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Sample records for acute leukemia patients

  1. Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

    2016-06-14

    Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute; Leukemia; Leukemia Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL); Leukemia Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL); Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

  2. Acute myeloid leukemia in the pregnant patient.

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mostly occurs in older patients, it could be seen in women of childbearing age. It is therefore not surprising that in some patients, the management of AML will be complicated by a coexistent pregnancy. However, the association of leukemia and pregnancy is uncommon. Its incidence is estimated to be 1 in 75,000-100,000 pregnancies. During pregnancy, most leukemias are acute: two-thirds are myeloid and one-third are lymphoblastic. There is no standard approach for this clinical dilemma, in part because of variables such as the type of AML, the seriousness of the symptoms, and the patient's personal beliefs. In many cases, the diagnostic workup has to be altered because of the pregnancy, and often available treatments have varying risks to the fetus. While chemotherapy is reported to have some risks during the first trimester, it is admitted that it can be administered safely during the second and the third trimesters.

  3. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Zoonotic Infections in Pediatric Patients With Acute Leukemia

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal dise...

  5. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Acute leukemic appendicitis in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Hatim Karachiwala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic and lymphomatous infiltration of the appendix is a rare complication. We present the case of a 31-year-old male with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed acute abdomen on day 11 of induction chemotherapy with idarubicin and cytarabine. After appropriate work-up, a clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made. Despite severe pancytopenia, he successfully underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The final pathology revealed leukemic infiltration of the appendix. It is hypothesized that the leukemic infiltration may play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Further, this case demonstrates the need to maintain a high index of suspicion and prompt surgical intervention for surgical pathologies in neutropenic patients.

  7. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Zoonotic infections in pediatric patients with acute leukemia.

    Lothstein, Katherine; Fisher, Brian; Li, Yimei; Seif, Alix; Harris, Tracey; Torp, Kari; Kavcic, Marko; Huang, Yuan-Shung V; Rheingold, Susan R; Aplenc, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Few studies have described the impact of zoonotic diseases in children with leukemia. This study aimed to describe the frequency of and associated demographic factors for zoonotic diseases in pediatric acute leukemia patients. Descriptive and comparative statistics relative to age, sex, and patient region were performed on an assembled 11-year retrospective cohort of acute leukemia patients. Of 10,197 patients, 88 patients (0.86%) were found to have a zoonotic infection. Gastrointestinal diseases were the most commonly (86.4%) identified zoonotic illnesses. Although rare, zoonotic diseases do occur in children with leukemia and frequency varies by age, region, and gender.

  10. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Brucella bacteremia in patients with acute leukemia: a case series

    Al-Anazi Khalid

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis may cause serious infections in healthy individuals living in countries that are endemic for the infection. However, reports of brucella infections in immunocompromised hosts are relatively rare. Case Presentations Reported here are two patients with acute leukemia who developed Brucella melitensis bacteremia during their follow up at the Armed Forces Hospital in Riyadh. The first patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia during the transformation of his myelodysplasia into acute myeloid leukemia. The second patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia while his acute lymphoblastic leukemia was under control. Interestingly, he presented with acute cholecystitis during the brucella sepsis. Both brucella infections were associated with a marked reduction in the hematological parameters in addition to other complications. The bacteremic episodes were successfully treated with netilmicin, doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Brucellosis can cause systemic infections, complicated bacteremia and serious morbidity in patients with acute leukemia living in endemic areas. These infections may occur at the presentation of the leukemia or even when the leukemia is in remission. Nevertheless, the early diagnosis of brucellosis and the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for sufficient duration usually improves the outcome in these immunocompromised patients.

  13. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    2016-12-19

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-10-24

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Acute appendicitis in acute leukemia and the potential role of decitabine in the critically ill patient

    Deepti Warad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia is uncommon and often recognized late. Immunocompromised host state coupled with the importance of avoiding treatment delays makes management additionally challenging. Leukemic infiltration of the appendix though rare must also be considered. Although successful conservative management has been reported, surgical intervention is required in most cases. We present our experience with acute appendicitis in children with acute leukemia and a case of complete remission of acute myeloid leukemia with a short course of decitabine. Decitabine may serve as bridging therapy in critically ill patients who are unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy.

  17. Pneumatosis Intestinalis in a Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Abhishek Mangaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumatosis Intestinalis is a rare condition characterized by the presence of gas within the intestinal wall. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed nausea and nonbloody diarrhea. CT showed intramural air in transverse and descending colon. Patient clinically improved with conservative management.

  18. Comorbidity and performance status in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    Ostgård, L S G; Nørgaard, J M; Sengeløv, H

    2015-01-01

    As the world population ages, the comorbidity burden in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients increases. Evidence on how to integrate comorbidity measures into clinical decision-making is sparse. We determined the prognostic impact of comorbidity and WHO Performance Status (PS) on achievement...

  19. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-03-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Obesity in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood

    Iughetti Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common malignancy in childhood. Continuous progress in risk-adapted treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has secured 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% and 8-year survival rates approaching 90%. Almost 75% of survivors, however, have a chronic health condition negatively impacting on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity can be considered one of the most important health chronic conditions in the general population, with an increasing incidence in patients treated for childhood cancers and especially in acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors who are, at the same time, more at risk of experiencing precocious cardiovascular and metabolic co-morbidities. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation and chemotherapy or to primary tumor together with lifestyle modifications and genetic factors could affect long-term outcomes. Nevertheless, the etiology of obesity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia is not yet fully understood. The present review has the aim of summarizing the published data and examining the most accepted mechanisms and main predisposing factors related to weight gain in this particular population.

  1. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  2. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-08-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Pleural effusions in patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Faiz, Saadia A; Bashoura, Lara; Lei, Xiudong; Sampat, Keeran R; Brown, Tiffany C; Eapen, George A; Morice, Rodolfo C; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jimenez, Carlos A

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are rarely observed in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Therefore the underlying etiology of pleural effusions and the efficacy and safety of pleural procedures in this population has not been well studied. In a retrospective review of cases from 1997 to 2007, we identified 111 patients with acute leukemia or MDS/MPN who underwent pleural procedures. Clinical characteristics were reviewed, and survival outcomes were estimated by Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 270 pleural procedures were performed in 111 patients (69 AML, 27 ALL, 15 MDS/MPN). The main indications for pleural procedures were possible infection (49%) and respiratory symptoms (48%), and concomitant clinical symptoms included fever (34%), dyspnea (74%), chest pain (24%) and cough (37%). Most patients had active disease (61%). The most frequent etiology of pleural effusions was infection (47%), followed by malignancy (36%). Severe thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 20 × 10(3)/µL) was present in 43% of the procedures, yet the procedural complication rate was only 1.9%. Multivariate analysis revealed that older age, AML, MDS/MPN and active disease status were associated with a shorter median overall survival. Infection and malignant involvement are the most common causes of pleural effusion in patients with acute leukemia or MDS. After optimizing platelet count and coagulopathy, thoracentesis may be performed safely and with high diagnostic yield in this population. Survival in these patients is determined by the response to treatment of the hematologic malignancy.

  5. Chromosomal banding patterns in patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 50% of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) patients studied with banding techniques have detectable clonal karyotypic abnormalities. Although there is considerable variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities are observed, including trisomy 8, monosomy 7, and the 8;21 translocation (frequently accompanied by loss of an X or Y). The 15;17 translocation is highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Clonal evolution of the karyotype can be observed in a significant number of ANLL patients for whom serial cytogenetic analyses are obtained. Gain of a No. 8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Bone marrow cells from paients who develop ANLL following treatment of a previous malignancy often have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of all or part of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  6. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Full Text Available Treatment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...tment of relapsed/refractory leukemia with intravenous administration of Dacarbazine Trattamento della leucemia...on(s) being investigated Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia... language Relapsed/Refractory acute myeloid leukemia patients Pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide re...arbazina nei pazienti affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide recidivata/refrattaria i cui blasti esprimono bassi

  9. Ecthyma gangrenosum in a patient with acute leukemia.

    Kryeziu, Emrush; Kryeziu, K; Bajraktari, Gjani; Abazi, M; Zylfiu, B; Rudhani, I; Sadiku, Sh; Ukimeri, A; Brovina, A; Dreshaj, Sh; Telaku, S

    2010-01-01

    Ecthymagangrenosum (EG)is a rare condition with characteristic clinical appearance of red maculae that progresses to a central area of necrosis surrounded by an erythematous halo. The most frequently it is caused by Pseudomonas bacteriaemia in neutropenic patient. The authors presents a patient with acute myloblastic leukemia M4 type in whom in relapse EG caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found. The patient was treated with antibiotics and surgical debridement. The author wants to point out on clinical significance this condition with high mortality rate.

  10. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  11. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. [Nursing diagnosis in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    de Souza, Luccas Melo; Gorini, Maria Isabel Pinto Coelho

    2006-09-01

    This case study aimed at identifying Nursing Diagnosis (ND) in adult patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, with the purpose of contributing to the Systematization of Nurse Care. Interviews and observation were used for data collection, in addition to Nursing Process application. During the three months of data collection, other NDs were obtained by searching the files of the 6 patients. The 32 ND found in this study were grouped according to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Out of these 32 ND, 15 corresponded to changes in Physiological Needs, and 10 to changes in Protection and Safety Needs.

  13. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Testis Scintigraphy in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Mine Şencan Eren

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a pediatric malignancy associated with remissions and relapses. Common relapsing sitesare meninges, testis and ovary. Testicular scintigraphy is a highly specific modality used mainly in the differential diagnosis of testicular torsion and epidydimitis/epidydimo-orchitis. There is only one interesting image on leukemic infiltration with scrotal scintigraphy in the literature. The aim of this case presentation is to report that although the scintigraphic appearance of testicular torsion was observed in a patient with the diagnosis of ALL, testicular ALL infiltration was revealed in pathologic examination.

  15. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Treatment Outcome in Older Patients with Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Jenkins, Laura; Dahl, Gary; Bowman, W. Paul; Taub, Jeffrey W; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Campana, Dario; Inaba, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    Background Older age has historically been an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The impact of age relative to that of other prognostic factors on the outcome of patients treated in recent trials is unknown. Methods Clinical outcome and causes of treatment failure of 351 patients enrolled on three consecutive protocols for childhood AML between 1991 and 2008 were analyzed according to age and protocol. Results The more recent protocol (AML02) produced improved outcomes for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to 2 earlier studies (AML91 and 97), with 3-year rates of event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS) and cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse (CIR) for this group similar to those of 0- to 9-year old patients: EFS, 58.3% ± 5.4% vs. 66.6% ± 4.9%, P=.20; OS, 68.9% ± 5.1% vs. 75.1% ± 4.5%, P=.36; cumulative incidence of refractory leukemia or relapse, 21.9% ± 4.4%; vs. 25.3% ± 4.1%, P=.59. EFS and OS estimates for 10–15-year-old patients overlapped those for 16–21-year-old patients. However, the cumulative incidence of toxic death was significantly higher for 10- to 21-year-old patients compared to younger patients (13.2% ± 3.6 vs. 4.5% ± 2.0%, P=.028). Conclusion The survival rate for older children with AML has improved on our recent trial and is now similar to that of younger patients. However, deaths from toxicity remain a significant problem in the older age group. Future trials should focus on improving supportive care while striving to develop more effective antileukemic therapy. PMID:22674050

  18. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  2. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  3. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Acute ... Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Past treatment for cancer and certain genetic conditions affect the ...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  5. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Orhan Ayyıldız

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are common and life-threatening among immunosupressive patients.Invasive pulmonar aspergilloz (IPA generally occurs when Aspergillus inhaled, but rarelywith the hematogen spread of dermal or gastrointestinal Aspergillus. We present here, IPA ina 58 year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. He was admitted to ourclinic with fatigue, weakness, pansitopenia, and with petechia. Supportive treatment,vincristine and prednisone was initiated. Chest roentgenogram was normal. Dyspnea andfever (39.5’C were seen after 1 month of therapy. Thorax high resolution computerizedtomography was obtained and cavitary lesion was seen in the left upper-anterior segment oflung. Sputum and blood culture were negative. In spite of the empiric use of Meropenem 3gr/d, Vancomycin 2 gr/d and fluconazole 200 mg/d, fever was not turned to normal andclinical symptoms were not healed. On the fifth days of therapy amphotericin-B was initiatedand the other antibiotics were stopped after 3 days. General symptoms were healed on the 8thdays. Radiologic findings were improved partially after 20 days. The patient clinically is welland remains in remission and radiologic findings were turn to near normal after 10 monthsof treatment. We aimed to emphasis about treatment of empirical Amphotericin-B incritically ill patient with ALL.

  11. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients

    Guldane Cengiz Seval

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this review were to discuss standard and investigational treatment strategies for adolescent and young adult with acute myeloid leukemia, excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML in adolescent and young adult patients (AYAs may need a different type of therapy than those currently used in children and older patients. As soon as AML is diagnosed, AYA patient should be offered to participate in well-designed clinical trials. The standard treatment approach for AYAs with AML is remission induction chemotherapy with an anthracycline/cytarabine combination, followed by either consolidation chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation, depending on the ability of the patient to tolerate intensive treatment and cytogenetic features. Presently, continuing progress of novel drugs targeting specific pathways in acute leukemia may bring AML treatment into a new era.

  13. Imaging of liver and spleen candidiasis in patients with acute leukemia

    Seino, Yasuo; Tamakawa, Y.; Kato, T.; Kimura, Y.; Miyazaki, S.; Miura, R.; Ishida, H.

    1988-01-01

    Four patients with acute leukemia were found to have candidal abscess of liver and spleen. CT and US showed hepatosplenomegaly and microabscess. These findings might be useful in diagnosis of visceral candidiasis.

  14. [Alcaligenes xylosoxidans bacteremia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Aydemir, Zeynep Alp; Ozdemir, Nihal; Celik, Nigar; Celkan, Tiraje

    2009-07-01

    Alcaligenes xylosoxidans which is an aerobic, non-fermentative gram-negative bacillus found in aqueous environments and human flora, can lead to opportunistic infections. It causes infections in elderly, immunocompromised patients, patients with chronic disorders or premature infants. In this report, a case of A. xylosoxidans bacteremia that developed in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented. Four-years-old male patient under ALL induction therapy was admitted with symptoms of lethargy, headache, somnolence, and fever (39 degrees C). Cerebrospinal fluid, blood, throat and urine cultures were taken from the patient and empirical treatment with sulbactam cefoperazon and amikacin was initiated. Blood cultures in BacT Alert 3D (Bio Merieux, France) revealed the growth of a gram-negative coccobacillus. The agent which was non-fermentative, indol and H2S negative, was identified as A. xylosoxidans by API 20 NE (Bio Merieux, France). Since fever continued under the current antibiotic treatment, the therapy was switched to imipenem (90 mg/kg 3x/day) and the patient's condition improved markedly after 24 hours. Disc diffusion susceptibility testing of the isolate revealed that it was resistant to ampicillin, cephalothin, cefuroxime, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, amikacin, netilmicin and gentamicin; susceptible to amoxicillin clavulanate, piperacillin tazobactam, seftazidime, cefepime, imipenem and ciprofloxacin. Following 14 days of imipenem therapy, the patient recovered and discharged from the hospital on routine follow-up. It is important to consider A. xylosoxidans as a possible causative agent particularly in the infections that develop in high risk patients at oncology, dialysis and neonatal intensive care units.

  15. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    Eriksson, Anna; Österroos, Albin; Hassan, Sadia Bashir; Gullbo, Joachim; Rickardson, Linda; Jarvius, Malin; Nygren, Peter; Fryknäs, Mårten; Höglund, Martin; Larsson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 mu M drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low...

  16. Inhibition factors of arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Sui Meijuan; Zhang Zhuo; Zhou Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize limitations involved in arsenic trioxide therapeutic effects in acute promyelocytic leukemia,because current studies show that some individuals of acute promyelocytic leukemia have relatively poor outcomes during treatment with arsenic trioxide.Data sources Most relevant articles were included in the PubMed database between 2000 and 2013 with the keywords "acute promyelocytic leukemia","arsenic trioxide","thiol" or "methylation".In addition,a few older articles were also reviewed.Study selection Data and articles related to arsenic trioxide effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia treatment were selected and reviewed.We developed an overview of limitations associated with arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect.Results This review focuses on the researches about the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect in acute promyelocytic leukemia and summarizes three mainly limitations which can influence the arsenic trioxide therapeutic effect to different degrees.First,with the combination of arsenic and glutathione the therapeutic effect and cytotoxicity decrease when glutathione concentration increases; second,arsenic methylation,stable arsenic methylation products weaken the apoptosis effect of arsenic trioxide in leukemia cells; third,gene mutations affect the sensitivity of tumor cells to arsenic trioxide and increase the resistance of leukemia cells to arsenic trioxide.Conclusions The chief limitations are listed in the review.If we can exclude all of them,we can obtain a better therapeutic effect of arsenic trioxide in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  17. Outcomes of CAG Regimen for Refractory Biphenotypic Acute Leukemia Patients

    Guang-sheng He; Xiang Zhang; De-pei Wu; Ai-ning Sun; Zheng-ming Jin; Hui-ying Qiu; Miao Miao; Xiao-wen Tang; Zheng-zheng Fu; Yue Han

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluated the efficiency of low-dose cytosine arabinoside plus aclarubicin with concurrent administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor(CAG)regimen for refractory biphenotypic acute leukemia(BAL).Methods We treated 5 refractory BAL patients by CAG regimen(10 mg·m 2 cytosine arabinoside subcutaneously administrated every 12 hours,day 1-14;5-7 mg·m2 aclarubicin intravenously administrated daily,day 1-8;and concurrently used 200 μg.m-2·d-1 granulocyte colony-stimulating factor subcutaneously)from November 2002 to April 2007.The efficacy of the regimen was evaluated by response rate,and the side effects were also measured.Results The complete remission rate was 80% ,median duration of absolute neutrophil count<5.0×108/L and platelet count<2.0×1010/L was day 13 and day 1,respectively;and the infection rate was low(Ⅲ-Ⅳ infection rate,20.00% ).Conclusion CAG regimen as remission induction chemotherapy for BAL patients is effective with a high remission rate and low toxicity.

  18. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Acute myocardial/cerebral infarction as first/relapse manifestation in one acute promyelocytic leukemia patient.

    Li, Ying; Suo, Shanshan; Mao, Liping; Wang, Lei; Yang, Chunmei; Xu, Weilai; Lou, Yinjun; Mai, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    In the clinical setting, bleeding is a common manifestation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), whereas thrombosis is relatively rare, especially as an initial symptom. Here, we report an unusual case of APL with acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation and cerebral infarction as the relapse manifestation in a healthy young woman. This unique case emphasizes that a thrombotic event could be the first manifestation of an underlying hematological disorder such as APL and could also be a sign of relapse. Rapid detection of the underlying disorder and the timely use of anticoagulation therapy and ATRA are crucial for preventing further deterioration of the disease and saving the patient's life.

  20. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. [Therapeutic results in patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia at Sapporo Medical University Hospital].

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Takimoto, Rishu; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2010-10-01

    We reviewed the results of 6 patients with biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) which the diagnostic standard of the European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemia (EGIL) at Sapporo Medical University Hospital between 2006 and 2008. There were 5 males and 1 females with an average age of 35 years. Among them, 4 were B lymphoid and myeloid, 2 were T lymphoid and myeloid, and one was T/B lymphoid. Two of 4 patients did not attain complete remission, and two relapsed after first treatment with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) protocol. On the other hand, two showed complete remission after the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) protocol. One of 4 patients survived who had been treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as a post-remission therapy. The ALL protocol was good for the induction therapy. However, overall treatment-related deaths were 4 patients and considerable caution was necessary.

  2. Acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemophilia A patient:a case report

    张磊; 李洪强; 赵辉; 王婷婷; 季林祥; 杨仁池; 韩忠朝

    2004-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is the M3 subtype of the French-American-British (FAB) classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Hemophilia is a congenital bleeding disorder characterized by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX. In our center, more than one thousand patients with haemophilia A have been treated since 1980.1 In June 2002, APL was first diagnosed in one person with haemophilia (PWH). The coincidence of these two diseases led to challenges in developing a treatment strategy.

  3. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym ANLL; Acute Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Nonl...ymphoblastic Leukemias; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Nonlymphocytic Leukemias; Leukemia, Acute Nonly...mphoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Nonlymphocytic; Leukemia, Nonlymphoblastic, Acute; Leukemias, Acute Nonlymphoblastic; Leukemias, Acute... Nonlymphocytic; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphoblastic Leukemias, Acut...e; Nonlymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; Nonlymphocytic Leukemias, Acute PharmGKB Accessi

  4. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia.

  5. Peripartum cardiomyopathy in a patient treated for acute myeloid leukemia

    Čolović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Peripartum cardiomyopathy usually presents with systolic heart failure during the last months of pregnancy and up to five months postpartum. The disease is rare and can be fatal. Case Outline. We report a 30-year-old female who was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, with maturation and cytogenetic finding of t(8;21(q22;q22,del(9(q22 in January 2004. She was treated with chemotherapy and achieved complete remission that lasts to date. She became pregnant and delivered a healthy newborn with caesarean section in 2009. Seven months later, she again became pregnant and delivered the second child with caesarean section in January 2011. Seven days after delivery she developed symptoms and signs of heart failure. Electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm, low voltage and negative T-waves in inferior and lateral leads. Echocardiography revealed global left ventricular dysfunction with ejection fraction of 15%, with mobile thrombotic mass of 12 mm attached to the left ventricle wall. She was treated with both unfractionated and low-molecular heparin, diuretics, cardiotonics, and beta-blockers. Within six following weeks left ventricle systolic function improved up to 25-30%. The full clinical recovery was achieved in September 2013, resulting in absence of heart failure and left ventricular ejection fraction of 54%. Conclusion. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare condition. The cause of cardiomyopathy is unknown, but it is believed that it could be triggered by various conditions and risk factors. Although the patient was treated with cardiotoxic drugs (doxorubicin and mitoxantrone in permitted doses, they could have been contributory factors of myocardial damage. Close monitoring of cardiac function in the peripartal period might be beneficial in patients treated with cardiotoxic drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175080 I br. OI 175034

  6. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  7. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O’Brien, Susan M.; Faderl, Stefan H.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan A.; Pierce, Sherry; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are uncommon in CLL. We retrospectively identified 95 patients with CLL also diagnosed with AL (n=38) or MDS (n=57), either concurrently (n=5) or subsequent (n=90) to CLL diagnosis and report their outcomes. Median number of CLL treatments prior to AL and MDS was 2(0–9) and 1(0–8), respectively; the most common regimen was purine analogue combined with alkylating agent±CD20 mAb. Twelve had no prior CLL treatment. Among 38 with AL, 33 had AML, 3 had ALL (1Ph+), 1 had biphenotypic, and 1 had extramedullary (bladder) AML. Unfavorable AML karyotype was noted in 26, intermediate-risk in 7. There was no association between survival from AL and number of prior CLL regimens or karyotype. Expression of CD7 on blasts was associated with shorter survival. Among MDS cases, all IPSS were represented; karyotype was unfavorable in 36, intermediate in 6, and favorable in 12 patients; 10 experienced transformation to AML. Shorter survival from MDS correlated with higher-risk IPSS, poor-risk karyotype, and increased number of prior CLL treatments. Overall, outcomes for patients with CLL subsequently diagnosed with AL or MDS were poor; AL/MDS occurred without prior CLL treatment. Effective therapies for these patients are desperately needed. PMID:26290497

  10. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Mody, Mayur D.; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S.; Kota, Vamsi K.

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:28203579

  11. Rhabdomyolysis Following Initiation of Posaconazole Use for Antifungal Prophylaxis in a Patient With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Case Report.

    Mody, Mayur D; Ravindranathan, Deepak; Gill, Harpaul S; Kota, Vamsi K

    2017-01-01

    Posaconazole is a commonly used medication for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with high-risk acute leukemia, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Despite clinical data that show that posaconazole is superior to other antifungal prophylaxis medications, posaconazole is known to have many side effects and drug-drug interactions. We present a patient who developed rhabdomyolysis after being started on posaconazole for prophylaxis in the setting of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

  12. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy for acute respiratory failure during chemotherapy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Youn Seup

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by pneumonia in patients with hematologic malignancies can be life-threatening. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is the only temporary treatment for patients with ARDS who are refractory to conventional treatment. However, the immunosuppression and coagulopathies in hematological malignancies such as lymphoma and acute leukemia are relative contraindications for ECMO, due to high risks of infection and bleeding. Here, we report a 22-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who developed pneumonia and ARDS during induction chemotherapy; he was treated with ECMO. PMID:28275497

  13. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Full Text Available emia in children and adolescent protocollo per la leucemia acuta mieloide in età pediatrica A.3.2Name or abb...pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia pazienti in età pediatrica affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide ...te myeloid leukemia pazienti in età pediatrica affetti da leucemia acuta mieloide E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Di

  16. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-01-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. The Mutation Profile of Calreticulin in Patients with Myeloproliferative Neoplasms and Acute Leukemia

    Jingyi Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Calreticulin (CALR plays important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and immune responses. CALR mutations were described recently in Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2-negative or MPLnegative primary myelofibrosis (PMF and essential thrombocythemia (ET patients. CALR trails JAK2 as the second most mutated gene in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. However, little is known about CALR mutation in Chinese patients with leukemia. In the present study, a cohort of 305 Chinese patients with hematopoietic neoplasms was screened for CALR mutations, with the aim of uncovering the frequency of CALR mutations in leukemia and MPNs. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing were performed to analyze mutations of CALR in 305 patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including 135 acute myeloid leukemia patients, 57 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, and 113 MPN patients. Results: CALR mutations were found in 10.6% (12 of 113 of samples from patients with MPNs. CALR mutations were determined in 11.3% (6 of 53, 21.7% (5 of 23, and 9.1% (1/11 of patients with ET, PMF, and unclassifiable MPN, respectively. Conclusion: We showed that MPN patients carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels compared to those with mutated JAK2. However, all of the leukemia patients had negative results for CALR mutations.

  18. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Olfa Kassar; Feten Kallel; Manel Ghorbel; Hatem. Bellaaj; Zeineb Mnif; Moez Elloumi

    2015-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patie...

  19. UNUSUAL CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF RELAPSE IN PATIENT WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA.

    Vanya Slavcheva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a disease, which is more common in children. We report a clinical case of a patient aged 25. Thirty-two months before his last admission in Hematology clinic, acute pre- B lymphoblastic leukemia had been diagnosed and treated till March 2012. In September 2013 after bone marrow aspiration, flow cytometric analysis, trepan biopsy and biopsy of the kidney had been carried out, the patient was diagnosed with first late relapse, involving bone marrow and kidney. A second remission was achieved using Berlin- Frankfurt– Munster chemotherapy [BFM] and allogenic stem cell transplantation was performed.

  20. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Addition of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to induction chemotherapy improves survival in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Burnett, Alan K; Russell, Nigel H; Hills, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE There has been little survival improvement in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the last two decades. Improving induction treatment may improve the rate and quality of remission and consequently survival. In our previous trial, in younger patients, we showed improved sur...

  2. The significance of change of Th22 cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    刘立民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the proportion of Th22 cells in peripheral blood of patients with acute lympho-blastic leukemia(ALL) and evaluate its significance.Methods The proportions of Th22 cells in peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients before therapy(group 1),

  3. Study of nucleophosmin (NPM) gene mutation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes

    张悦

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate nucleophosmin (NPM) gene mutations in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal cytogenetics and primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Methods Genomic DNA corresponding to exon 12 of NPM gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 40 AML patients (28 case untreated and 12 in first remission) and

  4. High-Dose Daunorubicin in Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Lowenberg, Bob; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Maertens, Johan; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; von Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie; Biemond, Bart J.; Vellenga, Edo; Kooy, Marinus van Marwijk; Verdonck, Leo F.; Beck, Joachim; Doehner, Hartmut; Gratwohl, Alois; Pabst, Thomas; Verhoef, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    Background A complete remission is essential for prolonging survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Daunorubicin is a cornerstone of the induction regimen, but the optimal dose is unknown. In older patients, it is usual to give daunorubicin at a dose of 45 to 50 mg per square meter o

  5. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-07-19

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Acquired hemoglobin H disease in a patient with aplastic anemia evolving into acute myeloid leukemia

    Maria Stella Figueiredo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The prognosis of severe aplastic anemia has improved since the introduction of bone marrow transplantation and treatment with antithymocyte globulin. In contrast to the success of these protocols, studies with long term follow-up have shown the occurrence of clonal diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia in aplastic anemia. CASE REPORT: We report the first case of a Brazilian patient with aplastic anemia who developed myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia showing acquired hemoglobin H and increased fetal hemoglobin.

  7. The mortality and response rate after FLANG regimen in patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia

    Vali A Mehrzad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oncologists today are greatly concerned about the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute leukemia. FLANG regimen, combination of novantron, cytarabine, fludarabine, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, has been used in treatment of refractory/relapsed acute leukemia since 1990s. The present study has evaluated mortality and response rate of this regimen. Materials and Methods: In this study, 25 patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia aged 15-55 years underwent FLANG regimen at Seyed-Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran during 2008-2009. One month later, bone marrow samples were taken to evaluate the responsiveness to treatment. Participants were followed for a year. The data was analyzed by student-t and chi-square tests, logistic, and Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves in SPSS 19. Results: Out of the 25 patients, 8 patients (32% had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5 refractory and 3 relapsed cases and 17 subjects had acute myeloid leukemia (7 refractory and 10 relapsed cases. According to the bone marrow biopsies taken one month after FLANG regimen, 10 patients (40% had responded to treatment. Five patients of the 10 responders underwent successful bone marrow transplantation (BMT. On the other hand, 13 patients (52%, who had not entered the CR period, died during the follow-up. Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any significant associations between disease type and responsiveness to treatment. Conclusion: This study indicated higher rates of unresponsiveness to treatment while its mortality rate was comparable with other studies. Overall, according to limitations for BMT (as the only chance for cure in Iran, it seems that FLANG therapy is an acceptable choice for these patients.

  8. CONTINUOUS-INFUSION OF CEFTAZIDIME IN FEBRILE NEUTROPENIC PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA

    DAENEN, S; ERJAVEC, Z; UGES, DRA; DEVRIESHOSPERS, HG; DEJONGE, P; HALIE, MR

    1995-01-01

    Twelve febrile patients with severe neutropenia, who had undergone aggressive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia, were treated empirically with a continuous infusion of ceftazidime 100 mg/kg/day after a 500 mg loading dose, in order to study the pharmacokinetics of ceftazidime after continuous

  9. REPEATED ARSENIC TRIOXIDE INTRAVENOUS INFUSION CAUSES FOCAL BONE MARROW NECROSIS IN TWO ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS

    Jin Zhou; Ran Meng; Xin-hua Sui; Bao-feng Yang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an effective agent used in treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However,appearances of side effects using clinical therapeutic dosages of As2O3 occur during the initial or consolidated stage in APL therapy. We report two APL patients suffering focal bone marrow necrosis after discontinuous As2O3 treatment during consolidated stage.

  10. [Esophageal aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and febrile neutropenia].

    Besa, Santiago; Kattan, Eduardo; Cid, Ximena; Claro, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillosis usually compromises the respiratory system, but can also affect others. We report a 46 yo female with acute myeloid leukemia, developed febrile neutropenia and dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed esophageal cytomegalovirus-like ulcers, but biopsies showed Aspergillus spp. It's important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions in high-risk patients.

  11. Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    2016-07-08

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  12. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Monocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Acute Monoblastic Leukemias; Acute... Monocytic Leukemia; Acute Monocytic Leukemias; Acute monoblastic leukaemia; Acute monoblastic leukemia; Acute... monocytic leukaemia; Acute monocytic leukemia, morphology; Acute monocytoid leukemia; Leukemia, Acute... Monoblastic; Leukemia, Acute Monocytic; Leukemia, Monoblastic, Acute; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute... Schilling-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Monoblastic; Leukemias, Acute Monocytic; M5a - Acute monoblastic leukaemia; M5a - Acute

  14. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok [Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  15. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  16. [Abnormality of blood coagulation indexes in patients with de novo acute leukemia and its clinical significance].

    Xiao, Fang-Fang; Hu, Kai-Xun; Guo, Mei; Qiao, Jian-Hui; Sun, Qi-Yun; Ai, Hui-Sheng; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2013-04-01

    To explore hemorrhage risk and the clinical significance of abnormal change of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), plasma fibrinogen (FIB), plasma thrombin time (TT) and d-dimer (D-D) in de novo acute leukemia (except for APL), the different bleeding manifestations of 114 cases of de novo acute leukemia with different coagulation indexes were analyzed retrospectively. The correlation between these blood coagulation indexes and the possible correlative clinical characteristics were analysed, including age, sex, type of acute leukemia, initial white blood cell(WBC) and platelet(Plt) count, the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow and cytogenetic abnormality of patients at diagnosis. The results indicated that the incidence of abnormal blood coagulation was as high as 78.1% for de novo AL patients. These patients with 5 normal blood coagulation indexes may have mild bleeding manifestation, but the more abnormal indexes, the more severe bleeding. Both PT and D-D were sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Incidence of abnormal blood coagulation significantly correlates with the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow (χ(2) = 4.184, OR = 1.021, P coagulation. It is concluded that the coagulation and fibrinolysis are abnormal in most patients with de novo acute leukemia. More abnormal indexes indicate more severe bleeding, and both PT and D-D are sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Higher proportion of blast cells in bone marrow predicts higher incidence of abnormal blood clotting. Acute leukemia with elderly age, high white blood cell count and adverse cytogenetics do not predict severer abnormal blood clotting. Detection of PT, APTT, TT, FIB, and D-D may help to judge whether the patients are in a state of hypercoagulability or disseminated intravenous coagulation, which will provide experiment evidences for early intervention and medication.

  17. CRUSTED SCABIES IN A PATIENT WITH ACUTE LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Mamatha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 17 year s old male patient presented with diffuse, ill defined, hyperpigmented, scaly plaques on the body, for the past 15 days. Lesions were more over the groin and also on both elbows and wrists. Patient is a known case of acute lymphocytic leukaemia, diagnosed a t the age of 13 years and has been on treatment ever since. A KOH ( 10% mount of the scales showed the presence of sarcoptes scabiei and skin biopsy with haematoxylin and eosin showed fragments of mite in the excised skin.

  18. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    2016-07-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Role of L-asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: focus on adult patients

    Rytting ME

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael E RyttingDepartment of Pediatrics and Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Asparaginase preparations deplete asparagine in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL blasts. Asparaginase in its various forms is an important component of treatment regimens for pediatric ALL. Recently, interest and use of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL has increased, particularly in young adults. There is much less information on asparaginase use and toxicity in adult compared with pediatric populations. This review surveys prior published studies of the three most commonly used asparagine preparations as used in adult patients, and discusses important toxicities encountered in adult patients who receive asparaginase preparations.Keywords: asparaginase, leukemia, adults, children

  20. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  1. Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) – a randomized controlled trial

    Jarden, Mary; Møller, Tom; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine if patients with acute leukemia can benefit by a structured...... and supervised counseling and exercise program.Methods/design: This paper presents the study protocol: Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise -- Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) trial, a two center, randomized controlled trial of 70 patients with acute leukemia (35 patients/study arm) following induction...... chemotherapy in the outpatient setting. Eligible patients will be randomized to usual care or to the 12 week exercise and counseling program. The intervention includes 3 hours + 30 minutes per week of supervised and structured aerobic training (moderate to high intensity 70 - 80%) on an ergometer cycle...

  2. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic...... syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients...... conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required....

  3. Granulomatous rosacea: Like leukemid in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Škiljević Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skin findings in leukemias may be divided into specific lesions (leukemia cutis and non-specific lesions (leukemids which may be found in up to 80% of all patients with leukemias. The leukemids vary clinically and they are usually a manifestation of bone marrow or immunologic impairment, but also Sweet syndrome, pyoderma gangrenosum, erythroderma, maculopapular exanthema, prurigo-like papules, generalized pigmentation, follicular mucinosis, generalized pruritus may be found during the course of leukemia. Case report. We report a 70-year-old male with a 3-month history of erythema, papules and pustules on the face, ears and neck and over a month history of refractory anemia, anorexia, weight loss, malaise, and fever. Physical examination revealed symmetric erythematous, violaceous papules, papulo-nodules and plaques with slate scale and sparse, small pustules on the face, earlobes and neck. Histopathologic findings of involved skin showed diffuse mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with perifollicular accentuation and focal granulomatous inflammation in the papillary and upper reticular dermis. Extensive checkup revealed the presence of acute myeloid leukemia French- American-British (FAB classification subtype M2, with signs of three-lineage dysplasia. The patient was treated by L6 protocol which led to complete remission, both in bone marrow and skin, but after seven months he had relapse of leukemia with the fatal outcome. Conclusion. This case indicates the importance of skin eruptions in the context of hematological malignancies.

  4. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-lymphocytic-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20042915 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  5. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    ... for information in your local library and on the Internet. Good sources include the National Cancer Institute, the ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acute-myelogenous-leukemia/basics/definition/CON-20043431 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  6. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  7. Patient Activation through Counseling and Exercise – Acute Leukemia (PACE-AL) – a randomized controlled trial

    Jarden, Mary; Møller, Tom; Kjeldsen, Lars; Birgens, Henrik; Christensen, Jesper Frank; Bang Christensen,Karl; Diderichsen, Finn; Hendriksen, Carsten; Adamsen, Lis

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with acute leukemia experience a substantial symptom burden and are at risk of developing infections throughout the course of repeated cycles of intensive chemotherapy. Physical activity in recent years has been a strategy for rehabilitation in cancer patients to remedy disease and treatment related symptoms and side effects. To date, there are no clinical practice exercise guidelines for patients with acute leukemia undergoing induction and consolidation chemotherapy. A r...

  8. Parenthood in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia after treatment with arsenic trioxide: a case series.

    Gupta, Shilpa; Bagel, Bhausaheb; Gujral, Sumeet; Subramanian, P G; Khattry, Navin; Menon, Hari; Nair, Reena

    2012-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide, believed to be a carcinogen and a teratogen, has found its niche in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). APL is a disease affecting young patients. Post-treatment fertility and outcome of pregnancy are always a concern in a disease with high cure rates. We report a case series of six patients who were treated successfully for APL with arsenic trioxide and who parented at least one healthy offspring after completing their treatment.

  9. Molecular subtypes of PMI/RaRa in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to describe the frequency of molecular subtypes of PML/RARα in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and their distribution according to risk of recurrence and cytomorphology. A case series was carried out, including fifty patients registered at the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) during 2010-2012, with molecular diagnosis of APL PML/RARα and bcr1, bcr2 and bcr3 subtypes by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bcr1 subtype...

  10. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A.; Newton, Robert C.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479. PMID:22422826

  11. Phase 2 study of the JAK kinase inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with refractory leukemias, including postmyeloproliferative neoplasm acute myeloid leukemia.

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Verstovsek, Srdan; Estrov, Zeev; Burger, Jan; Cortes, Jorge; Bivins, Carol; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Borthakur, Gautam; George, Solly; Scherle, Peggy A; Newton, Robert C; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Ravandi, Farhad

    2012-05-17

    We conducted a phase 2 study of ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed/refractory leukemias. Patients with acceptable performance status (0-2), adequate organ function, and no active infection, received ruxolitinib 25 mg orally twice a day for 4 weeks (1 cycle). Response was assessed after every 2 cycles of treatment, and patients who completed 2 cycles were allowed to continue treatment until disease progression. Dose escalation to 50 mg twice daily was permitted in patients demonstrating a benefit. Thirty-eight patients, with a median age of 69 years (range, 45-88), were treated. The median number of prior therapies was 2 (range, 1-6). Twelve patients had JAK2V617F mutation. Patients received a median of 2 cycles of therapy (range, 1-22). Three of 18 patients with postmyeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) showed a significant response; 2 achieved complete remission (CR) and one achieved a CR with insufficient recovery of blood counts (CRi). The responding patients with palpable spleens also had significant reductions in spleen size. Overall, ruxolitinib was very well tolerated with only 4 patients having grade 3 or higher toxicity. Ruxolitinib has modest antileukemic activity as a single agent, particularly in patients with post-MPN AML. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00674479.

  12. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. The study on relationship between age and cytogenetic subgroups in 640 patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia

    苏龙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the cytogenetic characteristicsof different age subgroups in patients with acute myeloid leukemia(AML),and to explore the relationship between age and cytogenetics.Methods Between

  15. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML - Acute... myeloblastic leukaemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloblastic Leukemias; Acute... Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelocytic Leukemias; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myelogenous Leukemias; Acute... granulocytic leukaemia; Acute myeloblastic leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia - category; Acute... myeloid leukaemia, disease; Acute myeloid leukemia; Acute myelo

  16. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    ... Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute ... bleeding and forming blood clots. Smoking, previous chemotherapy treatment, and exposure to radiation may affect the risk ...

  18. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Yamauchi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sugihara, M.; Nagao, T.; Arimori, S.

    1984-08-01

    The distribution within the body of autologous leukemic cells labeled with indium-111 oxine was studied in seven patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The leukemic blood cells initially entered the spleen and liver, and the major site of localization was the former rather than the latter. The majority of the leukemic cells had not left the spleen and liver within 48 hr. Liver radioactivity fell transitorily up to the third hr after the initial rise. The clearance curve of radioactivity from the blood showed a plateau or the appearance of a ''hump'' from 1 to 5 hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. These results might reflect recirculation of a portion of the leukemic cells between these organs and the bloodstream. In a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia. OKM1 monoclonal-antibody-treated monoblasts showed the lowest recovery into the blood and a greater increase of liver than splenic radioactivity at 30 min after injection. These results suggest the removal of damaged cells by the cytotoxic effects of antibody mediated by reticuloendothelial clearance mainly of the liver and others. In one patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia, leukemic cells accumulated in both kidneys, indicating the possible infiltration of these cells. Since indium-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damaged in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics.

  19. Prognostic significance of DNMT3A mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Ibrahem, Lamia; Mahfouz, Rabab; Elhelw, Loie; Abdsalam, Eman M; Soliman, Rehan

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with great variability in clinical course and response to therapy. Several molecular markers have been described that help to classify AML patients into risk groups. Mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) gene were recently demonstrated in AML. Approximately 20% patients with AML carry DNMT3A gene mutations and were associated with a poor clinical outcome but its clinical implications in Egyptian AML patients are largely unknown. The aim of the study was to study the incidence and prognostic impact of DNMT3A mutations in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia. A total of 120 patients with de novo AML were examined for mutations in DNMT3A by sequencing. DNMT3A mutations were identified in 34/120 (28%) of AML patients. 15 patients with M4, 14 patients with M5, 3 patient with M2 and 2 patient with M6. DNMT3A mutations were more frequently associated with older age, higher platelet counts and intermediate risk. DNMT3A-mutated patients did not differ regarding complete remission (CR) and disease-free survival (DFS), but had shorter overall survival (OS; P=0.048) than DNMT3A-wild-type patients. Mutations in DNMT3A independently predicted a shorter OS (P=0.049) by multivariate analysis. We concluded that DNMT3A mutations are highly frequent in Egyptian patients with AML and are associated with an unfavorable prognosis.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) - children

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside ... develops quickly. Both adults and children can get acute myeloid leukemia ( AML ). This article is about AML in children.

