fusion procedure. This study demonstrates that the rate of simple fusion surgery has increased for treatment of LSS compared with decompression only. 4.

  7. Impact of obesity on lumbar spinal surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Junming; Kong, Lingde; Meng, Fantao; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effect of obesity on surgical outcomes and complications following lumbar spinal surgery. A systematic electronic literature review of all relevant studies through to June 2015 was performed using the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane library databases. Pooled risk ratios (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random or fixed effects models. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to evaluate the methodological quality, and Stata 11.0 was used to analyse data (StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA). Significant differences between obese and non-obese patients were found for operation time (SMD, -0.273; 95%CI, -0.424 to -0.121), blood loss (SMD, -0.265; 95%CI, -0.424 to -0.107), surgical site infections (RR, 0.610; 95%CI, 0.446 to 0.834), and nerve injury (RR, 0.188; 95%CI, 0.042 to 0.841). Deep vein thrombosis, dural tear, revision surgery, and mortality were not significantly differences between the two groups (Pinfections and nerve injuries. However, the results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution due to heterogeneity amongst the included studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, A.H. [Department of CT-MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece); Zibis, A.H.; Papaliaga, M.; Georgiou, E.; Rousogiannis, S. [Larissa Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 tabs., 24 refs.

  9. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tim; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Burnett, Angus F; Straker, Leon; Smith, Anne

    2008-11-18

    Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP) patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx), Upper lumbar (ULx) and total lumbar (TLx) spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638), but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p postures in sitting and standing were evident. BMI accounted for regional differences found in all sitting and some standing measures. LBP was not associated with differences in regional lumbar spine angles or range of motion, with the exception of maximal backward bending range of motion (F = 5.18, p = 0.007). This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  10. Cost analysis of spinal and general anesthesia for the surgical treatment of lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar spine surgery is typically performed under general anesthesia, although spinal anesthesia can also be used. Given the prevalence of lumbar spine surgery, small differences in cost between the two anesthetic techniques have the potential to make a large impact on overall healthcare costs. We sought to perform a cost comparison analysis of spinal versus general anesthesia for lumbar spine operations. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective cohort study was performed from 2009-2012 on consecutive patients undergoing non-instrumented, elective lumbar spine surgery for spondylosis by a single surgeon. Each patient was evaluated for both types of anesthesia, with the decision for anesthetic method being made based on a combination of physical status, anatomical considerations, and ultimately a consensus agreement between patient, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups. Operating room costs were calculated whilst blinded to clinical outcomes and reported in percentage difference. General anesthesia (n=319) and spinal anesthesia (n=81) patients had significantly different median operative times of 175 ± 39.08 and 158 ± 32.75 minutes, respectively (p<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Operating room costs were 10.33% higher for general anesthesia compared to spinal anesthesia (p=0.003, Mann-Whitney U test). Complications of spinal anesthesia included excessive movement (n=1), failed spinal attempt (n=3), intraoperative conversion to general anesthesia (n=2), and a high spinal level (n=1). In conclusion, spinal anesthesia can be performed safely in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. It has the potential to reduce operative times, costs, and possibly, complications. Further prospective evaluation will help to validate these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of the Moderate Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with an Intespinous Distraction Device IMPALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haso Sefo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was the evaluation of symptom improvements in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis, who consecutively underwent placement of interspinous distraction deviceIMPALA®.Methods: This study included a total of 11 adult patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis. Clinical evaluations were performed preoperatively and 3-months after surgery using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI.Results: The mean preoperative VAS was 7.09 and fell to 2.27 a 3-months after surgery. The mean preoperative ODI was 59.45 fell to 20.72 a 3-months after surgery.Conclusions: Using the IMPALA® device in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis is a minimal invasive, effective and safe procedure. Clinical symptoms were improved 3 months after surgery.

  12. Lumbar spinal fusion patients' demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B; Lauerberg, Ida

    2006-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient......-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients were randomized 3 months post lumbar spinal fusion to either a 'video' group (one-time oral...... instruction by a physiotherapist and patients were then issued a video for home exercise), or a 'café' group (video regimen with the addition of three café meetings with other fusion-operated patients) or a 'training' group (exercise therapy; physiotherapist-guided; two times a week for 8 weeks). Register...

  13. Nursing Review Section of Surgical Neurology International Part 2: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The lumbar spine includes 5 lumbar vertebral bodies, L1, L2, L3, L4, and L5. At each level, there is a disc space defined by the two bones (vertebral bodies) in the back; for example, there is a disc space at the L5-S1 level etc. The normal front to back (anterior to posterior or AP diameter) measurement of the spinal canal is typically 18-20 mm, but some patients have narrowing called spinal stenosis. Methods: Lumbar stenosis is defined by two major types. Central stenosis compresses the midline (in the middle) sac of nerve tissue (dural or thecal sac containing the lumbar nerve roots). Lateral recess stenosis (off to the sides) compresses the individual exiting nerve roots. Results: At each lumbar level, there may be compression of the nerve tissue centrally (dura also called cauda equina) or the nerve roots (on one or both sides). Compression may occur due to soft or calcified discs in the front (anteriorly) of the spine at different levels or from behind (posteriorly) due to arthritic enlargement (hypertrophy) or calcification (ossification) of the yellow ligament, facet joints, and/or bones (laminae). Surgery to remove bone and arthritic structures from the back of the spinal canal to decompress nerve tissue is called a laminectomy. Conclusions: Patients with narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal may have central or lateral recess stenosis that compresses the thecal sac and/or exiting nerve roots at any of 5 levels. Laminectomy, performed at single or multiple levels, decompresses lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:28781916

  14. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone caused by continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage after transphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlela, S; Azmi, K N; Khalid, B A K

    2006-01-01

    A 53-year-old acromegalic woman had cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea following transphenoidal surgery for a pituitary microadenoma. A continuous lumbar spinal fluid drainage catheter was inserted and on the sixth postoperative day, she developed hyponatremia with features of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) requiring hypertonic saline administration. Over-drainage is potentially hazardous and close biochemical monitoring is required. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of SIADH caused by continuous lumbar drainage in an adult.

  15. Outcome after surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis: the lumbar extension test is not a predictive factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Lars; Hauerberg, John; Springborg, Jacob B

    2009-01-01

    surgery and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery using 3 different scoring systems: Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score, and Oswestry Disability Index. The group of patients with preoperative aggravation of the symptoms by the lumbar extension test, (positive...... itself had no prognostic value for the overall outcome after lumbar decompression. Using regression models with the 2-year Oswestry Disability Index as dependent variable, only before surgery self-reported health and age were found to have prognostic significance. CONCLUSION: The lumbar extension test...... extension test), was compared with the group of patients without aggravation by the test, (negative extension test). RESULTS: Before surgery, patients with a positive extension test scored significantly worse on all disability scoring systems than patients with a negative test. However, the extension test...

  16. Study Protocol- Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections for Spinal Stenosis (LESS: a double-blind randomized controlled trial of epidural steroid injections for lumbar spinal stenosis among older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly Janna L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain among older adults and can cause significant disability. Despite its prevalence, treatment of spinal stenosis symptoms remains controversial. Epidural steroid injections are used with increasing frequency as a less invasive, potentially safer, and more cost-effective treatment than surgery. However, there is a lack of data to judge the effectiveness and safety of epidural steroid injections for spinal stenosis. We describe our prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial that tests the hypothesis that epidural injections with steroids plus local anesthetic are more effective than epidural injections of local anesthetic alone in improving pain and function among older adults with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods We will recruit up to 400 patients with lumbar central canal spinal stenosis from at least 9 clinical sites over 2 years. Patients with spinal instability who require surgical fusion, a history of prior lumbar surgery, or prior epidural steroid injection within the past 6 months are excluded. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either ESI with local anesthetic or the control intervention (epidural injections with local anesthetic alone. Subjects receive up to 2 injections prior to the primary endpoint at 6 weeks, at which time they may choose to crossover to the other intervention. Participants complete validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health-related quality of life at baseline and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months after randomization. The primary outcomes are Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire and a numerical rating scale measure of pain intensity at 6 weeks. In order to better understand their safety, we also measure cortisol, HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, weight, and blood pressure at baseline, and at 3 and 6 weeks post-injection. We also obtain data on resource utilization

  17. The Effect of Early Initiation of Rehabilitation after Lumbar Spinal Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Lisa G; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Bünger, Cody

    2012-01-01

    examined patients' subsequent rehabilitation. Group-based rehabilitation is both efficient and cost-effective in rehabilitation of lumbar spinal fusion patients.Methods: Patients with degenerative disc diseases undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion were randomly assigned to initiate...... work. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the groups in terms of differences from baseline to 6 months and 1-year follow-up.Results: According to the ODI, at 1-year follow-up, the 6w-group had a median reduction of -6(-19;4) compared with -20(-30;-7) in the 12w-group (p...

  18. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation, and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and, more recently, by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. We used a detailed three-dimensional volume conductor model of the torso and the McIntyre-Richard-Grill axon model to calculate the thresholds of axons within the posterior columns in response to transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation. Superficially located large-diameter posterior column fibers with multiple collaterals have a threshold of 45.4 V, three times higher than posterior root fibers (14.1 V). With the stimulation strength needed to activate posterior column axons, posterior root fibers of large and small diameters as well as anterior root fibers are coactivated. The reported results inform on these threshold differences, when stimulation is applied to the posterior structures of the lumbar cord at intensities above the threshold of large-diameter posterior root fibers. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Functional organization of locomotor interneurons in the ventral lumbar spinal cord of the newborn rat.

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    Myriam Antri

    Full Text Available Although the mammalian locomotor CPG has been localized to the lumbar spinal cord, the functional-anatomical organization of flexor and extensor interneurons has not been characterized. Here, we tested the hypothesis that flexor and extensor interneuronal networks for walking are physically segregated in the lumbar spinal cord. For this purpose, we performed optical recordings and lesion experiments from a horizontally sectioned lumbar spinal cord isolated from neonate rats. This ventral hemi spinal cord preparation produces well-organized fictive locomotion when superfused with 5-HT/NMDA. The dorsal surface of the preparation was visualized using the Ca(2+ indicator fluo-4 AM, while simultaneously monitoring motor output at ventral roots L2 and L5. Using calcium imaging, we provided a general mapping view of the interneurons that maintained a stable phase relationship with motor output. We showed that the dorsal surface of L1 segment contains a higher density of locomotor rhythmic cells than the other segments. Moreover, L1 segment lesioning induced the most important changes in the locomotor activity in comparison with lesions at the T13 or L2 segments. However, no lesions led to selective disruption of either flexor or extensor output. In addition, this study found no evidence of functional parcellation of locomotor interneurons into flexor and extensor pools at the dorsal-ventral midline of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat.

  20. The impact of sarcopenia on the results of lumbar spinal surgery

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    Hiroyuki Inose

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: As the population ages, the number of lumbar spinal surgeries performed on sarcopenic patients will increase. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sarcopenia and evaluated its impact on the results of lumbar spinal surgery. Methods: This study included 2 groups: One group consisted of patients who underwent whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA scanning before the option of undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal disease (LSD group and a second group consisted of patients underwent DXA scanning for osteoporosis screening under hospital watch at the geriatric medicine department (control group. In order to evaluate the impact of sarcopenia on the clinical outcome of lumbar spinal surgery, the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA score, the recovery rate based on the JOA score, and visual analogue scale (VAS scores for lower back pain, lower extremity pain, and lower extremity numbness were compared within the LSD group. Results: The prevalence of sarcopenia showed no statistical difference between groups (control group, 50.7%; LSD group, 46.5%. In the LSD group, while the changes in VAS scores showed no statistical difference between the nonsarcopenia subgroup and sarcopenia subgroup, the sarcopenia subgroup demonstrated inferior JOA scores and recovery rates at the final follow-up when compared with the nonsarcopenia subgroup (P < 0.05. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among the elderly populations in Japan and a negative impact of sarcopenia on clinical outcomes after lumbar spinal surgery. Keywords: Lumbar canal stenosis, Sarcopenia

  1. Lumbar Myeloid Cell Trafficking into Locomotor Networks after Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher N.; Norden, Diana M.; Faw, Timothy D.; Deibert, Rochelle; S.Wohleb, Eric; Sheridan, John F.; P.Godbout, Jonathan; Basso, D. Michele

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) promotes inflammation along the neuroaxis that jeopardizes plasticity, intrinsic repair and recovery. While inflammation at the injury site is well-established, less is known within remote spinal networks. The presence of bone marrow-derived immune (myeloid) cells in these areas may further impede functional recovery. Previously, high levels of the gelatinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) occurred within the lumbar enlargement after thoracic SCI and impeded activity-dependent recovery. Since SCI-induced MMP-9 potentially increases vascular permeability, myeloid cell infiltration may drive inflammatory toxicity in locomotor networks. Therefore, we examined neurovascular reactivity and myeloid cell infiltration in the lumbar cord after thoracic SCI. We show evidence of region-specific recruitment of myeloid cells into the lumbar but not cervical region. Myeloid infiltration occurred with concomitant increases in chemoattractants (CCL2) and cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1) around lumbar vasculature 24 hours and 7 days post injury. Bone marrow GFP chimeric mice established robust infiltration of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells into the lumbar gray matter 24 hours after SCI. This cell infiltration occurred when the blood-spinal cord barrier was intact, suggesting active recruitment across the endothelium. Myeloid cells persisted as ramified macrophages at 7 days post injury in parallel with increased inhibitory GAD67 labeling. Importantly, macrophage infiltration required MMP-9. PMID:27191729

  2. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

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    Hey Hwee Weng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure.The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of

  3. Topacheous gout as a rare cause of spinal stenosis in the lumbar region. Case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Joseph

    2012-02-03

    Despite the fact that gout is a common metabolic disorder, because its involvement of the axial skeleton is rare the diagnosis is often delayed, even in patients with long-standing gout who present with neurological deficits. The authors report the case of a woman with a history of extensive gout, emphasizing the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of a lumbar spinal stenosis.

  4. Prognostic Factors for Satisfaction After Decompression Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rune Tendal; Bouknaitir, Jamal Bech; Fruensgaard, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis is associated with both short- and long-term benefits with improvements in patient function and pain. Even though most patients are satisfied postoperatively, some studies report that up to one-third of patients are dissatisfied. OBJECTIVE...

  5. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Due to Ligamentum Flavum Hypertrophy in a Patient with Multiple Exostosis

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    Sevgi Ižkbali Afsar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary multiple exostosis is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by multiple exostoses (osteochondromas usually affecting the metaphysical regions of long bones, usually of the lower extremity, and seldom occurring in the axial skeleton. In the literature, hereditary multiple exostosis cases that developed spinal canal stenosis due to spinal osteochondromas have been reported. Lumbar spinal stenosis may occur in a hereditary multiple exostosis patient due to ligamentum flavum hypertrophy, which is a hyperosteotic process that differs from exostosis. We discuss one such case, along with pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical features.

  6. Spinaplasty following lumbar laminectomy for multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis to prevent iatrogenic instability

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    Surendra Mohan Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Spinaplasty following posterior decompression for multilevel lumbar canal stenosis is a simple operation, without any serious complications, retaining median structures, maintaining the tension band and the strength with least disturbance of kinematics, mobility, stability and lordosis of the lumbar spine.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis in Symptomatic Subjects

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    Siddarth Ragupathi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Low backache is a common condition to occur in the middle age. It is mainly caused by the degeneration of the intervertebral disc which forms the main support to the vertebral column. Lumbar spinal canal stenosis results in the compression of spinal cord and nerves at the level of lumbar vertebra. Aim: The purpose of this study is to measure the spinal canal dimensions and correlate with the clinical symptoms to establish a radiological criterion based on MRI for diagnosis of lumbar canal stenosis. This study is done to improve the diagnostic accuracy of lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Materials and Methods: Two hundred subjects with complaints of low backache without a traumatic history underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI after assessment of pain by two methods: 1. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scoring and 2. Wong Baker Facial Expression scale. All the images were qualitatively analyzed to obtain the MRI grading for central canal at various levels from L1 to S1 vertebra after making sure that the neural foramina is not involved. Anteroposterior (AP and transverse diameter of spinal canal at intervertebral disc and upper part of vertebral body levels and spinal canal area are measurements that are taken. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis has been carried out in the present study. Results on continuous measurements are presented on mean±SD (min-max and results on categorical measurements are presented in number (%. Significance is assessed at 5% level of significance. Results: The spinal canal diameter measured along its AP and transverse direction is found to be correlating with the severity of low backache complained by the patient. Comparing the two methods of clinical assessment, ODI scoring was found to be more significant. Conclusion: The spinal canal measurements can be used as a radiologic criterion for diagnosis of acquired lumbar spinal canal stenosis. This will improve the diagnostic accuracy. However

  8. Comparison of treatment methods in lumbar spinal stenosis for geriatric patient: nerve block versus radiofrequency neurotomy versus spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Sung Bum; Kim, Min Ki; Park, Bong Jin; Choi, Seok Geun; Lim, Young Jin; Kim, Tae Sung

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of spinal treatment, including nerve block, radiofrequency neurotomy, instrumented fusions, is increasing, and progressively involves patients of age 65 and older. Treatment of the geriatric patients is often a difficult challenge for the spine surgeon. General health, sociofamilial and mental condition of the patients as well as the treatment techniques and postoperative management are to be accurately evaluated and planned. We tried to compare three treatment methods of spinal stenosis for geriatric patient in single institution. The cases of treatment methods in spinal stenosis over than 65 years old were analyzed. The numbers of patients were 371 underwent nerve block, radiofrequency neurotomy, instrumented fusions from January 2009 to December 2012 (nerve block: 253, radiofrequency neurotomy: 56, instrumented fusions: 62). The authors reviewed medical records, operative findings and postoperative clinical results, retrospectively. Simple X-ray were evaluated and clinical outcome was measured by Odom's criteria at 1 month after procedures. We were observed excellent and good results in 162 (64%) patients with nerve block, 40 (71%) patient with radIofrequency neurotomy, 46 (74%) patient with spinal surgery. Poor results were 20 (8%) patients in nerve block, 2 (3%) patients in radiofrequency neurotomy, 3 (5%) patient in spinal surgery. We reviewed literatures and analyzed three treatment methods of spinal stenosis for geriatric patients. Although the long term outcome of surgical treatment was most favorable, radiofrequency neurotomy and nerve block can be considered for the secondary management of elderly lumbar spinals stenosis patients.

  9. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

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    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  10. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: correlation with Oswestry Disability Index and MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvanci, Mustafa; Bhatia, Mona; Ganiyusufoglu, Kursat Ali; Duran, Cihan; Tezer, Mehmet; Ozturk, Cagatay; Aydogan, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2008-05-01

    Because neither the degree of constriction of the spinal canal considered to be symptomatic for lumbar spinal stenosis nor the relationship between the clinical appearance and the degree of a radiologically verified constriction is clear, a correlation of patient's disability level and radiographic constriction of the lumbar spinal canal is of interest. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the degree of radiologically established anatomical stenosis and the severity of self-assessed Oswestry Disability Index in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Sixty-three consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis who were scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and completed a self-assessment Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Quantitative image evaluation for lumbar spinal stenosis included the dural sac cross-sectional area, and qualitative evaluation of the lateral recess and foraminal stenosis were also performed. Every patient subsequently answered the national translation of the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire and the percentage disability was calculated. Statistical analysis of the data was performed to seek a relationship between radiological stenosis and percentage disability recorded by the Oswestry Disability Index. Upon radiological assessment, 27 of the 63 patients evaluated had severe and 33 patients had moderate central dural sac stenosis; 11 had grade 3 and 27 had grade 2 nerve root compromise in the lateral recess; 22 had grade 3 and 37 had grade 2 foraminal stenosis. On the basis of the percentage disability score, of the 63 patients, 10 patients demonstrated mild disability, 13 patients moderate disability, 25 patients severe disability, 12 patients were crippled and three patients were bedridden. Radiologically, eight patients with severe central stenosis and nine patients with moderate

  11. The pathologic mechanisms underlying lumbar distraction spinal cord injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Ji; Xue, Jing; Huang, Rongrong; Wu, Di; Song, Yueming

    2017-11-01

    A reliable experimental rabbit model of distraction spinal cord injury (SCI) was established to successfully simulate gradable and replicable distraction SCI. However, further research is needed to elucidate the pathologic mechanisms underlying distraction SCI. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathologic mechanisms underlying lumbar distraction SCI in rabbits. This is an animal laboratory study. Using a self-designed spine distractor, the experimental animals were divided into a control group and 10%, 20%, and 30% distraction groups. Pathologic changes to the spinal cord microvessels in the early stage of distraction SCI were identified by perfusion of the spinal cord vasculature with ink, production of transparent specimens, observation by light microscopy, and observation of corrosion casts of the spinal cord microvascular architecture by scanning electron microscopy. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) concentrations in the injured spinal cord tissue were measured after 8 hours. With an increasing degree and duration of distraction, the spinal cord microvessels were only partially filled and had the appearance of spasm until rupture and hemorrhage were observed. The MDA concentration increased and the SOD concentration decreased in the spinal cord tissue. Changes to the internal and external spinal cord vessels led to spinal cord ischemia, which is a primary pathologic mechanism of distraction SCI. Lipid peroxidation mediated by free radicals took part in secondary pathologic damage of distraction SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. PARAMETERS OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN PATIENTS WITH CONGENITAL NARROWING OF THE LUMBAR SPINAL CANAL

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    ELIU HAZAEL MORALES-RANGEL

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the morphological parameters of magnetic resonance in patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal with patients with low back pain. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective, observational study was conducted with measurements in the axial and sagittal magnetic resonance sections of the vertebral body and canal of the lumbar spine of 64 patients with diagnosis of low back pain, which were compared with resonance images taken from 31 Mexican patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal. Results: The results show that patients with congenital narrowing of the lumbar spinal canal in the axial sections have a difference in diameters, being L2<13.9 mm, L3<13.3 mm, L4<12.9 mm, L5<13.1 mm, compared with controls L2<20.5 mm, L3<20.5 mm, L4<19.3 mm, L5<18.1 mm with p = 0.000. Conclusions: We found different measurements in the Mexican population compared to those found by similar studies. With the parameters obtained, it would be possible to make the proper diagnosis, surgical planning, and treatment.

  13. Quantitative morphometric analysis of the lumbar vertebral facets and evaluation of feasibility of lumbar spinal nerve root and spinal canal decompression using the Goel intraarticular facetal spacer distraction technique: A lumbar/cervical facet comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoskar, Savni R; Goel, Aimee A; Mehta, Pooja H; Goel, Atul

    2014-10-01

    The authors evaluate the anatomic subtleties of lumbar facets and assess the feasibility and effectiveness of use of 'Goel facet spacer' in the treatment of degenerative spinal canal stenosis. Twenty-five lumbar vertebral cadaveric dried bones were used for the purpose. A number of morphometric parameters were evaluated both before and after the introduction of Goel facet spacers within the confines of the facet joint. The spacers achieved distraction of facets that was more pronounced in the vertical perspective. Introduction of spacers on both sides resulted in an increase in the intervertebral foraminal height and a circumferential increase in the spinal canal dimensions. Additionally, there was an increase in the disc space or intervertebral body height. The lumbar facets are more vertically and anteroposteriorly oriented when compared to cervical facets that are obliquely and transversely oriented. Understanding the anatomical peculiarities of the lumbar and cervical facets can lead to an optimum utilization of the potential of Goel facet distraction arthrodesis technique in the treatment of spinal degenerative canal stenosis.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of the lumbosacral sagittal alignment in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makirov, Serik K.; Jahaf, Mohammed T.; Nikulina, Anastasia A.

    2015-01-01

    Goal of the study This study intends to develop a method of quantitative sagittal balance parameters assessment, based on a geometrical model of lumbar spine and sacrum. Methods One hundred eight patients were divided into 2 groups. In the experimental group have been included 59 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis on L1-5 level. Forty-nine healthy volunteers without history of any lumbar spine pathlogy were included in the control group. All patients have been examined with supine MRI. Lumbar lordosis has been adopted as circular arc and described either anatomical (lumbar lordosis angle), or geometrical (chord length, circle segment height, the central angle, circle radius) parameters. Moreover, 2 sacral parameters have been assessed for all patients: sacral slope and sacral deviation angle. Both parameters characterize sacrum disposition in horizontal and vertical axis respectively. Results Significant correlation was observed between anatomical and geometrical lumbo-sacral parameters. Significant differences between stenosis group and control group were observed in the value of the “central angle” and “sacral deviation” parameters. We propose additional parameters: lumbar coefficient, as ratio of the lordosis angle to the segmental angle (Kl); sacral coefficient, as ratio of the sacral tilt (ST) to the sacral deviation (SD) angle (Ks); and assessment modulus of the mathematical difference between sacral and lumbar coefficients has been used for determining lumbosacral balance (LSB). Statistically significant differences between main and control group have been obtained for all described coefficients (p = 0.006, p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, accordingly). Median of LSB value of was 0.18 and 0.34 for stenosis and control groups, accordingly. Conclusion Based on these results we believe that that spinal stenosis is associated with an acquired deformity that is measureable by the described parameters. It's possible that spinal stenosis occurs in patients with an

  15. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation in surgical treatment for single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hao; Wang, Xiyang; Zhang, Penghui; Peng, Wei; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Yupeng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and efficacy of surgical management of single-segment lumbar spinal tuberculosis (TB) by using single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. Seventeen cases of single-segment lumbar TB were treated with single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation. The mean follow-up was 36.9 months (range: 24-62 months). The kyphotic angle ranged from 15.2-35.1° preoperatively, with an average measurement of 27.8°. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) score system was used to evaluate the neurological deficits and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) used to judge the activity of TB. Spinal TB was completely cured in all 17 patients. There was no recurrent TB infection. The postoperative kyphotic angle was 6.6-10.2°, 8.1° in average, and there was no significant loss of the correction at final follow-up. Solid fusion was achieved in all cases. Neurological condition in all patients was improved after surgery. Single-stage posterior transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, debridement, limited decompression, 3-column reconstruction, and posterior instrumentation can be a feasible and effective method the in treatment of single-segment lumbar spinal TB.

  16. Visual and quantitative assessment of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipola, Petri; Vanninen, Ritva; Manninen, Hannu; Leinonen, Ville; Niemelaeinen, Riikka; Aalto, Timo; Airaksinen, Olavi; Battie, Michele C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis is a common etiology of lumbar radicular symptoms. Quantitative measurements have commonly demonstrated better repeatability than visual assessments. We are not aware of any studies examining the repeatability of quantitative assessment of the lateral canal. Purpose. To evaluate the repeatability of visual assessments and newly developed quantitative measurements of lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods. Twenty-eight patients with lateral lumbar spinal canal stenosis or prior spinal surgery with recurrent symptoms were imaged with MRI. A radiologist, a neurosurgeon and a spine research trainee graded visually and quantitatively subarticular (n = 188) and foraminal zones (n = 260) of the lateral spinal canal. Quantitative measurements included the minimal subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen. Results. The repeatability of visual assessment at the subarticular zone and foraminal zones between raters varied from 0.45-0.59 and 0.42-0.53, respectively. Similarly, the intraclass correlation coefficients for the quantitative measurements varied from 0.67-0.71 and 0.66-0.76, respectively. The intra-rater repeatability for the visual assessments of the subarticular and foraminal zones was 0.70 and 0.62, respectively, while the corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients for quantitative measurements were 0.83 and 0.81, respectively. Conclusion. Inter-rater repeatability of visual assessments of lateral stenosis is moderate, whereas quantitative measurements of both subarticular width and the cross-sectional area of the foramen have substantial reproducibility and may be particularly useful for longitudinal studies and research purposes. The clinical value of these parameters requires further study

  17. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  18. Lumbar spinal fusion patients’ demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols. A prospective randomized study

    OpenAIRE

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B.; Lauersen, Ida; Bünger, Cody E.

    2005-01-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients’ demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-...

  19. Efficiency of spinal anesthesia versus general anesthesia for lumbar spinal surgery: a retrospective analysis of 544 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce JT

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available John T Pierce,1 Guy Kositratna,2 Mark A Attiah,1 Michael J Kallan,3 Rebecca Koenigsberg,1 Peter Syre,1 David Wyler,4 Paul J Marcotte,1 W Andrew Kofke,1,2 William C Welch1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, 3Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Neurosurgery, Jefferson Hospital of Neuroscience, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia PA, USA Background: Previous studies have shown varying results in selected outcomes when directly comparing spinal anesthesia to general in lumbar surgery. Some studies have shown reduced surgical time, postoperative pain, time in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, incidence of urinary retention, postoperative nausea, and more favorable cost-effectiveness with spinal anesthesia. Despite these results, the current literature has also shown contradictory results in between-group comparisons. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis was performed by querying the electronic medical record database for surgeries performed by a single surgeon between 2007 and 2011 using procedural codes 63030 for diskectomy and 63047 for laminectomy: 544 lumbar laminectomy and diskectomy surgeries were identified, with 183 undergoing general anesthesia and 361 undergoing spinal anesthesia (SA. Linear and multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify differences in blood loss, operative time, time from entering the operating room (OR until incision, time from bandage placement to exiting the OR, total anesthesia time, PACU time, and total hospital stay. Secondary outcomes of interest included incidence of postoperative spinal hematoma and death, incidence of paraparesis, plegia, post-dural puncture headache, and paresthesia, among the SA patients. Results: SA was associated with significantly lower operative time, blood loss, total anesthesia time, time

  20. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastián Flores; Marcelo Molina

    2015-01-01

    Existe una variada cantidad de alternativas no quirúrgicas para tratar el dolor radicular producido por la raquiestenosis lumbar degenerativa. Los corticoides epidurales se utilizan desde hace varias décadas, sin embargo la eficacia reportada en la literatura es muy variable. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos nueve revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen siete estudios aleatorizados. Realizamos un me...

  1. Lumbar spinal fusion. Outcome in relation to surgical methods, choice of implant and postoperative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Finn Bjarke

    2004-10-01

    Chronic low back pain (CLBP) has become one of the most common causes of disability in adults under 45 years of age and is consequently one of the most common reasons for early retirement in industrialised societies. Accordingly, CLBP represents an expensive drain on society's resources and is a very challenging area for which a consensus for rational therapy is yet to be established. The spinal fusion procedure was introduced as a treatment option for CLBP more than 70 years ago. However, few areas of spinal surgery have caused so much controversy as spinal fusion. The literature reveals divergent opinions about when fusion is indicated and how it should be performed. Furthermore, the significance of the role of postoperative rehabilitation following spinal fusion may be underestimated. There exists no consensus on the design of a program specific for rehabilitation. Ideally, for any given surgical procedure, it should be possible to identify not only possible complications relative to a surgical procedure, but also what symptoms may be expected, and what pain behaviour may be expected of a particular patient. The overall aims of the current studies were: 1) to introduce patient-based functional outcome evaluation into spinal fusion treatment; 2) to evaluate radiological assessment of different spinal fusion procedures; 3) to investigate the effect of titanium versus stainless steel pedicle screws on mechanical fixation and bone ingrowth in lumbar spinal fusion; 4) to analyse the clinical and radiological outcome of different lumbar spinal fusion techniques; 5) to evaluate complications and re-operation rates following different surgical procedures; and 6) to analyse the effect of different rehabilitation strategies for lumbar spinal fusion patients. The present thesis comprises 9 studies: 2 clinical retrospective studies, 1 clinical prospective case/reference study, 5 clinical randomised prospective studies and 1 animal study (Mini-pigs). In total, 594 patients

  2. Surgical results of dynamic nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases with instability: Minimum 2-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hideki; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Morishita, Yuichirou; Sakai, Tsubasa; Huang, George; Kida, Hirotaka; Takemitsu, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Background When spinal fusion is applied to degenerative lumbar spinal disease with instability, adjacent segment disorder will be an issue in the future. However, decompression alone could cause recurrence of spinal canal stenosis because of increased instability on operated segments and lead to revision surgery. Covering the disadvantages of both procedures, we applied nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System (Ulrich Medical, Ulm, Germany) and decompression. Methods The surgical results of 52 patients (35 men and 17 women) with a minimum 2-year follow-up were analyzed: 10 patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis, 15 with lumbar canal stenosis with disc herniation, 20 with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 with disc herniation, and 1 with lumbar discopathy. Results The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was improved, from 14.4 ± 5.3 to 25.5 ± 2.8. The improvement rate was 76%. Range of motion of the operated segments was significantly decreased, from 9.6° ± 4.2° to 2.0° ± 1.8°. Only 1 patient had adjacent segment disease that required revision surgery. There was only 1 screw breakage, but the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusions Over a minimum 2-year follow-up, the results of nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System for unstable degenerative lumbar disease were good. It is necessary to follow up the cases with a focus on adjacent segment disorders in the future. PMID:25802671

  3. Health economic evaluation in lumbar spinal fusion: a systematic literature review anno 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B

    2006-01-01

    in clinical practice are present, economic evaluation is needed in order to facilitate the decision-makers' budget allocations. NHS Economic Evaluation Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched. Two independent reviewers (one clinical content expert and one economic content expert) applied...... that the clinical effects are statistically synonymous, it does not support the use of high-cost techniques. There is a great potential for improvement of methodological quality in economic evaluations of lumbar spinal fusion and further research is imperative....

  4. Change in onset times of the abdominal muscles following functional task in lumbar spinal stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hyun Seung; Park, Seong Doo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference in the onset times of the abdominal muscle following a rapid arm task in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). In total, 32 patients with LSS were recruited from W oriental hospital. Muscle activity onset of the internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was measured by electromyography (EMG) activity with a rapid arm movement and during the performance of a walking task. The LSS group demonstrated a significantly later onset of...

  5. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EG...

  6. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    Several risk factors and causes of adjacent segment disease have been debated; however, no quantitative relationship to spino-pelvic parameters has been established so far. A retrospective case-control study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with adjacent segment disease compared to a control group. 45 patients (ASDis) were identified that underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease after on average 49 months (7-125), 39 patients were selected as control group (CTRL) similar in the distribution of the matching variables, such as age, gender, preoperative degenerative changes, and numbers of segments fused with a mean follow-up of 84 months (61-142) (total n = 84). Several radiographic parameters were measured on pre- and postoperative radiographs, including lumbar lordosis measured (LL), sacral slope, pelvic incidence (PI), and tilt. Significant differences between ASDis and CTRL groups on preoperative radiographs were seen for PI (60.9 ± 10.0° vs. 51.7 ± 10.4°, p = 0.001) and LL (48.1 ± 12.5° vs. 53.8 ± 10.8°, p = 0.012). Pelvic incidence was put into relation to lumbar lordosis by calculating the difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (∆PILL = PI-LL, ASDis 12.5 ± 16.7° vs. CTRL 3.4 ± 12.1°, p = 0.001). A cutoff value of 9.8° was determined by logistic regression and ROC analysis and patients classified into a type A (∆PILL adjacent segment disease, whereas 78.3 % of patients classified as type B alignment had revision surgery. Classification of patients into type A and B alignments yields a sensitivity for predicting adjacent segment disease of 71 %, a specificity of 81 % and an odds ratio of 10.6. In degenerative disease of the lumbar spine a high pelvic incidence with diminished lumbar lordosis seems to predispose to adjacent segment disease. Patients with such pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch exhibit a 10-times higher risk for undergoing revision surgery than controls if

  7. Diagnostic value of multiplanar reconstruction in CT recognition of lumbar spinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, S. K.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Sohn, M. H.; Lim, K. Y.; Choi, K. C. [Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    The computer tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the lumbar spine. Recently, the multiplanar reconstruction of lumbar spine of CT of significant value for the anatomical localization and for the myelographic and surgical correlation. We observed 177 cases of lumbar spine CT, who complains of spinal symptom, during the period from Dec. 1982 to Aug. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 113 males and 44 females. The CT diagnosis showed 152 cases of herniated lumbar disc, 15 cases of degenerative disease, 5 cases of spine tbc., 3 cases of spine trauma and 2 cases of meningocele. 2. CT findings of herniated disc were as follows: focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, indentation on dural sac in 92 cases (60.5%) soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 85 cases (55.9%), compression or displacement of nerve root sheath in 22 cases(14.4%). 3. Sites of herniated lumbar disc were at L4-L5 level in 100 cases(59.1%) and at L5-S1 level in 65 cases (38.4%). Location of it were central type in 70 cases(41.1%), left-central type in 46 cases (27.2%), right-central type in 44 cases(26.0%) and lateral type in 9 cases (5.1%). 4. The sagittal reconstruction images were helpful in evaluating neural foramina, size of disc bluge into spinal canal, especially at L5-S1, and patients with spondylolisthesis. The coronal reconstruction images were the least informative, although they contributed to the evaluation of lumbar nerve roots of course, the axial CT scans were the most sensitive and specific.

  8. Modeling trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuck, A.; Stegeman, D. F.; Van Asseldonk, E. H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a potential new technique for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). TsDCS aims to facilitate plastic changes in the neural pathways of the spinal cord with a positive effect on SCI recovery. To establish tsDCS as a possible treatment

  9. Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploumis Avraam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspinous distraction devices (IPDD are indicated as stand-alone devices for the treatment of spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis with a combination of unilateral microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. Methods This is a prospective clinical and radiological study of minimum 2 years follow-up. Twenty-two patients (average age 64.5 years with low-back pain and unilateral sciatica underwent decompressive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. Visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry Disability Index and walking capacity plus radiologic measurements of posterior disc height of the involved level and lumbar lordosis Cobb angle were documented both preoperatively and postoperatively. One-sided posterior subarticular and foraminal decompression was conducted followed by dynamic stabilization of the diseased level with an IPDD (X-STOP. Results The average follow-up time was 27.4 months. Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index improved statistically significantly (p Conclusions The described surgical technique using unilateral microdecompression and IPDD insertion is a clinically effective and radiologically viable treatment method for symptoms of spinal stenosis resistant to non-operative treatment.

  10. Noradrenergic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of lumbar motoneurons in the neonatal rat spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maylis Tartas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Although it is known that noradrenaline powerfully controls spinal motor networks, few data are available regarding the noradrenergic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons in motor networks. Our work explores the cellular basis of noradrenergic modulation in the rat motor spinal cord. We first show that lumbar motoneurons express the three classes of adrenergic receptors at birth. Using patch-clamp recordings in the newborn rat spinal cord preparation, we characterized the effects of noradrenaline and of specific agonists of the three classes of adrenoreceptors on motoneuron membrane properties. Noradrenaline increases the motoneuron excitability partly via the inhibition of a KIR like current. Methoxamine (α1, clonidine (α2 and isoproterenol (β differentially modulate the motoneuron membrane potential but also increase motoneuron excitability, these effects being respectively inhibited by the antagonists prazosin (α1, yohimbine (α2 and propranolol (β. We show that the glutamatergic synaptic drive arising from the T13-L2 network is enhanced in motoneurons by noradrenaline, methoxamine and isoproterenol. On the other hand, noradrenaline, isoproterenol and clonidine inhibit both the frequency and amplitude of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs while methoxamine increases their frequency. The T13-L2 synaptic drive is thereby differentially modulated from the other glutamatergic synapses converging onto motoneurons and enhanced by presynaptic α1 and β receptor activation. Our data thus show that the noradrenergic system exerts a powerful and complex neuromodulation of lumbar motor networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

  11. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson “drop” technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice week...

  12. Acute spinal cord injury--do ambulatory patients need urodynamic investigations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Carlos H Suzuki; Wöllner, Jens; Gregorini, Flavia; Birnböck, Dorothee; Kozomara, Marko; Mehnert, Ulrich; Schubert, Martin; Kessler, Thomas M

    2013-04-01

    We compared the urodynamic parameters of ambulatory vs nonambulatory acute spinal cord injured patients. A total of 27 women and 33 men (mean age 58 years) with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to acute spinal cord injury (duration of injury less than 40 days) were prospectively evaluated. The patients were dichotomized according to the mobility for moderate distances subscale of the SCIM (Spinal Cord Independence Measure) version III into ambulatory (score of 3 or greater) and nonambulatory (score less than 3). Videourodynamic parameters including maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase, bladder compliance, detrusor overactivity, detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia and vesicoureterorenal reflux were compared between the groups. Of the 60 patients with acute spinal cord injury 17 were ambulatory and 43 were nonambulatory. Mean ± SD duration of injury at urodynamic investigation was 30 ± 8 days. The lesion level was cervical in 14 patients, thoracic in 28 and lumbar/sacral in 18. Comparing unfavorable urodynamic parameters, no significant differences were found between ambulatory vs nonambulatory patients in terms of a high pressure system during the storage phase (29% vs 33%, p = 0.81), a low compliance bladder (12% vs 7%, p = 0.54), detrusor overactivity (24% vs 47%, p = 0.1), detrusor external sphincter dyssynergia (18% vs 21%, p = 0.77) and vesicoureterorenal reflux (0% vs 5%, p = 0.36). Ambulatory and nonambulatory patients with acute spinal cord injury have a similar risk of unfavorable urodynamic measures. Thus, we strongly recommend the same neurourological assessment including urodynamic investigations in all acute spinal cord injury patients independent of the ability to walk. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurologic improvement after thoracic, thoracolumbar, and lumbar spinal cord (conus medullaris) injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrop, James S; Naroji, Swetha; Maltenfort, Mitchell Gil; Ratliff, John K; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Frank, Brian; Anderson, D Greg; Albert, Todd; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective. With approximately 10,000 new spinal cord injury (SCI) patients in the United States each year, predicting public health outcomes is an important public health concern. Combining all regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if the lumbar and sacral regions (conus) have a neurologic improvement at different rates than the thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord. Over a 10-year period between January 1995 to 2005, 1746 consecutive spinal injured patients were seen, evaluated, and treated through a level 1 trauma referral center. A retrospective analysis was performed on 150 patients meeting the criteria of T4 to S5 injury, excluding gunshot wounds. One-year follow-up data were available on 95 of these patients. Contingency table analyses (chi-squared statistics) and multivariate logistic regression. Variables of interest included level of injury, initial American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA), age, race, and etiology. A total of 92.9% of lumbar (conus) patients neurologically improved one ASIA level or more compared with 22.4% of thoracic or thoracolumbar spinal cord-injured patients. Only 7.7% of ASIA A patients showed neurologic improvement, compared with 95.2% of ASIA D patients; ASIA B patients demonstrated a 66.7% improvement rate, whereas ASIA C had a 84.6% improvement rate. When the two effects were considered jointly in a multivariate analysis, ASIA A and thoracic/thoracolumbar patients had only a 4.1% rate of improvement, compared with 96% for lumbar (conus) and incomplete patients (ASIA B-D) and 66.7% to 72.2% for the rest of the patients. All of these relationships were significant to P spinal cord have a greater neurologic improvement rate, which might be related to a greater proportion of lower motor neurons. Thus, defining the exact region of injury and potential for neurologic improvement should be considered in future clinical trial design. Combining all anatomic regions of the spine in SCI trials may be misleading if

  14. Is epidural steroid injection effective for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Flores

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe una variada cantidad de alternativas no quirúrgicas para tratar el dolor radicular producido por la raquiestenosis lumbar degenerativa. Los corticoides epidurales se utilizan desde hace varias décadas, sin embargo la eficacia reportada en la literatura es muy variable. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos nueve revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen siete estudios aleatorizados. Realizamos un metanálisis y tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que la inyección de corticoides epidurales probablemente tiene poco o nulo efecto en reducir el dolor radicular por estenorraquis.

  15. Acute epidural lipedema: a novel entity and potential complication of bone morphogenetic protein use in lumbar spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Michael T; Hamilton, Kendall D; Russo, Scott S

    2013-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteogenesis, making them useful for decreasing time to union and increasing union rates. Although the advantages of BMP-2 as a substitute for iliac crest graft have been elucidated, less is known about the safety profile and adverse events linked to their use in spinal fusion. An accumulation of reactive edema in the epidural fat may lead to neural compression and significant morbidity after lumbar spinal fusion. Bone morphogenetic protein has never been implicated as a cause of spinal epidural lipedema. We report on a case of rapid accumulation of edematous adipose tissue in the epidural space after lumbar spine decompression and fusion with bone morphogenic protein. Case report. The patient was a 45-year-old woman with chronic back pain, worsening bilateral L5 radiculopathy, and degenerative disc disease. Surgery consisting of a one-level transpedicular decompression, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, and posterolateral fusion was performed using BMP-2 as an adjunct for arthrodesis. Two days postoperatively, the patient developed progressive cauda equina syndrome. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed edematous epidural fat extending above the initial laminectomy, compromising the spinal canal, and compressing the thecal sac. Emergent laminectomies at L3, L4, and L5 were performed, and intraoperative pathology revealed edematous epidural adipose tissue. The patient's cauda equina syndrome resolved after spinal decompression and the removal of epidural fat. Final cultures were negative for infection, and histology report yielded an accumulation of edematous fibroadipose tissue. We present a case of rapid accumulation of edematous adipose tissue causing cauda equina syndrome after a lumbar decompression and fusion surgery. The acute nature and extensive development of the lipedema presented in this case indicate an intense inflammatory reaction. We hypothesize that there may be a link between the use of BMP-2

  16. MR imaging of lumbar herniated intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis: Correlation with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jae; Park, Kil Sun; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Jip; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    MR imagings obtained in 40 patients with surgically proven lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and/or spinal stenosis were retrospectively analysed and compared with CT scans, in order to evaluate the MR findings of HIVD and spinal stenosis, and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of MR. The MR imaging was performed on a 2.0 T superconducting unit, using multislice spin echo (SE) and gradient echo (GE) techniques. The results were as follows: 1. The texture of vertebral body with spinal stenosis had the tendency to be more heterogeneous than that with HIVD. 2. The signal intensity of the diseased disc was isointense relative to normal disc in 81 % (60/74) and the remainder (19%) was hypointense on both T1 weighted SE and GE images. There was no significant difference in signal intensity among HIVD, HIVD combined with spinal stenosis and spinal stenosis groups, but there was the tendency of lower signal intensity of the diseased disc in patients with severe degenerative change of spine in both T1 weighted SE imaged and GE image. 3. The diagnostic accuracy of MR was 92%, which was similar to that of CT. 4. T1 weighted SE image appears superior to GE image in evaluation of most of the structural differentiation, but as for differentiating between lumina and ligamentum flavum, and for the vacuum phenomenon, GE image seems to be better than T1 weighted SE image. In conclusion, MR appears to be better than CT as a initial imaging modality in evaluation of the patients with suspected lumbar spinal stenosis or HIVD because MR has the capability of demonstrating rupture of anulus fibrosus in sagittal plane.

  17. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction. (author)

  18. Radiological diagnosis of chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Akino, Minoru; Abe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Kunio; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Abe, Satoru; Kaneda, Kiyoshi

    1988-10-01

    Radiological findings in five cases with chronic spinal cord compressive lesion at thoraco-lumbar junction were reported. Three cases had spondylosis and two cases had ossification of yellow ligament (OYL). The levels of the lesions were T12/L1 in three cases and T11/12 in two cases. Two out of three spondylotic patients had also OYL at the same level. The five cases consisted of three men and two women. The ages ranged from 42 to 60 years old with a mean age of 53 years old. Neurologically, every patient showed flaccid paresis and sensory disturbance of the legs. Two cases had sensory disturbance of stocking type. The intervals from the onset of the symptoms to the final diagnosis were 6 months, 7 years, 8 years, 11 years and 12 years. Myelography showed anterior spinal cord compression by bony spur in spondylotic patients, and posterior compression by OYL in other cases. Myelography in flexion posture disclosed the cord compression by bony spur more clearly in two out of three spondylotic patients. Delayed CT-myelography showed intramedullary filling of contrast material in two cases, which indicated degenerative change or microcavitation due to long term compression of the spinal cord. MRI was taken in three spondylotic patients and could directly show compression of the spinal cord. Difficulty in detecting abnormality at thoraco-lumbar junction on plain roentgenogram, and similarity of the symptoms to peripheral nerve disease often lead to a delay in diagnosis. The significance of dynamic myelography and delayed CT-myelography when dealing with such a lesion was discussed here. MRI is also a useful method for diagnosing a compressive lesion at the thoraco-lumbar junction.

  19. Analysis of Patients with Myelopathy due to Benign Intradural Spinal Tumors with Concomitant Lumbar Degenerative Diseases Misdiagnosed and Erroneously Treated with Lumbar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kang; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Liliang, Po-Chou; Yang, Chih-Hui; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tsai, Yu-Duan; Chen, Po-Yuan; Chye, Cien-Leong; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Liang, Cheng-Loong; Chen, Han-Jung

    2017-09-01

    When a cervical or thoracic benign intradural spinal tumor (BIST) coexists with lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), diagnosis can be difficult. Symptoms of BIST-myelopathy can be mistaken as being related to LDD. Worse, an unnecessary lumbar surgery could be performed. This study was conducted to analyze cases in which an erroneous lumbar surgery was undertaken in the wake of failure to identify BIST-associated myelopathy. Cases were found in a hospital database. Patients who underwent surgery for LDD first and then another surgery for BIST removal within a short interval were studied. Issues investigated included why the BISTs were missed, how they were found later, and how the patients reacted to the unnecessary lumbar procedures. Over 10 years, 167 patients received both surgeries for LDD and a cervical or thoracic BIST. In 7 patients, lumbar surgery preceded tumor removal by a short interval. Mistakes shared by the physicians included failure to detect myelopathy and a BIST, and a hasty decision for lumbar surgery, which soon turned out to be futile. Although the BISTs were subsequently found and removed, 5 patients believed that the lumbar surgery was unnecessary, with 4 patients expressing regrets and 1 patient threatening to take legal action against the initial surgeon. Concomitant symptomatic LDD and BIST-associated myelopathy pose a diagnostic challenge. Spine specialists should refrain from reflexively linking leg symptoms and impaired ability to walk to LDD. Comprehensive patient evaluation is fundamental to avoid misdiagnosis and wrong lumbar surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders; A comparison with myelography and discography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojiri, Hajime (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    To evaluate the stenotic condition of the lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelography and with discography in 102 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Various pathologic conditions were studied including 50 cases of herniated nucleus pulposus, 39 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral type or combined type), and 13 cases of spondylolisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, and dysplastic type). High correlation was detected between the T2 weighted mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and the lateral view of a full-column myelogram, but subtle changes such as adhesive changes, or redundancy, or anomalous changes of the nerve roots were more clearly demonstrated on myelograms than on MRI. Actually some of these changes could not be detected on MRI. The degrees of disc degeneration were classified into five grades according to the signal intensity and the irregularity of the disc on the T2-weighted image. The MRI evaluation of disc degeneration in this series was similar to that of the discography. However, MRI could not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI might be the imaging modality for diagnostic screening and for detecting stenotic conditions of the lumbar spinal canal, it will not be able to replace myelography and/or discography for determining indication for surgery and preferred surgical approach. (author).

  1. Effect of zoledronic acid on lumbar spinal fusion in osteoporotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qirui; Chen, Jian; Fan, Jin; Li, Qingqing; Yin, Guoyong; Yu, Lipeng

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effect of zoledronic acid (ZA) on lumbar spinal fusion in patients with osteoporosis. This retrospective study includes 94 osteoporotic patients suffering from lumbar degenerative diseases or lumbar fracture who underwent lumbar spinal fusion in our institution from January 2013 to August 2014. They were divided into ZA group and control group according to whether the patient received ZA infusion or not. The patients in ZA group were given 5 mg intravenous ZA at the 3rd-5th days after operation. All patients took daily oral supplement of 600 mg calcium carbonate and 800 IU vitamin D during the follow-up after operation. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form 36 (SF-36) scores were recorded preoperatively and post-operatively to evaluate the clinic outcomes; the spinal fusion was assessed by X-ray or CT Scan. 64 patients finished the final follow-up, including 30 patients in ZA group and 34 patients in control group. No significant difference was observed in gender, age, and preoperative BMI VAS, ODI, and SF-36 scores between the two groups (P > 0.05). The post-operative VAS and ODI scores decreased rapidly at 3 and 6 months, but rose back slightly at 12 and 24 months in both groups. On the contrary, post-operative SF-36 scores increased rapidly at 3 and 6 months, while fell back slightly at 12 and 24 months, with a statistically significant difference between the two groups at 12 months, but not at 3 and 6 month post-operation. The spinal fusion rate in ZA group was 90% at 6 months, 92% at 12 months, while it was 75% at 6 months, 92.86% at 12 months in control group, significantly different between the two groups at 12 months, but not at 6 months. In the whole follow-up period, adjacent vertebral compressing fracture occurred in five patients in control group, none in ZA group. No pedicle screw loosening was observed in ZA group, with six in control group. Zoledronic acid accelerates

  2. Rapid recovery and altered neurochemical dependence of locomotor central pattern generation following lumbar neonatal spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züchner, Mark; Kondratskaya, Elena; Sylte, Camilla B; Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-15

    Spinal compression injury targeted to the neonatal upper lumbar spinal cord, the region of highest hindlimb locomotor rhythmogenicity, leads to an initial paralysis of the hindlimbs. Behavioural recovery is evident within a few days and approaches normal function within about 3 weeks. Fictive locomotion in the isolated injured spinal cord cannot be elicited by a neurochemical cocktail containing NMDA, dopamine and serotonin 1 day post-injury, but can 3 days post-injury as readily as in the uninjured spinal cord. Low frequency coordinated rhythmic activity can be elicited in the isolated uninjured spinal cord by NMDA + dopamine (without serotonin), but not in the isolated injured spinal cord. In both the injured and uninjured spinal cord, eliciting bona fide fictive locomotion requires the additional presence of serotonin. Following incomplete compression injury in the thoracic spinal cord of neonatal mice 1 day after birth (P1), we previously reported that virtually normal hindlimb locomotor function is recovered within about 3 weeks despite substantial permanent thoracic tissue loss. Here, we asked whether similar recovery occurs following lumbar injury that impacts more directly on the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG). As in thoracic injuries, lumbar injuries caused about 90% neuronal loss at the injury site and increased serotonergic innervation below the injury. Motor recovery was slower after lumbar than thoracic injury, but virtually normal function was attained by P25 in both cases. Locomotor CPG status was tested by eliciting fictive locomotion in isolated spinal cords using a widely used neurochemical cocktail (NMDA, dopamine, serotonin). No fictive locomotion could be elicited 1 day post-injury, but could within 3 days post-injury as readily as in age-matched uninjured control spinal cords. Burst patterning and coordination were largely similar in injured and control spinal cords but there were differences. Notably, in both groups there

  3. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L. [Centre Hospitalier Vaudois, Service de Rhumatologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  4. Late effects of radiation on the lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs: Re-treatment tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, K.A.; Withers, H.R.; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    1993-01-01

    Using a guinea pig model of lumbar myelopathy, various factors affecting the tolerance of spinal cord to irradiation were assessed: (a) extent of initial injury; (b) time interval between priming and test doses; and (c) animal age at the time of initial radiation treatment. A 3 cm section of lumbar spinal cord of guinea pigs was irradiated with fractionated doses of 4.5 Gy gamma rays given as 9 fractions per week. Guinea pigs were primed with 9 x 4.5 Gy in 7 days which is 60% of the ED 50 for a continuous course of treatment. After 28 or 40 weeks, animal were retreated with 6-14 fractions of 4.5 Gy. Animals were observed for 2 years following the priming dose and both the incidence and latency of myelopathy recorded. Young adult guinea pigs (8 wk old) showed both a decreased radiation tolerance and latency compared to old individuals (40 wk old). At 28 or 40 wk after 9 x 4.5 Gy, only about 8% of the initial injury was remembered in young adult guinea pigs. The amount of residual injury was dependent on the initial damage as a proportion of the tolerance dose. The spinal cord shows a greater capacity for long-term recovery than generally appreciated and re-treatment doses clinically prescribed may be lower than necessary. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Adjacent Segment Disease 44 Years Following Posterior Spinal Fusion for Congenital Lumbar Kyphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Avionna; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-11-01

    Case report. To report the clinical and imaging findings of a patient with lumbar stenosis 44 years after posterior spinal fusion for congenital lumbar kyphosis. To our knowledge, there are no long-term follow-up reports after posterior spine fusion (PSF) for congenital kyphosis. Congenital kyphosis is an uncommon deformity with the potential to progress rapidly and result in deformity and neurologic deficits. We report the patient's history, physical examination, imaging findings, and management in addition to providing a literature review. A 54-year-old-male who underwent T8-L3 PSF in 1972 because of congenital kyphosis presented 44 years after surgery with lower back pain, buttock, and bilateral posterior leg pain. On physical examination, no weakness was elicited and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated L4-L5 lumbar stenosis. The patient was enrolled in physical therapy and responded well to medical/interventional management. To our knowledge, this is the longest follow-up of surgical management of congenital lumbar kyphosis. Posterior fusion only halted the progression of the kyphosis with subsequent developed of adjacent segment disease distal to the fusion. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Scoliosis Research Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Correlation Between Restoration of Lumbar Lordosis and Surgical Outcome in the Treatment of Low-grade Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis With Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Ta; Yang, Stephen S; Chen, Tzu Yung

    2016-02-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To investigate the relationship between the restoration of the lumbar lordosis (LL) and the surgical outcome of patients undergoing spinal fusion for low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Correlation between low back pain and the loss of LL in the treatment of low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis has seldom been reported. Between May 2005 and July 2011, 59 patients with low back pain and neurogenic claudication due to low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis underwent spinal decompression and fusion by a senior surgeon. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. The mean age of the remaining 49 patients (10 men and 39 women) was 64.0 years (range, 47-88 y). Patients were categorized on the basis of the spino-pelvic posture: type 1 [pelvic incidence (PI)60 degrees) (n=13). The LL restoration ratio was calculated by the actual LL divided by the predicted LL. The clinical results were evaluated using a visual analogue scale and the Oswestry Disability Index. Postoperative 36-inch spinal films were used to assess the sagittal balance. The mean follow-up period was 43.2 months (range, 28-62 mo). Forty-eight patients showed significant improvement with respect to visual analogue scale and Oswestry Disability Index regardless of whether the LL was restored higher or lower. Postoperative 36-inch spinal films showed the C7 plumb line to be within an average of 4.4 cm (range, 0.6-5.6 cm) from the posterior-superior corner of the S1 vertebrae. Patients with smaller PI tended to be restored higher, and those patients with a larger PI were more likely to be restored lower. For patients with normal sagittal balance, the surgical outcomes in the treatment of low-grade lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal fusion are not correlated with restoration of the LL.

  7. Posterior-only approach for lumbar vertebral column resection and expandable cage reconstruction for spinal metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Rahul; Kelly, Brandon; Chen, Mike Yue

    2013-07-01

    The increasing incidence of spinal metastasis, a result of improved systemic therapies for cancer, has spurred a search for an alternative method for the surgical treatment of lumbar metastases. The authors report a single-stage posterior-only approach for resecting any pathological lumbar vertebral segment and reconstructing with a medium to large expandable cage while preserving all neurological structures. The authors conducted a retrospective consecutive case review of 11 patients (5 women, 6 men) with spinal metastases treated at 1 institution with single-stage posterior-only vertebral column resection and reconstruction with an expandable cage and pedicle screw fixation. For all patients, the indications for operative intervention were spinal cord compression, cauda equina compression, and/or spinal instability. Neurological status was classified according to the American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale, and functional outcomes were analyzed by using a visual analog scale for pain. For all patients, a circumferential vertebral column resection was achieved, and full decompression was performed with a posterior-only approach. Each cage was augmented by posterior pedicle screw fixation extending 2 levels above and below the resected level. No patient required a separate anterior procedure. Average estimated blood loss and duration of each surgery were 1618 ml (range 900-4000 ml) and 6.6 hours (range 4.5-9 hours), respectively. The mean follow-up time was 14 months (range 10-24 months). The median survival time after surgery was 17.7 months. Delayed hardware failure occurred for 1 patient. Preoperatively, 2 patients had intractable pain with intact lower-extremity strength and 8 patients had severe intractable pain, lower-extremity paresis, and were unable to walk; 4 of whom regained the ability to walk after surgery. Two patients who were paraplegic before decompression recovered substantial function but remained wheelchair bound, and 2 patients

  8. A rat model of chronic syringomyelia induced by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Shin Won; Kim, Saet Pyoul; Kim, Hyeonjin; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Paek, Sun Ha; Pang, Dachling; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There has been no established animal model of syringomyelia associated with lumbosacral spinal lipoma. The research on the pathophysiology of syringomyelia has been focused on Chiari malformation, trauma, and inflammation. To understand the pathophysiology of syringomyelia associated with occult spinal dysraphism, a novel animal model of syringomyelia induced by chronic mechanical compression of the lumbar spinal cord was created. METHODS The model was made by epidural injection of highly concentrated paste-like kaolin solution through windows created by partial laminectomy of L-1 and L-5 vertebrae. Behavioral outcome in terms of motor (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score) and urinary function was assessed serially for 12 weeks. Magnetic resonance images were obtained in some animals to confirm the formation of a syrinx and to monitor changes in its size. Immunohistochemical studies, including analysis for glial fibrillary acidic protein, NeuN, CC1, ED-1, and caspase-3, were done. RESULTS By 12 weeks after the epidural compression procedure, syringomyelia formation was confirmed in 85% of the rats (34 of 40) on histology and/or MRI. The syrinx cavities were found rostral to the epidural compression. Motor deficit of varying degrees was seen immediately after the procedure in 28% of the rats (11 of 40). In 13 rats (33%), lower urinary tract dysfunction was seen. Motor deficit improved by 5 weeks after the procedure, whereas urinary dysfunction mostly improved by 2 weeks. Five rats (13%, 5 of 40) died 1 month postoperatively or later, and 3 of the 5 had developed urinary tract infection. At 12 weeks after the operation, IHC showed no inflammatory process, demyelination, or accelerated apoptosis in the spinal cords surrounding the syrinx cavities, similar to sham-operated animals. CONCLUSIONS A novel experimental model for syringomyelia by epidural compression of the lumbar spinal cord has been created. The authors hope that it will serve as an important research

  9. Early diagnosis and treatment of acute or subacute spinal epidural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang-ping; Fan, Shun-wu; Yang, Hui-lin; Tang, Tian-si; Zhou, Feng; Zhao, Xing

    2007-08-05

    Despite low morbidity, acute or subacute spinal epidural hematoma may develop quickly with a high tendency to paralysis. The delay of diagnosis and therapy often leads to serious consequences. In this study we evaluated the effects of a series of methods for the diagnosis and treatment of the hematoma in 11 patients seen in our hospital. Of the 11 patients (8 males and 3 females), 2 had the hematoma involving cervical segments, 2 cervico-thoracic, 4 thoracic, 1 thoraco-lumbar, and 2 lumbar. Three patients had quadriplegia, including one with central cord syndrome; another had Brown-Sequard's syndrome; and the other seven had paraplegia. Five patients were diagnosed at our hospitals within 3 - 48 hours after appearance of symptoms, and 6 patients were transferred from community hospitals within 21 - 106 hours after development of symptoms. Key dermal points, key muscles and the rectal sphincter were determined according to the American Spinal Injury Society Impairment Scales as scale A in two patients, B in 5 and C in 4. Emergency MRI in each patient confirmed that the dura mater was compressed in the spinal canal, with equal intensity or hyperintensity on T(1) weighted image and mixed hyperintensity on T(2) weighted image. Preventive and curative measures were taken preoperatively and emergency operation was performed in all patients. Open laminoplasty was done at the cervical and cervico-thoracic segments, laminectomy at the thoracic segments, laminectomy with pedicle screw fixation at the thoraco-lumbar and lumbar segments involving multiple levels, and double-sided laminectomy with the integrity of articular processes at the lumbar segments involving only a single level. During the operation, special attention was given to hematoma evacuation, hemostasis and drainage tube placement. Neither uncontrollable hemorrhage nor postoperative complications occurred. All patients were followed up for 1 - 6 years. A marked difference was noted between postoperative and

  10. High failure rate of the interspinous distraction device (X-Stop) for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis caused by degenerative spondylolisthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoof, O.J.W.; Bron, J.L.; Wapstra, F.H.; van Royen, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    The X-Stop interspinous distraction device has shown to be an attractive alternative to conventional surgical procedures in the treatment of symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. However, the effectiveness of the X-Stop in symptomatic degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis caused by

  11. [Effects of ablation of the hindlimb on the organization of the ventral horn of the spinal cord in the lumbar region of green lizard embryos (Lacerta viridis Laur.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, A; Clairambault, P

    1978-01-01

    After extirpation of an hind limb in embryos of Lacerta viridis, numerous motor neuroblasts degenerate on the operated side, in the ventral horn of the lumbar spinal cord and the corresponding motor column is reduced or disappears. The lumbar spinal ganglia are affected and reduced on the operated side.

  12. Spinal-cord swelling in acute multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Seiji; Tashiro, Kunio; Naganuma, Mutsuo; Hida, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Despite the frequent involvement of the spinal cord by multiple sclerosis, reports concerning neuroradiological findings regarding these lesions have been limited; most of them have demonstrated a normal or small spinal cord. Two cases of acute paraparesis showed evidence of spinal-cord swelling on myelography and CT myelography, initially suggesting the diagnosis of an intramedullary tumor. Spinal-cord swelling was demonstrated more clearly on CT myelography than on conventional myelography. The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis was made with the aid of the CSF findings, the clinical course, and the contracting-cord sign. The ''contracting-cord sign'' means the diminution of the spinal-cord diameter in the chronic stage. Since acute multiple sclerosis may produce spinal-cord swelling simulating a tumor, careful investigations are necessary to avoid unwarranted surgical interventions. (author)

  13. Differences in 3D vs. 2D analysis in lumbar spinal fusion simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hung-Wei; Bashkuev, Maxim; Pumberger, Matthias; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2018-03-15

    Lumbar interbody fusion is currently the gold standard in treating patients with disc degeneration or segmental instability. Despite it having been used for several decades, the non-union rate remains high. A failed fusion is frequently attributed to an inadequate mechanical environment after instrumentation. Finite element (FE) models can provide insights into the mechanics of the fusion process. Previous fusion simulations using FE models showed that the geometries and material of the cage can greatly influence the fusion outcome. However, these studies used axisymmetric models which lacked realistic spinal geometries. Therefore, different modeling approaches were evaluated to understand the bone-formation process. Three FE models of the lumbar motion segment (L4-L5) were developed: 2D, Sym-3D and Nonsym-3D. The fusion process based on existing mechano-regulation algorithms using the FE simulations to evaluate the mechanical environment was then integrated into these models. In addition, the influence of different lordotic angles (5, 10 and 15°) was investigated. The volume of newly formed bone, the axial stiffness of the whole segment and bone distribution inside and surrounding the cage were evaluated. In contrast to the Nonsym-3D, the 2D and Sym-3D models predicted excessive bone formation prior to bridging (peak values with 36 and 9% higher than in equilibrium, respectively). The 3D models predicted a more uniform bone distribution compared to the 2D model. The current results demonstrate the crucial role of the realistic 3D geometry of the lumbar motion segment in predicting bone formation after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Unilateral Approach for Bilateral Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Minimal Invasive Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, M.; Ali, M.; Khanzada, K.; Haq, N.U.; Aman, R.; Ali, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of a novel, minimally invasive spinal surgery technique for the correction of lumbar spinal stenosis involving unilateral approach for bilateral decompression. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Neurosurgery Department of PGMI, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from January to December 2010. Methodology: A total of 60 patients with lumbar stenosis were randomly assigned to undergo either a conventional laminectomy (30 patients, Group A), or a unilateral approach (30 patients, Group B). Clinical outcomes was measured using the scale of Finneson and Cooper. All the data was collected by using a proforma and different parameters were assessed for a minimum follow-up period of three months. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 17. Results: Adequate decompression was achieved in all patients. Compared with patients in the conventional laminectomy group, patients who received the novel procedure (unilateral approach) had a reduced mean duration of hospital stay, a faster recovery rate and majority of the patients (88.33%) had an excellent to fair operative result according to the Finneson and Cooper scale. Five major complications occurred in all patient groups, 2 patients had unintended dural rent and 2 wound dehiscence each and fifth patient had worsening of symptoms. There was no mortality in the series. Conclusion: The ultimate goal of the unilateral approach to treat lumbar spinal stenosis is to achieve adequate decompression of the neural elements. An additional benefit of a minimally invasive approach is adequate preservation of vertebral stability, as it requires only minimal muscle trauma, preservation of supraspinous/intraspinous ligament complex and spinous process, therefore, allows early mobilization. This also shortens the hospital stay, reduces postoperative back pain, and leads to satisfactory outcome. (author)

  15. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient

  16. Prevalence of facet joint pain in chronic spinal pain of cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pampati Vidyasagar

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facet joints are a clinically important source of chronic cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the prevalence of facet joint pain by spinal region in patients with chronic spine pain referred to an interventional pain management practice. Methods Five hundred consecutive patients with chronic, non-specific spine pain were evaluated. The prevalence of facet joint pain was determined using controlled comparative local anesthetic blocks (1% lidocaine or 1% lidocaine followed by 0.25% bupivacaine, in accordance with the criteria established by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP. The study was performed in the United States in a non-university based ambulatory interventional pain management setting. Results The prevalence of facet joint pain in patients with chronic cervical spine pain was 55% 5(95% CI, 49% – 61%, with thoracic spine pain was 42% (95% CI, 30% – 53%, and in with lumbar spine pain was 31% (95% CI, 27% – 36%. The false-positive rate with single blocks with lidocaine was 63% (95% CI, 54% – 72% in the cervical spine, 55% (95% CI, 39% – 78% in the thoracic spine, and 27% (95% CI, 22% – 32% in the lumbar spine. Conclusion This study demonstrated that in an interventional pain management setting, facet joints are clinically important spinal pain generators in a significant proportion of patients with chronic spinal pain. Because these patients typically have failed conservative management, including physical therapy, chiropractic treatment and analgesics, they may benefit from specific interventions designed to manage facet joint pain.

  17. MRI diagnosis of acute spinal cord decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaofeng; Yuan Fengmei; Ma Heng; Xu Yongzhong; Gai Qingzhu; Wang Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness. Methods: MRI findings of 5 cases with clinical definite acute spinal cord decompression sickness were retrospectively analyzed. The main clinical informations included underwater performance history against regulations, short-term complete or incomplete spinal cord injury symptoms after fast going out of water, sensory disability and urinary and fecal incontinence, etc. Results: Spinal cord vacuole sign was found in all 5 cases. Iso-signal intensity (n=3), high signal intensity (n=1), and low signal intensity (n=1) was demonstrated on T 1 WI, and high signal intensity (n=5) was found on T 2 WI. Owl eye sign was detected in 3 cases, and lacune foci were seen in 2 cases. Conclusion: MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness had some characteristics, and it was easy to diagnose by combining diving history with clinical manifestations. (authors)

  18. Relationship of activity in ascending paths with phase encoding in the lumbar spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Shugurov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We studied the relationship of discharges phase characteristics in ascending column of spinal cord (SC and specificity of activation of neurones, which generate negative components of evoked potentials of SC. The discharges was recorded from SC at a level of a presence of dorsal column (DC, spinocervical and dorsal spinocerebellar tract in upper lumbar and thoracic segments at a stimulation of a nerve or DC. It is shown, that the phase of the discharges depends on the quantity of synaptic delays in generating chain of such signals. Thus, the phase of a signal can carry the additional information on specificity of activation of the sensory elements in CNS.

  19. Synaptic targets of commissural interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of neonatal rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birinyi, András; Viszokay, Kornél; Wéber, Ildikó

    2003-01-01

    dextran amine (BDA) into the lateral motor column to retrogradely label commissural interneurons that may have direct projections to motor neurons. Stained neurons were recovered in the ventromedial areas of the contralateral gray matter in substantial numbers. In the second experiment BDA was injected...... into the ventromedial gray matter on one side of the lumbar spinal cord, whereas motor neurons were simultaneously labeled on the opposite side by applying biocytin onto the ventral roots. BDA injections into the ventromedial gray matter labeled a strong axon bundle that arose from the site of injection, crossed...

  20. Chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Barquero, A.; Pinto, J.I. [Univ. Hospital ' ' Marques de Valdecilla' ' , Santander (Spain). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Abascal, F.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Cerezal, L. [Hospital Mompia, Cantabria, (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Figols, F.J. [Univ. Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain). Dept. of Pathology

    2000-10-01

    An uncommon case of chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine in a 75-year-old woman is reported. The patient presented with a 7-month history of low back pain and bilateral sciatica. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled a correct preoperative diagnosis revealing a nodular, well-circumscribed epidural mass with peripheral enhancement and signal intensities consistent with chronic hematoma, which extended from L2 to L3. Laminectomy of L2-L3 was performed and the hematoma was totally resected. Histological examination of the surgical specimen demonstrated a chronic encapsulated hematoma. No evidence of vascular malformation was found. The patient recovered fully after surgical treatment. (orig.)

  1. Src-family kinases activation in spinal microglia contributes to central sensitization and chronic pain after lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangliang; Li, Yongyong; Zhong, Xiongxiong; Hu, Yuming; Liu, Pan; Zhao, Yuanshu; Deng, Zhen; Liu, Xianguo; Liu, Shaoyu; Zhong, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of radicular pain, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Spinal activation of src-family kinases are involved in the development of chronic pain from nerve injury, inflammation, and cancer. In the present study, the role of src-family kinases activation in lumbar disc herniation-induced radicular pain was investigated. Results Lumbar disc herniation was induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus, harvest from tail, in lumbar 4/5 spinal nerve roots of rat. Behavior test and electrophysiologic data showed that nucleus pulposus implantation induced persistent mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and increased efficiency of synaptic transmission in spinal dorsal horn which underlies central sensitization of pain sensation. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry staining revealed that the expression of phosphorylated src-family kinases was upregulated mainly in spinal microglia of rats with nucleus pulposus. Intrathecal delivery of src-family kinases inhibitor PP2 alleviated pain behaviors, decreased efficiency of spinal synaptic transmission, and reduced phosphorylated src-family kinases expression. Furthermore, we found that the expression of ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (marker of microglia), tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 1 -β in spinal dorsal horn was increased in rats with nucleus pulposus. Therapeutic effect of PP2 may be related to its capacity in reducing the expression of these factors. Conclusions These findings suggested that central sensitization was involved in radicular pain from lumbar disc herniation; src-family kinases-mediated inflammatory response may be responsible for central sensitization and chronic pain after lumbar disc herniation.

  2. Reoperation rate after surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis without spondylolisthesis: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Choon Seon; Choi, Boram; Hahn, Seokyung; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Kun Sei; Park, Byung Joo

    2013-10-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the most common degenerative spine diseases. Surgical options are largely divided into decompression only and decompression with arthrodesis. Recent randomized trials showed that surgery was more effective than nonoperative treatment for carefully selected patients with lumbar stenosis. However, some patients require reoperation because of complications, failure of bony fusion, persistent pain, or progressive degenerative changes, such as adjacent segment disease. In a previous population-based study, the 10-year reoperation rate was 17%, and fusion surgery was performed in 10% of patients. Recently, the lumbar fusion surgery rate has doubled, and a substantial portion of the reoperations are associated with a fusion procedure. With the change in surgical trends, the longitudinal surgical outcomes of these trends need to be reevaluated. To provide the longitudinal reoperation rate after surgery for spinal stenosis and to compare the reoperation rates between decompression and fusion surgeries. Retrospective cohort study using national health insurance data. A cohort of patients who underwent initial surgery for lumbar stenosis without spondylolisthesis in 2003. The primary end point was any type of second lumbar surgery. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to compare the adjusted reoperation rates between decompression and fusion surgeries. A national health insurance database was used to identify a cohort of patients who underwent an initial surgery for lumbar stenosis without spondylolisthesis in 2003; a total of 11,027 patients were selected. Individual patients were followed for at least 5 years through their encrypted unique resident registration number. After adjusting for confounding factors, the reoperation rates for decompression and fusion surgery were compared. Fusion surgery was performed in 20% of patients. The cumulative reoperation rate was 4.7% at 3 months, 7.2% at 1 year, 9.4% at 2 years, 11.2% at

  3. The outcome of decompression alone for lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Hamad, Abdulkader; Bhalla, Amit; Turner, Sarah; Balain, Birender; Jaffray, David

    2017-02-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis in the presence of degenerative spondylolisthesis is generally treated by means of surgery. The role of lumbar decompression without fusion is not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess whether patients who undergo decompression alone have a favourable outcome without the need for a subsequent fusion. This is a prospective cohort study with single blinding of 83 consecutive patients with lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis treated by decompression, without fusion, using a spinous process osteotomy. Blinded observers collected pre- and post-operative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EuroQol Five Dimensions (EQ-5D), and visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain scores prospectively. Failures for this study were those patients who required a subsequent lumbar fusion procedure at the decompressed levels. Statistical analysis was performed using paired t test and Mann-Whitney test. There were 36 males and 47 females with a mean age of 66 years (range 35-82). The mean follow-up was 36 months (range 19-48 months). The mean pre-operative ODI, EQ-5D, and VAS scores were 52 [standard deviation (SD) 18], 0.25 (SD 0.30), and 61 (SD 22), respectively. All mean scores improved post-operatively to 38 (SD 23), 0.54 (SD 0.34) and 36 (SD 27), respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in all scores (p ≤ 0.0001). Nine patients (11 %) required a subsequent fusion procedure and five patients (6 %) required revision decompression surgery alone. Our study's results show that a lumbar decompression procedure without arthrodesis in a consecutive cohort of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis had a significant post-operative improvement in ODI, EQ-5D, and VAS. The rate of post-operative instability and subsequent fusion is not high. Only one in 10 patients in this group ended up needing a subsequent fusion at a mean follow-up of 36 months, indicating that fusion is

  4. Stress myelography. A new functional examination for diseases of the lumbar spinal canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, M.

    1986-12-01

    To optimize functional diagnostics in lumbar syndromes a new myelographic technique was developed termed 'loading myelography'. During the procedure the patient stands with a 10 kg weight on his out-stretched arms. Based on the law of leverage the load exercised on the vertebral column is more than two and a half times of one-half of the body weight. The author tested the efficacy of the method in 119 patients suffering from disc prolapse, spinal canal stenosis, spondylolisthesis or arachnitis. The results of the conventional myelogram compared with myelography under load conditions demonstrate the value of the method: without load the diagnosis would have remained uncertain in 25% and in 18% load myelogram revealed a pathological finding although conventional myelography was normal. We consider as indications for load myelography: Discrepancy between clinical and conventional myelographic findings; clinically expected multisegmental lesions; spinal canal stenosis; and spondylolisthesis.

  5. Development of a modified model of spinal cord ischemia injury by selective ligation of lumbar arteries in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, W; Wen, J; Huang, Y-C; Yu, B-S

    2017-11-01

    Experimental study. The aim of this study is to develop a modified model of spinal cord ischemia in rabbits. Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Spine Surgery, Shenzhen, China. In total, 20 New Zealand rabbits were divided into the following four groups according to the level of ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries: (1) group A, sham group, no ligation, n=5; (2) group B, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at three levels (L2-L4, n=5); (3) group C, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at four levels (L2-L5, n=5); and (4) group D, ligation of bilateral lumbar arteries at five levels (L1-L5, n=5). The latency of motor-evoked potentials was measured intraoperatively and the modified Tarlov grades were scored, followed by a histological observation of spinal cord, on the seventh day after surgery. All 10 rabbits in Group A and Group B were electrophysiologically, neurologically and histologically normal. In Group C, moderate spinal cord ischemia injury was found in three of five rabbits: they had prolonged latency of motor-evoked potentials and neuronal karyopyknosis in the anterior horn of spinal cord, and the average Tarlov score was 4.2±0.8. In Group D, severe spinal cord ischemia injury was recorded in all the five rabbits: the latency of motor-evoked potential prolonged in one rabbit, whereas the waveform disappeared in four rabbits; loss of neurons and vacuolation of gray matter were seen in spinal cord sections, and the average Tarlov score was 0.6±0.9. Selective ligation of lumbar arteries was a modified method to induce feasible and reproducible model of spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

  6. Lumbar scoliosis associated with spinal stenosis in idiopathic and degenerative cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Huec, J C; Cogniet, A; Mazas, S; Faundez, A

    2016-10-01

    Degenerative de novo scoliosis is commonly present in older adult patients. The degenerative process including disc bulging, facet arthritis, and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy contributes to the appearance of symptoms of spinal stenosis. Idiopathic scoliosis has also degenerative changes that can lead to spinal stenosis. The aetiology, prevalence, biomechanics, classification, symptomatology, and treatment of idiopathic and degenerative lumbar scoliosis in association with spinal stenosis are reviewed. Review study is based on a review of pertinent but non-exhaustive literature of the last 20 years in PubMed in English language. Retrospective analysis of studies focused on all parameters concerning scoliosis associated with stenosis. Very few publications have focused specifically on idiopathic scoliosis and stenosis, and this was before the advent of modern segmental instrumentation. On the other hand, many papers were found for degenerative scoliosis and stenosis with treatment methods based on aetiology of spinal canal stenosis and analysis of global sagittal and frontal parameters. Satisfactory clinical results after operative treatment range from 83 to 96 % but with increased percentage of complications. Recent literature analysed the importance of stabilizing or not the spine after decompression in such situation knowing the increasing risk of instability after facet resection. No prospective randomized studies were found to support short instrumentation. Long instrumentation and fusion to prevent distabilization after decompression were always associated with higher complication rates. Imbalance patients with unsatisfactory compensation capacities were at risk of complications. Operative treatment using newly proposed classification system of lumbar scoliosis with associated canal stenosis is useful. Sagittal balance and rotatory dislocation are the main parameters to analyse to determine the length of fusion.

  7. A new lumbar posterior fixation system, the memory metal spinal system: an in-vitro mechanical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Dennis; Firkins, Paul John; Wapstra, Frits H; Veldhuizen, Albert G

    2013-09-18

    Spinal systems that are currently available for correction of spinal deformities or degeneration such as lumbar spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease use components manufactured from stainless steel or titanium and typically comprise two spinal rods with associated connection devices (for example: DePuy Spines Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System). The Memory Metal Spinal System of this study consists of a single square spinal rod made of a nickel titanium alloy (Nitinol) used in conjunction with connecting transverse bridges and pedicle screws made of Ti-alloy. Nitinol is best known for its shape memory effect, but is also characterized by its higher flexibility when compared to either stainless steel or titanium. A higher fusion rate with less degeneration of adjacent segments may result because of the elastic properties of the memory metal. In addition, the use of a single, unilateral rod may be of great value for a TLIF procedure. Our objective is to evaluate the mechanical properties of the new Memory Metal Spinal System compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. An in-vitro mechanical evaluation of the lumbar Memory Metal Spinal System was conducted. The test protocol followed ASTM Standard F1717-96, "Standard Test Methods for Static and Fatigue for Spinal Implant Constructs in a Corpectomy Model." 1. Static axial testing in a load to failure mode in compression bending, 2. Static testing in a load to failure mode in torsion, 3. Cyclical testing to estimate the maximum run out load value at 5.0 x 10^6 cycles. In the biomechanical testing for static axial compression bending there was no statistical difference between the 2% yield strength and the stiffness of the two types of spinal constructs. In axial compression bending fatigue testing, the Memory Metal Spinal System construct showed a 50% increase in fatigue life compared to the Titanium Moss Miami Spinal System. In static torsional testing the Memory Metal Spinal System constructs showed an

  8. Abdominal muscle activation increases lumbar spinal stability: analysis of contributions of different muscle groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Ian A F; Gardner-Morse, Mack G; Henry, Sharon M

    2011-10-01

    Antagonistic activation of abdominal muscles and increased intra-abdominal pressure are associated with both spinal unloading and spinal stabilization. Rehabilitation regimens have been proposed to improve spinal stability via selective recruitment of certain trunk muscle groups. This biomechanical analytical study addressed whether lumbar spinal stability is increased by such selective activation. The biomechanical model included anatomically realistic three-layers of curved abdominal musculature, rectus abdominis and 77 symmetrical pairs of dorsal muscles. The muscle activations were calculated with the model loaded with either flexion, extension, lateral bending or axial rotation moments up to 60 Nm, along with intra-abdominal pressure up to 5 or 10 kPa (37.5 or 75 mm Hg) and partial bodyweight. After solving for muscle forces, a buckling analysis quantified spinal stability. Subsequently, different patterns of muscle activation were studied by forcing activation of selected abdominal muscles to at least 10% or 20% of maximum. Spinal stability increased by an average factor of 1.8 with doubling of intra-abdominal pressure. Forcing at least 10% activation of obliques or transversus abdominis muscles increased stability slightly for efforts other than flexion, but forcing at least 20% activation generally did not produce further increase in stability. Forced activation of rectus abdominis did not increase stability. Based on analytical predictions, the degree of stability was not substantially influenced by selective forcing of muscle activation. This casts doubt on the supposed mechanism of action of specific abdominal muscle exercise regimens that have been proposed for low back pain rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical treatment for lumbar hyperlordosis after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tatsuya; Yonezawa, Ikuho; Onda, Shingo; Yoshikawa, Kei; Takano, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yukitoshi; Okuda, Takatoshi; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    A hyperlordosis deformity of the lumbar spine is relatively rare, and surgical treatment has not been comprehensively addressed. In this case report, we describe the clinical presentation, surgical treatment, and medium-term follow-up of a patient presenting with a progressive lumbar hyperlordosis deformity after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida. The patient was a 20-year-old woman presenting with a progressive hyperlordosis deformity of the lumbar spine associated with significant back pain (visual analog pain score of 89/100 mm), but with no neurological symptoms. The lumbar lordosis (LL), measured on standing lateral view radiographs, was 114°, with a sagittal vertical axis (SVA) of -100 mm. The patient had undergone excision of a lipoma, associated with spina bifida of the lumbar spine, at 7 months of age.She was first evaluated at our hospital at 18 years of age for progressive spinal deformity and lumbago. An in situ fusion, from T5 to S1, using pedicle screws with bone graft obtained from the iliac crest, was performed. Postoperatively, the LL decreased to 93°, and the SVA decreased to -50 mm. The decision to not correct the hyperlordosis deformity fully was intentional. Seven years and 1 month postsurgery, the patient had no limitations in standing and walking and reported a pain score of 8/100 mm; there was no evidence of a loss of correction. Lumbar hyperlordosis after resection of a spinal lipoma associated with spina bifida is rare. Posterior fixation provided an effective treatment in this case. As the lumbar hyperlordosis deformity is often high, correction can be difficult. In this case, although the correction and fusion were performed in situ, there was no progression of either the deformity or the lumbago. Early detection remains an essential component of effective treatment, allowing correction when the spinal deformity is easily reversible.

  10. Comparison of modic changes in the lumbar and cervical spine, in 3167 patients with and without spinal pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sheng-yun

    Full Text Available There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine.Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis.Retrospective clinical survey.Magnetic resonance images (MRIs were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy only; 2. 1023 patients with neck pain/radiculopathy only; 3. 497 patients with concurrent low-back and neck symptoms; 4. 304 asymptomatic subjects with lumbar MRIs; and 5. 120 asymptomatic subjects with cervical MRIs.The prevalence of MCs was higher in those with spinal pain than in those without, both in the lumbar spine (21.0% vs 10.5% and cervical spine (8.8% vs 3.3%. Type II MCs were most common and Type III were least common in all groups. The prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was little affected by the presence of concurrent neck pain, and the same was true for the prevalence of cervical MCs in people with neck pain with or without concurrent back pain. When symptomatic patients were reclassified into two groups (back pain, neck pain, the prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was greater than that of cervical MCs in people with neck pain. The prevalence of lumbar and cervical MCs increased with age, disc degeneration, (descending spinal level, and increased kyphosis.There is a significantly higher prevalence of MCs in patients with back and neck pain. The reported association with increased kyphosis (flat back is novel.

  11. The effect of body mass index on lumbar lordosis on the Mizuho OSI Jackson spinal table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Justin; Hernandez, Tommy; Zhou, Haitao; Chutkan, Norman

    2010-05-01

     Prospective cohort study.  Does the patients' body mass index (BMI) influence the degree of intraoperative lumbar lordosis in patients undergoing operative treatment on the Mizuho Orthopedic Systems Incorporated (OSI) Jackson spinal table?  Twenty-four consecutive patients undergoing posterior spinal instrumentation and fusion on the Jackson table, excluding those with sagittal malalignment, underwent standing preoperative and prone intraoperative lateral x-rays. Intervertebral body angle measurements were obtained from L1-S1 using the modified method of Cobb. Changes in angle measurements were compared to BMI using linear regression and ANOVA.  We found a mean lordosis of 52.6° in standing preoperative x-rays compared to a prone position mean lordosis of 61.5° on the Jackson table. The mean change was 8.88° with a range of 0°-18°. A linear association between lordosis and BMI was demonstrated (P < .0022). As BMI increased, so did lordosis (correlation coefficient, 0.59).  The current study is the first in which a correlation of patient body mass and use of the Jackson table has been evaluated. These data suggest that BMI influences lumbar lordosis on the Jackson table and that care must be used when dealing with a population with large BMI on the Jackson table. [Table: see text] The definiton of the different classes of evidence is available on page 83.

  12. A comparison between MRI and CT in acute spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Tress, B.M.; Hennessy, O.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 0.3T and computed Tomography (CT) were compared in the retrospective evaluation of 34 patients with acute spinal cord injury. MRI was highly accurate in the imaging of vertebral body fracture, and spondylitic changes, and is the method of choice for imaging ligament injury, traumatic disc protrusion and spinal cord compression. It was also useful for the identification of subtle subluxations in the sagittal plane. It is concluded that while CT remains the method of choice for imaging neural arch fractures, MRI at 0.3T is a valid technique for assessing patients with acute spinal trauma. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  13. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

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    Masala, Salvatore, E-mail: salva.masala@tiscali.it [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Tarantino, Umberto [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Nano, Giovanni, E-mail: gionano@gmail.com [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy); Iundusi, Riccardo [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (Italy); Fiori, Roberto, E-mail: fiori.r@libero.it; Da Ros, Valerio, E-mail: valeriodaros@hotmail.com; Simonetti, Giovanni [Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  14. Age-related contrast enhancement study of normal bone marrow in lumbar spinal MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young A; Ha, Doo Hoe

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of contrast enhancement of normal bone marrow in L-spine relating to aging and to determine the range of contrast enhancement in normal bone marrow. We analyzed a total of 120 patients (20 per decade) who had undergone lumbar spinal MRI and who ranged in age from the 2nd decade to more than the 7th. Bone marrow revealed no abnormal pathology. Sagittal T1-weighted spin echo sequences were obtained before and after gadolinium administration. For each sequence, a region of interest was drawn within the L1 vertebral body from the midsagittal slice. Signal intensity (SI) values of each sequence were ascertained and the percentage increase in SI was calculated. After contrast enhancement, lumbar MRI revealed no statistically significant in the percentage increase in SI of normal bone marrow in relation to aging. Most patients (99%) however showed an SI increase of between 10% and 49%. In only four, none of whom were aged over 40, was this increase above 50%. Lumbar MRI, revealed no statistically significant difference in percentage increase in SI in normal bone marrow relating to aging, but when the increase is above 50% in a patient aged over 40, bone marrow pathology should be further investigated

  15. Sparing of descending axons rescues interneuron plasticity in the lumbar cord to allow adaptive learning after thoracic spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Nelson Hansen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the role of spared axons on structural and behavioral neuroplasticity in the lumbar enlargement after a thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI. Previous work has demonstrated that recovery in the presence of spared axons after an incomplete lesion increases behavioral output after a subsequent complete spinal cord transection (TX. This suggests that spared axons direct adaptive changes in below-level neuronal networks of the lumbar cord. In response to spared fibers, we postulate that lumbar neuron networks support behavioral gains by preventing aberrant plasticity. As such, the present study measured histological and functional changes in the isolated lumbar cord after complete TX or incomplete contusion (SCI. To measure functional plasticity in the lumbar cord, we used an established instrumental learning paradigm. In this paradigm, neural circuits within isolated lumbar segments demonstrate learning by an increase in flexion duration that reduces exposure to a noxious leg shock. We employed this model using a proof-of-principle design to evaluate the role of sparing on lumbar learning and plasticity early (7 days or late (42 days after midthoracic SCI in a rodent model. Early after SCI or TX at 7d, spinal learning was unattainable regardless of whether the animal recovered with or without axonal substrate. Failed learning occurred alongside measures of cell soma atrophy and aberrant dendritic spine expression within interneuron populations responsible for sensorimotor integration and learning. Alternatively, exposure of the lumbar cord to a small amount of spared axons for 6 weeks produced near-normal learning late after SCI. This coincided with greater cell soma volume and fewer aberrant dendritic spines on interneurons. Thus, an opportunity to influence activity-based learning in locomotor networks depends on spared axons limiting maladaptive plasticity. Together, this work identifies a time dependent interaction between

  16. Risk factors of adjacent segment disease requiring surgery after lumbar spinal fusion: comparison of posterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Yongdai; Soh, Jae-Wan; Shin, Byung-Joon

    2014-03-01

    A retrospective study. To determine the incidence and risk factors of adjacent segment disease (ASD) requiring surgery among patients previously treated with spinal fusion for degenerative lumbar disease and to compare the survivorship of adjacent segment according to various risk factors including comparison of fusion methods: posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) versus posterolateral fusion (PLF). One of the major issues after lumbar spinal fusion is the development of adjacent segment disease. Biomechanically, PLIF has been reported to be more rigid than PLF, and therefore, patients who undergo PLIF are suspected to experience a higher incidence of ASD than those who underwent PLF. There have been many studies analyzing the risk factors of ASD, but we are not aware of any study comparing PLIF with PLF in incidence of ASD requiring surgery. A consecutive series of 490 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal fusion of 3 or fewer segments to treat degenerative lumbar disease was identified. The mean age at index operation was 53 years, and the mean follow-up period was 51 months (12-236 mo). The number of patients treated by PLF and PLIF were 103 and 387, respectively. The incidence and prevalence of revision surgery for ASD were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. For risk factor analysis, we used log-rank test and Cox regression analysis with fusion methods, sex, age, number of fused segments, and presence of laminectomy adjacent to index fusion. After index spinal fusion, 23 patients (4.7%) had undergone additional surgery for ASD. Kaplan-Meier analysis predicted a disease-free survival rate of adjacent segments in 94.2% of patients at 5 years and 89.6% at 10 years after the index operation. In the analysis of risk factors, PLIF was associated with 3.4 times higher incidence of ASD requiring surgery than PLF (P = 0.037). Patients older than 60 years at the time of index operation were 2.5 times more likely to undergo revision operation than those younger

  17. Percutaneous Decompression of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with a New Interspinous Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masala, Salvatore; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario Alberto; Volpi, Tommaso; Calabria, Eros; Novegno, Federica; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of the implantation of a new interspinous device (Falena) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The clinical outcomes and imaging results were assessed by orthostatic MR during an up to 6-month follow-up period. Methods: Between October 2008 and February 2010, the Falena was implanted at a single level in 26 patients (17 men; mean age, 69 (range, 54–82) years) who were affected by degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. All of the patients were clinically evaluated before the procedure and at 1 and 3 months. Furthermore, 20 patients have completed a 6-month follow-up. Pain was assessed before and after the intervention using the Visual Analogue Scale score and the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire. Orthostatic MR imaging was performed before the implantation and at 3 months to assess the correlation with the clinical outcome. Results: The mean ODI score decreased from 48.9 before the device implantation to 31.2 at 1 month (p < 0.0001). The mean VAS score decreased from 7.6 before to 3.9 (p < 0.0001) at 1 month and 3.6 at 3 months after the procedure (p = 0.0115). These values were stable at 6 months evaluation. No postimplantation major complications were recorded. MRI evaluation documented in most cases an increased size of the spinal canal area. Similarly a bilateral foraminal area improvement was found. The variation of the intervertebral space height measured on the posterior wall was not significant. Conclusions: In our preliminary experience with the Falena in a small cohort of patients, we obtained clinical and imaging results aligned to those reported with similar interspinous devices.

  18. Correlation between the Oswestry Disability Index and objective measurements of walking capacity and performance in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Annette Bennedsgaard; Gustafsson, Malin Eleonora Av Kák

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) plays a significant role in lumbar spinal stenosis research and is used to assess patient's walking limitations. The World Health Organisation describes the constructs of walking capacity and performance and recommend measuring both to fully describe...

  19. Tophaceous Gout in the Lumbar Spinal Canal Mimicking Epidural Spinal Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeshin; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2017-06-01

    Gout is an inflammatory arthritis characterized by deposition of monosodium urate crystals in joints. Though gout frequently involves the big toe or other extremities, it rarely occurs in the spinal canal. A 35-year-old man presented with left L5 radiculopathy. He had leg pain for 8 months and received several epidural steroid injections. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1.7×1.1-cm ovoid contrast-enhancing mass, causing pressure erosion of the left L5 pedicle. Microscopic laminotomy was performed at the left L5 lamina. White chalky materials, identified at the left lateral recess of the spinal canal, were removed in a piecemeal manner. The histopathologic diagnosis was tophaceous gout. Although the patient's radiating pain did not resolve postoperatively, it was dramatically relieved with uric acid-lowering medications. If a mass effect is suspected, surgical removal of gouty tophi might aid in symptom release and definite diagnosis. Medical treatment after rheumatology consultation is crucial.

  20. Perioperative outcomes, complications, and costs associated with lumbar spinal fusion in older patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kevin L; Auerbach, Joshua D; Lau, Edmund; Schmier, Jordana; Ochoa, Jorge A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the perioperative outcomes, complications, and costs associated with posterolateral spinal fusion (PSF) among Medicare enrollees with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and/or spondylolisthesis by using a national Medicare claims database. A 5% systematic sample of Medicare claims data (2005-2009) was used to identify outcomes in patients who had undergone PSF for a diagnosis of LSS and/or spondylolisthesis. Patients eligible for study inclusion also required a minimum of 2 years of follow-up and a claim history of at least 12 months prior to surgery. A final cohort of 1672 patients was eligible for analysis. Approximately half (50.7%) had LSS only, 10.2% had spondylolisthesis only, and 39.1% had both LSS and spondylolisthesis. The average age was 71.4 years, and the average length of stay was 4.6 days. At 3 months and 1 and 2 years postoperatively, the incidence of spine reoperation was 10.9%, 13.3%, and 16.9%, respectively, whereas readmissions for complications occurred in 11.1%, 17.5%, and 24.9% of cases, respectively. At 2 years postoperatively, 36.2% of patients had either undergone spine reoperation and/or received an epidural injection. The average Medicare payment was $36,230 ± $17,020, $46,840 ± $31,350, and $61,610 ± $46,580 at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery, respectively. The data showed that 1 in 6 elderly patients treated with PSF for LSS or spondylolisthesis underwent reoperation on the spine within 2 years of surgery, and nearly 1 in 4 patients was readmitted for a surgery-related complication. These data highlight several potential areas in which improvements may be made in the effective delivery and cost of surgical care for patients with spinal stenosis and spondylolisthesis.

  1. Acute bilateral vitreo-retinal hemorrhages following oxygen-ozone therapy for lumbar disk herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Valdi, Franco; Gismondi, Maurizio; Prosdocimo, Giovanni; de Belvis, Valentina

    2004-07-01

    To describe a case of acute bilateral intraocular hemorrhages occurring after injection of oxygen-ozone (O(2)O(3)) mixture. Observational case report. A 45-year-old woman complained about acute bilateral visual loss after intradiscal and periganglionic injection of gas mixture (O(2)O(3)) for lumbar disk herniation. Detailed ophthalmologic examination; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spinal cord; and neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser membranotomy in the left eye was performed. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a premacular hemorrhage involving the left macula. In the right eye multiple, flat, retinal hemorrhages around the optic disk and the posterior pole were observed. The MRI scan for intracranial hemorrhage was unremarkable. Drainage of the left premacular hemorrhage by pulsed Nd:YAG laser was obtained a few weeks later. Retinal hemorrhages seem to be an uncommon but significant complication of intradiscal O(2)O(3) infiltration, and we suggest that it should be carefully considered when recommending this procedure.

  2. A Diagnostic Algorithm for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Initially Diagnosed as Lumbar Disc Hernia or Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Personal Experience and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kosei; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Kota; Sato, Masaki; Arino, Yusuke; Mikami, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss syndrome) is a rare systemic vasculitis and is difficult to diagnose. EGPA has a number of symptoms including peripheral dysesthesia caused by mononeuropathy multiplex, which is similar to radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis. Therefore, EGPA patients with mononeuropathy multiplex often visit orthopedic clinics, but orthopedic doctors and spine neurosurgeons have limited experience in diagnosing EGPA because of its rarity. We report a consecutive series of patients who were initially diagnosed as having lumbar disc hernia or lumbar spinal stenosis by at least 2 medical institutions from March 2006 to April 2013 but whose final diagnosis was EGPA. All patients had past histories of asthma or eosinophilic pneumonia, and four out of five had peripheral edema. Laboratory data showed abnormally increased eosinophil counts, and nerve conduction studies of all patients revealed axonal damage patterns. All patients recovered from paralysis to a functional level after high-dose steroid treatment. We shortened the duration of diagnosis from 49 days to one day by adopting a diagnostic algorithm after experiencing the first case.

  3. Increased multiaxial lumbar motion responses during multiple-impulse mechanical force manually assisted spinal manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzburg Robert

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulation has been found to create demonstrable segmental and intersegmental spinal motions thought to be biomechanically related to its mechanisms. In the case of impulsive-type instrument device comparisons, significant differences in the force-time characteristics and concomitant motion responses of spinal manipulative instruments have been reported, but studies investigating the response to multiple thrusts (multiple impulse trains have not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to determine multi-axial segmental and intersegmental motion responses of ovine lumbar vertebrae to single impulse and multiple impulse spinal manipulative thrusts (SMTs. Methods Fifteen adolescent Merino sheep were examined. Tri-axial accelerometers were attached to intraosseous pins rigidly fixed to the L1 and L2 lumbar spinous processes under fluoroscopic guidance while the animals were anesthetized. A hand-held electromechanical chiropractic adjusting instrument (Impulse was used to apply single and repeated force impulses (13 total over a 2.5 second time interval at three different force settings (low, medium, and high along the posteroanterior axis of the T12 spinous process. Axial (AX, posteroanterior (PA, and medial-lateral (ML acceleration responses in adjacent segments (L1, L2 were recorded at a rate of 5000 samples per second. Peak-peak segmental accelerations (L1, L2 and intersegmental acceleration transfer (L1–L2 for each axis and each force setting were computed from the acceleration-time recordings. The initial acceleration response for a single thrust and the maximum acceleration response observed during the 12 multiple impulse trains were compared using a paired observations t-test (POTT, alpha = .05. Results Segmental and intersegmental acceleration responses mirrored the peak force magnitude produced by the Impulse Adjusting Instrument. Accelerations were greatest for AX and PA measurement axes. Compared to

  4. A comparative analysis of static balance between patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis and asymptomatic participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Trzaskoma, Zbigniew; Rąpała, Kazimierz; Tarnowski, Adam; Górniak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess static balance in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis who qualified for surgical decompression of associated neural structures and compare them with asymptomatic participants. This case-controlled study evaluated a sample of 50 patients with spinal canal stenosis (stenosis group) and 48 participants with no history of clinical symptoms of back pain. Static balance was assessed by conducting quantitative analysis of balance reaction parameters in quiet standing with the eyes closed. Higher values were observed in total length of center of pressure (COP) path, length of COP path in the anterior-posterior plane, mean amplitude of COP projection in the anterior-posterior plane, maximal amplitude between the 2 most distant points in the anterior-posterior plane, mean COP velocity, and sway area marked by the moving COP in the stenosis group compared with the asymptomatic group. This study showed statistically significant differences in static balance parameters between patients with spinal canal stenosis compared with the asymptomatic group. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gait variability measurements in lumbar spinal stenosis patients: part A. Comparison with healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis, N C; Christakis, D G; Tzagarakis, G N; Chlouverakis, G I; Kampanis, N A; Stergiopoulos, K N; Katonis, P G

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the gait variability of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (experimental group) with healthy individuals (control group). The hypothesis is that the preoperative gait variability of the experimental group is higher than the control group. The experimental group consisted of 35 adults (18 males, 17 females). The subjects of the experimental group suffered exclusively from spinal stenosis. The patients were determined by MRI scans. A tri-axial accelerometer sensor was used for the gait measurement, and differential entropy algorithm was used to quantify the gait acceleration signal. The Oswestry Low Back Pain Questionnaire was used to determine the condition on the day of the measurement. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was utilized to assess the diagnostic value of the method and determine a cut-off value. There is a statistically significant difference between gait variability in the control group and the experimental group. ROC analysis determines a cut-off differential entropy value. The cut-off value has a 97.6% probability of separating patients with spinal stenosis from healthy subjects. The Oswestry Low Back Questionnaire is well correlated with the spectral differential entropy values

  6. Load-bearing evaluation of spinal posterior column by measuring surface strain from lumbar pedicles. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peidong; Zhao, Weidong; Bi, Zhenyu; Wu, Changfu; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the load transfer within spinal posterior column of lumbar spine is necessary to determine the influence of mechanical factors on potential mechanisms of the motion-sparing implant such as artificial intervertebral disc and the dynamic spine stabilization systems. In this study, a new method has been developed for evaluating the load bearing of spinal posterior column by the surface strain of spinal pedicle response to the loading of spinal segment. Six cadaveric lumbar spine segments were biomechanically evaluated between levels L1 and L5 in intact condition and the strain gauges were pasted to an inferior surface of L2 pedicles. Multidirectional flexibility testing used the Panjabi testing protocol; pure moments for the intact condition with overall spinal motion and unconstrained intact moments of ±8 Nm were used for flexion-extension and lateral bending testing. High correlation coefficient (0.967-0.998) indicated a good agreement between the load of spinal segment and the surface strain of pedicle in all loading directions. Principal compressive strain could be observed in flexion direction and tensile strain in extension direction, respectively. In conclusion, the new method seems to be effective for evaluating posterior spinal column loads using pedicles' surface strain data collected during biomechanical testing of spine segments.