  1. [Prognostic significance of cytogenetics in aged patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Lin, Jie; Zhu, Hong-Li

    2015-04-01

    Aged patients with acute myeloid leukemia accounted for more than half of the adult AML patients, which has characteristics of low complete remission rate, short overall survival and poor prognosis. Recently, the importance of cytogenetics in AML was gradually realized. The diagnosis and typing, prognosis stratification and guide for treatment are performed on the basis of cytogenetics, but the research on influence of cytogenetics on adged patients with AML are relatively few. This review briefly summarizes the prognostic significance of cytogenetics in aged patients with AML.

  2. Fatal Breakthrough Mucormycosis in an Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patient while on Posaconazole Prophylaxis.

    Kang, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyun Seon; Bae, Myoung Nam; Kim, Jihye; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kwan Yong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hee-Je

    2015-03-01

    Posaconazole is a new oral triazole with broad-spectrum antifungal activity. Posaconazole has also shown a significant advantage of preventing invasive fungal infection compared to fluconazole or itraconazole in patients with prolonged neutropenia. Indeed, posaconazole has been commonly used for antifungal prophylaxis in patients undergoing remission induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. We experienced a case of fatal mucormycosis despite posaconazole prophylaxis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fatal breakthrough mucormycosis in a patient receiving posaconazole prophylaxis during remission induction chemotherapy in Korea. This case demonstrated that breakthrough fungal infection can occurs in patients receiving posaconazole prophylaxis because of its limited activity against some mucorales.

  3. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  4. [Treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia in patients more than 80 years old].

    Takeyama, H; Yamamoto, Y; Miyata, Y; Yamada, H; Watanabe, E; Aoki, H; Iinuma, M

    1997-07-01

    We studied fifteen patients older than 80 years of age with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) treated between 1984 and 1996. Among 15 cases of AML including 7 de novo cases and 8 from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or hypoplastic leukemia, 14 patients had complications, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus or other malignancies. Although patients with de novo AML showed high peripheral WBC counts and higher cellularity of bone marrow than those from MDS or hypoplastic leukemia, it was difficult in some cases to distinguish these types of AML from hematological findings. Of the 6 AML cases, three had entered complete remission (CR) by a standard dose of combination chemotherapy (BHAC-DMP). One CR patient has had CR for more than 9 years now with good QOL. Among the 3 patients treated by low-dose Ara-C, one attained CR but only for a short period. Four other patients received BRM, such as G-CSF or Ubenimex, and 2 patients died without chemotherapy. Since AML at more than 80 years of age is a highly heterogenous disease, it would be reasonable to give antileukemic agents according to the individual patient's condition.

  5. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: role of early diagnosis and surgical treatment in patients with acute leukemia

    Ursavas Ahmet

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus is a ubiquitous soil-dwelling fungus known to cause significant pulmonary infection in immunocompromised patients. The incidence of aspergillosis has increased during the past two decades and is a frequently lethal complication of acute leukemia patients that occurs following both chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. The diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA according to the criteria that are established by European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group raise difficulties in severely ill patients. Despite established improvements in field of diagnosis (galactomannan antigen, quantitative PCR, real-time PCR for Aspergillus spp., and findings of computed tomography and treatment with new antifungals, it is still a major problem in patients with acute leukemia. However, prompt and effective treatment of IPA is crucial because most patients will need subsequent chemotherapy for underlying hematologic disease as soon as possible. Case presentation We report a 33-year-old male patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed in 1993 that developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis due to A. flavus at relapse in 2003. The patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B and underwent surgical pulmonary resection. The operative course was uneventful. Conclusion This report emphasizes the clinical picture, applicability of recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IPA. For early identification of a patient infected with IPA, a high index of suspicion and careful clinical and radiological examinations with serial screening for galactomannan should be established. If aspergillosis is suspected, anti-aspergillosis drug should be administered immediately, and if a unique pulmonary lesion remains, surgical resection should be considered to prevent reactivation during consecutive chemotherapy courses and to improve the outcome.

  6. [Bone marrow autotransplantation in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia in primary remission].

    Richard, C; Iriondo, A; Baro, J; Conde, E; Hermosa, V; Alsar, M J; Gómez Casares, M T; Muruzabal, M J; Pérez Encinas, M; Zubizarreta, A

    1990-09-22

    Fifteen bone marrow autotransplants (BMAT) in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were performed after the first remission. The mean age was 37 years (range 12 to 60 years). According to the morphological classification FAB, 8 patients had monocytic leukemia (M4, M5) and 7 myeloid leukemia (M1, M2, M3). The mean interval elapsed between the date of complete remission and the BMAT was 3.9 months (range 1 to 5-9 months). In 8 patients this interval was longer than 6 months and in 7 cases it was shorter than 6 months. After achievement of the complete remission all patients underwent certain cycles of intensification before the BMAT. Eight patients received only a cycle whereas 7 patients received more than one cycle (between 2 and 4). The conditioning protocol consisted of cyclophosphamide (CP) (60 mg/kg x 2) and total body radiotherapy (TBR) (10 Gy) in 9 patients; CP and busulfan in five; and CP, cytarabine at high doses and melphalan in one case. Marrow extraction was performed after completion of chemotherapy of intensification. In 5 cases the bone marrow was depleted of leukemic cells by previous in vitro treatment with ASTA-Z. There are at present 8 alive patients. The survival free of illness was 51.8%. Seven patients died: 3 cases because relapse of the leukemia, 3 due to attachment failure of the transplantation, and one patient suffered a viral myocarditis. The survival free of illness was significantly longer in those patients transplanted after 6 months of the complete remission.

  7. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemias; Acute... myelomonocytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute myelomonocytic leukemia (clinical); Acute mye...lomonocytic leukemia, FAB M4; Leukemia, Acute Myelomonocytic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M4; Leukemia, Myeloi...d, Naegeli-Type; Leukemia, Naegeli-Type Myeloid; Leukemias, Acute Myelomonocytic; Myeloid Leukemia, Acute..., M4; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli Type; Myeloid Leukemia, Naegeli-Type; Myelomonocytic Leukemia, Acute

  8. Acute myelogenous leukemia and acute leukemic appendicitis: A case report

    Po-Jen Hsiao; Shih-Ming Kuo; Jia-Hong Chen; Hsuen-Fu Lin; Pau-Ling Chu; Shih-Hua Lin; Ching-Liang Ho

    2009-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) can involve the gastrointestinal tract but rarely involves the appendix.We report a male patient who had 1 year partial remission from AML and who presented with apparent acute appendicitis as the initial manifestation of leukemia relapse. Pathological findings of the appendix revealed transmural infiltrates of myeloblasts, whichindicated a diagnosis of leukemia. Unfortunately, the patient died from progression of the disease on the 19th d after admission. Although leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is uncommon, patients with leukemia relapse can present with symptoms mimicking acute appendicitis.

  9. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    2016-12-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Acute leukemia in early childhood

    M. Emerenciano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months has detected TEL/AML1+ve (N = 9, E2A/PBX1+ve (N = 4, PML/RARA+ve (N = 4, and AML1/ETO+ve (N = 2 cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95%CI = 1.05-2.07, OR = 2.27 (95%CI = 1.56-3.31 and OR = 9.08 (95%CI = 2.95-27.96], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.

  11. Long term follow-up of remission patients in adult acute leukemia.

    Gerecke, D; Kress, M; Hirschmann, W D

    1983-10-03

    31 adults suffering from acute leukemia were followed for a period of more than 5 years after achieving complete remission. Maintenance chemotherapy consisted of antimetabolite treatment (mercaptopurine + methotrexate) as well as COAP reinduction every 3 months. Chemotherapy was stopped if the first complete remission lasted for 3 years ("long term remission"). This was the case in 8 out of 31 remission patients (26%). Analysis of hematological parameters at diagnose for long term remission patients revealed that the initial leukocyte count was of prognostic significance.

  12. Azacitidine in Combination With Mitoxantrone, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed and Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article was re...

  14. Mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia

    Čolović Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Invasive fungal infection is among the leading causes of morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia after induction of chemotherapy. In the past few decades, the incidence of invasive fungal infection has increased dramatically. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. Mucorales. Neutropenic patients are at a high risk of developing an invasive mucormycosis with fulminant course and high mortality rate (35-100%. Case Outline. We are presenting the case of a 72-year-old male with an acute monoblastic leukemia. The patient was treated during five days with hydroxycarbamide 2 × 500 mg/day, followed by cytarabine 2 × 20 mg/sc over the next 10 days. He developed febrile neutropenia, headache, and edema of the right orbital region of the face. Computed tomography of the sinuses revealed shadow in sinuses with thickening of mucosa of the right paranasal sinuses. Lavage and aspirate from the sinuses revealed Rhizopus oryzae. Mucormycosis was successfully treated with amphotericin B (5 mg/kg/day followed by ketoconazole (400 mg/day. Two months later the patient died from primary disease. Conclusion. In patients with acute leukemia who developed aplasia, febrile neutropenia, and pain in paranasal sinuses, fungal infection should be taken into consideration. New and non-invasive methods for taking samples from sinuses should be standardized in order to establish an early and accurate diagnosis of mucormycosis with the source in paranasal sinuses, and to start early treatment by a proper antifungal drug. Clear communication between physician and mycologist is critical to ensure proper and timely sampling of lavage and aspirate from sinuses and correct specimen processing when mucormycosis is suspected clinically. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 175034

  15. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E;

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase overexpression has been observed in patients with hematologic malignancies. MK-0457, a pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that also inhibits the ABL T315I mutant, was evaluated to treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic...

  16. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Biphenotypic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute bilineal leukaemia; Acute bilineal leukemia; Acute... biphenotypic leukaemia; Acute biphenotypic leukemia; Acute mixed lineage leukaemia; Acute mixed line...age leukemia; B and T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B and T Cell Leukemia, Acute; B- and T-Cell Acute L...ymphoblastic Leukemia; B- and T-Cell Leukemia, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute..., Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Mixed-Cell; Leukemia, Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Mixed, B and T Cell

  17. Bacillus Cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient in a patient with acute lymphblastic leukemia

    Lütfiye Öksüz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related blood stream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B.cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts1 . Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B.cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblastıc leukemia (ALL in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.A 44-year old man presented with fatigue, weight loss, epistaxis and high fever. A double-lumen Hickman–catheter (Bard 12.0 Fr, Round Dual Lumen was inserted by surgical cut-down to access the right subclavian vein which would be necessary for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three weeks later the patient presented with high fever and headache. Bacillus spp. was isolated from the cathether while blood culture obtained from the peripheral vein remained negative. The bacterial identification was confirmed as B.cereus using VITEK identification system It has been reported Bacillus cereus septicemia may be fatal in immunocompromised hosts despite broad-spectrum appropriate treatment10. Catheter removal is essential for prevention of recurrent bacteremia. Long-term cathater salvage should be reserved for appropriate patient group.

  18. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Effect of Acupressure on Nausea-Vomiting in Patients With Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia.

    Avc, Hatice Sevil; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ovayolu, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of acupressure, applied at P6 (Neiguan) acupuncture point, on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia. This was a randomized controlled trial conducted on patients with myeloblastic leukemia. A total of 90 patients, who received the same chemotherapy regimen and antiemetic therapy, were included in the study as 30 patients in the control group, 30 patients in the band group, and 30 patients in the pressure group. Although acupressure was applied by placing wristbands at P6 acupuncture point of both wrists in patients of the band group for totally 4 days, acupressure was applied with the use of finger pressure in patients of the pressure group for totally 4 days. No intervention was made in patients of the control group other than the routine antiemetic therapy. The data of the study were collected by using a questionnaire and nausea-vomiting chart. Severity of nausea-vomiting was assessed by using the visual analog scale on this chart. It was determined that the acupressure band applied to the patients included in the study reduced number and severity of nausea-vomiting (P acupressure applied with pressure did not affect number and severity of nausea-vomiting (P > .05). It was found that the acupressure band was effective for reducing the chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

  20. FLT3-ITD Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Northeast Thailand.

    Kumsaen, Piyawan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chainansamit, Su-On; Wisanuyothin, Nittaya; Kuwatjanakul, Pichayanan; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most frequent genetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) where it is associated with a poor prognosis. The FLT3-ITD mutation could, therefore, be a potential molecular prognostic marker important for risk-stratified treatment options. We amplified the FLT3 gene at exon 14 and 15 in 52 AML patients (aged between 2 months and 74 years) from 4 referral centers (a university hospital and 3 regional hospitals in Northeast Thailand), using a simple PCR method. FLT3-ITD mutations were found in 10 patients (19.2%), being more common in adults than in children (21.1% vs. 14.3%) and more prevalent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3) than AML-non M3 (4 of 10 AML-M3 vs. 6 of 42 AML- non M3 patients). Duplication sequences varied in size-between 27 and 171 nucleotides (median=63.5) and in their location. FLT3-ITD mutations with common duplication sequences accounted for a significant percentage in AML patients in northeastern Thailand. This simple PCR method is feasible for routine laboratory practice and these data could help tailor use of the national protocol for AML.

  1. Bacillus cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Gurler, N; Oksuz, L; Muftuoglu, M; Sargin, Fd; Besisik, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related bloodstream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B. cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts. Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblast c leukemia (ALL) in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid beta-2-microglobulin in adult patients with acute leukemia or lymphoma

    Hansen, P B; Kjeldsen, L; Dalhoff, K

    1992-01-01

    Beta-2-microglobulin (B2m) was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from 18 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloblastic leukemia or lymphoma in order to detect early central nervous system (CNS) involvement or relapse. Six had CNS-involvement documented by neurologic...... determination of CSF-B2m alone may be a useful and sensitive marker of CNS-dissemination in acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma. Using the criteria of CSF-B2m greater than 160 nmol/l as a positive diagnostic test the sensitivity of the test was 100%, the specificity was 76%. The same values for the CSF...

  3. IDH mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Konoplev, Sergej; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chen, Weina

    2012-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous group of diseases. Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes represent a novel class of point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. These mutations prevent oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate and confer novel enzymatic activity, facilitating the reduction of α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate, a putative oncometabolite. IDH1/IDH2 mutations are heterozygous, and their combined frequency is approximately 17% in unselected acute myeloid leukemia cases, 27% in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia cases, and up to 67% in acute myeloid leukemia cases with cuplike nuclei. These mutations are largely mutually exclusive. Despite many similarities of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations, it is possible that they represent distinct molecular or clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia. All known mutations involve arginine (R), in codon 132 of IDH1 or codon 140 or 172 of IDH2. IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R140) mutations are frequently accompanied by normal cytogenetics and NPM1 mutation, whereas IDH2(R172) is frequently the only mutation detected in acute myeloid leukemia. There is increasing evidence that the prognostic impact of IDH1/2 mutations varies according to the specific mutation and also depends on the context of concurrent mutations of other genes. IDH1(R132) mutation may predict poor outcome in a subset of patients with molecular low-risk acute myeloid leukemia, whereas IDH2(R172) mutations confer a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Expression of IDH1/2 mutants induces an increase in global DNA hypermethylation and inhibits TET2-induced cytosine 5-hydroxymethylation, DNA demethylation. These data suggest that IDH1/2 mutations constitute a distinct mutational class in acute myeloid leukemia, which affects the epigenetic state, an important consideration for the development of therapeutic agents.

  4. Pathologic rupture of the spleen in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and leukostasis

    Gil Cunha De Santis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rupture of the spleen can be classified as spontaneous, traumatic, or pathologic. Pathologic rupture has been reported in infectious diseases such as infectious mononucleosis, and hematologic malignancies such as acute and chronic leukemias. Splenomegaly is considered the most relevant factor that predisposes to splenic rupture. A 66-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia evolved from an unclassified myeloproliferative neoplasm, complaining of fatigue and mild upper left abdominal pain. He was pale and presented fever and tachypnea. Laboratory analyses showed hemoglobin 8.3 g/dL, white blood cell count 278 × 109/L, platelet count 367 × 109/L, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ratio 2.10, and international normalized ratio (INR 1.60. A blood smear showed 62% of myeloblasts. The immunophenotype of the blasts was positive for CD117, HLA-DR, CD13, CD56, CD64, CD11c and CD14. Lactate dehydrogenase was 2384 U/L and creatinine 2.4 mg/dL (normal range: 0.7-1.6 mg/dL. Two sessions of leukapheresis were performed. At the end of the second session, the patient presented hemodynamic instability that culminated in circulatory shock and death. The post-mortem examination revealed infiltration of the vessels of the lungs, heart, and liver, and massive infiltration of the spleen by leukemic blasts. Blood volume in the peritoneal cavity was 500 mL. Acute leukemia is a rare cause of splenic rupture. Male gender, old age and splenomegaly are factors associated with this condition. As the patient had leukostasis, we hypothesize that this, associated with other factors such as lung and heart leukemic infiltration, had a role in inducing splenic rupture. Finally, we do not believe that leukapheresis in itself contributed to splenic rupture, as it is essentially atraumatic.

  5. Relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemodialysis-dependent patient treated with arsenic trioxide: a case report

    Emmons Gregory S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In the relapsed setting, arsenic trioxide remains the backbone of treatment. Scant literature exists regarding treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with renal failure. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to report a safe and effective means of treatment for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in the setting of advanced renal failure, employing titration of arsenic trioxide based on clinical parameters rather than arsenic trioxide levels. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man with a history of acute promyelocytic leukemia in remission for 3 years, as well as dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure secondary to a solitary kidney and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy presented to our hospital with bone marrow biopsy-confirmed relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Arsenic trioxide was begun at a low dose with dose escalation based only on side effect profile monitoring and not laboratory testing for induction as well as maintenance without undue toxicity. Our patient achieved and remains in complete hematologic and molecular remission as of this writing. Conclusion Arsenic trioxide can be used safely and effectively to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with advanced renal failure using careful monitoring of side effects rather than blood levels of arsenic to guide therapeutic dosing.

  6. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    2016-09-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia after treatment with temozolomide in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme.

    Kim, Sue Jung; Park, Tae Sung; Lee, Seung Tae; Song, Jaewoo; Suh, Borum; Kim, Se Hoon; Jang, Seon Jung; Lee, Chang Hoon; Choi, Jong Rak

    2009-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute leukemia after treatment with temozolomide have rarely been described in the literature. Only 10 cases in association with temozolomide have been documented. The cases included anaplastic astrocytoma (4 cases), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (2 cases), low grade astrocytoma (2 cases), low grade oligodendroglioma (1 case), and one case of secondary Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme. Here we report a novel case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia associated with der(1;7)(q10;p10) in a glioblastoma multiforme patient treated with temozolomide. Results of bone marrow morphology, chromosome, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, as well as the clinical history, strongly suggest a treatment-related etiology in our case. In past reports, karyotypes in cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia mostly demonstrated abnormalities in chromosomes 5 and 7. However, we report a case of temozolomide-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with der(1;7)(q10;p10), possibly the first reported case, to the authors' knowledge.

  8. [Effect of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Hui-Fei; Fu, Zheng-Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Based on the representative articles in recent years, the different mechanisms of decitabine on immune regulation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are summarized. Decitabine improves the expression of WT1 gene to stimulate specific cytotoxic T cells which can enhance graft versus leukemia effect (GVL) and improve the expression of FOXP3 gene to stimulate regulatory T cells so as to inhibit the acute graft versus host disease (GVHD). Through the above-mentimed mechanisms, decitabine can improve both therapeutic effect and quality of life in the patients with AML after allogeneic HSCT.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with constitutional 47,XXY karyotype

    Marla M. Jalbut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter syndrome (KS, a 47,XXY chromosomal abnormality, has been shown to be associated with a number of malignancies, but has not been linked to acute leukemias to date. We present a case of a 54-year-old male diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with monocytic differentiation, whose cytogenetic and subsequent FISH analyses revealed a constitutional 47,XXY karyotype. We also review and discuss relevant prior literature.

  10. Recurrent DNMT3A R882 Mutations in Chinese Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2011-01-01

    Somatic mutations of DNMT3A gene have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the entire coding sequences of DNMT3A gene by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing in Chinese patients with myeloid malignancies. R882 mutations were found in 12/182 AML and in 4/51 MDS, but not in either 79 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), or 57 myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or 4 chronic monomyelocytic leukemia. No other DNMT3A mutation...

  11. Subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Srisuttiyakorn, Chutika; Reeve, Jennifer; Reddy, Swapna; Imaeda, Suguru; Lazova, Rossitza

    2014-05-01

    Subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome is a rare variant of histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome (SS). We present a 68-year-old woman with subcutaneous histiocytoid SS in association with refractory myelodysplastic syndrome transformed to acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), status post induction chemotherapy and with persistent blasts (50%) in the bone marrow and blood, accompanied with neutropenia. The patient presented to the emergency room with fever and altered mental status. Clinical examination revealed approximately 20 scattered 0.5-2 cm, pink to pink-purple non-tender firm nodules on the legs and left arm. The differential diagnosis included Sweet’s syndrome (deep), leukemia cutis, infection, polyarteritis nodosa and erythema nodosum. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy from the left arm revealed a nodular infiltrate of neutrophils and histiocytoid mononuclear cells solely in the lobular compartment of the subcutaneous fat with focal areas of necrosis. Most cells in the infiltrate labeled with myeloperoxidase (MPO) including the histiocytoid cells. The cells were negative for CD34 and CD117. All special stains for microorganisms were negative. A diagnosis of subcutaneous histiocytoid SS was made. A subcutaneous histiocytoid SS should be suspected when a neutrophilic/histiocytoid panniculitis, occurring in the setting of myeloid disorders, is encountered and after exclusion of an infectious process and leukemia cutis.

  12. Bacillus Cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient in a patient with acute lymphblastic leukemia

    Lütfiye Öksüz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related blood stream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B.cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts1 . Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B.cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblastıc leukemia (ALL in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.A 44-year old man presented with fatigue, weight loss, epistaxis and high fever. A double-lumen Hickman–catheter (Bard 12.0 Fr, Round Dual Lumen was inserted by surgical cut-down to access the right subclavian vein which would be necessary for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three weeks later the patient presented with high fever and headache. Bacillus spp. was isolated from the cathether while blood culture obtained from the peripheral vein remained negative. The bacterial identification was confirmed as B.cereus using VITEK identification system

    It has been reported Bacillus cereus septicemia may be fatal in immunocompromised hosts despite broad-spectrum appropriate treatment10. Catheter removal is essential for prevention of recurrent bacteremia. Long-term cathater salvage should be reserved for appropriate patient group.

  13. Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Goyal, Gaurav; Gundabolu, Krishna; Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Silberstein, Peter T; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Elderly patients (>60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia have a poor prognosis with a chemotherapy-alone approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT) can improve overall survival (OS). However, myeloablative regimens can have unacceptably high transplant-related mortality (TRM) in an unselected group of older patients. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning regimens preserve the graft-versus-leukemia effects but reduce TRM. NMA regimens result in minimal cytopenia and may not require stem cell support for restoring hematopoiesis. RIC regimens, intermediate in intensity between NMA and myeloablative regimens, can cause prolonged myelosuppresion and usually require stem cell support. A few retrospective and prospective studies suggest a possibility of lower risk of relapse with myeloablative HCT in fit older patients with lower HCT comorbidity index; however, RIC and NMA HCTs have an important role in less-fit patients and those with significant comorbidities because of lower TRM. Whether early tapering of immunosuppression, monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance therapy can improve the outcomes of RIC and NMA HCT in elderly patients will require prospective trials.

  14. The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas Kræsten;

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The main aim of the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) was to obtain information about the epidemiology of the hematologic cancers acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). STUDY POPULATION: The registry...... patients is currently 90%. MAIN VARIABLES AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Approximately, 250 AML patients, 25 ALL patients, and 230 MDS patients are registered in the DNLR every year. In January 2015, the registry included detailed patient characteristics, disease characteristics, treatment characteristics...... years. To ensure this high coverage, completeness, and quality of data, linkage to the Danish Civil Registration System and the Danish National Registry of Patients, and several programmed data entry checks are used. CONCLUSION: The completeness and positive predictive values of the leukemia data have...

  15. Nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in patients treated for Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Rowley, J.D.; Golomb, H.M.; Vardiman, J.

    1977-11-01

    Chromosomal analyses of myeloid cells were performed on ten patients who had acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) following treatment for malignant lymphoma. Seven patients had Hodgkin disease and three had non-Hodgkin lymphoma, poorly differentiated lymphocytic type. Six patients were treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy; two had radiotherapy only, and two chemotherapy only. The median time between diagnosis of lymphoma and subsequent leukemia was 58 mo. Four patients had the blast phase of a myeloproliferative syndrome, four had acute myelogenous leukemia, one had acute promyelocytic leukemia, and the tenth, erythroleukemia. None of four patients whose leukemia was treated with intensive chemotherapy responded. Every patient had an abnormal karyotype. Seven of the patients showed hypodiploid cell lines, two a pseudodiploid, and one a hyperdiploid cell line. Cells from every patient except one were lacking a B chromosome; in eight, this could be identified as a No. 5. Five of nine patients were lacking a No. 7. Loss or rearrangement of No. 17 was found in four and of Nos. 6 or 8 in three patients. Many of the karyotypes were bizarre, with marker chromosomes and minute chromosomes. The karyotypic pattern seen in these patients showed no correlation with the nature of the original lymphoma, the type of leukemia, or the therapy used. The chromosomal pattern of hypodiploid cell lines found in ANLL that arose de novo was similar to that occurring in treated lymphoma. However, in ANLL de novo, less than half of the patients had fewer than 46 chromosomes, and less than 10% had fewer than 45 chromosomes. In this study, 70% of the patients had fewer than 46 and 40% had fewer than 45 chromosomes. The critical question thus concerns the factors, as yet unknown, that predispose to the development of hypodiploid modal numbers in ANLL in lymphoma.

  16. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in patients with refractory acute leukemia: a long-term follow-up.

    Oyekunle, A A; Kröger, N; Zabelina, T; Ayuk, F; Schieder, H; Renges, H; Fehse, N; Waschke, O; Fehse, B; Kabisch, H; Zander, A R

    2006-01-01

    We examined retrospectively 44 patients with refractory acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/acute lymphoblastic leukemia=25/19) who underwent allogeneic transplantation at our center between 11/1990 and 04/2004. The median leukemic blasts was 25% and age 28 years (range, 3-56). Twenty-one patients had untreated relapse, 13 failed reinduction, eight in partial remission and two aplastic. Conditioning was myeloablative using cyclophosphamide, busulfan, total-body irradiation and etoposide (Bu/Cy/VP, n=22; TBI/Cy/VP, n=17; others, n=5) followed by marrow or peripheral blood transplant (n=23/21) from unrelated or related donors (n=28/16). All patients had graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis with cyclosporin and methotrexate. One patient experienced late graft failure. Severe acute-GVHD and chronic-GVHD appeared in eight and 14 patients, respectively. Thirteen patients (30%) remain alive after a median of 25.3 months (range, 2.4-134.1); with 31 deaths, mostly from relapse (n=15) and infections (n=12). Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) at 5 years was 28 and 26%, respectively. OS and PFS were significantly better with blasts < or =20% and time to transplant < or =1 year while transplant-related mortality was less with the use of TBI. We conclude that patients with refractory leukemia can benefit from allogeneic BMT, especially with < or =20% marrow blast.

  17. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  18. Epidemiologic study on survival of chronic myeloid leukemia and Ph(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutation

    Nicolini, Franck E; Mauro, Michael J; Martinelli, Giovanni;

    2009-01-01

    The BCR-ABL T315I mutation represents a major mechanism of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The objectives of this retrospective observational study were to estimate overall and progression-free survival for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic-phase (CP), accelerated-phase (AP......), or blastic-phase (BP) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph)(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with T315I mutation. Medical records of 222 patients from 9 countries were reviewed; data were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models. Median age at T315I mutation...

  19. Therapy-induced secondary acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1) in a pediatric patient with relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Dang, Daniel N; Morris, Heather D; Feusner, James H; Koduru, Prasad; Wilson, Kathleen; Timmons, Charles F; Cavalier, MaryEllen; Luu, Hung S

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is classified based upon recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. The t(15;17)(q24.1;q21.1) abnormality is found in 5% to 8% of de novo acute myeloid leukemia and is diagnostic of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The translocation results in fusion of the retinoic acid receptor-α (RARA) gene at 17q21.1 and the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) gene at 15q24.1. Standard APL therapy is a combination of all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Anthracycline treatment is associated with secondary clonal chromosomal aberrations that can lead to therapy-related secondary myeloid neoplasms. We present a pediatric case of relapsed APL coexistent with treatment-associated secondary myeloid neoplasm with t(11;19)(q23;p13.1).

  20. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Acute Eosinophilic Leukemias; Acute... eosinophilic leukemia; Eosinophilic Leukemia, Acute; Eosinophilic Leukemias, Acute; Leukemia, Acute... Eosinophilic; Leukemias, Acute Eosinophilic PharmGKB Accession Id: PA446179 External Vocabularies Me...SH: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute (D015472) SnoMedCT: Acute eosinophilic leukemia... (277604002) UMLS: C0023439 (C0023439) NDFRT: Leukemia, Eosinophilic, Acute [Disease/Finding] (N0000003269)

  2. Chemotherapy drug scheduling for the induction treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Pefani, E; Panoskaltsis, N; Mantalaris, A; Georgiadis, M C; Pistikopoulos, E N

    2014-07-01

    Leukemia is an immediately life-threatening cancer wherein immature blood cells are overproduced, accumulate in the bone marrow (BM) and blood and causes immune and blood system failure. Treatment with chemotherapy can be intensive or nonintensive and can also be life-threatening since only relatively few patient-specific and leukemia-specific factors are considered in current protocols. We have already presented a mathematical model for one intensive chemotherapy cycle with intravenous (i.v.) daunorubicin (DNR), and cytarabine (Ara-C). This model is now extended to nonintensive subcutaneous (SC) Ara-C and for a standard intensive chemotherapy course (four cycles), consistent with clinical practice. Model parameters mainly consist of physiological patient data, indicators of tumor burden and characteristics of cell cycle kinetics. A sensitivity analysis problem is solved and cell cycle parameters are identified to control treatment outcome. Simulation results using published cell cycle data from two acute myeloid leukemia patients are presented for a course of standard treatment using intensive and nonintensive protocols. The aim of remission-induction therapy is to debulk the tumor and achieve normal BM function; by treatment completion, the total leukemic population should be reduced to at most 10(9) cells, at which point BM hypoplasia is achieved. The normal cell number should be higher than that of the leukemic, and a 3-log reduction is the maximum permissible level of population reduction. This optimization problem is formulated and solved for the two patient case studies. The results clearly present the benefits from the use of optimization as an advisory tool for treatment design.

  3. Addition of Arsenic Trioxide into Induction Regimens Could Not Accelerate Recovery of Abnormality of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Ye Zhang

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid combined to anthracycline-based chemotherapy is the standard regimen of acute promyelocytic leukemia. The advent of arsenic trioxide has contributed to improve the anti-leukemic efficacy in acute promyelocytic leukemia. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate if dual induction by all-trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide could accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.Retrospective analysis was performed in 103 newly-diagnosed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hemostatic variables and the consumption of component blood were comparably analyzed among patients treated by different induction regimen with or without arsenic trioxide.Compared to patients with other subtypes of de novo acute myeloid leukemia, patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia had lower platelet counts and fibrinogen levels, significantly prolonged prothrombin time and elevated D-dimers (P<0.001. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification presented lower initial fibrinogen level than that of low-risk group (P<0.05. After induction treatment, abnormal coagulation and fibrinolysis of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia was significantly improved before day 10. The recovery of abnormal hemostatic variables (platelet, prothrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer was not significantly accelerated after adding arsenic trioxide in induction regimens; and the consumption of transfused component blood (platelet and plasma did not dramatically change either. Acute promyelocytic leukemia patients with high or intermediate risk prognostic stratification had higher platelet transfusion demands than that of low-risk group (P<0.05.Unexpectedly, adding arsenic trioxide could not accelerate the recovery of abnormality of coagulation and fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received all

  4. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym AML M6; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemia; Acute Erythroblastic Leukemias; Acu...te erythraemic myelosis [obs]; Acute erythremia [obs]; Acute erythremic myelosis [obs]; Acute... erythroid leukaemia; Acute erythroid leukemia; Acute myeloid leukaemia, M6 type; Acute myeloid le...Erythroblastic Leukemia, Acute; Erythroblastic Leukemias, Acute; Erythroleukaemia...; Erythroleukemia; Erythroleukemias; FAB M6; Leukemia, Acute Erythroblastic; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, M6; Leukemias, Acute

  5. Influence of Chemotherapy on the Lipid Peroxidation and Antioxidant Status in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Zohreh Sanaat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic agents used in patients with cancer cause to generate the enormous amounts of free radicals associated with cell injury. In this study we assess the effects of chemotherapy regimen on oxidant/antioxidant status in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. 38 newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia were recruited in this study. All patients received cytarabine and daunorubicin as chemotherapy regimen. Plasma levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, total antioxidant status (TAS, and the levels of erythrocyte activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were determined before chemotherapy and 14 days after chemotherapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin. Plasma MDA concentrations increased significantly (from 2.68±0.89 nmol/L to 3.14±1.29 nmol/L during the 14days post-chemotherapy period (P=0.04. Plasma TAS concentrations changed with chemotherapy from 1.09±0.15 mmol/L to 1.02±0.14 mmol/L with P=0.005. Erythrocyte SOD and GPX activity decreased overtime from 1157.24±543.61 U/g Hb to 984.01±419.09 U/g Hb (P=0.04 and 46.96±13.70 U/g Hb to 41.40±6.44 U/g Hb (P=0.02 respectively. We report here that there is an increase in malondialdehyde levels and a decrease in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant status. This suggests that chemotherapy causes these changes as a result of enormous production of reactive oxygen species in the patients with AML. Antioxidant supplementation must be approached with caution because of the probability of reduction the therapeutic efficacy of these cytotoxic drugs.

  6. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning.

  7. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Prognostic value of immunophenotyping and gene mutations in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Dang, Harry; Jiang, Allan; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Brandwein, Joseph; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia generally have a poor prognosis and a highly heterogeneous clinical outcome. Prognostic indicators are required for and aid in patient stratification. However, the prognostic value of genetic mutations and immunophenotypic features in elderly normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia, the largest cytogenetic risk group, remains unclear. We investigated the genetic mutations NPM1, FLT3-ITD, and FLT3-TKD and expression of the membrane antigens CD7, CD15, CD34, and CD56 in 144 elderly patients with de novo normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia to retrospectively analyze the prognostic and clinical relevance of these parameters. CD7, CD15, CD34, and CD56 were expressed in 24%, 47%, 52%, and 15% of patients, respectively. NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations were detected in 51% and 17% of patients, respectively. Complete remission was obtained in 94 patients (65%), and the median overall survival was 16.5 months. Univariate analysis detected 5 markers with prognostic relevance: high leukocyte count, FLT3-ITD mutations, NPM1 mutations, CD34 expression, and CD56 expression in acute myeloid leukemia blasts. In multivariate analysis, patients with NPM1 predicted a higher complete remission (CR) rate (P = .016), longer event-free survival (P = .008), and longer overall survival (P = .049). FLT3-ITD mutations predicted a shorter event-free survival (P = .002) and shorter overall survival (P acute myeloid leukemia. By combining genetic and immunophenotypic markers, we can divide patients into distinct prognostic groups with important implications for prognostic stratification and risk-adapted therapy.

  9. Septic arthritis as the first sign of Candida tropicalis fungaemia in an acute lymphoid leukemia patient

    Vicari Perla

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections caused by Candida species have increased in incidence during the past two decades in England, North America and Europe. Candidal arthritis is rare in patients who are not intravenous drug users or are who not using a prostheses. We report the case of a 24-year-old man with acute lymphoid leukemia, who developed Candida tropicalis arthritis during an aplastic period after chemotherapy. This is the eighth case described in the literature of C. tropicalis causing arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. We call attention to an unusual first sign of fungal infection: septic arthritis without intra-articular inoculation. However, this case differs from the other seven, since despite therapy a fast and lethal evolution was observed. We reviewed reported cases, incidence, risk factors, mortality and treatment of neutropenic patients with fungal infections.

  10. KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia [KEGG

    Full Text Available PATHWAY: map05221 Entry map05221Pathway Name Acute myeloid leukemia Description Acute...Class Human Diseases; Cancers Pathwaymap map05221Acute myeloid leukemia Disease H00003Acute myeloid leukemia...inkDB DBGET integrated database retrieval system KEGG PATHWAY / Acute myeloid leukemia ...

  11. Azathioprine-associated acute myeloid leukemia in a patient with Crohn's disease and thiopurine S-methyltransferase deficiency

    Yenson, P.R.; Forrest, D.; Schmiegelow, K.;

    2008-01-01

    risk of hematologic toxicity and leukemogenesis. We present such a patient who was a slow metabolizer for azathioprine, and developed a rapidly lethal form acute myeloid leukemia after relatively low dose exposure to the drug. There was prominent hemophagocytic activity in the bone marrow...

  12. The expression of CD56 antigen is associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Ana Paula Alegretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The expression of CD56 is considered a bad prognostic factor for overall survival, lower rates or short complete remission and extramedullary invasion but the results are controversial. The importance of validating new prognostic parameters in acute leukemias was the reason to investigate the CD56 expression in blast cells of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: A cohort of 48 patients treated at Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre and diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia as classified by the French-American-British group (FAB criteria using cell morphology, cytochemistry and flow cytometry were evaluated. RESULTS: Eight cases (16.7% were CD56 positive without correlation to age or gender. The highest incidence of CD56 positivity was in FAB subtypes M4 and M5. The death rate during induction was not significantly different between patients with and without CD56 expression (62.5% vs. 27.5%; p-value = 0.097. However, patients that expressed CD56 had significantly lower overall survival than those who did not (mean 4.0 months vs. 14.5 months; p-value = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that expression of CD56 in acute myeloid leukemia may be indicative of poor prognosis because it is associated with a shorter overall survival. The death rate during induction was not significantly different despite an apparent difference in proportions between groups.

  13. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    Cervera, Jose; Montesinos, Pau; Hernandez-Rivas, Jesus M.; Calasanz, Maria J.; Aventin, Anna; Ferro, Maria T.; Luno, Elisa; Sanchez, Javier; Vellenga, Edo; Rayon, Chelo; Milone, Gustavo; de la Serna, Javier; Rivas, Concha; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Tormo, Mar; Amutio, Elena; Gonzalez, Marcos; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods Based on cytogenetic dat

  14. Additional chromosome abnormalities in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy

    J. Cervera (José); P. Montesinos (Pau); J.M. Hernandez-Rivas (J. M.); M.J. Calasanz (Maria); A. Aventín (Anna); M.T. Ferro (María); E. Luño (Elisa); J. Sánchez (Javier); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Chelo); G. Milone (Gustavo); J. de Serna (Javier); C. Rivas (Concha); J.D. González (José David); M. Tormo (Mar); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the t(15;17). The incidence and prognostic significance of additional chromosomal abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia is still a controversial matter. Design and Methods: Based on c

  15. Fatal Bacillus cereus endocarditis masquerading as an anthrax-like infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report.

    Cone, Lawrence A; Dreisbach, Luke; Potts, Barbara E; Comess, Barbara E; Burleigh, William A

    2005-01-01

    A 38-year-old male farm worker with relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukemia spontaneously developed an ulcerating ulcer on his anterior thigh which was surrounded by a non-tender area of erythema. Bacillus cereus was isolated from the ulcer and blood, and the patient received intravenous penicillin and vancomycin for one week. When sensitivity studies were returned he was treated with gatifloxacin orally. After two weeks of combined antimicrobial therapy and negative blood cultures, the patient received combination chemotherapy with vincristine, prednisone, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide. He was hospitalized a day after completing chemotherapy with neutropenic sepsis due to B. cereus. He received similar antimicrobial therapy as previously, but died three days later. At autopsy, the patient was found to have acute mitral valve endocarditis and bilateral brain abscesses. This was the first case of B. cereus endocarditis reported in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  16. Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Mutations in Patients with Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Salah Aref

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the prognostic impact of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 mutations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML among Egyptian patients. METHODS: Exons 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, and 9 of WT1 were screened for mutations in samples from 82 CNAML patients out of 203 newly diagnosed AML patients, of age ranging from 21 to 74 years, using high-resolution capillary electrophoresis. RESULTS: Eleven patients out of 82 (13.41% harbored WT1 mutations. Mutations were detected in exon 7 (n=7, exon 9 (n=2, exon 8 (n=1, and exon 3 (n=1, but not in exons 1 or 2. There was no statistically significant difference between the WT1 mutants and wild types as regards age, sex, French-American-British subtypes, and the prevalence of success of induction remission therapy (p=0.966; 28.6% vs. 29.3%. Patients with WT1 mutations had overall survival lower than patients with the wild type (HR=1.38; 95% CI 4.79-6.86; p=0.004. CONCLUSION: CN-AML patients with WT1 mutations have poor clinical outcome. We recommend molecular testing for WT1 mutations in patients with CN-AML at diagnosis in order to improve risk stratification of those patients.

  17. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  18. Acute myelogenous leukemia in pregnancy.

    D'Emilio, A; Dragone, P; De Negri, G; Montaldi, A; Stella, M; Battista, R

    1989-01-01

    We report on a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed at the 22nd week of pregnancy. She received chemotherapeutic treatment and reached a complete remission. At the 28th week of gestation the patient delivered, by cesarean section, a normal male infant. At present the mother is still disease-free 27 months after diagnosis. The child, too, is in good health. We point out the possibility of producing live babies with current chemotherapy regimens without exposing either the mother or the fetus to excessive risks.

  19. Role of low dose cytarabine in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia: An experience

    Yasir Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To highlight the acceptable results seen after use of low dose cytarabine in elderly patients of acute myeloid leukemia (AML with comorbidities. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study carried on 30 newly diagnosed patients of AML over 60 years of age who were unfit for standard treatment regimens. We did not use azacytidine and decitabine in our patients because these therapeutic modalities being extremely costly and our patient affordability being poor. After taking patient consent and institutional ethical clearance these patients were treated with 20 mg/m 2 cytarabine subcutaneously in two divided doses 12 h apart for 4 days every week for 4 weeks which constituted a cycle before disease, re-assessment was done. A repeat cycle was administered where ever needed and after attainment of remission, we continued low dose cytarabine for 2 days/week as maintenance after complete or partial response was documented. Results: In our study, we found that around 20% of patients achieved complete remission and 30% partial remission. The remission rates were definitely influenced by counts at presentation, performance at presentation, comorbidities, underlying myelodysplastic syndrome and baseline cytogenetics. Conclusion: Low dose cytarabine is effective treatment option for elderly patients with AML when standard treatment options are not warranted.