  7. Cost Utility Analysis of Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation, Central Spinal Stenosis, and Axial or Discogenic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-05-01

    Cost utility or cost effective analysis continues to take center stage in the United States for defining and measuring the value of treatments in interventional pain management. Appropriate cost utility analysis has been performed for caudal epidural injections, percutaneous adhesiolysis, and spinal cord stimulation. However, the literature pertaining to lumbar interlaminar epidural injections is lacking, specifically in reference to cost utility analysis derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a pragmatic approach in a practical setting. To assess the cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic low back pain. Analysis based on 3 previously published randomized trials of effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections assessing their role in disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic pain. A contemporary, private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation, central spinal stenosis, and discogenic or axial low back pain was conducted with data derived from 3 RCTs that included a 2-year follow-up, with inclusion of 360 patients. The primary outcome was significant improvement defined as at least a 50% in pain reduction and disability status. Direct payment data from 2016 was utilized for assessment of procedural costs. Overall costs, including drug costs, were determined by multiplication of direct procedural payment data by a factor of 1.6 to accommodate for indirect payments respectively for disc herniation, spinal stenosis, discogenic pain. The results of 3 RCTs showed direct cost utility for one year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of $2,050.87 for disc herniation, $2,112.25 for axial or discogenic pain without disc herniation

  8. Association between CT-evaluated lumbar lordosis and features of spinal degeneration, evaluated in supine position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Leonid; Li, Ling; Hunter, David; Been, Ella

    2013-01-01

    Background Context Few studies have directly evaluated the association of lumbar lordosis and segmental wedging of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks with prevalence of spinal degenerative features. Purpose To evaluate the association of CT-evaluated lumbar lordosis, segmental wedging of the vertebral bodies and that of the intervertebral disks with various spinal degeneration features. Study design This cross-sectional study was a nested project to the Framingham Heart Study. Sample A random consecutive subset of 191 participants chosen from the 3590 participants enrolled in the Framingham Heart Study who underwent multi-detector CT to assess aortic calcification. Outcome Measures Physiologic Measures Dichotomous variables indicating the presence of intervertebral disc narrowing, facet joint osteoarthritis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis and density (in Hounsfield units) of multifidus and erector spinae muscles were evaluated on supine CT, as well as the lordosis angle (LA) and the wedging of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disks. Sum of vertebral bodies wedging (ΣB) and sum of intervertebral discs wedging (ΣD) were used in analyses. Methods Mean values (±SD) of LA, ΣB and ΣD were calculated in males and females and compared using the t-test. Mean values (±SD) of LA, ΣB and ΣD in 4 age groups: 0.05) with increasing age. LA showed statistically significant association with presence of spondylolysis (OR(95%CI): 1.08(1.02–1.14)) and with density of multifidus (1.06 (1.01–1.11). as well as a marginally significant association with isthmic spondylolisthesis (1.07(1.00–1.14). ΣB showed a positive association with degenerative spondylolisthesis and disc narrowing ((1.14(1.06–1.23) and 1.04 (1.00–1.08), correspondingly), whereas ΣD showed negative one (0.93(0.87–0.98) and (0.93(0.89–0.97), correspondingly). Conclusions Significant associations were found between lumbar lordosis evaluated in supine position

  9. 1.5-T MR imaging of acute spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M.V.; Kopanicky, D.; McArdle, C.; Cotler, H.; Lee, K.F.; Bondrut, F.; Harris, J.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution surface coil MR imaging was performed in 53 patients with acute spinal trauma. Three types of spinal cord lesions were identified on MR. Cord hemorrhage was seen in approximately 25% of cases. Spinal cord hemorrhage and its subsequent resolution is demonstrated on serial MR images. The most common cord abnormality in acute spinal trauma was cord edema/contusion (61%). The third type of cord injury was probably a combination of the first two types (11%). The various types of cord injuries, their resolution and association with skeletal and ligamentous injury, are demonstrated and correlated with CT findings. Cord injury patterns and neurologic damage and neurological recovery are correlated using Frankel classification

  10. Symptoms of post-traumatic stress following elective lumbar spinal arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisseroth, Kate; Hart, Robert A

    2012-08-15

    A prospective cohort study with 100% follow-up. To assess incidence and risk factors for development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms after elective lumbar arthrodesis. Invasive medical care results in substantial physical and psychological stress to patients. The reported incidence of PTSD after medical care delivery in patients treated for trauma, cancer, and organ transplantation ranges from 5% to 51%. Similar data after elective lumbar spinal arthrodesis have not been reported. A consecutive series of 73 elective lumbar spine arthrodesis patients were evaluated prospectively, using the PTSD checklist-civilian version at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months after surgery. Patient's sex, age, education level, job status, marital status, psychiatric history, prior surgery with general anesthetic, surgical approach, blood loss, postoperative intubation, length of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and occurrence of perioperative complications were analyzed as predictors of PTSD symptoms, using χ analyses. The overall incidence of symptoms of PTSD identified at at least 1 time point was 19.2% (14 of 73). At each time point, the percentage of the population that was positive was 7.5% (6 wk), 11.6% (3 mo), 7.8%, (6 mo), 13.6% (9 mo), and 11.0% (12 mo). The presence of a prior psychiatric diagnosis proved to be the strongest predictor of postarthrodesis symptoms of PTSD (odds ratio [OR] = 7.05, P = 0.002). Occurrence of a complication also proved to be significantly correlated with the development of PTSD symptoms (OR = 4.33, P = 0.04). Age less than 50 years, blood loss of more than 1 L, hospital stay of more than 10 days, and diagnosis trended toward but failed to reach statistical significance. None of the remaining variables approached statistical significance. Positive PTSD symptoms occurred at least once in 19.2% of patients after elective lumbar arthrodesis, with 7.5% to 13.6% of patients experiencing these symptoms at any 1

  11. Gait variability measurements in lumbar spinal stenosis patients: part B. Preoperative versus postoperative gait variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis, N C; Christakis, D G; Tzagarakis, G N; Chlouverakis, G I; Kampanis, N A; Stergiopoulos, K N; Katonis, P G

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the gait variability of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients and to evaluate its postoperative progression. The hypothesis was that LSS patients' preoperative gait variability in the frequency domain was higher than the corresponding postoperative. A tri-axial accelerometer sensor was used for the gait measurement and a spectral differential entropy algorithm was used to measure the gait variability. Twelve subjects with LSS were measured before and after surgery. Preoperative measurements were performed 2 days before surgery. Postoperative measurements were performed 6 and 12 months after surgery. Preoperative gait variability was higher than the corresponding postoperative. Also, in most cases, gait variability appeared to decrease throughout the year

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  13. The relationship between developmental lumbar spinal stenosis and its BMD value : comparison by single energy quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Jin; Kim, Kun Il; Song, Keun Sung [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between developmental lumbar spinal stenosis and its BMD value by using the single energy quantitative CT(SEQCT). Eighty normal volunteers(20-60years) were selected as a control group and 28 patients with developmental lumbar spinal stenosis were selected as a disease group. The two groups were divided into a younger (20-39 years) and an older subgroup (40-60 years), and were further divided into male and female subgroups. All the cases showed no evidence of metabolic disease, fracture, herniated nucleus pulposus, degererative spondylosis, infectious disease, tumors or had no history of absolute immobilization of more than two weeks. All underwent lumbar spine CT and SEQCT. we measured bone mineral density(BMD) at the cancellous bone of L1, 2, 3 and obtained the mean and its one standard deviation, and compared the data between each sub-group of the control and the disease group using ANOVA. There was a significant low BMD value in the younger male patient subgroup compared with the control subgroup(p<0.005). Developmental lumbar spinal stenosis in a young male may be a factor of decreasing BMD of the body of the spine.

  14. Three dimensional analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in individuals with acutely herniated lumbar intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation affects a large number of patients annually and are the most common cause of sciatica. This study was aimed at measuring the spino-pelvic alignment and its relation to the functional limitations in subjects with acutely herniated lumbar disc. Sixteen patients with acute Lumbar Disc Herniation (LDH group) and 16 healthy matched volunteers (healthy group) represented the sample of the study. The patients were recently diagnosed as lumbar disc herniation (L4-5 or L5-S1) with acute sciatica and antalgic posture using magnetic resonance imaging. Spino-pelvic alignment was measured via Rasterstereography. Functional disability among patients was assessed using Oswestry Disability Index Arabic version. Trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic obliquity, pelvic torsion, lordotic and scoliotic angles were significantly different between groups (P ≤ 0.05). A non-significant difference in kyphotic angle was found between the patients and healthy controls. There was no association between the measured postural changes and functional disabilities in patients with lumbar disc herniation (P ≤ 0.05). There are significant postural changes in patients with acutely herniated lumbar disc which has no relation to functional disability. These results support the concept of staying active during acute stage.

  15. Preoperative MRI findings predict two-year postoperative clinical outcome in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Kuittinen

    Full Text Available To study the predictive value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings for the two-year postoperative clinical outcome in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.84 patients (mean age 63±11 years, male 43% with symptoms severe enough to indicate LSS surgery were included in this prospective observational single-center study. Preoperative MRI of the lumbar spine was performed with a 1.5-T unit. The imaging protocol conformed to the requirements of the American College of Radiology for the performance of MRI of the adult spine. Visual and quantitative assessment of MRI was performed by one experienced neuroradiologist. At the two-year postoperative follow-up, functional ability was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI 0-100% and treadmill test (0-1000 m, pain symptoms with the overall Visual Analogue Scale (VAS 0-100 mm, and specific low back pain (LBP and specific leg pain (LP separately with a numeric rating scale from 0-10 (NRS-11. Satisfaction with the surgical outcome was also assessed.Preoperative severe central stenosis predicted postoperatively lower LP, LBP, and VAS when compared in patients with moderate central stenosis (p<0.05. Moreover, severe stenosis predicted higher postoperative satisfaction (p = 0.029. Preoperative scoliosis predicted an impaired outcome in the ODI (p = 0.031 and lowered the walking distance in the treadmill test (p = 0.001. The preoperative finding of only one stenotic level in visual assessment predicted less postoperative LBP when compared with patients having 2 or more stenotic levels (p = 0.026. No significant differences were detected between quantitative measurements and the patient outcome.Routine preoperative lumbar spine MRI can predict the patient outcome in a two-year follow up in patients with LSS surgery. Severe central stenosis and one-level central stenosis are predictors of good outcome. Preoperative finding of scoliosis may indicate worse functional ability.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spinal disorders; A comparison of myelography, discography, and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojiri, Hajime; Matsui, Norio; Fujiyoshi, Fuminori; Izumida, Makoto; Wakita, Sato; Sekiya, Isato (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    In order to evaluate the stenotic condition of lumbar spinal canal, MRI was compared with myelogram and with discogram in 82 patients, all of whom underwent surgical exploration. Pathologic conditions were studied including herniated nucleus pulposus in 36, lumbar canal stenosis (central, peripheral portion, combined) in 35, and spondylisthesis (degenerative, spondylolytic, dysplastic) in 11. Correlation between T2 mid-sagittal image of the thecal sac and profile view of full-column myelogram was very high, but fine parts such as adhesive change or redundancy or anomalous condition of nerve roots were more clearly observed on myelogram than on MRI. And some of them were not detected on MRI. The stage of disc degeneration was classified in 5 grades according to signal intensity and irregularity of the disc on T2-weighted image. The evaluation of disc degeneration was similar to discogram. But MRI will not replace discography for identifying the source of pain in symptomatic patients. Although MRI is the most important imaging modality to diagnostic screening and to post-operative evaluation of the stenotic condition, determination of the strict indication and the method of the operation will need myelogram and/or discogram and so on. (author).

  17. Spinal Implant Density and Postoperative Lumbar Lordosis as Predictors for the Development of Proximal Junctional Kyphosis in Adult Spinal Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Jamal; Smith, Timothy R; Sugrue, Patrick A; Thompson, Sara E; O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Koski, Tyler R

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate spinal implant density and proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) in adult spinal deformity (ASD). Consecutive patients with ASD receiving ≥5 level fusions were retrospectively analyzed between 2007 and 2010. ASD, elective fusions, minimum 2-year follow-up. age Statistical analysis consisted of descriptives (measures of central tendency, dispersion, frequencies), independent Student t tests, χ 2 , analysis of variance, and logistic regression to determine association of implant density [(number of screws + number of hooks)/surgical levels of fusion] and PJK. Mean and median follow-up was 2.8 and 2.7 years, respectively. Eighty-three patients (17 male, 66 female) with a mean age of 59.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3) were analyzed. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 29.5 kg/m 2 (range, 18-56 kg/m 2 ) with mean preoperative Oswestry Disability Index of 48.67 (range, 6-86) and mean preoperative sagittal vertical axis of 8.42. The mean levels fused were 9.95 where 54 surgeries had interbody fusion. PJK prevalence was 21.7%, and pseudoarthrosis was 19.3%. Mean postoperative Oswestry Disability Index was 27.4 (range, 0-74). Independent Student t tests showed that PJK was not significant for age, gender, BMI, rod type, mean postoperative sagittal vertical axis, or Scoliosis Research Society-Schwab ASD classification; but iliac fixation approached significance (P = 0.077). Implant density and postoperative lumbar lordosis (LL) were predictors for PJK (P = 0.018 and 0.045, respectively). Controlling for age, BMI, and gender, postoperative LL (not implant density) continued to show significance in multivariate logistic regression model. PJK, although influenced by a multitude of factors, may be statistically related to implant density and LL. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Association between history and physical examination factors and change in lumbar multifidus muscle thickness after spinal manipulation in patients with low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Fritz, Julie M; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Kawchuk, Greg N; Parent, Eric C; Gill, Norman W; Childs, John D; Teyhen, Deydre S

    2012-10-01

    Understanding the clinical characteristics of patients with low back pain (LBP) who display improved lumbar multifidus (LM) muscle function after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) may provide insight into a potentially synergistic interaction between SMT and exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the baseline historical and physical examination factors associated with increased contracted LM muscle thickness one week after SMT. Eighty-one participants with LBP underwent a baseline physical examination and ultrasound imaging assessment of the LM muscle during submaximal contraction before and one week after SMT. The relationship between baseline examination variables and 1-week change in contracted LM thickness was assessed using correlation analysis and hierarchical multiple linear regression. Four variables best predicted the magnitude of increases in contracted LM muscle thickness after SMT. When combined, these variables suggest that patients with LBP, (1) that are fairly acute, (2) have at least a moderately good prognosis without focal and irritable symptoms, and (3) exhibit signs of spinal instability, may be the best candidates for a combined SMT and lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE) treatment approach. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. [Acute traumatic spinal cord injuries: Epidemiology and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, N; Perrin, F E; Lonjon, M; Fattal, C; Segnarbieux, F; Privat, A; Bauchet, L

    2012-10-01

    Specify the epidemiological data on the acute spinal cord injuries and define a group of patients that could benefit from cellular transplantation therapy designed with the aim of repair and regeneration of damaged spinal cord tissues. Five years monocentric (Gui-de-Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France) retrospective analysis of patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal cord injured-patients, defined as sensory-motor complete, underwent a clinical evaluation following American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) and functional type 2 Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM2) scorings as well as radiological evaluation through spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). One hundred and fifty-seven medical records were reviewed and we selected and re-examined 20 patients with complete thoracic spinal cord lesion. Clinical and radiological evaluations of these patients demonstrated, in 75 % of the cases, an absence of clinical progression after a mean of 49months. Radiological abnormalities were constantly present in the initial (at the admission to hospital) and control (re-evaluation) MRI and no reliable predictive criteria of prognosis had been found. We compare our results to the literature and discuss advantages and limits of cellular transplantation strategies for these patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation in spinal cord injury patients by lumbar puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Ishikawa, Namiko; Omae, Kaoru; Hirai, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Katsunori; Nakano, Norihiko; Nishida, Hidetaka; Nakatani, Toshio; Fukushima, Masanori; Ide, Chizuka

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the safety and feasibility of intrathecal transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells for the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury. Ten patients were included in the study. Approximately 120 ml of bone marrow aspirate was obtained from bilateral iliac bone of patients with spinal cord injury. Isolation of mononuclear cells was performed using Ficoll density-gradient centrifugation. Bone marrow mononuclear cells were transplanted into cerebrospinal fluid by lumbar puncture. Functional tests were performed prior to the cell transplantation and six months after cell transplantation. The patients were carefully observed for up to six months. In 5 patients with AIS A prior to cell transplantation, 1 patient converted to AIS B six months after cell transplantation. In 5 patients with AIS B, 1 patient converted to AIS D and 2 patients to AIS C. MRI did not show any complication. Two patients showed slight anemia after aspiration of bone-marrow cells, which returned to normal level within a several weeks. The results of this study suggest that this method may be safe and feasible.

  2. Characterization of DTI Indices in the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spinal Cord in Healthy Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael L. Bosma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize in vivo measurements of diffusion along the length of the entire healthy spinal cord and to compare DTI indices, including fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD, between cord regions. The objective is to determine whether or not there are significant differences in DTI indices along the cord that must be considered for future applications of characterizing the effects of injury or disease. A cardiac gated, single-shot EPI sequence was used to acquire diffusion-weighted images of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions of the spinal cord in nine neurologically intact subjects (19 to 22 years. For each cord section, FA versus MD values were plotted, and a k-means clustering method was applied to partition the data according to tissue properties. FA and MD values from both white matter (average FA=0.69, average MD=0.93 × 10−3 mm2/s and grey matter (average FA=0.44, average MD=1.8 × 10−3 mm2/s were relatively consistent along the length of the cord.

  3. Association of Lumbar Spondylolisthesis With Low Back Pain and Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in a Population-based Cohort: The Wakayama Spine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Yuyu; Yoshimura, Noriko; Muraki, Shigeyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Nagata, Keiji; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Minamide, Akihito; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Akune, Toru; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-06-01

    Cross-sectional study. To determine the association between lumbar spondylolisthesis and low back pain and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) in a population-based cohort. The basic epidemiology of lumbar spondylolisthesis is not well known. There is little information regarding the association between lumbar spondylolisthesis and clinical symptoms such as low back pain and LSS symptoms. This cross-sectional study included data from 938 participants (308 males, 630 females; mean age, 67.3 years; range, 40-93 years). Lumbar spondylolisthesis was defined as a slip of ≥5%. Diagnostic criteria for symptomatic LSS required the presence of both leg symptoms and radiographic LSS findings on magnetic resonance imaging. The prevalence of low back pain and symptomatic LSS was compared between those with or without spondylolisthesis. Furthermore, we determined the association between the amount of slippage and presence of symptomatic LSS. The prevalence of spondylolisthesis at any level was 15.8% in the total sample, 13.0% in males, and 17.1% in females; the prevalence was not significantly different between males and females (P = 0.09). In both, males and females, symptomatic LSS was related to spondylolisthesis [odds ratio (OR): 2.07; 95% CI: 1.20-3.44]; however, no such association was found for spondylolisthesis and presence of low back pain. The amount of slippage was not related to the presence of symptomatic LSS (P = 0.93). This population-based cohort study revealed that lumbar spondylolisthesis had a closer association with leg symptoms than with low back pain. There was a significant difference in the presence of symptomatic LSS between participants with and without spondylolisthesis. However, the amount of slippage was not related to the presence of symptomatic LSS. 3.

  4. Five-year durability of stand-alone interspinous process decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunley PD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pierce D Nunley,1 Vikas V Patel,2 Douglas G Orndorff,3 William F Lavelle,4 Jon E Block,5 Fred H Geisler6 1Spine Institute of Louisiana, Shreveport, LA, 2The Spine Center, University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, CO, 3Spine Colorado, Mercy Regional Hospital, Durango, CO, 4Upstate Bone and Joint Center, East Syracuse, NY, 5Independent Consultant, San Francisco, CA, 6Independent Consultant, Chicago, IL, USA Background: Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common indication for spine surgery in older adults. Interspinous process decompression (IPD using a stand-alone spacer that functions as an extension blocker offers a minimally invasive treatment option for intermittent neurogenic claudication associated with spinal stenosis.Methods: This study evaluated the 5-year clinical outcomes for IPD (Superion® from a randomized controlled US Food and Drug Administration (FDA noninferiority trial. Outcomes included Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ symptom severity (ss, physical function (pf, and patient satisfaction (ps subdomains, leg and back pain visual analog scale (VAS, and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI.Results: At 5 years, 84% of patients (74 of 88 demonstrated clinical success on at least two of three ZCQ domains. Individual ZCQ domain success rates were 75% (66 of 88, 81% (71 of 88, and 90% (79 of 88 for ZCQss, ZCQpf, and ZCQps, respectively. Leg and back pain success rates were 80% (68 of 85 and 65% (55 of 85, respectively, and the success rate for ODI was 65% (57 of 88. Percentage improvements over baseline were 42%, 39%, 75%, 66%, and 58% for ZCQss, ZCQpf, leg and back pain VAS, and ODI, respectively (all P<0.001. Within-group effect sizes were classified as very large for four of five clinical outcomes (ie, >1.0; all P<0.0001. Seventy-five percent of IPD patients were free from reoperation, revision, or supplemental fixation at their index level at 5 years.Conclusion: After 5 years of follow-up, IPD with a stand-alone spacer provides

  5. Clinical and radiological characteristics of concomitant peripheral arterial obstructive disease in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Hwan; Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Choo, Ho-Sik; Chung, Nam-Su

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a typical symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAD). Because both LSS and PAD are predominantly associated with degenerative conditions, concomitant conditions are not uncommon. However, few reports of the demographic, clinical, and radiological characteristics of concomitant LSS and PAD (LSSPAD) have been published. To identify the demographic, clinical, and radiological risk factors for concomitant PAD in LSS. A retrospective matched-control study. This study involved a retrospective cohort of 43 consecutive patients with LSSPAD and a control cohort of 45 age- and gender-matched patients diagnosed with LSS without PAD. Each patient in both groups underwent plain lumbar radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. Demographic and clinical parameters were obtained. The abdominal aorta calcification score (AACS) was evaluated on the lateral lumbar radiographs. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the lower limb was performed to confirm PAD. The mean age of the LSSPAD group was 67.7 ± 10.7 years (52 - 88 years). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) was significantly higher in the LSSPAD group than in the LSS group (P = 0.022). The mean ABI was 0.71 ± 0.22 (0.32 - 0.91) for the LSSPAD group and 0.96 ± 0.18 (0.83 - 1.10) for LSS group (P < 0.001). The prevalence of aortic calcification was significantly higher in the LSSPAD group than in the LSS group (P < 0.001). The mean AACS was 10.2 ± 3.2 (2 - 18) for the LSSPAD group and 3.4 ± 4.1 (0 - 14) for the LSS group (P < 0.001). Retrospective design. We found that concomitant PAD in patients with LSS is associated with old age, DM, the presence of aortic calcification, and ABI < 0.9. When these risk factors exist, further work up is needed to exclude the concomitant PAD.

  6. Transforaminal endoscopic decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: A novel surgical technique and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Ha; Bae, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sang-Ho; Keum, Han-Joong; Kim, Ho-Jin; Jang, Won-Seok

    2018-03-23

    Transforaminal endoscopic treatment has been reported to be an effective treatment option in patients with lumbar disc herniation. However, it is rarely performed for spinal stenosis because of the limitation of endoscopic working mobility due to the exiting nerve root and foraminous bony structure. The objective of the present study was to describe a novel transforaminal endoscopic decompression technique for spinal stenosis and report the clinical results. From October 2015 to October 2016, 30 consecutive cases were diagnosed as lateral recess stenosis in our institution and underwent transforaminal endoscopic decompression. The visual analog scales(VAS) of back and leg pain and the Oswestry disability index were measured preoperatively and at the follow-up RESULTS: The mean±standard deviation value of the preoperative VAS score for leg pain was 7.6±1.17. The score improved to 2.2±1.11 at 1 week postoperatively, 1.73±0.96 at 4 weeks postoperatively, and 1.63±0.95 at 26 weeks postoperatively (Pvalue of the preoperative ODI was 65.69±14.22. The score improved to 24.29±11.89 at 1 week postoperatively, 21.25±9.25 at 4 weeks postoperatively, and 15.62±10.49 at 26 weeks postoperatively (P<0.01). There were no patients with postoperative infection, dural tear, delayed neurological deterioration, or conversion to open surgery. Transforaminal endoscopic decompression under the local anesthesia could be an effective treatment method for the selected group of patients with spinal stenosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An investigation of the value of tridimensional kinematic analysis in functional diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbelotti, Silvio Antonio; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Ramalho, Amâncio; de Godoy, Wagner; Bernal, Milena; D'Andréa Greve, Julia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is based on clinical examination and imaging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 3D gait analysis as a tool in the differential diagnosis of LSS. Fourteen patients participated in the study that consisted of three phases: (1) capture six gait cycles after rest, (2) walk on a treadmill for a maximum of 20 min, (3) capture six gait cycles after effort. From these data, the kinematic variables were compared with the perception of pain and the cross sectional area of the spinal canal as measured by magnetic resonance. Most of correlations were weak and showed that the most significant results are reported by the Gait Deviation Index (GDI). The Gait Deviation Index demonstrated moderate negative correlation with the perception of pain after effort was made by both limbs. This means that there is a significant decrease in the overall function of the lower limbs according to the increase in pain symptoms. This situation may be reflected in decreased cadence and speed beyond the times of single support for the left limb, and the balance of the right limb, as part of a strategy to protect against pain and imbalance. We found no correlation between gait and pain in the cross-sectional area of the spinal canal. Therefore, we believe that there is no advantage for the patient to make a 3-D gait analysis because the analysis does not add relevant information to clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Spinal tuberculosis of the lumbar spine after percutaneous vertebral augmentation (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ming-Xiang; Wang, Xiao-Bin; Li, Jing; Lv, Guo-Hua; Deng, You-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Spinal tuberculosis occurring after percutaneous vertebral augmentation has rarely been described. To date, only two such cases have been documented in the literature. Vertebral augmentation may reactivate a quiescent tuberculous lesion and promote the infective process in elderly patients with or without immunosuppression, thereby resulting in poor outcomes. The purposes of this study were to present two cases in which spinal tuberculosis occurred after vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, to highlight the clinical features and need for early diagnosis of this pathology, and to postulate probable reasons for this association. This study is based on a clinical case series and literature review. In this report, we review the clinical histories of two old women undergoing vertebral augmentation with subsequent spinal tuberculosis. The first patient responded favorably to conservative treatment with multidrug antitubercular therapy and spinal braces. The second patient underwent surgical debridement through a posterior approach alone, without instrumentation, combined with adjuvant chemotherapy. By 1 year after treatment, both patients had experienced almost complete recovery and continued to be seen for follow-up visits. Suspicion should be high, and magnetic resonance imaging is warranted in cases with deteriorating clinical symptoms and signs of acute infection after vertebral augmentation. We propose obtaining exhaustive microbiologic and histologic evidence via needle biopsy or open surgery in a timely fashion to establish an accurate diagnosis because tubercular spondylitis occurring in such a situation may progress rapidly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Age-related loss of lumbar spinal lordosis and mobility--a study of 323 asymptomatic volunteers.

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    Marcel Dreischarf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The understanding of the individual shape and mobility of the lumbar spine are key factors for the prevention and treatment of low back pain. The influence of age and sex on the total lumbar lordosis and the range of motion as well as on different lumbar sub-regions (lower, middle and upper lordosis in asymptomatic subjects still merits discussion, since it is essential for patient-specific treatment and evidence-based distinction between painful degenerative pathologies and asymptomatic aging. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A novel non-invasive measuring system was used to assess the total and local lumbar shape and its mobility of 323 asymptomatic volunteers (age: 20-75 yrs; BMI 50 yrs compared to the youngest age cohort (20-29 yrs. Locally, these decreases mostly occurred in the middle part of the lordosis and less towards the lumbo-sacral and thoraco-lumbar transitions. The sex only affected the RoE. CONCLUSIONS: During aging, the lower lumbar spine retains its lordosis and mobility, whereas the middle part flattens and becomes less mobile. These findings lay the ground for a better understanding of the incidence of level- and age-dependent spinal disorders, and may have important implications for the clinical long-term success of different surgical interventions.

  10. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part I: Biology of spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C; Chen, M I

    1995-12-15

    The histology of lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion was studied in an experimental model in rabbits. To qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the sequential histology of spinal fusion using a previously validated animal model. Few previous studies have described the sequential histology during the posterolateral spinal fusion healing process using autogenous bone, and a basic understanding of the biology of this repair process is lacking. Fourteen adult New Zealand white rabbits underwent single-level posterolateral lumbar intertransverse process arthrodesis with autogenous iliac bone graft. Animals were killed 1-10 weeks after surgery, and the fusion masses were analyzed histologically and quantitated using a semiautomated image analysis system. Three distinct phases of healing were identified (inflammatory, reparative, and remodeling) and occurred in sequence but in a delayed fashion in the central zone of the fusion mass compared with the outer transverse process zones. Membraneous bone formation, evident first at the ends of the fusion eminating from the decorticated transverse processes, was the predominant mechanism of healing. The central zone was somewhat different in that there was a period of endochondral bone formation during weeks 3 and 4 in this zone where cartilage formed and was converted to bone. Remodeling in the central zone had equilibrated with the transverse process zones by 10 weeks. Lumbar intertransverse process spinal fusion is a complex process from a spatial and temporal standpoint. When autogenous bone is used as the graft material, this process critically depends on a variety of factors from the decorticated host bone and exposed marrow. The persistence of a central cartilage zone may be related to some types of nonunions and deserves future investigation. This enhanced understanding of the biology of spinal fusion with autogenous bone graft will provide a foundation for optimizing the use of osteoinductive bone growth

  11. Long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurra, Swamy; Lavelle, William F; Silverstein, Michael P; Savage, Jason W; Orr, R Douglas

    2017-11-22

    Patients with spinal deformity may present with complaints related to either the deformity itself or the manifestations of the coexisting spinal stenosis. There are reports of successful management of lumbar pathology in the absence of global sagittal or coronal imbalance, with limited decompression and fusion, addressing only the symptomatic segment. Our study examined the long-term outcomes of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), a less extensive procedure, based on the experience of the senior author over the past 10 years. This was a retrospective study of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and spinal deformity managed by one surgeon at The Cleveland Clinic since 2003. Forty-one patients were included in the study. The present study measures the long-term clinical functional outcomes of these patients through EQ-5D (EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire), PHQ-9 (Patient Health Questionnaire), and PDQ (Pain Disability Questionnaire) forms, along with documented radiographic parameters and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). There were no funding or potential conflicts of interest associated biases in the present study. Patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis with neutral global alignment in the sagittal and coronal planes and symptomatic stenosis at the deformity level were treated by limited fusion and TLIF, and had a follow-up period of at least 5 years. Excluded were patients under 18 years of age, had more than three levels of fusion, and had an active spinal malignancy or recent spinal trauma. The grouping variables were curve magnitude, revision surgeries, and TLIF levels. Clinical outcomes were compared in all the grouping variables. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-square tests were utilized; pfusion, in the setting of modest spinal deformity, is a reasonable and safe option. Further study on the concept of short segment fusions in the growing patient population is required as more comprehensive fusions do have noted complication

  12. medical management of suspected serious acute spinal cord ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paraplegia – complete loss of motor (power) function in the lower limbs, i.e. ... per and lower limbs. • Thoracic – torso. CLINICAL REVIEW. BokSmart: medical management of suspected serious acute spinal cord injuries in rugby players. Abstract ..... a double-strength mixture, i.e. 8 amps adrenalin in 200 ml normal saline at ...

  13. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Austin

    Full Text Available Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated primarily by functional changes in the lumbar dorsal horn, however, whether lumbar spinal changes may drive different affective-motivational states has never been considered. In these studies, we used microarrays to identify the unique transcriptomes of rats with altered social behaviours following sciatic CCI to determine whether specific patterns of lumbar spinal adaptations characterised this subgroup. Rats underwent CCI and on the basis of reductions in dominance behaviour in resident-intruder social interactions were categorised as having Pain & Disability, Pain & Transient Disability or Pain alone. We examined the lumbar spinal transcriptomes two and six days after CCI. Fifty-four 'disability-specific' genes were identified. Sixty-five percent were unique to Pain & Disability rats, two-thirds of which were associated with neurotransmission, inflammation and/or cellular stress. In contrast, 40% of genes differentially regulated in rats without disabilities were involved with more general homeostatic processes (cellular

  14. Prognosis and adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion surgery for destructive spondyloarthropathy in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Moriyama, Tokuhide; Tachibana, Toshiya; Inoue, Shinichi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Kusuyama, Kazuki; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar destructive spondyloarthropathy (DSA) is a serious complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. There have not been many reports regarding the surgical management for lumbar DSA. In addition, the adjacent segment pathology after lumbar fusion surgery for DSA is unclear. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical outcome and occurrence of adjacent segmental disease (ASD) after lumbar instrumented fusion surgery for DSA in long-term hemodialysis patients. A consecutive series of 36 long-term hemodialysis patients who underwent lumbar instrumented fusion surgery for DSA were included in this study. The mean age at surgery was 65 years. The mean follow-up period was 4 years. Symptomatic ASD was defined as symptomatic spinal stenosis or back pain with radiographic ASD. The Japanese Orthopedic Association score (JOA score), recovery rate (Hirabayashi method), complications, and reoperation were reviewed. The mean JOA score significantly increased from 13.5 before surgery to 21.3 at the final follow-up. The mean recovery rate was 51.4%. Six of the 36 patients died within 1 year after index surgery. One patient died due to perioperative complication. Symptomatic ASD occurred in 43% (13 of 30) of the cases. Of these 13 cases, 5 had adjacent segment disc degeneration and 8 had adjacent segment spinal stenosis. Three cases (10%) required reoperation due to proximal ASD. Multi-level fusion surgery increased the risk of ASD compared with single-level fusion surgery (59% vs. 23%). The recovery rate was significantly lower in the ASD group than the non-ASD group (38% vs. 61%). This study demonstrated that symptomatic ASD occurred in 43% of patients after surgery for lumbar DSA. A high mortality rate and complication rate were observed in long-term hemodialysis patients. Therefore, care should be taken for preoperative planning for surgical management of DSA. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  15. The sacral networks and neural pathways used to elicit lumbar motor rhythm in the rodent spinal cord

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    Meir eCherniak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of neural networks and pathways involved in activation and modulation of spinal central pattern generators (CPGs in the absence of the descending control from the brain is important for further understanding of neural control of movement and for developing innovative therapeutic approaches to improve the mobility of spinal cord injury patients. Activation of the hindlimb innervating segments by sacrocaudal afferent input and by specific application of neurochemicals to the sacral networks is feasible in the isolated spinal cord preparation of the newborn rat. Here we review our recent studies of sacral relay neurons with lumbar projections and evaluate their role in linking the sacral and thoracolumbar networks during different motor behaviors. Our major findings show that: 1 Heterogeneous groups of dorsal, intermediate and ventral sacral-neurons with ventral and lateral ascending funicular projections mediate the activation of the locomotor central pattern generators through sacral sensory input, and 2 Rhythmic excitation of lumbar flexor motoneurons, produced by bath application of alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists to the sacral segments is mediated exclusively by ventral clusters of sacral-neurons with lumbar projections through the ventral funiculus.

  16. Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    1991). Review of the secondary injury theory of acute spinal cord trauma with emphasis on vascular mechanisms. J. Neurosurg 75, 15-26. 2...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0194 TITLE: Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...individuals who sustain an acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment options include urgent surgical decompression to relieve pressure on the spinal

  17. Incidence and predictive factors of spinal cord stimulation treatment after lumbar spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakkala M

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Merja Vakkala,1 Voitto Järvimäki,1 Hannu Kautiainen,2,3 Maija Haanpää,4,5 Seppo Alahuhta1 1Department of Anaesthesiology, Medical Research Center Oulu (MRC Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, 2Primary Health Care Unit, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, 3Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki University Hospital, 5Mutual Insurance Company Etera, Helsinki, Finland Introduction: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS is recommended for the treatment of postsurgical chronic back and leg pain refractory to other treatments. We wanted to estimate the incidence and predictive factors of SCS treatment in our lumbar surgery cohort.Patients and methods: Three questionnaires (a self-made questionnaire, the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory were sent to patients aged 18–65 years with no contraindications for the use of SCS, and who had undergone non-traumatic lumbar spine surgery in the Oulu University Hospital between June 2005 and May 2008. Patients who had a daily pain intensity of ≥5/10 with predominant radicular component were interviewed by telephone.Results: After exclusions, 814 patients remained in this cohort. Of those, 21 patients had received SCS by the end of June 2015. Fifteen (71% of these received benefit and continued with the treatment. Complications were rare. The number of patients who replied to the postal survey were 537 (66%. Eleven of them had undergone SCS treatment after their reply. Features predicting SCS implantation were daily or continuous pain, higher intensities of pain with predominant radicular pain, more severe pain-related functional disability, a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms, and reduced benefit from pain medication. The mean waiting time was 65 months (26–93 months. One hundred patients were interviewed by telephone. Fourteen seemed to be potential SCS candidates. From the eleven patients who

  18. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of 18F-fluoride PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van; Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn

    2015-01-01

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of 18 F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after 18 F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) 18 F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following 18 F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, 18 F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest Oswestry Disability Index

  19. Pseudarthrosis after lumbar spinal fusion: the role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Marloes; Willems, Paul; Jutten, Liesbeth; Arts, Chris; Rhijn, Lodewijk van [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Weijers, Rene; Wierts, Roel; Urbach, Christian; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Radiology /Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Painful pseudarthrosis is one of the most important indications for (revision) surgery after spinal fusion procedures. If pseudarthrosis is the source of recurrent pain it may require revision surgery. It is therefore of great clinical importance to ascertain if it is the source of such pain. The correlation between findings on conventional imaging (plain radiography and CT) and clinical well-being has been shown to be moderate. The goal of this study was to determine the possible role of {sup 18}F-fluoride PET in patients after lumbar spinal interbody fusion by investigating the relationship between PET/CT findings and clinical function and pain. A cohort of 36 patients was retrospectively included in the study after {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT for either persistent or recurrent low back pain (18 patients) or during routine postoperative investigation (18 patients) between 9 and 76 months and 11 and 14 months after posterior lumbar interbody fusion, respectively. Sixty minutes after intravenous injection of 156 - 263 MBq (mean 199 MBq, median 196 MBq) {sup 18}F-fluoride, PET and CT images were acquired using an integrated PET/CT scanner, followed by a diagnostic CT scan. Two observers independently scored the images. The number of bony bridges between vertebrae was scored on the CT images to quantify interbody fusion (0, 1 or 2). Vertebral endplate and intervertebral disc space uptake were evaluated visually as well as semiquantitatively following {sup 18}F-fluoride PET. Findings on PET and CT were correlated with clinical wellbeing as measured by validated questionnaires concerning general daily functioning (Oswestry Disability Index), pain (visual analogue scale) and general health status (EuroQol). Patients were divided into three categories based on these questionnaire scores. No correlation was found between symptom severity and fusion status. However, {sup 18}F-fluoride activity in the vertebral endplates was significantly higher in patients in the lowest

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of the X-Stop device for surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zongmiao; Wang, Shaobai; Kozánek, Michal; Passias, Peter G; Mansfield, Frederick L; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan

    2012-10-01

    Controlled experimental study. To evaluate the kinematical effects of X-Stop device on the spinal process at the operated and the adjacent segments before and after X-Stop surgeries during various weight-bearing postures in elderly patients with lumbar spine stenosis. The mechanism of interspinous process (ISP) devices is to directly distract the ISP of the implanted level to indirectly decompress the intervertebra foramen and spinal canal. Few studies have investigated the changes of ISP gap caused by X-Stop implantation using magnetic resonance imaging or radiography, but the effect of X-Stop surgery on the kinematics of spinous processes during functional activities is still unclear. Eight patients were tested before and, on average, 7 months after surgical implantation of the X-Stop devices using a combined computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging system during weight-bearing standing, flexion-extension, left-right bending, and left-right twisting positions of the torso. The shortest distances of the ISPs at the operated and the adjacent levels were measured using iterative closest point method and was dissected into vertical (gap) and horizontal (lateral translation) components. At the operated levels, the shortest vertical ISP distances (gap) significantly (P0.05) in right twist, left bend, and right bend after the X-Stop implantation. The lateral translations were not significantly affected. At both cephalad and caudad adjacent levels, the ISP distances (vertical and horizontal) were not significantly affected during all postures after X-Stop implantation. The findings of this study indicate that implantation of the X-Stop devices can effectively distract the ISP space at the diseased level without causing apparent kinematic changes at the adjacent segments during the studied postures.

  1. Association of walking speed with sagittal spinal alignment, muscle thickness, and echo intensity of lumbar back muscles in middle-aged and elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Mitsuhiro; Ikezoe, Tome; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Minami, Seigo; Aoyama, Junichi; Ibuki, Satoko; Kimura, Misaka; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2016-06-01

    Age-related change of spinal alignment in the standing position is known to be associated with decreases in walking speed, and alteration in muscle quantity (i.e., muscle mass) and muscle quality (i.e., increases in the amount of intramuscular non-contractile tissue) of lumbar back muscles. Additionally, the lumbar lordosis angle in the standing position is associated with walking speed, independent of lower-extremity muscle strength, in elderly individuals. However, it is unclear whether spinal alignment in the standing position is associated with walking speed in the elderly, independent of trunk muscle quantity and quality. The present study investigated the association of usual and maximum walking speed with age, sagittal spinal alignment in the standing position, muscle quantity measured as thickness, and quality measured as echo intensity of lumbar muscles in 35 middle-aged and elderly women. Sagittal spinal alignment in the standing position (thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and sacral anterior inclination angle) using a spinal mouse, and muscle thickness and echo intensity of the lumbar muscles (erector spinae, psoas major, and lumbar multifidus) using an ultrasound imaging device were also measured. Stepwise regression analysis showed that only age was a significant determinant of usual walking speed. The thickness of the lumbar erector spinae muscle was a significant, independent determinant of maximal walking speed. The results of this study suggest that a decrease in maximal walking speed is associated with the decrease in lumbar erector spinae muscles thickness rather than spinal alignment in the standing position in middle-aged and elderly women.

  2. The Associations Between Physical Therapy and Long-Term Outcomes for Individuals with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in the SPORT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M.; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Whitman, Julie M.; Delitto, Anthony; Brennan, Gerard P.; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context A period of non-surgical management is advocated prior to surgical treatment for most patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Currently, little evidence is available to define optimal non-surgical management. Physical therapy is often used, however its use and effectiveness relative to other non-surgical strategies has not been adequately explored. Purpose Describe the utilization of physical therapy and other non-surgical interventions by patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and examine the relationship between physical therapy and long-term prognosis. Study Design Secondary analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) combining data from randomized and observational studies. Setting 13 spine clinics in 11 states in the United States. Patient Sample Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis receiving non-surgical management including those who did or did not receive physical therapy within 6 weeks of enrollment. Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures included cross-over to surgery, the bodily pain and physical function scales changes from the Survey Short Form 36 (SF-36), and the modified Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were patient satisfaction and the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index. Methods Baseline characteristics and rates of cross-over to surgery were compared between patients who did or did not receive physical therapy. Baseline factors predictive of receiving physical therapy were examined with logistic regression. Mixed effects models were used to compare outcomes between groups at 3 and 6 months, and 1 year after enrollment adjusted for baseline severity and patient characteristics. Results Physical therapy was used in the first 6 weeks by 90 of 244 patients (37%) and was predicted by the absence of radiating pain and being single instead of married. Physical therapy was associated with a reduced likelihood of cross-over to surgery after 1 year (21% vs 33%, p=0.045), and greater reductions on the SF-36

  3. Nocturnal Cramps in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis Treated Conservatively: A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Kapoor, Kulwant Singh

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study with questionnaire. Purpose To compare the treatment outcome of nocturnal leg cramps in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) patients on conservative treatment with historical surgical cohorts and to determine the sensitivity and specificity as well as positive predictive value and negative predictive value of knee flexion test suggested for LSCS patient. Overview of Literature True prevalence of nocturnal leg cramps in LSCS patients as well as the clinical outcome of its surgical treatment have been reported. Methods A questionnaire suggested from previous study with minor modifications was used in this study. Clinical data was collected. Knee flexion test was performed in two groups. Results The prevalence of nocturnal leg cramp was higher in the LSCS group compared to the control group (second group). In LSCS patients, 38 (88%) had improved leg cramps after the conservative treatment, 3 (6.97%) remained unchanged, and 2 (4.6%) had worsened leg cramps. Of the 43 patients, 21 (48.8%) had no disturbance to their activities of daily living. In the LSCS group, the sensitivity and specificity of the knee flexion test was 53.5% and 33.3%, respectively. The knee flexion test in the LSCS group had a positive predictive value and a negative predictive value of 65.71% and 23.1%, respectively. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that nocturnal leg cramps were significantly more frequent in LSCS patients than in the control group. PMID:25346815

  4. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with cages and local bone graft in the treatment of spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouillier, Hans; Birkenmaier, Christof; Rauch, Alexander; Weiler, Christoph; Kauschke, Thomas; Refior, Hans Jürgen

    2006-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) implants are increasingly being used for 360 degrees fusion after decompression of lumbar spinal stenosis combined with degenerative instability. Both titanium and PEEK (PolyEtherEtherKetone) implants are commonly used. Assessing the clinical and radiological results as well as typical complications, such as migration of the cages, is important. In addition, questions such as which radiological parameters can be used to assess successful fusion, and whether the exclusive use of local bone graft is sufficient, are frequently debated. We prospectively evaluated 30 patients after PLIF instrumentation for degenerative lumbar spinal canal stenosis, over a course of 42 months. In all cases, titanium cages and local bone graft were used for spondylodesis. The follow-up protocol of these 30 cases included standardised clinical and radiological evaluation at 3, 6, 12 and 42 months after surgery. Overall satisfactory results were achieved. With one exception, a stable result was achieved with restoration of the intervertebral space in the anterior column. After 42 months of follow-up in most cases, a radiologically visible loss of disc space height can be demonstrated. Clinically relevant migration of the cage in the dorsal direction was detected in one case. Based on our experience, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) can be recommended for the treatment of monosegmental and bisegmental spinal stenosis, with or without segmental instability. Postoperative evaluation is mainly based on clinical parameters since the titanium implant affects the diagnostic value of imaging studies and is responsible for artefacts. The results observed in our group of patients suggest that local autologous bone graft procured from the posterior elements after decompression is an adequate material for bone grafting in this procedure.

  5. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation.

  6. Muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique for treating long segmental lumbar spinal stenosis: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yang; De Cheng, Wang; Wei, Wang Zong; Hui, Li

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel surgical technique with the traditional median approach.In the Orthopedics Department of Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine Hospital, Tongzhou District, Beijing, 68 cases of lumbar spinal canal stenosis underwent surgery using the muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique and a median approach between September 2013 and February 2016. Both approaches adopted lumbar spinal canal decompression, intervertebral disk removal, cage implantation, and pedicle screw fixation. The operation time, bleeding volume, postoperative drainage volume, and preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score and Japanese Orthopedics Association score (JOA) were compared between the 2 groups.All patients were followed up for more than 1 year. No significant difference between the 2 groups was found with respect to age, gender, surgical segments. No diversity was noted in the operation time, intraoperative bleeding volume, preoperative and 1 month after the operation VAS score, preoperative and 1 month after the operation JOA score, and 6 months after the operation JOA score between 2 groups (P > .05). The amount of postoperative wound drainage (260.90 ± 160 mL vs 447.80 ± 183.60 mL, P gap approach group than in the median approach group (P gap approach under a minimally invasive channel group, the average drainage volume was reduced by 187 mL, and the average VAS score 6 months after the operation was reduced by an average of 0.48.The muscle gap approach under a minimally invasive channel technique is a feasible method to treat long segmental lumbar spinal canal stenosis. It retains the integrity of the posterior spine complex to the greatest extent, so as to reduce the adjacent spinal segmental degeneration and soft tissue trauma. Satisfactory short-term and long-term clinical results were obtained.

  7. The paravertebral muscle and psoas for the maintenance of global spinal alignment in patient with degenerative lumbar scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Mitsuru; Hosogane, Naobumi; Watanabe, Kota; Asazuma, Takashi; Matsumoto, Morio

    2016-04-01

    Various factors are reported to affect the spinal alignment in degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS). Although trunk muscles also appear to affect spinal alignment, the role of the trunk muscles is not yet clear. The aim was to elucidate the role of the multifidus (MF) and psoas (PS) in maintaining global spinal alignment in patients with DLS. This was a multicenter retrospective matched cohort study. Surgically treated 60 paired DLS and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) female (120 patients), matched for age and body mass index (BMI; DLS age 68.0±6.8 vs. LSS 67.1±8.9 years; BMI 21.6±3.3 vs. 23.2±3.8 kg/m(2)), were included and were followed for at least 2 years. Spinal alignment, muscle area, and volume were measured from radiographs, magnetic resonance images (MRIs), and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans. Muscle strength was measured by grip power and peak expiratory flow (PEF). As a surrogate of muscle area, we obtained the cross-sectional area (CSA) at the L5-S level from preoperative MRIs. The MF and PS CSAs were significantly smaller in the DLS group than in the LSS group (MF 477.7±192.5 vs. 779.8±248.6 mm(2), pstrength or PEF tests between the groups. Correlation coefficient tests showed moderate correlations between the MF average CSA (avCSA) and global spinal alignment and spinopelvic alignment (pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis; R=-0.37, -0.38) in the DLS group. The MF avCSA was correlated with the postoperative progression of kyphosis at the unfused thoracic vertebrae in the DLS group (R=0.34). The CSAs of the MF and PS were significantly smaller in the DLS group. Whole-body DXA showed no significant difference in the lean composition between the groups. There were significant correlations in the DLS patients between the MF CSA and sagittal spinal alignment. These findings suggest the causal relationship between muscles and global spine alignment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lumbar puncture in acute admissions to an adult medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspected multiple sclerosis - very rare in. Africa. Methods. From January t6 June 1986, 1,908 patients were admitted to the adult medical wards,. Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe. Lumbar puncture was considered necessary in 15 I, patients because of a clinical suspicion' of meningitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage. A.

  9. [Acute rhabdomyolysis after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, P M; Chavagnac, B; Cognet, V; Banssillon, V

    2001-08-01

    We report an observation of acute rhabdomyolysis of gluteus maximum muscles occurring in a non-obese patient installed in supine position that underwent knee arthroscopy under spinal anaesthesia. The patient had insulin-dependent diabetes melitus with documented microangiopathy. The interest of this observation resides in the occurrence of the syndrome after a short period of time (one hour) of installation in the supine position in a patient that did not have any of the generally described risk factors of rhabdomyolysis.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, S.; Nakamura, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, I.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury is described. The traumatized cord segment was clearly shown as a hyperintensity in a T2-weighted image whereas it appeared as an isointensity in a moderately T1-weighted image. This different sensitivity may result from parenchymal hemorrhagic tissue and edematous changes due to direct trauma. Hyperintense tissue was also seen in the retro-pharyngeal and -tracheal spaces. (orig.)

  11. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  12. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelmers, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new.

  13. Excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes, aseptic meningitis and acute mental symptoms, following metrizamide lumbar myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelmers, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    A clinical constellation of excacerbation of systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE), together with aseptic meningitis, and acutre mental symptoms occurred following lumbar myelography with metrizamide. Excacerbation of SLE has not been previously described following myelography with any contrast agent. Meningeal reactions and acute mental symptoms have been reported earlier, but this clinical constellation is new. (orig.)

  14. Successful operative management of an upper lumbar spinal canal stenosis resulting in multilevel lower nerve root radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearwood McClelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is a common disorder, usually characterized clinically by neurogenic claudication with or without lumbar/sacral radiculopathy corresponding to the level of stenosis. We present a case of lumbar stenosis manifesting as a multilevel radiculopathy inferior to the nerve roots at the level of the stenosis. A 55-year-old gentleman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain with neurogenic claudication in an L5/S1 distribution (posterior thigh, calf, into the foot concomitant with dorsiflexion and plantarflexion weakness. Imaging revealed grade I spondylolisthesis of L3 on L4 with severe spinal canal stenosis at L3-L4, mild left L4-L5 disc herniation, no stenosis at L5-S1, and no instability. EMG revealed active and chronic L5 and S1 radiculopathy. The patient underwent bilateral L3-L4 hemilaminotomy with left L4-L5 microdiscectomy for treatment of his L3-L4 stenosis. Postoperatively, he exhibited significant improvement in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The L5-S1 level was not involved in the operative decompression. Patients with radiculopathy and normal imaging at the level corresponding to the radiculopathy should not be ruled out for operative intervention should they have imaging evidence of lumbar stenosis superior to the expected affected level.

  15. Novel biomechanical quantification methodology for lumbar intraforaminal spinal nerve adhesion in a laminectomy and disc injury rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Vedant A; Massie, Jennifer B; Zauner, Florian; Murphy, Mark; Akeson, Wayne H

    2007-10-15

    Spinal nerve fibrosis following injury or surgical intervention may play an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic back pain. In this current study, we demonstrate the role of biomechanical quantification of lumbar intraforaminal spinal nerve adhesion and tethering in the analysis of the post-laminectomy condition and describe a direct methodology to make this measurement. Twenty age-matched Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into operative and non-operative (control) groups. Operative animals underwent a bilateral L5-L6 laminectomy with right-side L5-6 disc injury, a post-laminectomy pain model previously published by this lab. At eight weeks, animals were sacrificed and the strength of adhesion of the L5 intraforaminal spinal nerve to surrounding structures was quantified using a novel biomechanical methodology. Operative animals were found to have a significantly greater load to displace the intact right L5 spinal nerve through the intervertebral foramen when compared to control animals. The findings show that the post-laminectomy condition creates quantifiable fibrosis of the spinal nerve to surrounding structures and supports the conclusion that this fibrosis may play a role in the post-laminectomy pain syndrome.

  16. Minimally invasive treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with a novel interspinous spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabat S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Shay Shabat1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block3, Reuven Gepstein11Spinal Care Unit, Sapir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel; 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E Block, PhD, Inc, San Francisco, CA, USAPurpose: To assess the safety and effectiveness of a novel, minimally invasive interspinous spacer in patients with moderate lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.Methods: A total of 53 patients (mean age, 70 ± 11 years; 45% female with intermittent neurogenic claudication secondary to moderate LSS, confirmed on imaging studies, were treated with the Superion® Interspinous Spacer (VertiFlex, Inc, San Clemente, CA and returned for follow-up visits at 6 weeks, 1 year, and 2 years. Study endpoints included axial and extremity pain severity with an 11-point numeric scale, Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ, back function with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, health-related quality of life with the Physical Component Summary (PCS and Mental Component Summary (MCS scores from the SF-12, and adverse events.Results: Axial and extremity pain each decreased 54% (both P < 0.001 over the 2-year follow-up period. ZCQ symptom severity scores improved 43% (P < 0.001 and ZCQ physical function improved 44% (P < 0.001 from pre-treatment to 2 years post-treatment. A statistically significant 50% improvement (P < 0.001 also was noted in back function. PCS and MCS each improved 40% (both P < 0.001 from pre-treatment to 2 years. Clinical success rates at 2 years were 83%–89% for ZCQ subscores, 75% for ODI, 78% for PCS, and 80% for MCS. No device infection, implant breakage, migration, or pull-out was observed, although two (3.8% patients underwent explant with subsequent laminectomy.Conclusion: Moderate LSS can be effectively treated with a minimally invasive interspinous spacer. This device is appropriate for select patients who have failed nonoperative treatment measures for LSS and meet strict anatomical criteria.Keywords: Superion, axial

  17. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling for lumbar spinal stenosis using a specially designed needle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Kang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This report describes the methodological approach and clinical application of a minimally invasive intervention to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS. Methods Thirty-four patients with LSS underwent fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling using a specially designed flexed Round Needle. The needle was inserted 8-12 cm lateral to the midline at the level of the stenosis and advanced to a position between the anterior side of the facet joint and pedicle up to the outer-third of the pedicle. The needle was advanced medially and backed laterally within a few millimetres along the canal side of the inferior articular process between the facet joint and pedicle. The procedure was completed when a marked reduction in resistance was felt at the tip of the needle. The procedure was performed bilaterally at the level of the stenosis. Results The average follow-up period was 12.9 ± 1.1 months. The visual analogue scale (VAS pain score was reduced from 7.3 ± 2.0 to 4.6 ± 2.5 points, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score decreased from 41.4 ± 17.2 to 25.5 ± 12.6% and the average self-rated improvement was 52.6 ± 33.1%. The VAS scores indicated that 14 (41.2% patients reported a "good" to "excellent" treatment response, while 11 (32.4% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the ODI and 22 (64.7% had a "good" to "excellent" treatment response on the self-rated improvement scale. Conclusions These results suggest that fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural dry needling is effective for managing LSS.

  18. Prostaglandin E1 Treatment for Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis: Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    The important pathophysiologic factor of neurogenic intermittent claudication (NIC) in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) has been reported to be the reduction in intraneural blood flow and a state of relative ischemia in nerve tissues. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) presumably improves symptoms in patients with LSCS by improving the blood flow in the cauda equina and nerve roots through its vasodilation and antiplatelet aggregation effects. The purpose of the study was to summarize the results of previous studies regarding PGE1 treatment for LSCS and to describe the details of PGE1 treatment to all physicians who take care of patients with LSCS. Review of the literature. There are 3 PGE1-related products that have been used clinically for the treatment of LSCS: PGE1, lipo-PGE1, and limaprost (PGE1 derivative). Experimental studies have been performed to verify the efficacy of PGE1 treatment for LSCS. Many studies have reported clinical outcomes of PGE1 treatment in patients with LSCS. Overall, previous studies examining PGE1 treatment for LSCS demonstrate improvement in several clinical outcome measures such as the visual analog scale, Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, and NIC distance, although most of the studies have only short-term follow-up. Based on the results of previous studies, PGE1 treatment may be an option as a conservative treatment for LSCS. However, future studies with high-quality and long-term follow-up are necessary. Future studies also should include refinement of indications, administration period, as well as comparisons between PGE1 treatment and other conservative treatments such as epidural injection. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Limaprost or Pregabalin: Preoperative and Postoperative Medication for Pain due to Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasukawa, Yuji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Ebata, Kunio; Ishikawa, Noriyuki; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Hatakeyama, Yuji; Hongo, Michio; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Kudo, Daisuke; Abe, Toshiki; Okuyama, Koichiro; Kido, Tadato; Chiba, Mitsuho; Segawa, Toyohito; Suzuki, Masazumi; Mizutani, Takashi; Kimura, Ryota; Ono, Yuichi; Iida, Jumpei; Abe, Eiji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2017-10-27

    We aimed to evaluate the incidence of (and risk factors for) postoperative pregabalin and/or limaprost to treat persistent numbness and/or pain of the lower extremities after lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) surgery. Medical records of 329 patients (168 men, 161 women; average age 70 years) were retrospectively reviewed for data on the duration of LSS diagnosis; LSS disease; preoperative medication (limaprost, pregabalin, or combined limaprost/pregabalin; duration); symptoms; preoperative/postoperative intermittent claudication (IC); operation type; and postoperative medication and period. Limaprost, pregabalin, and combined limaprost/pregabalin were prescribed preoperatively for 43%, 7%, and 5% of patients, respectively. At an average of 21 months postoperatively, limaprost, pregabalin, and combined therapy were prescribed in 11%, 8%, 4% of patients, respectively. Medication requirement was significantly lower postoperatively than preoperatively (P < 0.0001). Significant risk factors for required postoperative medication were required preoperative medication (odds ratio [OR] 3.088, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.679 to 5.681]; postoperative period (OR 1.063, 95% CI 1.031 to 1.096); and postoperative IC (OR 3.868, 95% CI 1.481 to 10.103). A negative impact from postoperative medication was seen in patients who had undergone decompression surgery (OR 0.589, 95% CI 0.377 to 0.918). Overall, 23% of LSS patients required medication for pain and/or numbness at 21 months postoperatively. Significant factors portending required postoperative medication were preoperative medication, longer postoperative period, and postoperative IC. A negative influence from postoperative medication was seen in patients who had undergone decompression surgery without fusion. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  20. Physical therapy interventions for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Luciana Gazzi; Hum, Abraham; Kuleba, Laura; Mo, Joey; Truong, Linda; Yeung, Mankeen; Battié, Michele C

    2013-12-01

    Physical therapy is commonly prescribed for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS); however, little is known about its effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to systematically review randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled trials, and cohort studies evaluating the effectiveness of physical therapy for LSS. Studies were searched on electronic databases to January 2012. Inclusion criteria were: clinical diagnosis of LSS with confirmatory imaging, evaluation of physical therapy treatment, presence of a comparison group, and outcomes of pain, disability, function, or quality of life. Outcomes were extracted and, when possible, pooled using RevMan 5, a freely available review program from the Cochrane Library. Ten studies were included: 5 RCTs, 2 controlled trials, 2 mixed-design studies, and 1 longitudinal cohort study. Pooled effects of 2 studies revealed that the addition of a physical therapy modality to exercise had no statistically significant effect on outcome. Pooled effects results of RCTs evaluating surgery versus physical therapy demonstrated that surgery was better than physical therapy for pain and disability at long term (2 years) only. Other results suggested that exercise is significantly better than no exercise, that cycling and body-weight-supported treadmill walking have similar effects, and that corsets are better than no corsets. The limitations of this review include the low quality and small number of studies, as well as the heterogeneity in outcomes and treatments. No conclusions could be drawn from the review regarding which physical therapy treatment is superior for LSS. There was low-quality evidence suggesting that modalities have no additional effect to exercise and that surgery leads to better long-term (2 years) outcomes for pain and disability, but not walking distance, than physical therapy in patients with LSS.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute trauma of the spine and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradzki, J.; Paprzycki, W.; Jankowski, R.; Nowak, S.

    1993-01-01

    30 patients with acute neurologic deficits following spine trauma were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. 15 patients had hemorrhagic necrosis of spinal cord and 9 patients had contusion and/or oedema of spinal cord. 21 patients had compression of spinal cord. MRI appears to be useful in the diagnosis of acute cord injury. MRI in acute phase of spine injury can be predictive of the eventual motor recovery of the patient. (author)

  2. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors: technique and outcomes from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sreejit; Gobin, Y Pierre; Leng, Lewis Z; Marcus, Joshua D; Bilsky, Mark; Laufer, Ilya; Patsalides, Athos

    2013-09-01

    The existing literature on preoperative spine tumor embolization is limited in size of patient cohorts and diversity of tumor histologies. This report presents our experience with preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spinal column tumors in the largest series to date. We conducted a retrospective review of 228 angiograms and 188 pre-operative embolizations for tumors involving thoracic, lumbar and sacral spinal column. Tumor vascularity was evaluated with conventional spinal angiography and was graded from 0 (same as normal adjacent vertebral body) to 3 (severe tumor blush with arteriovenous shunting). Embolic materials included poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and detachable platinum coils and rarely, liquid embolics. The degree of embolization was graded as complete, near-complete, or partial. Anesthesia records were reviewed to document blood loss during surgery. Renal cell carcinoma (44.2%), thyroid carcinoma (9.2%), and leiomyosarcoma (6.6%) were the most common tumors out of a total of 40 tumor histologies. Hemangiopericytoma had the highest mean vascularity (2.6) of all tumor types with at least five representative cases followed by renal cell carcinoma (2.0) and thyroid carcinoma (2.0). PVA particles were used in 100% of cases. Detachable platinum coils were used in 51.6% of cases. Complete, near-complete, and partial embolizations were achieved in 86.1%, 12.7%, and 1.2% of all cases, respectively. There were no new post-procedure neurologic deficits or other complications with long-term morbidity. The mean intra-operative blood loss for the hypervascular tumors treated with pre-operative embolization was 1745 cc. Preoperative embolization of hypervascular thoracic, lumbar, and sacral spine tumors can be performed with high success rates and a high degree of safety at high volume centers.

  3. Optical monitoring of spinal cord subcellular damage after acute spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadgan, Babak; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Fong, Allan; Streijger, Femke; Macnab, Andrew; Kwon, Brian K.

    2018-02-01

    Introduction: Sudden physical trauma to the spinal cord results in acute spinal cord injury (SCI), leading to spinal cord (SC) tissue destruction, acute inflammation, increased SC intraparenchymal pressure, and tissue ischemia, hypoxia, and cellular necrosis. The ability to monitor SC tissue viability at subcellular level, using a real-time noninvasive method, would be extremely valuable to clinicians for estimating acute SCI damage, and adjusting and monitoring treatment in the intensive care setting. This study examined the feasibility and sensitivity of a custommade near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) sensor to monitor the oxidation state of SC mitochondrial cytochrome aa3 (CCO), which reflects the subcellular damage of SC tissue in an animal model of SCI. Methods: Six anesthetized Yorkshire pigs were studied using a custom-made multi-wavelength NIRS system with a miniaturized optical sensor applied directly on the surgically exposed SC at T9. The oxidation states of SC tissue hemoglobin and CCO were monitored before, during and after acute SCI, and during mean arterial pressure alterations. Results: Non-invasive NIRS monitoring reflected changes in SC tissue CCO, simultaneous but independent of changes in hemoglobin saturation following acute SCI. A consistent decrease in SC tissue CCO chromophore concentration (-1.98 +/- 2.1 ab, pinjury site. Elevation of mean arterial pressure can reduce SC tissue damage as suggested by different researchers and observed by significant increase in SC tissue CCO concentration (1.51 +/- 1.7 ab, p<0.05) in this study. Conclusions: This pilot study indicates that a novel miniaturized multi-wave NIRS sensor has the potential to monitor post-SCI changes of SC cytochrome aa3 oxygenation state in real time. Further development of this method may offer new options for improved SCI care.

  4. Effect of acute lateral hemisection of the spinal cord on spinal neurons of postural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenin, P. V.; Lyalka, V. F.; Orlovsky, G. N.; Deliagina, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    In quadrupeds, acute lateral hemisection of the spinal cord (LHS) severely impairs postural functions, which recover over time. Postural limb reflexes (PLRs) represent a substantial component of postural corrections in intact animals. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute LHS on two populations of spinal neurons (F and E) mediating PLRs. For this purpose, in decerebrate rabbits, responses of individual neurons from L5 to stimulation causing PLRs were recorded before and during reversible LHS (caused by temporal cold block of signal transmission in lateral spinal pathways at L1), as well as after acute surgical (Sur) LHS at L1. Results obtained after Sur-LHS were compared to control data obtained in our previous study. We found that acute LHS caused disappearance of PLRs on the affected side. It also changed a proportion of different types of neurons on that side. A significant decrease and increase in the proportion of F- and non-modulated neurons, respectively, was found. LHS caused a significant decrease in most parameters of activity in F-neurons located in the ventral horn on the lesioned side and in E-neurons of the dorsal horn on both sides. These changes were caused by a significant decrease in the efficacy of posture-related sensory input from the ipsilateral limb to F-neurons, and from the contralateral limb to both F- and E-neurons. These distortions in operation of postural networks underlie the impairment of postural control after acute LHS, and represent a starting point for the subsequent recovery of postural functions. PMID:27702647

  5. 1997 Volvo Award winner in clinical studies. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis: a prospective, randomized study comparing decompressive laminectomy and arthrodesis with and without spinal instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischgrund, J S; Mackay, M; Herkowitz, H N; Brower, R; Montgomery, D M; Kurz, L T

    1997-12-15

    This prospective study analyzed the influence of transpedicular instrumented on the operative treatment of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. To determine whether the addition of transpedicular instrumented improves the clinical outcome and fusion rate of patients undergoing posterolateral fusion after decompression for spinal stenosis with concomitant degenerative spondylolisthesis. Decompression is often necessary in the treatment of symptomatic patients who have degenerative spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Results of recent studies demonstrated that outcomes are significantly improved if posterolateral arthrodesis is performed at the listhesed level. A meta-analysis of the literature concluded that adjunctive spinal instrumentation for this procedure can enhance the fusion rate, although the effect on clinical outcome remains uncertain. Seventy-six patients who had symptomatic spinal stenosis associated with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis were prospectively studied. All patients underwent posterior decompression with concomitant posterolateral intertransverse process arthrodesis. The patients were randomized to a segmental transpedicular instrumented or noninstrumented group. Sixty-seven patients were available for a 2-year follow-up. Clinical outcome was excellent or good in 76% of the patients in whom instrumentation was placed and in 85% of those in whom no instrumentation was placed (P = 0.45). Successful arthrodesis occurred in 82% of the instrumented cases versus 45% of the noninstrumented cases (P = 0.0015). Overall, successful fusion did not influence patient outcome (P = 0.435). In patients undergoing single-level posterolateral fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis, the use of pedicle screws may lead to a higher fusion rate, but clinical outcome shows no improvement in pain in the back and lower limbs.

  6. Repeat Lumbar Puncture: CSF Lactic Acid Levels are Predictive of Cure with Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A common clinical problem concerns the utility of repeat lumbar puncture (LP in adults with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM, e.g., pneumococcal meningitis [1]. An LP is initially done for diagnostic purposes in patients with suspected ABM, i.e., diagnostic lumbar puncture (DLP. A repeat LP (RLP may be done 1–3 days after the initial DLP, if the patient shows no improvement. If a patient with ABM is not doing well after three days, adequacy of antimicrobial therapy is the main concern. Other reasons for RLP is to detect possible intracranial complications of ABM unrelated to adequacy of therapy [1–2].

  7. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  8. Lumbar spondylosis, lumbar spinal stenosis, knee pain, back muscle strength are associated with the locomotive syndrome: Rural population study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Daisuke; Tsuda, Eiichi; Wada, Kanichiro; Kumagai, Gentaro; Sasaki, Eiji; Nawata, Atsushi; Nakagomi, Sho; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2016-05-01

    To comprehensively investigate the clinical and physical factors associating with locomotive syndrome (Loc-S); the locomotorium-disability for daily life. 647 volunteers participated (247 males, 400 females, Age: 58.4 ± 11.0, BMI: 22.5 ± 3.3). Three self-assessment questionnaires were administered: 1) "25-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale" (GFLS-25) for evaluating Loc-S (GLFS-25 ≥ 16 defined as Loc-S); 2) "diagnostic support tool for LSS" (LSS-DST) for evaluating the prevalence of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS); 3) Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Plain radiographs of the bilateral knees and lumbar spine were evaluated, and the severity of lumbar spondylosis (LS) and knee osteoarthritis (KOA) defined by Kellgren-Lawrence grade. Bone status was evaluated by using the osteo-sono assessment index (OSI) at the calcaneus. Isometric muscle strength of trunk and leg (Nm/kg, both extension and flexion) were evaluated. Linear regression analysis was performed to elucidate the factors concerned with GFLS-25 including age, sex, and BMI. Thirty-nine subjects (6.0%, 13 males, 26 females) were defined as having Loc-S. Single regression model showed that age, height, BMI, skeletal muscle mass, OSI, LSS, KOOS, the severity of LS and KOA, and trunk- and leg-muscle strength were correlated with the degree of GLFS-25. Stepwise multiple regression model showed that sex, height, LSS, KOOS, the severity of LS, and back muscle strength were significantly correlated with that of GLFS-25. In this cross-sectional study, pain status associated with LSS and knee joint, structural severity for LS, and back muscle strength primarily affected the degree of GFLS-25. For managing Loc-S, we must pay more intensive attention to these factors. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION WITH TRANSFORAMINAL NERVE ROOT BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIANO NEVES VIALLE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of anesthetic transforaminal nerve root block in patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation through a prospective observational study. Methods: The study included 176 patients from a private clinic undergoing transforaminal injection performed by a single spinal surgeon. The patients were assessed after two weeks, three months and six months regarding to the improvement of the pain radiating to the lower limbs. In case of persistent symptoms, patients could choose to perform a new nerve root block and maintenance of physical therapy or be submitted to conventional microdiscectomy. Results: By the end of six-month follow-up of the 176 patients, 116 had a favorable outcome (95 after one block and 21 after two blocks, and only 43 required surgery. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest a positive effect of transforaminal block for the treatment of sciatica in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

  10. Acute longitudinal ligament rupture following acute spinal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Hansom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a rare case of anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL rupture in a 47- year-old gentleman following a bicycle accident. The ALL is a continuous band of a variable thickness that acts as a primary spinal stabiliser. Stress, strain or rupture of the ALL usually occurs as a result of hyperextension, with the primary perpetrator being whiplash injuries. Such injuries have been shown to result in cervical spine instability during extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending modes. Spine radiographs of such patients may be routinely assessed as normal, therefore this specific type of injury does not lend itself to identification by traditional imaging methods. This account demonstrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion of a ligamentous neck injury in the setting of normal plain radiographs but abnormal clinical examination.

  11. Neurological complications after 434 MHz microwave hyperthermia of the rat lumbar region including the spinal cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, N. A.; de Vrind, H. H.; Sminia, P.; Haveman, J.; Troost, D.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    1992-01-01

    Hyperthermia was applied in the region of the vertebral column from the second to the fifth lumbar vertebra using a ring-shaped 434 MHz microwave radiator. In all experiments temperatures were measured at a 'reference' thermocouple which was placed against the fourth lumbar vertebra. After 60 min of

  12. Multilevel Contiguous Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fractures: The Relationship of Scoliosis to the Development of Cascading Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Alex; Hatgis, Jesse; Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-12-19

    Osteoporotic patients can present with either single or multiple fractures secondary to repeated falls and progressive osteoporosis. Multiple fractures often lead to additional spinal deformity and are a sign of more severe osteoporosis. In the thoracic spine, multiple fractures are associated with the development of gradual thoracic kyphosis but neurologic deficits are uncommon. In the lumbar spine, patients with multiple lumbar fractures have more constant lumbar pain, may have symptoms related to concurrent lumbar stenosis or degenerative scoliosis, and may present with radiculopathy, especially with fractures at L4 and L5. In a review of a series of patients with recurrent multiple lumbar fractures or 'cascading' fractures, it was found that all the patients were female, had severe osteoporosis, often untreated, had a previous history of multiple previous thoracic and lumbar fractures, and all had associated scoliotic spinal deformities ranging from 6 o to 50 o . It was found that if the curve progressed and the greater the degree of curvature, the more frequently subsequent multiple fractures developed, leading to recurrent acute episodes of pain. Forty percent also had additional sacral insufficiency fractures, an unusually high percentage. Biomechanically, the lumbar spine is both more mobile and supports a larger portion of the spinal load compared to the thoracic spine. The existence or worsening of a lumbar spinal deformity from degenerative lumbar scoliosis shifts the mechanical forces more to one side on already weakened osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and sacrum, leading to an increased incidence of these fractures. Because of the chronic and uneven lower lumbar spinal load with severe vertebral osteoporosis in certain patients with repeat lumbar fractures and worsening degenerative lumbar scoliosis, there may be a rationale to add preventive vertebroplasty at adjacent vertebral endplates when treating acute recurrent lumbar fractures to decrease the

  13. Multilevel Contiguous Osteoporotic Lumbar Compression Fractures: The Relationship of Scoliosis to the Development of Cascading Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Alex; Hatgis, Jesse; Granville, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporotic patients can present with either single or multiple fractures secondary to repeated falls and progressive osteoporosis. Multiple fractures often lead to additional spinal deformity and are a sign of more severe osteoporosis. In the thoracic spine, multiple fractures are associated with the development of gradual thoracic kyphosis but neurologic deficits are uncommon. In the lumbar spine, patients with multiple lumbar fractures have more constant lumbar pain, may have symptoms related to concurrent lumbar stenosis or degenerative scoliosis, and may present with radiculopathy, especially with fractures at L4 and L5. In a review of a series of patients with recurrent multiple lumbar fractures or 'cascading' fractures, it was found that all the patients were female, had severe osteoporosis, often untreated, had a previous history of multiple previous thoracic and lumbar fractures, and all had associated scoliotic spinal deformities ranging from 6o to 50o. It was found that if the curve progressed and the greater the degree of curvature, the more frequently subsequent multiple fractures developed, leading to recurrent acute episodes of pain. Forty percent also had additional sacral insufficiency fractures, an unusually high percentage. Biomechanically, the lumbar spine is both more mobile and supports a larger portion of the spinal load compared to the thoracic spine. The existence or worsening of a lumbar spinal deformity from degenerative lumbar scoliosis shifts the mechanical forces more to one side on already weakened osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and sacrum, leading to an increased incidence of these fractures. Because of the chronic and uneven lower lumbar spinal load with severe vertebral osteoporosis in certain patients with repeat lumbar fractures and worsening degenerative lumbar scoliosis, there may be a rationale to add preventive vertebroplasty at adjacent vertebral endplates when treating acute recurrent lumbar fractures to decrease the

  14. Pedicle screw-only constructs with lumbar or pelvic fixation for spinal stabilization in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Satyen S; Modi, Hitesh N; Srinivasalu, Santhana; Suh, Seung-Woo; Yi, Ju-Won; Cho, Jae-Woo; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2009-08-01

    Retrospective case study. We present a retrospective clinical study of 36 patients of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) treated for correction of scoliosis with pedicle screw-only constructs with the objective to analyze our technique, correction and maintenance of spinal and pelvic deformity, spinal fusion, the complications we encountered, and the adequacy of lumbar fixation. Pedicle screw constructs have shown better deformity correction and maintenance as compared with other methods of instrumentation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. There are very few reports of pedicle screw-only constructs for DMD patients. Thirty-six patients were followed up for an average period of 37.75 months (min 24 mo). All patients were instrumented from T2, T3, or T4 to L5 and all levels were instrumented. Pelvic fixation was performed only if the pelvic tilt was more than 15 degrees (10 patients). Cobb angle improved 65% (Ppelvic fixation was performed, pelvic tilt improved 62% (Ppelvic fixation was not performed, the pelvic obliquity also improved from 10.5 degrees preoperatively to 5.8 degrees postoperatively (41.5% correction) and 8.5 degrees at final follow-up (4.2% correction). Pedicle screw-only constructs provide good stability allowing better correction and maintenance of coronal and lumbar deformities, obtaining good sitting balance, and mobilizing patients early after surgery. Longer follow-up is required to adequately comment on the need for pelvic stabilization.

  15. Clinical results of posterolateral fusion for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. A follow-up study of more than 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoya; Kubo, Shinichiro

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes and the effects on unfused motion segments of posterolateral fusion. This study involved 35 cases (37 intervertebral levels) of posterolateral fusion performed to treat degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. There were 20 male and 15 female patients ranging in age from 30 to 67 years, with a mean age of 49 years. The postoperative period ranged from 10 years to 17 years and 8 months, with a mean period of 13 years. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for assessment of treatment for low back pain. The effects on unfused motion segments were investigated with radiographic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Postoperative satisfactory improvement (mean recovery rate, 66.9%) reached a plateau at 1 year and was maintained at final follow-up. Radiographically, the union rate was 86.5%. There were few cases of induced instability of unfused motion segments. On MR imaging, increased signal intensity in both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images was seen in the paravertebral muscles in 15 of 20 cases (75.0%). Posterolateral fusion is a useful technique for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Clinical outcomes were stable throughout follow-up. Instability of unfused motion segments rarely occurred. (author)

  16. Seven years follow-up for total lumbar facet joint replacement (TOPS) in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anekstein, Yoram; Floman, Yizhar; Smorgick, Yossi; Rand, Nahshon; Millgram, Michael; Mirovsky, Yigal

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical improvement of a total posterior arthroplasty system in the surgical management of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and or spinal stenosis. During a 1-year period (June 2006 to July 2007), ten patients were enrolled in a non-randomized prospective clinical study. The primary indication was neurogenic claudication due to spinal stenosis with single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients were evaluated with X-rays and MRI scans, visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability questionnaire, and the SF-36 health survey preoperatively, at 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and at 1, 2, 3 and 7 years postoperatively. The VAS score for back pain dropped from 56.2 preoperatively to 12.5 at 6 weeks and 19 at 7 years follow-up. The VAS score for worse leg pain dropped from 83.5 before surgery to 13 at 6 weeks and 8.8 at 7 years follow-up. The ODI dropped from 49.1 preoperatively to 13.5 at 6 weeks and 7.8 at 7 years follow-up. MRI examination at 7 years after surgery did not demonstrate stenosis adjacent to the stabilized segment. Spondylolisthesis did not progress in any of the cases. One patient had a symptomatic L3-L4 far lateral disc herniation 5 years after surgery whose symptoms resolved with non-operative treatment. In one patient, conversion to posterolateral fusion was performed due to an early device malfunction. In patients with spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis, decompression and posterior arthroplasty with the TOPS System can maintain clinical improvement and radiologic stability over time.

  17. Acute spinal cord injury: tetraplegia and paraplegia in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Nicolas; Carwardine, Darren

    2014-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a common problem in animals for which definitive treatment is lacking, and information gained from its study has benefit for both companion animals and humans in developing new therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the main concepts that are useful for clinicians in assessing companion animals with severe acute SCI. Current available advanced ancillary tests and those in development are reviewed. In addition, the current standard of care for companion animals following SCI and recent advances in the development of new therapies are presented, and new predictors of recovery discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Lumbar spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seichi, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar spondylosis is a chronic, noninflammatory disease caused by degeneration of lumbar disc and/or facet joints. The etiology of lumbar spondylosis is multifactorial. Patients with lumbar spondylosis complain of a broad variety of symptoms including discomfort in the low back lesion, whereas some of them have radiating leg pain or neurologenic intermittent claudication (lumbar spinal stenosis). The majority of patients with spondylosis and stenosis of the lumbosacral spine can be treated nonsurgically. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2 inhibitors are helpful in controlling symptoms. Prostaglandin, epidural injection, and transforaminal injection are also helpful for leg pain and intermittent claudication. Operative therapy for spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis is reserved for patients who are totally incapacitated by their condition.

  19. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  20. Case study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Mae-sun therapy of the spinal cord injury due to lumbar burst fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Gi-sun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Traumatic lumbar burst fracture causes significant spinal cord injury. This report is intended to estimate the efficacy using oriental treatment on a patient with lumbar burst fracture and spinal cord injury. Methods : From 21th December, 2009 to 5th February, 2010, 1 female inpatient diagnosed with lumbar burst fracture and spinal cord injury was treated with general oriental medicine therapy : mae-sun therapy ; acupuncture ; moxibustion ; pharmacopuncture ; physical therapy and herbal medication. TUG, SCIMⅡ and VAS were used for evaluation of gait disturbance and pain in both feet. Measurement of self voiding amount and remaining amount through CIC was used for evaluation of neurogenic vesical dysfunction. Results : The patient showed a certain degree of improvement in gait disturbance, pain in both feet and neurogenic vesical dysfunction through above evaluation methods. Conclusion : Oriental treatments such as mae-sun therapy, acupuncture and moxibustion therapy, pharmacopuncture therapy and herbal medication can be effective for spinal cord injury due to traumatic lumbar burst fracture.

  1. The positive effect of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion is preserved at long-term follow-up: a RCT with 11-13 year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Videbaek, Tina S; Hansen, Ebbe S

    2008-01-01

    patients originally randomised to posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without pedicle screw instrumentation. Follow-up included Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), SF-36 and a question regarding willingness to undergo the procedure again knowing the result as global...

  2. A Prospective Study on the Outcome of Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Treated With Open Laminotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wong Chung-Ting

    2012-12-01

    Result: There were significant improvement of mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association lumbar score, Oswestry Disability Index(ODI, and visual analogue scale (VAS. Male had significantly better result in ODI and VAS. There was no significant difference regarding to older age (>65 or the presence of preexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. One patient was found to have increased lumbar instability after operation. The overall reoperation rate was 6.9%.

  3. EARLY AND LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE THORACIC AND LUMBAR VERTEBRAL AND SPINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates the outcomes of operative treatment of 190 patients with spinal cord injuryof thoracic and lumbar spine for 10 years. Associated injuries were revealed in 96 patients, the mean ISS score being27.5. All patients underwent decompressive and stabilizing interventions using a transpedicular system of “Synthes” production (Saint Petersburg. Ventral interventions were performed in 27 (14.2% patients. In all cases, decompression of the spinal canalcontents at the level of damage was achieved. In those patients who were operated within two weeks after trauma, transpedicular system allowed for recovery of a form and size of the spinal canal and the damaged vertebral body. The fractures of transpedicular system were observed in patients operated both with only rear and with combined access. The errors and complications, which happened during surgery, did not influence the outcomes of treatment. The outcomes of treatment were assessed according to the neurological statusdynamics (ASIA score, recovery of support ability of the spine, the presence of pain, and patients’ recovery (Е Denis score. Favorable outcomes were achieved in 114 (61.3% patients, satisfactoryin 53 (28.5%,and poor in 19 (10.2 %.

  4. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Associated With Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Secondary Fusion Rates Following Open vs Minimally Invasive Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöller, Karsten; Alimi, Marjan; Cong, Guang-Ting; Christos, Paul; Härtl, Roger

    2017-03-01

    Decompression without fusion is a treatment option in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) associated with stable low-grade degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). A minimally invasive unilateral laminotomy (MIL) for "over the top" decompression might be a less destabilizing alternative to traditional open laminectomy (OL). To review secondary fusion rates after open vs minimally invasive decompression surgery. We performed a literature search in Pubmed/MEDLINE using the keywords "lumbar spondylolisthesis" and "decompression surgery." All studies that separately reported the outcome of patients with LSS+DS that were treated by OL or MIL (transmuscular or subperiosteal route) were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. The primary end point was secondary fusion rate. Secondary end points were total reoperation rate, postoperative progression of listhetic slip, and patient satisfaction. We identified 37 studies (19 with OL, 18 with MIL), with a total of 1156 patients, that were published between 1983 and 2015. The studies' evidence was mostly level 3 or 4. Secondary fusion rates were 12.8% after OL and 3.3% after MIL; the total reoperation rates were 16.3% after OL and 5.8% after MIL. In the OL cohort, 72% of the studies reported a slip progression compared to 0% in the MIL cohort, respectively. After OL, satisfactory outcome was 62.7% compared to 76% after MIL. In patients with LSS and DS, minimally invasive decompression is associated with lower reoperation and fusion rates, less slip progression, and greater patient satisfaction than open surgery. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  5. Local up-regulation of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) following disc herniation is involved in the inflammatory response underlying acute lumbar radicular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Gunn-Helen; Moen, Aurora; Schistad, Elina I; Gjerstad, Johannes

    2017-09-01

    Lumbar radicular pain after disc herniation may be associated with release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue. In the present study we examined the role of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and cluster of differentiation 68 (CD68) in the acute phase of this process. First, in an animal model mimicking the clinical situation after disc herniation, the role of IFN-γ close to the dorsal nerve roots was studied. Next, in patients with lumbar radicular pain due to disc herniation, we examined how two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs2069705 and rs2069718) are important for the IFN-γ expression influenced the pain behavior. The animal data demonstrated a significant increase in the nociceptive activity at the spinal level after local application of NP and IFN-γ onto the dorsal nerve roots. A positive correlation between IFN-γ and CD68 in the NP tissue was also demonstrated. In the patients, a significant increase in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score was observed in carriers of the IFN-γ SNPs; rs2069705 A and rs2069718 G alleles. The present data suggest that IFN-γ close to the dorsal nerve roots may contribute to the pathogenesis, the nociceptive activity and the pain behavior following lumbar disc herniation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiographic and MRI characteristics of lumbar disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and spondylosis deformans in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togni, A; Kranenburg, H J C; Morgan, J P; Steffen, F

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate clinical signs, describe lesions and differences in the magnetic resonance imaging appearance of spinal new bone formations classified as disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and/or spondylosis deformans on radiographs and compare degeneration status of the intervertebral discs using the Pfirrmann scale. Retrospective analysis of 18 dogs presented with spinal disorders using information from radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. All dogs were found to be affected with both disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and spondylosis deformans. Neurological signs due to foraminal stenosis associated with disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis were found in two dogs. Spondylosis deformans was associated with foraminal stenosis and/or disc protrusion in 15 cases. The Pfirrmann score on magnetic resonance imaging was significantly higher in spondylosis deformans compared with disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and signal intensity of new bone due to disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis was significantly higher compared to spondylosis deformans. Differences between disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis and spondylosis deformans found on magnetic resonance imaging contribute to an increased differentiation between the two entities. Clinically relevant lesions in association with disseminated idiopathic spinal hyperostosis were rare compared to those seen with spondylosis deformans. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Comparison of rigid and semi-rigid instrumentation under acute load on vertebrae treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önen, Mehmet Reşid; Başgül, Cemile; Yılmaz, İlhan; Özkaya, Mustafa; Demir, Teyfik; Naderi, Sait

    2018-04-01

    Rigid and semi-rigid fixations are investigated several times in order to compare their biomechanical stability. Interbody fusion techniques are also preferable for maintaining the sagittal balance by protecting the disk height. In this study, the biomechanical comparison of semi-rigid and rigid fixations with posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures is conducted under trauma. There were four different test groups to analyze the effect of acute load on treated ovine vertebrae. First and second groups were fixed with polyetheretherketone rods and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages, respectively. Third and fourth groups were fixed with titanium rods and posterior lumbar interbody fusion and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cages, respectively. The drop tests were conducted with 7 kg weight. There were six samples in each group so the drop test repeated 24 times in total. The test samples were photographed and X-rayed (laterally and anteroposteriorly) before and after drop test. Two fractures were observed on group 1. Conversely, there were no fractures observed for group 2. There were no anterior element fractures for both groups 1 and 2. However, one fracture seen on group 3 was anterior element fracture, whereas the other three were posterior element fractures. All three fractures were anterior element fractures for group 4. Treated vertebrae with polyetheretherketone rods and posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages showed the best durability to the drop tests among the groups. Semi-rigid fixation gave better results than rigid fixation according to failed segments. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion cages seem to be better option for semi-rigid fixation, however mentioned surgical disadvantages must be considered.

  8. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  9. Prospective multicenter surveillance and risk factor analysis of deep surgical site infection after posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota; Azuma, Seiichi; Yamada, Takashi; Murakami, Motoaki; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hara, Nobuhiro; Terayama, Sei; Morii, Jiro; Kato, So; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a serious and significant complication after spinal surgery and is associated with high morbidity rates, high healthcare costs and poor patient outcomes. Accurate identification of risk factors is essential for developing strategies to prevent devastating infections. The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients using a prospective multicenter surveillance research method. From July 2010 to June 2012, we performed a prospective surveillance study in adult patients who had developed surgical site infection after undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar posterior spinal surgery at 11 participating hospitals. Detailed preoperative and operative patient characteristics were prospectively recorded using a standardized data collection format. Surgical site infection was based on the definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 2,736 consecutive adult patients were enrolled, of which 24 (0.9%) developed postoperative deep surgical site infection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated four independent risk factors. Preoperative steroid therapy (P = 0.001), spinal trauma (P = 0.048) and gender (male) (P = 0.02) were statistically significant independent patient-related risk factors, whereas an operating time ≥3 h (P operating time ≥3 h were independent risk factors for deep surgical site infection after thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients. Identification of these risk factors can be used to develop protocols aimed at decreasing the risk of surgical site infection.

  10. Lumbar spinal fusion patients' demands to the primary health sector: evaluation of three rehabilitation protocols. A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn B; Lauerberg, Ida; Lauersen, Ida; Bünger, Cody E

    2006-05-01

    Very few studies have investigated the effects or costs of rehabilitation regimens following lumbar spinal fusion. The effectiveness of in-hospital rehabilitation regimens has substantial impact on patients' demands in the primary health care sector. The aim of this study was to investigate patient-articulated demands to the primary health care sector following lumbar spinal fusion and three different in-hospital rehabilitation regimens in a prospective, randomized study with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients were randomized 3 months post lumbar spinal fusion to either a 'video' group (one-time oral instruction by a physiotherapist and patients were then issued a video for home exercise), or a 'café' group (video regimen with the addition of three café meetings with other fusion-operated patients) or a 'training' group (exercise therapy; physiotherapist-guided; two times a week for 8 weeks). Register data of service utilization in the primary health care sector were collected from the time of randomization through 24 months postsurgery. Costs of in-hospital protocols were estimated and the service utilization in the primary health care sector and its cost were analyzed. A significant difference (P=0.023) in number of contacts was found among groups at 2-year follow-up. Within the periods of 3-6 months and 7-12 months postoperatively, the experimental groups required less than half the amount of care within the primary health care sector as compared to the video group (P=0.001 and P=0.008). The incremental costs of the café regimen respectively, the training regimen were compensated by cost savings in the primary health care sector, at ratios of 4.70 (95% CI 4.64; 4.77) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.68; 1.72). This study concludes that a low-cost biopsychosocial rehabilitation regimen significantly reduces service utilization in the primary health care sector as compared to the usual regimen and a training exercise regimen. The results stress the importance of a cognitive

  11. Minimally invasive decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative scoliosis: Predictive factors of radiographic and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamide, Akihito; Yoshida, Munehito; Iwahashi, Hiroki; Simpson, Andrew K; Yamada, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Shunji; Kagotani, Ryohei; Sonekatsu, Mayumi; Sasaki, Takahide; Shinto, Kazunori; Deguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2017-05-01

    There is ongoing controversy regarding the most appropriate surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) with concurrent degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS): decompression alone, decompression with limited spinal fusion, or long spinal fusion for deformity correction. The coexistence of degenerative stenosis and deformity is a common scenario; Nonetheless, selecting the appropriate surgical intervention requires thorough understanding of the patients clinical symptomatology as well as radiographic parameters. Minimally invasive (MIS) decompression surgery was performed for LSS patients with DLS. The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the clinical outcomes of MIS decompression surgery in LSS patients with DLS, and (2) to identify the predictive factors for both radiographic and clinical outcomes after MIS surgery. 438 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. Inclusion criteria was evidence of LSS and DLS with coronal curvature measuring greater than 10°. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, JOA recovery rate, low back pain (LBP), and radiographic features were evaluated preoperatively and at over 2 years postoperatively. Of the 438 patients, 122 were included in final analysis, with a mean follow-up of 2.4 years. The JOA recovery rate was 47.6%. LBP was significantly improved at final follow-up. Cobb angle was maintained for 2 years postoperatively (p = 0.159). Clinical outcomes in foraminal stenosis patients were significantly related to sex, preoperative high Cobb angle and progression of scoliosis (p = 0.008). In the severe scoliosis patients, the JOA recovery was 44%, and was significantly depended on progression of scoliosis (Cobb angle: preoperation 29.6°, 2-years follow-up 36.9°) and mismatch between the pelvic incidence (PI) and the lumbar lordosis (LL) (preoperative PI-LL 35.5 ± 21.2°) (p = 0.028). This study investigated clinical outcomes of MIS decompression surgery in LSS patients with DLS. The predictive

  12. Diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for detecting lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liangming; Chen, Ruiqiang; Xie, Peigen; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Rong, Limin [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-11-28

    This study aimed to determine the diagnostic value of the nerve root sedimentation sign, a relatively new radiological sign using magnetic resonance imaging, for diagnosing lumbar spinal stenosis. The literature search was based on PUBMED, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database up to March 2014. A total of 120 articles were identified. Seven studies involving 1,182 patients were included. The quality of the methodology of the seven studies was good. Overall, the pooled weighted value showed that the sedimentation sign had moderate sensitivity of 0.80 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.83] and high specificity of 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.98). The area under the curve was 0.76. Subgroup analysis showed that the degree of morphological spinal stenosis was responsible for the heterogeneity. In the patients with severe morphological lumbar spinal stenosis, the sedimentation sign had even higher sensitivity and specificity: 0.899 (95 % CI 0.87-0.92) and 0.99 (95 % CI 0.98-1.00), respectively. The area under the curve was 0.96. In the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis without definition of morphological stenosis, there was a notable threshold effect and significant heterogeneity. The area under the curve was 0.63. Current evidence suggests that the sedimentation sign has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing severe lumbar spinal stenosis. Its performance in diagnosing moderate and mild spinal stenosis, however, has yet to be corroborated in properly designed studies. (orig.)

  13. Patients' experience with non-surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Allyn M; Lynch, Andrew D; Ammendolia, Carlo; Schneider, Michael

    2017-09-21

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a highly prevalent disease in older adults that causes significant limitations in walking and other daily activities. There is a lack of research into optimal non-surgical treatment approaches for LSS. The purpose of this qualitative study is to assess the opinions of participants in a randomized clinical trial of nonsurgical LSS treatments regarding the interventions they received, factors contributing to adherence to the interventions, and methods of outcomes assessment. This study used a qualitative focus group design conducted at an academic research center. Individuals participating in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) for non-surgical LSS treatment were invited to discuss their study treatments and general experiences with LSS. The three treatment arms in the study were medical care, community-based group exercise, and clinic-based manual therapy and individual exercise. Following coding of qualitative data, kappa statistic was used to calculate agreement between observers. Themes were identified and agreed upon by both coders. This study was funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Fifty individuals (28 women, mean age 73±7.7 years) participated in a focus group. Two focus groups based on modified grounded theory were held for participants of each of the three treatment arms, for a total of six focus groups. Discussion topics included perceived effectiveness of the assigned treatment, suggestions for improvement, barriers and facilitators to completing treatment, and opinions of research outcome measures. Several themes were evident across all treatment groups. First, patients prefer individualized treatment that is tailored to their specific impairments and functional limitations. They also want to learn self-management strategies to rely less upon formal health-care providers. Participants consistently stated that exercise improved their pain levels and physical function. However, they noted that

  14. Fat saturation technique and gadolinium in MRI of lumbar spinal degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aprile, P; Tarantino, A; Lorusso, V; Brindicci, D

    2006-11-30

    We evaluated the potential of MR sequences with Fat Saturation and gadolinium in patients with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and low back pain, by studying both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine. We examined 3323 patients (age range 15-78 years) presenting low back pain. We used T2-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation and in some selected cases (1063 patients, 32%) administered gadolinium using T1-weighted sequences with Fat Saturation. In particular we used gadolinium in the following cases: 1) presence of hyperintense areas on T2 weighted images with Fat Saturation in the osteo-articular and muscular-ligamentous structures of the lumbar spine; 2) Clinical-radiological discrepancy in patients without disc-root conflict and clinical suspicion of posterior vertebral compartment syndrome. We found degenerative-inflammatory changes in osteo-articular, ligamentous and muscular structures in 1063 patients: osteochondrosis, "aseptic discitis", facet joint effusion and synovitis, osteoarthritis, synovial cysts, spondylolysis, degenerative-inflammatory changes of the posterior ligaments (flava, interspinous and supraspinous ligaments) and posterior perispinal muscles. To improve diagnostic accuracy and allow correct therapeutic guidance, MR examination in patients with low back pain must evaluate both anterior and posterior elements of the lumbar spine. Our study indicates that T2 sequences with Fat Saturation and, in selected cases, gadolinium administration, better visualize or disclose degenerative-inflammatory changes in the lumbar spine, showing the active-inflammatory phase and extension of these processes which may not be depicted during a standard MR examination.

  15. 1995 Volvo Award in basic sciences. The use of an osteoinductive growth factor for lumbar spinal fusion. Part II: Study of dose, carrier, and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, S D; Schimandle, J H; Hutton, W C

    1995-12-15

    Efficacy of a bovine-derived osteoinductive growth factor was studied in a rabbit model and in a nonhuman primate model of posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion. To determine the minimum effective dose of growth factor and the influence of different carrier material on the outcome of intertransverse process lumbar fusion. Bone morphogenetic proteins and related growth factors are becoming increasingly available in purified extract or genetically engineered forms and are capable of inducing new bone formation in vivo. Osteoinductive growth factors to enhance lumbar spinal infusion have not been well studied in models of posterolateral intertransverse process fusion. Because of the diminished potential of bone regeneration in primates (including humans) compared with phylogenetically lower animals, extrapolations regarding dose and efficacy cannot be made directly from results obtained in experiments performed on phylogenetically lower animals. Experiments on non-human primates are a critical step before attempting to use these growth factors on humans. METHODS. One hundred fifteen adult New Zealand white rabbits and 10 adult rhesus macaques underwent single level posterolateral intertransverse process lumbar spinal arthrodesis to evaluate different doses and carrier materials for a bovine-derived osteoinductive bone protein extract. Rabbit fusion masses were evaluated 5 weeks after arthrodesis by manual palpation, radiography, biomechanical testing, and light microscopy. Monkey fusion masses were evaluated 12 weeks after arthrodesis by radiography and light microscopy. Successful posterolateral intertransverse process spinal fusions were achieved in the rabbit models using an osteoinductive growth factor with three different carriers (autogenous iliac bone, demineralized allogeneic bone matrix, and natural coral). There was a dose-dependent response to the osteoinductive growth factor in the rabbit model, indicating that a threshold must be overcome before bone

  16. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: an increasingly philosophical debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Bowers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following publication of NASCIS II, methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS was hailed as a breakthrough for patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI. MPSS use for SCI has since become very controversial and it is our opinion that additional evidence is unlikely to break the stalemate amongst clinicians. Patient opinion has the potential to break this stalemate and we review our recent findings which reported that spinal cord injured patients informed of the risks and benefits of MPSS reported a preference for MPSS administration. We discuss the implications of the current MPSS debate on translational research and seek to address some misconceptions which have evolved. As science has failed to resolve the MPSS debate we argue that the debate is an increasingly philosophical one. We question whether SCI might be viewed as a serious condition like cancer where serious side effects of therapeutics are tolerated even when benefits may be small. We also draw attention to the similarity between the side effects of MPSS and isotretinoin which is prescribed for the cosmetic disorder acne vulgaris. Ultimately we question how patient autonomy should be weighed in the context of current SCI guidelines and MPSS′s status as a historical standard of care.

  17. Anesthetic considerations for patients with acute cervical spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-ping Bao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anesthesiologists work to prevent or minimize secondary injury of the nervous system and improve the outcome of medical procedures. To this end, anesthesiologists must have a thorough understanding of pathophysiology and optimize their skills and equipment to make an anesthesia plan. Anesthesiologists should conduct careful physical examinations of patients and consider neuroprotection at preoperative interviews, consider cervical spinal cord movement and compression during airway management, and suggest awake fiberoptic bronchoscope intubation for stable patients and direct laryngoscopy with manual in-line immobilization in emergency situations. During induction, anesthesiologists should avoid hypotension and depolarizing muscle relaxants. Mean artery pressure should be maintained within 85–90 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa; vasoactive drug selection and fluid management. Normal arterial carbon dioxide pressure and normal blood glucose levels should be maintained. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring is a useful option. Anesthesiologists should be attentive to postoperative respiratory insufficiency (carefully considering postoperative extubation, thrombus, and infection. In conclusion, anesthesiologists should carefully plan the treatment of patients with acute cervical spinal cord injuries to protect the nervous system and improve patient outcome.