  20. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. In severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction pathways for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may play a part in the progression to acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS. We isolated genomic DNA and RNA from hematopoietic cells obtained from two patients with acute m...

  1. Bone Density in Pediatric Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL: A Literature Review

    Ali Ghassemi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:  Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children and the main form of childhood leukemia (75%. ALL different treatment options have a great impact on children weight and appetite. The improving prognosis for children with cancer refocuses attention to long-term outcomes with an emphasis on quality of life. More survival rate allows researchers to evaluate long term complication of ALL and its different treatment options such as endocrine abnormalities for example decreased bone mineral density. METHODS:  a systematic web base search was conducted in MEDLINE up to December 2014. We included articles with available abstract in English language, and participants younger than 18 years. Manual searching was done within the reference list of articles.  Two reviewers independently reviewed and assessed eligibility criteria, assessed quality, and extracted data. RESULTS:  Trace elements concentration decline due to malabsorption or inadequate intake in children with ALL. Osteopenia occurs more frequent in younger children and those who treated with higher doses of corticosteroids. CONCLUSION:  The dietary history of ALL patients who are at more risk for fractures and osteopenia should be screened by paying more attention to calcium and vitamin D intake.

  2. Ciprofloxacin versus colistin prophylaxis during neutropenia in acute myeloid leukemia: two parallel patient cohorts treated in a single center

    Pohlen, Michele; Marx, Julia; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Mesters, Rolf M.; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Schliemann, Christoph; Lenz, Georg; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Büchner, Thomas; Krug, Utz; Stelljes, Matthias; Karch, Helge; Peters, Georg; Gerth, Hans U.; Görlich, Dennis; Berdel, Wolfgang E.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia are at high risk for bacterial infections during therapy-related neutropenia. However, the use of specific antibiotic regimens for prophylaxis in afebrile neutropenic acute myeloid leukemia patients is controversial. We report a retrospective evaluation of 172 acute myeloid leukemia patients who received 322 courses of myelosuppressive chemotherapy and had an expected duration of neutropenia of more than seven days. The patients were allocated to antibiotic prophylaxis groups and treated with colistin or ciprofloxacin through 2 different hematologic services at our hospital, as available. The infection rate was reduced from 88.6% to 74.2% through antibiotic prophylaxis (vs. without prophylaxis; P=0.04). A comparison of both antibiotic drugs revealed a trend towards fewer infections associated with ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (69.2% vs. 79.5% in the colistin group; P=0.07), as determined by univariate analysis. This result was confirmed through multivariate analysis (OR: 0.475, 95%CI: 0.236–0.958; P=0.041). The prophylactic agents did not differ with regard to the microbiological findings (P=0.6, not significant). Of note, the use of ciprofloxacin was significantly associated with an increased rate of infections with pathogens that are resistant to the antibiotic used for prophylaxis (79.5% vs. 9.5% in the colistin group; P<0.0001). The risk factors for higher infection rates were the presence of a central venous catheter (P<0.0001), mucositis grade III/IV (P=0.0039), and induction/relapse courses (vs. consolidation; P<0.0001). In conclusion, ciprofloxacin prophylaxis appears to be of particular benefit during induction and relapse chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. To prevent and control drug resistance, it may be safely replaced by colistin during consolidation cycles of acute myeloid leukemia therapy. PMID:27470601

  3. Iron overload in patients with acute leukemia or MDS undergoing myeloablative stem cell transplantation.

    Armand, Philippe; Kim, Haesook T; Rhodes, Joanna; Sainvil, Marie-Michele; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P; Hearsey, Doreen; Neufeld, Ellis J; Fleming, Mark D; Steen, Hanno; Anderson, Damon; Kwong, Raymond Y; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H

    2011-06-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) commonly have an elevated serum ferritin prior to HSCT, which has been associated with increased mortality after transplantation. This has led to the suggestion that iron overload is common and deleterious in this patient population. However, the relationship between serum ferritin and parenchymal iron overload in such patients is unknown. We report a prospective study of 48 patients with acute leukemia (AL) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) undergoing myeloablative HSCT, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate liver iron content (LIC) and cardiac iron. The median (and range) pre-HSCT value of serum ferritin was 1549 ng/mL (20-6989); serum hepcidin, 59 ng/mL (10-468); labile plasma iron, 0 LPI units (0.0-0.9). Eighty-five percent of patients had hepatic iron overload (HIO), and 42% had significant HIO (LIC ≥5.0 mg/gdw). Only 1 patient had cardiac iron overload. There was a strong correlation between pre-HSCT serum ferritin and estimated LIC (r = .75), which was mostly dependent on prior transfusion history. Serum hepcidin was appropriately elevated in patients with HIO. Labile plasma iron elevation was rare. A regression calibration analysis supported the hypothesis that elevated pre-HSCT LIC is significantly associated with inferior post-HSCT survival. These results contribute to our understanding of the prevalence, mechanism, and consequences of iron overload in HSCT.

  4. Acute promyelocytic leukemia after whole brain irradiation of primary brain lymphomainan HIV-infected patient

    Boban A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The occurrence of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in HIV-infected patients has been reported in only five cases. Due to a very small number of reported HIV/APL patients who have been treated with different therapies with the variable outcome, the prognosis of APL in the setting of the HIV-infection is unclear. Here, we report a case of an HIV-patient who developed APL and upon treatment entered a complete remission. A 25-years old male patient was diagnosed with HIV-infection in 1996, but remained untreated. In 2004, the patient was diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma. We treated the patient with antiretroviral therapy and whole-brain irradiation, resulting in complete remission of the lymphoma. In 2006, prompted by a sudden neutropenia, we carried out a set of diagnostic procedures, revealing APL. Induction therapy consisted of standard treatment with all-trans-retinoic-acid (ATRA and idarubicin. Subsequent cytological and molecular analysis of bone marrow demonstrated complete hematological and molecular remission. Due to the poor general condition, consolidation treatment with ATRA was given in March and April 2007. The last follow-up 14 months later, showed sustained molecular APL remission. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a complete molecular APL remission in an HIV-patient was achieved by using reduced-intensity treatment.

  5. DNMT3A Mutations in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in South Brazil

    Annelise Pezzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a complex and heterogeneous hematopoietic tissue neoplasm. Several molecular markers have been described that help to classify AML patients into risk groups. DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A gene mutations have been recently identified in about 22% of AML patients and associated with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor. Our aims were to determine the frequency of somatic mutations in the gene DNMT3A and major chromosomal translocations in a sample of patients with AML. We investigated in 82 samples of bone marrow from patients with AML for somatic mutations in DNMT3A gene by sequencing and sought major fusion transcripts by RT-PCR. We found mutations in the DNMT3A gene in 6 patients (8%; 3 were type R882H. We found fusion transcripts in 19 patients, namely, AML1/ETO (n=5; 6.1%, PML/RARα (n=12; 14.6%, MLL/AF9 (0; 0%, and CBFβ/MYH11 (n=2; 2.4%. The identification of recurrent mutations in the DNMT3A gene and their possible prognostic implications can be a valuable tool for making treatment decisions. This is the first study on the presence of somatic mutations of the DNMT3A gene in patients with AML in Brazil. The frequency of these mutations suggests a possible ethnogeographic variation.

  6. Trisomy 19 and T(9;22 In a Patient with Acute Basophilic Leukemia

    Alicia Rojas-Atencio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute basophilic leukemia with two coexisting clonal abnormalities, t(9;22 and trisomy 19. The blast showed positive reaction with myeloperoxidase but negative reaction with chloroacetate esterase and acid phosphatase. Metachromatic features of the blast were observed with toluidine blue stain. Ultrastructure study showed the presence of azurophilic granules in basophils and blast mast cells. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies revealed, t(9;22 with BCR/ABL positive and trisomy 19 in all metaphase cells. To our knowledge, this paper here is the first to present acute basophilic leukemia with trisomy 19 and t(9;22.

  7. A comparison of toxicities in acute myeloid leukemia patients with and without renal impairment treated with decitabine.

    Levine, Lauren B; Roddy, Julianna Vf; Kim, Miryoung; Li, Junan; Phillips, Gary; Walker, Alison R

    2017-01-01

    Purpose There are limited data regarding the clinical use of decitabine for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in patients with a serum creatinine of 2 mg/dL or greater. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 111 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had been treated with decitabine and compared the development of toxicities during cycle 1 in those with normal renal function (creatinine clearance greater than or equal to 60 mL/min) to those with renal dysfunction (creatinine clearance less than 60 mL/min). Results Notable differences in the incidence of grade ≥3 cardiotoxicity (33% of renal dysfunction patients vs. 16% of normal renal function patients, p = 0.042) and respiratory toxicity (40% of renal dysfunction patients vs. 14% of normal renal function patients, p = 0.0037) were observed. The majority of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and atrial fibrillation cases occurred in the renal dysfunction group. The odds of developing grade ≥3 cardiotoxicity did not differ significantly between patients with and without baseline cardiac comorbidities (OR 1.43, p = 0.43). Conclusions This study noted a higher incidence of grade ≥3 cardiac and respiratory toxicities in decitabine-treated acute myeloid leukemia patients with renal dysfunction compared to normal renal function. This may prompt closer monitoring, regardless of baseline cardiac comorbidities. Further evaluation of decitabine in patients with renal dysfunction is needed.

  8. Frequency and Prognostic Relevance of FLT3 Mutations in Saudi Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    Ghaleb Elyamany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Mutations of FLT3 were first described in 1997 and account for the most frequent molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. AML patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutations have poor cure rates the prognostic significance of point mutations; tyrosine kinase domain (TKD is still unclear. We analyzed the frequency of FLT3 mutations (ITD and D835 in patients with AML at diagnosis; no sufficient data currently exist regarding FLT3 mutations in Saudi AML patients. This study was aimed at evaluating the frequency of FLT3 mutations in patients with AML and its significance for prognosis. The frequency of FLT3 mutations in our study (18.56% was lower than many of the reported studies, FLT3-ITD mutations were observed in 14.4%, and FLT3-TKD in 4.1%, of 97 newly diagnosed AML patients (82 adult and 15 pediatric. Our data show significant increase of FLT3 mutations in male more than female (13 male, 5 female. Our results support the view that FLT3-ITD mutation has strong prognostic factor in AML patients and is associated with high rate of relapse, and high leucocytes and blast count at diagnosis and relapse.

  9. Psychological Impact of Chemotherapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on Patients and Their Parents.

    Sherief, Laila M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abdalrahman, Hadel M; Youssef, Doaa M; Abd Alhady, Mohamed A; Ali, Adel S A; Abd Elbasset, Maha Aly; Hashim, Hiatham M

    2015-12-01

    To assess the self-esteem of pediatric patients on chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and psychological status of their parents.The psychological status of 178 children receiving chemotherapy for ALL and their parents was assessed using parenting stress index (PSI) to determine the degree of stress the parents are exposed to using parent's and child's domains. Self-esteem Scale was used to determine the psychological status of patients.The study revealed significant low level of self-esteem in 84.83% of patients. Their parents had significant psychological stress. PSI was significantly associated with parents' low sense of competence, negative attachment to their children, feeling of high restriction, high depression, poor relation to spouse, high social isolation variables of parent's domains. It was significantly associated with low distraction, negative parents' reinforcement, low acceptability, and high demanding variables of child's domains. Long duration of disease was the most detrimental factor among demographic data of the patients.Chemotherapy for ALL has a significant impact on the psychological status of both patients and their parents with high prevalence of low self-esteem in children and high degree of stress in their parents.

  10. Decitabine in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in elderly patients

    Malik P

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Priya Malik, Amanda F CashenWashington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are elderly and have a poor prognosis despite induction therapy. Decitabine, a DNA-hypomethylating agent that induces differentiation and apoptosis of leukemic cells, is a well-tolerated alternative to aggressive chemotherapy. It is currently FDA-approved for myelodysplastic syndrome, including patients with 20%–30% bone marrow blasts. Recent clinical attention has focused on evaluating decitabine as frontline therapy for untreated high-risk elderly AML patients. A large randomized international phase III study comparing decitabine to supportive care and cytarabine in elderly AML patients demonstrated significantly improved complete remission rates, but the survival difference did not reach significance. Due to this, decitabine did not achieve FDA approval for AML, but continues to be used off-label. Current research is focused on further defining subgroups of elderly AML patients who may derive greater benefit from decitabine therapy and combining it with other low-intensity active agents for AML.Keywords: decitabine, elderly, AML

  11. Prognostic factors in acute promyelocytic leukemia: strategies to define high-risk patients.

    Testa, Ugo; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    All trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has revolutionized the therapy of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Treatment of this leukemia with ATRA in combination with chemotherapy has resulted in complete remission rates >90 % and long-term remission rates above 80 %. Furthermore, the combination of ATRA and arsenic trioxide (ATO) was shown to be safe and effective in frontline treatment and, for patients with low and intermediate risk disease, possibly superior to the standard ATRA and anthracycline-based regimen. However, in spite of this tremendous progress, APL still remains associated with a high incidence of early death due to the frequent occurrence of an abrupt bleeding diathesis. This hemorrhagic syndrome more frequently develops in high-risk APL patients, currently defined as those exhibiting >10 × 10(9)/L WBC at presentation. In addition to high WBC count, other molecular and immunophenotypic features have been associated with high-risk APL. Among them, the expression in APL blasts of the stem/progenitor cell antigen CD34, the neural adhesion molecule (CD56), and the T cell antigen CD2 help to identify a subset of patients at higher risk of relapse and often the expression of these markers is associated with high WBC count. At the molecular level, the short PML/RARA isoform and FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations have been associated with increased relapse risk. These observations indicate that extended immunophenotypic and molecular characterization of APL at diagnosis including evaluation of CD2, CD56, and CD34 antigens and of FLT3 mutations may help to better design risk-adapted treatment in this disease.

  12. LEUKOCYTOSIS AND RETINOIC ACID SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA TREATED WITH ARSENIC TRIOXIDE

    Bo Jin; Ke-zuo Hou; Yun-peng Liu; Ping Yu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the incidence of leukocytosis and retinoic acid (RA) syndrome in newly diagnosed and relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients treated with arsenic trioxide (ATO).Methods Thirty patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed APL received ATO for remission induction at the dose of 10 mg/d. RA syndrome was defined when patient was with one or more of the following signs or symptoms: fever,dyspnea, serous cavity effusion, muscular pain, pulmonary infiltration, weight gain, or pulmonary infiltration on chest X-ray.Results Twenty-three (77%) patients achieved complete remission, mean time to remission was 37.1 days. Leukocytosis was observed in 14 (47%) patients, mean time to leukocytosis was 12.7 days, median baseline leukocyte count for patients with leukocytosis was 3.1 × 109/L, which was higher than that for patients who did not develop leukocytosis (2.6×109/L, z=-2.635, P=0.008). No other cytotoxic therapy was administered, and the leukocytosis resolved in all cases. The RA syndrome was observed in 9(30%) patients, mean time to diagnose of RA syndrome was 13.9 days, median baseline leukocyte count for patients with RA syndrome was 3.6×109/L, which was higher than that for patients who did not develop RA syndrome (2.6 × 109/L, z=-1.909, P=0.046). No patient died of RA syndrome.Conclusion Leukocytosis and RA syndrome are associated with ATO and baseline leukocyte count respectively,and there is distinct link between leukocytosis and RA syndrome.

  13. Pretransplant HLA mistyping in diagnostic samples of acute myeloid leukemia patients due to acquired uniparental disomy

    Dubois, V.; Sloan-Bena, F.; Cesbron, A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Gagne, K.; Gimelli, S.; Heim, D.; Tichelli, A.; Delaunay, J.; Drouet, M.; Jendly, S.; Villard, J.; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Although acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD) has been reported in relapse acute myeloid leukemia (AML), pretransplant aUPD involving chromosome 6 is poorly documented. Such events could be of interest because loss of heterozygosity (LOH) resulting from aUPD in leukemic cells may lead to erroneous res

  14. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-04-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome, in Adults; AML (Adult) With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; AML (Adult) With Del(5q); AML (Adult) With Inv(16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(16;16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary AML (Adult); Untreated AML (Adult)

  15. Downregulated stromal antigen 2 expression in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients

    Han, Qiaoyan; He, Xuefeng; Wu, Lili; Gao, Feng; Ye, Jinsong; Wu, Lingyu; Chen, Lu; Jiang, Xin; Sun, Miao; Chen, Suning

    2017-01-01

    The stromal antigen 2 (STAG2) gene encodes a component of the cohesin complex that participates in the regulation of sister chromatid separation during mitosis. When activated, STAG2 may act as a ‘caretaker’ tumor suppressor gene. As it is unknown whether STAG2 gene is responsible for the occurrence and associated with the prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the present study analyzed the relative expression levels of STAG2 in 127 de novo AML patients and 17 healthy volunteers using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, AML patients were divided into three risk groups using cytogenetic and molecular genetic abnormalities to define their risk status. STAG2 gene expression was found to be significantly downregulated in de novo AML patients, when compared with the healthy controls; however, the expression was not significantly different in the various gender and age subgroups. Furthermore, no significant difference between risk groups was detected in AML patients. Thus, the STAG2 gene may serve an important role in AML development, but is not associated with prognosis in AML.

  16. U2AF1 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Jun Qian

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of U2AF1 gene have recently been identified in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML. In this study, we analyzed the frequency and clinical impact of U2AF1 mutations in a cohort of 452 Chinese patients with myeloid neoplasms. Mutations in U2AF1 were found in 2.5% (7/275 of AML and 6.3% (6/96 of MDS patients, but in none of 81 CML. All mutations were heterozygous missense mutations affecting codon S34 or Q157. There was no significant association of U2AF1 mutation with blood parameters, FAB subtypes, karyotypes and other gene mutations in AML. The overall survival (OS of AML patients with U2AF1 mutation (median 3 months was shorter than those without mutation (median 7 months (P = 0.035. No difference in the OS was observed between MDS patients with and without U2AF1 mutations. Our data show that U2AF1 mutation is a recurrent event at a low frequency in AML and MDS.

  17. Elevated IL-35 in bone marrow of the patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Wang, Jia; Tao, Qianshan; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Pan, Ying; Tao, Lili; Xiong, Shudao; Wang, Yiping; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common hematological malignancy in adults, but the etiology of it remains poorly understood. IL-35 is a recently described cytokine composed of an IL-12 subunit p35 and an IL-27 subunit Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 3 (EBI3), and has an immunosuppressive effect on inflammation through induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppression of Th1 and Th17. Recently, we have illustrated that concentrations of IL-35 in peripheral blood are up-regulated in newly diagnosed (ND) AML patients. However, whether IL-35 in bone marrow is increased in AML patients is not clear. In this study, we examined IL-35 in bone marrow by various methods including RT-PCR, ELISA, FCM and IHC, and found that IL-35 levels are also increased significantly in bone marrow of adult AML patients. Furthermore, we investigated that concentrations of bone marrow IL-35 in ND group were higher than that in complete remission (CR) group and control group, but there was no significant difference compared to that in relapse group. In conclusion, IL-35 was elevated in bone marrow of adult AML patients and this increase was correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy, suggesting that IL-35 is involved in pathogenesis of AML.

  18. Analyzing transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to secondary acute myeloid leukemia using a large patient database.

    Shukron, Ofir; Vainstein, Vladimir; Kündgen, Andrea; Germing, Ulrich; Agur, Zvia

    2012-09-01

    One-third of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) progress to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), with its concomitant poor prognosis. Recently, multiple mutations have been identified in association with MDS-to-sAMLtransition, but it is still unclear whether all these mutations are necessary for transformation. If multiple independent mutations are required for the transformation, sAML risk should increase with time from MDS diagnosis. In contrast, if a single critical biological event determines sAML transformation; its risk should be constant in time elapsing from MDS diagnosis. To elucidate this question, we studied a database of 1079 patients with MDS. We classified patients according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), using either the French-American-British (FAB) or the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and statistically analyzed the resulting transformation risk curves of each group. The risk of transformation after MDS diagnosis remained constant in time within three out of four risk groups, and in all four risk groups, when patients were classified according to FAB or to the WHO-determined criteria, respectively. Further subdivision by blast percentage or cytogenetics had no influence on this result. Our analysis suggests that a single random biological event leads to transformation to sAML, thus calling for the exclusion of time since MDS diagnosis from the clinical decision-making process.

  19. Plasma Exosomes as Markers of Therapeutic Response in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Chang-Sook eHong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Exosomes isolated from the plasma of newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients have elevated protein and TGF-β1 contents and inhibit natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity. A potential role of exosomes in predicting responses to chemotherapy (CT was evaluated in AML patients undergoing treatment. Experimental Design: Plasma was obtained from AML patients at diagnosis (n=16; post induction CT (n=9; during consolidation CT (n=10; in long-term remission (LTCR, n=5; and from healthy volunteers (n=7. Exosomes were isolated by exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation. The exosomal protein, soluble TGFβ-1 levels (ELISA and the TGF-β1 profiles (western blots were compared among patients’ cohorts. The results were correlated with the patients’ cytogenetic profile, percentage of leukemic blast and outcome. Results: At diagnosis, protein and TGF-β1 levels were higher (pConclusions: Changes in exosomal protein and/or TGF-β1 content may reflect responses to CT. The exosomal TGF-β1 profile suggests the presence of residual disease in patients considered to have achieved complete remission.

  20. [Clinical observation of decitabine-treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    Yang, Hua; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Wang, Quan-Shun; Han, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Wen-Rong; Jing, Yu; Wang, Shu-Hong; Zhang, Song-Song; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the clinical efficiencies and adverse reactions of treating the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by using decitabine. The clinical data of 12 MDS and AML patients treated with decitabine were analyzed retrospectively. Among 12 patients there were 1 case of MDS-RA, 2 cases of MDS-RAEB-I, 3 cases of MDS-RAEB-II, 2 cases of AML-M4, 2 cases of AML-M5, 1 case of AML-M6 and 1 case of AML-M0. In decitabine chemotherapy program for 5 days (n = 8), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) × 5 days was applied, 4 weeks for 1 cycle; in program for 3 days (n = 2), decitabine 15 mg/m(2), once 8 h for 3 days, 6 weeks for 1 cycle; another program (n = 2), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) every other day for 5 times. For 1 patient achieved complete remission (CR) after treatment with decitabine, ID4 gene methylated level was detected by MS-PCR and ML-PCR before and after treatment. The results showed that 2 cases achieved CR, 1 case partial remission, 5 cases stable disease, 1 case progress of disease and 3 cases died. Disease control rate was 66.67% (8/12), the effective rate 25% (3/12). The average survival time was (11.5 ± 2.1) months. 1-year OS rate was 40%, 2-year OS rate was 16.7%. MS-PCR detection showed that the decitabine could significantly reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. It is concluded that decitabine can stabilize disease status of MDS patients, reduce blood transfusion dependence and improve the life quality of patients, and even some patients who transformed from MDS to leukemia achieved CR after treatment with decitabine. Decitabine can reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. The main adverse reaction of decitabine was myelosuppression, infection and so on. So the blood transfusions, antibiotics and other supportive treatments for these patients are needed. Most of patients well tolerate the adverse effects of decitabine after active symptomatic and supportive treatment. The efficacy and survival rate of

  1. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    F. Dong (Fan); R.K. Brynes; N. Tidow; K. Welte (Karl); B. Löwenberg (Bob); I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND. In severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction

  2. Increased fibrinogen levels at diagnosis are associated with adverse outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Berger, Martin D; Heini, Alexander D; Seipel, Katja; Mueller, Beatrice; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Pabst, Thomas

    2016-06-15

    Increased plasma fibrinogen levels are associated with shortened overall survival (OS) in some solid tumor types. In contrast, the prognostic significance of varying fibrinogen levels in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis is unknown. In this study, we assessed the prognostic significance of fibrinogen levels in AML patients. In a comprehensive retrospective single-center study, we determined the survival rates of 375 consecutive AML patients undergoing at least one cycle of intensive chemotherapy induction treatment. Patients were dichotomized between low (high fibrinogen levels (≥4.1 g/L) at diagnosis of AML before initiation of treatment. Subsequently, quartile ranges were applied to analyze the association of varying fibrinogen levels on survival. We observed that the rates of complete remission, early death, and admission to intensive care unit were equal in the low versus high fibrinogen group. However, OS was significantly better in the low fibrinogen group (27.3 vs 13.5 months; p = 0.0009) as well as progression-free survival (12.3 vs 7.8 months; p = 0.0076). This survival difference remained significant in the multivariate analysis (p = 0.003). Assessing quartiles of fibrinogen values, we further confirmed this observation. Our data suggest that high fibrinogen levels at diagnosis of AML are associated with unfavorable OS and progression-free survival but not with increased mortality during induction treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym APL - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APL - Acute ...promyelocytic leukemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukaemia; APML - Acute promyelocytic leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acut...e Promyelocytic Leukemias; Acute myeloid leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid le...ukemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute myeloid leukemia, t(15;17)(q22;q11-12); Acute promye...locytic leukaemia (clinical); Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, FAB M3; Acute promyelocytic leukaemia, PML/RAR-alpha; Acute

  4. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-10-31

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. A phase I trial of the aurora kinase inhibitor, ENMD-2076, in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Yee, Karen W L; Chen, Hsiao-Wei T; Hedley, David W; Chow, Sue; Brandwein, Joseph; Schuh, Andre C; Schimmer, Aaron D; Gupta, Vikas; Sanfelice, Deborah; Johnson, Tara; Le, Lisa W; Arnott, Jamie; Bray, Mark R; Sidor, Carolyn; Minden, Mark D

    2016-10-01

    ENMD-2076 is a novel, orally-active molecule that inhibits Aurora A kinase, as well as c-Kit, FLT3 and VEGFR2. A phase I study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) and toxicities of ENMD-2076 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Patients received escalating doses of ENMD-2076 administered orally daily [225 mg (n = 7), 375 mg (n = 6), 325 mg (n = 9), or 275 mg (n = 5)]. Twenty-seven patients were treated (26 AML; 1 CMML-2). The most common non-hematological toxicities of any grade, regardless of association with drug, were fatigue, diarrhea, dysphonia, dyspnea, hypertension, constipation, and abdominal pain. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) consisted of grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 typhilitis, grade 3 syncope and grade 3 QTc prolongation). Of the 16 evaluable patients, one patient achieved a complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), three experienced a morphologic leukemia-free state (MLFS) with a major hematologic improvement in platelets (HI-P), and 5 other patients had a reduction in marrow blast percentage (i.e. 11-65 %). The RP2D in this patient population is 225 mg orally once daily.

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  7. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  8. Impact of postremission consolidation chemotherapy on outcome after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission

    Yeshurun, Moshe; Labopin, Myriam; Blaise, Didier;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the role of postremission consolidation chemotherapy before reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1).......The objective of the current study was to investigate the role of postremission consolidation chemotherapy before reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1)....

  9. Outcome and medical costs of patients with invasive aspergillosis and acute myelogenous leukemia-myelodysplastic syndrome treated with intensive chemotherapy: An observational study

    Slobbe, Lennert; Polinder, Suzanne; Doorduijn, Jeanette; Lugtenburg, Pieternella; Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Steyerberg, Ewout; Rijnders, Bart

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with acute leukemia. Management of IA is expensive, which makes prevention desirable. Because hospital resources are limited, prevention costs have to be compared with treatment costs and outcome. Methods. In 269 patients treated for acute myelogenous leukemia-myelodysplastic syndrome (AML-MDS) during 2002-2007, evidence of IA was collected using high-resolution computed tomography and galactomanna...

  10. Second induction in pediatric patients with recurrent acute lymphoid leukemia using DFCI-ALL protocols.

    Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Moghrabi, Albert; Rousseau, Pierre; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Barrette, Stephane; Bernstein, Mark L; Champagne, Josette; David, Michele; Demers, Jocelyn; Duval, Michel; Hume, Heather; Meyer, Patrick; Champagne, Martin A

    2005-02-01

    Between 15% and 30% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) experience disease recurrence. With the possible exception of patients presenting with late isolated extramedullary relapse, induction of second complete remission (CR) is employed as a stepping stone to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The authors report their institutional experience in the management of children with recurrent ALL using the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) ALL protocol in patients treated initially with that same protocol. Successful reinduction was followed by allogeneic HSCT when possible. Between April 1986 and May 2003, 34 patients with recurrent ALL, treated at initial diagnosis with DFCI-ALL protocol therapy, were given the same protocol as repeat induction chemotherapy. The median age was 4.6 years at diagnosis and 7.1 years at recurrence. Median duration of CR1 was 30.3 months. Second CR was obtained in 29 (85%) patients. Twenty went on to allogeneic HSCT; 10 of them currently remain in CR. Two additional patients treated with chemotherapy without HSCT are also in continuous CR2. Overall, 13 (38%) of the 34 patients are alive with a median follow-up of 105 months. There were no toxic deaths due to the reinduction therapy. One child died of cardiac failure after autologous HSCT. The treatment of children with recurrent ALL using the DFCI-ALL protocol induction regimen after initial use of the same protocol is associated with a high rate of second CR with no excess toxicity. However, the overall prognosis in these patients remains unsatisfactory and needs to be improved.

  11. Prognostic Impact of Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1 Gene Mutations in Egyptian Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    Magda Zidan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Somatic mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1, which alter the subcellular localization of the product, are the most frequent mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and prognostic impact of NPM1 gene mutations in adult AML patients. METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP were used to screen 55 AML patients for mutations of NPM1 gene. RESULTS: NPM1 mutations were found in 12 (21.8% of 55 patients, significantly associated with higher total leukocytie count, marrow blast percentage (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively, and M5 subtype (p<0.001. Patients with NPM1 mutations had significantly higher complete remission rates (p=0.003 and a trend to lower rates of mortality, relapse and refractory disease (p=0.28, p=0.45 and p=0.08, respectively. Survival analysis showed significantly longer disease-free survival (mean 18.635±1.229 versus 11.041±1.250 months, p=0.044 and overall survival (mean 19.810±1.624 versus 12.063±1.244 months, p=0.041 in patients with NPM1 mutations compared with those without. Multivariate analyses confirmed NPM1 mutation as a significant independent predictor for disease-free survival (HR=0.066, p=0.001 and overall survival (HR=0.125, p=0.002. CONCLUSION: NPM1 mutation is a prognostic factor for a favorable outcome in Egyptian population. This finding is of major clinical importance since it strongly suggests that NPM1 mutations may allow one to divide the heterogeneous patient group of AML into prognostically different subgroups.

  12. Characterization of Common Chromosomal Translocations and Their Frequencies in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients of Northwest Iran

    Elnaz Amanollahi Kamaneh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Detection of chromosomal translocations has an important role in diagnosis and treatment of hematological disorders. We aimed to evaluate the 46 new cases of de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients for common translocations and to assess the effect of geographic and ethnic differences on their frequencies. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used on 46 fresh bone marrow or peripheral blood samples to detect translocations t (8; 21, t (15; 17, t (9; 11 and inv (16. Patients were classified using the French-American-British (FAB criteria in to eight sub-groups (M0-M7. Immunophenotyping and biochemical test results of patients were compared with RT-PCR results. Results: Our patients were relatively young with a mean age of 44 years. AML was relatively predominant in female patients (54.3% and most of patients belonged to AML-M2. Translocation t (8; 21 had the highest frequency (13% and t (15; 17 with 2.7% incidence was the second most frequent. CD19 as an immunophenotypic marker was at a relatively high frequency (50% in cases with t (8; 21, and patients with this translocation had a specific immunophenotypic pattern of complete expression of CD45, CD38, CD34, CD33 and HLA-DR. Conclusion: Similarities and differences of results in Iran with different parts of the world can be explained with ethnic and geographic factors in characterizations of AML. Recognition of these factors especially in other comprehensive studies may aid better diagnosis and management of this disease.

  13. [Clinical study of 32 patients with adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Zheng, Yong-Liang; Chen, Yi-Jian

    2014-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib in the treatment of patients with adult Ph chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph(+)ALL). A total of 32 diagnosed adult Ph(+)ALL patients from July 2007 to February 2014 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed and were divided into two groups: imatinib plus chemotherapy group and traditional chemotherapy group. The differences between two groups were analysed in disease-free survival time (DFS), overall survival time (OS) and toxicity. The G banding technigue was used to analyse the karyotype, and the flow cytometry was applyed to detect the immune markers on surface of cells. The results showed that all patients expressed B cell and hematopietic stem/progenitor cell immune markers, out of them 21 patients (65.6%) were with myeloid antigens, 27 patients with simple Ph (+) phenotype and 5 patients with additional chromosome abnormality. The DFS and OS of the imatinib group were statistically longer than those of the traditional chemotherapy group (14.3 ± 4.7 months vs 10.7 ± 3.8 months) (P 0.05)). It is concluded that the all cases of adult Ph(+)ALL are with B cell phenotype and express hematopietic stem/progenitor cell antigen. They often accompanied by expression of myeloid antigens and additonal chromosome abnormality in genetics. The combination of imatinib with chemotherapy can prolong remission time and survival time for patients of non-hematopietic stem cell transplantation on the basis of no notably increasing the toxic effects.

  14. Th17 cells and interleukin-17 increase with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Han, Yixiang; Ye, Aifang; Bi, Laixi; Wu, Jianbo; Yu, Kang; Zhang, Shenghui

    2014-08-01

    Although Th17 cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, their roles in malignancies are currently under debate. The role and mechanism of Th17 cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrated that the frequency of Th17 cells was significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bone marrow mononuclear cells from AML patients compared with healthy donors. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-23, IL-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were significantly increased in blood and bone marrow in AML patients compared with healthy donors. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, but not TGF-β1 promoted the generation and differentiation of Th17 cells from naive CD4(+) T cells in humans. IL-17A, a signature cytokine secreted by Th17 cells, induced the proliferation of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R)-positive AML cells via IL-17R, in which activation of PI3K/Akt and Jak/Stat3 signaling pathway may play important roles. In addition, combination of IL-17A and IL-22 significantly reduced the generation of Th1 cells and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ from healthy donor or AML patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Patients with high Th17 cell frequency had poor prognosis, whereas patients with high Th1 cell frequency had prolonged survival. Combined analysis of Th1 and Th17 cell frequencies improved the ability to predict patient outcomes. In conclusion, Th17 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AML and may be an important therapeutic target and prognostic predictor.

  15. Cytogenetic findings in 303 Mexican patients with de novo acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Arana-Trejo, R M; Gómez-Morales, E; Rubio-Borja, M E; Kassack-Ipiña, J J; Cervantes-Peredo, A; Guerrero-Rivera, S; González-Llaven, J; Gutiérrez-Romero, M; Pizzuto-Chávez, J; Kofman-Alfaro, S

    1997-01-01

    In this report we show the chromosomal changes seen in a group of 303 Mexican patients with de novo Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia (AML). Two hundred forty-two patients were diagnosed and treated at two hospitals affiliated with the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). These are the Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI and Centro Medico La Raza Hospitals; the remaining 61 patients were diagnosed and treated at the Hospital General de Mexico (HGM). Clonal abnormalities were detected in 75.6% of the patients; this result agrees with what has been reported in other large series of AML studies. The incidence of changes per hospital was similar in patients from the IMSS hospitals (72-75%), while an increase was seen in patients from the HGM (85.2%). The chromosomal changes seen in this study in order of frequency were: t(15;17)[18.8%], t(9;22)[9.2%], miscellaneous chromosomal changes (mainly rearrangements of chromosomes 1,2,3,12y17)[8.2%], abnormalities of 16q22 [7.3%], t(8;21)[6.3%], -7/del(7q)[5.6%], t(6;9)[5.3%], and abnormalities of 11q23 [4.6%]. We reported an increase in the incidence of certain types of chromosomal changes seen in cases of AML, in comparison with reports from other countries. These differences could be due to methodological variations, although ethnic, socioeconomic and nutritional differences must not be disregarded. We support this finding when comparing distribution of changes in the population of patients seen in the IMSS hospitals with those from the HGM; the main difference lies in the socioeconomic level.

  16. [Cord blood transplantation after successful treatment of brain abscess caused by Bacillus cereus in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Kuwabara, Hideyuki; Kawano, Tomoko; Tanaka, Masatugu; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Okabe, Gaichi; Maruta, Atsuo; Nagao, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mori, Hiraku

    2006-11-01

    Central nervous system infection caused by Bacillus cereus is a rare condition, which often progresses rapidly and is fatal in immunocompromised patients. A 54-year-old woman with acute myelogenous leukemia fell into a coma with high fever during severe neutropenia while undergoing chemotherapy. A blood culture demonstrated the presence of B. cereus and magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple abnormal lesions in her brain. The patient was treated with meropenem and vancomycin, and recovered from the coma in a week. Antibiotic therapy was administered for seven weeks, and then she underwent cord blood transplantation for refractory acute myelogenous leukemia with successful engraftment without exacerbation of the brain abscess. This case demonstrates that brain abscess caused by B. cereus can be treated without surgical treatment.

  17. Management of acute myeloid leukemia during pregnancy.

    Avivi, Irit; Brenner, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosis of acute leukemia during pregnancy presents significant medical challenges. Pancytopenia, caused by bone marrow substitution with leukemic cells, impairs maternal and fetal health. Chemotherapeutic agents required to be immediately used to save the mother's life are likely to adversely affect fetal development and outcome, especially if administered at an early gestational stage. Patients diagnosed with acute leukemia during the first trimester are, therefore, recommended to undergo pregnancy termination. At later gestational stages, antileukemic therapy can be administered, although in this case, fetal outcome is still associated with increased incidence of growth restriction and loss. Special attention to the issue of future reproduction, adopting a personalized fertility preservation approach, is required. This article addresses these subjects, presenting women diagnosed with acute myeloid and acute promyelocytic leukemia in pregnancy. The rarity of this event, resulting in insufficient data, emphasizes the need for collaborative efforts to optimize management of this complicated clinical condition.

  18. Clofarabine, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine (CIA) as Frontline Therapy for Patients ≤60 Years with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    Nazha, Aziz; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop; Huang, Xuelin; Choi, Sangbum; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Andreeff, Michael; Du, Min; Brandt, Mark; Faderl, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore the combination of clofarabine, cytarabine, and idarubicin (CIA) in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) 40 years. Compared to historical patients treated with IA combination, the OS and EFS were significantly higher (P = 0.005, 0.0001, respectively) for CIA treated patients. In multivariate analysis, CIA retained its superior impact on OS and EFS compared to IA. Conclusion CIA is an effective combination for patients Patients ≤ 40 years had better OS and EFS. CIA achieved longer OS and EFS compared to IA alone. PMID:23877926

  19. Concurrent acute myeloid leukemia and T lymphoblastic lymphoma in a patient with rearranged PDGFRB genes

    Chang Hung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concurrent hematologic malignancies are relatively rare. We encountered a case of concurrent acute myeloid leukemia (AML and T lymphoblastic lymphoma. The bone marrow chromosome analysis showed the karyotype 46, XY, t(5;12(q33;p13, which indicated presence of PDGFRB gene translocations. Therefore, this disease belongs to the new WHO category of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with abnormalities in PDGFRA, PDGFRB and FGFR1 genes. Although such genetic mutations are prone to multi-lineage differentiation, the present case is in fact the first report of concurrent AML and T lymphoblastic lymphoma involving PDGFRB mutations. The patient was treated with cytarabine and daunomycin in combination with high dose dexamethasone. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation was performed after successful remission induction for both entities. The patient eventually died of chronic graft-versus-host-disease related infection. Based on such an experience, we suggest the decision of stem cell transplantation should be weighed carefully against the risks, especially when tyrosine kinase inhibitors are safe and potentially effective in dealing with such entities.

  20. Prognostic value of cytogenetics in adult patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Gómez-Seguí, Inés; Cervera, Jose; Such, Esperanza; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Luna, Irene; Ibáñez, Mariam; López-Pavía, María; Gascón, Adriana; Roig, Mónica; Martínez, Jesús; Sanz, Jaime; Montesinos, Pau; Martín-Aragonés, Guillermo; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Senent, Leonor; Barragán, Eva; Cordón, Lourdes; Sempere, Amparo; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    The prognostic value of cytogenetics in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is not as established as in childhood ALL. We have analyzed the outcome and prognostic value of karyotype in 84 adults diagnosed with Philadelphia-negative ALL from a single institution that received induction chemotherapy and had successful karyotype performed. The most frequent finding was normal karyotype in 35 (42%) cases, followed by aneuploidies in 20 cases (24%) and t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL/AF4 in 5 (6%), and the remaining 24(27%) cases carried miscellaneous clonal abnormalities. The group of patients with t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL/AF4, hypodiploidy and low hyperdiploidy (less than 50 chromosomes) showed a worse outcome than those with normal karyotype and miscellaneous abnormalities in terms of overall survival (OS) (3 years OS; 47% vs. 13%, p = 0.014) and relapse-free survival (RFS) (3 years RFS; 44% vs. 27%, p = 0.005). Other cytogenetic prognostic classifications reported to date were tested in our series, but any was fully reproducible. In conclusion, karyotype is a useful tool for risk assessment in adult ALL. We have confirmed the bad prognosis of t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL/AF4 and hypodiploidy. Besides, low hyperdiploidy could also define a high-risk group of patients who might be candidates for more intensive treatment.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA alterations of peripheral lymphocytes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients undergoing total body irradiation therapy

    Ji Fuyun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations, including mtDNA copy number and mtDNA 4977 bp common deletion (CD, are key indicators of irradiation-induced damage. The relationship between total body irradiation (TBI treatment and mtDNA alterations in vivo, however, has not been postulated yet. The aim of this study is to analyze mtDNA alterations in irradiated human peripheral lymphocytes from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as well as to take them as predictors for radiation toxicity. Methods Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 26 ALL patients 24 hours after TBI preconditioning (4.5 and 9 Gy, respectively. Extracted DNA was analyzed by real-time PCR method. Results Average 2.31 times mtDNA and 0.53 fold CD levels were observed after 4.5 Gy exposure compared to their basal levels. 9 Gy TBI produced a greater response of both mtDNA and CD levels than 4.5 Gy. Significant inverse correlation was found between mtDNA content and CD level at 4.5 and 9 Gy (P = 0.037 and 0.048. Moreover, mtDNA content of lymphocytes without irradiation was found to be correlated to age. Conclusions mtDNA and CD content may be considered as predictive factors to radiation toxicity.

  2. APC2 and CYP1B1 methylation changes in the bone marrow of acute myeloid leukemia patients during chemotherapy

    XIA, YONGMING; Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; YE, HUADAN; Fang, Lili; Zhou, Annan; GAO, YUTING; Jiang, Danjie; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant promoter DNA methylation is a major mechanism of leukemogenesis in hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the association between promoter methylation with chemotherapeutic outcomes remains unknown. In the present study, bone marrow samples were collected prior to and following chemotherapy in 30 AML patients. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction technology was used to examine the promoter methylation status of adenomatous polyposis col 2...