  18. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  19. The current role of steroids in acute spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Lin, Joseph; Macki, Mohamed; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (ASCI) is a catastrophic event that can profoundly affect the trajectory of a patient's life. Debate continues over the pharmacologic management of ASCI, specifically, the widespread but controversial use of the steroid methylprednisolone (MP). Treatment efforts are impeded because of limitations in understanding of the pathobiology of ASCI and the difficulty in proving the efficacy of therapies. This review presents the pathophysiology of ASCI and the laboratory and clinical findings on the use of MP. The use of MP remains a contentious issue in part because of the catastrophic nature of ASCI, the paucity of treatment options, and the legal ramifications. Although historical data on the use of MP in ASCI have been challenged, more recent studies have been used both to support and to oppose treatment of ASCI with steroids. ASCI is a devastating event with a complex aftermath of secondary damaging processes that worsen the initial injury. Although the results of NASCIS (National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study) II and III trials led to the widespread adoption of a high-dose MP regimen for patients treated within 8 hours of injury, subsequent studies have called into question the validity of NASCIS conclusions. Further evidence of the ineffectiveness of the MP protocol has led to declining confidence in the treatment over the last decade. At the present time, high-dose MP cannot be recommended as a standard of care, but it remains an option until supplanted by future evidence-based therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Considerations in Spinal Fusion Surgery for Chronic Lumbar Pain: Psychosocial Factors, Rating Scales, and Perioperative Patient Education-A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Daniel; Krafcik, Brianna M; Mansour, Tarek R; Alnemari, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    Despite widespread use of lumbar spinal fusion as a treatment for back pain, outcomes remain variable. Optimizing patient selection can help to reduce adverse outcomes. This literature review was conducted to better understand factors associated with optimal postoperative results after lumbar spinal fusion for chronic back pain and current tools used for evaluation. The PubMed database was searched for clinical trials related to psychosocial determinants of outcome after lumbar spinal fusion surgery; evaluation of commonly used patient subjective outcome measures; and perioperative cognitive, behavioral, and educational therapies. Reference lists of included studies were also searched by hand for additional studies meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients' perception of good health before surgery and low cardiovascular comorbidity predict improved postoperative physical functional capacity and greater patient satisfaction. Depression, tobacco use, and litigation predict poorer outcomes after lumbar fusion. Incorporation of cognitive-behavioral therapy perioperatively can address these psychosocial risk factors and improve outcomes. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, European Quality of Life five dimensions questionnaire, visual analog pain scale, brief pain inventory, and Oswestry Disability Index can provide specific feedback to track patient progress and are important to understand when evaluating the current literature. This review summarizes current information and explains commonly used assessment tools to guide clinicians in decision making when caring for patients with lower back pain. When determining a treatment algorithm, physicians must consider predictive psychosocial factors. Use of perioperative cognitive-behavioral therapy and patient education can improve outcomes after lumbar spinal fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Successful management of aortic thrombi resulting in spinal cord infarction in a patient with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izumi M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Manabu Izumi, Shoko Teraoka, Keisuke Yamashita, Kenji Matsumoto, Tomohiro Muronoi, Yoshimitsu Izawa, Chikara Yonekawa, Masaki Ano, Masayuki SuzukawaDepartment of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: A 74-year-old man with coronary artery disease was suffering from acute nonobstructive cholecystitis and was admitted to a nearby hospital. Dual antiplatelet (aspirin and ticlopidine therapy was discontinued before preparation for surgical resection of the gall bladder. During his time in hospital he was aware of lumbar pain and weakness in both legs. He was transferred to our hospital for further evaluation and therapy. Diffuse intra-aortic thrombi were revealed by computed tomography with contrast media, and magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal cord infarction. However, computed tomography scans of the descending aorta obtained 4 months before admission exhibited no signs of atherosclerotic plaques or intra-aortic thrombi. Laboratory data suggest that antiphospholipid antibody syndrome might have caused these acute multiple intra-arterial thrombi. By restarting dual antiplatelet therapy and increasing the dose of heparin (from 10,000 IU/day to 15,000 IU/day we successfully managed the patient's clinical condition and symptoms. It is important to understand that stopping antiplatelet therapy may rapidly grow thrombi in patients with a hypercoagulative state.Keywords: intra-aortic thrombus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, spinal cord infarction

  2. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, H.F.; Keers, J.C.; Oterdoom, D.L. Marinus; Kuijlen, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two

  3. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis : a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boogert, Hugo F.; Keers, Joost C.; Oterdoom, D. L. Marinus; Kuijlen, Jos M. A.

    OBJECT The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two

  4. Prevalence of “Congenital Lumbar Spinal Stenosis” in Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: In the study group, 26% of the participants had canal stenosis (AP diameter <12mm) at the distal lumbar canal compared to 8% in the control group; 38% had moderate sized canal (12-14mm) in the study group (31% in control) while only 36% had a normal canal (66% in control group). The differences were found ...

  5. Computed tomography in the evaluation of thoracic and lumbar spinal fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Tae; Cho, Chi Ja; Lee, Jeung Sik

    1983-01-01

    The accurate diagnosis of spine trauma is essential to its proper management, since therapeutic decisions depend on radiography and clinical data. Failure to recognize significant injury to the spine can lead to severe neurological deficit in the previously neulogically intact patient. The development of CT has open a new dimension in evaluation of spinal column. In our experience CT not only offer the accurate and thorough evaluation of spinal injury, but does so in a rapid and more efficient manner when compared with conventional radiography. CT has become the diagnostic procedure of choice when screening plain film and clinical examination indicate that a comprehensive radiographic evaluation is necessary. Eighteen patients with thoracic and lumber spinal fracture were studied with CT. Four had multiple level injuries. The results are summarized as follow; 1. Among the 18 patients, 4 had multiple level injuries and other 14 patients had single spinal injury. 2. 8 patients (11 spines) had simple compression fracture and 12 patients (13 spines) had burst fracture of vertebral body. 3. 15 spines among the 24 involved spines are located at T12 and L1 level. 4. Spinal canal narrowing and bony fragment in the canal are defined only 7 of 13 spines (53.8%) of burst fracture in conventional radiography. However CT showed in all spines of burst fracture. 5. Spinal posterior element involvement is suggested only one of 12 spines of burst fracture, but correctly interpretated by CT in 7 spines (11 anatomical position)

  6. Minimally invasive laminectomy for lumbar spinal stenosis in patients with and without preoperative spondylolisthesis: clinical outcome and reoperation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Marjan; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Pyo, Se Young; Paulo, Danika; Härtl, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surgical decompression is the intervention of choice for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) when nonoperative treatment has failed. Standard open laminectomy is an effective procedure, but minimally invasive laminectomy through tubular retractors is an alternative. The aim of this retrospective case series was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of this procedure in patients who underwent LSS and to compare outcomes in patients with and without preoperative spondylolisthesis. Patients with LSS without spondylolisthesis and with stable Grade I spondylolisthesis who had undergone minimally invasive tubular laminectomy between 2004 and 2011 were included in this analysis. Demographic, perioperative, and radiographic data were collected. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores, as well as Macnab's criteria. Among 110 patients, preoperative spondylolisthesis at the level of spinal stenosis was present in 52.5%. At a mean follow-up of 28.8 months, scoring revealed a median improvement of 16% on the ODI, 2.75 on the VAS back, and 3 on the VAS leg, compared with the preoperative baseline (p spondylolisthesis had no significant differences in their clinical outcome or reoperation rate. Minimally invasive laminectomy is an effective procedure for the treatment of LSS. Reoperation rates for instability are lower than those reported after open laminectomy. Functional improvement is similar in patients with and without preoperative spondylolisthesis. This procedure can be an alternative to open laminectomy. Routine fusion may not be indicated in all patients with LSS and spondylolisthesis.

  7. Survey of integrative lumbar spinal stenosis treatment in Korean medicine doctors: preliminary data for clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-Riong; Ahn, Yong-Jun; Shin, Ye-Sle; Park, Ki Byung; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Lee, Myeong Soo; Kim, Joo-Hee; Cho, Jae-Heung; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2017-08-29

    Considering that large variations exist amongst practitioners in lumbar disorder management and the significant costs that lumbar disorders incur, determining clinical practice patterns to provide preliminary data for standardization should be given higher priority. Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is commonly treated using integrative non-surgical methods by Korean medicine doctors (KMDs) in Korea, and this is the first study to assess current Korean medicine practice trends for LSS. A survey on KMD diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and decision-making in LSS treatment was developed in a 3-step procedure of preliminary drafting, revision based on extramural expert opinion, and final editing. The survey was conducted at the internal conference of a spine-specialty Korean medicine hospital on January 25th, 2015. The response rate was high at 79.19% (n = 118/149). Participants replied that they treated 7.3 ± 6.8 LSS patients/day using a multimodal treatment method consisting of acupuncture, pharmacopuncture, herbal medicine, Chuna manipulation, and electroacupuncture. Acupuncture mainly used Ashi points and MSAT, and pharmacopuncture mainly Shinbaro solution. The most frequently prescribed herbal medicine was Chungpa-jun, and the most commonly applied Chuna techniques were sidelying lumbar extension dysfunction correction technique, and prone lumbosacral joint distraction method. Radiological findings were mainly referred to for diagnosis, and clinical symptoms, age, radiological findings, and medical history were regarded to be important for prognosis. Participants replied that 7.8 ± 3.3 weeks were required for 50% reduction in pain, and 16.1 ± 7.7 weeks for 80% reduction. These results suggest that KMDs in Korea combine a conventional approach to LSS and a Korean medicine approach to low back pain for integration of empirical- and evidence-based diagnosis and treatment. The findings may contribute in bridging the divide between evidence and clinical practice

  8. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, U.; Freund, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  9. A Population-Based Study of the Incidence of Acute Spinal Cord Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Suri, M Fareed K

    2017-06-01

    There is a paucity of reliable data regarding incidence of acute spinal cord infarction in population-based studies. To determine the incidence of acute spinal cord infarction using a population-based design. Medical records and neuroimaging data of all patients with acute spinal cord infarction from Stearns and Benton Counties, Minnesota, between January 1, 2010 and May 31, 2014 were reviewed. Patients with a first-time diagnosis of spinal cord infarction were categorized as primary or secondary depending upon underlying etiology identified. We calculated the incidences of primary and secondary spinal cord infarction adjusted for age and sex based on the 2010 US census (189,093 resident populations). The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of spinal cord infarction was 3.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-7.2] per100,000 person-years. The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of primary and secondary spinal cord infarction was 1.5 [95% CI 0.6-3.6] and 1.6 [95% CI 0.6-3.6] per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The age-adjusted incidences among men and women were 1.5 [95%CI 0.6-3.7] and 4.6 [95% CI 2.2-8.7] per 100,000 person-years, respectively. No case fatality was observed at one month. We provide incidence rates for acute spinal cord infarction to assist in future studies and resource allocation.

  10. Influence of spinal disc translational stiffness on the lumbar spinal loads, ligament forces and trunk muscle forces during upper body inclination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Rizwan; Zander, Thomas; Bashkuev, Maxim; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2017-08-01

    Inverse dynamic musculoskeletal human body models are commonly used to predict the spinal loads and trunk muscle forces. These models include rigid body segments, mechanical joints, active and passive structural components such as muscles, tendons and ligaments. Several studies used simple definition of lumbar spinal discs idealized as spherical joints with infinite translational stiffness. The aim of the current sensitivity study was to investigate the influence of disc translational stiffness (shear and compressive stiffness) on the joint kinematics and forces in intervertebral discs (L1-L5), trunk muscles and ligaments for an intermediately flexed position (55°). Based on in vitro data, a range of disc shear stiffness (100-200N/mm) and compressive stiffness (1900-2700N/mm) was considered in the model using the technique of force dependent kinematics (FDK). Range of variation in spinal loads, trunk muscle forces and ligaments forces were calculated (with & without load in hands) and compared with the results of reference model (RM) having infinite translational stiffness. The discs' centers of rotation (CoR) were computed for L3-L4 and L4-L5 motion segments. Between RM and FDK models, maximum differences in compressive forces were 7% (L1-L2 & L2-L3), 8% (L3-L4) and 6% (L4-L5) whereas in shear forces 35% (L1-L2), 47% (L2-L3), 45% (L3-L4) and more than 100% in L4-L5. Maximum differences in the sum of global and local muscle forces were approximately 10%, whereas in ligament forces were 27% (supraspinous), 40% (interspinous), 56% (intertransverse), 58% (lig. flavum) and 100% (lig. posterior). The CoRs were predicted posteriorly, below (L3-L4) and in the disc (L4-L5). FDK model predicted lower spinal loads, ligament forces and varied distribution of global and local muscle forces. Consideration of translational stiffnesses influenced the model results and showed increased differences with lower stiffness values. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  11. 3D visualization of Thoraco-Lumbar Spinal Lesions in German Shepherd Dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azpiroz, J.; Krafft, J.; Cadena, M.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2006-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been found to be an excellent imaging modality due to its sensitivity to characterize the morphology of the spine in dogs. This technique is considered to be particularly helpful for diagnosing spinal cord atrophy and spinal stenosis. The three-dimensional visualization of organs and bones can significantly improve the diagnosis of certain diseases in dogs. CT images were acquired of a German shepherd's dog spinal cord to generate stacks and digitally process them to arrange them in a volume image. All imaging experiments were acquired using standard clinical protocols on a clinical CT scanner. The three-dimensional visualization allowed us to observe anatomical structures that otherwise are not possible to observe with two-dimensional images. The combination of an imaging modality like CT together with imaging processing techniques can be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of a number of animal diseases

  12. Acute diagnosis of spinal trauma; Akutdiagnostik des Wirbelsaeulentraumas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, M.; Mallouhi, A.; Jaschke, W. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Innsbruck (Austria); El Attal, R.; Kathrein, A.; Knop, C.; Blauth, M. [Medizinische Universitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-06-15

    Most traumatic spinal injuries result from a high-energy process and are accompanied by other injuries. Following the CCSPR study, the presence of all low-risk factors (simple trauma mechanism, fully conscious, ambulatory at any time since trauma, neck rotation exceeding 45 bilaterally) obviates the need to acutely image the cervical spine. Imaging is indicated in all other patients. Emergency spiral CT should be performed as the first imaging method in high-risk and moderate-risk patients; only in low-risk patients should conventional radiography be performed and trusted as the sole modality. The AO classification according to Magerl et al. is used for the subaxial spine, whereas the upper cervical spine should be classified separately because the anatomy is different at each level. Radiological evaluation of traumatic spinal injuries should be done systematically using the ''ABCS'' scheme. (orig.) [German] Wirbelsaeulentraumen entstehen zumeist infolge hochenergetischer Mechanismen und sind haeufig von weiteren Verletzungen begleitet. Auf eine Diagnostik der Wirbelsaeule kann laut CCSPR-Studie nur dann verzichtet werden, wenn alle Niedrigrisikofaktoren (bewusstseinsklar, gehfaehig, ausreichender Bewegungsumfang, einfacher Unfallmechanismus) erfuellt sind. Alle anderen Patienten muessen radiologisch abgeklaert werden. Dabei sollten Patienten mit einer hohen und mittleren Verletzungswahrscheinlichkeit primaer computertomographisch untersucht werden, nur bei einer geringen Verletzungswahrscheinlichkeit kann der konventionellen Diagnostik vertraut werden. Die Frakturen der subaxialen Wirbelsaeule werden nach der Magerl-AO-Klassifikation eingeteilt, wohingegen fuer die obere HWS separate Einteilungen angewandt werden. Die radiologische Beurteilung des Wirbelsaeulentraumas sollte systematisch anhand des ''ABCS''-Schemas erfolgen. (orig.)

  13. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of...

  14. Tuberculous lumbar spinal epidural abscess in a young adult (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ghazwan Abdulla

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Isolated tuberculous spinal epidural abscess is a rare disease and should be treated urgently with evacuation and decompression. Signs of spondylitis or spondylodiscitis may appear later and therefore long follow up is recommended in tuberculous cases presenting with an isolated epidural abscess.

  15. Does obesity preclude lumbar puncture with a standard spinal needle? The use of computed tomography to measure the skin to lumbar subarachnoid space distance in the general hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, Darragh

    2013-06-05

    OBJECTIVES: Failed lumbar puncture (LP) is a common indication for referral for radiologically guided LP. This study aims to evaluate what percentage of the hospital population would fail an LP using a standard 9-cm needle because of obesity and a skin to subarachnoid space distance greater than 9 cm. METHODS: Images of 402 consecutive patients undergoing computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis were reviewed. Skin to subarachnoid space distance was calculated using sagittal images. A survey was conducted among junior hospital doctors to assess their experience of performing lumbar puncture in obese patients. RESULTS: Four hundred patients were included. Fifty-five patients (13.8 %) had a skin to subarachnoid space distance greater than 9 cm. Intra-abdominal fat, subcutaneous fat and abdominal girth correlated with distance between the skin and subarachnoid space. Among junior doctors, 68.3 % (n = 41) reported LP failure on an obese patient; 78.4 % (n = 47) were unaware of the existence of a longer needle and 13.3 % (n = 8) had experience using a longer needle. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of the hospital population will fail LP with a standard length spinal needle. Selecting a longer needle may be sufficient to successfully complete LP in obese patients. KEY POINTS : • Lumbar puncture failure commonly leads to referral for an image-guided procedure • Standard lumbar puncture may fail in 13.8 % of patients due to obesity • 78.4 % of trainee doctors are unaware of the existence of longer spinal-needles • Using longer spinal needles may allow successful LP in obese patients.

  16. Body Position Influences Which Neural Structures Are Recruited by Lumbar Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Danner

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous stimulation of the human lumbosacral spinal cord is used to evoke spinal reflexes and to neuromodulate altered sensorimotor function following spinal cord injury. Both applications require the reliable stimulation of afferent posterior root fibers. Yet under certain circumstances, efferent anterior root fibers can be co-activated. We hypothesized that body position influences the preferential stimulation of sensory or motor fibers. Stimulus-triggered responses to transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation were recorded using surface-electromyography from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae muscles in 10 individuals with intact nervous systems in the supine, standing and prone positions. Single and paired (30-ms inter-stimulus intervals biphasic stimulation pulses were applied through surface electrodes placed on the skin between the T11 and T12 inter-spinous processes referenced to electrodes on the abdomen. The paired stimulation was applied to evaluate the origin of the evoked electromyographic response; trans-synaptic responses would be suppressed whereas direct efferent responses would almost retain their amplitude. We found that responses to the second stimulus were decreased to 14%±5% of the amplitude of the response to the initial pulse in the supine position across muscles, to 30%±5% in the standing, and to only 80%±5% in the prone position. Response thresholds were lowest during standing and highest in the prone position and response amplitudes were largest in the supine and smallest in the prone position. The responses obtained in the supine and standing positions likely resulted from selective stimulation of sensory fibers while concomitant motor-fiber stimulation occurred in the prone position. We assume that changes of root-fiber paths within the generated electric field when in the prone position increase the stimulation thresholds of posterior above those of anterior root fibers. Thus, we

  17. Correction of Grade 2 Spondylolisthesis Following a Non-Surgical Structural Spinal Rehabilitation Protocol Using Lumbar Traction: A Case Study and Selective Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorchuk, Curtis; Lightstone, Douglas F; McRae, Christi; Kaczor, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Objective Discuss the use of non-surgical spinal rehabilitation protocol in the case of a 69-year-old female with a grade 2 spondylolisthesis. A selective literature review and discussion are provided. Clinical Features A 69-year-old female presented with moderate low back pain (7/10 pain) and severe leg cramping (7/10 pain). Initial lateral lumbar x-ray revealed a grade 2 spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 measuring 13.3 mm. Interventions and Outcomes The patient completed 60 sessions of Mirror Image® spinal exercises, adjustments, and traction over 45 weeks. Post-treatment lateral lumbar x-ray showed a decrease in translation of L4-L5 from 13.3 mm to 2.4 mm, within normal limits. Conclusions This case provides the first documented evidence of a non-surgical or chiropractic treatment, specifically Chiropractic BioPhysics®, protocols of lumbar spondylolisthesis where spinal alignment was corrected. Additional research is needed to investigate the clinical implications and treatment methods. PMID:29299090

  18. The impact of magnetic resonance on the diagnostic evaluation of acute cervicothoracic spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, A.L.; Rothfus, W.E.; Deeb, Z.L.; Daffner, R.H.; Lupetin, A.R.; Wilberger, J.E.; Prostko, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    From 1984 to 1987 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed on 100 patients suffering acute spinal trauma. MR demonstrated one or more injuries to the cervicothoracic region in 31 patients. It displayed a spectrum of spinal cord injury ranging from mild compression and swelling to complete transection. MR was also useful in evaluating alignment at the cervicothoracic junction, in depicting ligamentous injury, in establishing the presence of disc herniation, and in identifying unsuspected levels of injury. We present a diagnostic algorithm that incorporates the role of MR in evaluating acute cervicothoracic spinal trauma and emphasizes the replacement of myelography by MR in the initial assessment of neurologic deficit. (orig.)

  19. Detrusor Acontractility after Acute Spinal Cord Injury-Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Mirjam; Tornic, Jure; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kessler, Thomas M

    2018-01-17

    We assessed urodynamic parameters within the first 40 days after spinal cord injury to investigate whether the detrusor is acontractile during the acute phase of spinal cord injury. We performed a prospective cohort study in 54 patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction due to acute spinal cord injury who underwent urodynamic investigation within the first 40 days after injury at a single university spinal cord injury center. Urodynamic investigation revealed an acontractile detrusor in only 20 of the 54 patients (37%) but unfavorable urodynamic parameters in 34 (63%). We found detrusor overactivity in 32 patients, detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in 25, maximum storage detrusor pressure greater than 40 cm H 2 O in 17, vesicoureteral reflux in 3 and low bladder compliance (less than 20 ml/cm H 2 O) in 1. More than 1 unfavorable urodynamic parameter per patient was possible. In contrast to the common notion of an acontractile detrusor during acute spinal cord injury, almost two-thirds of our patients showed unfavorable urodynamic parameters within the first 40 days after spinal cord injury. Considering that early treatment of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with acute spinal cord injury might improve the long-term urological outcome, urodynamic investigation should be performed timely to optimize patient tailored therapy. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury: Relationship of Cord Compression to Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeers, Peta; Battistuzzo, Camila R; Clark, Jillian M; Bernard, Stephen; Freeman, Brian J C; Batchelor, Peter E

    2018-02-21

    Spinal cord injury in the cervical spine is commonly accompanied by cord compression and urgent surgical decompression may improve neurological recovery. However, the extent of spinal cord compression and its relationship to neurological recovery following traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantify maximum cord compression following thoracolumbar spinal cord injury and to assess the relationship among cord compression, cord swelling, and eventual clinical outcome. The medical records of patients who were 15 to 70 years of age, were admitted with a traumatic thoracolumbar spinal cord injury (T1 to L1), and underwent a spinal surgical procedure were examined. Patients with penetrating injuries and multitrauma were excluded. Maximal osseous canal compromise and maximal spinal cord compression were measured on preoperative mid-sagittal computed tomography (CT) scans and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by observers blinded to patient outcome. The American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades from acute hospital admission (≤24 hours of injury) and rehabilitation discharge were used to measure clinical outcome. Relationships among spinal cord compression, canal compromise, and initial and final AIS grades were assessed via univariate and multivariate analyses. Fifty-three patients with thoracolumbar spinal cord injury were included in this study. The overall mean maximal spinal cord compression (and standard deviation) was 40% ± 21%. There was a significant relationship between median spinal cord compression and final AIS grade, with grade-A patients (complete injury) exhibiting greater compression than grade-C and D patients (incomplete injury) (p compression as independently influencing the likelihood of complete spinal cord injury (p compression. Greater cord compression is associated with an increased likelihood of severe neurological deficits (complete injury) following

  1. Projection patterns of commissural interneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of the neonatal rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokke, Mathis Frøshaug; Nissen, Ulla Vig; Glover, Joel C.

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the axonal projection patterns of commissural interneurons (CINs) in the neonatal rat spinal cord. Some CINs are integral components of the neuronal networks in the vertebrate spinal cord that generate locomotor activity. By using differential retrograde labeling protocols...... with fluorescent dextran amines, we show that CINs with ascending axons (ascending CINs, or aCINs) and CINs with descending axons (descending CINs, or dCINs) constitute largely different populations. We show that aCINs and dCINs occupy partially overlapping domains in the transverse plane. The aCINs are located...... and a half segment rostrally or caudally and are present in roughly equal numbers. We also demonstrate the presence of a third, smaller population of CINs whose axons bifurcate to project for at least one and a half segment both rostrally and caudally (adCINs). The adCINs are located predominantly among...

  2. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. Clinical practice guidelines endorsed by The Polish Society of Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latka, Dariusz; Miekisiak, Grzegorz; Jarmuzek, Pawel; Lachowski, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc (HLD) is arguably the most common spinal disorder requiring surgical intervention. Although the term is fairly straightforward, the exact pathology and thus the clinical picture and natural history may vary. Therefore, it is immensely difficult to formulate universal guidelines for surgical treatment. The aim of this paper is to organize the terminology and clear the inconsistencies in phraseology, review treatment options and gather available published evidence to address the clinical questions to create a set of clinical guidelines in relevant to the topic. Twelve queries, addressing optimal surgical treatment of the HLD have been formulated. The results, based on the literature review are described in the present work. The final product of the analysis was a set of guidelines for the surgical treatment of symptomatic HLD. Categorized into four tiers based on the level of evidence (I-III and X), they have been designed to assist in the selection of optimal, effective treatment leading to the successful outcome. The evidence based medicine (EBM) is becoming ever more popular among spinal surgeons. Unfortunately this is not always feasible. Lack of uniform guidelines and numerous conflicts of interest introduce flaws in the decision making process. The key role of experts and professional societies is to provide high value recommendation based on the most current literature. Present work contains a set of guidelines for the surgical treatment of HLD officially endorsed by the Polish Spine Surgery Society. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Excitatory inputs to four types of spinocerebellar tract neurons in the cat and the rat thoraco-lumbar spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sony Shakya; Bannatyne, B Anne; Jankowska, Elzbieta; Hammar, Ingela; Nilsson, Elin; Maxwell, David J

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum receives information from the hindlimbs through several populations of spinocerebellar tract neurons. Although the role of these neurons has been established in electrophysiological experiments, the relative contribution of afferent fibres and central neurons to their excitatory input has only been estimated approximately so far. Taking advantage of differences in the immunohistochemistry of glutamatergic terminals of peripheral afferents and of central neurons (with vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT1 or VGLUT2, respectively), we compared sources of excitatory input to four populations of spinocerebellar neurons in the thoraco-lumbar spinal cord: dorsal spinocerebellar tract neurons located in Clarke's column (ccDSCT) and in the dorsal horn (dhDSCT) and ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT) neurons including spinal border (SB) neurons. This was done on 22 electrophysiologically identified intracellularly labelled neurons in cats and on 80 neurons labelled by retrograde transport of cholera toxin b subunit injected into the cerebellum of rats. In both species distribution of antibodies against VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 on SB neurons (which have dominating inhibitory input from limb muscles), revealed very few VGLUT1 contacts and remarkably high numbers of VGLUT2 contacts. In VSCT neurons with excitatory afferent input, the number of VGLUT1 contacts was relatively high although VGLUT2 contacts likewise dominated, while the proportions of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 immunoreactive terminals were the reverse on the two populations of DSCT neurons. These findings provide morphological evidence that SB neurons principally receive excitatory inputs from central neurons and provide the cerebellum with information regarding central neuronal activity. PMID:22371473

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 in the ligamentum flavum from lumbar spinal canal stenosis patients with and without diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Guanyu; Watanabe, Kota; Miyauchi, Yoshiteru

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) is one of the most common spinal disorders in the elderly, and ligamentum flavum (LF) hypertrophy is an important cause of LSCS. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) can degrade fibrillar collagens and elastic microfibrils, and is involved in inflammation and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the expression of MMP13 in the LF from LSCS patients with diabetes mellitus [DM (+)] with that in the LF from patients without DM [DM (-)] and to analyze the relationship among DM, MMP13 expression, and LF hypertrophy. LFs from 11 DM (+) and 24 DM (-) LSCS patients were analyzed in this study. Histology analysis using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome stain was performed for each LF. The expression of MMP13 was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The thickness of LF was measured by CT. In the LF from DM (+) LSCS patients, the elastic fibers were more disorganized and had lower volumes than in the LF from DM (-) LSCS patients, while more fibrotic tissue was observed in the LF from DM (+) than from DM (-) LSCS patients. MMP13 expression was significantly higher in the LF from DM (+) LSCS patients (0.46±0.61 vs. 0.05±0.09, P=0.002). The LF from the DM (+) LSCS patients was significantly thicker than that from the DM (-) LSCS patients (5.0±0.9 vs. 3.1±0.8 mm, P<0.01), and the thickness was correlated with the expression of MMP13 (correlation coefficient=0.43, P=0.01, Pearson's correlation test). DM-related MMP13 expression can be one of the factors contributing to fibrosis and hypertrophy of the LF. Further research on the mechanism of this process may lead to new therapies for LF hypertrophy. (author)

  5. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Substance P immunoreactivity in the lumbar spinal cord of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni following peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Partata

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoreactive substance P was investigated in turtle lumbar spinal cord after sciatic nerve transection. In control animals immunoreactive fibers were densest in synaptic field Ia, where the longest axons invaded synaptic field III. Positive neuronal bodies were identified in the lateral column of the dorsal horn and substance P immunoreactive varicosities were observed in the ventral horn, in close relationship with presumed motoneurons. Other varicosities appeared in the lateral and anterior funiculi. After axotomy, substance P immunoreactive fibers were reduced slightly on the side of the lesion, which was located in long fibers that invaded synaptic field III and in the varicosities of the lateral and anterior funiculus. The changes were observed at 7 days after axonal injury and persisted at 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after the lesion. These findings show that turtles should be considered as a model to study the role of substance P in peripheral axonal injury, since the distribution and temporal changes of substance P were similar to those found in mammals.

  7. Effect of Acupuncture on Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadianfard, Mohammad J; Aminlari, Ali; Daneshian, Arghavan; Safarpour, Ali R

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a major cause of debilitation in adults, and acupuncture is a recommended treatment. We assessed the effect of acupuncture on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. Twenty-four patients with LSS who had symptoms of neurogenic claudication were randomly selected and underwent 10 sessions of acupuncture. Pain and quality of life were evaluated before and immediately after the intervention and 6 weeks later using a visual analogue scale and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Paired t tests and repeated measure tests were used to analyze the data. The mean age of the patients was 48.2 ± 10.8 years. The mean visual analogue scale scores before and immediately after intervention (7.9 ± 1.3 and 4.3 ± 2.1) were statistically different (p acupuncture (p pain, and physical well-being. Therefore, acupuncture had a significant short-term effect on pain and quality of life in patients with LSS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effect of lidocaine on spinal cord lipid peroxide levels after acute spinal cord trauma in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, A.S.; Özer, F.; Pamir, N.; Emerk, K.

    1991-01-01

    A standard spinal cord trauma was performed on control and lidocaine-treated (5 mg/kg. i.p.) rats. Spinal cord lipid peroxide levels in the lidocaine-trcaled group were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant difference was observed in plasma lipid peroxide levels. Our results suggest a protective role of lidocaine against lipid peroxidation after experimental spinal cord trauma in rats.

  9. Decompression and paraspinous tension band: a novel treatment method for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J N Alastair; Depreitere, Bart; Pflugmacher, Robert; Schnake, Klaus J; Fielding, Louis C; Alamin, Todd F; Goffin, Jan

    2015-03-02

    Prior studies have demonstrated the superiority of decompression and fusion over decompression alone for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis. More recent studies have investigated whether nonfusion stabilization could provide durable clinical improvement after decompression and fusion. To examine the clinical safety and effectiveness of decompression and implantation of a novel flexion restricting paraspinous tension band (PTB) for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. A prospective clinical study. Forty-one patients (7 men and 34 women) aged 45 to 83 years (68.2 ± 9.0) were recruited with symptomatic spinal stenosis and Meyerding Grade 1 or 2 degenerative spondylolisthesis at L3-L4 (8) or L4-L5 (33). Self-reported measures included visual analog scale (VAS) for leg, back, and hip pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Physiologic measures included quantitative and qualitative radiographic analysis performed by an independent core laboratory. Patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and stenosis were prospectively enrolled at four European spine centers with independent monitoring of data. Clinical and radiographic outcome data collected preoperatively were compared with data collected at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. This study was sponsored by the PTB manufacturer (Simpirica Spine, Inc., San Carlos, CA, USA), including institutional research support grants to the participating centers totaling approximately US $172,000. Statistically significant improvements and clinically important effect sizes were seen for all pain and disability measurements. At 24 months follow-up, ODI scores were reduced by an average of 25.4 points (59%) and maximum leg pain on VAS by 48.1 mm (65%). Back pain VAS scores improved from 54.1 by an average of 28.5 points (53%). There was one postoperative wound infection (2.4%) and an overall reoperation rate of 12%. Eighty-two percent patients available for 24 months

  10. Nonoperative treatment of acute traumatic spinal injuries: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic spinal injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is no agreed method of care. Neurological recovery in complete injury has been dismal. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the neurological recovery at discharge in traumatic spinal injury patients ...

  11. Efficacy of Early Fusion With Local Bone Graft and Platelet-Rich Plasma in Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Followed Over 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Takamatsu, Junki; Matsushita, Tadashi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2017-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. Many oral surgeons use platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for bone defects, but the efficacy of PRP for spinal arthrodesis remains uncertain. The objective was to compare the efficacy of autologous local bone graft and PRP with local bone graft alone for promotion of bony union in posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) surgery, with investigation of the safety of PRP over 10 years. A prospective study was conducted in 29 consecutive patients who underwent one-level PLF at L4/5 for degenerative lumbar disease. Local bone on the left (control) side and local bone with PRP on the right side were grafted. The fusion area and absorption of grafted bone at 58 regions were determined using computed tomography at 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Average bone fusion areas on the PRP side were significantly wider at 3 and 6 months after surgery ( P fusion for lumbar arthrodesis with no adverse events over 10 years, and thus is a safe and low cost autologous option in spinal fusion.

  12. MicroRNA-221 Regulates Hypertrophy of Ligamentum Flavum in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis by Targeting TIMP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun-qiang; Zhang, Zhen-hui; Zheng, Yong-fa; Feng, Shi-qing

    2016-02-01

    A study of lumbar ligamentum flavum (LF). The aim of this study was to identify LF hypertrophy related microRNAs (miRNAs) expression profile and to investigate the role of miRNAs in the development of LF hypertrophy in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Although histologic and biologic literature on LF hypertrophy is available, the pathomechanism is still unknown. Accumulating evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) participate in many physiologic processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and fibrosis, but the role of specific miRNAs involved in LF hypertrophy remains elusive. An initial screening of LF tissues miRNA expression by miRNA microarray was performed using samples from 10 patients and 10 controls, respectively. Subsequently, differential expression was validated using qRT-PCR. Then, functional analysis of the miRNAs in regulating collagens I and III expression was carried out. Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay were also used to detect the target gene. In addition, the thickness of the LF at the level of the facet joint was measured on axial T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. We identified 18 miRNAs that were differentially expressed in patients compared with controls. Following qRT-PCR confirmation, miR-221 was significantly lower in LF tissues of patients than controls. The LF was significantly thicker in patients than that in controls. Bioinformatics target prediction identified tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 as a putative target of miR-221. Furthermore, luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-221 directly targets TIMP-2 and affects the protein expression of TIMP-2 in fibroblasts isolated from LF. Of note, miR-221 mimic reduced mRNA and protein expression of collagens I and collagen III in fibroblasts isolated from LF. The downregulation of miR-221 might contribute to LF hypertrophy by promoting collagens I and III expression via the induction of TIMP-2. Our study also underscores the

  13. The effect of electrical stimulation on lumbar spinal fusion in older patients: a randomized, controlled, multi-center trial: part 2: fusion rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Egund, Niels; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Rasmussen, Sten; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Lindblad, Bent Erling; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Bünger, Cody

    2009-10-01

    Randomized, controlled, multi-center trial. To investigate the effect of direct current (DC) electrical stimulation on fusion rates after lumbar spinal fusion in patients older than 60 years. Older patients have increased complication rates after spinal fusion surgery. Treatments which have the possibility of enhancing functional outcome and fusion rates without lengthening the procedure could prove beneficial. DC-stimulation of spinal fusion has proven effective in increasing fusion rates in younger and "high risk" patients, but little information exist on the effect in older patients. A randomized clinical trial comprising 5 orthopedic centers. The study included a total of 107 patients randomized to uninstrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without DC-stimulation. Fusion rate was assessed at 2 year follow-up using thin slice CT. Functional outcome was assessed using Dallas Pain Questionnaire and Low Back Pain Rating Scale pain index. RESULTS.: Available follow-up after 2 years was 89% (84 of 95 patients). Fusion rates were surprisingly low. DC-stimulation had no effect on fusion rate: 35% versus 36% in controls. Other factors associated with low fusion rates were female gender (32% vs. 42% in males, P = 0.050) and smoking (21% vs. 42% in nonsmokers, P = 0.079). Patients who achieved a solid fusion as determined by CT had superior functional outcome and pain scores at their latest follow-up. Thin slice CT revealed very high nonunion rates after uninstrumented spinal fusion in older patients. DC-stimulation was not effective in increasing fusion rates in this patient population. The achievement of a solid fusion was associated with superior functional outcome.

  14. Correlation between the Oswestry Disability Index and objective measurements of walking capacity and performance in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Annette Bennedsgaard; Gustafsson, Malin Eleonora Av Kák

    2018-03-05

    The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) plays a significant role in lumbar spinal stenosis research and is used to assess patient's walking limitations. The World Health Organisation describes the constructs of walking capacity and performance and recommend measuring both to fully describe patient's walking ability. Objective methods to assess walking capacity and performance is being investigated and used alongside the traditional use of PROs. This review of the literature was made to provide an overview of relations between the ODI and outcome measures of walking capacity and performance in spinal stenosis research, and to provide a strategy for improving such measures in future research. The review was conducted according to the Prisma Statement. In February 2017, a search was performed in Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane database. Authors independently screened articles by title, abstract, and full text, and studies were included if both authors agreed. Articles with correlation analysis between the ODI, walking capacity and performance measures by accelerometer or GPS were included. The results support a correlation between the ODI and walking capacity measures. The available studies using ODI and accelerometers were too few to reach a conclusion regarding correlation between ODI and walking performance. No articles with GPS measure were identified. The ODI should not stand alone when evaluating walking limitations in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. To enable a comprehensive assessment of walking ability, a walking test should be used to assess walking capacity and accelerometers should be investigated and standardized in measuring walking performance. These slides can be retrieved under Electronic Supplementary Material.

  15. Deconstructing Chronic Low Back Pain in the Older Adult-Step by Step Evidence and Expert-Based Recommendations for Evaluation and Treatment. Part VI: Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Julie M; Rundell, Sean D; Dougherty, Paul; Gentili, Angela; Kochersberger, Gary; Morone, Natalia E; Naga Raja, Srinivasa; Rodriguez, Eric; Rossi, Michelle I; Shega, Joseph; Sowa, Gwendolyn; Weiner, Debra K

    2016-03-01

    . To present the sixth in a series of articles designed to deconstruct chronic low back pain (CLBP) in older adults. This article focuses on the evaluation and management of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), the most common condition for which older adults undergo spinal surgery. . The evaluation and treatment algorithm, a table articulating the rationale for the individual algorithm components, and stepped-care drug recommendations were developed using a modified Delphi approach. The Principal Investigator, a five-member content expert panel and a nine-member primary care panel were involved in the iterative development of these materials. The illustrative clinical case was taken from the clinical practice of a contributor's colleague (SR). . We present an algorithm and supportive materials to help guide the care of older adults with LSS, a condition that occurs not uncommonly in those with CLBP. The case illustrates the importance of function-focused management and a rational approach to conservative care. . Lumbar spinal stenosis exists not uncommonly in older adults with CLBP and management often can be accomplished without surgery. Treatment should address all conditions in addition to LSS contributing to pain and disability. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Prospective comparison of changes in lumbar spine MRI findings over time between individuals with acute low back pain and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, J.; Magnussen, J. S.; Hush, J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The clinical importance of lumbar MR imaging findings is unclear. This study was an exploratory investigation of whether lumbar spine MR imaging findings change more commonly during a 12-week period in individuals with acute low back pain compared with pain-free controls...... difference. For all other MR imaging findings, the proportions of subjects and controls in whom MR imaging findings were reported to change during 12 weeks were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in MR imaging findings were observed in a similar proportion of the low back pain and control groups, except....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty individuals with recent-onset low back pain and 10 pain-free controls were recruited into an exploratory prospective cohort study. All participants had a lumbar spine MR imaging at baseline and repeat MR imaging scans at 1, 2, 6, and 12 weeks. The proportion of individuals who...

  17. Surface coil MR imaging of acute spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, C.B.; Mirfakhraee, M.; Crofford, M.J.; Calhoun, J.H.; Amparo, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-two fractures were imaged in 21 patients, 18 in the first week after trauma, MR imaging detected all significant fractures of the thoracolumbar spine; and it was superior to other modalities in evaluating trauma to the disk and spinal cord. It was more sensitive, although less specific, than CT in assessing epidural mass effect. Most important, MR imaging was the only modality that identified tears of the spinal ligaments, enabling surgeons to accurately determine the stability of the spinal injury. The results indicate that Mr imaging can replace CT in evaluating the thoracolumbar spine. CT will play the major role in assessment of the cervical region, but MR is helpful in evaluating the spinal canal and cord

  18. Effects of Spinal Stabilization Exercise on the Cross-sectional Areas of the Lumbar Multifidus and Psoas Major Muscles, Pain Intensity, and Lumbar Muscle Strength of Patients with Degenerative Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongho; Kim, Hyungguen; Chung, Jaeyeop

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using spinal stabilizing exercise to reduce atrophy of the multifidus and psoas major muscles, reduce the levels of pain and disability, and increase paraspinal muscle strength in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). [Subjects and Methods] In 33 patients (Age range: 25-65 years) diagnosed with DDD, spinal stabilization exercise was conducted for 8 weeks. The levels of pain and disability were measured before and after exercise using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Paraspinal muscular strength in four directions was evaluated with a CENTAUR 3D Spatial Rotation Device. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of both the left and right multifidus and the psoas major at the upper endplate of L4 were measured before and after exercise using computed tomography (CT). [Results] After 8 weeks of spinal stabilization exercise, the pain and lumbar disability in subjects decreased significantly from 6.12±1.24 to 2.43±1.14. The ODI score also improved from 20.18±7.14 to 8.81±5.73. In addition, paraspinal muscle strength increased significantly, while the CSAs of the left and right multifidus and psoas major widened as compared with the pre-exercise size. [Conclusion] Spinal stabilization exercise was effective for reducing pain and disability in DDD patients. It was an effective adjunct to aid rehabilitation in these cases.

  19. Treatment of symptomatic lumbar spinal degenerative pathologies by means of combined conservative biochemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A; Corò, L; Paradiso, R; Dall'aglio, R; Alexandre, A M; Fraschini, F; Spaggiari, P G

    2011-01-01

    Research in spine surgery has proposed new soft and less invasive techniques. These are the results of our experience with oxygen-ozone therapy, which we could experiment within the Italian National Health System over 3 years. A total of 1,920 patients were admitted on the basis of unselected enrolment because of lumbosciatic pain. Patients were divided into three groups: (A) Patients with degenerative disc disease and arthropathy: 509 (26.5%), (B) Patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS): 1,027 (53.489%), and (C) Patients with pure herniated lumbar disc: 384 (20%). The rationale of the treatment for all these different pathologies we have taken into consideration is the biochemical mechanism by which they can engender pain and dysfunction. Treatment for group A: paravertebral injection and phleboclysis (two cycles of 6 sessions, one each 3 days) +endoscopic neurolysis. Treatment for group B: paravertebral injection and phleboclysis (two cycles of 6 sessions, one each 3 days) + endoscopic neurolysis with intradiscal procedure (named percutaneous peridurodiscolysis). Treatment for group C: paravertebral injection (two cycles of 6 sessions, one each 3 days) + percutaneous discolysis.The perceived quality of result for this minimally invasive procedure makes oxygen-ozone therapy an interesting weapon in the hands of doctors. Furthermore, if the technique loses its clinical effectiveness, it can be repeated without harm for the patient, and costs for the health organization are notably very low, above all if compared to surgical procedures.We underline the need that this treatment should be performed in protected structures, in operative rooms, under anesthesiologic control, and in the hands of specialists.

  20. Effectiveness of Reoperations for Adjacent Segment Disease Following Lumbar Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysch, Austin; Ajiboye, Remi M; Sharma, Akshay; Li, Jesse; Reza, Tara; Harley, Dushawn; Park, Don Y; Pourtaheri, Sina

    2018-03-01

    Although several options are available to address adjacent segment disease (ASD), the most effective surgical treatment has not been determined. In addition, it is important to subdivide ASD into stenosis with or without instability to determine if a decompression alone vs an extension of fusion is necessary. A systematic search of multiple medical reference databases was conducted for studies on surgical treatment of ASD. The primary outcome measures used were radiographic and clinical success rates. Meta-analysis was completed to determine effect summary values, 95% confidence intervals, and Q statistic and I 2 values, using the random effects model for heterogeneity. The search yielded 662 studies, of which 657 were excluded. A total of 5 (level IV) studies with a total of 118 patients were included in this review. In 2 studies (46 patients), stenosis without instability was the indication for reoperation for ASD. However, extension of fusion was the modality of choice for the treatment of ASD in all studies. Overall clinical improvement (in back and/or leg pain scores) was noted in 71.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, 37.4-100), while radiographic fusion was noted in 89.3% of patients (95% confidence interval, 51.2-100). Following reoperation for ASD, revision surgery rates ranged from 4.5% to 23.1% at last clinical follow-up. There is variability in the clinical improvement following lumbar fusion for ASD. In addition, little literature exists regarding the optimal treatment options for patients with ASD for stenosis with or without instability. [Orthopedics. 2018; 41(2):e161-e167.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Preliminary results of a soft novel lumbar intervertebral prothesis (DIAM) in the degenerative spinal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariottini, A; Pieri, S; Giachi, S; Carangelo, B; Zalaffi, A; Muzii, F V; Palma, L

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a series of 43 patients suffering from lower limb pain, almost constantly associated with chronic or acute backpain, treated by microsurgical nerve root decompression and by implantation of a soft intervertebral prothesis (DIAM). Satisfying results were obtained in 97% of cases, inducing the authors to consider the device a reliable tool for curing low-back pain and sciatica. Selection criteria are exposed and discussed.

  2. Morphometry study on pre and post-hatching nerve cell bodies of lumbar spinal ganglia of Gallus domesticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Ferraz de Carvalho

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available A cytomorphometric study was performed in lumbar spinal ganglia neurons of Gallus domesticus on the 10th and 18th incubation days and 8th, 35th, 61st, and 120th post-hatching days. The absolute volume of nucleus and relative volume of cytoplasm were respectively estimated by the Bach² caryometric method and by point-counting volumetry, carried out in 0.5mm thick araldite sections. The relative volume, the surface-to-volume ratio and the total surface of RER, SER, mitochondria, dense bodies, Golgi complex and the relative volume of hyaloplasm inside and outside the Nissl bodies were estimated from electronmicrographs by the Weibel et al.58 method. The conclusions were: a there was an increase of the cell volume and a decrease of the nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, particularly between the first two ages; b the relative volumes of RER and SER change inversely with respect to each other: the RER increases before hatching, decreasing progressively afterwards; the changes of relative volume of dense bodies are similar to those of the RER, and the mitochondria show relatively small variations concerning the same parameter; c the relative volume of hyaloplasm inside the Nissl bodies decreases while those outside increases; d the surface-to-volume ratio drops sharply for all organelles from the 10th to the 18th day of incubation; after hatching, a tendency to increase is observed; e the membrane surface-to-cytoplasmic volume ratio decreases for all organelles from the 10th to the 18th day of incubation; after hatching, this ratio increases slightly for mitochondria and Golgi complex, sharply for SER, dropping for dense bodies. The RER values alternate regularly.

  3. Understanding inhibitory mechanisms of lumbar spinal manipulation using H-reflex and F-wave responses: a methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, J Donald; Weber, Kenneth A; Corbin, Roger L; Burke, Jeanmarie R

    2012-09-30

    The purpose of this research was to characterize unique neurophysiologic events following a high velocity, low amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation (SM) procedure. Descriptive time series analysis techniques of time plots, outlier detection and autocorrelation functions were applied to time series of tibial nerve H-reflexes that were evoked at 10-s intervals from 100 s before the event until 100 s after three distinct events L5-S1 HVLA SM, or a L5-S1 joint pre-loading procedure, or the control condition. Sixty-six subjects were randomly assigned to three procedures, i.e., 22 time series per group. If the detection of outliers and correlograms revealed a pattern of non-randomness that was only time-locked to a single, specific event in the normalized time series, then an experimental effect would be inferred beyond the inherent variability of H-reflex responses. Tibial nerve F-wave responses were included to determine if any new information about central nervous function following a HVLA SM procedure could be ascertained. Time series analyses of H(max)/M(max) ratios, pre-post L5-S1 HVLA SM, substantiated the hypothesis that the specific aspects of the manipulative thrust lead to a greater attenuation of the H(max)/M(max) ratio as compared to the non-specific aspects related to the postural perturbation and joint pre-loading. The attenuation of the H(max)/M(max) ratio following the HVLA SM procedure was reliable and may hold promise as a translational tool to measure the consistency and accuracy of protocol implementation involving SM in clinical trials research. F-wave responses were not sensitive to mechanical perturbations of the lumbar spine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmink, Jan T.

    2010-01-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  5. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, Jan T. [University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. Radiology

    2010-07-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  6. Acute vertebral fracture after spinal fusion: a case report illustrating the added value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography to magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with spinal Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, M.; Putzier, M.; Pumberger, M.; Hermann, K.G.; Diekhoff, T.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is degraded by metal-implant-induced artifacts when used for the diagnostic assessment of vertebral compression fractures in patients with instrumented spinal fusion. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) offers a promising supplementary imaging tool in these patients. This case report describes an 85-year-old woman who presented with a suspected acute vertebral fracture after long posterior lumbar interbody fusion. This is the first report of a vertebral fracture that showed bone marrow edema on DECT; however, edema was missed by an MRI STIR sequence owing to metal artifacts. Bone marrow assessment using DECT is less susceptible to metal artifacts than MRI, resulting in improved visualization of vertebral edema in the vicinity of fused vertebral bodies. (orig.)

  7. The Effects of Leukocyte Filtration on Cell Salvaged Autologous Blood Transfusion on Lung Function and Lung Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Reactions in Elderly Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Shen, Jianjun; Sun, Jianliang; McQuillan, Patrick M; Hu, Zhiyong

    2018-02-21

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of leukocyte filtration of autologous salvaged blood on lung function, lung inflammatory reaction, and oxidative stress reaction in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery. Sixty elderly patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups: Leukocyte Filter group and Control group. Serum levels of inflammatory markers including white blood cell and polymorphonuclear count, neutrophil elastase, serum surfactant protein A, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde, superoxide dismutase, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and respiratory function markers including dynamic respiratory system compliance, oxygenation index, and respiratory index were measured immediately before induction of anesthesia (T0), immediately before blood transfusion (T1), and 1 (T2), 6 (T3), and 12 hours (T4) after end of blood transfusion. The Leukocyte Filter group had higher dynamic respiratory system compliance at T2, oxygenation index at T2 and T3, respiratory index and superoxide dismutase at T2, T3, and T4 than those in the Control group (P<0.05). The Leukocyte Filter group had lower white blood cell, polymorphonuclear count, neutrophil elastase, serum surfactant protein A, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α at T2, T3, and T4 than those in the Control group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in adverse reactions related specifically to blood transfusion or postoperative respiratory complications within 72 hours. Salvaged autologous blood leukocyte filtration can improve ventilation, promote gas exchange and oxygenation, and inhibit lung inflammatory and oxidative stress reactions in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery.

  8. Shakuyaku-kanzo-to (Shao-Yao-Gan-Cao-Tang) as Treatment of Painful Muscle Cramps in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Its Minimum Effective Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Yumiko; Takaoka, Yutaka; Sugano, Aki; Sato, Hitoaki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Ohta, Mika; Nishimoto, Takashi; Mizobuchi, Satoshi

    2016-04-04

    Shakuyaku-kanzo-to (Shao-Yao-Gan-Cao-Tang) is a Kampo medicine, which is known to be effective against muscle cramps as well as crampy pain in the gastrointestinal smooth muscle and skeletal muscle. However, glycyrrhizin in this medicine also causes adverse drug reactions such as hypokalemia, hypertension, and edema. We analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to for painful muscle cramps associated with lumbar spinal stenosis and clarified its minimum effective dose. 58 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and painful muscle cramps were included. We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to (n=16) comparing with eperisone hydrochloride (n=14). We then examined the minimum effective dose of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to in the remaining 28 patients. Shakuyaku-kanzo-to reduced the frequency of painful muscle cramps to less than 50% in 13 of 16 patients. However, eperisone hydrochloride reduced it to the same level in 4 of 14 patients. The onset of the maximum therapeutic effect of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to was less than 3 days from the start of treatment in 11 of 15 patients. Regarding the minimum effective dose for painful muscle cramps, 2.5 g of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to used as needed had a therapeutic effect that was equivalent to the regular use of 7.5 g/day (given in divided doses three times daily). Our data show that Shakuyaku-kanzo-to is effective for painful muscle cramps associated with lumbar spinal stenosis. The dosage of 2.5 g of Shakuyaku-kanzo-to as needed had a therapeutic effect that was equal to the regular use of 7.5 g/day.

  9. Interdisciplinary Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Part of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery Rehabilitation: Experience of Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgreen, Pil; Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving lumbar spinal fusion surgery often have persisting postoperative pain negatively affecting their daily life. These patients may be helped by interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral therapy which is recognized as an effective intervention for improving beneficial pain coping behavior, thereby facilitating the rehabilitation process of patients with chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experience of patients recovering from lumbar spinal fusion surgery and to explore potential similarities and disparities in pain coping behavior between receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. We conducted semistructured interviews with 10 patients; 5 receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy in connection with their lumbar spinal fusion surgery and 5 receiving usual care. We conducted a phenomenological analysis to reach our first aim and then conducted a comparative content analysis to reach our second aim. Patients' postoperative experience was characterized by the need to adapt to the limitations imposed by back discomfort (coexisting with the back), need for recognition and support from others regarding their pain, a relatively long rehabilitation period during which they "awaited the result of surgery", and ambivalence toward analgesics. The patients in both groups had similar negative perception of analgesics and tended to abstain from them to avoid addiction. Coping behavior apparently differed among receivers and nonreceivers of interdisciplinary cognitive-behavioral group therapy. Receivers prevented or minimized pain by resting before pain onset, whereas nonreceivers awaited pain onset before resting. The postoperative experience entailed ambivalence, causing uncertainty, worry and insecurity. This ambivalence was relieved when others recognized the patient's pain and offered support. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as part of rehabilitation may have encouraged beneficial pain coping

  10. Using the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III to measure functional recovery in a post-acute spinal cord injury program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, P; Morrison, S A; McDowell, S; Vazquez, L

    2010-05-01

    A prospective design was conducted using admission and discharge Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III) data for persons discharged from a post-acute rehabilitation program. The purpose of this study is to analyze the functional gains as measured by the SCIM-III that occur during a post-acute rehabilitation program. Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA, USA. Participants were included if they had a motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI), were within 12 months from the date of injury and completed the recommended length of stay. Median SCIM-III changes between admission and discharge were calculated by subgroups (C1-4, C5, C6, C7-8, T1-6 and T7-12) based on the American Spinal Injury Association motor injury levels. Ceiling and floor effects were examined by item and the percentage of participants showing change between admission and discharge were calculated. In all, 114 participants were included in the analysis. The median total SCIM-III score at admission was 42 (range 13-68), whereas the median total SCIM-III score at discharge was 50 (range 16-72). The median improvement of 5 points in total SCIM-III score between admission and discharge was statistically significant. Significant improvements were also observed between admission and discharge across all subgroups except C1-4. Ceiling and floor effects were noted in some subgroups. The SCIM-III seems to be an effective measure for functional assessment of persons with SCI in a post-acute rehabilitation program. There are some ceiling and floor effects noted; however, the SCIM-III seems to be sensitive enough to capture functional changes during a post-acute rehabilitation program.

  11. Multishot diffusion-weighted MR imaging features in acute trauma of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jin Song; Huan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    To analyse diffusion-weighted MRI of acute spinal cord trauma and evaluate its diagnostic value. Conventional MRI and multishot, navigator-corrected DWI were performed in 20 patients with acute spinal cord trauma using 1.5-T MR within 72 h after the onset of trauma. Twenty cases were classified into four categories according to the characteristics of DWI: (1) Oedema type: ten cases presented with variable hyperintense areas within the spinal cord. There were significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between lesions and unaffected regions (t = -7.621, P < 0.01). ADC values of lesions were markedly lower than those of normal areas. (2) Mixed type: six cases showed heterogeneously hyperintense areas due to a mixture of haemorrhage and oedema. (3) Haemorrhage type: two cases showed lesions as marked hypointensity due to intramedullary haemorrhage. (4) Compressed type (by epidural haemorrhage): one of the two cases showed an area of mild hyperintensity in the markedly compressed cord due to epidural haematoma. Muti-shot DWI of the spinal cord can help visualise and evaluate the injured spinal cord in the early stage, especially in distinguishing the cytotoxic oedema from vasogenic oedema. It can assist in detecting intramedullary haemorrhage and may have a potential role in the evaluation of compressed spinal cord. (orig.)

  12. Multishot diffusion-weighted MR imaging features in acute trauma of spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jin Song; Huan, Yi [Fourth Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi' an (China)

    2014-03-15

    To analyse diffusion-weighted MRI of acute spinal cord trauma and evaluate its diagnostic value. Conventional MRI and multishot, navigator-corrected DWI were performed in 20 patients with acute spinal cord trauma using 1.5-T MR within 72 h after the onset of trauma. Twenty cases were classified into four categories according to the characteristics of DWI: (1) Oedema type: ten cases presented with variable hyperintense areas within the spinal cord. There were significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between lesions and unaffected regions (t = -7.621, P < 0.01). ADC values of lesions were markedly lower than those of normal areas. (2) Mixed type: six cases showed heterogeneously hyperintense areas due to a mixture of haemorrhage and oedema. (3) Haemorrhage type: two cases showed lesions as marked hypointensity due to intramedullary haemorrhage. (4) Compressed type (by epidural haemorrhage): one of the two cases showed an area of mild hyperintensity in the markedly compressed cord due to epidural haematoma. Muti-shot DWI of the spinal cord can help visualise and evaluate the injured spinal cord in the early stage, especially in distinguishing the cytotoxic oedema from vasogenic oedema. It can assist in detecting intramedullary haemorrhage and may have a potential role in the evaluation of compressed spinal cord. (orig.)

  13. Objective measurement of function following lumbar spinal stenosis decompression reveals improved functional capacity with stagnant real-life physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuck, Matthew; Muaremi, Amir; Zheng, Patricia; Norden, Justin; Sinha, Aman; Hu, Richard; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2018-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a prevalent and costly condition associated with significant dysfunction. Alleviation of pain and improvement of function are the primary goals of surgical intervention. Although prior studies have measured subjective improvements in function after surgery, few have examined objective markers of functional improvement. We aimed to objectively measure and quantify changes in physical capacity and physical performance following surgical decompression of LSS. Prospective cohort study. Thirty-eight patients with LSS determined by the treating surgeon's clinical and imaging evaluation, and who were scheduled for surgical treatment, were consecutively recruited at two academic medical facilities, with 28 providing valid data for analysis at baseline and 6 months after surgery. Before surgery and at 6 months after surgery, participants provided 7 days of real-life physical activity (performance) using ActiGraph accelerometers; completed two objective functional capacity measures, the Short Physical Performance Battery and Self-Paced Walking Test; and completed three subjective functional outcome questionnaires, Oswestry Disability Index, Spinal Stenosis Symptom Questionnaire, and Short-Form 36. Physical activity, as measured by continuous activity monitoring, was analyzed as previously described according to the 2008 American Physical Activity Guidelines. Paired t tests were performed to assess for postsurgical changes in all questionnaire outcomes and all objective functional capacity measures. Chi-square analysis was used to categorically assess whether patients were more likely to meet these physical activity recommendations after surgery. Participants were 70.1 years old (±8.9) with 17 females (60.7%) and an average body mass index of 28.4 (±6.2). All subjective measures (Oswestry Disability Index, Spinal Stenosis Symptom Questionnaire, and Short-Form 36) improved significantly at 6 months after surgery, as did objective functional

  14. The effect of electrical stimulation on lumbar spinal fusion in older patients: a randomized, controlled, multi-center trial: part 1: functional outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Thomas; Christensen, Finn B; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Rasmussen, Sten; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Lindblad, Bent Erling; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Egund, Niels; Bünger, Cody

    2009-10-01

    Randomized, controlled, multi-center trial. To investigate the effect of direct current (DC) electrical stimulation on functional and clinical outcome after lumbar spinal fusion in patients older than 60 years. Older patients have increased complication rates after spinal fusion surgery. Treatments which have the possibility of enhancing functional outcome and fusion rates without lengthening the procedure could prove beneficial. DC-stimulation of spinal fusion has proven effective in increasing fusion rates in younger and "high risk" patients, but functional outcome measures have not been reported. A randomized, clinical trial comprising 5 orthopedic centers. The study included a total of 107 patients randomized to uninstrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion with or without DC-stimulation. Functional outcome was assessed using Dallas Pain Questionnaire, SF-36, Low Back Pain Rating Scale pain index, and walking distance. Follow-up after 1 year was 95/107 (89%). DC-stimulated patients had significant better outcome in 3 of 4 categories in the Dallas Pain Questionnaire, better SF-36 scores (not significantly), but no difference in pain scores were observed. Median walking distance at latest follow-up was better in the stimulated group (not significant). Walking distance was significantly associated with functional outcome. There was no difference in any of the functional outcome scores between patients who experienced a perioperative complication and those without complications. The achievement of a good functional outcome was heavily dependent on the obtained walking distance. DC-stimulated patients tended to have better functional outcome as compared to controls. No negative effects of perioperative complications could be observed on the short-term functional outcome.

  15. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  16. Delayed acute spinal cord injury following intracranial gunshot trauma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jason S; Richardson, R Mark; Gean, Alisa D; Stiver, Shirley I

    2012-04-01

    The authors report the case of a patient who presented with a hoarse voice and left hemiparesis following a gunshot injury with trajectory entering the left scapula, traversing the suboccipital bone, and coming to rest in the right lateral medullary cistern. Following recovery from the hemiparesis, abrupt quadriparesis occurred coincident with fall of the bullet into the anterior spinal canal. The bullet was retrieved following a C-2 and C-3 laminectomy, and postoperative MR imaging confirmed signal change in the cord at the level where the bullet had lodged. The patient then made a good neurological recovery. Bullets can fall from the posterior fossa with sufficient momentum to cause an acute spinal cord injury. Consideration for craniotomy and bullet retrieval should be given to large bullets lying in the CSF spaces of the posterior fossa as they pose risk for acute spinal cord injury.

  17. [Medical treatment of spinal cord injury during the acute phase. Effect of a calcium inhibitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointillard, V; Petitjean, M E

    1993-01-01

    Post traumatic ischemia appears to be largely involved for the extension of lesions in acute injury of the spinal cord. The present study evaluate the putative improvement of spinal cord blood flow (S.C.B.F.) by calcium channel blocker after acute spinal cord injury in baboons. S.C.B.F. measured by a scannographic technique with 133Xe were realised each thirty min for 4 hours and seven days later; somatosensory evoked potentials (S.E.P.) magnetic resonance imaging (M.R.I.) and histological study of the spine were realised at different time of the experimentation. Ten monkey were used. Acute trauma was achieved by compression of the cord at T1 by applying a 2.10(2) kPa (2 bar) pressure for 5 s with a balloon catheter inflated with Ringer's solution. Then, five monkeys received saline infusion for seven days and the other five received a nimodipine infusion (0.04 mg.kg-1.h-1) during the same time. Nimodipine improved significantly S.C.B.F. Two monkeys in the treated group showed improvement of axonal function as judged by S.E.P. Conversely no significant difference was noted by R.M.I. although the histological study showed smaller lesions in the treated group. Nimodipine could represent in the next years a new medical treatment in acute spinal cord injury in man.

  18. Acute phase complications following traumatic spinal cord injury in Dutch level 1 trauma centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, K.C. van; Schouten, E.J.; Hofstede, J.; Meent, H. van de; Holtslag, H.R.; Berg-Emons, R.J. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the number and nature of complications during the acute phase following traumatic spinal cord injury and to explore the relationship between number of complications and length of hospital stay. DESIGN: Multi-centre prospective cohort study. PATIENTS: A total of 54 patients with

  19. Stabilization of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine with the internal spinal skeletal fixation system. Indications, techniques, and first results of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebi, M; Etter, C; Kehl, T; Thalgott, J

    1987-01-01

    Since 1984, 30 patients with burst fractures of the lower thoracic and lumbar spine were treated with AO internal spinal skeletal fixation system. All patients in this series had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. This new instrumentation is a posterior intrapedicular system developed by Dick in 1982. It allows stable fixation that is limited only to adjacent spinal segments. The internal fixator permits reduction in all three planes. Independently, it is possible to add distraction or compression to the involved segments. It also is able to reduce effectively the "middle column" which is thought to be accomplished by "ligamentotaxis." In this series there were 16 neurologically intact patients and 14 with partial or complete neurologic injury. There were two minor instrumentation loosenings early in the series. Most patients in this series had a near-anatomic reduction of all three columns in the involved segment. It was also possible to re-establish the normal lordosis of the lumbar spine. The device provided sufficient rigid fixation for rapid postoperative mobilization in a light external orthosis.

  20. A prospective randomized multi-center study for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with the X STOP interspinous implant: 1-year results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucherman, J F; Hsu, K Y; Hartjen, C A; Mehalic, T F; Implicito, D A; Martin, M J; Johnson, D R; Skidmore, G A; Vessa, P P; Dwyer, J W; Puccio, S; Cauthen, J C; Ozuna, R M

    2004-02-01

    Patients suffering from neurogenic intermittent claudication secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis have historically been limited to a choice between a decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion or a regimen of non-operative therapies. The X STOP Interspinous Process Distraction System (St. Francis Medical Technologies, Concord, Calif.), a new interspinous implant for patients whose symptoms are exacerbated in extension and relieved in flexion, has been available in Europe since June 2002. This study reports the results from a prospective, randomized trial of the X STOP conducted at nine centers in the U.S. Two hundred patients were enrolled in the study and 191 were treated; 100 received the X STOP and 91 received non-operative therapy (NON OP) as a control. The Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) was the primary outcomes measurement. Validated for lumbar spinal stenosis patients, the ZCQ measures physical function, symptom severity, and patient satisfaction. Patients completed the ZCQ upon enrollment and at follow-up periods of 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year. Using the ZCQ criteria, at 6 weeks the success rate was 52% for X STOP patients and 10% for NON OP patients. At 6 months, the success rates were 52 and 9%, respectively, and at 1 year, 59 and 12%. The results of this prospective study indicate that the X STOP offers a significant improvement over non-operative therapies at 1 year with a success rate comparable to published reports for decompressive laminectomy, but with considerably lower morbidity.

  1. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.).

  2. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi

    1994-01-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.)

  3. A non-surgical approach to the management of lumbar spinal stenosis: A prospective observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz Eric L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While it is widely held that non-surgical management should be the first line of approach in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, little is known about the efficacy of non-surgical treatments for this condition. Data are needed to determine the most efficacious and safe non-surgical treatment options for patients with LSS. The purpose of this paper is to describe the clinical outcomes of a novel approach to patients with LSS that focuses on distraction manipulation (DM and neural mobilization (NM. Methods This is a prospective consecutive case series with long term follow up (FU of fifty-seven consecutive patients who were diagnosed with LSS. Two were excluded because of absence of baseline data or failure to remain in treatment to FU. Disability was measured using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RM and pain intensity was measured using the Three Level Numerical Rating Scale (NRS. Patients were also asked to rate their perceived percentage improvement. Results The mean patient-rated percentage improvement from baseline to the end to treatment was 65.1%. The mean improvement in disability from baseline to the end of treatment was 5.1 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. Clinically meaningful improvement in disability from baseline to the end of treatment was seen in 66.7% of patients. The mean improvement in "on average" pain intensity was 1.6 points. This did not reach the threshold for clinical meaningfulness. The mean improvement in "at worst" pain was 3.1 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. The mean duration of FU was 16.5 months. The mean patient-rated percentage improvement from baseline to long term FU was 75.6%. The mean improvement in disability was 5.2 points. This was considered to be clinically meaningful. Clinically meaningful improvement in disability was seen in 73.2% of patients. The mean improvement in "on average" pain intensity from baseline to long

  4. Autologous bone marrow cell transplantation in acute spinal cord injury--an Indian pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, H S; Sarda, K; Arora, M; Sharawat, R; Singh, V; Nanda, A; Sangodimath, G M; Tandon, V

    2016-01-01

    Phase- I/II, prospective, randomized, single-blind, controlled pilot study. To determine the safety and feasibility of autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI) via two routes of transplantation as compared with controls. Indian Spinal Injuries Center, New Delhi. Twenty-one subjects with acute, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A (complete), traumatic SCI with neurological level T1-T12, were recruited and randomized into three groups of seven subjects each. Two groups underwent cell transplantation through the intrathecal or intralesional route, whereas the third served as control. Participants were assessed at baseline and followed up at 6 months and 12-months post enrollment. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by monitoring for any adverse events. Efficacy was assessed through neurological, functional and psychological evaluation, as well as through electrophysiological studies and urodynamics. Surgery was tolerated well by all participants. There were no significant adverse events attributable to the procedure. There was no significant improvement in the neurological, electrophysiological or urodynamic efficacy variables. A statistically significant improvement in functional scores as evaluated by the Spinal Cord Independence Measure and International Spinal Cord Injury Scale was observed in all groups. The procedure is safe and feasible in AIS A participants with thoracic-level injuries at 12-months follow-up. No efficacy could be demonstrated that could be attributed to the procedure.

  5. Methylprednisolone– acute spinal cord injury, benefits or risks? 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Tęsiorowski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylprednisolone is a synthetic glucocorticoid with a potent and long-acting anti-inflammatory, antiallergic and immunosuppressant. Its mechanism of action of methylprednisolone is the result of many cellular changes. Methylprednisolone is used in many diseases, such as rheumatic diseases, autoimmune diseases, allergic, anaphylactic shock, asthma. Methylprednisolone was also used in patients with spinal cord injury, in order to minimize neurological damage. While in the above mentioned fields of medicine is undeniable role of methylprednisolone, whereas its use in the treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury within the last few years raises a lot of controversy, and in most cases, the side effects of its use outweigh the potential benefits. 

  6. MRI detection of unsuspected vertebral injury in acute spinal trauma: incidence and significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaiyum, M.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; McCall, I.W.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Multilevel spinal injury is well recognised. Previous studies reviewing the radiographs of spinal injury patients have shown an incidence of 15.2% of unsuspected spinal injury. It is recognised that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify injuries that are not demonstrated on radiographs. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and significance of spinal injuries using MRI in comparison with radiographs.Design and patients. The radiographs and MR images of 110 acute spinal injury patients were reviewed independently of each other and the findings were then correlated to determine any unsuspected injury.Results. MRI detected vertebral body bone bruises (microtrabecular bone injury) in 41.8% of spinal injury patients which were not seen on radiographs. These bone bruises were best appreciated on sagittal short tau inversion recovery MR sequences and seen at contiguous and non-contiguous levels in relation to the primary injury.Conclusion. This level of incidence of bone bruises has not previously been appreciated. We recommend that patients undergoing MRI for an injured segment of the spine are better assessed by MRI of the entire spine at the same time to exclude further injury. (orig.)

  7. Characteristics and determinants of clinical symptoms in radiographic lumbar spinal stenosis in a tertiary health care centre in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualla-Bija, Marie; Takang, Mbeng Ashu; Mankaa, Emmanuella; Moutchia, Jude; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Luma-Namme, Henry

    2017-11-28

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) refers to narrowing of the lumbar central spinal canal, lateral recess, and/or neuro-foramina. Radiographic LSS plays an important role in clinical LSS but is not solely accountable for the presence of symptoms. We sought to characterise clinical LSS and to determine factors associated with presence of symptoms of LSS in patients with radiographic LSS in a sub Saharan Africa setting. After prior ethical clearance, a case control study was done in a tertiary hospital in Douala-Cameroon, including 105 patients with radiographic LSS: 57 with symptoms of LSS (cases) and 58 with no symptoms (controls). Spinal stenosis was assessed using computed tomography (CT) scans. Data were analysed using SPSS version 23. The mean age of our study participants was 53.4 ± 13.1 years. The mean age of onset of symptoms of LSS was 50.3 ± 11.6 years and the most common symptoms were Low back pain (100.0%), radicular symptoms (98.2%) and neurogenic claudication (98.2%). Obesity (p history of low back pain (p = 0.004), vertebra lesion at L2 (p = 0.034), L3 (p = 0.002), L4 (p = 0.025) and multiple (p = 0.008) levels, degenerative disc protrusion (p = 0.044), disc lesion at L3-L4 (p = 0.001), L4-L5 (p = 0.011) and multiple (p = 0.046) levels were significantly associated with presence of symptoms of LSS in persons with radiographic LSS. Characteristics of clinical LSS have been described in this sub-Saharan Africa population. Obesity, a high waist circumference and a positive family history of low back pain are significantly associated with presence of symptoms of LSS in persons with radiographic LSS.

  8. Semi-Circumferential Decompression: Microsurgical Total en-bloc Ligamentum Flavectomy to Treat Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Grade I Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun Cheol; Oh, Sang Hun; Park, Sub Ri; Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Nam Ik

    2015-01-01

    Background To describe and assess clinical outcomes of the semi-circumferential decompression technique for microsurgical en-bloc total ligamentum flavectomy with preservation of the facet joint to treat the patients who have a lumbar spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and radiologic outcomes of 19 patients who have a spinal stenosis with Meyerding grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. They were treated using the "semi-circumferential decompression" method. We evaluated improvements in back and radiating pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). We also evaluated occurrence of spinal instability on radiological exam using percentage slip and slip angle. Results The mean VAS score for back pain decreased significantly from 6.3 to 4.3, although some patients had residual back pain. The mean VAS for radiating pain decreased significantly from 8.3 to 2.5. The ODI score improved significantly from 25.3 preoperatively to 10.8 postoperatively. No significant change in percentage slip was observed (10% preoperatively vs. 12.2% at the last follow-up). The dynamic percentage slip (gap in percentage slip between flexion and extension X-ray exams) did not change significantly (5.2% vs. 5.8%). Slip angle and dynamic slip angle did not change (3.2° and 8.2° vs. 3.6° and 9.2°, respectively). Conclusions The results suggested that semi-circumferential decompression is a clinically recommendable procedure that can improve pain. This procedure does not cause spinal instability when treating patients who have a spinal stenosis with degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:26640630

  9. [Operative treatment of traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spinal column: Part III: Follow up data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, M; Knop, C; Beisse, R; Audigé, L; Kandziora, F; Pizanis, A; Pranzl, R; Gercek, E; Schultheiss, M; Weckbach, A; Bühren, V; Blauth, M

    2009-03-01

    In this third and final part, the Spine Study Group (AG WS) of the German Trauma Association (DGU) presents the follow-up (NU) data of its second, prospective, internet-based multicenter study (MCS II) for the treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal injuries including 865 patients from 8 trauma centers. Part I described in detail the epidemiologic data of the patient collective and the subgroups, whereas part II analyzed the different methods of treatment and radiologic findings. The study period covered the years 2002 to 2006 including a 30-month follow-up period from 01.01.2004 until 31.05.2006. Follow-up data of 638 (74%) patients were collected with a new internet-based database system and analyzed. Results in part III will be presented on the basis of the same characteristic treatment subgroups (OP, KONS, PLASTIE) and surgical treatment subgroups (Dorsal, Ventral, Kombi) in consideration of the level of injury (thoracic spine, thoracolumbar junction, lumbar spine). After the initial treatment and discharge from hospital, the average duration of subsequent inpatient rehabilitation was 4 weeks, which lasted significantly longer in patients with persistent neurologic deficits (mean 10.9 weeks) or polytraumatized patients (mean 8.6 weeks). Following rehabilitation on an inpatient basis, subsequent outpatient rehabilitation lasted on average 4 months. Physical therapy was administered significantly longer to patients with neurologic deficits (mean 8.7 months) or type C injuries (mean 8.6 months). The level of injury had no influence of the duration of the inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. A total of 382 (72.2%) patients who were either operated from posterior approach only or in a combined postero-anterior approach had an implant removal after an average 12 months. During the follow-up period 56 (8.8%) patients with complications were registered and of these 18 (2.8%) had to have surgical revision. The most common complications reported were infection, loss

  10. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in patients with acute spinal cord injury: a comparison with nonparalyzed patients immobilized due to spinal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllynen, P.; Kammonen, M.; Rokkanen, P.; Boestman, O.L.; Lalla, M.; Laasonen, E.

    1985-01-01

    The occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in the series of 23 consecutive patients with acute spinal cord injury and 14 immobilized patients with spinal fractures without paralysis. The incidence of DVT in paralyzed patients was 100% as detected by the 125 I-labeled fibrinogen test and confirmed by contrast venography, and 64% as detected by repeated clinical examinations and confirmed by contrast venography. The respective incidence of DVT in nonparalyzed patients with spinal fractures was 0%. The diagnosis of DVT was reached earlier with the radiofibrinogen test than with the clinical followup (5 days vs. 25 days). Two of the 23 paralyzed patients (9%) developed nonfatal clinical pulmonary embolism (PE). There were no differences in the values of routine coagulation tests. The result justifies prophylactic anticoagulant therapy in all cases of spinal cord injury during the acute post-traumatic phase

  11. X-ray signs of traumas of the cervical region of the spinal cord in the acute period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodskaya, Z.L.

    1983-01-01

    The results are analyzed of an X-ray examination of 208 patients with traumas of the cervical region of the spinal column and spinal cord in the acute period of trauma. The authors proposed a scheme that included telespondylography in standard and oblique projections, flebospondylography, discography and pneumomyelography in the Schantz collar with a patient lying on the back. Four types of the spinal cord traumas were diagnosed: compression with osseous elements (76.92%), with sharp discs and strained epidural hematomas (3.85%), isolated contusion of the spinal cord (10.1%) and disorder of the spinal circulation (9.13%). Special emphasis was laid on clinicospondylographic correlations, a critical distance, congenital narrowing of the vertebral canal. The concept of traumatic decompression of the spinal cord was stressed. Symptoms of its contusion and trauma of the spinal circulation were indicated

  12. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  13. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-06-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of functional outcome were recorded during the acute hospitalization: age, sex, level and type of injury, comorbidities, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), ASIA Motor Score (AMS), ASIA Light Touch score (LT), ASIA Pin Prick score (PP), Injury Severity Score (ISS), traumatic brain injury, and delay from trauma to surgery. A linear regression model was created with the primary outcome modeled relative to the acute clinical findings. Only four variables were selected in the model, with performance averaging an R-square value of 0.57. In descending order, the best predictors for SCIM at 1 year were: LT, AIS grade, ISS, and AMS. One-year functional outcome (SCIM) can be estimated by a simple equation that takes into account four parameters of the initial physical examination. Estimating the patient long-term outcome early after traumatic SCI is important in order to define the management strategies that might diminish the costs and to give the patient and family a better view of the long-term expectations.

  14. ICF Based Comprehensive Evaluation for Post-Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Kwang Dong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of the ICF for initial comprehensive evaluation of early post-acute spinal cord injury. Method A comprehensive evaluation of 62 early post-acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients was conducted by rehabilitation team members, such as physicians, physical therapists, occupational therapists, nutritionists, medical social-workers, and nurses. They recorded each of their evaluation according to the ICF first level classification. The contents of the comprehensive evaluation were linked to the ICF second level categories, retrospectively. The linked codes were analyzed descriptively and were also compared with the brief ICF core set for early post-acute SCI. Results In the evaluation of early post-acute SCI patients based on the ICF first level categories, 19 items from the body functions domain, such as muscle power functions (b730) and urination functions (b620), 15 items from the body structures domain, including spinal cord and related structures (s120), 11 items from the activities and participation domain, such as transferring oneself (d420) and walking (d450), and 9 items from the environmental factors domain, e.g., health professionals (e355), were linked to the ICF second level categories. In total, 82.4% of all contents were linked to the brief ICF core set. Prognosis insight, a personal factor not linkable to an ICF code, was mentioned in 29.0% of all patients. Conclusion First level ICF categories can provide a structural base for a comprehensive evaluation in early post-acute spinal cord injury. However, frequently linked items, including the brief core set, as well as personal factors should be considered via a checklist in order to prevent the omission of significant contents. PMID:23342313

  15. Chiropractic care and risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a population-based self-controlled case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié, Cesar A; Tomlinson, George A; Côté, Pierre; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Jadad, Alejandro R; Cassidy, J David

    2017-10-16

    Chiropractic care is popular for low back pain, but may increase the risk for acute lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Low back pain is a common early (prodromal) symptom of LDH and commonly precedes LDH diagnosis. Our objective was to investigate the association between chiropractic care and acute LDH with early surgical intervention, and contrast this with the association between primary care physician (PCP) care and acute LDH with early surgery. Using a self-controlled case series design and population-based healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada, we investigated all adults with acute LDH requiring emergency department (ED) visit and early surgical intervention from April 1994 to December 2004. The relative incidence of acute LDH with early surgery in exposed periods after chiropractic visits relative to unexposed periods was estimated within individuals, and compared with the relative incidence of acute LDH with early surgery following PCP visits. 195 cases of acute LDH with early surgery (within 8 weeks) were identified in a population of more than 100 million person-years. Strong positive associations were found between acute LDH and both chiropractic and PCP visits. The risk for acute LDH with early surgery associated with chiropractic visits was no higher than the risk associated with PCP visits. Both chiropractic and primary medical care were associated with an increased risk for acute LDH requiring ED visit and early surgery. Our analysis suggests that patients with prodromal back pain from a developing disc herniation likely seek healthcare from both chiropractors and PCPs before full clinical expression of acute LDH. We found no evidence of excess risk for acute LDH with early surgery associated with chiropractic compared with primary medical care.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of malignant extradural tumors with acute spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.; Blomlie, V.; Heimdal, K.; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo; Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-six cancer patients with extradural spinal metastatic disease and acute symptoms of spinal cord compression underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 1.5 T. Cord involvement was found in all 36, 7 of whom had lesions at 2 different sites. Vertebral metastases in addition to those corresponding to the cord compressions were detected in 27 patients, and 18 of these had widespread deposits. MR displayed the extent of the tumors in the craniocaudal and lateral directions. The ability to identify multiple sites of cord and vertebral involvement and to delineate tumor accurately makes MR the examination of choice in cancer patients with suspected spinal cord compression. It obviates the need for myelography and postmyelography CT in this group of patients. (orig.)

  17. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    prevention programs, including pressure relief regimes and selection of support surfaces , to optimize tissue heath during initial rehabilitation. Study...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0618 TITLE: Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury...Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  18. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Massage to Reduce Pain in People with Spinal Cord Injury during Acute Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Chase, Theresa; Jha, Amitabh; Brooks, C. A.; Allshouse, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial of massage therapy for patients with new spinal cord injury (SCI) during acute inpatient rehabilitation. Design A pilot single-center, randomized, single-blind, cross-over clinical trial. Setting Free-standing, not-for-profit, comprehensive rehabilitation center specializing in SCI rehabilitation Participants Forty adults ages 18 years and older undergoing acute rehabilitation following spinal cord injury repor...

  19. Clinical value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in acute contusion of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinsong; Huan Yi; Sun Lijun; Zhao Haitao; Ge Yali; Chang Yingjuan; Yang Chunmin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in acute contusion of spinal cord. Methods: Eighteen cases with acute contusion of spinal cord were examined with routine MRI and DWI, including single-shot DWI (ssh-DWI) in 2 cases and multi-shot DWI (msh-DWI) in 16 cases, on a 1.5-tesla MR system within 72 h post-trauma. Results: Two cases examined by ssh-DWI showed local lesions with significant high signals, but ssh-DWI images could not be used to measure apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value due to its weak resolution. Other 16 cases examined by msh-DWI showed better images and were classified into three categories depending on different degrees of tissue injury and characteristics of DWI: (1) Edema-type: ten cases presented DWI high signals with different degree in local lesions. There were significant difference of ADC values between lesions and normal parts (t=7.515, P 2 WI heterogeneous high signals and T 1 WI low signals due to prominent hemorrhage. Conclusion: DWI of the spinal cord provided satisfactory images and was a useful method for visualizing the injury cord in the super-early stage, helping determine integrity and compression degree of spinal cord and detecting hemorrhage. (authors)

  20. Acute Compressive Myelopathy Caused by Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Combined Effect of Asymptomatic Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshinari; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by hemorrhagic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) usually presents with meningeal signs, including headache and nausea, and focal neurologic deficit is found in rare cases. In this article, we report a case of acute compressive cervical myelopathy caused by hemorrhagic AVF at the craniocervical junction. A 73-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for sudden headache and subsequent left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography scan showed SAH exclusively in the posterior fossa, and catheter angiography revealed a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction as a source of the SAH. Detailed neurologic examination showed the sensory disturbance of bilateral upper extremities and bladder and rectal disturbance, suggesting concurrent cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed disk herniation at the C4-5 level, spinal SAH deposition above the C4-5 level, and accompanying myelomalacia. No intramedullary hemorrhage was found. Spinal SAH alone rarely causes focal neurologic deficit. However, this case suggests spinal SAH can cause acute compressive myelopathy when complicated with preexisting spinal canal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Validation of the Polish language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kłosiński

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Patient-reported outcome (PRO questionnaires have become the standard measure for treatment effectiveness after spinal surgery. One of the most widely used generic PROs is the SF-36 Health Survey. The aim of this study was to specifically focus on validating the SF-36 Health Survey to confirm that the tool is an acceptable and psychometrically robust measure to collect HRQoL data in Polish patients with spinal stenosis. [b]materials and methods[/b]. Patients were eligible if they were above 18 years of age and had been qualified for spine surgery of the lumbar region due to either discopathy or non-traumatic spinal stenosis. All patients filled-in the Polish version of the SF-36 and a demographic questionnaire. Standard validity and reliability analyses were performed. [b]results.[/b] 192 patients (83 women – 43.2% agreed to take part in the study (mean age: 57.5±11.4 years. In 47 patients (24.5%, using MRI, ossification of the ligamenta flava were found. Cronbach’s alpha coefficients showed positive internal consistency (0.70–0.92. Interclass correlations for the SF-36 ranged from 0.72 – 0.86 and proved appropriate test-retest reliability. Satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity in multi-trait scaling analyses was seen. [b]conclusions.[/b] The Polish version of the SF-36 is a reliable and valid tool for measuring HRQoL in patients with spinal stenosis. It can be recommended for use in clinical and epidemiological settings in the Polish population. However, caution is warranted when interpreting the results of the ‘role limitations due to physical health problems’ and the ‘role limitations due to emotional problems’ scales because of floor and ceiling effects.

  2. Frequency of unexpected multifocal metastasis in patients with acute spinal cord compression. Evaluation by low-field MR imaging in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heldmann, U; Myschetzky, P S; Thomsen, H S

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate, in an acute care service, the frequency of multiple-level lesion involvement in patients with clinically suspected spinal cord compression or spinal blockage.......The aim of the study was to estimate, in an acute care service, the frequency of multiple-level lesion involvement in patients with clinically suspected spinal cord compression or spinal blockage....

  3. The effects of aquatic walking and jogging program on physical function and fall efficacy in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Sung, Eunsook

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 12-week aqua walking and jogging program on muscle function, ankle range of motion (ROM), balance and fell efficacy in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) patients. Six patients (2 males, 4 females) with DLSS participated in aquatic exercise program 3 times per week with each session of 60 min (warming-up, aqua walking, aqua jogging and cool down) at 1 m 20 cm-1 m 30 cm deep pool. Janda's muscle function test, ankle ROM, Berg balance scale (BBS) and fall efficacy scale (FES) were analyzed before and after the training intervention. We found significant increases in balance, muscle function, ankle ROM and fall efficacy after training intervention. In conclusion, aquatic exercise seems to affect physical function and fall efficacy positively in elderly DLSS patients.

  4. Do thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries classification systems exhibit lower inter- and intra-observer agreement than other fractures classifications?: A comparison using fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur as contrast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Klaber, Ianiv; Carmona, Maximiliano; Palma, Joaquin; Campos, Mauricio; Yurac, Ratko

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated that the complex patterns of spinal injuries have prevented adequate agreement using thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries (TLSI) classifications; however, limb fracture classifications have also shown variable agreements. This study compared agreement using two TLSI classifications with agreement using two classifications of fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur (FTAPF). Six evaluators classified the radiographs and computed tomography scans of 70 patients with acute TLSI using the Denis and the new AO Spine thoraco-lumbar injury classifications. Additionally, six evaluators classified the radiographs of 70 patients with FTAPF using the Tronzo and the AO schemes. Six weeks later, all cases were presented in a random sequence for repeat assessment. The Kappa coefficient (κ) was used to determine agreement. Inter-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine classification, the mean κ was 0.62 (0.57-0.66) considering fracture types, and 0.55 (0.52-0.57) considering sub-types; using the Denis classification, κ was 0.62 (0.59-0.65). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.58 (0.54-0.63) considering fracture types and 0.31 (0.28-0.33) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.54 (0.50-0.57). Intra-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine scheme, the mean κ was 0.77 (0.72-0.83) considering fracture types, and 0.71 (0.67-0.76) considering sub-types; for the Denis classification, κ was 0.76 (0.71-0.81). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.75 (0.69-0.81) considering fracture types and 0.45 (0.39-0.51) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.64 (0.58-0.70). Using the main types of AO classifications, inter- and intra-observer agreement of TLSI were comparable to agreement evaluating FTAPF; including sub-types, inter- and intra-observer agreement evaluating TLSI were significantly better than assessing FTAPF. Inter- and intra-observer agreements using the Denis

  5. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oral glyburide in dogs with acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Jeffery

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Glyburide (also known as glibenclamide is effective in reducing the severity of tissue destruction and improving functional outcome after experimental spinal cord injury in rodents and so has promise as a therapy in humans. There are many important differences between spinal cord injury in experimental animals and in human clinical cases, making it difficult to introduce new therapies into clinical practice. Spinal cord injury is also common in pet dogs and requires new effective therapies, meaning that they can act as a translational model for the human condition while also deriving direct benefits from such research. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety of glyburide in dogs with clinical spinal cord injury. Methods We recruited dogs that had incurred an acute thoracolumbar spinal cord injury within the previous 72 h. These had become acutely non-ambulatory on the pelvic limbs and were admitted to our veterinary hospitals to undergo anesthesia, cross sectional diagnostic imaging, and surgical decompression. Oral glyburide was given to each dog at a dose of 75 mcg/kg. In five dogs, we measured blood glucose concentrations for 10 h after a single oral dose. In six dogs, we measured serum glyburide and glucose concentrations for 24 h and estimated pharmacokinetic parameters to estimate a suitable dose for use in a subsequent clinical trial in similarly affected dogs. Results No detrimental effects of glyburide administration were detected in any participating dog. Peak serum concentrations of glyburide were attained at a mean of 13 h after dosing, and mean apparent elimination half-life was approximately 7 h. Observed mean maximum plasma concentration was 31 ng/mL. At the glyburide dose administered there was no observable association between glyburide and glucose concentrations in blood. Discussion Our data suggest that glyburide can be safely administered to dogs that are undergoing anesthesia, imaging and

  6. Comparing the effects of epidural methylprednisolone acetate injected in patients with pain due to lumbar spinal stenosis or herniated disks: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharibi F

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jafar Mobaleghi1, Faramarz Allahdini2, Karim Nasseri3, Behzad Ahsan3, Shoaleh Shami4, Mansour Faizi5, Fardin Gharibi51Department of Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Anesthesia, 4Faculty of Nursing, 5Faculty of Medicine, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Kurdistan, IranObjective: Satisfactory results have been seen with epidural steroid injections (ESI in patients with herniated disks (HD, but the role in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS has been less investigated. We compared long-term effects of ESI in HD and LSS patients.Methods: In a prospective, single-blind uncontrolled study, 60 patients with radicular pain due to HD (n = 32 or LSS (n = 28 were enrolled over a 9-month period. Methylprednisolone acetate 80 mg plus 0.5% bupivacaine 10 mg were diluted in normal saline up to a total volume of 10 mL, and injected into the epidural space. The amount of pain based on numeric pain score, level of activity, and subjective improvement were reported by patients after 2 and 6 months by telephone. Demographic data were analyzed with the chi-square test. The differences in numeric pain scale scores between the two groups at different times were analyzed with the t-test.Results: There were no differences between HD and LSS patients regarding age, sex, and average duration of pain prior to ESI. The degree of pain was significantly higher in LSS patients in comparison with HD patients in the pre-injection period. The amount of pain was significantly reduced in both groups 2 months after injection. This pain reduction period lasted for 6 months in the HD group, but to a lesser extent in LSS patients (P < 0.05.Discussion: Epidural methylprednisolone injection has less analgesic effect in LSS, with less permanent effect in comparison with HD.Keywords: methylprednisolone acetate, lumbar spinal stenosis, herniated disk

  7. [The quantitative assessment of spinal motor function during the action of hydrogen sulfide baths on patients with lumbar osteochondrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tysiachnyĭ, N D

    1994-01-01

    300 males experiencing pain and motor dysfunction as a result of lumbar osteochondrosis received sulfide balneotherapy. The baths contained moderate (50-150 mg/l) and high concentrations (150-250 mg/l) of hydrogen sulfide. The effect of the treatment was assessed with repeated goniometry by means of specially devised instruments by 6 parameters. According to the degree measurements, the recovered motility in the lumbar spine in patients on large-concentration baths surpassed that in patients on less concentrated ones 1.5-fold.

  8. Prediction of functional recovery six months following traumatic spinal cord injury during acute care hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Denis, Andréane; Feldman, Debbie; Thompson, Cynthia; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-15

    To determine factors associated with functional status six months following a traumatic cervical and thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI), with a particular interest in factors related to the acute care hospitalization stay. This is a prospective cohort study. Sixteen potential predictive variables were studied. Univariate regression analyses were first performed to determine the strength of association of each variable independently with the total Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score. Significant ones were then included in a General linear model in order to determine the most relevant predictive factors among them. Analyses were carried out separately for tetraplegia and paraplegia. A single specialized Level I trauma center. One hundred fifty-nine patients hospitalized for an acute traumatic SCI between January 2010 and February 2015. Not applicable. The SCIM (version 3) functional score. Motor-complete SCI (AIS-A,B) was the main predictive factor associated with decreased total SCIM score in tetraplegia and paraplegia. Longer acute care length of stay and the occurrence of acute medical complications (either pneumonia, urinary tract infections or pressure ulcers) were predictors of decreased functional outcome following tetraplegia, while increased body mass index and higher trauma severity were predictive of decreased functional outcome following paraplegia. This study supports previous work while adding information regarding the importance of optimizing acute care hospitalization as it may influence chronic functional status following traumatic SCI.

  9. Clinical and Radiological Study Focused on Relief of Low Back Pain After Decompression Surgery in Selected Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Associated With Grade I Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Tominaga, Fuyuki; Sakuragi, Takahide; Kai, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-12-15

    A retrospective study. The aim of the present study was to identify the clinical and radiological features of low back pain (LBP) that was relieved after decompression alone of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) associated with grade I lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS). Although decompression and fusion are generally the recommended surgical treatments of LDS, several authors have reported that some patients with LDS could obtain good clinical results including relief from LBP by decompression alone. The pathogenesis of relief from LBP after decompression is, however, not known. Forty patients with LSS associated with grade I LDS, who underwent a minimally invasive surgical-decompression were enrolled in the present study. All patients complained preoperatively of predominantly leg-related symptoms and LBP (≥ 4 points on Numeric Rating Scale). Clinical and radiological assessments were performed 1 year after surgery (a relief of LBP: Numeric Rating Scale reduction ≥3 points and valuation ≤3 points) and at the last follow-up. We conducted a comparative study between patient groups with and without the relief from LBP (groups R and N, respectively). Twenty-nine patients were distributed to group R and the remaining 11 patients to group N. Preoperatively, there was a significant difference between the two groups for age and radiographic flexibility for lumbar extension. Postoperatively, there was a positive correlation between improvement in both LBP and leg symptoms. The clinical outcomes of group R were significantly better than those of group N throughout follow-up period (mean 37 mo). In group R, sagittal lumbopelvic radiographic parameters improved significantly after surgery. Although the causes of LBP are varied in each patients, our results show that concomitant LSS itself might cause LBP in some patients with grade I LDS, because it involves impingement of the neural tissue and discordant sagittal lumbopelvic alignment. 3.

  10. The Effect of Anxiety, Depression, and Optimism on Postoperative Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Patients: Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Hong-Sik; Shim, Kyu-Dong; Park, Ye-Soo

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of depression, anxiety, and optimism on postoperative satisfaction and clinical outcomes in patients who underwent less than two-level posterior instrumented fusions for lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Preoperative psychological status of subjects, such as depression, anxiety, and optimism, was evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R). Clinical evaluation was determined by measuring changes in a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before and after surgery. Postoperative satisfaction of subjects assessed using the North American Spine Society lumbar spine questionnaire was comparatively analyzed against the preoperative psychological status. The correlation between patient's preoperative psychological status (depression, anxiety, and optimism) and clinical outcomes (VAS and ODI) was evaluated. VAS and ODI scores significantly decreased after surgery ( p optimism) was not related to the degree of improvement in clinical outcomes (VAS and ODI) after surgery. However, postoperative satisfaction was moderately correlated with optimism. Anxiety and optimism were more correlated with patient satisfaction than clinical outcomes. Accordingly, the surgeon can predict postoperative satisfaction of patients based on careful evaluation of psychological status before surgery.

  11. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Platz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL. Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™. Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™ indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  12. MiR-21 promotes fibrosis and hypertrophy of ligamentum flavum in lumbar spinal canal stenosis by activating IL-6 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Tian, Jiwei; Liu, Xinhui; Guan, Guoping

    2017-08-26

    The molecular mechanism underlying the fibrosis of ligamentum flavum(LF) in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis(LSCS) remains unknown. MicroRNAs are reported to play important roles in regulating fibrosis in different organs. The present study aimed to identify fibrosis related miR-21 expression profile and investigate the pathological process of miR-21 in the fibrosis of LF hypertrophy and associated regulatory mechanisms. 15 patients with LSCS underwent surgical treatment were enrolled in this study. For the control group, 11 patients with lumbar disc herniation(LDH) was included. The LF thickness was measured on MRI. LF samples were obtained during the surgery. Fibrosis score was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. The expression of miR-21 in LF tissues were determined by RT-PCR. Correlation among LF thickness, fibrosis score, and miR-21 expression was analyzed. In addition, Lentiviral vectors for miR-21 mimic were constructed and transfected into LF cells to examine the role of miR-21 in LF fibrosis. Types I and III collagen were used as indicators of fibrosis. IL-6 expression in LF cells after transfection was investigated by RT-PCR and ELISA. Patients in two groups showed similar outcomes regarding age, gender, level of LF tissue. The thickness and fibrosis score of LF in the LSCS group were significantly greater than those in LDH group (all P hypertrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Device-Training for Individuals with Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Cord Injury Using a Powered Exoskeleton for Technically Assisted Mobility: Achievements and User Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platz, Thomas; Gillner, Annett; Borgwaldt, Nicole; Kroll, Sylvia; Roschka, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Results of a device-training for nonambulatory individuals with thoracic and lumbar spinal cord injury (SCI) using a powered exoskeleton for technically assisted mobility with regard to the achieved level of control of the system after training, user satisfaction, and effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods. Observational single centre study with a 4-week to 5-week intensive inpatient device-training using a powered exoskeleton (ReWalk™). Results. All 7 individuals with SCI who commenced the device-training completed the course of training and achieved basic competences to use the system, that is, the ability to stand up, sit down, keep balance while standing, and walk indoors, at least with a close contact guard. User satisfaction with the system and device-training was documented for several aspects. The quality of life evaluation (SF-12v2™) indicated that the use of the powered exoskeleton can have positive effects on the perception of individuals with SCI regarding what they can achieve physically. Few adverse events were observed: minor skin lesions and irritations were observed; no falls occurred. Conclusions. The device-training for individuals with thoracic and lumbar SCI was effective and safe. All trained individuals achieved technically assisted mobility with the exoskeleton while still needing a close contact guard.

  14. A prospective randomized study comparing short- and intermediate-term perioperative outcome variables after spinal or general anesthesia for lumbar disk and laminectomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellish, W S; Thalji, Z; Stevenson, K; Shea, J

    1996-09-01

    General or regional anesthesia may be used for lumbar laminectomy. To determine whether one method is superior, 122 patients were randomly assigned to receive either a standard general anesthetic (GA) or spinal anesthesia (SA) supplemented with intravenous (IV) propofol sedation. Data from the intraoperative period through hospital discharge were collected and compared. Demographically, both groups were similar. Total anesthesia (131.0 +/- 4.3 vs 106.6 +/- 3.2 min) and surgical times (81.5 +/- 3.6 vs 67.1 +/- 2.8 min) were longer in the GA group. Intraoperative hemodynamics were similar between groups except that the incidence of increased blood pressure was more frequent with GA (26.2% vs 3.3%). Blood loss was less during SA (133 +/- 18 mL vs 221 +/- 32 mL). Postanesthesia care unit (PACU) heart rates and mean arterial pressures were higher in the GA group. Peak pain scores in the PACU were higher after GA compared with SA (58 +/- 4 vs 22 +/- 3) as were the number of patients who required analgesics. Severe nausea was more common in the GA group both in the PACU and during the 24 h after surgery. Analgesic requirements after discharge from the PACU, urinary retention, and days in the hospital did not differ between groups. This study suggests that SA may be superior to GA both intraoperatively and postoperatively for lumbar spine procedures lasting less than 2 h.

  15. The role of stenosis ratio as a predictor of surgical satisfaction in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis: a receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Hassanreza R; Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate independent factors that predict surgical satisfaction in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) patients. Patients who underwent surgery were grouped based on the age, gender, duration of symptoms, walking distance, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score (NCOS) and the stenosis ratio (SR) described by Lurencin. We recorded on 2-year patient satisfaction using standardized measure. The optimal cut-off points in SR, NCOS and walking distance for predicting surgical satisfaction were estimated from sensitivity and specificity calculations and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. One hundred fifty consecutive patients (51 male, 99 female, mean age 62.4±10.9 years) were followed up for 34±13 months (range 24-49). One, two, three and four level stenosis was observed in 10.7%, 39.3%, 36.0 % and 14.0% of patients, respectively. Post-surgical satisfaction was 78.5% at the 2 years follow up. In ROC curve analysis, the asymptotic significance is less than 0.05 in SR and the optimal cut-off value of SR to predict worsening surgical satisfaction was measured as more than 0.52, with 85.4% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity (AUC 0.798, 95% CI 0.73-0.90; Ppatients with degenerative lumbar stenosis considered for surgical treatment. Using a ROC curve analysis, a radiological feature, the SR, demonstrated superiority in predicting patient satisfaction, compared to functional and clinical characteristics such as walking distance and NCOS.