  3. Rapidly progressive cutaneous Rhizopus microsporus infection presenting as Fournier's gangrene in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Durand, C M; Alonso, C D; Subhawong, A P; Kwiatkowski, N P; Showel, M; Carroll, K C; Marr, K A

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Rhizopus within the class Zygomycetes can cause devastating opportunistic infections. Cutaneous disease arising from direct inoculation of fungal spores has the potential to disseminate widely. Here, we describe a dramatic case of cutaneous Rhizopus infection involving the penis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. Despite aggressive surgical debridement, systemic antifungal therapy, and donor lymphocyte infusion, the infection was ultimately fatal. This case illustrates the unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in the clinical management of cutaneous Rhizopus infection.

  4. An operational definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia allowing early identification of patients who may benefit from allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    Ferguson, Paul; Hills, Robert K; Grech, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Up to 30% of adults with acute myeloid leukemia fail to achieve a complete remission after induction chemotherapy - termed primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. There is no universally agreed definition of primary refractory disease, nor have the optimal treatment modalities been defined. We.......0001) cohorts. The utilization of REF1 criteria permits the early identification of patients whose outcome after one course of induction chemotherapy is very poor, and informs a novel definition of primary refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that allogeneic stem cell...

  5. The Frequency and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in Chinese acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Lixun Guan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenease 1 (IDH1 occur in various hematopoietic tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. IDH1 mutations are significant in both diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions. In the present study we determined the prevalence and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in 349 samples from newly diagnosed AML patients. RESULTS: Of the 349 AML patient specimens analyzed, 35 (10.03% were found to have IDH1 mutations including 4 IDH1 R132 mutations and 31 non-R132 mutations. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were largely concentrated within AML-M1 (35.72%, pA, p.R100Q; (2 c.311G>T, p.G104V; (3 c.322T>C, p.F108L; (4 c.356G>A, p.R119Q; and (5 c.388A>G, p.I130V. In addition, we identified three IDH1 mutations that were previously described in AML. The frequency of IDH1 mutations in AML patients with normal karyotype was 9.9%. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were concurrent with mutations in FLT3-ITD (p<0.01, CEBPA (p<0.01, and NRAS (p<0.01, as well as the overexpression of MN1 (p<0.01 and WT1(p<0.01. The overall survival (OS in the patients with IDH1 non-R132 mutations compared to patients without IDH1 mutations don't reach statistically significance (median 521 days vs median: not reached; n.s.. CONCLUSION: IDH1 non-R132 mutations occurred frequently in newly diagnosed adult Chinese AML patients, and these mutations were associated with genetic alterations. The OS was not influenced by IDH1 non-R132 mutations in the present study.

  6. Azacitidine in combination with intensive induction chemotherapy in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: The AML-AZA trial of the Study Alliance Leukemia.

    Müller-Tidow, C; Tschanter, P; Röllig, C; Thiede, C; Koschmieder, A; Stelljes, M; Koschmieder, S; Dugas, M; Gerss, J; Butterfaß-Bahloul, T; Wagner, R; Eveslage, M; Thiem, U; Krause, S W; Kaiser, U; Kunzmann, V; Steffen, B; Noppeney, R; Herr, W; Baldus, C D; Schmitz, N; Götze, K; Reichle, A; Kaufmann, M; Neubauer, A; Schäfer-Eckart, K; Hänel, M; Peceny, R; Frickhofen, N; Kiehl, M; Giagounidis, A; Görner, M; Repp, R; Link, H; Kiani, A; Naumann, R; Brümmendorf, T H; Serve, H; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Krug, U

    2016-03-01

    DNA methylation changes are a constant feature of acute myeloid leukemia. Hypomethylating drugs such as azacitidine are active in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as monotherapy. Azacitidine monotherapy is not curative. The AML-AZA trial tested the hypothesis that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors such as azacitidine can improve chemotherapy outcome in AML. This randomized, controlled trial compared the efficacy of azacitidine applied before each cycle of intensive chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in older patients with untreated AML. Event-free survival (EFS) was the primary end point. In total, 214 patients with a median age of 70 years were randomized to azacitidine/chemotherapy (arm-A) or chemotherapy (arm-B). More arm-A patients (39/105; 37%) than arm-B (25/109; 23%) showed adverse cytogenetics (P=0.057). Adverse events were more frequent in arm-A (15.44) versus 13.52 in arm-B, (P=0.26), but early death rates did not differ significantly (30-day mortality: 6% versus 5%, P=0.76). Median EFS was 6 months in both arms (P=0.96). Median overall survival was 15 months for patients in arm-A compared with 21 months in arm-B (P=0.35). Azacitidine added to standard chemotherapy increases toxicity in older patients with AML, but provides no additional benefit for unselected patients.

  7. Leukemoid reaction in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following the

    Osman Yokuş

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of persistent neutrophilic leukocytosisabove 50,000 cells/μL for reasons other thanleukemia is defined as leukemoid reaction. Chronicmyelogenous leukemia (CML and chronic neutrophilicleukemia (CNL should be excluded, and underlyingdiseases or causes should be examined,in differential diagnosis. The most commonly observedcauses of leukemoid reactions are severeinfections, intoxications, malignancies, severe hemorrhage,or acute hemolysis [1]. J Clin Exp Invest2013; 4 (2: 258-259

  8. Fulminant septicemia of Bacillus cereus resistant to carbapenem in a patient with biphenotypic acute leukemia.

    Kiyomizu, Kazunobu; Yagi, Toshinari; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Minami, Ryota; Tanimura, Akira; Karasuno, Takahiro; Hiraoka, Akira

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of fulminant septicemia with Bacillus cereus resistant to carbapenem. A 33-year-old man was suffering from febrile neutropenia (FN) on day 15 after the start of remission-induction therapy for biphenotypic acute leukemia under gut decontamination with polymyxin B and nystatin. Meropenem, a carbapenem, was administered according to the guideline for FN. Two days later (on day 17), he complained of severe abdominal pain, lost consciousness, went into sudden cardiopulmonary arrest, and died. Autopsy showed multiple spots of hemorrhage and necrosis caused by bacterial plaque in the brain, lungs, and liver. B. cereus was isolated from a blood sample obtained in the morning on day 17 and it was after his death that the isolated B. cereus was revealed to be resistant to carbapenem. B. cereus obtained from blood samples has been reported to be usually sensitive to carbapenem and also to vancomycin, new quinolones, and clindamycin. If B. cereus resistant to carbapem increases, our method of gut decontamination with polymyxin B and nystatin may have to be changed to one containing a new quinolone for the prevention of septicemia. Careful watching to determine whether B. cereus resistant to carbapem increases may be also important for empiric therapy, because carbapenem is often selected as the initial therapy for FN in patients with severe neutropenia.

  9. The complexity of interpreting genomic data in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Nazha, A; Zarzour, A; Al-Issa, K; Radivoyevitch, T; Carraway, H E; Hirsch, C M; Przychodzen, B; Patel, B J; Clemente, M; Sanikommu, S R; Kalaycio, M; Maciejewski, J P; Sekeres, M A

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous neoplasm characterized by the accumulation of complex genetic alterations responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease. Translating genomic information into clinical practice remained challenging with conflicting results regarding the impact of certain mutations on disease phenotype and overall survival (OS) especially when clinical variables are controlled for when interpreting the result. We sequenced the coding region for 62 genes in 468 patients with secondary AML (sAML) and primary AML (pAML). Overall, mutations in FLT3, DNMT3A, NPM1 and IDH2 were more specific for pAML whereas UTAF1, STAG2, BCORL1, BCOR, EZH2, JAK2, CBL, PRPF8, SF3B1, ASXL1 and DHX29 were more specific for sAML. However, in multivariate analysis that included clinical variables, only FLT3 and DNMT3A remained specific for pAML and EZH2, BCOR, SF3B1 and ASXL1 for sAML. When the impact of mutations on OS was evaluated in the entire cohort, mutations in DNMT3A, PRPF8, ASXL1, CBL EZH2 and TP53 had a negative impact on OS; no mutation impacted OS favorably; however, in a cox multivariate analysis that included clinical data, mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, CBL, EZH2 and TP53 became significant. Thus, controlling for clinical variables is important when interpreting genomic data in AML. PMID:27983727

  10. Successful voriconazole treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a patient with acute biphenotypic leukemia

    Hirano,Teiichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year old woman with acute biphenotypic leukemia (ABL complained of chest pain with cough, high fever and hemoptysis during induction chemotherapy, although she had been treated with anti-biotics and micafungin. We made a clinical diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA based on a consolidation in the right upper lung field on a chest radiograph as well as a high level of serum beta-D-glucan (with no evidence of tuberculosis and candidiasis. We changed her treatment from micafungin to voriconazole. Later, we discovered an air-crescent sign by CT scan that supported the diagnosis of IPA. Following voriconazole treatment, clinical symptoms ceased and abnormal chest shadows improved gradually and concurrently with a recovery of neutrophils. IPA must be considered in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates who do not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Serological tests and CT findings can aid in early diagnosis of IPA, which, along with treatment for IPA, will improve clinical outcomes.

  11. Whole brain magnetization transfer histogram analysis of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving intrathecal methotrexate therapy

    Yamamoto, Akira [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: mikiy@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Souichi [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: sadachi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp (and others)

    2006-03-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram analysis of the whole brain could detect early and subtle brain changes nonapparent on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Materials and methods: Subjects in this prospective study comprised 10 children with ALL (mean age, 6 years; range, 0-16 years). In addition to conventional MRI, magnetization transfer images were obtained before and after intrathecal and intravenous MTX therapy. MTR values were calculated and plotted as a histogram, and peak height and location were calculated. Differences in peak height and location between pre- and post-MTX therapy scans were statistically analyzed. Conventional MRI was evaluated for abnormal signal area in white matter. Results: MTR peak height was significantly lower on post-MTX therapy scans than on pre-MTX therapy scans (p = 0.002). No significant differences in peak location were identified between pre- and post-chemotherapy imaging. No abnormal signals were noted in white matter on either pre- or post-MTX therapy conventional MRI. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MTR histogram analysis allows better detection of early and subtle brain changes in ALL patients who receive MTX therapy than conventional MRI.

  12. Recurrent DNMT3A R882 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Jiang Lin

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of DNMT3A gene have recently been reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. We examined the entire coding sequences of DNMT3A gene by high-resolution melting analysis and sequencing in Chinese patients with myeloid malignancies. R882 mutations were found in 12/182 AML and in 4/51 MDS, but not in either 79 chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, or 57 myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, or 4 chronic monomyelocytic leukemia. No other DNMT3A mutations were detected in all patients. R882 mutations were associated with old age and more frequently present in monoblastic leukemia (M4 and M5, 7/52 compared to other subtypes (5/130. Furthermore, 14/16 (86.6% R882 mutations were observed in patients with normal karyotypes. The overall survival of mutated MDS patients was shorter than those without mutation (median 9 and 25 months, respectively. We conclude that DNMT3A R882 mutations are recurrent molecular aberrations in AML and MDS, and may be an adverse prognostic event in MDS.

  13. Decitabine is more cost effective than cytarabine and daunorubicin in elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients

    Batty N

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decitabine is not approved in the United States (US for acute myeloid leukemia (AML because it did not improve overall survival compared with standard conventional induction treatment with cytarabine and daunorubicin (AD. We asked what would be the cost effectiveness of decitabine versus AD in AML patients older than 60 years of age. Methods: A semi-Markov model compiling survival and cost data was used based on survival probabilities from the literature. Data accounted for re-induction therapy with idarubicin, fludarabine, cytarabine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine (HiDAC but not for stem cell transplantation. The assumption-based model considered a maximum of four cycles of HiDAC and continuing decitabine until loss of benefit. Results: Assuming 1,000 patients for each treatment arm in a semi-Markov model over one year time horizon, the quality-adjusted life year (QALY for AD vs. decitabine were 0.47 and 0.61. The percentage survival for AD and decitabine were 45.2% and 50.5%. Their costs were $168,863 and $108,084. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was -$60,779/0.14 = -$433,756 per QALY. By sensitivity analysis, decitabine was superior to AD in all parameters. Conclusion: Decitabine is a more cost-effective therapy for patients older than 60 years of age than AD. While cost effectiveness is certainly important, decitabine may be arguably considered for elderly newly diagnosed AML patients given the economic pressures in the US health system; however, this is not a criterion for drug approval.

  14. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  15. Mycobacterium kansasii Pneumonia with Mediastinal Lymphadenitis in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Successful Treatment to Stem Cell Transplantation

    Choi, Yeon-Geun; Lee, Dong-Gun; Yim, Eunjung; Joo, Hyonsoo; Ryu, Seongyul; Choi, Jae-Ki; Kim, Hee-Je

    2017-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease is a relatively rare cause of neutropenic fever in patients with hematologic malignancies. During the neutropenic period, performing invasive procedures for microbiological or pathological confirmation is difficult. In addition, the optimal treatment duration for NTM disease in patients with leukemia, especially prior to stem cell transplantation (SCT), has not been documented. Therefore, we report a case of pneumonia with necrotizing lymphadenitis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii diagnosed during chemotherapy being performed for acute myeloid leukemia. The radiologic findings were similar to those of invasive fungal pneumonia; however, a bronchoalveolar washing fluid culture confirmed that the pathogen was M. kansasii. After 70 days from starting NTM treatment, allogeneic SCT was performed without any complications. The patient fully recovered after 12 months of NTM treatment, and neither reactivation of M. kansasii infection nor related complications were reported.

  16. Health related quality of life and impact of infectious comorbidity in outpatient management of patients with acute leukemia

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis; Appel, Charlotte;

    2012-01-01

    Although survival has improved among patients with acute leukemia, there is still a considerable risk of severe complications throughout the course of treatment. This contrast increases the interest in monitoring health related quality of life (HRQOL) in these patients. This study presents...... a longitudinal HRQOL evaluation (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer core 30-item questionnaire; EORTC-QLQ C-30) and the impact of infectious comorbidity among 60 patients with leukemia (median age 47) treated in an outpatient management program at Copenhagen University Hospital....... Significant improvement was seen on several HRQOL scores during follow-up. Explorative general linear models (GLMs) suggest that high cumulative severity of infectious comorbidity significantly reduces physical functioning and overall quality of life at treatment completion....

  17. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-09-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcomes among different graft sources. However, the risk and types of infections have not been compared among graft sources. Such information may influence the choice of a particular graft source. We compared the incidence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections in 1781 adults with acute leukemia who received alternative donor HCT (UCB, n= 568; MUD, n = 930; MMUD, n = 283) between 2008 and 2011. The incidences of bacterial infection at 1 year were 72%, 59%, and 65% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. Incidences of viral infection at 1 year were 68%, 45%, and 53% (P < .0001) for UCB, MUD, and MMUD, respectively. In multivariable analysis, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections were more common after either UCB or MMUD than after MUD (P < .0001). Bacterial and viral but not fungal infections were more common after UCB than MMUD (P = .0009 and <.0001, respectively). The presence of viral infection was not associated with an increased mortality. Overall survival (OS) was comparable among UCB and MMUD patients with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥ 90% but was inferior for UCB for patients with KPS < 90%. Bacterial and fungal infections were associated with poorer OS. Future strategies focusing on infection prevention and treatment are indicated to improve HCT outcomes.

  18. Gene mutation patterns in patients with minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia.

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Wu, Jin-Hou; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wang, Po-Nan; Yang, Chao-Ping; Shih, Yu-Shu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Huang, Yu-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2014-06-01

    Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M0) is a rare subtype of AML with poor prognosis. Although genetic alterations are increasingly reported in AML, the gene mutations have not been comprehensively studied in AML-M0. We aimed to examine a wide spectrum of gene mutations in patients with AML-M0 to determine their clinical relevance. Twenty gene mutations including class I, class II, class III of epigenetic regulators (IDH1, IDH2, TET2, DNMT3A, MLL-PTD, ASXL1, and EZH2), and class IV (tumor suppressor genes) were analyzed in 67 patients with AML-M0. Mutational analysis was performed with polymerase chain reaction-based assays followed by direct sequencing. The most frequent gene mutations from our data were FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD (28.4%), followed by mutations in IDH1/IDH2 (28.8%), RUNX1 (23.9%), N-RAS/K-RAS (12.3%), TET2 (8.2%), DNMT3A (8.1%), MLL-PTD (7.8%), and ASXL1 (6.3%). Seventy-nine percent (53/67) of patients had at least one gene mutation. Class I genes (49.3%) were the most common mutated genes, which were mutually exclusive. Class III genes of epigenetic regulators were also frequent (43.9%). In multivariate analysis, old age [hazard ratio (HR) 1.029, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.013-1.044, P=.001) was the independent adverse factor for overall survival, and RUNX1 mutation (HR 2.326, 95% CI 0.978-5.533, P=.056) had a trend toward inferior survival. In conclusion, our study showed a high frequency of FLT3, RUNX1, and IDH mutations in AML-M0, suggesting that these mutations played a role in the pathogenesis and served as potential therapeutic targets in this rare and unfavorable subtype of AML.

  19. Efficacy of Exercise Interventions in Patients with Acute Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis.

    Yuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Decreased physical performance and impaired physiological and psychological fitness have been reported in patients with acute leukemia (AL. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of exercise in patients with AL.In this meta-analysis, the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and PEDro were searched through November 2015. Three authors participated in the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment. The instrument used for quality assessment was derived from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Analyses were performed according to the recommendations of The Cochrane Collaboration using Review Manager 5.3.Nine trials (8 randomized controlled trials and 1 quasi-experimental design trial with 314 AL participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled standardized mean differences between the exercise and control groups were 0.45 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.09 to 0.80, P value = 0.01, P for heterogeneity = 0.23, I2 = 28% for cardiorespiratory fitness and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.28 to 1.06, P value = 0.0007, P for heterogeneity = 0.14, I2 = 43% for muscle strength. Based on the data for fatigue, anxiety, and depression, there were no significant differences in these parameters between the exercise and control groups.Exercise has beneficial effects on cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength and functional mobility; however, no significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety, depression or quality of life were observed. Further large-scale randomized trials are needed to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of exercise programs for AL patients.

  20. Psychological Risk Factors in Acute Leukemia

    Gouva M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Several theoretical models have been occasionally proposed to account for the involvement of psychological factors in cancer genesis. Family environment and relations as well as certain personality traits were correlated to cancer onset. However, little is known in the case of acute leukemia. The present study examined family environment, state-trait anxiety, hostility and the direction of hostility as well as alexithymia in 41 acute leukemia patients and their first degree relatives (70. In accordance with previous findings, the present results showed that family cohesion, conflict and organization as well as guilt, state anxiety and alexithymia were significant risk factors for the development of the disease.

  1. Flow cytometric analysis of hemetopoietic progenitor cells in peripheral blood stem cell harvest from patients with CD34 positive acute leukemia.

    Miyazaki, T; Matsuda, I; Oguri, M; Amaya, H; Kiyosaki, M; Hamada, A; Tamaki, S; Tashiro, E; Kudo, Y; Taniguchi, O; Nakamura, T; Tomoyasu, S

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed CD34 positive cells in peripheral blood stem cell harvest (PBSCH) using flow cytometry. PBSCH from CD34 positive acute myelogeous leukemia (AML-M2) patient contained 1.87% CD34 positive cells, of which 1.21% was represented by MRD.PBSCH from CD34 positive acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) patient contained 3.14% CD34 positive cells, of which 0.11% was accounted for by minimal residual disease (MRD). If PBSCH from CD34 positive acute leukemia patient is analyzed for CD34 monoclonal antibody alone, the presence of CD34 positive MRD may escape attention so that CD34 positive hematopoietic progenitor cells may be overestimated. To avoid this risk, it is necessary to analyze PBSCH using both CD34 monoclonal antibody and characteristic markers of leukemia cells that were found pre-treatment.

  2. Prognostic impact of Wilms tumor gene mutations in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    Zidan, Magda Abdel Aziz; Kamal Shaaban, Howyda M; Elghannam, Doaa M

    2014-07-01

    The Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene mutations were detected in patients with most forms of acute leukemia. However, the biological significance and the prognostic impact of WT1 mutation in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) are still uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and clinical relevance of WT1 gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK). Exons 7 and 9 of WT1 were screened in samples from 216 adult NK-AML using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism techniques. Twenty-three patients (10.6%) harbored WT1 mutations. Younger ages and higher marrow blasts were significantly associated with WT1 mutations (P = 0.006 and 0.003 respectively). Complete remission rates were significantly lower in patients with WT1 mutations than those with WT1 wild-type (P = 0.015). Resistance, relapse, and mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with WT1 mutations than those without (P = 0.041, 0.016, and 0.008 respectively). WT1 mutations were inversely associated with NPM1 mutations (P = 0.007). Patients with WT1 mutations had worse disease-free survival (P mutations independently predicted worse DFS (P mutational status. In conclusion, WT1 mutations are a negative prognostic indicator in intensively treated patients with AML-NK, may be a part of molecularly based risk assessment and risk-adapted treatment stratification of patients with AML-NK.

  3. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  4. Invasive infection in an acute myeloblastic leukemia patient due to triazole-resistant Candida tropicalis.

    de Carvalho Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo; da Silva, Carolina Maria; Leão, Mariele Porto Carneiro; Macario, Michele Chianca; Filho, Gustavo Antônio da Trindade Meira Henriques; de Oliveira, Neiva Tinti; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2011-11-01

    Non-albicans Candida species are being increasingly reported as causes of nosocomial fungal infections. For example, invasive candidiasis caused by C. tropicalis has been associated with hematologic malignancies. In this study, we report a fatal case of fungemia and a possible urinary and pulmonary infection in a leukemia patient that was due to a strain of C. tropicalis resistant to 2 triazole antifungals.

  5. FLT3 and NPM1 mutations in Chinese patients with acute myeloid leukemia and normal cytogenetics.

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Wei-lai; Meng, Hai-tao; Qian, Wen-bin; Mai, Wen-yuan; Tong, Hong-yan; Mao, Li-ping; Tong, Yin; Qian, Jie-jing; Lou, Yin-jun; Chen, Zhi-mei; Wang, Yun-gui; Jin, Jie

    2010-10-01

    Mutations of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) and nucleophosmin (NPM1) exon 12 genes are the most common abnormalities in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with normal cytogenetics. To assess the prognostic impact of the two gene mutations in Chinese AML patients, we used multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis to screen 76 AML patients with normal cytogenetics for mutations in FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3/ITD) and exon 12 of the NPM1 gene. FLT3/ITD mutation was detected in 15 (19.7%) of 76 subjects, and NPM1 mutation in 20 (26.3%) subjects. Seven (9.2%) cases were positive for both FLT3/ITD and NPM1 mutations. Significantly more FLT3/ITD aberration was detected in subjects with French-American-British (FAB) M1 (42.8%). NPM1 mutation was frequently detected in subjects with M5 (47.1%) and infrequently in subjects with M2 (11.1%). FLT3 and NPM1 mutations were significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count in peripheral blood and a lower CD34 antigen expression, but not age, sex, or platelet count. Statistical analysis revealed that the FLT3/ITD-positive group had a lower complete remission (CR) rate (53.3% vs. 83.6%). Survival analysis showed that the FLT3/ITD-positive/NPM1 mutation-negative group had worse overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS). The FLT3/ITD-positive/NPM1 mutation-positive group showed a trend towards favorable survival compared with the FLT3/ITD-positive/NPM1 mutation-negative group (P=0.069). Our results indicate that the FLT3/ITD mutation might be a prognostic factor for an unfavorable outcome in Chinese AML subjects with normal cytogenetics, while NPM1 mutation may be a favorable prognostic factor for OS and RFS in the presence of FLT3/ITD.

  6. Survival in patients with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia at the "Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima". Hospital. A ten years experience

    Rafael Alejandro Gómez Baute

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: acute non-lymphoblastic leukemias account for 80% of leukemias in adults. Its incidence increases with age up to 20 per 100 000 in over 70 years old patients. Objective: To characterize the survival of patients with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia at the "Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima " Hospital of Cienfuegos. Methods: A case series which included all patients who underwent diagnosis of acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia between 1999 and 2010 at the Hospital of Cienfuegos. Data were obtained from the record book of hematological malignancies from the Oncohematology Department. Such variables like age, sex, morphological variant of the leukemia, incidence per year and overall survival were analyzed according to sex, morphological variant, origin, age and bone marrow transplant. Results: The average age of the studied series was 55 years old . Males were predominant with 55 cases. The most common morphological variant was the myelomonocytic. Overall survival of the series was 20% with a median follow-up of 60 months. Overall survival was slightly higher in females (25% vs 18%. The patients who underwent some form of transplant had a better survival (75% vs 13%. Conclusions: The survival of patients with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia at the "Dr. Aldereguía Gustavo Lima" Hospital is very limited.

  7. The emerging role of exercise and health counseling in patients with acute leukemia undergoing chemotherapy during outpatient management

    Jarden, Mary; Adamsen, Lis; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility, safety and benefits of a 6-week exercise and health counseling intervention in patients with acute leukemia undergoing consolidation chemotherapy during outpatient management. Seventeen of twenty patients completed study requirements (85%), adherence...... to exercise was 73% and for health counseling 92%. There were improvements in the 6-min-walk-distance (p=0.0013), sit-to-stand test (p=0.0062), the right and left biceps arm-curl tests p=0.0002 and p=0.0002, respectively; health-related quality of life (p=0.0209) (FACT-An), vitality (p=0.0015), mental health...

  8. Reduced-intensity stem-cell transplantation for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective study of 33 patients.

    Hamaki, T; Kami, M; Kanda, Y; Yuji, K; Inamoto, Y; Kishi, Y; Nakai, K; Nakayama, I; Murashige, N; Abe, Y; Ueda, Y; Hino, M; Inoue, T; Ago, H; Hidaka, M; Hayashi, T; Yamane, T; Uoshima, N; Miyakoshi, S; Taniguchi, S

    2005-03-01

    Efficacy of reduced-intensity stem-cell transplantation (RIST) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was investigated in 33 patients (median age, 55 years). RIST sources comprised 20 HLA-identical related donors, five HLA-mismatched related, and eight unrelated donors. Six patients had undergone previous transplantation. Disease status at RIST was first remission (n=13), second remission (n=6), and induction failure or relapse (n=14). All patients tolerated preparatory regimens and achieved neutrophil engraftment (median, day 12.5). Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 45 and 64%, respectively. Six patients received donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI), for prophylaxis (n=1) or treatment of recurrent ALL (n=5). Nine patients died of transplant-related mortality, with six deaths due to GVHD. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 11.6 months (range, 3.5-37.3 months). The 1-year relapse-free and overall survival rates were 29.8 and 39.6%, respectively. Of the 14 patients transplanted in relapse, five remained relapse free for longer than 6 months. Cumulative rates of progression and progression-free mortality at 3 years were 50.9 and 30.4%, respectively. These findings suggest the presence of a graft-versus-leukemia effect for ALL. RIST for ALL is worth considering for further evaluation.

  9. Chromosomal changes detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    ZHANG Lijun 张丽君; PARKHURST JB; KERN WF; SCOTT KV; NICCUM D; MULVIHILL JJ; LI Shibo 李师伯

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for TEL/AML1 fusion, BCR/ABL fusion, MLL gene rearrangements, and numerical changes of chromosomes 4, 10, 17 and 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and to determine the relationship and the significance of those findings.Methods Fifty-one American patients (34 men and 17 women) were included in this study. Of them there were 41 patients with pro-B cell type ALL, 9 with B cell type ALL and 1 with T cell type ALL. Chromosome metaphases of each sample were prepared according to standard protocols. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using commercially available DNA probes, including whole chromosome painting probes, locus specific probes, specific chromosome centromere probes and dual color/multiple color translocation fusion probes. The digital image analysis was carried out using Cytovision and Quips FISH programs.Results An overall incidence of chromosomal anomalies, including t (9;22), MLL gene rearrangements, t (12;21), and numerical chromosomal anomalies of chromosomes 4, 10, 17 and 21 was found in 33 patients (65%). Thirty-one of them were pediatric patients and two adults. The t (12;21) was the commonest chromosomal anomaly detected in this population; 14 out of the 45 pediatric patients (31%) were positive for TEL/AML1 fusion, among which three had an additional derivative 21 [t (12;21)], four had a deletion of 12p and two had an extra copy of chromosome 21. All 14 patients with positive TEL/AML1 fusion had ALL pre-B cell or B-cell lineage according to standard immunotyping. The percentage of cells with fusion signals ranged from 20% to 80%. All fourteen patients positive for TEL/AML1 gene fusion were mosaic. Three out of the 14 patients positive for the TEL/AML1 gene fusion were originally reported to be culture failures and none of the remaining eleven samples had been found to have chromosome 12 abnormalities by conventional cytogenetic techniques. All

  10. Management of venous thromboembolism in patients with acute leukemia at high bleeding risk: a multi-center study.

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Valore, Luca; Malato, Alessandra; Saccullo, Giorgia; Vetro, Calogero; Mitra, Maria Enza; Fabbiano, Francesco; Mannina, Donato; Casuccio, Alessandra; Lucchesi, Alessandro; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Candoni, Anna; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Siragusa, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, evaluation of clinically relevant thrombotic complications in patients with acute leukemia (AL) has been poorly investigated. The authors performed a multi-center study to evaluate the management of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in adult patients with AL. The intention was to find as clinically relevant the following: symptomatic Venous Thrombosis (VT) occurred in typical (lower limbs) and atypical (cerebral, upper limbs, abdominal, etc) sites with or without pulmonary embolism (PE). Over a population of 1461 patients with AL, 22 cases of symptomatic VTE were recorded in hospitalized patients with a mean age of 54.6 years. The absolute incidence of VTE was 1.5%. VTE occurred during chemotherapy in 17/22 (77.2%) cases, mainly (14/17, 82.3%) during the induction phase. Treatment of acute VTE was based on Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH) at full dosage for the first month from diagnosis and reduced dosage (75%) for the following months.

  11. DNMT3A GENE POINT MUTATIONS DETECTION IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATIENTS USING SEQUENCING TECHNIQUE

    A. V. Vinogradov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to estimate the frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients (pts using target automatic sequencing technique.Material and Methods. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were obtained from 34 AML pts aged 21 to 64, who were treated in Sverdlovsk Regional Hematological Centre (Ekaterinburg during the period 2012–2014. Distribution of the pts according to FAB-classification was as follows: AML M0 – 3, M1 – 1, M2 – 12, M3 – 3, M4 – 10, M5 – 2, M6 – 1, M7 – 1, blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm – 1. Total RNA was extracted from leukemic cells and subjected to reverse transcription. DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 were amplified by PCR. Detection of mutations in DNMT3A gene was performed by direct sequencing. Sequencing was realized using an automatic genetic analyzer ABI Prism 310.Results. The average frequency of functionally significant point mutations in DNMT3A gene exons 18– 26 among the treated AML pts was 5.9%. They were detected in morphological subgroups M2 and M4(according to WHO classification. The average frequency of DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations among the AML M2 and M4 pts without chromosomal aberrations and TP53 gene point mutations was 14.3%. In both cases there were samples in which DNMT3A gene mutations were accompanied by molecular lesions of NPM1, KRAS and WT1 genes. AML pts with DNMT3A gene exons 18–26 point mutations characterized by poor response to standard chemotherapeutic regimens and unfavorable prognosis.

  12. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  13. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  14. Immune Responses to RHAMM in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Chemotherapy and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    R. Casalegno-Garduño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic blasts overexpress immunogenic antigens, so-called leukemia-associated antigens like the receptor for hyaluronan acid-mediated motility (RHAMM. Persistent RHAMM expression and decreasing CD8+ T-cell responses to RHAMM in the framework of allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chemotherapy alone might indicate the immune escape of leukemia cells. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of RHAMM in 48 patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia (AML and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Furthermore, we correlated transcripts with the clinical course of the disease before and after treatment. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed from RNA of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. T cell responses against RHAMM were assessed by tetramer staining (flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT assays. Results were correlated with the clinical outcome of patients. The results of the present study showed that almost 60% of the patients were RHAMM positive; specific T-cells recognizing RHAMM could be detected, but they were nonfunctional in terms of interferon gamma or granzyme B release as demonstrated by ELISPOT assays. Immunotherapies like peptide vaccination or adoptive transfer of RHAMM-specific T cells might improve the immune response and the outcome of AML/MDS patients.

  15. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Elzbieta Gocek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17(q22;q12 chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  16. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  17. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  18. FLT3 INTERNAL TANDEM DUPLICATION AND D835 MUTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Ghaleb Elyamany

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3 gene is a member of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase family, mutations of FLT3 were first described in 1997 and account for the most frequent molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia. No data currently exist regarding FLT3 mutations in Saudi acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients as no study has reported for FLT3 mutations in Saudi ALL patients. In this retrospective study, we have examined a cohort of 77 ALL patients, to determine the prevalence of FLT3 mutations and the possible prognostic relevance of these mutations in ALL patients and did correlations to other biologic factors, such as karyotype, molecular mutations, and leukocyte count. FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutations and point mutation in tyrosine kinase domain (D835 mutations were analyzed in ALL patients at diagnosis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. 2 cases (2.6%, 2/77 were positive for FLT3 mutations, one was found to have FLT3/ITD and other was found to have FLT3/D835. Our findings suggest that FLT3 mutations were not common in Saudi ALL and did not affect clinical outcome.

  19. Gene Mutation Patterns in Patients with Minimally Differentiated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Hsiao-Wen Kao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Minimally differentiated acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M0 is a rare subtype of AML with poor prognosis. Although genetic alterations are increasingly reported in AML, the gene mutations have not been comprehensively studied in AML-M0. We aimed to examine a wide spectrum of gene mutations in patients with AML-M0 to determine their clinical relevance. Twenty gene mutations including class I, class II, class III of epigenetic regulators (IDH1, IDH2, TET2, DNMT3A, MLL-PTD, ASXL1, and EZH2, and class IV (tumor suppressor genes were analyzed in 67 patients with AML-M0. Mutational analysis was performed with polymerase chain reaction–based assays followed by direct sequencing. The most frequent gene mutations from our data were FLT3-ITD/FLT3-TKD (28.4%, followed by mutations in IDH1/IDH2 (28.8%, RUNX1 (23.9%, N-RAS/K-RAS (12.3%, TET2 (8.2%, DNMT3A (8.1%, MLL-PTD (7.8%, and ASXL1 (6.3%. Seventy-nine percent (53/67 of patients had at least one gene mutation. Class I genes (49.3% were the most common mutated genes, which were mutually exclusive. Class III genes of epigenetic regulators were also frequent (43.9%. In multivariate analysis, old age [hazard ratio (HR 1.029, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.013-1.044, P = .001 was the independent adverse factor for overall survival, and RUNX1 mutation (HR 2.326, 95% CI 0.978-5.533, P = .056 had a trend toward inferior survival. In conclusion, our study showed a high frequency of FLT3, RUNX1, and IDH mutations in AML-M0, suggesting that these mutations played a role in the pathogenesis and served as potential therapeutic targets in this rare and unfavorable subtype of AML.

  20. Maternal acute lymphoctic leukemia with rearrangement of the mixed lineage leukemia gene occurring during pregnancy.

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Nassar, Amr; Saleh, Abu J; Almhareb, Fahed; Alzahrani, Hazzaa; Walter, Claudia; Bakr, Mohammad; Ahmed, Syed Osman; Chaudhri, Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease during pregnancy, accounting for about 15% of all cases of pregnancy-associated leukemia. Although mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangement is the dominant genetic aberration in infantile acute leukemia, the occurrence of MLL gene rearrangement in maternal ALL occurring during pregnancy has not been reported. Out of 31 cases of maternal leukemia diagnosed during pregnancy at our institution, 5 were ALL cases. Three of the 5 patients had MLL gene rearrangement. The data for these 5 patients are presented in this report. We believe that the association of MLL gene rearrangement with maternal leukemia is biologically plausible and this observation needs to be validated in a larger cohort of pregnancy-associated maternal leukemia cases.

  1. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  2. CT and MR imaging findings of appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis in a patient with acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia

    Choi, Seo Youn; Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Hae Kyung; Yi, Boem Ha; Chin, Su Sie; Park, Seong Kyu; Chung, Jun Chul [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Fungal infections occur in severely immunocompromised patients having profound and prolonged neutropenia. Here, we report a case of a 41-year-old female who, at the conclusion of induction chemotherapy for acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia, developed angioinvasive mucormycosis involving the appendix and liver, which presented as abdominal pain. This case is the first to provide detailed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of angioinvasive appendiceal and hepatic mucormycosis. The implications of these findings as well as the diagnosis and management of mucormycosis, is further discussed.

  3. A new recurring chromosome 13 abnormality in two older patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia: An Indian experience

    Trivedi P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here two cases of trisomy 13 in acute myeloid leukemia M1 subtype. short-term unstimulated bone marrow and peripheral blood lymphocyte culture showed 47, XY, +13 in all metaphase plates and trisomy 13 was confirmed with whole chromosome paint probes. Trisomy 13 in AML-M1 is a rare numerical abnormality. This is the first Indian report of sole trisomy 13 in AML-M1. Here, we present two cases of elder male patients, which may constitute a distinct subtype.

  4. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  5. The treatment with patients of acute promyelocytic leukemia complicating pregnancy%急性早幼粒细胞白血病合并妊娠处理

    郁进

    2014-01-01

    aPl 是急性白血病中病情十分凶险的一种类型,除具有急性白血病的共同特点外,出血症状明显重于其他白血病。我们通过2例白血病合并妊娠患者的诊疗过程探讨白血病与妊娠的相互影响。白血病合并妊娠时孕妇及胎儿死亡率均增加。在治疗妊娠合并白血病的患者时,不仅要注意治疗母体,还有考虑对胎儿的影响。%aPl is a type of acute leukemia that is very dangerous, in addition to the common features of acute leukemia, bleeding symptoms were significantly heavier than other leukemia. We explored the interaction of leukemia and pregnancy through 2 cases of leukemia patients complicating pregnancy during their diagnosis and treatment of patients. the death incidence of patients with leukemia complicating pregnancy was increased. in the treatment of pregnancy complicated with leukemia patients, we should not only pay attention to treatment of the parent, but also consider the impact on the fetus.

  6. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  7. Clinical Research of Compound Zhebei Granules for Increasing the Therapeutic Effect of Chemotherapy in Refractory Acute Leukemia Patients

    LU Dian-rong; LI Dong-yun; CHEN Xin-yi; YE Pei-zhi; TIAN Shao-dan

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effects of Compound Zhebei Granules (复方浙贝颗粒 CZG) in chemotherapy for refractory acute leukemia.Method:Using a randomized, double-blind and multi-central concurrent control clinical research project, the patients conformed with the diagnostic criteria, according to the drug randomized method, were divided into a CZG group and a control group.The patients of the two groups respectively took the observation drug or a placebo 3 days before chemotherapy, and the therapeutic effects were evaluated after one course of chemotherapy.According to the clinical research project, 137 patients were enrolled, including 71 cases in the CZG group and 66 cases in the control group.Results:The clinical complete remission (CR)rate was 42.3% in the CZG group with a total effective rate of 73.2%, and it was 25.8% in the control group with a total effective rate of 53.0%, showing a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P<0.05).Conclusion:CZG can increase the clinical remission rate for refractory acute leukemia during chemotherapy.

  8. Does acute promyelocytic leukemia in Indian patients have biology different from the West?

    Dutta Pankhi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APML is a well-characterized malignancy with typical clinico-hematological and molecular features. However, Indian data on this malignancy are limited. This study was conducted to determine the clinico-hematological profile of APML in India. Thirty-five patients with APML presenting to Hematology Department, AIIMS, New Delhi, between July 2003 and June 2005 were evaluated for presenting clinical features, hemogram, peripheral smear, bone marrow morphology and cytochemistry. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR for PML-RARα was done in all cases. Male-to-female ratio was 0.9:1 (males - 17 and females - 18 with median age 25 years (range 11-57 years. Presenting features included anemia, bleeding, fever, gum hypertrophy and scrotal ulceration. All cases showed hypergranular abnormal promyelocytes. Median hemoglobin was 6.3 g/dL (range - 3.0-9.0 g/dL, total leukocyte count (TLC was 33.88 x 10 9 /L (range - 1-170 x 10 9 /L. Platelet count was 28 x 10 9 /L (range - 4-170 x 10 9 /L. All cases were positive for myeloperoxidase and sudan black (SB, whereas 60% cases also showed non specific esterase (NSE positivity with 40% cases being fluoride sensitive. RT-PCR showed PML-RARα in 33/35 cases with the bcr3 isoform being present in 24/33 positive cases (72.7%. The two cases negative for PML-RARα showed typical morphology and responded to ATRA. On statistical analysis, no correlation was found between bcr isoform and TLC, platelet count, age sex and early death. Unusual features included gum hypertrophy and scrotal ulceration at presentation and high median presenting TLC (33.8 x 10 9 /L. There was, however, no microgranular variant. Another interesting feature was a high incidence of NSE positivity (60%, which was fluoride sensitive in 40%. Moreover, the bcr3 isoform was significantly overexpressed (72.7% in comparison to other studies. APML in India has certain unusual features, which may reflect a different biology.

  9. Vosaroxin and vosaroxin plus low-dose Ara-C (LDAC) vs low-dose Ara-C alone in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Dennis, Mike; Russell, Nigel; Hills, Robert K;

    2015-01-01

    The development of new treatments for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia is an active area, but has met with limited success. Vosaroxin, a quinolone-derived intercalating agent has several properties that could prove beneficial. Initial clinical studies showed it to be well-tolerated in o......The development of new treatments for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia is an active area, but has met with limited success. Vosaroxin, a quinolone-derived intercalating agent has several properties that could prove beneficial. Initial clinical studies showed it to be well...

  10. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis

    2016-01-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic...... fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness...... of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between...

  11. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who have chromosome 5 and/or 7 abnormalities.

    Straaten, H.M. van der; Biezen, A. van; Brand, R.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Egeler, R.M.; Barge, R.M.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Schouten, H.C.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Verdonck, L.F.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Chromosome 5 and/or 7 abnormalities are cytogenetic findings indicative of a poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The only potential cure for such patients is allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). As data on

  12. Pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia, and its treatment using recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin.

    Ikezoe, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is an uncommon subtype of acute myelogenous leukemia characterized by the proliferation of blasts with distinct morphology, a specific balanced reciprocal translocation t(15;17), and life-threatening hemorrhage caused mainly by enhanced fibrinolytic-type disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) into anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy regimens has dramatically improved overall survival of individuals with APL, although hemorrhage-related death during the early phase of therapy remains a serious problem. Moreover, population-based studies have shown that the incidence of early death during induction chemotherapy is nearly 30 %, and the most common cause of death is associated with hemorrhage. Thus, development of a novel treatment strategy to alleviate abnormal coagulation in APL patients is urgently required. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) comprises the active extracellular domain of TM, and has been used for treatment of DIC since 2008 in Japan. Use of rTM in combination with remission induction chemotherapy, including ATRA, produces potent resolution of DIC without exacerbation of bleeding tendency in individuals with APL. This review article discusses the pathogenesis and features of DIC caused by APL, as well as the possible anticoagulant and anti-leukemic action of rTM in APL patients.

  13. The quality and quantity of leukemia-derived dendritic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome are a predictive factor for the lytic potential of dendritic cells-primed leukemia-specific T cells.

    Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Dreyig, Julia; Kremser, Andreas; Kroell, Tanja; Freudenreich, Markus; Schmid, Christoph; Schweiger, Cornelia; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochen; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-06-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an important therapy option to reduce relapse rates after stem-cell transplantation in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloid leukemic cells can regularly be induced to differentiate into leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)), regaining the stimulatory capacity of professional dendritic cells (DCs) while presenting the known/unknown leukemic antigen repertoire. So far, induced antileukemic T-cell responses are variable or even mediate opposite effects. To further elicit DC/DC(leu)-induced T-cell-response patterns, we generated DC from 17 Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 2 myelodysplastic syndrome cases and carried out flowcytometry and (functional) nonradioactive fluorolysis assays before/after mixed lymphocyte cultures of matched (allogeneic) donor T cells (n=6), T cells prepared at relapse after stem-cell transplantation (n=4) or (autologous) patients' T cells (n=7) with blast containing mononuclear cells ("MNC") or DC(leu) ("DC"). Compared with "MNC", "DC" were better mediators of antileukemic-activity, although not in every case effective. We could define DC subtypes and cut-off proportions of DC subtypes/qualities (mature DC/DC(leu)) after "DC" priming, which were predictive for an antileukemic activity of primed T cells and the clinical course of the disease after immunotherapy (allogeneic stem-cell transplantation/donor lymphocytes infusion/therapy). In summary, our data show that the composition and quality of DC after a mixed lymphocyte culture-priming phase is predictive for a successful ex vivo antileukemic response, especially with respect to proportions of mature and leukemia-derived DC. These data contribute not only to predict DC-mediated functions or the clinical course of the diseases but also to develop and refine DC-vaccination strategies that may pave the way to develop and modify adoptive immunotherapy, especially for patients at relapse after allogeneic stem

  14. [Curative effect of decitabine combined with cytokine-induced killer cells in two elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia].

    Chang, Cheng; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Hong-Li; Lu, Xue-Chun; Guo, Bo; Cai, Li-Li; Han, Wei-Dong; Wang, Yao; Fan, Hui; Li, Su-Xia; Liu, Yang; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Bing; Ran, Hai-Hong; Lin, Jie; Zhang, Feng

    2013-02-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of low methylation drug decitabine combined with autologous cytokine induced killer cells (CIK) to treat the elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Two AML patients aged over 80 years old were diagnosed and treated in our department from 2006 to 2012; both company with MDS history, and one case was M4-type, another case was M6-type according to FAB classification. The changes in lymphocyte subsets, hematologic response, transfusion frequency, leukemic gene expression, obtaining CR or PR, quality of life and survival time of the patients with different treatment regimen (decitabine alone; CIK alone; decitabine combined with CIK) were systematically observed. The results showed that therapy of decitabine combined with CIK cells could reduce bone marrow suppression extent, decrease the frequency and volume of blood transfusion, and prolong the duration of partial remission, compared with the single use of CIK cell infusion and single use of decitabine treatment. Meanwhile, the kinds of expressed genes associated with leukemia decreased and the survival time was prolonged obviously. The patients' life quality significantly improved. It is concluded that decitabine combined with CIK for treatment of elderly patients with AML is safe and effective.

  15. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  16. Cytogenetic patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Testa, J.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of chromosomal banding patterns in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) reveals that approximately 50% of patients have an abnormal karyotype. Although there is substantial variability, certain nonrandom abnormalities occur, e.g., +8, -7, and the 8;21 translocation (often accompanied by loss of an X or Y chromosome). The 15;17 translocation appears to be highly specific for acute promyelocytic leukemia. These abnormalities usually are not seen in remission, but reappear in relapse, sometimes exhibiting further clonal evolution; a +8 is the most frequently observed evolutionary change. Patients with ANLL following treatment of a malignant lymphoma tend to have hypodiploid modal numbers and frequently show loss of a chromosome No. 5 or No. 7.

  17. Transformation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome to Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Child

    2010-01-01

    Childhood myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is an uncommon condition. Unlike adult MDS, pediatric patients have a more progressive course and rapidly transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Evolution to acute lymphoblastic leukemia is extremely rare. We report a 5 year old female child who presented with refractory anemia with excess blasts and transformed into acute lymphoblastic leukemia 4 months after initial diagnosis.

  18. Successful Control of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation by Recombinant Thrombomodulin during Arsenic Trioxide Treatment in Relapsed Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Motohiro Shindo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC frequently occurs in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. With the induction of therapy in APL using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, DIC can be controlled in most cases as ATRA usually shows immediate improvement of the APL. However, arsenic trioxide (ATO which has been used for the treatment of relapse in APL patients has shown to take time to suppress APL cells, therefore the control of DIC in APL with ATO treatment is a major problem. Recently, the recombinant soluble thrombomodulin fragment has received a lot of attention as the novel drug for the treatment of DIC with high efficacy. Here, we present a relapsed patient with APL in whom DIC was successfully and safely controlled by rTM during treatment with ATO.

  19. Acute promyelocytic leukemia and pregnancy.

    Giagounidis, A A; Beckmann, M W; Giagounidis, A S; Aivado, M; Emde, T; Germing, U; Riehs, T; Heyll, A; Aul, C

    2000-04-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the use of all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) as a differentiating agent induces complete remission in a high percentage of patients. In pregnancy, however, this drug bears the risk of severe teratogenicity to the child. We report the case of a 23-yr-old woman at 21 weeks' gestation suffering from APL. She was treated with ATRA (45 mg/m2) for 40 d and two courses of standard chemotherapy. The mother achieved complete remission within 22 d of treatment. Fetal development was normal, and a healthy premature girl was born in the 35th week of pregnancy. In a review of the literature we have identified 14 cases of APL in pregnancy treated with ATRA alone or in combination with chemotherapy. ATRA has been used as early as in the 3rd week of gestation and in no case have malformations or other teratogenic effects occurred. Side-effects, however, ranged from fetal cardiac arrhythmias to induction of labour. Although known to exhibit severe teratogenic effects during the first trimester of pregnancy, ATRA seems to be reasonably safe during the second and third trimesters in the treatment of APL. However, careful obstetric follow-up is mandatory regarding fetal cardiac complications.

  20. Lack of Correlation Between the CCR5-Δ32 Mutation and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Iranian Patients.

    Khorramdelazad, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yousef; Momeni, Mohammad; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Khandany, Behjat Kalantary; Moogooei, Mozhgan; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein

    2015-03-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are crucially important in the pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a specific chemokine receptor for CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), CCL4 and CCL5 which all play key roles in identifying cancer properties and localization of leukemia cells. It has been demonstrated that the known mutation in CCR5 gene (CCR5-Δ32) leads to mal-expression of the receptor and affect its function. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of CCR5-Δ32 mutation within Iranian AML patients. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 60 AML patients and 300 healthy controls. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation was evaluated using Gap-PCR technique. Our results showed that CCR5-Δ32 mutation was not found in the patients, while three out of the controls had hetrozygotic form of this mutation. The rest of studied samples had the wild form of the gene. According to these findings, it can probably be concluded that the CCR5-Δ32 is not associated with susceptibility to AML in Iranian patients.

  1. A Case of Abdominal Sarcoidosis in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Vadsala Baskaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The allogeneic bone marrow transplantation usually preceded by induction chemotherapy, in fit patients, represents the gold standard in the acute myeloid leukaemia. In the last years, many trials have been set up with the view of improving the number of remissions during the induction by adding new drugs. Several early or late side effects have been described in the literature. We herein present a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia patient who, after chemotherapy, developed ascites that turned out to be abdominal sarcoidosis.

  2. Advances in Management of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia with Arsenic Trioxide

    MA Jun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), with specific features in cell morphology, is classified as M3 by French-American-British (FAB).Among M3, 95% of patients show specific chromosome translocation t(15;17)q(22;21) with PML-RAR α fusion gene, and 5% of patients show other subtypes. According to the statistical analysis of 2 540 adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML)cases in Harbin Institute of Hematology & Oncology, APL accounted for 23%.

  3. High EVI1 expression predicts poor survival in acute myeloid leukemia: a study of 319 de novo AML patients.

    Barjesteh van Waalwijk van Doorn-Khosrovani, Sahar; Erpelinck, Claudia; van Putten, Wim L J; Valk, Peter J M; van der Poel-van de Luytgaarde, Sonja; Hack, Ronald; Slater, Rosalyn; Smit, Elisabeth M E; Beverloo, H Berna; Verhoef, Gregor; Verdonck, Leo F; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Sonneveld, Pieter; de Greef, Georgine E; Löwenberg, Bob; Delwel, Ruud

    2003-02-01

    The proto-oncogene EVI1 encodes a DNA binding protein and is located on chromosome 3q26. The gene is aberrantly expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients carrying 3q26 abnormalities. Two mRNAs are transcribed from this locus: EVI1 and a fusion of EVI1 with MDS1 (MDS1-EVI1), a gene located 5' of EVI1. The purpose of this study was to investigate which of the 2 gene products is involved in transformation in human AML. To discriminate between EVI1 and MDS1-EVI1 transcripts, distinct real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were developed. Patients with 3q26 abnormalities often showed high EVI1 and MDS1-EVI1 expression. In a cohort of 319 AML patients, 4 subgroups could be distinguished: EVI1(+) and MDS1-EVI1(-) (6 patients; group I), EVI1(+) and MDS1-EVI1(+) (26 patients; group II), EVI1(-) and MDS1-EVI1(+) (12 patients; group III), and EVI1(-) and MDS1-EVI1(-) (275 patients; group IV). The only 4 patients with a 3q26 aberration belonged to groups I and II. Interestingly, high EVI1 and not MDS1-EVI1 expression was associated with unfavorable karyotypes (eg, -7/7q-) or complex karyotypes. Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between EVI1 expression and 11q23 aberrations (mixed lineage leukemia [MLL] gene involvement). Patients from groups I and II had significantly shorter overall and event-free survival than patients in groups III and IV. Our data demonstrate that high EVI1 expression is an independent poor prognostic marker within the intermediate- risk karyotypic group.

  4. Identification of a Novel P190-Derived Breakpoint Peptide Suitable for Peptide Vaccine Therapeutic Approach in Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    Ippoliti, Micaela; Defina, Marzia; Gozzini, Antonella; Baratè, Claudia; Aprile, Lara; Pietrini, Alice; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Raspadori, Donatella; Lauria, Francesco; Bocchia, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) is a high-risk acute leukemia with poor prognosis, in which the specific t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation results in a chimeric bcr-abl (e1a2 breakpoint) and in a 190 KD protein (p190) with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. The advent of first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) improved the short-term outcome of Ph+ ALL patients not eligible for allo-SCT; yet disease recurrence is almost inevitable. Peptides derived from p190...

  5. The clinical importance of myeloid antigen coexpression and TEL-AML1 mutation in patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ayşen Türedi Yıldırım

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship,if any, between clinical features, prognosis, and thecoexpressions and TEL-AML1 mutation in patients withacute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.Methods: Eigthy-three patients with acute lymphoblasticleukemia were retrospectively examined. Age, gender,White blood cell count, hemoglobin level, platelet count,ALL subtypei (B or T ALL, risk groups, surface antigensdeteceted by flow cytometry, existence of TEL-AML1 mutations,response, remission and relapse status at 8., 15.ve 33. Days of treatment were recorded and analyzed.Results: 15 (18% out of 83 were identified with aberrantantigen expression. Of these patients, twelve (14.4%had myeloid antigen coexpression (CD13 and/or CD33,two with B cell ALL had CD2 and CD7 coexpressions respectively,one with T cell ALL had CD19 coexpression.No significant differences were found between patientswith and without myeloid antigen coexpression in terms ofhemoglobin levels, white blood cells and platelet counts,responses given on the 8th, 15th, and 30th days on the treatment,risk groups, and relapse (p>0.05. Myeloid antigencoexpression was found in 4 of 13 patients who were identifiedwith TEL-AML1 mutation. No significant relationshipwas found between this mutation and coexpressions. Norelapse and exitus were observed in four patients with coexpressionand TEL-AML1.Conclusion: The prognosis and clinical features showsno statistically significant relationship with the presence ofneither Myeloid antigen expression nor TEL-AML1 mutation.We believe, however, the future studies involving biggersample sizes will prove to be useful in terms of moreconvincing results. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4(1: 90-94Key words: Acute lenfoblastic leukemia, coexpression,TEL-AML1 mutation, prognosis

  6. Histamine revisited: Role in acute myeloid leukemia

    Prasan R Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine dihydrochloride (HDC is derived from biogenic amine histamine. It suppresses the production of reactive oxygen species which inhibits the stimulation of T cells and natural killer (NK cells. Co-administration of the cytokine interleukin (IL-2 and HDC assists the activation of T cells and NK cells by IL-2, causing in the destruction of cancer cells, including those of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A significantly longer leukemia-free survival (LFS; primary endpoint was demonstrated in a phase III trial in adult patients with AML in first or subsequent remission, in those who received subcutaneous HDC and concomitant subcutaneous IL-2 as maintenance therapy compared to that of patients receiving no treatment. However, the difference in overall survival (OS between the two groups was not significant. Patients had acceptable levels of adverse effects. Thus, HDC in addition to IL-2 appears to be a useful maintenance therapy option for adult patients with AML in remission.

  7. Development of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia 15 years after hydroxyurea use in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    Baz, Walid; Najfeld, Vesna; Yotsuya, Matthew; Talwar, Jotica; Terjanian, Terenig; Forte, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We report a 41 year old male with sickle cell disease who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with complex karyotype involving chromosomes 5, 7 and 17 after 15 years of hydroxyurea treatment. He responded poorly to induction chemotherapy with cytarabine/idarubicin followed by high dose cytarabine and succumbed to neutropenic sepsis. Multiple systematic reviews, observational studies and clinical trials were conducted to identify the toxicity profile of hydroxurea. Only six cases of leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome were identified in patients with sickle cell anemia treated with hydroxyurea. Subsequently, it was concluded that hydroxyurea is not leukemogenic. However, it was noted that most of the published studies had only up to 9 years of follow-up. Our patient was started on hydroxyurea in 1990, before the widespread use of the drug and took hydroxyurea for 15 years. His presentation may reflect an outcome otherwise not yet observed because of the short follow-up of prior studies. We believe that the leukemogenic risk of hydroxyurea should be discussed with the patients and their families. Studies evaluating the adverse effects of hydroxyurea should have longer follow-up before definitive conclusions are drawn.

  8. THE DIFFERENTIATION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: EXPERIENCE OF THE PETHEMA GROUP AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Pau Montesinos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation syndrome (DS, formerly known as retinoic acid syndrome, is the main life-threatening complication of therapy with differentiating agents (all-trans retinoic acid [ATRA] or arsenic trioxide [ATO] in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. The differentiation of leukemic blasts and promyelocytes induced by ATRA and/or ATO may lead to cellular migration, endothelial activation, and release of interleukins and vascular factors responsible of tissue damage. Roughly one quarter of patients with APL undergoing induction therapy will develop the DS, characterized by unexplained fever, acute respiratory distress with interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and/or a vascular capillary leak syndrome leading to acute renal failure. Although the development of the DS, particularly of the severe form, is still associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality during induction, the early administration of high-dose dexamethasone at the onset of the first symptoms seems likely to have dramatically reduced the mortality rate of this complication. In this article, we will review the clinical features, incidence, prognostic factors, management, and outcome of the DS reported in the scientific literature. We will make focus in the experience of the three consecutive Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología trials (PETHEMA LPA96, LPA99, and LPA2005, in which more than one thousand patients were treated with ATRA plus idarubicin for induction.

  9. THE DIFFERENTIATION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA: EXPERIENCE OF THE PETHEMA GROUP AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE.

    Pau Montesinos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Differentiation syndrome (DS, formerly known as retinoic acid syndrome, is the main life-threatening complication of therapy with differentiating agents (all-trans retinoic acid [ATRA] or arsenic trioxide [ATO] in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. The differentiation of leukemic blasts and promyelocytes induced by ATRA and/or ATO may lead to cellular migration, endothelial activation, and release of interleukins and vascular factors responsible of tissue damage. Roughly one quarter of patients with APL undergoing induction therapy will develop the DS, characterized by unexplained fever, acute respiratory distress with interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, and/or a vascular capillary leak syndrome leading to acute renal failure. Although the development of the DS, particularly of the severe form, is still associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality during induction, the early administration of high-dose dexamethasone at the onset of the first symptoms seems likely to have dramatically reduced the mortality rate of this complication. In this article, we will review the clinical features, incidence, prognostic factors, management, and outcome of the DS reported in the scientific literature. We will make focus in the experience of the three consecutive Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología trials (PETHEMA LPA96, LPA99, and LPA2005, in which more than one thousand patients were treated with ATRA plus idarubicin for induction.

  10. An evaluation of diagnostic techniques utilized in the initial workup of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Kuntz, D J; Leonard, J C; Nitschke, R M; Vanhoutte, J J; Wilson, D A; Basmadjian, G P

    1984-07-01

    The records of 32 pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were reviewed to evaluate the role of various diagnostic techniques used to assess the extent of extramedullary disease. Our findings indicate that adequate screening for hepatosplenomegaly is obtained by clinical assessment and for bone and renal involvement by bone scintigraphy including concomitant renal imaging. We recommend that radiographs be restricted to scintigraphically abnormal areas and/or sites of bone pain. Liver-spleen scintigraphy, gallium studies, intravenous pyelography, and ultrasound studies of the abdomen and pelvis should be utilized only to answer specific clinical questions. Evaluation in this manner reduces both radiation exposure and patient expense, while it adequately defines the extent of disease in these organs.

  11. [Successful treatment of a persistent rhino-cerebral mucormycosis in a pediatric patient with a debut of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Cofré, Fernanda; Villarroel, Milena; Castellón, Loreto; Santolaya, María E

    2015-08-01

    The fungi of the order Mucorales cause mucormycosis, which usually presents as an invasive fungal disease with rapid angioinvasion in immunocompromised patients. Rhinocerebral is the most common presentation. The lipid formulations of amphotericin B are used as primary treatment in invasive mucormycosis; the combined use of posaconazole could allow a reduction in the dose of amphotericin B improving tolerance and adherence to treatment. Caspofungin and amphotericin B association has been shown to be synergistic in vitro and effective in murine models. We present the case of a preschool patient that during the debut of acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed a rhinocerebral mucormycosis successfully responding to antifungal treatment with the combination of liposomal amphotericin and caspofungin.

  12. Causes and prognostic factors of remission induction failure in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin

    J. de Serna (Javier); P. Montesinos (Pau); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Chelo); R. Parody (Ricardo); A. León (Angel); J. Esteve (Jordi); J.M. Bergua (Juan Miguel); G. Milone (Gustavo); G. Debén (Guillermo); C. Rivas (Concha); M. González (Marcos); M. Tormo (Mar); J. Díaz-Mediavilla (Joaquín); J.D. González (Jose); S. Negri (Silvia); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAn understanding of the prognostic factors associated with the various forms of induction mortality in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has remained remarkably limited. This study reports the incidence, time of occurrence, and prognostic factors of the major categories of

  13. Clinical significance of CD56 expression in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based regimens

    Montesinos, Pau; Rayon, Chelo; Vellenga, Edo; Brunet, Salut; Gonzalez, Jose; Gonzalez, Marcos; Holowiecka, Aleksandra; Esteve, Jordi; Bergua, Juan; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Rivas, Concha; Tormo, Mar; Rubio, Vicente; Bueno, Javier; Manso, Felix; Milone, Gustavo; de la Serna, Javier; Perez, Inmaculada; Perez-Encinas, Manuel; Krsnik, Isabel; Ribera, Josep M.; Escoda, Lourdes; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    The expression of CD56 antigen in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) blasts has been associated with short remission duration and extramedullary relapse. We investigated the clinical significance of CD56 expression in a large series of patients with APL treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthr

  14. Causes and prognostic factors of remission induction failure in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin

    de la Serna, Javier; Montesinos, Pau; Vellenga, Edo; Rayon, Chelo; Parody, Ricardo; Leon, Angel; Esteve, Jordi; Bergua, Juan M.; Milone, Gustavo; Deben, Guillermo; Rivas, Concha; Gonzalez, Marcos; Tormo, Mar; Diaz-Mediavilla, Joaquin; Gonzalez, Jose D.; Negri, Silvia; Amutio, Elena; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the prognostic factors associated with the various forms of induction mortality in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has remained remarkably limited. This study reports the incidence, time of occurrence, and prognostic factors of the major categories of induction f

  15. Prognostic value of FLT3 mutations in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy

    Barragan, Eva; Montesinos, Pau; Camos, Mireia; Gonzalez, Marcos; Calasanz, Maria J.; Roman-Gomez, Jose; Gomez-Casares, Maria T.; Ayala, Rosa; Lopez, Javier; Fuster, Oscar; Colomer, Dolors; Chillon, Carmen; Larrayoz, Maria J.; Sanchez-Godoy, Pedro; Gonzalez-Campos, Jose; Manso, Felix; Amador, Maria L.; Vellenga, Edo; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene mutations are frequent in acute promyelocytic leukemia but their prognostic value is not well established. Design and Methods We evaluated FLT3-internal tandem duplication and FLT3-D835 mutations in patients treated with all-trans retinoic acid and a

  16. Prognostic value of FLT3 mutations in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy

    P. Montesinos (Pau); M. González (Marcos); F. Manso (Félix); E. Vellenga (Edo); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene mutations are frequent in acute promyelocytic leukemia but their prognostic value is not well established. Design and Methods We evaluated FLT3-internal tandem duplication and FLT3-D835 mutations in patients treated with all-trans retinoi

  17. Outcome and medical costs of patients with invasive aspergillosis and acute myelogenous leukemia-myelodysplastic syndrome treated with intensive chemotherapy: An observational study

    L. Slobbe (Lennert); S. Polinder (Suzanne); J.K. Doorduijn (Jeanette); P.J. Lugtenburg (Pieternella); A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); B.J.A. Rijnders (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a leading cause of mortality in patients with acute leukemia. Management of IA is expensive, which makes prevention desirable. Because hospital resources are limited, prevention costs have to be compared with treatment costs and outcome. Methods

  18. Mutations in the gene for the granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor receptor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia preceded by severe congenital neutropenia

    F. Dong (Fan); R.K. Brynes; N. Tidow; K. Welte (Karl); B. Löwenberg (Bob); I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn severe congenital neutropenia the maturation of myeloid progenitor cells is arrested. The myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia develop in some patients with severe congenital neutropenia. Abnormalities in the signal-transduction pathways for granulocyte colony-stimulati

  19. Differentiation syndrome in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all- trans retinoic acid and anthracycline chemotherapy: Characteristics, outcome, and prognostic factors

    P. Montesinos (Pau); J.M. Bergua (Juan Miguel); E. Vellenga (Edo); C. Rayón (Chelo); R. Parody (Ricardo); J. de Serna (Javier); A. León (Angel); J. Esteve (Jordi); G. Milone (Gustavo); G. Debén (Guillermo); C. Rivas (Concha); M. González (Marcos); M. Tormo (Mar); D.M. Joaquín; J.D. González (José David); S. Negri (Silvia); E. Amutio (Elena); S. Brunet (Salut); B. Löwenberg (Bob); M.A. Sanz (Miguel Angel)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDifferentiation syndrome (DS) can be a life-threatening complication in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) undergoing induction therapy with all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Detailed knowl- edge about DS has remained limited. We present an analysis of the incidence, char- a

  20. Bone scintigraphy in acute myeloid leukemia patient with fungal vertebral osteomyelitis

    Zekiye Hasbek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The result of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study was reported as “metastasis of primary disease on L2-L3 vertebrae” in a 63-year-old male patient, who developed a back pain after receiving four courses of treatment for AML. The patient, who did not respond to pain medication, was sent to nuclear medicine department for a bone scintigraphy. Diffuse increased osteoblastic activity was reported on L2-L3 vertebrae with a suspicion about infection or fracture, together with a focal osteoblastic activity involvement in the right sacroiliac joint in the bone scintigraphy which was made with Tc99m-MDP. In the mean time, the patient complained about progressive loss of strength on bilateral lower extremities and numbness in legs. Repeated MRI was reported as “irregularities in L2-L3 vertebral disc region concordant with infection, prominent thecal pressure, loss of height in L2-L3 vertebrae associated with osteomyelitis and a mass concordant with paravertebral abscess and granulation tissue”. The patient was operated and necrotic tissue was removed by curettage, relieving the compression on L2-L3 and on the disc distance. In culture examination of the sample “candida albicans” was isolated. Antifungal treatment with Amphotericin B was started. Patient's pain was reduced and MRI findings showed some regression in abscess following the treatment. There was improvement in neurological examination. However, relapse in AML was observed in bone marrow aspiration, performed during follow-up and chemotherapy was started again. On the second day of chemotherapy high fever started and cellulitis developed on the right leg. The patient received hemodialysis treatment due to increase in BUN and creatinine levels. Pulmonary edema and associated respiratory insufficiency was developed and the patient died. Fungal infections are one of the most important clinical problems in leukemia patients. However, vertebral osteomyelitis secondary to fungal

  1. Outpatient management of intensively treated acute leukemia patients-the patients' perspective

    Jepsen, Lene Østergaard; Høybye, Mette Terp; Hansen, Dorte Gilså

    2016-01-01

    the possibility of maintaining everyday life, which was essential to the patients. The privacy ensured by the home was important to patients, and they accepted the necessary responsibility that came with it. However, time spent together with fellow patients and their relatives was an important and highly valued...... part of their social life. CONCLUSIONS: Approached from the patient perspective, outpatient management provided a motivation for patients as it ensured their presence at home and provided the possibility of taking part in everyday life of the family, despite severe illness and intensive treatment...

  2. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  3. Integrating a prospective pilot trial and patient-derived xenografts to trace metabolic changes associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Carrabba, Matteo G; Tavel, Laurette; Oliveira, Giacomo; Forcina, Alessandra; Quilici, Giacomo; Nardelli, Francesca; Tresoldi, Cristina; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Bernardi, Massimo; Vago, Luca; Musco, Giovanna

    2016-10-28

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the molecular bases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), new tools to link disease biology to the unpredictable patient clinical course are still needed. Herein, high-throughput metabolomics, combined with the other "-omics" disciplines, holds promise in identifying disease-specific and clinically relevant features.In this study, we took advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to trace AML-associated metabolic trajectory employing two complementary strategies. On the one hand, we performed a prospective observational clinical trial to identify metabolic changes associated with blast clearance during the first two cycles of intensive chemotherapy in nine adult patients. On the other hand, to reduce the intrinsic variability associated with human samples and AML genetic heterogeneity, we analyzed the metabolic changes in the plasma of immunocompromised mice upon engraftment of primary human AML blasts.Combining the two longitudinal approaches, we narrowed our screen to seven common metabolites, for which we observed a mirror-like trajectory in mice and humans, tracing AML progression and remission, respectively. We interpreted this set of metabolites as a dynamic fingerprint of AML evolution.Overall, these NMR-based metabolomic data, to be consolidated in larger cohorts and integrated in more comprehensive system biology approaches, hold promise for providing valuable and non-redundant information on the systemic effects of leukemia.

  4. Integrating a prospective pilot trial and patient-derived xenografts to trace metabolic changes associated with acute myeloid leukemia

    Matteo G. Carrabba

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the considerable progress in understanding the molecular bases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML, new tools to link disease biology to the unpredictable patient clinical course are still needed. Herein, high-throughput metabolomics, combined with the other “-omics” disciplines, holds promise in identifying disease-specific and clinically relevant features. In this study, we took advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR to trace AML-associated metabolic trajectory employing two complementary strategies. On the one hand, we performed a prospective observational clinical trial to identify metabolic changes associated with blast clearance during the first two cycles of intensive chemotherapy in nine adult patients. On the other hand, to reduce the intrinsic variability associated with human samples and AML genetic heterogeneity, we analyzed the metabolic changes in the plasma of immunocompromised mice upon engraftment of primary human AML blasts. Combining the two longitudinal approaches, we narrowed our screen to seven common metabolites, for which we observed a mirror-like trajectory in mice and humans, tracing AML progression and remission, respectively. We interpreted this set of metabolites as a dynamic fingerprint of AML evolution. Overall, these NMR-based metabolomic data, to be consolidated in larger cohorts and integrated in more comprehensive system biology approaches, hold promise for providing valuable and non-redundant information on the systemic effects of leukemia.

  5. Oral bacteria in patients with acute leukemia linfocítica.

    Torres Ramos, Gilmer; Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Anticona Huaynate, Cynthia; Bachiller de Odontología Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Gálvez Calla, Luis H.; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas. Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Florián, Silva; Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, even the presence of a complex oral micro-flora, it is possible to cure Acute Linphoblastic Leucemic patients. Upon 200 different species have been isolated, the majority is transient, and just 20 are resident species. Our investigation analyzed 106 LLA patients treated in the Neoplasic Diseases Peruvian Institute (INEN) since January to December 2001, whit the aim to state the oral micro flora, emphasizing in the opportunistic species that may cause systemic pathologies. It consist...

  6. Liver Involvement with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Emily Mathews

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver involvement with acute myeloid leukemia (AML is rarely reported. The majority of published cases suggest a cholestatic picture and obstructive jaundice at presentation. On the contrary, our patient presented with transaminitis without cholestasis. Elevated liver function tests persisted in our patient despite cholecystectomy; however, they normalized with chemotherapy administration, suggesting that AML was the causative effect of the hepatitis-like picture. Our review of the literature revealed that most reported cases of AML with liver involvement had short-lived remissions and an overall ominous prognosis. In our opinion, patients who have liver involvement with AML should be offered alternative investigational therapies with a low hepatic toxicity profile.

  7. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presented as Multiple Breast Masses

    Bayrak, Ilkay Koray; Yalin, Turkay; Ozmen, Zafer; Aksoz, Tolga; Doughanji, Roula [Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2009-10-15

    Breast metastases in cases leukemia are very rare and occur primarily in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We report the involvement of breast metastases in a 30-year-old woman with acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient's mammograms revealed an extremely dense pattern with ill-defined, denser mass-like lesions in both breasts. A bilateral breast ultrasonographic evaluation revealed lobular-shaped and partly ill-defined hypoechoic masses with a multi-septated nodular (mottled) appearance.

  8. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with gross hematuria

    Kalbani, Naifain Al; Weitzman, Sheila; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Carcao, Manuel; Abla, Oussama

    2007-01-01

    A case of a six-year-old boy presenting with gross hematuria is reported. Investigations revealed the etiology of the hematuria to be thrombocytopenia in the setting of newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnosis of leukemia was confirmed by bone marrow examination. The patient’s hematuria completely resolved with platelet transfusions. Although thrombocytopenia is a very common presenting feature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, gross hematuria is exceedingly rare. Thus, thro...

  10. A phase 2 study of high-dose lenalidomide as initial therapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Fehniger, Todd A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Nelson, Alissa D; Demland, Jeffery; Abboud, Camille N; Cashen, Amanda F; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Vij, Ravi

    2011-02-10

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have limited treatment options and a poor prognosis, thereby warranting novel therapeutic strategies. We evaluated the efficacy of lenalidomide as front-line therapy for older AML patients. In this phase 2 study, patients 60 years of age or older with untreated AML received high-dose (HD) lenalidomide at 50 mg daily for up to 2 28-day cycles. If patients achieved a complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) or did not progress after 2 cycles of HD lenalidomide, they received low-dose lenalidomide (10 mg daily) until disease progression, an unacceptable adverse event, or completion of 12 cycles. Thirty-three AML patients (median age, 71 years) were enrolled with intermediate (55%), unfavorable (39%), or unknown (6%) cytogenetic risk. Overall CR/CRi rate was 30%, and 53% in patients completing HD lenalidomide. The CR/CRi rate was significantly higher in patients presenting with a low (< 1000/μL) circulating blast count (50%, P = .01). The median time to CR/CRi was 30 days, and duration of CR/CRi was 10 months (range, 1- ≥ 17 months). The most common grades ≥ 3 toxicities were thrombocytopenia, anemia, infection, and neutropenia. HD lenalidomide has evidence of clinical activity as initial therapy for older AML patients, and further study of lenalidomide in AML and MDS is warranted. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00546897.

  11. COMPARISON OF CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS BETWEEN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA TREATED WITH ALL-TRANS RETINOIC ACID AND CHEMOTHERAPY

    张芬琴; 吴立德; 李秀松; 孙关林; 蔡敬仁; 王振义

    1992-01-01

    Clinical observations were retrospectively compared between 2 matched groups of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) each 20. The first group were treated with chemotherapy, the other with all-tram retinoic acid (ATRA) alone at a dose of 45-60mg/M~2/d. The complete remission (CR) rate of ATRA group was significantly higher than that of chemotherapy (90% vs 55%). The time for obtaining CR as well as the duration of fever and hospitalization were shorter and the amount of blood transfused was less in the former than in the latter group. Seven cases were complicated by DIC and 4 died in the group of chemotherapy, while no case was by of DIC or death in the ATRA group. The mechanism was discussed. ATRA is an alternative effective drug for remission induction therapy in APL with high rate of CR.

  12. [Problems in maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemias in adults].

    Gürtler, R; Raderecht, C

    1975-01-01

    Problems of maintaining therapy for acute myelocytic leukemias in adults are discussed. The analysis of the maintaining therapy in 22 patients affected with an acute myelocytic leukemia and living for more than 6 months revealed that the interval therapy with a high dosage of cytostatic combinations in the sense of the COAP scheme is preferable compared with the daily administration of 6-mercaptopurin, in addition methotrexate twice a week. Reasons for this are discussed.

  13. The prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients treated with high-dose cytarabine

    Ahmad EI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebtesam I Ahmad, Heba H Gawish, Nashwa MA Al Azizi, Ashraf M ElhefniClinical Pathology Department, Hematology and Oncology Unit of Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, Sharkia, EgyptBackground: Activating point mutation of the RAS gene has been generally accepted as an oncogenic event in a variety of malignancies. It represents one of the most common genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. However, little is known about its clinical relevance in the treatment outcome for this leukemia.Objective: This study aimed to clarify the biologic and prognostic impact of K-RAS mutations in relation to the dose of cytarabine (ara-C used in postinduction consolidation chemotherapy in adult AML patients.Patients and methods: The study comprised of 71 de novo AML patients with male/female ratio 1.4:1; their ages ranged from 21–59 years with a median of 37 years. They were subjected to full clinical evaluation, routine laboratory investigations, cytogenetic studies by G-banding (Giemsa staining, and K-RAS mutation detection using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The patients were randomized into two groups according to the ara-C dose used in consolidation treatment, the high the dose ara-C (HDAC group receiving 400 mg ara-C and-low-dose ara-C (LDAC group receiving 100 mg ara-C; they were followed over a period of five years.Results: Mutations in the K-RAS gene (mutRAS were detected in 23 patients (32% with the remaining 48 patients (68% having wild-type RAS (wtRAS. The percent of blast cells was significantly lower in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P ≤ 0.001 while M4 subtype of AML and Inv(16 frequencies were significantly higher in mutRAS compared to wtRAS patients (P = 0.015 and (P = 0.003, respectively. The patients were followed up for a median of 43 months (range 11–57 months. There was no significant difference in overall survival (OS between mutRAS and wtRAS (P = 0.326. Within the mut

  14. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Azizi, Zahra; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; DABAGHI, MOHAMMAD; NADIMI, MOTAHAREH

    2015-01-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the...

  15. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Koprivnikar J

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Jamie Koprivnikar, James McCloskey, Stefan Faderl Division of Leukemia, John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ, USA Abstract: Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug. Keywords: PEG-asparaginase, ALL, chemotherapy, pegaspargase, AYA, pediatric 

  16. An adult patient who developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma 9 years after radiation therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Kato, Yasuhiro [National Hiroshima Hospital, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Ohno, Norioki; Horikawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Shimose, Shoji [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    A 24-year-old Japanese man with a history of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which occurred during childhood, developed malignant fibrous histiocytoma of his left knee. His past history revealed that he had undergone leukemic blast cell invasion of the left knee and subsequent radiation therapy 9 years ago. The total radiation doses for the upper part of the left tibia and the lower part of the left femur were 60 Gy and 40 Gy, respectively. Neither distant metastasis nor a relapse of leukemia occurred. A curative resection of the left femur with a noninvasive margin was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy including high-dose methotrexate was given successfully before and after surgery; this was followed by relapse-free survival for 3 years. The nature of postirradiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma is highly aggressive. When a patient complains of persistent symptoms in a previously irradiated field, the possibility of this tumor must be taken into account. The importance of early diagnosis cannot be over-emphasized. (author)

  17. Immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and mutational characterization of cell lines derived from myelodysplastic syndrome patients after progression to acute myeloid leukemia.

    Palau, Anna; Mallo, Mar; Palomo, Laura; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ines; Diesch, Jeannine; Campos, Diana; Granada, Isabel; Juncà, Jordi; Drexler, Hans G; Solé, Francesc; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    Leukemia cell lines have been widely used in the hematology field to unravel mechanistic insights and to test new therapeutic strategies. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and frequent progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A few cell lines have been established from MDS patients after progression to AML but their characterization is incomplete. Here we provide a detailed description of the immunophenotypic profile of the MDS-derived cell lines SKK-1, SKM-1, F-36P; and MOLM-13. Specifically, we analyzed a comprehensive panel of markers that are currently applied in the diagnostic routine for myeloid disorders. To provide high-resolution genetic data comprising copy number alterations and losses of heterozygosity we performed whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism-based arrays and included the cell line OHN-GM that harbors the frequent chromosome arm 5q deletion. Furthermore, we assessed the mutational status of 83 disease-relevant genes. Our results provide a resource to the MDS and AML field that allows researchers to choose the best-matching cell line for their functional studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring trisomy 8.

    Konuma, Takaaki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kohno, Akio; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adult patients with AML harboring +8 remains unclear. To evaluate, the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with AML harboring +8 as the only chromosomal abnormality or in association with other abnormalities, we retrospectively analyzed the Japanese registration data of 631 adult patients with AML harboring +8 treated with allogeneic HSCT between 1990 and 2013. In total, 388 (61%) patients were not in remission at the time of HSCT. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, the probability of overall survival and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years were 40 and 34%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two or more additional cytogenetic abnormalities and not being in remission at the time of HSCT were significantly associated with a higher overall mortality and relapse. Nevertheless, no significant impact on the outcome was observed in cases with one cytogenetic abnormality in addition to +8. Although more than 60% of the patients received HSCT when not in remission, allogeneic HSCT offered a curative option for adult patients with AML harboring +8.

  19. Deferasirox and vitamin D improves overall survival in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia after demethylating agents failure.

    Etienne Paubelle

    Full Text Available The prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML in elderly (≥65 years patients is poor and treatment remains non-consensual especially for those who are not eligible for intensive therapies. Our group has shown that in vitro the iron chelator deferasirox (DFX synergizes with vitamin D (VD to promote monocyte differentiation in primary AML cells. Herein, we present results from a retrospective case-control study in which the association of DFX (1-2 g/d and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (100,000 IU/week (DFX/VD was proposed to patients following demethylating agents failure. Median survival of patients treated with DFX/VD combination (n = 17 was significantly increased in comparison with matched patients receiving best supportive care (BSC alone (n = 13 (10.4 versus 4 months respectively. In addition, the only factor associated to an increased overall survival in DFX/VD-treated patients was serum VD levels. We conclude that DFX/VD treatment correlated with increased overall survival of AML patients in this retrospective cohort of elderly patients.

  20. Deferasirox and Vitamin D Improves Overall Survival in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Demethylating Agents Failure

    Suarez, Felipe; Callens, Céline; Dussiot, Michaël; Isnard, Françoise; Rubio, Marie-Thérèse; Damaj, Gandhi; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Monteiro, Renato C.; Moura, Ivan C.; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in elderly (≥65 years) patients is poor and treatment remains non-consensual especially for those who are not eligible for intensive therapies. Our group has shown that in vitro the iron chelator deferasirox (DFX) synergizes with vitamin D (VD) to promote monocyte differentiation in primary AML cells. Herein, we present results from a retrospective case-control study in which the association of DFX (1–2 g/d) and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (100,000 IU/week) (DFX/VD) was proposed to patients following demethylating agents failure. Median survival of patients treated with DFX/VD combination (n = 17) was significantly increased in comparison with matched patients receiving best supportive care (BSC) alone (n = 13) (10.4 versus 4 months respectively). In addition, the only factor associated to an increased overall survival in DFX/VD-treated patients was serum VD levels. We conclude that DFX/VD treatment correlated with increased overall survival of AML patients in this retrospective cohort of elderly patients. PMID:23840388

  1. Successful pregnancy and delivery via in vitro fertilization with cryopreserved and thawed embryo transfer in an acute myeloid leukemia patient after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Nakajima, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hideyuki; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Numata, Ayumi; Motohashi, Kenji; Tachibana, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Naoki; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Shin

    2015-04-01

    As the number of young long-term survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute leukemia continues to increase, post-transplant infertility is becoming a significant concern. HSCT, particularly with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation conditioning, is known to cause secondary premature ovarian failure, resulting in infertility. To preserve post-transplant fertility, several methods have been proposed, including in vitro fertilization (IVF) with embryo cryopreservation. Due to the aggressiveness of acute leukemia, however, patients have little chance to undergo egg harvesting and IVF before they must begin receiving chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no detailed reports of successful pregnancy after HSCT using IVF with embryo cryopreservation and transfer in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia. Here, we report the case of a 42-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia who became pregnant 2 years and 2 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation via IVF-embryo transfer with an egg collected after induction therapy and delivered a full-term healthy infant.

  2. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission.

  3. A Cluster of CNS Infections Due to B. cereus in the Setting of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Neuropathology in 5 Patients.

    Vodopivec, Ivana; Rinehart, Elizabeth M; Griffin, Gabriel K; Johncilla, Melanie E; Pecora, Nicole; Yokoe, Deborah S; Feske, Steven K; Milner, Danny A; Folkerth, Rebecca D

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus cereus typically causes a self-limited foodborne gastrointestinal (GI) illness. Severe invasive infection occurs rarely, mainly among immunocompromised hosts. We describe a cluster of B. cereus infections among 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The initial case presented with occipital lobe abscess and was found on biopsy to have organisms consistent with Bacillus species. Within 1 week, a second patient died of fulminant brain swelling and hemorrhage. Neuropathologic autopsy and culture revealed B. cereus; hospital infection control and public health officials were notified. Three more patients died within the subsequent 9 months (2 patients had rapid massive hemorrhage and many bacilli reminiscent of Bacillus anthracis infection, and 1 patient had sparse bacilli, petechial hemorrhages, and border zone infarcts). Blood cultures yielded positive results in 3 of 5 cases. A possible route of infection was hematogenous dissemination via GI mucosal breaches (GI symptoms occurred in 3 of 5 cases, and postmortem GI ulceration was found in 3 of 4 cases). Bacilli were seen in 2 of 3 GI ulcerations. Epidemiologic work-up, including a site visit conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, did not identify a clear common source but suggested the possibility of bananas as a food source. Bacillus cereus causes a rapidly progressive, hemorrhagic meningoencephalitis with high mortality among patients with neutropenia. Neuropathologists can play a key role in the detection of outbreaks.