  16. Spinal neuropeptide expression and neuropathic behavior in the acute and chronic phases after spinal cord injury: Effects of progesterone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, María F; Villar, Marcelo J; Brumovsky, Pablo R; González, Susana L

    2017-02-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) develop chronic pain that severely compromises their quality of life. We have previously reported that progesterone (PG), a neuroprotective steroid, could offer a promising therapeutic strategy for neuropathic pain. In the present study, we explored temporal changes in the expression of the neuropeptides galanin and tyrosine (NPY) and their receptors (GalR1 and GalR2; Y1R and Y2R, respectively) in the injured spinal cord and evaluated the impact of PG administration on both neuropeptide systems and neuropathic behavior. Male rats were subjected to spinal cord hemisection at T13 level, received daily subcutaneous injections of PG or vehicle, and were evaluated for signs of mechanical and thermal allodynia. Real time PCR was used to determine relative mRNA levels of neuropeptides and receptors, both in the acute (1day) and chronic (28days) phases after injury. A significant increase in Y1R and Y2R expression, as well as a significant downregulation in GalR2 mRNA levels, was observed 1day after SCI. Interestingly, PG early treatment prevented Y1R upregulation and resulted in lower NPY, Y2R and GalR1 mRNA levels. In the chronic phase, injured rats showed well-established mechanical and cold allodynia and significant increases in galanin, NPY, GalR1 and Y1R mRNAs, while maintaining reduced GalR2 expression. Animals receiving PG treatment showed basal expression levels of galanin, NPY, GalR1 and Y1R, and reduced Y2R mRNA levels. Also, and in line with previously published observations, PG-treated animals did not develop mechanical allodynia and showed reduced sensitivity to cold stimulation. Altogether, we show that SCI leads to considerable changes in the spinal expression of galanin, NPY and their associated receptors, and that early and sustained PG administration prevents them. Moreover, our data suggest the participation of galaninergic and NPYergic systems in the plastic changes associated with SCI-induced neuropathic pain

  17. Is the outcome in acute spinal cord ischaemia different from that in traumatic spinal cord injury? A cross-sectional analysis of the neurological and functional outcome in a cohort of 93 paraplegics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouw, M.H.; Hosman, A.J.F.; van Kampen, A.; Hirschfeld, S.; Thietje, R.; Meent, H. van de

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To compare the neurological outcome between paraplegic patients with acute spinal cord ischaemia syndrome (ASCIS) or traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and to investigate the influence of SCI aetiology on the total Spinal Cord Independence

  18. Oral Steroids for Acute Radiculopathy Due to a Herniated Lumbar Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Harley; Firtch, William; Tyburski, Mark; Pressman, Alice; Ackerson, Lynn; Hamilton, Luisa; Smith, Wayne; Carver, Ryan; Maratukulam, Annu; Won, Lawrence A.; Carragee, Eugene; Avins, Andrew L.

    2018-01-01

    prednisone group showed an adjusted mean 3.3-point (95%CI, 1.3-5.2; P = .001) greater improvement in the SF-36 PCS score at 3 weeks, no difference in the SF-36 PCS score at 52 weeks (mean, 2.5; 95%CI, −0.3 to 5.4; P = .08), no change in the SF-36MCS score at 3 weeks (mean, 2.2; 95%CI, −0.4 to 4.8; P = .10), and an adjusted 3.6-point (95%CI, 0.6-6.7; P = .02) greater improvement in the SF-36MCS score at 52 weeks. There were no differences in surgery rates at 52-week follow-up. Having 1 or more adverse events at 3-week follow-up was more common in the prednisone group than in the placebo group (49.2% vs 23.9%; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with acute radiculopathy due to a herniated lumbar disk, a short course of oral steroids, compared with placebo, resulted in modestly improved function and no improvement in pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00668434 PMID:25988461

  19. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may...

  20. The role of bone SPECT/CT in the evaluation of lumbar spinal fusion with metallic fixation devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Nimb, Lars; Madsen, Jan L

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is difficult to evaluate the stability of the lumbar spondylodesis with metallic fixation devices by conventional imaging methods such as radiography or magnetic resonance imaging. It is unknown whether single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) may be u...

  1. Epidemiology of acute spinal cord injuries in the Groote Schuur Hospital Acute Spinal Cord Injury (GSH ASCI) Unit, Cape Town, South Africa, over the past 11 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Johan; Stander, Juliette; Kruger, Nicolas; Dunn, Robert

    2015-09-19

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is devastating to both patient and society, with acute management and ongoing care being extremely expensive. Few epidemiological data are available on SCIs in South Africa (SA). To identify the epidemiological profile of SCI patients at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH), Cape Town, SA, and identify seasonal trends and peak periods. As the majority of the injuries are preventable, these data are important to develop prevention strategies. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted on all patients admitted to the Acute Spinal Cord Injury (ASCI) Unit at GSH from 1 April 2003 to 31 March 2014. All cases registered on a prospectively maintained database were included in the study. The total number of patients admitted to the ASCI Unit was 2,042, with an average of 185 admissions per year. The male/female ratio was 5.25:1. The 21-30-year-old age category was the largest, comprising 33.5% of the patients. The most prevalent cause of injury was motor vehicle accidents (44.6%), followed by violence-related injuries (27.2%). Thirty-two point two per cent of patients needed ventilatory support, and 91.5% of mechanically ventilated patients were successfully weaned. December was the busiest month in the unit. In patients in whom neurological deficit was incomplete, the average motor function improvement was 16.0%. Data capturing and analysis of SCIs should be encouraged in SA to guide management and prevention strategies, and to optimise outcomes. This study establishes the ASCI Unit at GSH to be one of the key role players in acute SCI management in SA.

  2. Does experimental low back pain change posteroanterior lumbar spinal stiffness and trunk muscle activity? A randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Prasad, Narasimha; Huang, Christopher; Chan, K Ming; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2016-05-01

    While some patients with low back pain demonstrate increased spinal stiffness that decreases as pain subsides, this observation is inconsistent. Currently, the relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of experimental low back pain on temporal changes in posteroanterior spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle activity. In separate sessions five days apart, nine asymptomatic participants received equal volume injections of hypertonic or isotonic saline in random order into the L3-L5 interspinous ligaments. Pain intensity, spinal stiffness (global and terminal stiffness) at the L3 level, and the surface electromyographic activity of six trunk muscles were measured before, immediately after, and 25-minute after injections. These outcome measures under different saline conditions were compared by generalized estimating equations. Compared to isotonic saline injections, hypertonic saline injections evoked significantly higher pain intensity (mean difference: 5.7/10), higher global (mean difference: 0.73N/mm) and terminal stiffness (mean difference: 0.58N/mm), and increased activity of four trunk muscles during indentation (Ppain subsided. While previous clinical research reported inconsistent findings regarding the association between spinal stiffness and low back pain, our study revealed that experimental pain caused temporary increases in spinal stiffness and concurrent trunk muscle co-contraction during indentation, which helps explain the temporal relation between spinal stiffness and low back pain observed in some clinical studies. Our results substantiate the role of spinal stiffness assessments in monitoring back pain progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Physiologic strains in the lumbar spinal ligaments. An in vitro biomechanical study 1981 Volvo Award in Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjabi, M M; Goel, V K; Takata, K

    1982-01-01

    For understanding of the mechanical causes of low-back pain, knowledge of the biomechanics of the various spinal elements is essential. In this in vitro biomechanical study, in situ behavior of spinal ligaments of the L3-4 and L4-5 functional spinal units during physiologic activities was studied in a three-stage procedure. First, 72 load-displacement curves were obtained to determine the three-dimensional flexibility characteristics of the spinal units. Second, three-dimensional morphometric measurements were made of all the spinal ligament attachment points. Finally, a mathematical model was constructed to combine the flexibility and morphometric data and compute the ligament length changes and strains as functions of various spinal movements. In flexion movement, the interspinous and supra-spinous ligaments were found to be subjected to the highest strains, followed by the capsular ligaments and the ligamentum flavum. During extension, it is the anterior longitudinal ligament that has the maximum strain. In lateral bending, the contralateral transverse ligaments carried the highest strains, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were relatively unstrained. In rotation, the capsular ligaments were by far the most strained ligaments.

  4. Transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder with metastasis in lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an ocelot(Leopardus pardalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y.R. Nakagaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of nonpapillary and infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder with metastasis of lumbar vertebrae and spinal cord compression in an adult female ocelot (Leopardus pardalis, from the Mato Grosso state, Brazil. The ocelot had pelvic limb paralysis and skin ulcers in the posterior region of the body and was submitted to euthanasia procedure. At necropsy was observed a multilobulated and irregular shaped, yellowish to white nodule in the urinary bladder. The nodule had a soft consistency and arised from the mucosa of the urinary bladder extending throughout the muscular layers and the serosa. Nodules of similar appearance infiltrating the vertebral column the at L6 and L7 vertebrae with corresponding spinal canal invasion were also observed. The histological evaluation showed epithelial neoplastic proliferation in the urinary bladder with characteristics of nonpapillary and infiltrative TCC, with positive immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin, and strong immunostaining for cytokeratin of low molecular weight, and weak or absent labeling for high molecular weight cytokeratin. This is the first report of TCC of urinary bladder in ocelot in Brazil.

  5. Acute airway obstruction during spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggy, D J; Hughes, N

    1998-10-01

    A 30-year-old primiparous Caucasian woman with known placenta praevia required an emergency caesarean section for a mild antepartum haemorrhage at the onset of spontaneous term labour. Following intravenous prehydration with 500 ml gelatin colloid (Haemaccel trade mark ), spinal anaesthesia was induced in the sitting position with 2.6 ml of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (13 mg). The patient was then placed in the recumbent position with left lateral tilt, whereupon she suddenly became dyspnoeic. A generalized erythematous urticarial rash with associated facial, periorbital, glossal and perioral oedema became evident. Although maternal blood pressure remained within normal limits, emergency conversion to general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation was necessary to secure the airway. Laryngoscopy revealed gross submucosal, epiglottic and pharyngeal oedema, characteristics of the syndrome of angioneurotic oedema, which may complicate an anaphylactoid reaction. After the airway was secured with a cuffed endotracheal tube, caesarean section proceeded uneventfully and a healthy male infant was delivered. Maternal facial and airway oedema subsided and extubation was performed in intensive care 2 h later. Life-threatening airway obstruction often accompanies angioneurotic oedema. Since parturients have a higher incidence of difficult airway management than the general population, anaphylactoid reactions presenting as angioneurotic oedema pose a particular challenge for the anaesthetist. The lower incidence of allergy associated with hydroxyethyl starch (Hetastarch) may make it a more appropriate choice of colloid in this setting. However, the balance of evidence now suggests that vasopressors, particularly ephedrine, are superior to fluids for maintenance of blood pressure during regional anaesthesia for caesarean section.

  6. Role of Lumbar Drainage as an Adjunct for controlling Intracranial pressure in Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gudmundsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 16-year-old girl with fulminant bacterial meningitis in whom external ventricular drainage and intense volume-targeted therapy (the Lund protocol was not sufficient to control intracranial pressure, but lumbar drainage on day 8 decreased the intracranial pressure immediately and led to a sustained low intracranial pressure level. The case is unusual and not fully understood, but the authors assume that due to inflammation and tissue reactions following aggressive infection, cerebrospinal fluid could not flow freely from the posterior fossa up to the ventricular drain. High pressure in the posterior compartment maintained the high intracranial pressure measured by the ventricular drain, and lumbar drain insertion caused an immediate fall in pressure. The lesson learned is that during an intracranial pressure crisis in a patient with open basal cisterns, a lumbar drain may be necessary because the cerebrospinal fluid space can be compartmentalized.

  7. Lever reduction using polyaxial screw and rod fixation system for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis: technique and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zu-De; Li, Xin-Feng; Qian, Lie; Wu, Lian-Ming; Lao, Li-Feng; Wang, Han-Tao

    2015-02-15

    The management for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis remains controversial. Reduction of lumbar spondylolisthesis has been performed via numerous techniques. Most of them need extra reduction assembly. In this retrospective analysis, 27 patients of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with spinal stenosis underwent reduction using polyaxial screw and rod constructs and posterolateral fusion. The average age at the time of surgery was 53 ± 3.23 years. The outcome measures consisted of a radiographic assessment of deformity and fusion rate and a clinical assessment of perioperative improvement in low back pain and function. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic evaluation included the percent slip, slip angle, and the lumbar lordosis between L1 and the sacrum measured using the Cobb method. Before surgery and at the final follow-up, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the visual pain analog scale (VPAS) between 0 (no pain) and 10 (maximal pain) were quantified. The average follow-up period more than 5 years was available. The mean operative time was 90.19 ± 14.51 min, and the mean blood loss during surgery was 152.59 ± 45.71 ml. The mean length of incision was 4.83 ± 0.63 cm. The average percent slippage and the mean slip angle were, respectively, 19.8 ± 4.49% and 9.69 ± 3.79° before surgery, 5.09 ± 3.40% and 6.39 ± 3.16° after surgery, and 5.67 ± 3.92% and 7.21 ± 3.05° at the last follow-up. The average lumbar lordosis was 36.88 ± 2.64° before surgery, 41.96 ± 1.64° after surgery, and 40.27 ± 1.19° at the final follow-up. No neurologic deficit occurred. Solid fusion was achieved for all cases. Compared with the outcome preoperation, the data improved from 6.56 ± 1.40 to 2.48 ± 1.16 for VPAS pain scores and from 32.22 ± 3.57 to 10.93 ± 4.93 for the ODI at the final follow-up. Lever slip reduction maneuver techniques using polyaxial screw

  8. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  9. Epidural injections with or without steroids in managing chronic low back pain secondary to lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hai Meng, Qi Fei, Bingqiang Wang, Yong Yang, Dong Li, Jinjun Li, Nan Su Department of Orthopedics, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Epidural injections of anesthetic with or without steroids are widely used for treating lumbar spinal stenosis, a common cause of chronic low back pain, but there is a lack of rigorous data comparing the effectiveness of epidural injections of anesthetic with and without steroids. This meta-analysis presents a current, comprehensive picture of how epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids compare with those using local anesthetic alone.Methods: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched from their inception through February 5, 2015. Weight mean difference, risk ratio, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A random effects model or fixed effects model was used to pool the estimates, according to the heterogeneity between the included studies.Results: We included 13 randomized controlled trials, involving 1,465 patients. Significant pain relief (≥50% was demonstrated in 53.7% of patients administered with epidural injections of anesthetic with steroids (group 1 and in 56.4% of those administered with local anesthetic alone (group 2. Patients showed a reduction in numeric rating scale pain score of 3.7 and 3.6 in the two groups, respectively. Significant functional improvement was achieved in 65.2% of patients in group 1 and 63.1% of patients in group 2, with Oswestry Disability Index reductions of 13.8 and 14.5 points, respectively. The overall number of injections per year was 3.2±1.3 and 3.4±1.2 with average total relief per year of 29.3±19.7 and 33.8±19.3 weeks, respectively. The opioid intakes decreased from baseline by 12.4 and 7.8 mg, respectively. Among the outcomes listed, only total relief time differed significantly between the two groups.Conclusion: Both epidural injections with

  10. Acute traumatic spinal cord injury induces glial activation in the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Westmoreland, S V; Evangelous, N R; Graham, A; Sledge, J; Nesathurai, S

    2012-06-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury leads to direct myelin and axonal damage and leads to the recruitment of inflammatory cells to site of injury. Although rodent models have provided the greatest insight into the genesis of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), recent studies have attempted to develop an appropriate non-human primate model. We explored TSCI in a cynomolgus macaque model using a balloon catheter to mimic external trauma to further evaluate the underlying mechanisms of acute TSCI. Following 1hour of spinal cord trauma, there were focal areas of hemorrhage and necrosis at the site of trauma. Additionally, there was a marked increased expression of macrophage-related protein 8, MMP9, IBA-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages and microglia at the site of injury. This data indicate that acute TSCI in the cynomolgus macaque is an appropriate model and that the earliest immunohistochemical changes noted are within macrophage and microglia populations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Spinal Epidural Hematoma as a Complication of Intravenous Thrombolysis in an Acute Ischemic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Liebkind

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An 80-year-old white male suffered a stroke, fell to the floor, and suffered acute right hemiparesis and facial palsy. After an intravenous alteplase infusion 2.5 h later, the patient first complained of numbness in his right arm, then neck pain, followed by left leg numbness and slowly progressing paraparesis. MRI of the spine demonstrated an acute spinal dorsal epidural hematoma extending from the C6 to the T6 level; 12 h later, he underwent hematoma evacuation and laminectomy. Three months after surgery, the patient was paraplegic with moderate sensory loss below mamillary level. Acute ischemic stroke is often associated with a sudden fall, which, after thrombolysis, may result in unusual hemorrhagic complications.

  12. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion compared with motion-preservation procedures: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Aixing; Hai, Yong; Yang, Jincai; Zhou, Lijin; Chen, Xiaolong; Guo, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of motion-preservation procedures to prevent the adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) or adjacent segment disease (ASDis) compared with fusion in lumbar spine. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were comprehensively searched and a meta-analysis was performed of all randomized controlled trials and well designed prospective or retrospective comparative cohort studies assessing the lumbar fusion and motion-preservation procedures. We compared the ASDeg and ASDis rate, reoperation rate, operation time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, visual analogue scale (VAS) and oswestry disability index (ODI) improvement of the two procedures. A total of 15 studies consisting of 1474 patients were included in this study. The meta-analysis indicated that the prevalence of ASDeg, ASDis and reoperation rate on the adjacent level were lower in motion-preservation procedures group than in the fusion group (P = 0.001; P = 0.0004; P adjacent segment degeneration compared with the lumbar fusion. And the clinical outcomes of the two procedures are similar.

  13. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  14. Medida da área do canal vertebral lombar em diferentes faixas etárias Medida de la superficie del canal vertebral lumbar en los diferentes grupos de edad Lumbar spinal canal area in different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Ortiz

    2009-03-01

    rango de edad fue 0,258 y para el sexo de 0,062; en el caso de la L5, el "p-value" para el rango de edad fue 0,279 y el sexo de 0,003. CONCLUSIÓN: no hay diferencia en el ámbito de la canal vertebral lumbar entre los grupos de edad analizados, pero hay diferencias entre los sexos, siendo mayor en los hombres.OBJECTIVE: to measure the lumbar spinal canal area, using computerized tomography, compare different age groups and determine if there are differences between those. METHODS: the lumbar spinal canal area was measured in 78 individuals, divided in eight age groups, with data obtained from computerized tomography scans of the abdomen. The measurements were made at L1, L3 and L5 levels at the transpedicular section. RESULTS: the values for L1 produced a p-value of 0,586 for the age group and a p-value of 0,003 for sex. Therefore, we can say that there is no evidence of differences among age rage groups, but shows evidence of difference for sex being larger in males. For L3, the p-value of age rage was 0,258, and the value for sex was 0,062. For L5, the p-value for the age range was 0279, and the value for sex was 0,003. CONCLUSION: there is no difference of spinal canal area between the age groups, but there is difference for the sex being larger in males.

  15. A method for unit recording in the lumbar spinal cord during locomotion of the conscious adult rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rune W; Chen, Ming-Teh; Huang, Hsueh-Chen

    2009-01-01

    valuable insights for the development of hypotheses about the organization of functional networks in the spinal cord. However, since reduced preparations could result in spurious conclusions, it is crucial to test these hypotheses in animals that are awake and behaving. Furthermore, unresolved issues...

  16. Determination of the Optimal Cutoff Values for Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire Scores and the Oswestry Disability Index for Favorable Surgical Outcomes in Subjects With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Park, Jong-Woong; Kang, Kyoung-Tak; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Kang, Sung-Shik; Yeom, Jin S

    2015-10-15

    Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data (NCT02134821). The aim of this study was to elucidate the cutoff values for significant predictors for favorable outcomes after lumbar spine surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Various factors are associated with the surgical outcomes for patients with LSS. However, we did not know the odds ratio and/or cutoff values of a predictive factor for a favorable surgical outcome for LSS. A total of 157 patients who underwent spine surgery due to LSS between June 2012 and April 2013 were included in this study. The patients were dichotomized into 2 groups on the basis of an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score of 22 or less (favorable outcome group) or more than 22 (unfavorable outcome group) at 12 months after surgery. Regarding favorable outcomes, the odds ratio for each preoperative variable including demographic data, preoperative symptom severity, and pain sensitivity questionnaire (PSQ) score was calculated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. For the significant variables for surgical outcome, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted with calculation of the area under the ROC curve. Multivariate analysis revealed that the ODI and total PSQ scores were significantly associated with a greater likelihood of an unfavorable surgical outcome [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of ODI, 1.289 (1.028-1.616); odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of total PSQ, 1.060 (1.009-1.113)]. ROC analysis revealed area under the ROC curves for the total PSQ and ODI scores of 0.638 (P = 0.005) and 0.692 (P disability and pain sensitivity can be predictors of the functional level achieved after spine surgery in patients with LSS, and the ideal cutoff values for the total PSQ and ODI scores were 6.6 and 45.0, respectively.

  17. Descriptive Analysis of Spinal Neuroaxial Injections, Surgical Interventions, and Physical Therapy Utilization for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Within Medicare Beneficiaries from 2000 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Joseph A; Constantin, Alexandra; Ho, Pei-Shu; Akuthota, Venu; Chan, Leighton

    2017-02-15

    A retrospective, observational study. The aim of this study was to determine the utilization of various treatment modalities in the management of degenerative spondylolisthesis within Medicare beneficiaries. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis is a condition often identified in symptomatic low back pain. A variety of treatment algorithms including physical therapy and interventional techniques can be used to manage clinically significant degenerative spondylolisthesis. This study utilized the 5% national sample of Medicare carrier claims from 2000 through 2011. A cohort of beneficiaries with a new International Classification of Diseases 9th edition (ICD-9) diagnosis code for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis was identified. Current procedural terminology codes were used to identify the number of procedures performed each year by specialty on this cohort. A total of 95,647 individuals were included in the analysis. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis was 72.8 ± 9.8 years. Within this study cohort, spondylolisthesis was more prevalent in females (69%) than males and in Caucasians (88%) than other racial demographics. Over 50% of beneficiaries underwent at least one injection, approximately one-third (37%) participated in physical therapy, one in five (21%) underwent spinal surgery, and one-third (36%) did not utilize any of these interventions. Greater than half of all procedures (124,280/216,088) occurred within 2 years of diagnosis. The ratio of focal interventions (transforaminal and facet interventions) to less selective (interlaminar) procedures was greater for the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation than for the specialties of Anesthesiology, Interventional Radiology, Neurosurgery, and Orthopedic Surgery. The majority of physical therapy was dedicated to passive treatment modalities and range of motion exercises rather than active strengthening modalities within this cohort. Interventional techniques and physical therapy are

  18. Descriptive analysis of spinal neuroaxial injections, surgical interventions and physical therapy utilization for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis within Medicare beneficiaries from 2000–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Joseph A.; Constantin, Alexandra; Ho, Pei-Shu; Akuthota, Venu; Chan, Leighton

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, observational study. Objective To determine the utilization of various treatment modalities in the management of degenerative spondylolisthesis within Medicare beneficiaries. Summary of Background Data Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis is a condition often identified in symptomatic low back pain. A variety of treatment algorithms including physical therapy and interventional techniques can be used to manage clinically significant degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods This study utilized the 5% national sample of Medicare carrier claims from 2000 through 2011. A cohort of beneficiaries with a new ICD-9 diagnosis code for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis was identified. Current procedural terminology codes were used to identify the number of procedures performed each year by specialty on this cohort. Results A total of 95,647 individuals were included in the analysis. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis was 72.8 ± 9.8 years. Within this study cohort, spondylolisthesis was more prevalent in females (69%) than males and in Caucasians (88%) compared to other racial demographics. Over 40% of beneficiaries underwent at least one injection, approximately one third (37%) participated in physical therapy, one in five (22%) underwent spinal surgery, and one third (36%) did not utilize any of these interventions. Greater than half of all procedures (124,280/216,088) occurred within 2 years of diagnosis. The ratio of focal interventions (transforaminal and facet interventions) to less selective (interlaminar) procedures was greater for the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation compared to the specialties of Anesthesiology, Interventional Radiology, Neurosurgery, and Orthopedic Surgery. The majority of physical therapy was dedicated to passive treatment modalities and range of motion exercises rather than active strengthening modalities within this cohort. Conclusion Interventional techniques and physical therapy are

  19. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for a huge herniated disc causing acute cauda equina syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Hama, Shingo; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microsurgery for lumbar disc herniation that requires surgical intervention has been well described. The methods vary from traditional open discectomy to minimally invasive techniques. All need adequate preanesthetic preparation of patients as general anesthesia is required for the procedure, and nerve monitoring is necessary to prevent iatrogenic nerve injury. Conventional surgical techniques sometimes require the removal of the corresponding lamina to assess the nerve root and herniated disc, and this may increase the risk for posterior instability of the vertebral body. Should this occur, fusion surgery may be needed, further increasing morbidity and cost. We present here a case of lumbar herniated disc fragments causing acute cauda equina syndrome that were endoscopically resected through a transforaminal approach in an awake patient under local anesthesia. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy under local anesthesia proved to be a better alternative to open back surgery as it made immediate intervention possible, was associated with fewer perioperative complications and morbidity, minimized soft tissue damage, and allowed early rehabilitation with a better outcome and greater patient satisfaction. In addition to these advantages, percutaneous endoscopic discectomy protects other approaches that may be needed in subsequent surgeries, whether open or minimally invasive.

  20. The Effect of Therapeutic Lumbar Punctures on Acute Mortality From Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Rhein, Joshua; Nabeta, Henry W.; Taseera, Kabanda; Schutz, Charlotte; Musubire, Abdu; Rajasingham, Radha; Williams, Darlisha A.; Thienemann, Friedrich; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. ?Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is common in cryptococcosis. Prior studies suggest elevated ICP is associated with mortality, and guidelines recommend frequent lumbar punctures (LPs) to control ICP. However, the magnitude of the impact of LPs on cryptococcal-related mortality is unknown. Methods. ?In sum, 248 individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal ...

  1. Acute complete paraplegia of 8-year-old girl caused by spinal cord infarction following minor trauma complicated with longitudinal signal change of spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Kosei; Tanaka, Yuji; Kanai, Hiroyuki; Oshima, Yasushi

    2017-05-01

    Spinal cord infarction followed by minor trauma in pediatric patients is rare and causes serious paralysis. Fibrocartilaginous embolism (FCE) is a possible diagnosis and there have been no consecutive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reports. Here, we report a case of an acute complete paraplegia with spinal cord infarction and longitudinal spinal cord signal change following minor trauma in an 8-year-old girl. An 8-year-old girl presented to our hospital emergency services with total paraplegia 2 h after she hit her back and neck after doing a handstand and falling down. She completely lost pain, temperature sensation, and a sense of vibration below her bilateral anterior thighs. Four hours later on MRI, the T2-weighted sequence showed no spinal cord compression or signal change in vertebral bodies. The patient was treated with rehabilitation after complete bed rest. A week after the trauma, the T2-weighted sequence indicated longitudinal extension of the lesion between T11 and C6 vertebral level with ring-shaped signal change. In addition, the diffusion-weighted MRI showed increased signal below C6 vertebral level. Two weeks after the trauma, we performed the T2 star sequence images, which showed minor bleeding at T11 vertebral area and spinal cord edema below C6. Four weeks after the trauma, MRI showed minor lesion at C6 vertebral level, but spinal cord atrophy was observed at T11 vertebral level without disc signal change. Thirteen weeks after the trauma, her cervical spinal cord became almost intact and severe atrophy of the spinal cord at T11 vertebral level. At 1 year following her injury, complete paraplegia remained with sensory loss below T11 level. Her clinical presentation, lack of evidence for other plausible diagnosis, and consecutive MRI findings made FCE at T11 vertebral level with pencil-shaped softening the most likely diagnosis. In addition, consecutive cervical MRI indicated minor cervical spinal cord injury. This Grand Round case highlights

  2. Barriers and facilitators to a home-based cycling program tailored to older patient preferences in lumbar spinal stenosis: a retrospective mixed-method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Charlotte; Roren, Alexandra; Gautier, Adrien; Linières, Jonathan; Rannou, François; Poiraudeau, Serge; Nguyen, Christelle

    2018-02-27

    Lumbar-flexion-based endurance training, namely cycling, could be effective in reducing pain and improving function and health-related quality of life in older people with chronic low back pain. To assess barriers and facilitators to home-based cycling in older patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). We conducted a retrospective mixed-method study. Patients ≥ 50 years old followed up for LSS from November 2015 to June 2016 in a French tertiary care center were screened. The intervention consisted of a single supervised session followed by home-based sessions of cycling, with dose (number of sessions and duration, distance and power per session) self-determined by patient preference. The primary outcome was assessed by a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews at baseline and 3 months and was the identification of barriers and facilitators to the intervention. Secondary outcomes were assessed by a quantitative approach and were adherence monitored by a USB stick connected to the bicycle, burden of treatment assessed by the Exercise Therapy Burden Questionnaire (ETBQ) and clinical efficacy assessed by change in lumbar pain, radicular pain, disability, spine-specific activity limitation and maximum walking distance at 3 months. Overall, 15 patients were included and data for 12 were analyzed at 3 months. At baseline, the mean age was 70.9 years (95% CI 64.9-76.8) and 9/15 patients (60.0%) were women. Barriers to cycling were fear of pain and fatigue, a too-large bicycle, burden of hospital follow-up and lack of time and motivation. Facilitators were clinical improvement, surveillance and ease-of-use of the bicycle. Adherence remained stable overtime. The burden of treatment was low (mean ETBQ score: 21.0 [95% confidence interval 11.5-30.5]). At 3 months, 7/12 patients (58.3%) self-reported clinical improvement, with reduced radicular pain and disability (mean absolute differences: -27.5 [-43.3- -11.7], pcycling is a feasible intervention

  3. The experimental study of selective arterial embolization in the lumbar spine of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Caifang; Xu Ming; Liu Yizhi; Ding Yi; Yang Huilin; Tang Tiansi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To establish the model of acute spinal infarction, to evaluate the relative factors affecting results in spinal embolization, and to provide the theoretical basis with the preoperative embolization of spinal tumors. Methods: Through the SAE of the lumbar arteries, the neuro-function of the posterior legs of dogs, MRI findings, and pathologic changes of the spinal specimen were observed in 12 dogs. The embolizing agents was gelfoam (GF). Results: The significant ischemia changes of spinal column and the corresponding muscles at the occluding spinal after embolizing more than one segmental arteries occurred in 9 dogs, but there were no paraplegia or obvious changes in 3 dogs having been embolized single lumbar arteries no matter they sent out the radiculomedullary artery (RA) or not. Paraplegia occurred in one dog after embolizing the multisegmental arteries. Conclusion: (1) The method of SAE in dog can be used to set up the experimental model of the acute ischemia of spine. (2) The occlusion in single-segmental arteries can not result in the infarction of the whole spine. (3) The serious complication may result from embolizing multisegmental spinal arteries (especially sending out RA). (4) The protecting embolization should be carried out in order to decrease the reaction during SAE in spine

  4. Risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J; Shao, J; Qi, H-H; Song, D-W; Zhu, W

    2015-01-01

    To analyze risk factors for respiratory failure with tetraplegia after acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI). Total 180 tetraplegia cases after acute traumatic CSCI treated in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed retrospectively and the frequency of respiratory failure in these patients were analyzed against the factors including age, gender, cause of injury, level/severity of injury, high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) therapy, and surgery intervention, using Chi-square test to look into the correlations of the prevalence of respiratory failure to those factors. Of the 180 tetraplegia with acute traumatic CSCI, 29 patients (16.11%) developed respiratory failure. The factors, including age, level and severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention, were found to significantly correlate with the appearance of respiratory failure in tetraplegia after acute traumatic CSCI (p < 0.05), while no significant correlation was found between the other factors: gender and cause of injury and the frequency of respiratory failure. Age, level/severity of injury, high-dose MP therapy, and surgery intervention are the four major relevant factors of respiratory failure in patients with acute traumatic CSCI. The appropriate and timing treatments involving high-dose MP therapy and surgical decompression and reconstruction can substantially increase the rates of clinical improvements and reduce the frequency of respiratory failure.

  5. Acute effects of spinal bracing on scapular kinematics in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Gozde; Turgut, Elif; Ayhan, Cigdem; Baltaci, Gul; Yakut, Yavuz

    2017-08-01

    Bracing is the most common nonsurgical treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Spinal braces affect glenohumeral and scapulothoracic motion because they restrict trunk movements. However, the potential spinal-bracing effects on scapular kinematics are unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the acute effects of spinal bracing on scapular kinematics in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Scapular kinematics, including scapular internal/external rotation, posterior/anterior tilting, and downward/upward rotation during scapular plane elevation, were evaluated in 27 in-brace and out-of-brace adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with a three-dimensional electromagnetic tracking system. Data on the position and orientation of the scapula at 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° humerothoracic elevation were used for statistical comparisons. The paired t-test was used to assess the differences between the mean values of in-brace and out-of-brace conditions. The in-brace condition showed significantly increased (Pscoliosis. Therefore, clinicians should include assessments of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic joints when designing rehabilitation protocols for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Does the lower instrumented vertebra have an effect on lumbar mobility, subjective perception of trunk flexibility, and quality of life in patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated by spinal fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Raya, Judith; Bago, Juan; Pellise, Ferran; Cuxart, Ampar; Villanueva, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Cross-sectional study in patients with idiopathic scoliosis treated with spinal fusion. To measure lumbar spine mobility in the study population; determine low back pain intensity (LBPi), subjective perception of trunk flexibility (TF), and quality of life using validated outcome instruments; and investigate correlations of the lower instrumented vertebra (LIV) with TF, LBPi, and quality of life. The loss of range of motion resulting from spinal fusion might lead to low back pain, trunk rigidity, and a negative impact on quality of life. Nonetheless, these outcomes have not been conclusively demonstrated because lumbar mobility and LIV have not been correlated with validated outcome instruments. Forty-one patients (mean age, 27 y) with idiopathic scoliosis treated by spinal fusion (mean time since surgery, 135 mo) were included. Patients were assigned to 3 groups according to LIV level: group 1 (fusion to T12, L1, or L2) 14 patients; group 2 (fusion to L3) 13 patients, and group 3 (fusion to L4, L5, or S1) 14 patients. At midterm follow-up, patients completed the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 Questionnaire and Quality of Life Profile for Spine Deformities to evaluate perceived TF, and rated LBPi with a numerical scale. Lumbar mobility was assessed using a dual digital inclinometer. Group 3 (fusion to L4, L5, or S1) showed statistically significant differences relative to the other groups, with less lumbar mobility and poorer scores for the SRS subtotal (P = 0.003) and SRS pain scale (P = 0.01). Nevertheless, LBPi and TF were similar in the 3 groups. TF correlated with SRS-22 subtotal (r = -0.38, P = 0.01) and pain scale (r = -0.42, P = 0.007) scores, and with LBPi (r = 0.43, P = 0.005). LIV correlated moderately with lumbar mobility, health-related quality of life (SRS-22), and spinal pain (SRS-22 pain subscale), but not with intensity of pain in the lumbar area or perceived TF.

  7. Biomechanical effects of fusion levels on the risk of proximal junctional failure and kyphosis in lumbar spinal fusion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won Man; Choi, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yongjung J; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2015-12-01

    Spinal fusion surgery is a widely used surgical procedure for sagittal realignment. Clinical studies have reported that spinal fusion may cause proximal junctional kyphosis and failure with disc failure, vertebral fracture, and/or failure at the implant-bone interface. However, the biomechanical injury mechanisms of proximal junctional kyphosis and failure remain unclear. A finite element model of the thoracolumbar spine was used. Nine fusion models with pedicle screw systems implanted at the L2-L3, L3-L4, L4-L5, L5-S1, L2-L4, L3-L5, L4-S1, L2-L5, and L3-S1 levels were developed based on the respective surgical protocols. The developed models simulated flexion-extension using hybrid testing protocol. When spinal fusion was performed at more distal levels, particularly at the L5-S1 level, the following biomechanical properties increased during flexion-extension: range of motion, stress on the annulus fibrosus fibers and vertebra at the adjacent motion segment, and the magnitude of axial forces on the pedicle screw at the uppermost instrumented vertebra. The results of this study demonstrate that more distal fusion levels, particularly in spinal fusion including the L5-S1 level, lead to greater increases in the risk of proximal junctional kyphosis and failure, as evidenced by larger ranges of motion, higher stresses on fibers of the annulus fibrosus and vertebra at the adjacent segment, and higher axial forces on the screw at the uppermost instrumented vertebra in flexion-extension. Therefore, fusion levels should be carefully selected to avoid proximal junctional kyphosis and failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4 h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24 h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines—monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)—to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  9. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal ...

  10. Functional status predicts acute care readmission in the traumatic spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Donna; Slocum, Chloe; Silver, Julie K; Morgan, James W; Goldstein, Richard; Zafonte, Ross; Schneider, Jeffrey C

    2018-03-29

    Context/objective Acute care readmission has been identified as an important marker of healthcare quality. Most previous models assessing risk prediction of readmission incorporate variables for medical comorbidity. We hypothesized that functional status is a more robust predictor of readmission in the spinal cord injury population than medical comorbidities. Design Retrospective cross-sectional analysis. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation facilities, Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation data from 2002 to 2012 Participants traumatic spinal cord injury patients. Outcome measures A logistic regression model for predicting acute care readmission based on demographic variables and functional status (Functional Model) was compared with models incorporating demographics, functional status, and medical comorbidities (Functional-Plus) or models including demographics and medical comorbidities (Demographic-Comorbidity). The primary outcomes were 3- and 30-day readmission, and the primary measure of model performance was the c-statistic. Results There were a total of 68,395 patients with 1,469 (2.15%) readmitted at 3 days and 7,081 (10.35%) readmitted at 30 days. The c-statistics for the Functional Model were 0.703 and 0.654 for 3 and 30 days. The Functional Model outperformed Demographic-Comorbidity models at 3 days (c-statistic difference: 0.066-0.096) and outperformed two of the three Demographic-Comorbidity models at 30 days (c-statistic difference: 0.029-0.056). The Functional-Plus models exhibited negligible improvements (0.002-0.010) in model performance compared to the Functional models. Conclusion Readmissions are used as a marker of hospital performance. Function-based readmission models in the spinal cord injury population outperform models incorporating medical comorbidities. Readmission risk models for this population would benefit from the inclusion of functional status.

  11. Acute management of traumatic spinal cord injury in a Greek and a Swedish region: a prospective, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divanoglou, A; Seiger, A; Levi, R

    2010-06-01

    Prospective, population-based study. This paper is part of the Stockholm Thessaloniki Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Study (STATSCIS). To characterize patient populations and to compare acute management after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). The Greater Thessaloniki region in Greece and the Greater Stockholm region in Sweden. Inception cohorts with acute TSCI that were hospitalized during the study period, that is September 2006 to October 2007, were identified. Overall, 81 out of 87 cases consented to inclusion in Thessaloniki and 47 out of 49 in Stockholm. Data from Thessaloniki were collected through physical examinations, medical record reviews and communication with TSCI cases and medical teams. Data from Stockholm were retrieved from the Nordic Spinal Cord Injury Registry. There were no significant differences between study groups with regard to core clinical characteristics. In contrast, there were significant differences in (1) transfer logistics from the scene of trauma to a tertiary-level hospital (number of intermediate admissions, modes of transportation and duration of transfer) and (2) acute key therapeutic interventions, that is, the use of mechanical ventilation (49% in Thessaloniki versus 20% in Stockholm), and performance of tracheostomy (36% in Thessaloniki versus 15% in Stockholm); spinal surgery was performed significantly more often and earlier in Stockholm than in Thessaloniki. Despite largely similar core clinical characteristics, Stockholm and Thessaloniki cases underwent significantly different acute management, most probably to be attributed to adaptations to the differing regional approaches of care one following a systematic approach of SCI care and the other not.

  12. Does daily tobacco smoking affect outcomes after microdecompression for degenerative central lumbar spinal stenosis? - A multicenter observational registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Sasha; Nordseth, Trond; Nerland, Ulf S; Gulati, Michel; Weber, Clemens; Giannadakis, Charalampis; Nygaard, Øystein P; Solberg, Tore K; Solheim, Ole; Jakola, Asgeir S

    2015-07-01

    There are limited scientific data on the impact of smoking on patient-reported outcomes following minimally invasive spine surgery. The aim of this multicenter observational study was to examine the relationship between daily smoking and patient-reported outcome at 1 year using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after microdecompression for single- and two-level central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stays, perioperative and postoperative complications. Data were collected through the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery (NORspine). A total of 825 patients were included (619 nonsmokers and 206 smokers). For the whole patient population there was a significant difference between preoperative ODI and ODI at 1 year (17.3 points, 95% CI 15.93-18.67, p Smoking was identified as a negative predictor for ODI change in a multiple regression analysis (p = 0.001) CONCLUSIONS: Nonsmokers experienced a significantly larger improvement at 1 year following microdecompression for LSS compared to smokers. Smokers were less likely to achieve a minimal clinically important difference. However, it should be emphasized that considerable improvement also was found among smokers.

  13. Fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection for management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: short-term and long-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Myung, Jae Sung; Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S.; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term and long-term effects of fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI) for the management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) and to analyze outcome predictors. All patients who underwent caudal ESI in 2006 for DLSS were included in the study. Response was based on chart documentation (aggravated, no change, slightly improved, much improved, no pain). In June 2009 telephone interviews were conducted, using formatted questions including the North American Spine Society (NASS) patient satisfaction scale. For short-term and long-term effects, age difference was evaluated by the Mann-Whitney U test, and gender, duration of symptoms, level of DLSS, spondylolisthesis, and previous operations were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Two hundred and sixteen patients (male: female = 75:141; mean age 69.2 years; range 48∝91 years) were included in the study. Improvements (slightly improved, much improved, no pain) were seen in 185 patients (85.6%) after an initial caudal ESI and in 189 patients (87.5%) after a series of caudal ESIs. Half of the patients (89/179, 49.8%) replied positively to the NASS patient satisfaction scale (1 or 2). There were no significant outcome predictors for either the short-term or the long-term responses. Fluoroscopically guided caudal ESI was effective for the management of DLSS (especially central canal stenosis) with excellent short-term and good long-term results, without significant outcome predictors. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of the anatomic effect of physical therapy exercises for mobilization of lumbar spinal nerves and the dura mater in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenenfelder, Fredrik I; Boos, Alois; Mouwen, Marco; Steffen, Frank

    2006-10-01

    To adapt and standardize neural tissue mobilization exercises, quantify nerve root movement, and assess the anatomic effects of lumbar spinal nerve and dural mobilization in dogs. 15 canine cadavers. 5 cadavers were used in the preliminary part of the study to adapt 3 neural tissue mobilization physical therapy exercises to canine anatomy. In the other 10 cadavers, the L4 to L7 nerve roots and the dura at the level of T13 and L1 were isolated and marked. Movements during the physical therapy exercises were standardized by means of goniometric control. Movement of the nerve roots in response to each exercise was digitally measured. The effects of body weight and crownrump length on the distance of nerve root movement achieved during each exercise were also assessed. Each exercise was divided into 4 steps, and the overall distance of neural movement achieved was compared with distances achieved between steps. Neural tissue mobilization exercises elicited visible and measurable movement of nerve roots L4 to L7 and of the dura at T13 and L1 in all cadavers. The physical therapy exercises evaluated had measurable effects on nerve roots L4 to L7 and the dura mater in the T13 and L1 segments. These exercises should be evaluated in clinical trials to validate their efficacy as primary treatments or ancillary postsurgical therapy in dogs with disorders of the thoracolumbar and lumbosacral segments of the vertebral column.

  15. The tibial nerve compression test for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis-A simple and reliable physical examination for use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kin, Akihiro; Baba, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Neo, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and suitability of the 'Tibial Nerve Compression Test (TNCT)' as a screening tool for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). A total of 108 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital for surgical treatment or diagnosis of LSS were included in this study. Fifty healthy volunteers were examined as a control group. The severity of tenderness was scored (tenderness score) and measured on a visual analogue scale (P-VAS score). These scores were compared between the LSS and control groups. Moreover, they were compared before and after the operation among operated patients. The positive tenderness rate was significantly higher (92.6% [100/108]) in the LSS group than in the control group (30% [15/50]). The sensitivity and specificity of TNCT (95% confidence interval) were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.70 (0.61-0.77), respectively. Positive tenderness rates and P-VAS scores were significantly higher in the LSS group (p Test is a useful screening tool for LSS diagnosis in a primary care setting. Level II, diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Has a Negative Impact on Quality of Life Compared with Other Comorbidities: An Epidemiological Cross-Sectional Study of 1862 Community-Dwelling Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Otani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS is common in the elderly. However, there have been few reports on its impact on quality of life (QoL in community-dwelling individuals. The purpose of this study was to clarify how symptomatic LSS affects QoL at the community level. A total of 1862 people (697 males and 1165 females, most subjects were between 40 and 85 y.o. agreed to participate and were interviewed. The presence of symptomatic LSS was assessed by a specially designed questionnaire. The Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 was also administered. In addition, the presence of comorbid conditions that affect QoL, such as osteoarthritis of the knee and hip, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, or respiratory disease, was also analyzed. The prevalence of symptomatic LSS gradually increased with age. Furthermore, the presence of symptomatic LSS had a strong negative effect on all 8 physical and mental domains and the physical component summary (PCS (OR: 1.547–2.544 but not the mental component summary (MCS. In comparison with comorbid conditions, LSS had a much stronger negative impact on health-related QoL (HR-QoL. The current study confirmed that the presence of symptomatic LSS might have a strong negative influence on HR-QoL in the community setting.

  17. Fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection for management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: short-term and long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Myung, Jae Sung; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Kim, Ki-Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-do (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    To evaluate the short-term and long-term effects of fluoroscopically guided caudal epidural steroid injection (ESI) for the management of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) and to analyze outcome predictors. All patients who underwent caudal ESI in 2006 for DLSS were included in the study. Response was based on chart documentation (aggravated, no change, slightly improved, much improved, no pain). In June 2009 telephone interviews were conducted, using formatted questions including the North American Spine Society (NASS) patient satisfaction scale. For short-term and long-term effects, age difference was evaluated by the Mann-Whitney U test, and gender, duration of symptoms, level of DLSS, spondylolisthesis, and previous operations were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Two hundred and sixteen patients (male: female = 75:141; mean age 69.2 years; range 48{proportional_to}91 years) were included in the study. Improvements (slightly improved, much improved, no pain) were seen in 185 patients (85.6%) after an initial caudal ESI and in 189 patients (87.5%) after a series of caudal ESIs. Half of the patients (89/179, 49.8%) replied positively to the NASS patient satisfaction scale (1 or 2). There were no significant outcome predictors for either the short-term or the long-term responses. Fluoroscopically guided caudal ESI was effective for the management of DLSS (especially central canal stenosis) with excellent short-term and good long-term results, without significant outcome predictors. (orig.)

  18. Predicting the risk and severity of acute spinal cord injury after a minor trauma to the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebli, Nikolaus; Rüegg, Tabea B; Wicki, Anina G; Petrou, Nassos; Krebs, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has been reported in patients without preceding neurologic symptoms. Spinal canal stenosis may be the reason for the discrepancy between the severity of the injury and that of the trauma. The spinal canal to vertebral body ratio is often used to assess canal stenosis on conventional radiographs. However, the ratio does not appraise soft-tissue stenosis and canal narrowing at the level of the intervertebral disc. Parameters measured on magnetic resonance (MR) images may thus be more meaningful. The relevance of MR image parameters for predicting the risk and severity of acute SCI in patients after a minor trauma to the cervical spine has not yet been established. To investigate MR image parameters of the cervical spine in patients suffering from acute SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. To investigate the use of these parameters for predicting the risk and severity of acute cervical SCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. Retrospective radiological study of consecutive patients. Fifty-two patients suffering from acute cervical SCI and 131 patients showing no neurologic deficits after a minor trauma to the cervical spine. On sagittal MR images: vertebral body diameter, midvertebral canal diameter, disc-level canal diameter, and spinal cord diameter. On lateral conventional radiographs: vertebral body diameter and midvertebral canal diameter. Conventional lateral radiographs and sagittal T2-weighted MR images of the cervical spine (C3-C7) were analyzed. The following calculations were performed using measurements from MR images: the spinal canal to vertebral body ratio, the space available for the cord, and the canal-to-cord ratio. Using measurements from conventional radiographs, the spinal canal to vertebral body ratio was determined. Receiver-operating curves were calculated for evaluating the classification accuracy of the different parameters for predicting the risk

  19. Role of disc area and trabecular bone density on lumbar spinal column fracture risk curves under vertical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Moore, Jason; Pintar, Frank A; Banerjee, Anjishnu; DeVogel, Nicholas; Zhang, JiangYue

    2018-04-27

    While studies have been conducted using human cadaver lumbar spines to understand injury biomechanics in terms of stability/energy to fracture, and physiological responses under pure-moment/follower loads, data are sparse for inferior-to-superior impacts. Injuries occur under this mode from underbody blasts. determine role of age, disc area, and trabecular bone density on tolerances/risk curves under vertical loading from a controlled group of specimens. T12-S1 columns were obtained, pretest X-rays and CTs taken, load cells attached to both ends, impacts applied at S1-end using custom vertical accelerator device, and posttest X-ray, CT, and dissections done. BMD of L2-L4 vertebrae were obtained from QCT. Survival analysis-based Human Injury Probability Curves (HIPCs) were derived using proximal and distal forces. Age, area, and BMD were covariates. Forces were considered uncensored, representing the load carrying capacity. The Akaike Information Criterion was used to determine optimal distributions. The mean forces, ±95% confidence intervals, and Normalized Confidence Interval Size (NCIS) were computed. The Lognormal distribution was the optimal function for both forces. Age, area, and BMD were not significant (p > 0.05) covariates for distal forces, while only BMD was significant for proximal forces. The NCIS was the lowest for force-BMD covariate HIPC. The HIPCs for both genders at 35 and 45 years were based on population BMDs. These HIPCs serve as human tolerance criteria for automotive, military, and other applications. In this controlled group of samples, BMD is a better predictor-covariate that characterizes lumbar column injury under inferior-to-superior impacts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. A Brief Analysis of Traditional Chinese Medical Elongated Needle Therapy on Acute Spinal Cord Injury and Its Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxuan Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute spinal cord injury is one of the most common and complicated diseases among human spinal injury. We aimed to explore the effect of point-through-point acupuncture therapy with elongated needles on acute spinal cord injury in rabbits and its possible mechanism. Adult rabbits were randomly divided into a model group, elongated needle therapy group, and blank group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the protein levels of Fas and caspase-3 in the model group were significantly higher than those in the blank group at each time point (P<0.05 and significantly lower than those in the elongated needle therapy group on the 3rd and 5th days after operation (P<0.05. RT-PCR showed that Fas and caspase-3 mRNA levels in the model group and elongated needle therapy group were significantly higher than those in the blank group (P<0.05, 0.01. The mRNA levels of Fas and caspase-3 in the elongated needle therapy group were significantly lower than those in model group on the 3rd day (P<0.05, 0.01. Therefore, we confirmed that elongated needle therapy has an obvious effect on acute spinal cord injury in rabbits. Its mechanism is made possible by inhibiting the expression of the Fas→caspase-3 cascade, thereby inhibiting cell apoptosis after spinal cord injury.

  1. A brief analysis of traditional chinese medical elongated needle therapy on acute spinal cord injury and its mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mengxuan; Chen, Rongliang; Quan, Renfu; Zhang, Liang; Xu, Jinwei; Yang, Zhongbao; Yang, Disheng

    2013-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury is one of the most common and complicated diseases among human spinal injury. We aimed to explore the effect of point-through-point acupuncture therapy with elongated needles on acute spinal cord injury in rabbits and its possible mechanism. Adult rabbits were randomly divided into a model group, elongated needle therapy group, and blank group. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the protein levels of Fas and caspase-3 in the model group were significantly higher than those in the blank group at each time point (P therapy group on the 3rd and 5th days after operation (P model group and elongated needle therapy group were significantly higher than those in the blank group (P therapy group were significantly lower than those in model group on the 3rd day (P therapy has an obvious effect on acute spinal cord injury in rabbits. Its mechanism is made possible by inhibiting the expression of the Fas→caspase-3 cascade, thereby inhibiting cell apoptosis after spinal cord injury.