  4. PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    王晓娟; 戴国仪; 曹利民; 王国华; 朱慧芬; 张悦; 沈关心

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of survivin gene and its significance in acute leukemia. Methods: The expression of surviving in 134 acute leukemia patients and 4 leukemia cell lines was detected by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analysis. Results: We detected survivin expression in 78 of 134 acute leukemia patients and all the cell lines but not in normal controls and anemia patients. Survivin gene expression correlated with a lower white blood cell count, which was 11×109/L and 48×109/L in the positive and negative group respectively (P<0.01 by the Mann-Whitney test). In 55 cases of FAB M1/M2/M3, it was associated with leukemic cell maturation(P<0.01 by the Fisher test). Survivin expression was strongly related to survival time of acute leukemia patients (P<0.05). Conclusion: These data suggest that survivin expression may be considered as a new unfavorable prognostic factor for acute leukemia due to its important role in apoptosis inhibition that influences disease outcome.

  5. [Our experiences in the treatment of acute leukemias].

    Jelić, S; Dragović, M; Vidaković, B; Plecas, V

    1976-01-01

    This paper deals with observations concerning treatment of acute leukemia in the Department of haematology of The Clinical hospital of Belgrade during the period from 1970 to 1975, and with results of the treatment itself. During the last five years, 27 patients with different types of acute leukemia were treated. The type of acute leukemia was determined using cytological criteria of Levy and Lortholary and cytochemical criteria as described by Hayhoe. One thrid of the patients died during the first days of hospitalisation, before any effect of cytostatic treatment could be evaluated. The cause of death in those patients was septic shock, intracranial haemorrhage or cardiovascular colapsus; initial signs of those complications of acute leukemia were allready present before diagnosis. Those data point to the fact that diagnosis of acute leukemia is often made too late, when irreversible ocmplications of the disease are allready established. Patients over sixty, often "fragile" to aggresive cytostatic therapy, may enter complete and relatively long lasting remission with induction therapy cosisting of 6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate only. Allthough the number of cases was rather limited, the authors had rather disappointing results with the 06-LA-66 protocole in adult lymphoblastic leukemia. The first with COAP treatment protocole seem encouraging. Adequate cytostatic therapy was in several cases impossible, duo to the lack of adequate substitution therapy; such inadequate cytostatic therapy resulted in partial remissions with a rather poor quality survival. A beeter cooperation is needed between hospital centers and institutions which provide matherial for the substitution theapy.

  6. Pharmacogenetics and induction/consolidation therapy toxicities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated with AIEOP-BFM ALL 2000 protocol.

    Franca, R; Rebora, P; Bertorello, N; Fagioli, F; Conter, V; Biondi, A; Colombini, A; Micalizzi, C; Zecca, M; Parasole, R; Petruzziello, F; Basso, G; Putti, M C; Locatelli, F; d'Adamo, P; Valsecchi, M G; Decorti, G; Rabusin, M

    2017-01-01

    Drug-related toxicities represent an important clinical concern in chemotherapy, genetic variants could help tailoring treatment to patient. A pharmacogenetic multicentric study was performed on 508 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated with AIEOP-BFM 2000 protocol: 28 variants were genotyped by VeraCode and Taqman technologies, deletions of GST-M1 and GST-T1 by multiplex PCR. Toxicities were derived from a central database: 251 patients (49.4%) experienced at least one gastrointestinal (GI) or hepatic (HEP) or neurological (NEU) grade III/IV episode during the remission induction phase: GI occurred in 63 patients (12.4%); HEP in 204 (40.2%) and NEU in 44 (8.7%). Logistic regression model adjusted for sex, risk and treatment phase revealed that ITPA rs1127354 homozygous mutated patients showed an increased risk of severe GI and NEU. ABCC1 rs246240 and ADORA2A rs2236624 homozygous mutated genotypes were associated to NEU and HEP, respectively. These three variants could be putative predictive markers for chemotherapy-related toxicities in AIEOP-BFM protocols.

  7. Evaluation of Serum Leptin Level in Children With Acute Leukemia

    Iraj Shahramian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Leptin is a multifunctional hormone plays an important role in regulating lipid, energy, homeostasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, hematopoiesis and cell cycle. This polypeptide is effective in growth and differentiation of leukemic cells through an Ob-R receptor expressed by them. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate serum leptin levels in patients with acute leukemia and compare it in lymphoid and myeloid groups. Patients and Methods This analytical case-control study, conducted on 60 children in age ranged from 6 months to 16 years in two case and control groups in Ali ibn Abi Talib hospital, Zahedan. They matched based on age and gender and examined after their parent’s satisfaction according to the parental consent forms. None of patients had heart disease, digestive, glandular and metabolic problems, iron deficiency anemia and chronic kidney disease. After collecting the samples, leptin levels of both groups were measured with ELISA kit. Then, the gathered data were analyzed in SPSS-20 software, using independent t-test in considering of 95% confidence interval. Results Leptin serum levels in patients with acute leukemia and controls showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum levels in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloblastic leukemia showed significant difference (P < 0.05. Leptin serum level in relation to age and gender groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions The findings of this study showed that in patients with acute leukemia, leptin serum levels increase independently of age and gender. In addition, leptin serum levels in acute lymphoid leukemia were higher than acute myeloid leukemia in this study.

  8. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  9. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Maria Hernandez-Valladares

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC. We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  10. Infective endocarditis caused by Scedosporium prolificans infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing induction chemotherapy.

    Ochi, Yotaro; Hiramoto, Nobuhiro; Takegawa, Hiroshi; Yonetani, Noboru; Doi, Asako; Ichikawa, Chihiro; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Disseminated Scedosporium prolificans infection occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. The mortality rate is high, as the fungus is resistant to most antifungal agents. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old female with acute myeloid leukemia who developed infective endocarditis caused by S. prolificans infection during induction chemotherapy. Her 1,3-β-D-glucan levels were elevated and computed tomography revealed bilateral sinusitis and disseminated small nodular masses within the lungs and spleen; it nonetheless took 6 days to identify S. prolificans by blood culture. The patient died of multi-organ failure despite the combined use of voriconazole and terbinafine. Autopsy revealed numerous mycotic emboli within multiple organs (caused by mitral valve vegetation) and endocarditis (caused by S. prolificans). The geographic distribution of this infection is limited to Australia, the United States, and southern Europe, particularly Spain. The first Japanese case was reported in 2011, and four cases have been reported to date, including this one. Recently, the incidence of S. prolificans-disseminated infection in immunocompromised patients has increased in Japan. Therefore, clinicians should consider S. prolificans infection as a differential diagnosis when immunocompromised patients suffer disseminated infections with elevated 1,3-β-D-glucan levels.

  11. Prognostic factors of patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide-based frontline therapy.

    Lou, Yinjun; Ma, Yafang; Suo, Shanshan; Ni, Wanmao; Wang, Yungui; Pan, Hanzhang; Tong, Hongyan; Qian, Wenbin; Meng, Haitao; Mai, Wenyuan; Huang, Jian; Yu, Wenjuan; Wei, Juyin; Mao, Liping; Jin, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Prognostic factors for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treated in the context of arsenic trioxide (ATO)-based frontline regimes have not been established clearly. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features, immunophenotypes, Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), and outcomes of 184 consecutive newly diagnosed APL patients treated by intravenous ATO-based therapy. The median age was 40 years (14-77 years). The early death rate was 4.9% (9/184 patients). With a median follow-up time of 36 months (9-74 months), the 3-year relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were 93.3% and 92.2%, respectively. Interestingly, there was no meaningful association between 3-year RFS and initial white blood cell count, FLT3-ITD status, or type of PML-RARA isoforms. In multivariable analysis, the CD56 expression was the only independent risk factor in terms of RFS (hazard ratio, 4.70; P=0.005). These results suggested that ATO-based therapy may ameliorate the unfavorable influence of previously known high-risk features; moreover, CD56 expression remains to be a potentially unfavorable prognostic factor in APL patients.

  12. Impaired dexamethasone-related increase of anticoagulants is associated with the development of osteonecrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    M.L. te Winkel (Mariël Lizet); I.M. Appel (Inge); R. Pieters (Rob); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCoagulation alterations may be involved in osteonecrosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Retrospectively, we evaluated the available coagulation parameters at diagnosis and during induction treatment of 161 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 24 with symptomatic osteonecros

  13. The negative impact of being underweight and weight loss on survival of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    den Hoed, Marissa A. H.; Pluijm, Saskia M. F.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; te Winkel, Mariel L.; Fiocco, Martha; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; van den Berg, Henk; Leeuw, Jan A.; Bruin, Marrie C. A.; Bresters, Dorine; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index and change in body mass index during treatment may influence treatment outcome of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, previous studies in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported contradictory results. We prospectively collected data on body composit

  14. APC2 and CYP1B1 methylation changes in the bone marrow of acute myeloid leukemia patients during chemotherapy.

    Xia, Yongming; Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Ye, Huadan; Fang, Lili; Zhou, Annan; Gao, Yuting; Jiang, Danjie; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-11-01

    Aberrant promoter DNA methylation is a major mechanism of leukemogenesis in hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the association between promoter methylation with chemotherapeutic outcomes remains unknown. In the present study, bone marrow samples were collected prior to and following chemotherapy in 30 AML patients. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction technology was used to examine the promoter methylation status of adenomatous polyposis col 2 (APC2) and cytochrome P450 family 1 subfamily B polypeptide 1 (CYP1B1). The results revealed no change in the methylation status of the APC2 promoter in patients following various chemotherapy regimens. However, the methylation status of the CYP1B1 promoter changed in response to 6 different chemotherapy regimens. AML patients of the M3 subtype displayed an induction of the CYP1B1 promoter methylation levels more frequently (57.1%) than patients affected by the other subtypes (M1: 33.3%; M2: 12.5%; M4: 16.7%; M5: 0% and M6: 0%). In addition, a higher frequency of male patients (4/13) exhibited modulation of the CYP1B1 promoter methylation status compared with female patients (3/17). Furthermore, of five AML patients with a poor prognosis, two exhibited changes leading to CYP1B1 hypomethylation and two leading to CYP1B1 hypermethylation. By contrast, three other patients exhibited hypermethylation changes along with remission. This may be explained by the different chemotherapy regimens used to treat these patients or by other unknown factors. The present study revealed that CYP1B1 promoter methylation was induced during chemotherapy, whereas the APC2 promoter remained hemimethylated. Furthermore, the changes in CYP1B1 methylation were dependent on the AML subtypes and the gender of the patients.

  15. Comparison of newly diagnosed and relapsed patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide: insight into mechanisms of resistance.

    Ezhilarasi Chendamarai

    Full Text Available There is limited data on the clinical, cellular and molecular changes in relapsed acute promyeloytic leukemia (RAPL in comparison with newly diagnosed cases (NAPL. We undertook a prospective study to compare NAPL and RAPL patients treated with arsenic trioxide (ATO based regimens. 98 NAPL and 28 RAPL were enrolled in this study. RAPL patients had a significantly lower WBC count and higher platelet count at diagnosis. IC bleeds was significantly lower in RAPL cases (P=0.022. The ability of malignant promyelocytes to concentrate ATO intracellularly and their in-vitro IC50 to ATO was not significantly different between the two groups. Targeted NGS revealed PML B2 domain mutations in 4 (15.38% of the RAPL subset and none were associated with secondary resistance to ATO. A microarray GEP revealed 1744 genes were 2 fold and above differentially expressed between the two groups. The most prominent differentially regulated pathways were cell adhesion (n=92, cell survival (n=50, immune regulation (n=74 and stem cell regulation (n=51. Consistent with the GEP data, immunophenotyping revealed significantly increased CD34 expression (P=0.001 in RAPL cases and there was in-vitro evidence of significant microenvironment mediated innate resistance (EM-DR to ATO. Resistance and relapse following treatment with ATO is probably multi-factorial, mutations in PML B2 domain while seen only in RAPL may not be the major clinically relevant cause of subsequent relapses. In RAPL additional factors such as expansion of the leukemia initiating compartment along with EM-DR may contribute significantly to relapse following treatment with ATO based regimens.

  16. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (Pleukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (Pafter allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  17. Clofarabine, idarubicin, and cytarabine (CIA) as frontline therapy for patients ≤60 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    Nazha, Aziz; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Huang, Xuelin; Choi, Sangbum; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Andreeff, Michael; Estrov, Zeev; Du, Min; Brandt, Mark; Faderl, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue with activity in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A phase I trial of clofarabine, idarubicin, and cytarabine (CIA) in relapsed and refractory AML had shown an overall response rate (ORR) of 48%. To explore this combination further, we conducted a phase II study of (CIA) in patients with newly diagnosed AML ≤60 years. Patients ≥18-60 years with AML and adequate organ function were enrolled. Induction therapy consisted of clofarabine (C) 20 mg m⁻² IV daily (days 1-5), idarubicin (I) 10 mg m⁻² IV daily (days 1-3), and cytarabine (A) 1 g m⁻² IV daily (days 1-5). Patients in remission received up to six consolidation cycles (C 15 mg m⁻² × 3, I 8 mg m⁻² × 2, and A 0.75 g m⁻² × 3). Fifty-seven patients were evaluable. ORR was 79%. With a median follow up of 10.9 months, the median overall survival (OS) was not reached, the median event-free survival (EFS) was 13.5 months. Most toxicities were ≤grade 2. Four week mortality was 2%. In subgroup analysis, patients ≤40 years had better OS (P = 0.04) and EFS (P = 0.04) compared to patients >40 years. Compared to historical patients treated with idarubicin and cyarabine (IA), the OS and EFS were significantly longer for CIA treated patients. In multivariate analysis, CIA retained its favorable impact on OS compared to IA. Thus, CIA is an effective and safe therapy for patients ≤60 years with newly diagnosed AML.

  18. Effect of all-trans retinoic acid on newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia patients: results of a Brazilian center

    B.C. de-Medeiros

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-seven patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL were treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA. Patients received 45 mg m-2 day-1 po of ATRA until complete remission (CR was achieved, defined as: a presence of less than 5% blasts in the bone marrow, with b white blood cells >103/mm3, c platelets >105/mm3 and d hemoglobin concentration >8 g/dl, with no blood or platelet transfusions. Thirty-one (83.7% patients achieved CR by day 50, and 75% of these before day 30. Correction of the coagulopathy, achieved between days 2 and 10 (mean, 3 days, was the first evidence of response to treatment. Only one patient had been previously treated with chemotherapy and three had the microgranular variant M3 form. Dryness of skin and mucosae was the most common side effect observed in 82% of the patients. Thrombosis, hepatotoxicity and retinoid acid syndrome (RAS were observed in 7 (19%, 6 (16% and 4 (11% patients, respectively. Thirteen (35% patients had to be submitted to chemotherapy due to hyperleukocytosis (above 40 x 103/mm3 and six of these presented with new signs of coagulopathy after chemotherapy. Four (11% patients died secondarily to intracerebral hemorrhage (IH and two (5.4% dropped out of the protocol due to severe ATRA side effects (one RAS and one hepatotoxicity. RAS and IH were related strictly to hyperleukocytosis. The reduced use of platelets and fresh frozen plasma probably lowered the total cost of treatment. We conclude that ATRA is an effective agent for inducing complete remission in APL patients.

  19. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  20. Internal tandem duplication of the FLT3 gene confers poor overall survival in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy: an International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia study.

    Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Kim, Haesook T; Jacomo, Rafael H; Melo, Raul A; Bittencourt, Rosane; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pagnano, Katia; Fagundes, Evandro M; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes; Chiattone, Carlos S; Lima, Ana Silvia; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo; Undurraga, Maria Soledad; Martinez, Lem; Kwaan, Hau C; Gallagher, Robert; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Schrier, Stanley L; Tallman, Martin S; Grimwade, David; Ganser, Arnold; Berliner, Nancy; Ribeiro, Raul C; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Löwenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A; Rego, Eduardo M

    2014-12-01

    Activating internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations in the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene (FLT3-ITD) are associated with poor outcome in acute myeloid leukemia, but their prognostic impact in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) remains controversial. Here, we screened for FLT3-ITD mutations in 171 APL patients, treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and anthracycline-based chemotherapy. We identified FLT3-ITD mutations in 35 patients (20 %). FLT3-ITD mutations were associated with higher white blood cell counts (P < 0.0001), relapse-risk score (P = 0.0007), higher hemoglobin levels (P = 0.0004), higher frequency of the microgranular morphology (M3v) subtype (P = 0.03), and the short PML/RARA (BCR3) isoform (P < 0.0001). After a median follow-up of 38 months, FLT3-ITD(positive) patients had a lower 3-year overall survival rate (62 %) compared with FLT3-ITD(negative) patients (82 %) (P = 0.006). The prognostic impact of FLT3-ITD on survival was retained in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio: 2.39, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.17-4.89; P = 0.017). Nevertheless, complete remission (P = 0.07), disease-free survival (P = 0.24), and the cumulative incidence of relapse (P = 0.94) rates were not significantly different between groups. We can conclude that FLT3-ITD mutations are associated with several hematologic features in APL, in particular with high white blood cell counts. In addition, FLT3-ITD may independently predict a shorter survival in patients with APL treated with ATRA and anthracycline-based chemotherapy.

  1. Frequency of p190 and p210 BCR-ABL rearrangements and survival in Brazilian adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Ilana de França Azevedo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated the occurrence of the p190 and p210 break point clusterregion-Abelson (BCR-ABL rearrangements in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and possible associations with clinical and laboratory characteristics and survival. Methods: Forty-one over 18-year-old patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of both genders followed-up between January 2008 and May 2012 were included in this study. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical charts of the patients. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using specific primers was employed to identify molecular rearrangements. Results: At diagnosis, the median age was 33 years, and there was a predominance of males (61%. The most common immunophenotype was B lineage (76%. BCR-ABL rearrangements was detected in 14 (34% patients with the following distribution: p190 (28%, p210 (50% and double positive (22%. Overall survival of patients with a mean/median of 331/246 days of follow up was 39%, respectively, negative BCR-ABL (44% and positive BCR-ABL (28%. Conclusion: These results confirm the high frequency of BCR-ABL rearrangements and the low survival rate of adult Brazilian patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  2. Eradication of Pulmonary Aspergillosis in an Adolescent Patient Undergoing Three Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantations for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Michaela Döring

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic fungal infections are a major cause of infection-related mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies. This report addresses the case of an adolescent patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent three allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations and developed pulmonary aspergillosis. Combination therapy with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB, 3 mg/kg bw/day and caspofungin (CAS, 50 mg/day during the first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT improved the pulmonary situation. After shifting the antifungal combination therapy to oral voriconazole (2 × 200 mg/day and CAS, a new pulmonal lesion occurred alongside the improvements in the existing pulmonary aspergillosis. An antifungal combination during a second HSCT with L-AmB (3 mg/kg bw/day and CAS showed an improvement in the pulmonary aspergillosis. A combination therapy with CAS and L-AmB (1 mg/kg bw/day during the third HSCT led once again to progress the pulmonary aspergillosis, after increasing the L-AMB to 3 mg/kg bw/day for recovery. The presented case provides an example of how, despite severe immunosuppression, a combination of antifungal drugs administered intravenously at therapeutic dosages may be more efficient than either intravenous monotherapy or combinations of intravenous and oral antifungals in selecting pediatric and adolescent patients with proven fungal infections.

  3. Prospective evaluation of gene mutations and minimal residual disease in patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia.

    Jourdan, Eric; Boissel, Nicolas; Chevret, Sylvie; Delabesse, Eric; Renneville, Aline; Cornillet, Pascale; Blanchet, Odile; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Recher, Christian; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Delaunay, Jacques; Pigneux, Arnaud; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Berthon, Céline; Pautas, Cécile; Vey, Norbert; Lioure, Bruno; Thomas, Xavier; Luquet, Isabelle; Terré, Christine; Guardiola, Philippe; Béné, Marie C; Preudhomme, Claude; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2013-03-21

    Not all patients with core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) display a good outcome. Modern risk factors include KIT and/or FLT3 gene mutations and minimal residual disease (MRD) levels, but their respective values have never been prospectively assessed. A total of 198 CBF-AML patients were randomized between a reinforced and a standard induction course, followed by 3 high-dose cytarabine consolidation courses. MRD levels were monitored prospectively. Gene mutations were screened at diagnosis. Despite a more rapid MRD decrease after reinforced induction, induction arm did not influence relapse-free survival (RFS) (64% in both arms; P = .91). Higher WBC, KIT, and/or FLT3-ITD/TKD gene mutations, and a less than 3-log MRD reduction after first consolidation, were associated with a higher specific hazard of relapse, but MRD remained the sole prognostic factor in multivariate analysis. At 36 months, cumulative incidence of relapse and RFS were 22% vs 54% (P gene mutations, should be used for future treatment stratifications in CBF-AML patients. This trial was registered at EudraCT as #2006-005163-26 and at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT 00428558.

  4. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Tamer M Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate

  5. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  6. Comparative therapeutic value of post-remission approaches in patients with acute myeloid leukemia aged 40-60 years.

    Cornelissen, J J; Versluis, J; Passweg, J R; van Putten, W L J; Manz, M G; Maertens, J; Beverloo, H B; Valk, P J M; van Marwijk Kooy, M; Wijermans, P W; Schaafsma, M R; Biemond, B J; Vekemans, M-C; Breems, D A; Verdonck, L F; Fey, M F; Jongen-Lavrencic, M; Janssen, J J W M; Huls, G; Kuball, J; Pabst, T; Graux, C; Schouten, H C; Gratwohl, A; Vellenga, E; Ossenkoppele, G; Löwenberg, B

    2015-05-01

    The preferred type of post-remission therapy (PRT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) is a subject of continued debate, especially in patients at higher risk of nonrelapse mortality (NRM), including patients >40 years of age. We report results of a time-dependent multivariable analysis of allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) (n=337) versus chemotherapy (n=271) or autologous HSCT (autoHSCT) (n=152) in 760 patients aged 40-60 years with AML in CR1. Patients receiving alloHSCT showed improved overall survival (OS) as compared with chemotherapy (respectively, 57±3% vs 40±3% at 5 years, P<0.001). Comparable OS was observed following alloHSCT and autoHSCT in patients with intermediate-risk AML (60±4 vs 54±5%). However, alloHSCT was associated with less relapse (hazard ratio (HR) 0.51, P<0.001) and better relapse-free survival (RFS) (HR 0.74, P=0.029) as compared with autoHSCT in intermediate-risk AMLs. AlloHSCT was applied following myeloablative conditioning (n=157) or reduced intensity conditioning (n=180), resulting in less NRM, but comparable outcome with respect to OS, RFS and relapse. Collectively, these results show that alloHSCT is to be preferred over chemotherapy as PRT in patients with intermediate- and poor-risk AML aged 40-60 years, whereas autoHSCT remains a treatment option to be considered in patients with intermediate-risk AML.

  7. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide.

    Colović, M; Suvajdžić, N; Janković, G; Tomin, D; Colović, N; Fekete, M Denčić; Palibrk, V

    2011-08-01

    We retrospectively studied four cases of t-MDS/AML among 210 (1.9%) consecutive patients with CLL treated at a single center with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (FC) either as the first- or second-line therapy. The median follow-up of the whole cohort of patients was 46months (range: 7-60). Two of these patients (2/130, 1.7%) had been treated with FC only, and two more (2/80, 2.3%) with CHOP and CHOP+FND, respectively, prior to FC. The median age was 61.5years (range: 49-71); three were male. They developed t-MDS/AML after a median latency period of 41months (range: 7-56) from the FC completion. Chromosomal aberrations with an adverse prognostic impact were present in the karyotype of all four patients, including abnormalities of chromosome 5 in three of them, and a rare chromosomal translocation in one patient. Median survival after t-MDS/AML diagnosis was 4months (range: 2-8). Although the agents administered prior to FC make it difficult to assess the risk of t-MDS/AML attributable to FC, this report might be a valuable addition to the literature.

  8. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  9. Successful pregnancy in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Alegre, A; Chunchurreta, R; Rodriguez-Alarcon, J; Cruz, E; Prada, M

    1982-01-01

    A successful pregnancy with a normal baby in a woman with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with daunorubicin from the ninth week of gestation is reported. Daunorubicin is an effective agent against this leukemia during pregnancy. That daunorubicin may be safely used, when required during the early gestation, is suggested.

  10. Epidemiologic Investigation of a Cluster of Neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus Infections in 5 Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    Rhee, Chanu; Klompas, Michael; Tamburini, Fiona B; Fremin, Brayon J; Chea, Nora; Epstein, Lauren; Halpin, Alison Laufer; Guh, Alice; Gallen, Rachel; Coulliette, Angela; Gee, Jay; Hsieh, Candace; Desjardins, Christopher A; Pedamullu, Chandra Sekhar; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Manzo, Veronica E; Folkerth, Rebecca Dunn; Milner, Danny A; Pecora, Nicole; Osborne, Matthew; Chalifoux-Judge, Diane; Bhatt, Ami S; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Five neuroinvasive Bacillus cereus infections (4 fatal) occurred in hospitalized patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) during a 9-month period, prompting an investigation by infection control and public health officials. Methods.  Medical records of case-patients were reviewed and a matched case-control study was performed. Infection control practices were observed. Multiple environmental, food, and medication samples common to AML patients were cultured. Multilocus sequence typing was performed for case and environmental B cereus isolates. Results.  All 5 case-patients received chemotherapy and had early-onset neutropenic fevers that resolved with empiric antibiotics. Fever recurred at a median of 17 days (range, 9-20) with headaches and abrupt neurological deterioration. Case-patients had B cereus identified in central nervous system (CNS) samples by (1) polymerase chain reaction or culture or (2) bacilli seen on CNS pathology stains with high-grade B cereus bacteremia. Two case-patients also had colonic ulcers with abundant bacilli on autopsy. No infection control breaches were observed. On case-control analysis, bananas were the only significant exposure shared by all 5 case-patients (odds ratio, 9.3; P = .04). Five environmental or food isolates tested positive for B cereus, including a homogenized banana peel isolate and the shelf of a kitchen cart where bananas were stored. Multilocus sequence typing confirmed that all case and environmental strains were genetically distinct. Multilocus sequence typing-based phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organisms clustered in 2 separate clades. Conclusions.  The investigation of this neuroinvasive B cereus cluster did not identify a single point source but was suggestive of a possible dietary exposure. Our experience underscores the potential virulence of B cereus in immunocompromised hosts.

  11. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Nair, Sreejith G.; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea.

  13. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  14. Identification of a Novel P190-Derived Breakpoint Peptide Suitable for Peptide Vaccine Therapeutic Approach in Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    Micaela Ippoliti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL is a high-risk acute leukemia with poor prognosis, in which the specific t(9;22(q34;q11 translocation results in a chimeric bcr-abl (e1a2 breakpoint and in a 190 KD protein (p190 with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. The advent of first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs improved the short-term outcome of Ph+ ALL patients not eligible for allo-SCT; yet disease recurrence is almost inevitable. Peptides derived from p190-breakpoint area are leukemia-specific antigens that may mediate an antitumor response toward p190+ leukemia cells. We identified one peptide named p190-13 able to induce in vitro peptide-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation in Ph+ ALL patients in complete remission during TKIs. Thus this peptide appears a good candidate for developing an immune target vaccine strategy possibly synergizing with TKIs for remission maintenance.

  15. Molecular Genetic Markers in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Sophia Yohe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetics play an increasingly important role in the risk stratification and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients. Traditionally, AML classification and risk stratification relied on cytogenetic studies; however, molecular detection of gene mutations is playing an increasingly important role in classification, risk stratification, and management of AML. Molecular testing does not take the place of cytogenetic testing results, but plays a complementary role to help refine prognosis, especially within specific AML subgroups. With the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML therapy is not targeted but the intensity of therapy is driven by the prognostic subgroup. Many prognostic scoring systems classify patients into favorable, poor, or intermediate prognostic subgroups based on clinical and genetic features. Current standard of care combines cytogenetic results with targeted testing for mutations in FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, and KIT to determine the prognostic subgroup. Other gene mutations have also been demonstrated to predict prognosis and may play a role in future risk stratification, although some of these have not been confirmed in multiple studies or established as standard of care. This paper will review the contribution of cytogenetic results to prognosis in AML and then will focus on molecular mutations that have a prognostic or possible therapeutic impact.

  16. Cytogenetics of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    Manola, Kalliopi N

    2009-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disease accounting for 15-20% of all childhood acute leukemias, while it is responsible for more than half of the leukemic deaths in these patients. This article focuses on the significance of cytogenetic analysis in pediatric AML supporting the importance of cytogenetic analysis in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, follow-up and treatment selection in childhood AML. It reviews in detail the types and frequencies of most common chromosomal aberrations, their molecular background, their correlation with French American British (FAB) subtypes and age distribution and their prognostic relevance. It also summarizes some less frequent or rare chromosome aberrations in which the prognostic classification has not been determined yet owning to the small number of patients and the variable treatment modalities used in different study groups. Furthermore, it discusses the association of specific chromosome rearrangements with prenatal exposure to carcinogenic agents or therapeutic agents and highlights the ongoing and future research on pediatric AML in the evolving field of Cytogenetics.

  17. Subsequent primary malignancies and acute myelogenous leukemia transformation among myelodysplastic syndrome patients treated with or without lenalidomide.

    Rollison, Dana E; Shain, Kenneth H; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Hampras, Shalaka S; Fulp, William; Fisher, Kate; Al Ali, Najla H; Padron, Eric; Lancet, Jeffrey; Xu, Qiang; Olesnyckyj, Martha; Kenvin, Laurie; Knight, Robert; Dalton, William; List, Alan; Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-07-01

    The few studies that have examined rates of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation in lenalidomide-treated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have been limited to deletion 5q MDS. The association between lenalidomide and subsequent primary malignancies (SPMs) in MDS patients has not been evaluated previously. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the risk of both SPM and AML in association with lenalidomide. A cohort of MDS patients (n = 1248) treated between 2004 and 2012 at Moffitt Cancer Center were identified, and incident cases of SPM and AML transformation were ascertained. Using a nested case-control design, MDS controls were 1:1 matched to SPM (n = 41) and AML (n = 150) cases, on age and date of MDS diagnosis, gender, follow-up time, IPSS, and del (5q). Associations between lenalidomide and (1) SPM incidence and (2) AML transformation were estimated with hazards ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in the cohort and odds ratios (OR) in the case-control analysis. SPM incidence did not differ significantly between cohort MDS patients treated with (0.7 per 100 person-years) or without lenalidomide (1.4 per 100 person-years) (HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.40-2.74), whereas a significantly reduced SPM risk was observed in the case-control sample (OR = 0.03, 95% CI = Lenalidomide was not associated with AML transformation in the cohort analysis (HR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.44-1.27) or in the case-control analyses (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.52-2.56), after adjustment for potential confounders. Lenalidomide was not associated with increased risk of SPM or AML transformation in a large cohort of MDS patients mostly including nondeletion 5q MDS.

  18. High-Risk Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Bhojwani, Deepa; Howard, Scott C.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2009-01-01

    Although most children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are cured, certain subsets have a high risk of relapse. Relapse risk can be predicted by early response to therapy, clinical and pharmacogenetic features of the host, and genetic characteristics of leukemic cells. Though early treatment response can be assessed by the peripheral blast cell count after 1 week of single-agent glucocorticoid treatment or percent of bone marrow blasts by morphology after 1 or 2 weeks of multiagent induction treatment, determination of minimal residual disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or flow cytometry after 2 to 6 weeks of induction is the most precise and useful measure. Augmented therapy has improved outcome for the poor responders to initial treatment. Infants with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)–rearranged ALL comprise a very poor-risk group wherein further intensification of chemotherapy causes significant toxicity. Hybrid protocols incorporating drugs effective for acute myeloid leukemia could improve survival, a strategy being tested in international trials. Studies on the biology of MLL-induced leukemogenesis have prompted the development of novel targeted agents, currently under evaluation in clinical trials. Short-term outcomes of patients with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive ALL have improved significantly by adding tyrosine kinase inhibitors to standard chemotherapy regimens. New agents and methods to overcome resistance are under investigation, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation is recommended for certain subsets of patients, for example those with Ph+ and T-cell ALL with poor early response. Genome-wide interrogation of leukemic cell genetic abnormalities and germline genetic variations promise to identify new molecular targets for therapy. PMID:19778845

  19. Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia 15 Years after Hydroxyurea Use in a Patient with Sickle Cell Anemia

    2012-01-01

    We report a 41 year old male with sickle cell disease who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia with complex karyotype involving chromosomes 5, 7 and 17 after 15 years of hydroxyurea treatment. He responded poorly to induction chemotherapy with cytarabine/idarubicin followed by high dose cytarabine and succumbed to neutropenic sepsis. Multiple systematic reviews, observational studies and clinical trials were conducted to identify the toxicity profile of hydroxurea. ...

  20. Importance of genetics in acute myeloid leukemia

    R. Pippa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML comprises a biologically and clinically heterogeneous group of aggressive disorders that occur as a consequence of a wide variety of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic progenitors. Despite significant advances in the understanding of the biology of AML, most patients will die from relapsed disease. Whole-genome studies have identified novel recurrent gene mutations with prognostic impact in AML; furthermore, it is likely that in the near future genome-wide sequencing will become a routine for newly diagnosed patients with AML. Therefore, future clinical trials should aim to identify genetically defined high-risk patients, and further research is necessary to identify effective agents and develop new individualized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of this deadly disease.

  1. Comparison of biochemical and immunological profile of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia in relation to healthy individuals

    Fabiane L.F.Z. Sanches

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the biochemical and immunological profiles of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with healthy children and adolescents. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in which 21 therapy-naïve patients with AML were compared with a group of 24 healthy individuals. The following data were analyzed: serum proteins, leucocytes and subgroups, erythrocytes, hematocrit, hemoglobin, platelets, cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultures under spontaneous and BCG- or PHA-stimulated conditions, immunoglobulin A, and erythrocytic glutathione. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software, considering as significant p-values < 0.05. RESULTS: Serum albumin levels were higher (p < 0.0001 in the control group, as well as all the parameters related to red blood cells (p < 0.0001. For leucocytes and subgroups, no statistical difference was found between the AML and the control groups. For cytokines, the concentrations were significantly higher under spontaneous and BCG-stimulated conditions for TNF-a, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-? in the control group. Under PHA-stimulated conditions, the concentration was higher (p = 0.002 only for IL-6. No difference was found between the two groups for the other cytokines and for IgA in the saliva. Erythrocytic glutathione was higher (p < 0.0001 in AML patients. CONCLUSIONS: It was possible to characterize the biochemical and immunological profile of pediatric patients with AML, as well as highlight some significant differences in these parameters when comparing with healthy children and adolescents.

  2. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with Down syndrome

    Buitenkamp, Trudy D; Izraeli, Shai; Zimmermann, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of B-cell precursor (BCP) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prognostic factors and outcome of DS-ALL patients treated in contemporary protocols are uncertain. We studied 653 DS-ALL patients enrolled in 16 international trials from 1995...

  3. Understanding Health Care Costs in a Wisconsin Acute Leukemia Population

    Patricia Steinert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We investigated factors driving health care costs of patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Standard costs identified in insurance claims data obtained from the Wisconsin Health Information Organization were used in a sample of 837 acute leukemia patients from April 2009 to June 2011. The Andersen behavioral model of health care utilization guided selection of patient and community factors expected to influence health care costs. A generalized linear model fitting gamma-distributed data with log-link technique was used to analyze cost. Results: Type of treatment received and disease severity represented significant cost drivers, and patients receiving at least some of their treatment from academic medical centers experienced higher costs. Inpatient care and pharmacy costs of patients who received treatment from providers located in areas of higher poverty experienced lower costs, raising questions of potential treatment and medical practice disparities between provider locations. Directions of study findings were not consistent between different types of services received and underscore the complexity of investigating health care cost. Conclusions: While prevalence of acute leukemia in the United States is low compared to other diseases, its extreme high cost of treatment is not well understood and potentially influences treatment decisions. Acute leukemia health care costs may not follow expected patterns; further exploration of the relationship between cost and the treatment decision, and potential treatment disparities between providers in different socioeconomic locations, is needed.

  4. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syn...

  5. Cellulitis with Leukocytopenia as an Initial Sign of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Sachiko Sakamoto; Naoki Oiso; Masakatsu Emoto; Shusuke Uchida; Ayaka Hirao; Yoichi Tatsumi; Itaru Matsumura; Akira Kawada

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies are immunosuppressive and may develop cutaneous or invasive infections as a primary sign of immune suppression. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia M3) is caused by translocation of reciprocal chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), which produces an oncogenic protein. We herein describe a 71-year-old man having cellulitis with leukocytopenia as a first sign of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Dermatologists and hematologists should keep in min...

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference [Genetics Home Reference (Conditions)

    Full Text Available Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Acute Myeloid...te myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA Fanconi anemia You may also search Genetics Home Reference for Acut...e Myeloid Leukemia for additional information. Published : October 27, 2014 Acute Myeloid Leukemia - Genetics Home Reference ...

  7. 急性白血病患者1056例资料分析%Archive analysis of 1056 patients with acute leukemia

    庞丽萍; 徐海婵; 许蕾; 钟凤鸾; 张倩; 柳金; 张红宇

    2009-01-01

    目的 初步研究深圳市急性白血病(AL)发病及可能致白血病危险因素特点.方法 回顾分析了2002年至2007年收治的1056例AL患者的资料.结果 男性患者较女性患者多见(男:女=1.78:1),急性髓系白血病(AML)患者较急性淋巴细胞性白血病(ALL)患者多见(AML:ALL=1.87:1),AML以青壮年为主(65%),ALL老年少见(1.33%);AL病例数呈逐年增高趋势;治疗相关性白血病比例明显低于国外文献报道,且主要原因是肿瘤放、化疗和银屑病口服乙双吗啉所致.结论 进一步肯定了有关我国急性白血病发病情况的一些特征,同时也提出了一些新的特点,这些新的变化有待于下一次全国性白血病流行病学调查来加以证实.%Objective To explore the features of patients with acute leukemia (AL) in Hematology Department of Shenzhen Hospital affliated to Beijing University during the past six years. Methods The data of the 1056 acute leukemia dignosed in our department between 2002-2007 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results The male patients was predominant (male/female ratio was 1.78). The number of patients with acute myeloid leukemia(AML) was higher than that of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (AML/ALL ratio was 1.85). Most of the AML patients were young adult (65 %) and elderly ALL patients were very rare(1.33 %). AL cases were tended to increase gradually by year. The ratio of treatment-related AL in Shenzhen was lower than that reported literature in other countries. The major cause of the treatment-related AL were chemotherapy/radiotherapy and psoriasis treated with bimolane. Conclusion Some of the features of AL patients in China were further confirmed and some new features were also found in this study. These changes should be demonstrated by the next national epidemiology survey of leukemia.

  8. Prognostic and biologic significance of DNMT3B expression in older patients with cytogenetically normal primary acute myeloid leukemia.

    Niederwieser, C; Kohlschmidt, J; Volinia, S; Whitman, S P; Metzeler, K H; Eisfeld, A-K; Maharry, K; Yan, P; Frankhouser, D; Becker, H; Schwind, S; Carroll, A J; Nicolet, D; Mendler, J H; Curfman, J P; Wu, Y-Z; Baer, M R; Powell, B L; Kolitz, J E; Moore, J O; Carter, T H; Bundschuh, R; Larson, R A; Stone, R M; Mrózek, K; Marcucci, G; Bloomfield, C D

    2015-03-01

    DNMT3B encodes a DNA methyltransferase implicated in aberrant epigenetic changes contributing to leukemogenesis. We tested whether DNMT3B expression, measured by NanoString nCounter assay, associates with outcome, gene and microRNA expression and DNA methylation profiles in 210 older (⩾60 years) adults with primary, cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients were dichotomized into high versus low expressers using median cut. Outcomes were assessed in the context of known CN-AML prognosticators. Gene and microRNA expression, and DNA methylation profiles were analyzed using microarrays and MethylCap-sequencing, respectively. High DNMT3B expressers had fewer complete remissions (CR; P=0.002) and shorter disease-free (DFS; P=0.02) and overall (OS; PDNMT3B expression remained an independent predictor of lower CR rates (P=0.04) and shorter DFS (P=0.04) and OS (P=0.001). High DNMT3B expression associated with a gene expression profile comprising 363 genes involved in differentiation, proliferation and survival pathways, but with only four differentially expressed microRNAs (miR-133b, miR-148a, miR-122, miR-409-3p) and no differential DNA methylation regions. We conclude that high DNMT3B expression independently associates with adverse outcome in older CN-AML patients. Gene expression analyses suggest that DNMT3B is involved in the modulation of several genes, although the regulatory mechanisms remain to be investigated to devise therapeutic approaches specific for these patients.

  9. FLT3 Mutation as a Significant Prognostic Marker in de novo Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients: Incidence, Distribution and Association with Cytogenetic Findings in a Study from South India

    Santhi Sarojam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 is a tyrosine kinase receptor that plays an important role in proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Internal tandem duplication and tyrosine kinase domain mutation are the two most common types of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 mutations frequently reported in acute myeloid leukemia associated with pathogenesis of this disease. The present study investigates the prevalence and distribution pattern in different acute myeloid leukemia sub- and cytogenetic groups, the association with clinical parameters and the prognostic importance of these mutations in acute myeloid leukemia patients from South India. Methods:Mutation analysis was performed in 276 de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism using specific restriction enzymes followed by sequencing to confirm the mutations. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to detect the prognosis. Results: Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem duplication mutations were observed in 20%, tyrosine kinase domain mutation in 4% and dual mutations in 0.3% of the analyzed cases. The internal tandem duplication mutations ranged from 15-107 nucleotides with the majority at the juxta membrane domain of the receptor. Three types of tyrosine kinase domain point mutations were identified: D835Y, D835H and D835V. We observed a significant association between fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 mutations and increased WBC and LDH counts (P<0.001 and blast percentage but not with age, gender and FAB subtypes. A significant association with normal karyotype was observed for the mutants (P=0.002. Survival analysis revealed that the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 gene mutation was a negative prognostic marker for acute myeloid leukemia patients. The risk stratified analysis showed the mutation to be a risk factor for the intermediate karyotype group, especially for those with normal cytogenetics

  10. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  11. [Acute myeloid leukemia originating from the same leukemia clone after the complete remission of acute lymphoid leukemia].

    Matsuda, Isao; Nakamaki, Tsuyoshi; Amaya, Hiroshi; Kiyosaki, Masanobu; Kawakami, Keiichiro; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Akihiro; Hino, Ken-ichiro; Tomoyasu, Shigeru

    2003-09-01

    A 22-year-old female was diagnosed as having acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) in February 1995, from the findings of peroxidase negative, CD10+, CD19+, TdT+ and rearrangement of IgH and TCR beta. AdVP (doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) therapy achieved a complete remission (CR). Bone marrow transplantation had to be abandoned because of the lack of an HLA-identical donor. Intensification therapy was thus carried out repeatedly. In June 1998, myeloblast with Auer rods, peroxidase positive, CD13+, CD33+ and HLA-DR+, appeared. The patient was diagnosed as having lineage switch acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from ALL. Though A-DMP (cytosine arabinoside, daunorubicin, 6-mercaptopurine) therapy was resistant, AdVP therapy led to a CR. The patient died of cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines in February 1999. From the results of the Ramasamy method using the clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain gene locus, the origin of the pathological cells of ALL and AML was indicated to be the same leukemia clone.

  12. Expression of the outcome predictor in acute leukemia 1 (OPAL1) gene is not an independent prognostic factor in patients treated according to COALL or St Jude protocols

    A. Holleman (Amy); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing); J.R. Downing (James); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); U. Göbel (Ulrich); U. Graubner (Ulrike)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNew prognostic factors may result in better risk classification and improved treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recently, high expression of a gene named OPAL1 (outcome predictor in acute leukemia) was reported to be associated with favorable prognosis in ALL.

  13. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  14. Outcome of conditioning intensity in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomal karyotype in patients over 45 year-old : A study from the acute leukemia working party (ALWP) of the European group of blood and marrow transplantation (EBMT)

    Poire, Xavier; Labopin, Myriam; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Volin, Liisa; Richard Espiga, Carlos; Veelken, J. Hendrik; Milpied, Noel; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Yacoub-Agha, Ibrahim; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Michallet, Mauricette; Michaux, Lucienne; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with monosomal karyotype (MK AML) carries a very poor prognosis, even after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, SCT remains the only curative option in this high-risk population. Because myeloablative conditioning regimen (MAC) is associated with less relapse,

  15. [Infections in the child with acute leukemia].

    Carrillo, J M; Jiménez, E; Jiménez, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five febrile episodes in 82 children with acute leukemia were studied; 46% of the patients were from urban and 54% from rural areas. The origin of the fever was identified in 91% of the episodes, prevailing pneumonia, septicemia, chickenpox and herpes zoster. The etiological agent was identified in 46% of the cases. A viral predominance was evident, and among them varicela-zoster, following in importance gram-negative bacteria. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis carinii were isolated in two occassions each. Sepsis was found more frequently in children with active leukemia than in those in remission (p less than 0.001). Forty-four febrile episodes occurred in patients with less than 1,000 neutrophils/ul. The daily-risk rate of infection was higher in children fom rural than in those from urban areas (p less than 0.001). After clinical and laboratory studies, methicillin and gentamicin were used, in addition to carbenicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is selected cases. This treatment was effective in 86% of the cases. Twelve (15%) children died, 6 of whom were in remission at that moment.

  16. Survival after intestinal mucormycosis in acute myelogenous leukemia.

    Parra, R; Arnau, E; Julia, A; Lopez, A; Nadal, A; Allende, E

    1986-12-15

    A young woman with acute myelocytic leukemia developed acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding immediately after a first remission induction of her leukemia. After the site of bleeding was located in the descending colon, a necrotic bleeding ulcer was resected. Histologic examination of the ulcer established the diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Treatment with amphotericin B was administered because of the high risk of dissemination. The patient has been followed for 9 months with no evidence of relapse of infection. Survival after gastrointestinal mucormycosis in acute leukemia has not previously been reported in the English language literature. Success in managing mucormycosis depends on the adherence to the recommended principles of early aggressive diagnostic measures, excisional surgery, amphotericin B therapy, and control of the underlying predisposing condition.

  17. Wilms Tumor 1 Expression and Pre-emptive Immunotherapy in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing an Allogeneic Hemopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Di Grazia, Carmen; Pozzi, Sarah; Geroldi, Simona; Grasso, Raffaella; Miglino, Maurizio; Colombo, Nicoletta; Tedone, Elisabetta; Luchetti, Silvia; Lamparelli, Teresa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ibatici, Adalberto; Bregante, Stefania; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Raiola, Anna Maria; Dominietto, Alida; Varaldo, Riccardo; Galaverna, Federica; Ghiso, Anna; Sica, Simona; Bacigalupo, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) was monitored by Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) expression in 207 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after an allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) as a trigger to initiate pre-emptive immunotherapy (IT) with cyclosporin discontinuation and/or donor lymphocyte infusion. The trigger for IT was WT1 ≥ 180 copies/10(4) Abelson cells in marrow cells in the first group of 122 patients (WT1-180) and ≥ 100 copies in a subsequent group of 85 patients (WT1-100). Forty patients received IT. The cumulative incidence (CI) of relapse was 76% in WT1-180 (n = 17) versus 29% in WT1-100 patients (n = 23) receiving IT (P = .006); the leukemia-free survival from MRD positivity was 23% versus 74%, respectively (P = .003). We then looked at the entire AML patient population (n = 207). WT1-180 and WT1-100 patients were comparable for disease phase and age. The overall 4-year CI of transplantation-related mortality was 13% in both groups; the CI of leukemia relapse was 38% in the WT1-180 and 28% in the WT1-100 patients (P = .05) and leukemia-free survival was 56% versus 48%, respectively (P = .07). In conclusion, we suggests that WT1-based pre-emptive immunotherapy is feasible in patients with undergoing an allogeneic HSCT. The protective effect on relapse is greater when IT is triggered at lower levels of WT1.

  18. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R.; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/’fatigue’ of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and

  19. Cytogenetic features of acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemias in pediatric patients with Down syndrome: an iBFM-SG study.

    Forestier, Erik; Izraeli, Shai; Beverloo, Berna; Haas, Oskar; Pession, Andrea; Michalová, Kyra; Stark, Batia; Harrison, Christine J; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Johansson, Bertil

    2008-02-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) have a markedly increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To identify chromosomal changes cooperating with +21 that may provide information on the pathogenesis of these leukemias, we analyzed 215 DS-ALLs and 189 DS-AMLs. Unlike previous smaller series, a significant proportion of DS-ALLs had the typical B-cell precursor ALL abnormalities high hyperdiploidy (HeH; 11%) and t(12;21)(p13;q22) (10%). The HeH DS-ALLs were characterized by gains of the same chromosomes as non-DS-HeH, suggesting the same etiology/pathogenesis. In addition, specific genetic subtypes of DS-ALL were suggested by the significant overrepresentation of cases with +X, t(8;14)(q11;q32), and del(9p). Unlike DS-ALL, the common translocations associated with non-DS-AML were rare in DS-AML, which instead were characterized by the frequent presence of dup(1q), del(6q), del(7p), dup(7q), +8, +11, del(16q), and +21. This series of DS leukemias-the largest to date-reveals that DS-ALL is a heterogeneous disorder that comprises both t(12;21) and HeH as well as DS-related abnormalities. Furthermore, this analysis confirms that DS-AML is a distinct entity, originating through other genetic pathways than do non-DS-AMLs, and suggests that unbalanced changes such as dup(1q), +8, and +21 are involved in the leukemogenic process.

  20. Negative effect of DNA hypermethylation on the outcome of intensive chemotherapy in older patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia following myelodysplastic syndrome

    Grövdal, Michael; Khan, Rasheed; Aggerholm, Anni

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Promoter hypermethylation of, for example, tumor-suppressor genes, is considered to be an important step in cancerogenesis and a negative risk factor for survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS); however, its role for response to therapy has not been determined. This study...... was designed to assess the effect of methylation status on the outcome of conventional induction chemotherapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Sixty patients with high-risk MDS or acute myeloid leukemia following MDS were treated with standard doses of daunorubicin and 1-beta-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine. Standard...

  1. Vaccination with synthetic analog peptides derived from WT1 oncoprotein induces T-cell responses in patients with complete remission from acute myeloid leukemia.

    Maslak, Peter G; Dao, Tao; Krug, Lee M; Chanel, Suzanne; Korontsvit, Tatyana; Zakhaleva, Victoria; Zhang, Ronghua; Wolchok, Jedd D; Yuan, Jianda; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; Berman, Ellin; Weiss, Mark; Jurcic, Joseph; Frattini, Mark G; Scheinberg, David A

    2010-07-15

    A pilot study was undertaken to assess the safety, activity, and immunogenicity of a polyvalent Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) peptide vaccine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission but with molecular evidence of WT1 transcript. Patients received 6 vaccinations with 4 WT1 peptides (200 microg each) plus immune adjuvants over 12 weeks. Immune responses were evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity, CD4+ T-cell proliferation, CD3+ T-cell interferon-gamma release, and WT1 peptide tetramer staining. Of the 9 evaluable patients, 7 completed 6 vaccinations and WT1-specific T-cell responses were noted in 7 of 8 patients. Three patients who were HLA-A0201-positive showed significant increase in interferon-gamma-secreting cells and frequency of WT1 tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells. Three patients developed a delayed hypersensitivity reaction after vaccination. Definite related toxicities were minimal. With a mean follow-up of 30 plus or minus 8 months after diagnosis, median disease-free survival has not been reached. These preliminary data suggest that this polyvalent WT1 peptide vaccine can be administered safely to patients with a resulting immune response. Further studies are needed to establish the role of vaccination as viable postremission therapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. Polymorphisms of Dectin-1 and TLR2 Predispose to Invasive Fungal Disease in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Mike Fischer

    Full Text Available Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML who undergo induction chemotherapy are at high risk for invasive fungal disease (IFD. Dectin-1, a C-type lectin family member represents one of the most important pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the Dectin-1 gene have been associated with an increased risk of infectious complications. We sought to investigate the impact of three different Dectin-1 SNPs and one TLR2 SNP on developing IFD in 186 adult patients with newly diagnosed AML following anthracycline-based induction chemotherapy.Genotyping of Dectin-1 SNPs (rs16910526, rs3901533 and rs7309123 and TLR2 SNP (rs5743708 was performed by TaqMan method and pyrosequencing. IFD was defined according to the EORTC/MSG consensus guidelines. Multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to evaluate the association between the polymorphisms and the occurrence of pulmonary infections. Dectin-1 expression studies with SNP genotyped human monocytes were performed to elucidate susceptibility to IFD following chemotherapy.We could demonstrate that patients carrying the Dectin-1 SNP rs7309123 G/G (n = 47 or G/G and C/G (n = 133 genotype revealed a significant higher risk for developing both pneumonia in general (adjusted odds ratio (OR: 2.5; p = 0.014 and OR: 3.0, p = 0.004 and pulmonary IFD (OR: 2.6; p = 0.012 and OR: 2.4, p = 0.041, respectively. Patients carrying the TLR2 SNP rs5743708 (R753Q, GA/AA genotype, n = 12 also revealed a significantly higher susceptibility to pneumonia including IFD. Furthermore, Dectin-1 mRNA expression in human monocytes was lower following chemotherapy.To our best knowledge, this study represents the first analysis demonstrating that harbouring polymorphisms of Dectin-1 (rs7309123 or TLR2 (rs5743708 represents an independent risk factor of developing IFD in patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy.

  3. MORPHOLOGIC & FLOWCYTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIAS IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN CHHATTISGARH

    Rabia Parveen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Immunophenotyping of leukemi a by flowcytometry offers a better classification of the hematopoietic lineage of malignant cells as compared to morphology. AIM : To determine the immunophenotypic subtypes of acute leukemia in a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIAL & METHODS : A one y ear study of morphologic & flowcytometric data of patients with acute leukemia. RESULTS : Total numbers of acute leukemia patients diagnosed morphologically were 45, out of which 20 patients underwent immunophenotyping by flowcytometry. Maximum patients wer e in the age group of 0 - 10 yrs followed by 11 - 20 yrs with males outnumbering female. Immunophenotypically they belonged to ALL - B cell lineage, ALL - T cell lineage, AML, biphenotypic, inconclusive. CONCLUSION : Immunophenotyping of acute leukemias by flowcyto metry, not only helps to confirm the morphologic diagnosis but also helps in assigning specific lineage to the blasts, particularly in acute lymphoid leukemia

  4. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    HAN Li-na; ZHOU Jin; Jan Jacob Schuringa; Edo Vellenga

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials.Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant English articles published from 1991 to 2009.Study selection Articles regarding the risk stratification and therapeutic options of AML, as well as the characteristics of leukemic stem cells were selected.Results AML is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical outcome dependent on several prognostic factors,including age, cytogenetics and molecular markers. The advances in the understanding of AML pathogenesis and development will generate potential novel agents that might improve the treatment results of standard chemotherapy.Conclusion Deeper insight into the multiple transforming events of AML may aid us in designing combinations of small molecule inhibitors based on the individual patient characteristics.

  5. Epigenetics in MLL-rearranged infant Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    D.J.P.M. Stumpel (Dominique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNowadays the cure rate for children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has exceeded 80%. Although this is considered to be one of the major successes in pediatric oncology, the subgroup of patients that did not benefit from the improved therapeutic strategies should not be

  6. All-trans retinoic acid as a single agent induces complete remission in a patient with acute leukemia of M2a subtype

    陈子兴; 王阳; 王玮; 贡静霞; 薛永权

    2002-01-01

    Objective To present a special case with the karyotype and molecular marker of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M2 who was induced to complete remission by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) alone.Methods A recently hospitalized young female patient with acute leukemia was initially diagnosed as M3 subtype based on morphological French-American-British (FAB) classification. Karyotype analysis using standard G and R banding techniques and RT-PCR were applied to further define the diagnosis. After primarily cultured bone marrow cells from the iliac aspiration were tested for in vitro induced differentiation, the patient was treated with oral all-trans retinoic acid alone, 60?mg per day until complete remission was achieved. Peripheral blood and bone marrow changes were monitored over the whole treatment course.Results The characteristic chromosomal aberration for M3, the t(15;17) reciprocal translocation, was not found while a t(8;21) translocation was verified. Furthermore, an amplified product of the AML-1/ETO fusion gene instead of the PML/RARα fusion gene was detected by RT-PCR and the diagnosis was corrected from M3 to M2. Primary cultured bone marrow cells can be fully induced to terminal differentiation after 4 days exposure to ATRA. A hematological complete remission was achieved after 40 days treatment with ATRA as a single therapeutic agent, suggesting an alternative pathway mediating ATRA-induced myeloid differentiation. Conclusion A leukemia patient with a subtype other than M3, such as M2 in this case, may also be induced to complete remission by the mechanism of ATRA-induced terminal differentiation. This implies that there may be a pathway other than PML/RARα fusion gene product which mediates ATRA-induced myeloid maturation in leukemia cells.

  7. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3

    Hulya Gunbatar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3. During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML.

  8. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3).

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML.

  9. Acute lymphocytic leukemia recurring in the spinal epidural space.

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sakata, Katsumi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Kanno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-08-01

    A 27-year-old man presented with a very rare spinal epidural mass associated with recurrence of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) manifesting as acute progressive neurological deficits. The patient presented with shoulder pain and ambulatory difficulties 3 years after remission of ALL treated by bone marrow transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural mass extending from C-7 to T-3, which compressed the cord and extended to the intervertebral foramen along the roots. After decompression surgery, the symptoms dramatically improved. Histological examination showed clusters of immature lymphocytes consistent with recurrence of leukemia, so chemotherapy and radiation therapy were carried out. At 1 year after the operation, no local mass expansion or systemic progression of leukemia had occurred. Leukemic mass must be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural mass, even in patients with ALL.

  10. Improved outcome in acute myeloid leukemia patients enrolled in clinical trials

    Østgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Mette; Sengeløv, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    Clinical trials are critical to improve AML treatment. It remains, however, unclear if clinical trial participation per se affects prognosis and to what extent the patients selected for trials differ from those of patients receiving intensive therapy off-trial.We conducted a population-based cohort...... study of newly diagnosed Danish AML patients treated with intensive chemotherapy between 2000-2013. We estimated accrual rates and compared characteristics, complete remission (CR) rates, and relative risks (RRs) of death at 90-day, 1-year, and 3-years in clinical trial patients to patients treated off......-trial.Of 867 patients, 58.3% (n = 504) were included in a clinical trial. Accrual rates were similar across age groups (p = 0.55). Patients with poor performance status, comorbidity, therapy-related and secondary AML were less likely to be enrolled in trials. CR rates were 80.2% in trial-patients versus 68...

  11. ERYTHEMA NODOSUM REVEALING ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Chebbi Wafa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Erythema nodosum (EN is the most common type of panniculitis. It may be idiopathic or secondary to various etiologies. However, the occurrence of erythema nodosum in malignant hemopathy had rarely been reported. Case report: A 42 year-old woman presented with a four week history of recurrent multiple painful erythematous nodules developed on the lower limbs associated with arthralgia of the ankles and fever. The clinical features of skin lesions with contusiform color evolution allowed establishing the diagnosis of EN. No underlying cause was found. The skin lesions were improved with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine. Three months later, the patient consulted for recurrence of EN associated with fever, inflammatory polyarthralgia and hepatosplenomegaly. The peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia. A bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia type 2. Initiation of chemotherapy was followed by the complete disappearance of skin lesions of EN. Conclusion: Paraneoplastic erythema nodosum is a rare entity. In the literature, a few cases of association with leukemia have been reported. Exploration for solid neoplasms or hemopathy in case of recurrent EN or resistance to conventional treatment should be systematic

  12. Pre-chemotherapy risk factors for invasive fungal diseases: prospective analysis of 1,192 patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (SEIFEM 2010-a multicenter study)

    Caira, Morena; Candoni, Anna; Verga, Luisa; Busca, Alessandro; Delia, Mario; Nosari, Annamaria; Caramatti, Cecilia; Castagnola, Carlo; Cattaneo, Chiara; Fanci, Rosa; Chierichini, Anna; Melillo, Lorella; Mitra, Maria Enza; Picardi, Marco; Potenza, Leonardo; Salutari, Prassede; Vianelli, Nicola; Facchini, Luca; Cesarini, Monica; De Paolis, Maria Rosaria; Di Blasi, Roberta; Farina, Francesca; Venditti, Adriano; Ferrari, Antonella; Garzia, Mariagrazia; Gasbarrino, Cristina; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Lessi, Federica; Manna, Annunziata; Martino, Bruno; Nadali, Gianpaolo; Offidani, Massimo; Paris, Laura; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rossi, Giuseppe; Spadea, Antonio; Specchia, Giorgina; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Vacca, Adriana; Cesaro, Simone; Perriello, Vincenzo; Aversa, Franco; Tumbarello, Mario; Pagano, Livio

    2015-01-01

    Correct definition of the level of risk of invasive fungal infections is the first step in improving the targeting of preventive strategies. We investigated the potential relationship between pre-hospitalization exposure to sources of fungi and the development of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia after their first course of chemotherapy. From January 2010 to April 2012, all consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients in 33 Italian centers were prospectively registered. Upon first admission, information about possible pre-chemotherapy risk factors and environmental exposure was collected. We recorded data regarding comorbid conditions, employment, hygienic habits, working and living environment, personal habits, hobbies, and pets. All invasive fungal infections occurring within 30 days after the first course of chemotherapy were recorded. Of the 1,192 patients enrolled in this study, 881 received intensive chemotherapy and were included in the present analysis. Of these, 214 developed an invasive fungal infection, including 77 proven/probable cases (8.7%). Of these 77 cases, 54 were proven/probable invasive mold infections (6.1%) and 23 were proven yeast infections (2.6%). Upon univariate analysis, a significant association was found between invasive mold infections and age, performance status, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking, cocaine use, job, hobbies, and a recent house renovation. Higher body weight resulted in a reduced risk of invasive mold infections. Multivariate analysis confirmed the role of performance status, job, body weight, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and house renovation. In conclusion, several hospital-independent variables could potentially influence the onset of invasive mold infections in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Investigation of these factors upon first admission may help to define a patient’s risk category and improve targeted prophylactic

  13. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Laura B Ramsey

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002. Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  14. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  15. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. New vessel formation and aberrant VEGF/VEGFR signaling in acute leukemia : Does it matter?

    De Bont, ESJM; Neefjes, VME; Rosati, S; Vellenga, E; Kamps, WA

    2002-01-01

    Although many patients with acute leukemia achieve a hematological complete remission with aggressive intensive therapy protocols, a large proportion shows reoccurrence of disease. Novel strategies are warranted. In acute leukemia new vessel formation is observed. New vessel formation is the result

  18. Aurora kinases in childhood acute leukemia: The promise of aurora B as therapeutic target

    S.A. Hartsink-Segers (S.); C.M. Zwaan (Michel); C. Exalto (Carla); M.W.J. Luijendijk (M. W J); V. Calvert (V.); E.F. Petricoin (Emanuel F.); W.E. Evans (William); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); V. de Haas (Valerie); M. Hedtjärn (M.); B.R. Hansen (B.); T. Koch (T.); H.N. Caron (Huib); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the effects of targeting the mitotic regulators aurora kinase A and B in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aurora protein expression levels in pediatric ALL and AML patient samples were determined by western blot and reverse ph

  19. Prediction of molecular subtypes in acute myeloid leukemia based on gene expression profiling

    R.G.W. Verhaak (Roel); B.J. Wouters (Bas); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); S. Abbas (Saman); H.B. Beverloo (Berna); S. Lugthart (Sanne); B. Löwenberg (Bob); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examined the gene expression profiles of two independent cohorts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia [n=247 and n=214 (younger than or equal to 60 years)] to study the applicability of gene expression profiling as a single assay in prediction of acute myeloid leukemia-specific mol

  20. Effect of age and body weight on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    Løhmann, Ditte J A; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia is very toxic and the association between outcome and age and Body Mass Index is unclear. We investigated effect of age and Body Mass Index on toxicity and survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. We studied all patients who completed first indu...

  1. CHP2 gene expression and quantitation in Egyptian patients with acute leukemia

    Amira Ahmed Hammam

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Many studies suggest that CHP2 expression is a novel prognostic marker in AL and thus needs to be incorporated into the patient stratification and treatment protocols. In addition, a quarter of AL patients fail therapy and novel treatments that are focused on undermining specifically the leukemic process are needed urgently.

  2. Comparable results in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after related and unrelated stem cell transplantation.

    Dahlke, J; Kröger, N; Zabelina, T; Ayuk, F; Fehse, N; Wolschke, C; Waschke, O; Schieder, H; Renges, H; Krüger, W; Kruell, A; Hinke, A; Erttmann, R; Kabisch, H; Zander, A R

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of 84 patients with ALL after related (n = 46) or unrelated (n = 38) allogeneic SCT. Mean recipient age was 23 years (range: 1-60) and median follow-up was 18 months (range: 1-133). Forty-three patients were transplanted in CR1; 25 in CR2 or CR3; four were primary refractory; four in PR; eight in relapse. The conditioning regimen consisted of TBI/VP16/CY (n = 76), TBI/VP16 (n = 2), TBI/CY (n = 2), Bu/VP16/CY (n = 4). The OS at 3 years was 45% (44% unrelated, 46% related). Univariate analysis showed a significantly better OS for patients <18 years (P=0.03), mismatched sex-combination (P = 0.03), both with a stronger effect on increasing OS after unrelated SCT. Factors decreasing TRM were patient age <18 years (P = 0.004), patient CMV-seronegativity (P = 0.014), female recipient (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in TRM and the relapse rate was similar in both donor type groups. Multivariate analysis showed that factors for increased OS which remained significant were mismatched sex-combination (RR: 0.70,95% CI: 0.51-0.93, P = 0.015), patient age < 18 years (RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.47-0.93, P = 0.016). A decreased TRM was found for female patients (RR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.33-0.98, P=0.042), negative CMV status of the patient (RR: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.36-0.90, P = 0.015). Unrelated stem cell transplantation for high-risk ALL patients with no HLA-compatible family donor is justifiable.

  3. Infection Rates among Acute Leukemia Patients Receiving Alternative Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Ballen, Karen; Woo Ahn, Kwang; Chen, Min; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Ahmed, Ibrahim; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Antin, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami S; Boeckh, Michael; Chen, George; Dandoy, Christopher; George, Biju; Laughlin, Mary J; Lazarus, Hillard M; MacMillan, Margaret L; Margolis, David A; Marks, David I; Norkin, Maxim; Rosenthal, Joseph; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin; Schouten, Harry C; Storek, Jan; Szabolcs, Paul; Ustun, Celalettin; Verneris, Michael R; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Williams, Kirsten M; Wingard, John R; Wirk, Baldeep; Wolfs, Tom; Young, Jo-Anne H; Auletta, Jeffrey; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lindemans, Caroline; Riches, Marcie L

    2016-01-01

    Alternative graft sources (umbilical cord blood [UCB], matched unrelated donors [MUD], or mismatched unrelated donors [MMUD]) enable patients without a matched sibling donor to receive potentially curative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Retrospective studies demonstrate comparable outcome

  4. FLT3 and NPM-1 mutations in a cohort of acute promyelocytic leukemia patients from India

    Suchitra Swaminathan

    2014-01-01

    Results: Frequency of FLT3/internal tandem duplication and FLT3/tyrosine kinase domain was found to be 25% and 7% respectively. We observed a high frequency of NPM1 mutation (45% in the present population of APL patients.

  5. Specific scoring systems to predict survival of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after intensive antileukemic treatment based on results of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML-10 and intergroup CRIANT studies

    Oosterveld, M.; Suciu, S.; Muus, P.; Germing, U.; Delforge, M.; Belhabri, A.; Aul, C.; Selleslag, D.; Ferrant, A.; Marie, J.P.; Amadori, S.; Jehn, U.; Mandelli, F.; Hess, U.; Hellstrom-Lindberg, E.; Cakmak-Wollgast, S.; Vignetti, M.; Labar, B.; Willemze, R.; Witte, T.J. de

    2015-01-01

    High-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have usually a less favorable outcome after intensive treatment compared with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. This may reflect different disease-related and patient-related factors. The purpose of this analysis is to identify disease-s

  6. Clinical case of acute myeloblastic leukemia with t(8;21(q22;q22 in a patient with Klinefelter’s syndrome

    Vanya Slavcheva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter’s syndrome is characterized by abnormal karyotype 47, XXY and a phenotype associated with hypogonadism and gynecomastia. Often the disease can be diagnosed accidentally, when carrying out cytogenetic analysis in cases of a malignant blood disease. We present the clinical case of a patient diagnosed with acute myelomonoblastic leukemia- M4 Eo (AML- M4, where by means of classic cytogenetics a karyotype was found corre-sponding to Klinefelter’s syndrome. Three induction courses of polychemotherapy wermade, which led to remission of the disease, documented both flowcytometrically and cytogenetically.

  7. Treatment of sepsis and ARDS with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and interventional lung assist membrane ventilator in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Gorjup, Vojka; Fister, Misa; Noc, Marko; Rajic, Vladan; Ribaric, Suada Filekovic

    2012-07-01

    We report an 18-year-old ice skater with acute lymphoblast leukemia. She developed Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia, severe sepsis, septic shock, and ARDS following chemotherapy-induced severe bone marrow failure. She was successfully treated with extraordinary life support measures, which included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, double lumen lung ventilation for management of hemoptysis, and lung assist membrane ventilation. After 57 days of ICU treatment and a year of rehabilitation, the patient has fully regained her functional status, is now finishing high school, and is ice skating again.

  8. Patterns of infection in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia receiving azacitidine as salvage therapy. Implications for primary antifungal prophylaxis.

    Falantes, Jose F; Calderón, Cristina; Márquez-Malaver, Francisco J; Aguilar-Guisado, Manuela; Martín-Peña, Almudena; Martino, María L; Montero, Isabel; González, Jose; Parody, Rocío; Pérez-Simón, Jose A; Espigado, Ildefonso

    2014-02-01

    Incidence, etiology, and outcome of infectious episodes in patients with myeloid neoplasms receiving azacitidine are uncertain, with no prospective data available in this group of patients. The aim of the current study was to analyze the incidence and factors related to the probability of infection in a cohort of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated with azacitidine who did not receive any type of antimicrobial prophylaxis. Significantly, the group of patients who received prior intensive chemotherapy had more infectious episodes (P = 10(-4)), and particularly, invasive aspergillosis (P = .015), than patients who received frontline azacitidine. Primary antifungal prophylaxis might be recommended in MDS and AML patients receiving azacitidine as salvage therapy after intensive regimens.

  9. [The feasibility of Erwinia asparaginase for pediatric patients who developed an allergic reaction to E.coli asparaginase during treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Takahashi, Hiroyoshi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kato, Motohiro; Isobe, Kiyotaka; Yasui, Naoko; Mori, Makiko; Akiyama, Kosuke; Kikuchi, Akira; Hanada, Ryoji

    2013-04-01

    Asparaginase (ASNase) is one of the most important key drugs in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, clinical hypersensitivity reactions often occur and lead to the discontinuation of ASNase treatment. Here, we report a retrospective study of 68 Erwinia ASNase (Erw-ASNase) administrations in 11 patients with childhood ALL who developed allergic reactions to E.coli-ASNase in our hospital between 2006 and 2012. The median age of the patients was 6 (range, 0 to 14). Erw-ASNase purchased overseas by the patients' guardians had already been administered when we obtained informed consent from the guardians. In all patients, fibrinogen and/or anti-thrombin III levels were decreased, but thrombosis did not develop. There was only one mild adverse event (grade 2 urticaria) in one patient, in whom Erw-ASNase could be continued after increasing the doses of premedication with antihistamine and prednisolone. Erw-ASNase could be safely administered to all patients.

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  11. Clinical, cytogenetic and dual-color FISH studies on five cases of myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia patients with 1;7 translocation

    申咏梅; 薛永权; 李建勇; 潘金兰; 吴亚芳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of four patients with myel odysplastic syndrome (MDS) and one with acute myeloid leukemia experiencing t(1; 7).Methods Five patients seen in our hospital from 1992 to 2001 were diagnosed as MDS and acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) according to the French-American-British (FAB) criteria. Chromosomes were prepared using the direct method as well as 24-hou r unstimulated cultures of fresh heparinized bone marrow for each subject, while R-banding was used to analyze karyotypes. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hy bridization (FISH) using SpectrumRed and SpectrumGreen directly labeled chromoso me 1-specific α-satellite DNA probe (red) and chromosome 7- specific α-sat ellite DNA probe (green) was performed for three cases. Results Of the five patients, three had 1;7 translocation due to along history of expos ure to benzene. In three cases, dual-color FISH resulted in three red signals and two green ones, in which one red signal adjoining one green signal in 27.6% , 84% and 18.5% metaphases, respectively. Conclusions Exposure to benzene may be the cause for Chinese MDS and AML patients with t(1;7 ) translocation. The result of dual-color FISH convincingly confirmed that the centromere of the derivative chromosome 7p/1q resulting from 1;7 translocation was made up of centromeres from both chromosomes 1 and 7.

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Full Text Available abel Study of Sargramostim Among Patients Receiving Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelog...g Myelosuppressive Induction Chemotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number...r disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute ...Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Myeloid Leukemia NOS E.1.1...r investigation E.1.2Version 18.0 E.1.2Level PT E.1.2Classification code 10000880 E.1.2Term Acute

  13. Defining Molecular Phenotypes of Mesenchymal and hematopoietic Stem Cells derived from Peripheral blood of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia patients for regenerative stem cell therapy.

    Potdar, Pd; Subedi, Rp

    2011-01-01

    Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) is a clonal myeloid disorder affecting all age groups, characterized by accumulation of immature blast cells in bone marrow and in peripheral blood. Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation is a present treatment for cure of ALL patients, which is very expensive, invasive process and may have possibility of transplantation of malignant stem cells to patients. In the present study, we hypothesized to isolate large number of normal Mesenchymal & Hematopoietic stem cells from peripheral blood of ALL patients, which will be further characterized for their normal phenotypes by using specific molecular stem cell markers. This is the first study, which defines the existing phenotypes of isolated MSCs and HSCs from peripheral blood of ALL patients. We have established three cell lines in which two were Mesenchymal stem cells designated as MSCALL and MSCnsALL and one was suspension cell line designated as HSCALL. The HSCALL cell line was developed from the lymphocyte like cells secreted by MSCALL cells. Our study also showed that MSCALL from peripheral blood of ALL patient secreted hematopoietic stem cells in vitro culture. We have characterized all three-cell lines by 14 specific stem cell molecular markers. It was found that both MSC cell lines expressed CD105, CD13, and CD73 with mixed expression of CD34 and CD45 at early passage whereas, HSCALL cell line expressed prominent feature of hematopoietic stem cells such as CD34 and CD45 with mild expression of CD105 and CD13. All three-cell lines expressed LIF, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, IL6, and DAPK. These cells mildly expressed COX2 and did not express BCR-ABL. Overall it was shown that isolated MSCs and HSCs can be use as a model system to study the mechanism of leukemia at stem cell level and their use in stem cell regeneration therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia.

  14. Elastase mediated fibrinolysis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Oudijk, E J; Nieuwenhuis, H K; Bos, R; Fijnheer, R

    2000-06-01

    The bleeding syndrome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is complex and consists of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hyperfibrinolysis. Elastase, derived from malignant promyelocytes, is believed to mediate the fibrinogeno- and fibrinolysis by aspecific proteolysis. In this study we measured the role of elastase in fifteen patients with APL by using an assay for elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) and the results were compared with those obtained in patients with sepsis induced DIC. High levels of elastase were observed in sepsis and APL. The levels of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products were significantly higher in APL patients compared to patients with sepsis induced DIC. Nevertheless, the level of elastase degraded fibrin(ogen) was higher in the sepsis group (635.3 ng/ml, compared to 144.3 ng/ml in APL; p <0.0001). So, the enormous increase in fibrin and fibrinogen degradation products in APL cannot be explained by elastase activity. This study suggests a minor role for elastase mediated proteolysis in the hemorrhagic diathesis in APL patients.

  15. Fatal Ophiostoma piceae infection in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Bommer, M.; Hütter, M.L.; Stilgenbauer, S.; de Hoog, G.S.; de Beer, Z.W.; Wellinghausen, N.

    2009-01-01

    We report to our knowledge the first case of human infection with Ophiostoma piceae. This Sporothrix schenckii-related fungus caused disseminated infection involving the lung and the brain in a patient with lymphoblastic lymphoma. The case emphasizes the significance of molecular techniques for iden

  16. Complicated septic shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans bacteremia in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Al-Jasser A M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans cause significant morbidity and mortality in debilitated individuals. Eradication of these infections requires prolonged therapy with antimicrobial agents and removal of any infected central venous catheter. The outcome is usually poor in patients with high risk malignancy, septic complications, and/or multi-organ dysfunction

  17. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  18. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  19. Treatment strategies in acute myeloid leukemia

    Han Li-na, [No Value; Zhou Jin, [No Value; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To summarize the risk stratification and current treatment strategies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and discuss the role of emerging novel agents that might be applied in future clinical trials. Data sources The data in this article were collected from PubMed database with relevant Engl

  20. Cytarabine dose for acute myeloid leukemia

    B. Löwenberg (Bob); T. Pabst (Thomas); E. Vellenga (Edo); W. van Putten; H.C. Schouten (Harry); C. Graux (Carlos); A. Ferrant (Augustin); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); B.J. Biemond (Bart); A. Gratwohl (Alois); G.E. de Greef (Georgine); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); M.R. Schaafsma (Martijn); M. Gregor (Michael); M. Theobald; U. Schanz (Urs); J. Maertens (Johan); G.J. Ossenkoppele (Gert)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 m

  1. Cytarabine Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Lowenberg, Bob; Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C.; Graux, Carlos; Ferrant, Augustin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Biemond, Bart J.; Gratwohl, Alois; de Greef, Georgine E.; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schaafsma, Martijn R.; Gregor, Michael; Theobald, Matthias; Schanz, Urs; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cytarabine (ara-C) is an important drug in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). High-dose cytarabine (2000 to 3000 mg per square meter of body-surface area) is toxic but results in higher rates of relapse-free survival than does the conventional dose of 100 to 400 mg per square

  2. Molecular Insights in MLL Rearranged Acute Leukemia

    R.W. Stam (Ronald)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAcute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants (<1 year of age) is characterized by a high incidence (~80%) of rearrangements of the MLL gene, resistance to several important chemotherapeutic drugs, and a poor treatment outcome. With overall survival rates for infant ALL not exceeding 50%

  3. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author’s Institution

    Gustavo M. Cervantes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author’s institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  4. Cardiac function in survivors of childhood acute myeloid leukemia treated with chemotherapy only

    Jarfelt, Marianne; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Glosli, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We report cardiac function of patients treated for Childhood acute myeloid leukemia with chemotherapy only according to three consecutive Nordic protocols. METHODS: Ninety-eight of 138 eligible patients accepted examination with standardized echocardiography. Results were compared...

  5. Use of a stop-flow programmable shunt valve to maximize CNS chemotherapy delivery in a pediatric patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Sheri K Palejwala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The requirement for frequent intraventricular drug delivery in the setting of shunt dependence is particularly challenging in the treatment of central nervous system infection, neoplastic disease, and hemorrhage. This is especially relevant in the pediatric population where both hematogenous malignancy requiring intrathecal drug delivery and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus are more prevalent. Intrathecal and intraventricular chemotherapy agents can be prematurely diverted in these shunt-dependent patients. Case Description: We report the use of a stop-flow programmable shunt valve to maximize delivery of intraventricular chemotherapy in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and disseminated intravascular coagulation who presented with spontaneous intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhages. The patient then developed posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and eventually progressed to shunt dependence but still required frequent intraventricular chemotherapy administration. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt, equipped with a valve that allows for near cessation of cerebrospinal fluid flow (Certas; , Codman, Raynham, MA, and a contralateral Ommaya reservoir were inserted to maximize intraventricular dissemination of chemotherapy. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of the use of a high-resistance programmable valve being used to virtually cease cerebrospinal fluid flow through the distal catheter temporarily in order to maximize intraventricular drug dissemination in a pediatric patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with del(7)(q22) in a patient with de novo AML.

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Cho, Sun Young; Park, Tae Sung; Oh, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Hwi-Joong

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old Korean woman was initially diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML). After induction chemotherapy was performed using cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF, complete remission (CR) was subsequently achieved following reinduction chemotherapy using the same chemotherapeutic agents. Thirty-six months after the initial CR, an increase in immature cells (up to 12.0%) was observed in the patient's bone marrow. Because chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,del(7)(q22) in all of the analyzed cells, the patient was diagnosed with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS). Although the patient subsequently received chemotherapy and G-CSF for neutropenia, t-MDS rapidly progressed after 3 months to therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although very rare, de novo AML can progress to a secondary MDS/AML with del(7q) after chemotherapy with cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF. Further investigation into the role of genes located in 7q22 may provide more information about the mechanisms of leukemogenesis.

  7. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy.

    Yang, Daisy; Hladnik, Lindsay

    2009-06-01

    Management of the pregnant patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a challenge. Immediate treatment of APL is critical, as it is an oncologic emergency, with a high risk of morbidity and mortality associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. However, administration of chemotherapy and differentiating agents in pregnancy is controversial because of potential teratogenic effects. In addition, complications associated with APL, including retinoic acid syndrome, add to the complexity of management. To better understand how to manage this complex patient care situation, we searched the PubMed database (January 1972-May 2008) for English-language articles about maternal and fetal outcomes resulting from APL treatment during pregnancy. A total of 42 cases from 35 articles were identified: 12 first-trimester, 21 second-trimester, and 9 third-trimester cases. The most commonly administered agents were all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), anthracyclines, and antimetabolites. Complete remission was reported in 35 (83%) of 42 patients. Administration of ATRA or chemotherapy in the first trimester was associated with an increased risk of fetal malformations and spontaneous abortion, whereas administration in the second and third trimesters was associated with relatively favorable fetal outcomes. The overall treatment of the pregnant patient with APL should include a discussion about pregnancy termination, especially if APL is diagnosed in the first trimester. If the pregnancy is to continue, then the appropriate chemotherapy regimen needs to be determined. Frequent fetal monitoring, along with aggressive management of potential APL-related complications, is necessary to allow for optimal maternal and fetal outcomes.

  8. Use of combination therapy to successfully treat breakthrough Trichosporon asahii infection in an acute leukemia patient receiving voriconazole

    Jia Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Trichosporon species is an important life-threatening opportunistic systemic pathogen, especially in leukemia patients. Voriconazole is proved to be a promising agent in past decade. However, recently we observed a case of breakthrough Trichosporon asahii infection while receiving voriconazole, which calls for an alternative treatment strategy. A combination therapy of liposomal amphotericin B (AmB plus caspofungin – in which liposomal AmB dose was reduced due to renal toxicity – was administered to successfully treat this patient.

  9. Cerebral venous thrombosis in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma during induction chemotherapy with l-asparaginase: The GRAALL experience.

    Couturier, Marie-Anne; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Suarez, Felipe; Thomas, Xavier; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Cacheux, Victoria; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Bonmati, Caroline; Sanhes, Laurence; Bories, Pierre; Daguindau, Etienne; Dorvaux, Véronique; Reman, Oumedaly; Frayfer, Jamile; Orvain, Corentin; Lhéritier, Véronique; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Tanguy-Schmidt, Aline

    2015-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) thrombotic events are a well-known complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) induction therapy, especially with treatments including l-asparaginase (l-ASP). Data on risk factors and clinical evolution is still lacking in adult patients. We report on the clinical evolution of 22 CNS venous thrombosis cases occurring in 708 adults treated for ALL or lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL) with the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-induction protocol, which included eight L-ASP (6,000 IU/m(2) ) infusions. The prevalence of CNS thrombosis was 3.1%. CNS thrombosis occurred after a median of 18 days (range: 11-31) when patients had received a median of three l-ASP injections (range: 2-7). Patients with CNS thrombosis exhibited a median antithrombin (AT) nadir of 47.5% (range: 36-67%) at Day 17 (range: D3-D28), and 95% of them exhibited AT levels lower than 60%. There were no evident increase in hereditary thrombotic risk factors prevalence, and thrombosis occurred despite heparin prophylaxis which was performed in 90% of patients. Acquired AT deficiency was frequently detected in patients with l-ASP-based therapy, and patients with CNS thrombosis received AT prophylaxis (45%) less frequently than patients without CNS thrombosis (83%), P = 0.0002). CNS thrombosis was lethal in 5% of patients, while 20% had persistent sequelae. One patient received all planned l-ASP infusions without recurrence of CNS thrombotic whereas l-ASP injections were discontinued in 20 patients during the management of thrombosis without a significant impact on overall survival (P = 0.4).

  10. Panobinostat as part of induction and maintenance for elderly patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia: phase Ib/II panobidara study

    Ocio, Enrique M.; Herrera, Pilar; Olave, María-Teresa; Castro, Nerea; Pérez-Simón, José A.; Brunet, Salut; Oriol, Albert; Mateo, Marta; Sanz, Miguel-Ángel; López, Javier; Montesinos, Pau; Chillón, María-Carmen; Prieto-Conde, María-Isabel; Díez-Campelo, María; González, Marcos; Vidriales, María-Belén; Mateos, María-Victoria; San Miguel, Jesús F.