  2. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  3. Effects of acute exposure of heavy ion to spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and muscle fibers in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akihiko; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Norifumi; Nagaoka, Shunji; Nojima, Kumie

    2003-01-01

    We investigate effects of localized exposure of heavy ion to the lumbar 4th to 6th segments of the rat spinal cord on the properties of motoneurons and the innervated muscle fibers without surgical treatments. Twenty 7-week-old male Wistar rats were exposed to 5 mm spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) carbon beam (290 MeV, linear energy transfer (LET)=130 keV/μm): Two doses (15 Gy or 20 Gy) were applied to each group of rats (n=5) in two different depths; one group was exposed only for ventral horn of the spinal cord while other for whole spinal cord. Five rats served as controls. The rats were exposed to carbon irons on October 26, 2002. We will sacrifice the rats soon after they show an abnormal behavior including posture and walking. Cell body size and oxidative enzyme activity of spinal motoneurons of the control and heavy-ion-exposed rats will be analyzed. In addition, cell size, oxidative enzyme activity, and expressions of myosin heavy chain isoforms of the gastrocnemius, soleus, plantaris, extensor digitorum longus, and tibialis anterior muscle fibers will be also determined. This study is performed to test our hypothesis that atrophy and a decrease in cross-sectional area of motoneurons and muscle fibers which they innervate, as well as a decrease in oxidative activity of motoneurons and muscle fibers, will be induced due to exposure to heavy ion. (author)

  4. Limited magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine has high sensitivity for detection of acute fractures, infection, and malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Benjamin; Fintelmann, Florian J.; Kamath, Ravi S.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to determine how a limited protocol MR examination compares to a full conventional MR examination for the detection of non-degenerative pathology such as acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. A sample of 349 non-contrast MR exams was selected retrospectively containing a 3:1:1:1 distribution of negative/degenerative change only, acute fracture, infection, and malignancy. This resulted in an even distribution of pathology and non-pathology. A limited protocol MR exam was simulated by extracting T1-weighted sagittal and T2-weighted fat-saturated (or STIR) sagittal sequences from each exam and submitting them for blinded review by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The exams were evaluated for the presence or absence of non-degenerative pathology. Interpretation of the limited exam was compared to the original report of the full examination. If either reader disagreed with the original report, the case was submitted for an unblinded adjudication process with the participation of a third musculoskeletal radiologist to establish a consensus diagnosis. There were five false negatives for a sensitivity of 96.9 % for the limited protocol MR exam. Infection in the psoas, paraspinal muscles, and sacroiliac joint, as well as acute fractures in transverse processes and sacrum were missed by one or more readers. No cases of malignancy were missed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 96.0 % (335/349). MR imaging of the lumbar spine limited to sagittal T1-weighted and sagittal T2 fat-saturated (or STIR) sequences has high sensitivity for the detection of acute fracture, infection, or malignancy compared to a conventional MR examination. (orig.)

  5. A Comparison of the Effect of Kettlebell Swings and Isolated Lumbar Extension Training on Acute Torque Production of the Lumbar Extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinborough, Luke; Fisher, James P; Steele, James

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to use a fatigue response test to measure the muscular fatigue (defined as a reduction in torque production) sustained by the lumbar extensors after a single set of kettlebell swings (KBS) in comparison with isolated lumbar extensions (ILEX) and a control condition (CON). The purpose of which is to measure the physiological response of KBS against an already established modality. Subsequent data provide insight of the efficacy of kettlebells swings in strengthening the lumbar muscles and lower back pain treatment. Eight physically active males participated in a repeated measures design where participants completed all conditions. There were statistically significant reductions in maximal torque, reported as strength index (SI), after both KBS and ILEX exercise. A statistically significant difference was found for reductions in maximal torque between CON and both KBS (p = 0.005) and ILEX (p = 0.001) and between KBS and ILEX (p = 0.039). Mean reduction and effect sizes were -1824 ± 1127.12 (SI) and -1.62 for KBS and -4775.6 ± 1593.41 (SI) and -3.00 for ILEX. In addition, a statistically significant difference was found between KBS and ILEX for rate of perceived exertion (p = 0.012). Data suggest that both KBS and ILEX were able to fatigue the lumbar extensors. Isolated lumbar extension was able to generate a greater level of fatigue. However, contrary to previous research, the KBS was able to elicit a physiological response, despite the lack of pelvic restraint supporting the potential to strengthen the lumbar extensors.

  6. Inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic description of the extent and frequency of acute spinal changes using magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baraliakos, X.; Landewé, R.; Hermann, K.-G.; Listing, J.; Golder, W.; Brandt, J.; Rudwaleit, M.; Bollow, M.; Sieper, J.; van der Heijde, D.; Braun, J.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to detect inflammation in the spine of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). To detect differentially the presence and extent of inflammation in the three spinal segments of patients with AS by MRI. In 38 patients with active AS, acute

  7. High dose methylprednisolone in the management of acute spinal cord injury - a systematic review from a clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, D J; El Masry, W S; Jones, P W

    2000-05-01

    Systematic literature review for primary data using predefined inclusion, exclusion and validity criteria. Primary outcome measure was standardised neurological examination or neurological function. Secondary outcomes; acute mortality, early morbidity. To access the literature available to clinicians systematically and evaluate the evidence for an effect of high dose methylprednisolone (MPSS) on neurological improvement following acute spinal cord injury (ACSI). Information retrieval was based on Medline search (1966 through December 1999) using the strategy 'spinal cord injury' and 'methylprednisolone' (or 'dexamethasone') with no other restrictions. Primary data publications using high dose steroids given within 12 h following spinal cord injury and reporting outcome measures separately for steroid and non-steroid treated groups were selected. Evaluation followed the guides of Guyatt et al7 (for the Evidence Based Working Group in Canada). Studies with questionable validity were excluded. Level of evidence and treatment recommendation utilised the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination criteria.6 Experimental spinal cord injury studies on larger animals were included; small mammal experiments were considered beyond evaluation. Three clinical trials and six cohort study publications were found to satisfy the review criteria. The evidence they provide supports 'the recommendation that the manoeuvre (high dose methylpredisolone) be excluded from consideration as an intervention for the condition'10 (acute spinal cord injury). Twelve larger animal publications were detailed. Validity and the functional significance of results was of concern in many. The weight of evidence lay with those studies demonstrating no definite effect of MPSS on functional outcome. In cat experiments with higher level cord damage, deaths in the MPSS treated groups were notable. The evidence produced by this systematic review does not support the use of high dose

  8. Design and testing of a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of acute traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petteys, Rory J; Spitz, Steven M; Syed, Hasan; Rice, R Andrew; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; Goodwin, C Rory; Sciubba, Daniel M; Freedman, Brett A

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes debilitating neurological dysfunction and has been observed in warfighters injured in IED blasts. Clinical benefit of SCI treatment remains elusive and better large animal models are needed to assess treatment options. Here, we describe a controlled electromagnetic spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI. A custom spinal cord impactor and platform were fabricated for large animals (e.g., pig, sheep, dog, etc.). Impacts were generated by a voice coil actuator; force and displacement were measured with a load cell and potentiometer respectively. Labview (National Instruments, Austin, TX) software was used to control the impact cycle and import force and displacement data. Software finite impulse response (FIR) filtering was employed for all input data. Silicon tubing was used a surrogate for spinal cord in order to test the device; repeated impacts were performed at 15, 25, and 40 Newtons. Repeated impacts demonstrated predictable results at each target force. The average duration of impact was 71.2 ±6.1ms. At a target force of 40N, the output force was 41.5 ±0.7N. With a target of 25N, the output force was 23.5 ±0.6N; a target of 15Newtons revealed an output force of 15.2 ±1.4N. The calculated acceleration range was 12.5-21.2m/s 2 . This custom spinal cord impactor reliably delivers precise impacts to the spinal cord and will be utilized in future research to study acute traumatic SCI in a large animal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. [Fast visualization of fat infiltration in dorsal muscles of the trunk at lumbar spinal column by magnetic resonance images (MR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Miguelsanz, María Juliana; Herrera-Hervás, Luis; Franco-López, María de Los Ángeles

    2014-11-01

    In magnetic resonance, fat is considered an "unwanted artifact or signal" which is suppressed when performing a clinical study, unless otherwise specified. The increase in obesity and associated diseases has become necessary to study fat deposits both in adipose tissue and ectopic fat. In this paper, we analyze the information that is available from the CD which patients receive after undergoing magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen along with the medical report, using a personal computer, focusing on the fat deposits in spinal muscles of healthy adult volunteers or analyzes nonspecific low back pain. The application of colored interfaces or windows on gray resonance images is very useful to display fat deposits, especially when the observer is not familiar with these images. It is a fast, easy and intuitive method of semiquantitative muscle visualization of the ectopic fat. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of Lean Principles to Neurosurgical Procedures: The Case of Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery, a Literature Review and Pilot Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jesse J; Raskin, Jeffrey S; Hardaway, Fran; Holste, Katherine; Brown, Sarah; Raslan, Ahmed M

    2018-03-14

    Delivery of higher value healthcare is an ultimate government and public goal. Improving efficiency by standardization of surgical steps can improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and lead to higher value healthcare. Lean principles and methodology have improved timeliness in perioperative medicine; however, process mapping of surgery itself has not been performed. To apply Plan/Do/Study/Act (PDSA) cycles methodology to lumbar posterior instrumented fusion (PIF) using lean principles to create a standard work flow, identify waste, remove intraoperative variability, and examine feasibility among pilot cases. Process maps for 5 PIF procedures were created by a PDSA cycle from 1 faculty neurosurgeon at 1 institution. Plan, modularize PIF into basic components; Do, map and time components; Study, analyze results; and Act, identify waste. Waste inventories, spaghetti diagrams, and chartings of time spent per step were created. Procedural steps were broadly defined in order to compare steps despite the variability in PIF and were analyzed with box and whisker plots to evaluate variability. Temporal variabilities in duration of decompression vs closure and hardware vs closure were significantly different (P = .003). Variability in procedural step duration was smallest for closure and largest for exposure. Wastes including waiting and instrument defects accounted for 15% and 66% of all waste, respectively. This pilot series demonstrates that lean principles can standardize surgical workflows and identify waste. Though time and labor intensive, lean principles and PDSA methodology can be applied to operative steps, not just the perioperative period.

  11. Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  12. Calorie and Protein Intake in Acute Rehabilitation Inpatients with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Versus Other Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity and its consequences affect patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). There is a paucity of data with regard to the dietary intake patterns of patients with SCI in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Our hypothesis is that acute rehabilitation inpatients with SCI consume significantly more calories and protein than other inpatient rehabilitation diagnoses. Objective: To compare calorie and protein intake in patients with new SCI versus other diagnoses (new traumatic brain injury [TBI], new stroke, and Parkinson’s disease [PD]) in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. Methods: The intake of 78 acute rehabilitation inpatients was recorded by registered dieticians utilizing once-weekly calorie and protein intake calculations. Results: Mean ± SD calorie intake (kcal) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 1,967.9 ± 611.6, 1,546.8 ± 352.3, 1,459.7 ± 443.2, and 1,459.4 ± 434.6, respectively. ANOVA revealed a significant overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 4.74, P = .004. Mean ± SD protein intake (g) for the SCI, TBI, stroke, and PD groups was 71.5 ± 25.0, 61.1 ± 12.8, 57.6 ± 16.6, and 55.1 ± 19.1, respectively. ANOVA did not reveal an overall group difference, F(3, 74) = 2.50, P = .066. Conclusions: Given the diet-related comorbidities and energy balance abnormalities associated with SCI, combined with the intake levels demonstrated in this study, education with regard to appropriate calorie intake in patients with SCI should be given in the acute inpatient rehabilitation setting. PMID:23960707

  13. Ketamine for acute neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyongsong; Mishina, Masahiro; Kokubo, Rinko; Nakajima, Takao; Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Kobayashi, Shiro; Teramoto, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may be useful for treating neuropathic pain, which is often difficult to control. We report a prospective study of 13 patients with acute neuropathic pain due to spinal cord injury (SCI) treated with ketamine. All underwent a test challenge with 5mg ketamine. Patients with satisfactory responses were then treated intravenously and subsequently perorally with ketamine. Pre- and post-treatment pain was recorded on a visual analogue scale. All 13 patients responded positively to the ketamine test challenge and underwent continued ketamine administration. At the cessation of treatment and alter at final follow up, pain was decreased by 74.7% and 96.8%, respectively. The average administration period was 17.2 days; it was longer (59 days) in one patient treated in the subacute phase. All patients suffered allodynia-type pain and experienced 30% or less of their original pain intensity upon test challenge. Side effects were noted in five patients, although their severity did not require treatment cessation. In patients with SCI, ketamine reduced allodynia. Particularly good results were obtained in patients treated in the acute phase and these patients did not experience post-treatment symptom recurrence. Our results suggest that in patients with SCI, ketamine is useful for treating neuropathic pain in the acute phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study participation rate of patients with acute spinal cord injury early during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, J; Katrin Brust, A; Tesini, S; Guler, M; Mueller, G; Velstra, I M; Frotzler, A

    2015-10-01

    Retrospective observational study. To investigate the study participation rate of patients with acute spinal cord injury (SCI) early during rehabilitation after conveying preliminary study information. Single SCI rehabilitation center in Switzerland. Newly admitted acute SCI patients receive a flyer to inform them concerning the purpose of clinical research, patient rights and active studies. Upon patient request, detailed study information is given. The rate of patients asking for detailed information (study interest) and the rate of study participation was evaluated from May 2013 to October 2014. Furthermore, the number of patients not withdrawing consent to the utilization of coded health-related data was determined. The flyer was given to 144 of the 183 patients admitted during the observation period. A total of 96 patients (67%) were interested in receiving detailed information, and 71 patients (49%) finally participated in at least one study. The vast majority of patients (that is, 91%) did not withdraw consent for retrospective data analysis. An age over 60 years had a significantly (P⩽0.023) negative effect on study interest and participation, and the consent rate to retrospective data analysis was significantly (Pinterest and participation were reduced more than 5 and 14-fold, respectively, in patients older than 60 years. The relatively low (approximately 50%) study participation rates of acute SCI patients should be considered when planning clinical trials. The recruitment of patients older than 60 years may be reduced substantially.

  15. Current Use of Methylprednisolone for Acute Spinal Cord Injury by Spine Surgeons of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirichai Wilartratsami

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine current decision making in methylprednisolone succinate (MPS administration for acute spinal cord injury (ASCI treatment in Thailand. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all orthopedic surgeons who attended the annual meeting of the Spine Society of Thailand 2016. The questionnaire had 3 parts of questions including demographic data, opinions in MPS use in general ASCI patients and patients who meet the exclusion criteria in NASCIS III study. Results: Fifty five respondents completed the survey (overall response rate was 27.1 % and there was 78.18% prescribe MPS to ASCI patients. Among them, 40 % prescribe according to NASCIS II and 55.6% NASCIS III. The main reasons for MPS administration are practice standard (38.6%, effectiveness (31.8% and liability issue (22.7%. In patients who met the exclusion criteria of NASCIS III, most respondents do not prescribe any steroids in patients who had age below 14 years old (42.2%, pregnancy (77.8%, severe underlying disease (72.7%, body weight more than 109 kg (40.9%, gunshot injury (59.1% and previous spinal cord injury (46.5%. Interestingly, there were 93.2% prescribed MPS to patients who sustained ACSI more than 8 hours. Conclusion: Because the institutional standard supported MPS use, most participants prescribed MPS in ASCI despite current clinical data from recent studies. Most participants who did not use MPS in patients had exclusion criteria of NASCIS III.

  16. Preoperative dexamethasone reduces acute but not sustained pain after lumbar disk surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke V; Siegel, Hanna; Fomsgaard, Jonna S

    2015-01-01

    with morphine. Primary outcome was pain during mobilization (visual analog scale) 2 to 24 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were acute pain at rest, morphine consumption, nausea, vomiting, ondansetron consumption, sedation, and quality of sleep. Patients were followed up by written questionnaire 3......Glucocorticoids have attracted increasing attention as adjuvants in the treatment of acute postoperative pain. Furthermore, anecdotal reports may support glucocorticoids for preventing sustained postoperative pain. We explored preoperative dexamethasone combined with paracetamol and ibuprofen...

  17. Evaluation of low back pain using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire for lumbar spinal disease in a multicenter study. Differences in scores based on age, sex, and type of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Seiji; Ito, Toshinori; Yamashita, Masaomi

    2010-01-01

    The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) has investigated the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ) to evaluate several aspects of low back pain in patients. The score includes five categories (25 items) selected from the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire and Short Form 36, and a visual analogue scale. Japanese physicians have recently used these scores to evaluate back pain; however, the efficacy has not been fully explored in large-scale studies. In the current study, we used the JOABPEQ to evaluate lumbar spinal disease in 555 patients (with lumbar disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, and lumbar disc degeneration/spondylosis) in multiple spine centers and compared the results based on age, sex, and type of disease. A total of 555 patients who had low back or leg pain were selected in 22 hospitals in Chiba Prefecture. Spine surgeons diagnosed their disease type based on symptoms, physical examination, radiography images, and magnetic resonance imaging. In all, 486 patients were diagnosed with spinal stenosis (239 patients), disc degeneration/spondylosis (143 patients), or disc herniation (104 patients). The other 69 patients were diagnosed with spondylolysis (16 patients) or other diseases (53 patients). The pain score in all patients was evaluated using the JOABPEQ (from 0 to 100, with 0 indicating the worst pain). The age of the patients was 56.1±13.3 years (mean±standard deviation (SD)); the age of patients in the disc herniation and disc degeneration/spondylosis group was significantly lower than that in the spinal stenosis group. The average JOABPEQ scores in all patients were, for low back pain, 47.1; lumbar function, 53.6; walking ability, 54.8; social life function, 48.7; and mental health, 48.3. The low back pain score in men was significantly worse than that in women. In contrast, the mental health score in women was significantly higher than that in men. The low back pain score in patients 65 years old were significantly lower

  18. Intramuscular oxygen-ozone therapy in the treatment of acute back pain with lumbar disc herniation: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, clinical trial of active and simulated lumbar paravertebral injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Marco; Di Sante, Luca; Cacchio, Angelo; Apuzzo, Dario; Marotta, Salvatore; Razzano, Michele; Franzini, Marianno; Santilli, Valter

    2009-06-01

    Multicenter randomized, double-blind, simulated therapy-controlled trial in a cohort of patients with acute low back pain (LBP) due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH). To assess the benefit of intramuscular-paravertebral injections of an oxygen-ozone (O2O3) mixture. Recent findings have shown that O2O3 therapy can be used to treat LDH that fails to respond to conservative management. However, these findings are based on intradiscal/intraforaminal O2O3 injection, whereas intramuscular-paravertebral injection is the technique used most in clinical practice in Italy and other Western countries. Sixty patients suffering from acute LBP caused by LDH was randomized to an intramuscular O2O3 or control group. Patients were observed up to assess pain intensity, LBP-related disability, and drug intake (15 [V2] and 30 [V3] days after treatment started, and 2 weeks [V4], and 3 [V5] and 6 [V6] months after treatment ended). A significant difference between the 2 groups in the percentage of cases who had become pain-free (61% vs. 33%, P Treatment of LBP and sciatica is a major concern. Although the natural history of acute LBP is often self-limiting, conservative therapies are not always effective; in such cases, O2O3 intramuscular lumbar paravertebral injections, which are minimally invasive, seem to safely and effectively relieve pain, as well as reduce both disability and the intake of analgesic drugs.

  19. Acute hospital costs after minimally invasive versus open lumbar interbody fusion: data from a US national database with 6106 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Lerner, Jason; Lesko, James; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective multi-institutional database review. To determine if minimally invasive interbody fusion is associated with cost savings when compared with open surgery. Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgeries are increasingly recognized as equivalent to open procedures. Although these techniques have been advocated for reducing pain, disability, and length of hospitalization, to date there has been little data demonstrating these benefits. This study analyzed inpatient hospital records from the Premier Perspective database (2002 to 2009), including patients who underwent a posterior lumbar fusion with interbody cage placement by ICD-9 code, and had implant charge codes that allowed determination if MIS pedicle screws were utilized. Exclusion criteria included a refusion surgery, deformity, >2 levels, and anterior fusion. Total costs were adjusted for covariates (age, sex, race, hospital geography and setting, payor, and comorbidities) using an analysis of covariance model. A total of 6106 patients were identified (1667 MIS and 4439 open). Length of stay (LOS) for 1-level MIS surgery averaged of 3.35 days versus 3.6 days for open surgery (P≤0.006). For 2-level MIS surgery LOS averaged of 3.4 days versus 4.03 days for open surgery (P≤0.001). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $29,187 for 1-level MIS procedures versus $29,947 for open surgery, a nonsignificant difference (P=0.55). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $2106 lower for 2-level MIS surgery (total costs of $33,879 for MIS vs. $35,984 for open surgery, P=0.0023). Cost savings were attributable primarily to lower room and board ($857), operating room ($359), pharmacy ($304), and laboratory ($166) costs in the MIS group. High variances in the 2-level open surgery with prolonged hospital stay also accounted for overall cost differences. This data from a large nationwide sample of hospitalizations demonstrates that MIS lumbar interbody fusion results in a

  20. Management of Spinal Implants in Acute Pediatric Surgical Site Infections: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbecker, Michael P; Gomez, Jaime A; Miller, Patricia E; Troy, Michael J; Skaggs, David L; Vitale, Michael G; Flynn, John M; Barrett, Kody K; Pace, Gregory I; Atuahene, Brittany N; Hedequist, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective review of patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and returned within 90 days with an acute infection. The study motive is to identify and understand the risk factors associated with failure of retaining spinal implants and failure to treat acute infection. The natural history of early surgical site infection (SSI) (less than 3 months) after PSF is not known and removing the implants early after PSF risks pseudarthrosis and deformity progression. Patients ranging from 1999 to 2011 with surgical site infections (SSIs) who required irrigation and debridement within 3 months of PSF were identified from 4 institutions. Univariable and multivariable regression analysis were used to identify risk factors associated with failure of acute infection treatment. Eighty-two patients (59 female, 23 male) with a mean age of 13.6 years were identified. Median follow-up after initial surgery was 33 months (range: 12-112 months). Sixty-two (76%) were treated successfully with acute treatment and did not return with recurrent infection (cleared infection, group C); 20 (24%) returned later with chronic infection (recurrent infection, group R). Multivariable analysis indicated that patients with stainless steel implants (OR = 6.4, 95% CI = 1.7-32.1; p = .009) and older subjects (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.0-1.6; p = .03) were more likely to present with recurrent infection. There was no difference between the groups with regard to the initial time of presentation post fusion, proportion of non-idiopathic diagnosis, rate of positive cultures, culture species, presence of fusion to pelvis, and time on antibiotic treatment. Seventy-six percent of patients presenting with an SSI less than 3 months after PSF did not require implant removal to clear their infection. Early postoperative SSIs can be treated with retention or implant exchange. Older patients and patients with stainless steel instrumentation are more likely to present with a late recurrent infection

  1. Does a preoperative cognitive-behavioral intervention affect disability, pain behavior, pain, and return to work the first year after lumbar spinal fusion surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolving, Nanna; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Holm, Randi; Bünger, Cody Eric; Oestergaard, Lisa Gregersen

    2015-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial including 90 patients. To examine the effect of a preoperative cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBT) for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion (LSF) surgery. Few published studies have looked at the potential of rehabilitation to improve outcomes after LSF. Rehabilitation programs using CBT are recommended. Furthermore, initiating interventions preoperatively seems beneficial, but only limited data exist in the field of spine surgery. Patients with degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis undergoing LSF were randomized to usual care (control group) or preoperative CBT and usual care (CBT group). Primary outcome was change in Oswestry Disability Index from baseline to 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes were catastrophizing, fear avoidance belief, work status, and back and leg pain. At 1-year follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference between the CBT group and the control group in Oswestry Disability Index score (P = 0.082). However, the CBT group had achieved a significant reduction of -15 points (-26; -4) already at 3 months (between group difference P = 0.003), and this reduction was maintained throughout the year. There were no differences between groups at 1-year follow-up with regard to any of the secondary outcomes. Participating in a preoperative CBT intervention in addition to usual care did not produce better outcomes at 1-year follow-up for patients undergoing LSF. Although the reduction in disability was achieved much faster in the CBT group, resulting in a significant difference between groups already 3 months after surgery, it did not translate into a faster return to work. Our findings support the need for further research into the use of targeted rehabilitation interventions among patients with elevated levels of catastrophizing and fear avoidance beliefs. 2.

  2. Effects of systemic administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor on Bax and Bcl-2 proteins in the lumbar spinal cord of neonatal rats after sciatic nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.S. Rezende

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a cytokine that plays a neuroprotective role in relation to axotomized motoneurons. We determined the effect of daily subcutaneous doses of CNTF (1.2 µg/g for 5 days; N = 13 or PBS (N = 13 on the levels of mRNA for Bcl-2 and Bax, as well as the expression and inter-association of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins, and the survival of motoneurons in the spinal cord lumbar enlargement of 2-day-old Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection. Five days after transection, the effects were evaluated on histological and molecular levels using Nissl staining, immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The motoneuron survival ratio, defined as the ratio between the number of motoneurons counted on the lesioned side vs those on the unlesioned side, was calculated. This ratio was 0.77 ± 0.02 for CNTF-treated rats vs 0.53 ± 0.02 for the PBS-treated controls (P < 0.001. Treatment with CNTF modified the level of mRNA, with the expression of Bax RNA decreasing 18% (with a consequent decrease in the level of Bax protein, while the expression of Bcl-2 RNA was increased 87%, although the level of Bcl-2 protein was unchanged. The amount of Bcl-2/Bax heterodimer increased 91% over that found in the PBS-treated controls. These data show, for the first time, that the neuroprotective effect of CNTF on neonatal rat axotomized motoneurons is associated with a reduction in free Bax, due to the inhibition of Bax expression, as well as increased Bcl-2/Bax heterodimerization. Thus, the neuroprotective action of the CNTF on axotomized motoneurons can be related to the inhibition of this apoptotic pathway.

  3. Outcomes of Revision Surgery Following Instrumented Posterolateral Fusion in Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Comparative Analysis between Pseudarthrosis and Adjacent Segment Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Seung-Pyo; Jo, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Hae Won; Choi, Won Rak; Kang, Chang-Nam

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective study. We examined the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who received revision surgery for pseudarthrosis or adjacent segment disease (ASD) following decompression and instrumented posterolateral fusion (PLF). At present, information regarding the outcomes of revision surgery for complications such as pseudarthrosis and ASD following instrumented PLF is limited. This study examined 60 patients who received PLF for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and subsequently developed pseudarthrosis or ASD leading to revision surgery. Subjects were divided into a group of 21 patients who received revision surgery for pseudarthrosis (Group P) and a group of 39 patients who received revision surgery for ASD (Group A). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the visual analogue scales for back pain (VAS-BP) and leg pain (VAS-LP), the Korean Oswestry disability index (K-ODI), and each patient's subjective satisfaction. Radiological outcomes were evaluated from the extent of bone union, and complications in the two groups were compared. VAS-LP at final follow-up was not statistically different between the two groups ( p =0.353), although VAS-BP and K-ODI at final follow-up were significantly worse in Group P than in Group A (all p <0.05), and only 52% of the patients in Group P felt that their overall well-being had improved following revision surgery. Fusion rates after the first revision surgery were 71% (15/21) in Group P and 95% (37/39) in Group A ( p =0.018). The rate of reoperation was significantly higher in Group P (29%) than in Group A (5%) ( p =0.021) due to complications. Clinical and radiological outcomes were worse in patients who had received revision surgery for pseudarthrosis than in those who had revision surgery for ASD. Elderly patients should be carefully advised of the risks and benefits before planning revision surgery for pseudarthrosis.

  4. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis in patients with acute spinal cord injuries: use of rotating treatment tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, D.M.; Gonzalez, M.; Gentili, A.; Eismont, F.; Green, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    A randomized clinical trial of 15 patients with acute spinal cord injuries was performed to test the hypothesis that rotating treatment tables prevent deep venous thrombosis in this population. Four of 5 control (nonrotated) patients developed distal and proximal thrombi, assessed by /sup 125/I fibrinogen leg scans and impedance plethysmography. In comparison, only 1 of 10 treated (rotated) patients developed both distal and proximal thrombosis. These results suggest but do not prove that rotating treatment tables prevent the development of proximal deep venous thrombosis in spinal cord-injured patients. Larger clinical trials are needed to confirm this heretofore undocumented benefit of rotating treatment tables.

  5. Prevention of deep venous thrombosis in patients with acute spinal cord injuries: use of rotating treatment tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.M.; Gonzalez, M.; Gentili, A.; Eismont, F.; Green, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial of 15 patients with acute spinal cord injuries was performed to test the hypothesis that rotating treatment tables prevent deep venous thrombosis in this population. Four of 5 control (nonrotated) patients developed distal and proximal thrombi, assessed by 125 I fibrinogen leg scans and impedance plethysmography. In comparison, only 1 of 10 treated (rotated) patients developed both distal and proximal thrombosis. These results suggest but do not prove that rotating treatment tables prevent the development of proximal deep venous thrombosis in spinal cord-injured patients. Larger clinical trials are needed to confirm this heretofore undocumented benefit of rotating treatment tables

  6. Exploring acute-to-chronic neuropathic pain in rats after contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudet, Andrew D; Ayala, Monica T; Schleicher, Wolfgang E; Smith, Elana J; Bateman, Emily M; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes chronic pain in 65% of individuals. Unfortunately, current pain management is inadequate for many SCI patients. Rodent models could help identify how SCI pain develops, explore new treatment strategies, and reveal whether acute post-SCI morphine worsens chronic pain. However, few studies explore or compare SCI-elicited neuropathic pain in rats. Here, we sought to determine how different clinically relevant contusion SCIs in male and female rats affect neuropathic pain, and whether acute morphine worsens later chronic SCI pain. First, female rats received sham surgery, or 150kDyn or 200kDyn midline T9 contusion SCI. These rats displayed modest mechanical allodynia and long-lasting thermal hyperalgesia. Next, a 150kDyn (1s dwell) midline contusion SCI was performed in male and female rats. Interestingly, males, but not females showed SCI-elicited mechanical allodynia; rats of both sexes had thermal hyperalgesia. In this model, acute morphine treatment had no significant effect on chronic neuropathic pain symptoms. Unilateral SCIs can also elicit neuropathic pain that could be exacerbated by morphine, so male rats received unilateral T13 contusion SCI (100kDyn). These rats exhibited significant, transient mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia. Acute morphine did not exacerbate chronic pain. Our data show that specific rat contusion SCI models cause neuropathic pain. Further, chronic neuropathic pain elicited by these contusion SCIs was not amplified by our course of early post-trauma morphine. Using clinically relevant rat models of SCI could help identify novel pain management strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-05-07

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy.

  8. Acute Reciprocal Changes Distant from the Site of Spinal Osteotomies Affect Global Postoperative Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Klineberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Three-column vertebral resections are frequently applied to correct sagittal malalignment; their effects on distant unfused levels need to be understood. Methods. 134 consecutive adult PSO patients were included (29 thoracic, 105 lumbar. Radiographic analysis included pre- and postoperative regional curvatures and pelvic parameters, with paired independent t-tests to evaluate changes. Results. A thoracic osteotomy with limited fusion leads to a correction of the kyphosis and to a spontaneous decrease of the unfused lumbar lordosis (−8°. When the fusion was extended, the lumbar lordosis increased (+8°. A lumbar osteotomy with limited fusion leads to a correction of the lumbar lordosis and to a spontaneous increase of the unfused thoracic kyphosis (+13°. When the fusion was extended, the thoracic kyphosis increased by 6°. Conclusion. Data from this study suggest that lumbar and thoracic resection leads to reciprocal changes in unfused segments and requires consideration beyond focal corrections.

  9. A diagnostic support tool for lumbar spinal stenosis: a self-administered, self-reported history questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama Toru

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no validated gold-standard diagnostic support tool for LSS, and therefore an accurate diagnosis depends on clinical assessment. Assessment of the diagnostic value of the history of the patient requires an evaluation of the differences and overlap of symptoms of the radicular and cauda equina types; however, no tool is available for evaluation of the LSS category. We attempted to develop a self-administered, self-reported history questionnaire as a diagnostic support tool for LSS using a clinical epidemiological approach. The aim of the present study was to use this tool to assess the diagnostic value of the history of the patient for categorization of LSS. Methods The initial derivation study included 137 patients with LSS and 97 with lumbar disc herniation who successfully recovered following surgical treatment. The LSS patients were categorized into radicular and cauda equina types based on history, physical examinations, and MRI. Predictive factors for overlapping symptoms between the two types and for cauda equina symptoms in LSS were derived by univariate analysis. A self-administered, self-reported history questionnaire (SSHQ was developed based on these findings. A prospective derivation study was then performed in a series of 115 patients with LSS who completed the SSHQ before surgery. All these patients recovered following surgical treatment. The sensitivity of the SSHQ was calculated and clinical prediction rules for LSS were developed. A validation study was subsequently performed on 250 outpatients who complained of lower back pain with or without leg symptoms. The sensitivity and specificity of the SSHQ were calculated, and the test-retest reliability over two weeks was investigated in 217 patients whose symptoms remained unchanged. Results The key predictive factors for overlapping symptoms between the two categories of LSS were age > 50, lower-extremity pain or numbness, increased pain when walking

  10. Lumbar Spinous Process Fixation and Fusion: A Systematic Review and Critical Analysis of an Emerging Spinal Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro J; Scheer, Justin K; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Patel, Alpesh A; Smith, Zachary A

    2017-11-01

    A systematic review. The available literature on interspinous rigid fixation/fusion devices (IFD) was systematically reviewed to explore the devices' efficacy and complication profile. The clinical application of new spinal technologies may proceed without well-established evidence, as is the case with IFDs. IFDs are plate-like devices that are attached to the lateral aspects of 2 adjacent spinous processes to promote rigidity at that segment. Despite almost a decade since the devices' introduction, the literature regarding efficacy and safety is sparse. Complications have been reported but no definitive study is known to the authors. A systematic review of the past 10 years of English literature was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. The timeframe was chosen based on publication of the first study containing a modern IFD, the SPIRE, in 2006. All PubMed publications containing MeSH headings or with title or abstract containing any combination of the words "interspinous," "spinous process," "fusion," "fixation," "plate," or "plating" were included. Exclusion criteria consisted of dynamic stabilization devices (X-Stop, DIAM, etc.), cervical spine, pediatrics, and animal models. The articles were blinded to author and journal, assigned a level of evidence by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria, and summarized in an evidentiary table. A total of 293 articles were found in the initial search, of which 15 remained after examination for exclusion criteria. No class I or class II evidence regarding IFDs was found. IFDs have been shown by methodologically flawed and highly biased class III evidence to reduce instability at 1 year, without statistical comparison of complication rates against other treatment modalities. Although IFDs are heavily marketed and commonly applied in modern practice, data on safety and efficacy are inadequate. The paucity of evidence warrants reexamination of these devices' value and indications by the spine surgery

  11. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  12. Spinal trauma. Pathophysiology and management of traumatic spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, A

    1992-07-01

    Spinal trauma can originate from internal or external sources. Injuries to the spinal cord can be classified as either concussive or compressive and concussive. The pathophysiologic events surrounding spinal cord injury include the primary injury (compression, concussion) and numerous secondary injury mechanisms (vascular, biochemical, electrolyte), which are mediated by excessive oxygen free radicles, neurotransmitter and electrolyte alterations in cell membrane permeability, excitotoxic amino acids, and various other biochemical factors that collectively result in reduced SCBF, ischemia, and eventual necrosis of the gray and white matter. Management of acute spinal cord injuries includes the use of a high-dose corticosteroid regimen within the initial 8 hours after trauma. Sodium prednisolone and methylprednisolone, at recommended doses, act as oxygen radical scavengers and are anti-inflammatory. Additional considerations are the stability of the vertebral column, other conditions associated with trauma (i.e., pneumothorax), and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression, which may warrant surgical therapy. Vertebral fractures or luxations can occur in any area of the spine but most commonly occur at the junction of mobile and immobile segments. Dorsal and dorsolateral surgical approaches are applicable to the lumbosacral and thoracolumbar spine and dorsal and ventral approaches to the cervical spine. Indications for surgical intervention include spinal cord compression and vertebral instability. Instability can be determined from the type of fracture, how many of the three compartments of the vertebrae are disrupted, and on occasion, by carefully positioned stress studies of fluoroscopy. Decompression (dorsal laminectomy, hemilaminectomy, or ventral cervical slot) is employed when compression of the spinal cord exists. The hemilaminectomy (unilateral or bilateral) causes less instability than dorsal laminectomy and therefore should be used when practical

  13. Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis with severe brainstem and spinal cord involvement: MRI features with neuropathological confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Pedro S; Taipa, Ricardo; Moreira, Bruno; Correia, Carlos; Melo-Pires, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis (AHLE) is a rare and fulminant demyelinating disease considered to be the most severe form of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). A 70-year-old man was admitted to our emergency department (ED) after 1 week of unspecific abdominal symptoms and moderate fever in the first 3 days. Within the ED he developed a rapid onset coma and flaccid tetraparesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed mild polymorphonuclear pleocytosis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed supratentorial focal white matter lesions and diffuse involvement of the medulla and spinal cord. A presumptive diagnosis of ADEM was made and the patient was treated with corticosteroids followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. His neurological state did not improve and the MRI on day 8 after admission showed an increased number of lesions, mainly in the brainstem, with hemorrhagic foci. The patient died the following day and pathological features confirmed the diagnosis of AHLE. This is a unique presentation of a rare disease with detailed MRI characteristics and pathological confirmation. Although this condition is usually fatal, early recognition and aggressive therapeutic management can facilitate survival. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Acute diagnostic biomarkers for spinal cord injury: review of the literature and preliminary research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokobori, Shoji; Zhang, Zhiqun; Moghieb, Ahmed; Mondello, Stefania; Gajavelli, Shyam; Dietrich, W Dalton; Bramlett, Helen; Hayes, Ronald L; Wang, Michael; Wang, Kevin K W; Bullock, M Ross

    2015-05-01

    Many efforts have been made to create new diagnostic technologies for use in the diagnosis of central nervous system injury. However, there is still no consensus for the use of biomarkers in clinical acute spinal cord injury (SCI). The aims of this review are (1) to evaluate the current status of neurochemical biomarkers and (2) to discuss their potential acute diagnostic role in SCI by reviewing the literature. PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) was searched up to 2012 to identify publications concerning diagnostic biomarkers in SCI. To support more knowledge, we also checked secondary references in the primarily retrieved literature. Neurofilaments, cleaved-Tau, microtubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, neuron-specific enolase, S100β, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were identified as structural protein biomarkers in SCI by this review process. We could not find reports relating ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 and α-II spectrin breakdown products, which are widely researched in other central nervous system injuries. Therefore, we present our preliminary data relating to these two biomarkers. Some of biomarkers showed promising results for SCI diagnosis and outcome prediction; however, there were unresolved issues relating to accuracy and their accessibility. Currently, there still are not many reports focused on diagnostic biomarkers in SCI. This fact warranted the need for greater efforts to innovate sensitive and reliable biomarkers for SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine; Akute Rueckenmark- und Wirbelsaeulenverletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, U.; Freund, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie Aschaffenburg (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Bone marrow stromal cells elicit tissue sparing after acute but not delayed transplantation into the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tewarie, R.D.; Hurtado, A.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Rahiem, S.T.; Wendell, D.F.; Barroso, M.M.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Oudega, M.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted into the contused spinal cord may support repair by improving tissue sparing. We injected allogeneic BMSC into the moderately contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord at 15 min (acute) and at 3, 7, and 21 days (delayed) post-injury and quantified tissue

  17. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustai...

  18. The Effect of Therapeutic Lumbar Punctures on Acute Mortality From Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Rhein, Joshua; Nabeta, Henry W.; Taseera, Kabanda; Schutz, Charlotte; Musubire, Abdu; Rajasingham, Radha; Williams, Darlisha A.; Thienemann, Friedrich; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is common in cryptococcosis. Prior studies suggest elevated ICP is associated with mortality, and guidelines recommend frequent lumbar punctures (LPs) to control ICP. However, the magnitude of the impact of LPs on cryptococcal-related mortality is unknown. Methods. In sum, 248 individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis, screened for the Cryptococcal Optimal ART Timing (COAT) trial in Uganda and South Africa, were observed. Individuals received an LP to diagnose meningitis, and subsequent therapeutic LPs were recommended for elevated ICP (>250 mmH2O) or new symptoms. We compared survival, through 11 days, between individuals receiving at least 1 therapeutic LP with individuals not receiving therapeutic LPs. The COAT trial randomized subjects at 7–11 days; thus, follow-up stopped at time of death, randomization, or 11 days. Results. Seventy-five (30%) individuals had at least 1 therapeutic LP. Individuals receiving therapeutic LPs had higher cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressures, higher CSF fungal burdens, and were more likely to have altered mental status at baseline than those with no therapeutic LPs. Thirty-one deaths (18%) occurred among 173 individuals without a therapeutic LP and 5 deaths (7%) among 75 with at least 1 therapeutic LP. The adjusted relative risk of mortality was 0.31 (95% confidence interval: .12–.82). The association was observed regardless of opening pressure at baseline. Conclusions. Therapeutic LPs were associated with a 69% relative improvement in survival, regardless of initial intracranial pressure. The role of therapeutic LPs should be reevaluated. PMID:25057102

  19. The effect of therapeutic lumbar punctures on acute mortality from cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, Melissa A; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Rhein, Joshua; Nabeta, Henry W; Taseera, Kabanda; Schutz, Charlotte; Musubire, Abdu; Rajasingham, Radha; Williams, Darlisha A; Thienemann, Friedrich; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2014-12-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is common in cryptococcosis. Prior studies suggest elevated ICP is associated with mortality, and guidelines recommend frequent lumbar punctures (LPs) to control ICP. However, the magnitude of the impact of LPs on cryptococcal-related mortality is unknown. In sum, 248 individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis, screened for the Cryptococcal Optimal ART Timing (COAT) trial in Uganda and South Africa, were observed. Individuals received an LP to diagnose meningitis, and subsequent therapeutic LPs were recommended for elevated ICP (>250 mmH2O) or new symptoms. We compared survival, through 11 days, between individuals receiving at least 1 therapeutic LP with individuals not receiving therapeutic LPs. The COAT trial randomized subjects at 7-11 days; thus, follow-up stopped at time of death, randomization, or 11 days. Seventy-five (30%) individuals had at least 1 therapeutic LP. Individuals receiving therapeutic LPs had higher cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) opening pressures, higher CSF fungal burdens, and were more likely to have altered mental status at baseline than those with no therapeutic LPs. Thirty-one deaths (18%) occurred among 173 individuals without a therapeutic LP and 5 deaths (7%) among 75 with at least 1 therapeutic LP. The adjusted relative risk of mortality was 0.31 (95% confidence interval: .12-.82). The association was observed regardless of opening pressure at baseline. Therapeutic LPs were associated with a 69% relative improvement in survival, regardless of initial intracranial pressure. The role of therapeutic LPs should be reevaluated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Exacerbation of Symptoms of Lumbar Disc Herniation Complicated by a Schwannoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Yung Liu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of the lumbar disc is a common cause of low back pain. Conservative management with physiotherapy, such as lumbar spine traction, is usually effective. Although a schwannoma of the lumbar spine is relatively uncommon, the clinical manifestations are similar to those of lumbar disc herniation, making the diagnosis difficult. This case report describes a 51-year-old male who had suffered from low back pain for 3 years and who was diagnosed with L2/L3 lumbar disc herniation. The low back pain was well-controlled by conservative treatment and the symptoms improved progressively. Two months prior to our evaluation, however, the symptoms worsened acutely, and were accompanied by the onset of symptoms of cauda equina syndrome. A small tumor at the site of the L2/L3 disc herniation, observed incidentally during magnetic resonance imaging, was responsible for the symptoms of spinal stenosis at the lumbar region. The patient underwent laminectomy, tumor resection, and discectomy with near-complete resolution of symptoms. In patients with lumbar disc herniation that improves with conservative treatment, the recurrence of symptoms should prompt a thorough review of the medical history, physical examination, and imaging studies to establish the diagnosis and prevent delay in treatment.

  1. Pulmonary edema and hemorrhage after acute spinal cord injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Nan, Guoxin

    2016-04-01

    Respiratory complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality during the first days after acute spinal cord injury (ASCI). However, the pathophysiology of respiratory insufficiency resulting from spinal cord injury that involves lower levels is less well understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate pulmonary pathophysiology after ASCI. This is an experimental animal study of ASCI investigating pulmonary pathophysiology after ASCI. Eighty-four (N=84) rats were divided into two groups: a sham surgery (n=42) and an injury group (n=42). In the injury group, ASCI was induced at the level of the tenth thoracic vertebra by a modified Allen method. Rats were sacrificed 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after surgery. Pulmonary edema was assessed by calculating the ratio of the wet-to-dry lung weight (W:D). Pulmonary edema and hemorrhage were evaluated by observing gross and microscopic morphology. The study was funded by Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, 81272172). The funder of the present study had no capacity to influence the scholarly conduct of the research, interpretation of results, or dissemination of study outcomes. In the injury group, W:D was significantly increased 12 hours after surgery compared with the sham surgery group; W:D peaked 3 days after ASCI (pASCI and pulmonary edema 24 hours after ASCI. Pulmonary edema peaked 3 days after ASCI and was obviously decreased 1 week after ASCI. Hemorrhage was apparent until 2 weeks after ASCI. Light microscopy showed congestion of pulmonary capillaries 6 hours after ASCI. The pulmonary alveoli were filled with erythrocytes and serous extravasate 12 hours after ASCI. Hemorrhage and edema were observed in the interstitium and lung alveoli 24 hours after ASCI. Early pathologic changes such as pulmonary congestion, hemorrhage, and edema after injury may be the basis for early respiratory dysfunction following ASCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Early versus delayed decompression in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury: A prospective outcome study at a Level I trauma center from India

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Vaghani, Gaurang; Siddiqui, Saquib; Sawhney, Chhavi; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Kumar, Atin; Kale, S. S.; Sharma, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study was done with the aim to compare the clinical outcome and patients’ quality of life between early versus delayed surgically treated patients of acute subaxial cervical spinal cord injury. The current study was based on the hypothesis that early surgical decompression and fixations in acute subaxial cervical spinal cord trauma is safe and is associated with improved outcome as compared to delayed surgical decompression. Materials and Methods: A total of 69 patients were recrui...

  3. Absent cervical spine pedicle and associated congenital spinal abnormalities - a diagnostic trap in a setting of acute trauma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildermuth Simon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital spinal abnormalities can easily be misdiagnosed on plain radiographs. Additional imaging is warranted in doubtful cases, especially in a setting of acute trauma. Case Presentation This patient presented at the emergency unit of our university hospital after a motor vehicle accident and was sent to our radiology department for imaging of the cervical spine. Initial clinical examination and plain radiographs of the cervical spine were performed but not conclusive. Additional CT of the neck helped establish the right diagnosis. Conclusion CT as a three-dimensional imaging modality with the possibility of multiplanar reconstructions allows for the exact diagnosis and exclusion of acute traumatic lesions of the cervical spine, especially in cases of doubtful plain radiographs and when congenital spinal abnormalities like absent cervical spine pedicle with associated spina bifida may insinuate severe trauma.

  4. Absent cervical spine pedicle and associated congenital spinal abnormalities - a diagnostic trap in a setting of acute trauma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Andreisek, Gustav; Scheffel, Hans; Wildermuth, Simon; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul

    2010-11-09

    Congenital spinal abnormalities can easily be misdiagnosed on plain radiographs. Additional imaging is warranted in doubtful cases, especially in a setting of acute trauma. This patient presented at the emergency unit of our university hospital after a motor vehicle accident and was sent to our radiology department for imaging of the cervical spine. Initial clinical examination and plain radiographs of the cervical spine were performed but not conclusive. Additional CT of the neck helped establish the right diagnosis. CT as a three-dimensional imaging modality with the possibility of multiplanar reconstructions allows for the exact diagnosis and exclusion of acute traumatic lesions of the cervical spine, especially in cases of doubtful plain radiographs and when congenital spinal abnormalities like absent cervical spine pedicle with associated spina bifida may insinuate severe trauma.

  5. MRI investigation of the sensorimotor cortex and the corticospinal tract after acute spinal cord injury: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Patrick; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Ashburner, John; Wolf, Katharina; Sutter, Reto; Altmann, Daniel R; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan; Curt, Armin

    2013-09-01

    In patients with chronic spinal cord injury, imaging of the spinal cord and brain above the level of the lesion provides evidence of neural degeneration; however, the spatial and temporal patterns of progression and their relation to clinical outcomes are uncertain. New interventions targeting acute spinal cord injury have entered clinical trials but neuroimaging outcomes as responsive markers of treatment have yet to be established. We aimed to use MRI to assess neuronal degeneration above the level of the lesion after acute spinal cord injury. In our prospective longitudinal study, we enrolled patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury and healthy controls. We assessed patients clinically and by MRI at baseline, 2 months, 6 months, and 12 months, and controls by MRI at the same timepoints. We assessed atrophy in white matter in the cranial corticospinal tracts and grey matter in sensorimotor cortices by tensor-based analyses of T1-weighted MRI data. We used cross-sectional spinal cord area measurements to assess atrophy at cervical level C2/C3. We used myelin-sensitive magnetisation transfer (MT) and longitudinal relaxation rate (R1) maps to assess microstructural changes associated with myelin. We also assessed associations between MRI parameters and clinical improvement. All analyses of brain scans done with statistical parametric mapping were corrected for family-wise error. Between Sept 17, 2010, and Dec 31, 2012, we recruited 13 patients and 18 controls. In the 12 months from baseline, patients recovered by a mean of 5·27 points per log month (95% CI 1·91-8·63) on the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury (ISNCSCI) motor score (p=0·002) and by 10·93 points per log month (6·20-15·66) on the spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) score (pspinal cord area (patients declined by 0·46 mm per month compared with a stable cord area in controls; pscore 5·21, p=0·0081; left Z score 4·12, p=0·0004) and

  6. Daily acute intermittent hypoxia elicits functional recovery of diaphragm and inspiratory intercostal muscle activity after acute cervical spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Opazo, A; Vinit, S; Dougherty, B J; Mitchell, G S

    2015-04-01

    A major cause of mortality after spinal cord injury is respiratory failure. In normal rats, acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces respiratory motor plasticity, expressed as diaphragm (Dia) and second external intercostal (T2 EIC) long-term facilitation (LTF). Dia (not T2 EIC) LTF is enhanced by systemic adenosine 2A (A2A) receptor inhibition in normal rats. We investigated the respective contributions of Dia and T2 EIC to daily AIH-induced functional recovery of breathing capacity with/without A2A receptor antagonist (KW6002, i.p.) following C2 hemisection (C2HS). Rats received daily AIH (dAIH: 10, 5-min episodes, 10.5% O2; 5-min normoxic intervals; 7 successive days beginning 7days post-C2HS) or daily normoxia (dNx) with/without KW6002, followed by weekly (reminder) presentations for 8weeks. Ventilation and EMGs from bilateral diaphragm and T2 EIC muscles were measured with room air breathing (21% O2) and maximum chemoreceptor stimulation ( 7% CO2, 10.5% O2). dAIH increased tidal volume (VT) in C2HS rats breathing room air (dAIH+vehicle: 0.47±0.02, dNx+vehicle: 0.40±0.01ml/100g; pbreathing and MCS (pbreathing, KW6002 had no effect. dAIH had no statistically significant effects on diaphragm or T2 EIC EMG activity ipsilateral to injury. Thus, two weeks post-C2HS: 1) dAIH enhances breathing capacity by effects on contralateral diaphragm and T2 EIC activity; and 2) dAIH-induced recovery is A2A dependent in diaphragm, but not T2 EIC. Daily AIH may be a useful in promoting functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury, but A2A receptor antagonists (e.g. caffeine) may undermine its effectiveness shortly after injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in polytraumatized patients. The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of minimal-invasive instrumentation in the setting of minor and major trauma and to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of this procedure. M