    2015-01-01

    This phase Ib/II trial combined the pan-deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat with chemotherapy followed by panobinostat maintenance in elderly patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia. Patients with prior history of myelodysplastic syndrome were excluded and 38 evaluable patients were included in the study (median age: 71 years; range: 65–83). Study patients received an induction with idarubicin (8 mg/m2 iv days 1–3) plus cytarabine (100 mg/m2 iv days 1–7) plus panobinostat po at escalating doses (days 8, 10, 12, 15, 17 and 19) that could be repeated in non-responding patients. Patients achieving complete remission received a consolidation cycle with the same schema, followed by panobinostat maintenance (40 mg po 3 days/week) every other week until progression. Thirty-one patients were treated at the maximum tolerated dose of panobinostat in the combination (10 mg) with good tolerability. Complete remission rate was 64% with a time to relapse of 17.0 months (12.8–21.1). Median overall survival for the whole series was 17 months (5.5–28.4). Moreover, in 4 of 5 patients with persistent minimal residual disease before maintenance, panobinostat monotherapy reduced its levels, with complete negativization in two of them. Maintenance phase was well tolerated. The most frequent adverse events were thrombocytopenia (25% grades 3/4), and gastrointestinal toxicity, asthenia and anorexia (mainly grades 1/2). Five patients required dose reduction during this phase, but only one discontinued therapy due to toxicity. These results suggest that panobinostat is one of the first novel agents with activity in elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients, and suggest further investigation is warranted, particularly in the context of maintenance therapy. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00840346. PMID:26160880

  11. Subdural hemorrhages in acute lymphoblastic leukemia: case report and literature review

    Rui Yin; CaiXia Qiu; XiaoHui Dong; YeLong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a rare hematological malignancy.Pure subdural hemorrhages in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient are extremely rare.Case presentation:This case presented acute spontaneous subdural hemorrhage without head trauma at first,and acute lymphoblastic leukemia was diagnosed later.The second time,the patient was admitted with multiple pure subdural hemorrhages in different locations and periods with a history of slight head trauma.Conclusions:Pure subdural hemorrhages can occur in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.More care would be needed for pure subdural hemorrhages without obvious head trauma,and patients with hematological malignancies should be protected from even mild head trauma.

  12. Severe Lower Limb Ischemia by Massive Arterial Thrombosis Revealing an Acute Myeloid Leukemia Needing for Leg Amputation: Clinical and Emotional Aspects Related to the Communication with the Patient and His Family

    Taormina, Calogero; Mosa, Clara; Di Marco, Floriana; Valentino, Fabrizio; Trizzino, Angela; Guadagna, Paola; Talarico, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Large vessel thrombosis is a very rare clinical presentation of acute leukemia, generally associated with coagulopathy, usually characteristic of acute promyelocytic leukemia. A 13- year-old boy with a previously undiagnosed acute myeloid leukemia was referred to our hospital with acute ischemia of the right lower limb due to occlusion of the right external iliac artery, treated with emergency double surgical thromboembolectomy and chemotherapy. The thrombotic complication resulted in leg amputation. Now the boy is well in complete remission, with a good social integration and quality of life, 30 months after completing treatment. The report highlights the crucial role of early diagnosis and subsequent chemotherapy in avoiding amputation. We particularly focused critical and emotional aspects related to the communication about the leg amputation with the patient and his family. PMID:28058104

  13. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein.

  14. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Hanaa H. Arnaoaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  15. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, Julian; Burmeister, T;

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia ...

  16. [A case of mediastinal growing teratoma syndrome with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia].

    Hayashi, Masachika; Igarashi, Natsue; Fujimori, Fumio; Kuriyama, Hideyuki; Ebe, Yusuke; Nishibori, Takeaki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Hosaka, Yasuko; Yamato, Yasushi; Togashi, Kenichi; Yano, Toshio

    2014-07-01

    We report a case of a 38-year-old man who was diagnosed with a mediastinal germ cell tumor. After induction chemotherapy, the tumor marker levels normalized, but the tumor itself continued to grow. Surgical resection was performed successfully, but the patient developed acute megakaryoblastic leukemia 6 months later, and induction and consolidation therapies failed to achieve remission. Leukemia cells invaded the central nervous system following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and the patient died 5 months after being diagnosed with leukemia. This very rare case of a mediastinal germ cell tumor met the criteria for "growing teratoma syndrome", against a background of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia.

  17. FLAG-induced remission in a patient with acute mast cell leukemia (MCL exhibiting t(7;10(q22;q26 and KIT D816H

    Peter Valent

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cell leukemia (MCL is a life-threatening disease associated with high mortality and drug-resistance. Only few patients survive more than 12 months. We report on a 55-year-old female patient with acute MCL diagnosed in May 2012. The disease was characterized by a rapid increase in white blood cells and mast cells (MC in the peripheral blood, and a rapid increase of serum tryptase levels. The KIT D816H mutation was detected in the blood and bone marrow (BM. Induction chemotherapy with high-dose ARA-C and fludarabine (FLAG was administered. Unexpectedly, the patient entered a hematologic remission with almost complete disappearance of neoplastic MC and a decrease of serum tryptase levels to normal range after 2 cycles of FLAG. Consecutively, the patient was prepared for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, shortly after the third cycle of FLAG, tryptase levels increased again, immature MC appeared in the blood, and the patient died from cerebral bleeding. Together, this case shows that intensive chemotherapy regimens, like FLAG, may induce remission in acute MCL. However, treatment responses are short-lived and the overall outcome remains dismal in these patients. We propose to separate this acute type of MCL from more subacute or chronic variants of MCL.

  18. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia with Bilateral Renal Masses Masquerading as Nephroblastomatosis

    Poonam Thakore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in the pediatric patient population. However, renal involvement as the primary manifestation of ALL is rare. We report a case of a 4-year-old boy with bilateral renal lesions resembling nephroblastic rests as the first finding of early stage ALL preceding hematological changes and subsequent classic clinical findings by two weeks. These renal hypodensities completely resolved after one week of induction chemotherapy. This case demonstrates that renal involvement can be the only initial presenting finding of leukemia. Children with lesions resembling nephroblastic rests need appropriate surveillance due to the risk of malignant disease.

  19. Oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A review

    Kadalagere Lakshmana Girish Babu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia is a malignancy of the bone marrow and blood. It is the most common childhood cancer in India. Advances in the treatment regimens have greatly increased the chances of survival. Both the disease and its treatment change the oral environment. In some cases, oral manifestations are the presenting feature of the disease and it will be the dentist′s responsibility to identify the underlying disorder and guide the diagnosis of the patient. Hence, the aim of present article is to review the literature concerning the oral health of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL.

  20. High-Dose Cytarabine in Induction Treatment Improves the Outcome of Adult Patients Younger Than Age 46 Years With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Results of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML-12 Trial

    Willemze, R.; Suciu, S.; Meloni, G.; Labar, B.; Marie, J.P.; Halkes, C.J.; Muus, P.; Mistrik, M.; Amadori, S.; Specchia, G.; Fabbiano, F.; Nobile, F.; Sborgia, M.; Camera, A.; Selleslag, D.L.; Lefrere, F., Sr.; Magro, D.; Sica, S.; Cantore, N.; Beksac, M.; Berneman, Z.; Thomas, X.; Melillo, L.; Guimaraes, J.E.; Leoni, P.; Luppi, M.; Mitra, M.E.; Bron, D.; Fillet, G.; Marijt, E.W.; Venditti, A.; Hagemeijer, A.; Mancini, M.; Jansen, J.H.; Cilloni, D.; Meert, L.; Fazi, P.; Vignetti, M.; Trisolini, S.M.; Mandelli, F.; Witte, T.J. de

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cytarabine plays a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most centers use 7 to 10 days of cytarabine at a daily dose of 100 to 200 mg/m(2) for remission induction. Consensus has not been reached on the benefit of higher dosages of cytarabine. PATIENTS

  1. 成人急性白血病医院感染危险因素探讨%Risk Factors of Nosocomial Infection in Adult Patients with Acute Leukemia

    刘玲

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨成人急性白血病医院感染的危险因素,从整体上促进医院感染预防措施的制定。方法对该院血液科2013年8月-2015年8月期间住院治疗的653例成人急性白血病例进行回顾性调查研究,并做好个案登记。其中386例为医院感染组,267例为非医院感染组,在研究中对这两组进行单因素χ2检验和多元素回归分析。结果通过多因素回归分析可知,有统计学意义的危险因素有五项,主要包含预防性使用抗生素、使用糖皮质激素、肛周疾患以及血红蛋白和血小板计数。结论成人急性白血病患者的医院感染率较高,血红蛋白以及血小板计数是医院感染的保护因素,危险因素中的另外3项是成人急性白血病患者出现医院感染的独立危险因素。%Objective To explore the risk factors of nosocomial infection in adult acute leukemia, promote the overall pre-ventive measures of hospital infection in the Department of Hematology in our hospital. Methods August 2013 to August 2015 hospitalization of 653 cases of adult acute leukemia patients were retrospectively analysed, and make a case for regis-tration. Including 386 cases of hospital infection group, 267 cases non hospital infection in the study group, the two group of χ2 regression analysis of single factor test and multiple elements. Results By multivariate regression analysis, a statistically significant risk factor of five, mainly includes the preventive use of antibiotics, corticosteroids, perianal disease, hemoglobin and platelet count rate is higher. Conclusion The infection of adult acute leukemia patients in hospital, hemoglobin and platelet count were the protective factors of hospital infection, risk factors in the other three are anxious Independent risk factors for hospital infection in patients with leukemia.

  2. Gene-expression patterns in drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and response to treatment

    A. Holleman (Amy); C. Cheng (Cheng); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); M.V. Relling (Mary); R. Pieters (Rob); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); M.L. den Boer (Monique); W. Yang; A.J. Veerman; K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is curable with chemotherapy in approximately 80 percent of patients. However, the cause of treatment failure in the remaining 20 percent of patients is largely unknown. METHODS: We tested leukemia cells from 173

  3. New treatment strategies in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia : Hypomethylating agents and proteasome inhibitors

    van der Helm, Lidia Henrieke

    2016-01-01

    New treatment strategies in leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging, especially in the large group of patients older than 60 years. In these patients, results of standard chemotherapy are often disappointing

  4. P-glycoprotein inhibition using valspodar (PSC-833) does not improve outcomes for patients younger than age 60 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia: Cancer and Leukemia Group B study 19808.

    Kolitz, Jonathan E; George, Stephen L; Marcucci, Guido; Vij, Ravi; Powell, Bayard L; Allen, Steven L; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Shea, Thomas C; Stock, Wendy; Baer, Maria R; Hars, Vera; Maharry, Kati; Hoke, Eva; Vardiman, James W; Bloomfield, Clara D; Larson, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    Cancer and Leukemia Group B 19808 (CALGB 19808) is the only randomized trial of a second-generation P-glycoprotein (Pgp) modulator in untreated patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) younger than age 60 years. We randomly assigned 302 patients to receive induction chemotherapy regimens consisting of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C; A), daunorubicin (D), and etoposide (E), without (ADE) or with (ADEP) PSC-833 (P). The incidence of complete remission was 75% with both regimens. Reversible grade 3 and 4 liver and mucosal toxicities were significantly more common with ADEP. Therapy-related mortality was 7% and did not differ by induction arm. Excess cardiotoxicity was not seen with high doses of D in ADE. The median disease-free survival was 1.34 years in the ADE arm and 1.09 years in the ADEP arm (P = .74, log-rank test); the median overall survival was 1.86 years in the ADE arm and 1.69 years in the ADEP arm (P = .82). There was no evidence of a treatment difference within any identifiable patient subgroup. Inhibition of Pgp-mediated drug efflux by PSC-833 did not improve clinical outcomes in younger patients with untreated AML. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00006363.

  5. ST-elevation myocardial infarction and myelodysplastic syndrome with acute myeloid leukemia transformation.

    Jao, Geoffrey T; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W; Sane, David C

    2014-04-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach--balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents--might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days.

  6. How I treat acute and chronic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Shapira, Tal; Pereg, David; Lishner, Michael

    2008-09-01

    The prevalence of pregnancy associated leukemia is approximately 1 case out of 10,000 pregnancies. This rare occurrence precludes the conducting of large, prospective studies to examine diagnostic, management and outcome issues. The treatment of a pregnant woman with leukemia may be associated with severe adverse fetal outcome including death and malformations, and therefore poses a difficult challenge for both the patient and the attending physician. Chemotherapy during the 1st trimester is associated with an increased risk for congenital malformations. However, this risk diminishes as pregnancy advances. When acute leukemia is diagnosed during the 1st trimester, patients should be treated promptly similar to non-pregnant patients. However, the aggressive induction therapy should follow pregnancy termination. When the diagnosis is made later in pregnancy standard chemotherapy regimen should be considered and usually pregnancy termination is not mandatory. However, both the mother and the fetus should be under close observation and delivery should be postponed to a non-cytopenic period. Pregnancy associated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) can be treated with interferon throughout pregnancy with no apparent increase in adverse fetal outcome. In the very rare case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) during pregnancy treatment can usually be delayed until after delivery.

  7. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Man Treated With Fingolimod for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    Stanley Cohan MD, PhD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A man with relapsing multiple sclerosis, treated with fingolimod 0.5 mg/d for 15 months, developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and died 4 months after immune ablation and bone marrow allograft, from graft versus host disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia reported in a patient treated with fingolimod. Although no causal relationship can be established between fingolimod use and acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk in this single case, future surveillance for lymphatic cell malignancies in patients treated with fingolimod appears justified.

  8. Leukemia Associated Antigens: Their Dual Role as Biomarkers and Immunotherapeutic Targets for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Michael Schmitt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia associated antigens (LAAs are being increasingly identified by methods such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL cloning, serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX and mass spectrometry (MS. In additional, large scale screening techniques such as microarray, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE have expanded our understanding of the role that tumor antigens play in the biological processes which are perturbed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. It has become increasingly apparent that these antigens play a dual role, not only as targets for immunotherapy, but also as biomarkers of disease state, stage, response to treatment and survival. We need biomarkers to enable the identification of the patients who are most likely to benefit from specific treatments (conventional and/or novel and to help clinicians and scientists improve clinical end points and treatment design. Here we describe the LAAs identified in AML, to date, which have already been shown to play a dual role as biomarkers of AML disease.Abbreviations: AML: acute myeloid leukemia; APL: acute promyelocytic leukemia; ATRA: all-trans-retinoic acid; B-CLL: B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; CT: cancer-testis; CTL: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte; FAB: French-American-British; HI: hypusination inhibitors; HSP: heat shock protein; ITD: internal tandem duplication; LAA: leukemia associated antigen; MDS: myelodysplastic syndrome; MGEA6: meningioma antigen 6; MPD: myeloproliferative disease; MS: mass spectrometry; NK: natural killer; PRAME: preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma; PRTN3: proteinase 3; RAGE-1: renal antigen 1; RHAMM: receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility; RQ-PCR: real-time PCR; SAGE: serial analysis of gene expression; SCT: stem cell transplant; SEREX: serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries; SNPs: single nucleotide polymorphisms; UPD

  9. Acute myocardial infarction as a finding of acute promyelocytic leukemia-related coagulation disorder.

    Özkurt, Zübeyde N; Aypar, Eda; Sarifakiogullari, Serpil; Taçoy, Gülten; Özdag, Murat; Kahraman, Seda; Çengel, Atiye

    2015-12-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has one of the most favorable prognoses among other leukemia subtypes. However, the major cause of mortality in APL is disseminated intravascular coagulation at the presentation. We present a case of acute myocardial infarction (MI) at the time of APL diagnosis before treatment. The patient suffered from chest pain, sweating and giddiness. He was hypoxic, hypotensive and bradycardic. ECG showed inferior MI. Unfractioned heparin infusion (850 U/h) was started and 5 min after the previous ECG showed total ST resolution. We suggest that in this case, MI was not related to atherosclerotic plaque rupture but related to DIC manifestation.

  10. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed.

  11. Retrospective survey and evaluation of first-line antibiotics for chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Mukoyama, Naoki; Nakashima, Marie; Miyamura, Koichi; Yoshimi, Akira; Noda, Yukihiro; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with acute leukemia are susceptible to chemotherapy-induced severe myelosuppression, and therefore are at a high risk for febrile neutropenia (FN). In such cases, the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics such as fourth-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems is recommended as first-line antimicrobial treatment; however, the effectiveness of these agents in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been investigated in detail. We retrospectively examined and evaluated the effectiveness of first-line antibiotic treatment regimens for chemotherapy-induced FN in patients with AML in Japanese Red Cross Nagoya Daiichi Hospital. The evaluated first-line treatment regimens were as follows: cefozopran (CZOP) + amikacin (AMK) in 38 cases, cefepime (CFPM) alone in 2 cases, CFPM + AMK in 2 cases, piperacillin (PIPC) + AMK in 2 cases, and CZOP alone in 1 case. Additionally, prophylactic antifungal agents were administered in all cases. Markedly effective, effective, moderately effective, and ineffective responses occurred in 31.1%, 8.9%, 8.9%, and 51.1%, respectively, of the treated cases. The response rate, defined as the combination of markedly effective and effective outcomes, was 40.0%. In 11 cases, impairment of renal functions were observed, and they were associated with combination treatments including AMK; nine of these were associated with a glycopeptide. The combination of CZOP with AMK (84.4%) was the most commonly used first-line treatment for FN in patients with AML; carbapenem or tazobactam/PIPC has never been used for treatment of such cases. Our findings demonstrate that fourth-generation cephems will be an effective first-line treatment for FN in patients with AML in our hospital. PMID:28303057

  12. B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Haeri, Sina; Baker, Arthur M; Boles, Jeremiah; Brown, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and can be rapidly fatal if left untreated. The need for immediate treatment of ALL, coupled with the maternal-fetal risks from the chemotherapy regimen render a therapeutic dilemma in pregnant women with ALL. We report a case of ALL diagnosed in the 24th week of pregnancy to outline our management strategy, to demonstrate the feasibility of treatment with multi-agent chemotherapy, and to provide a review of the literature.

  13. A Proven Case of Cutaneous Rhizopus Infection Presenting with Severe Limb Pain Very Soon after Induction Treatment in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Mehmet Sezgin Pepeler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Importance. Invasive mucormycosis may complicate the course of patients with hematologic malignancies and has a very high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and aggressive approach combined with surgical and medical treatment have paramount importance for cure. Clinical Presentation. We report here a case of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with a subcutaneous mass lesion which was sampled by an ultrasound guided needle biopsy. The pathology showed microorganisms with aseptate hyphae with wide, irregular walls and more or less branching with highly vertical angles which suggested a mold infection. The specimen was also cultured where Rhizopus spp. grew. Conclusion. Posaconazole 200 mg QID was commenced. She recovered from neutropenia and pain on day 20 of treatment. After 4 courses of hyper-CVAD chemotherapy, the remaining soft tissue mass was removed surgically and she underwent allogeneic HSCT from a full matched sibling donor under secondary prophylaxis.

  14. A phase II study of AZD2171 (cediranib) in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Mattison, Ryan; Jumonville, Alcee; Flynn, Patrick James; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Erlichman, Charles; LaPlant, Betsy; Juckett, Mark B

    2015-07-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) not fit for intensive treatment need novel therapy options. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is one potential mechanism by which AML and MDS could be treated. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 (cediranib) has activity against VEGF receptors KDR and FLT-1. This multicenter phase II study was designed to test cediranib's activity in patients with AML or high-risk MDS. The primary endpoint was confirmed disease response defined as a composite of complete remission, partial remission or hematologic improvement. The study enrolled 23 subjects in the AML cohort and 16 subjects in the MDS cohort. There were no confirmed responses in either group. Since the study met the stopping rule after the first stage of enrollment, the trial was closed to further accrual. Common adverse events in both cohorts included thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, nausea and dehydration.

  15. Novel therapeutic options in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Michael Medinger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a biologically complex and molecularly and clinically heterogeneous disease, and its incidence is increasing as the population ages. Cytogenetic anomalies and mutation testing remain important prognostic tools for tailoring treatment after induction therapy. Despite major advances in understanding the genetic landscape of AML and its impact on the pathophysiology and biology of the disease, as well as the rapid development of new drugs, standard treatment options have not experienced major changes during the past three decades. Especially for patients with intermediate or high-risk AML, which often show relapse. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains the best chance for cure. Here we review the state of the art therapy of AML, with special focus on new developments in immunotherapies and cellular therapies including HSCT and particularly discuss the impact of new conditioning and haplo-identical donor regimens for HSCT, post-transplant strategies for preventing and treating relapse, and emerging novel therapeutic options.

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with a uterine cervical mass

    N Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of female genital tract with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is extremely rare, and it is even rarer for a patient to have symptomatic presentation. We report the case of a middle-aged lady with ALL, who presented with severe abnormal uterine bleeding and a uterine cervical mass. Biopsy of the cervical mass showed infiltration by leukemic blasts. She received chemotherapy with Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster protocol and is alive in remission after 10 years.

  17. [2 cases of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in normal pregnancy and as the first symptom of acute promyelocytic leukemia].

    Kardaszewicz, E; Bujak, M; Spychałowicz, W; Siudyka, A; Harbut-Gryłka, A

    Two cases of the acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) are presented. DIC in the first case was diagnosed in healthy pregnant woman without any obstetric pathology. This patient recovered completely. The acute DIC in another patient preceded the acute promyelocytic leukemia. The patient died despite a control of DIC. DIC therapy included antifibrinolytic agents and additionally corticoids in pregnant patient. Heparin was not administered because of post partum period and foreseen cytostatic therapy in the leukemic patient.

  18. Autologous stem cell transplantation after complete remission and first consolidation in acute myeloid leukemia patients aged 61-70 years: results of the prospective EORTC-GIMEMA AML-13 study.

    Thomas, X.; Suciu, S.; Rio, B.; Leone, G.; Broccia, G.; Fillet, G.; Jehn, U.; Feremans, W.; Meloni, G.; Vignetti, M.; Witte, T.J.M. de; Amadori, S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The optimal post-remission treatment for elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is presently unknown. Recent studies have reported the feasibility of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) in this population. We evaluate the outcome of th

  19. Impact on cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a in patients with acute leukemia: in vivo assessment of cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a

    Tanaka Masami

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasma microRNA (miRNA has become a promising biomarker for detecting cancer; however, it remains uncertain whether miRNA expression levels in plasma reflect those in tumor cells. Our aim was to determine the biological relevance of miR-92a, which has been implicated as an oncomiR in both plasma and leukemia cells in patients with acute leukemia and to evaluate whether it could be a novel biomarker for monitoring these patients. Results We quantified the expression level of miR-92a in both cells and plasma by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 91 patients with acute leukemia. We also determined miR-92a expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC from normal controls. We compared miR-92a expression in plasma with its expression in leukemia cells. Synthetic anti-miR-92a inhibitor was transfected into Raji and OM9;22 cells, and apoptosis was assessed. For in vivo assessment, 6-week-old female nude mice were injected with U937 cells, and miR-92a expression in plasma and tumors was measured. The level of miR-92a expression in fresh leukemia cells was highly variable compared with PBMNC, but significantly lower compared with CD34-positive cells obtained from healthy volunteers. We also noticed that miR-92a was preferentially expressed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells in comparison with acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. More specifically, cellular miR-92a expression was significantly increased in a subset of ALL cells, and ALL patients with overexpressed miR-92a had poor prognoses. The anti-miR-92a inhibitor-treated Raji and OM9;22 cells revealed an increase of apoptotic cells. Notably, the cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a expression was significantly higher in both AML and ALL cells compared with PBMNC from healthy volunteers. In tumor-bearing mice, the plasma miR-92a level was significantly decreased in accordance with tumor growth, while tumor tissue was strongly positive for miR-92a

  20. Two-Stage Priming of Allogeneic Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Phase I Trial.

    Panagiotis D Kottaridis

    Full Text Available Human Natural Killer (NK cells require at least two signals to trigger tumor cell lysis. Absence of ligands providing either signal 1 or 2 provides NK resistance. We manufactured a lysate of a tumour cell line which provides signal 1 to resting NK cells without signal 2. The tumor-primed NK cells (TpNK lyse NK resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML blasts expressing signal 2 ligands. We conducted a clinical trial to determine the toxicity of TpNK cell infusions from haploidentical donors. 15 patients with high risk AML were screened, 13 enrolled and 7 patients treated. The remaining 6 either failed to respond to re-induction chemotherapy or the donor refused to undergo peripheral blood apheresis. The conditioning consisted of fludarabine and total body irradiation. This was the first UK trial of a cell therapy regulated as a medicine. The complexity of Good Clinical Practice compliance was underestimated and led to failures requiring retrospective independent data review. The lessons learned are an important aspect of this report. There was no evidence of infusional toxicity. Profound myelosuppression was seen in the majority (median neutrophil recovery day 55. At six months follow-up, three patients treated in Complete Remission (CR remained in remission, one patient infused in Partial Remission had achieved CR1, two had relapsed and one had died. One year post-treatment one patient remained in CR. Four patients remained in CR after treatment for longer than their most recent previous CR. During the 2 year follow-up six of seven patients died; median overall survival was 400 days post infusion (range 141–910. This is the first clinical trial of an NK therapy in the absence of IL-2 or other cytokine support. The HLA-mismatched NK cells survived and expanded in vivo without on-going host immunosuppression and appeared to exert an anti-leukemia effect in 4/7 patients treated.ISRCTN trial registry ISRCTN11950134.

  1. Mosaic Down syndrome and acute lymphoblastic B cell-leukemia. Case report

    Parra-Baltazar, Isabel Mónica

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS or trisomy 21 is a constitutional chromosomal abnormality, which may be mosaic in 1 % to 4 % of cases. DS mosaic diagnosis is difficult because most patients have a normal phenotype and show no significant clinical abnormalities. Patients with DS have a higher risk of developing acute leukemia such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We report the case of a 19-year old woman with mosaic trisomy 21 and ALL.

  2. Recurrent isochromosome 21 and multiple abnormalities in a patient suspected of having acute myeloid leukemia with eosinophilic differentiation-a rare case from South India

    Sangeetha Vijay; Santhi Sarojam; Sureshkumar Raveendran; Vani Syamala; Sreeja Leelakumari; Geetha Narayanan; Sreedharan Hariharan

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder.The M4 subtype of AML is frequently associated with the cytogenetic marker inversion 16 and/or the presence of eosinophilia.Blast crisis is the aggressive phase of the triphasic chronic myeloid leukemia (CML),which is a disease with Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome as the major abnormality.In the present study,we report a 76-year-old patient suspected of having AML with eosinophilic differentiation (AML-M4),which in clinical tests resembles CML blast crisis with multiple chromosomal abnormalities.Isochromosome 21 [i(21)(q10)] was the most recurrent feature noted in metaphases with 46 chromosomes.Ring chromosome,tetraploid endoreduplication,recurrent aneuploid clones with loss of X chromosome,monosomy 17,monosomy 7,and structural variation translocation (9;14) were also observed in this patient.Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed the absence of Ph chromosome.This report shows how cytogenetic analyses revealed atypical structural aberrations in the M4 subtype of AML.

  3. Evolution of T-cell clonality in a patient with Ph-negative acute lymphocytic leukemia occurring after interferon and imatinib therapy for Ph-positive chronic myeloid leukemia

    Yang Lijian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The development of Philadelphia chromosome (Ph negative acute leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS in patients with Ph-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is very rare. The features of restrictive usage and absence of partial T cell clones have been found in patients with CML. However, the T-cell clonal evolution of Ph-negative malignancies during treatment for CML is still unknown. Objective To investigate the dynamic change of clonal proliferation of T cell receptor (TCR Vα and Vβ subfamilies in one CML patient who developed Ph-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL after interferon and imatinib therapy. Methods The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC samples were collected at the 3 time points (diagnosis of Ph-positive chronic phase (CP CML, developing Ph-negative ALL and post inductive chemotherapy (CT for Ph-negative ALL, respectively. The CDR3 size of TCR Vα and Vβ repertoire were detected by RT-PCR. The PCR products were further analyzed by genescan to identify T cell clonality. Results The CML patient who achieved complete cytogenetic remission (CCR after 5 years of IFN-α therapy suddenly developed Ph-negative ALL 6 months following switch to imatinib therapy. The expression pattern and clonality of TCR Vα/Vβ T cells changed in different disease stages. The restrictive expression of Vα/Vβ subfamilies could be found in all three stages, and partial subfamily of T cells showed clonal proliferation. Additionally, there have been obvious differences in Vα/Vβ subfamily of T cells between the stages of Ph-positive CML-CP and Ph-negative ALL. The Vα10 and Vβ3 T cells evolved from oligoclonality to polyclonality, the Vβ13 T cells changed from bioclonality to polyclonality, when Ph-negative ALL developed. Conclusions Restrictive usage and clonal proliferation of different Vα/Vβ subfamily T cells between the stages of Ph-positive CP and Ph-negative ALL were detected in one patient. These changes

  4. Determination of the Prevalence of HGV Infection in Leukemia Patients

    Ramin Yaghoubi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The potential of acute and chronic viral hepatitis infections in blood leukocytes is one of the possible risk factors of leukemia. Between hepatitis viruses, HGV is important for unknown mechanism of pathogenesis in affecting the outcome of leukemia. In this research the prevalence of HGV infection was studied for evaluation of the possible role of this viral infection in the pathophysiology of leukemia. Methods: In this study, 100 EDTA treated blood samples were collected for 2 and half a year from different types of leukemia and also healthy control group, respectively. The plasma of these blood samples were harvested and stored at -80°C till laboratory tests were performed. Serological and antigenic markers of HBV, HCV and HGV were analyzed by ELISA methods. The HGV viremia was also studied by an in-house nested-RT-PCR method in plasma samples of patients with leukemia and control population. Results: Anti-E2-Ab was detected in 1(1% of leukemia patients who has not the history of HBV and HCV infections. HGV-RNA was diagnosed in 4(4% of patients with leukemia and 1(1% of control group. Simultaneous infection of HGV-RNA and HBsAg was detected in one of patients with leukemia. Significant difference was seen between the prevalence of HBV infection in leukemia patients and control group (P=0.02. Also significant correlation was detected between sex and the prevalence of HBV infection in leukemia patients (P=0.02. None of studied risk factors of leukemia were not significantly correlated with HGV infection. Conclusion: In this study the low prevalence of active and persistent HGV infections in leukemia patients in comparing with control population was confirmed. Also detection of HGV and HBV co-infection in these patients, announced the need of completed studies in different populations with different hematological malignancies and/or abnormalities, for better therapeutic and laboratory management of these cancers.

  5. Unilateral Exudative Retinal Detachment as the Sole Presentation of Relapsing Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Fatih Mehmet Azık

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocular findings are rarely the initial symptom of leukemia, although up to 90% of all leukemia patients have fundus changes during the course of the disease. Herein we report a relapsing acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient with the sole presentation of sudden visual loss and exudative retinal detachment. An 8-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed sudden visual loss during his first remission period. Bullous retinal detachment with total afferent pupillary defect was observed. Orbital magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intraocular mass lesion; simultaneously obtained bone marrow and cerebrospinal fluid samples showed no evidence of leukemic cells. Following local irradiation, and systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy the mass disappeared. Local irradiation, and systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy effectively controlled the isolated ocular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and eliminated the need for enucleation.

  6. Association between the methylation status of the MGMT promoter in bone marrow specimens and chemotherapy outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Ye, Huadan; Zhou, Annan; Gao, Yuting; Jiang, Danjie; Wu, Xiaodong; Tian, Bingru; Chen, Youfen; Wang, Ming; Xie, Jiping; Xia, Yongming; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-04-01

    The O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene is a tumor suppressor gene that is associated with the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the association between the methylation status of the MGMT promoter and the chemotherapeutic outcomes of patients with AML remains unknown. In the present study, 30 bone marrow samples derived from patients with AML were collected prior and subsequent to chemotherapy. The methylation status of the MGMT promoter in the bone marrow specimens was determined by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that the methylation status of the MGMT promoter was influenced by different chemotherapeutic regimens. The MGMT methylation status of M4 patients (3 out of 6) were more chemosensitive, compared with that of patients with other AML subtypes (M1, 1 out of 3; M2, 0 out of 8; M3, 3 out of 7; M5, 0 out of 3; and M6, 1 out of 3). Age-based analysis revealed that the group aged ≤60 years (7 out of 24 patients) exhibited more methylation changes than patients aged >60 years (1 out of 6). Male patients (4 out of 13) were more susceptible to chemotherapy-induced methylation changes than female patients (4 out of 17). Thus, the methylation status of the MGMT promoter may serve as a potential biomarker to predict the therapeutic outcomes in male AML patients. However, further studies in larger sample sets are required to confirm the present findings.

  7. Population PK/PD model of homocysteine concentrations after high-dose methotrexate treatment in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Hauke Rühs

    Full Text Available Elevated homocysteine concentrations have been associated with methotrexate-induced neurotoxicity. Based on methotrexate and homocysteine plasma concentrations of 494 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with high-dose methotrexate in the TOTAL XV study, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD model was built with NONMEM. Several compartment and indirect response models were investigated. The pharmacokinetic disposition of methotrexate was best described by a two-compartment model. Homocysteine concentrations were included by an indirect response model where methotrexate inhibition of the homocysteine elimination rate was described by an E(max model. The homocysteine baseline level was found to be age-dependent. Simulations revealed that folinate rescue therapy does not affect peak concentrations of homocysteine but leads to a modestly reduced homocysteine exposure. In conclusion, our PK/PD model describes the increase of methotrexate-induced HCY concentrations with satisfactory precision and can be applied to assess the effect of folinate regimens on the HCY concentration-time course.

  8. Development of acute leukemia in a known case of fanconi anaemia ( aplastic anaemai

    Preeti Jhaveri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease associated with an abnormal DNA damage. Although Fanconi anemia is well known for its association of Aplastic anemia and characteristic birth defects, leukemia and solid tumors also occur at a high rate in this group of patients. A patient male / 20yrs, known case of Fanconi anemia presented with ulcer over left lower limb. On further evaluation, the patient was found to have pancytopenia and his peripheral smear revealed many atypical blast like cells. So bone marrow study was done which revealed it to be Acute leukemia probably Acute Myeloid leukemia.

  9. Microgranular acute promyelocytic leukemia: a distinct clinical, ultrastructural, and cytogenetic entity

    Golomb, H.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Vardiman, J.W.; Testa, J.R.; Butler, A.

    1980-02-01

    Three patients with acute leukemia, disseminated intravaslar coagulation, and a specific acquired chromosome abnormality (t(15;17)) were found by transmission electron microscopy to have the typical distribution of granules seen in promyelocytes. However, the average granule sizes were 120, 170 and 180 nm, respectively, for the three patients, significantly less than the 250-nm resolution of light microscopy. We regard the leukemia in these three patients as comprising a distinct clinical, ultrastructural, and cytogenetic entity that we have chosen to all microgranular acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  10. 急性白血病患者血清中SDF-1、IL-3水平测定的临床价值%Serum Levels of SDF-1 and IL-3 in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    李俊; 刘英杰; 苏永强

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the serum levels of stromal cellderived factor-1 (SDF-1) and interleukin-3 (IL-3) in patients with acute leukemia and their clinical significance. Methods ELISA method was used to detect the serum levels of SDF-1 and IL-3 in 102 patients with acute leukemia and 30 healthy volunteers. Results The serum level of SDF-1 in the patients with acute leukemia was higher than that of the healthy volunteers, but the serum level of IL-3 in the patients with acute leukemia was lower than that of the healthy volunteers (P<0.05). The serum level of SDF-1 was negatively related with the serum level of IL-3 in the patients with acute leukemia (P<0.05). Conclusion The serum levels of SDF-1 and IL-3 are abnormal in patients with acute leukemia, and can be used to evaluate the progression of acute leukemia.%目的:探讨急性白血病患者血清中基质细胞衍生因子-1(SDF-1)、白介素-3(IL-3)水平变化在急性白血病诊断中的临床价值。方法采用ELISA法测定102例急性白血病患者和30例健康体检者血清中SDF-1、IL-3水平。结果急性白血病患者血清中 SDF-1水平高于健康体检者,而 IL-3水平低于健康体检者(P<0.05)。急性白血病患者血清中SDF-1、IL-3水平呈负相关关系(r=0.834,P<0.05)。结论急性白血病患者血清中SDF-1、IL-3均存在异常表达,可用于急性白血病病情监测。

  11. Recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in cryptorchid testis: case report

    Góes, Luccas Santos Patto de [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lopes, Roberto Iglesias [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Campos, Octavio Henrique Arcos [Hospital do Servidor Público Municipal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Neves de; Sant' Anna, Alexandre Crippa; Dall' Oglio, Marcos Francisco; Srougi, Miguel [Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A 23-year-old male with a history of bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. He presented a large mass in the right inguinal region 5 years ago. Upon physical examination, right-sided cryptorchidism was observed. The tumor markers alpha-fetoprotein and beta-HCG were within normalcy range and lactate dehydrogenase was raised. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis revealed right testicular mass in contiguity with the inguinal canal to the ipsilateral retroperitoneum, associated with right hydronephrosis. Due to the risk of germ-cell tumor in undescended testicle, the patient underwent radical right orchiectomy. The pathological examination showed recurrence of acute myeloid leukemia in the testis. He was referred to oncology for adjuvant therapy. Our literature review found no similar cases described.

  12. The role of ZAP70 kinase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia infiltration into the central nervous system

    Alsadeq, Ameera; Fedders, Henning; Vokuhl, Christian; Belau, Nele M.; Zimmermann, Martin; Wirbelauer, Tim; Spielberg, Steffi; Vossen-Gajcy, Michaela; Cario, Gunnar; Schrappe, Martin; Schewe, Denis M.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system infiltration and relapse are poorly understood in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We examined the role of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in preclinical models of central nervous system leukemia and performed correlative studies in patients. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells was modulated using short hairpin ribonucleic acid-mediated knockdown or ectopic expression. We show that zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 regulates CCR7/CXCR4 via activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. High expression of zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells resulted in a higher proportion of central nervous system leukemia in xenografts as compared to zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 low expressing counterparts. High zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 also enhanced the migration potential towards CCL19/CXCL12 gradients in vitro. CCR7 blockade almost abrogated homing of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells to the central nervous system in xenografts. In 130 B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 117 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 and CCR7/CXCR4 expression levels were significantly correlated. Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression correlated with central nervous system disease in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and CCR7/CXCR4 correlated with central nervous system involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In multivariate analysis, zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 expression levels in the upper third and fourth quartiles were associated with central nervous system involvement in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (odds ratio=7.48, 95% confidence interval, 2.06–27.17; odds ratio=6.86, 95% confidence interval, 1.86–25.26, respectively). CCR7 expression in the upper fourth quartile correlated with

  13. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  14. Effect of Taurine on Febrile Episodes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine on the incidence of febrile episodes during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Forty young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were eligible for this study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 gram per day orally. Life quality and side effects including febrile episodes were assessed using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results: Of total forty participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3 % were male. The mean age was 19.16±1.95 years (ranges: 16-23 years. The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells are significantly (P<0.05 increased in taurine treated group. There was no elevation in blasts count. A total of 70 febrile episodes were observed during study, febrile episodes were significantly (P<0.05 lower in taurine patients in comparison to the control ones. Conclusion: The overall incidence of febrile episodes and infectious complications in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving taurine was lower than placebo group. Taurine’s ability to increase leukocyte count may result in lower febrile episodes.

  15. Acute erythroid leukemia: autopsy report of a rare disease

    Cristiane Rúbia Ferreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL is a rare subtype of acute myeloid leukemia(AML, characterized by predominant erythroid proliferation. The 2008 WorldHealth Organization (WHO classification of AML defined two AEL subtypes:erythroleukaemia (EL, in which erythroid precursors account for 50% or moreof all nucleated bone marrow cells and myeloblasts account for 20% or more ofthe nonerythroid cell population; and pure erythroid leukemia (PEL, in whicherythroid precursors account for 80% or more of all nucleated bone marrowcells. We report the case of an elderly female patient with wasting syndromeand pancytopenia without evidence of blasts in peripheral blood. A diagnosisof PEL was established on the basis of bone marrow biopsy findings. Thepatient died on postadmission day 20, and an autopsy was performed. Wereclassified the disease as EL on the basis of the autopsy findings, whichincluded myeloblasts accounting for more than 20% of the nonerythroid cellsin the bone marrow, as well as leukemic infiltration and myeloid metaplasia insolid organs, such as the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenal glands, and abdominallymph nodes. A rare disease, AEL accounts for less than 5% of all AMLs and ispractically a diagnosis of exclusion. Autopsy reports of AEL are extremely rarein the literature. We demonstrate that in the case reported here, leukemia cellstended to infiltrate solid organs with myeloid metaplasia. Our findings alsoshow that a larger neoplastic bone marrow sample is crucial to the correctdiagnosis of EL, which is based on morphological and quantitative criteria.

  16. Evaluating frequency of PML-RARA mutations and conferring resistance to arsenic trioxide-based therapy in relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia patients.

    Lou, Yinjun; Ma, Yafang; Sun, Jianai; Ye, Xiujin; Pan, Hanzhang; Wang, Yungui; Qian, Wenbin; Meng, Haitao; Mai, Wenyuan; He, JingSong; Tong, Hongyan; Jin, Jie

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study is to better understand the mechanism of relapse and acquired clinical resistance to arsenic trioxide (ATO) and/or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Thirty relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients were followed. Fifteen patients experienced two or more relapses; nine patients had clinical resistance to ATO-based therapy. The frequency and clinical significance of promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) mutational status using Sanger sequencing were evaluated. Overall, eight different types of mutations in the RARA region (V218D, R272Q, T278A, T291I, N299D, R294W, A300G, and L220_F228delinsP) were identified in 11 patients. Eight missense mutations (L211P, C213R, S214L, A216V, L217F, D219H, S221G, and D241G) were found in the PML portion of PML-RARA in 14 patients, with A216V as the predominant mutation. Eight patients were found to harbor both PML and RARA mutations over the course of the disease. The PML-region mutations were associated with response to ATO-based therapy (P < 0.0001), number of relapses (P = 0.001), and early relapse (P = 0.013). Notably, one case sampled at nine different time points showed alternating clonal dominance over the course of treatment. This study demonstrated frequent mutations of PML-RARA and supported a clonal selection model in relation to APL relapse and ATO resistance.

  17. 3 Tesla proton MRI for the diagnosis of pneumonia/lung infiltrates in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Initial results in comparison to HRCT

    Attenberger, U.I., E-mail: ulrike.attenberger@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, J.N. [Scott and White Hospital, Texas A and M Health Sciences Center, Temple (United States); Henzler, T. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Buchheidt, D. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology, AKH Celle, Celle (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O.; Reichert, M. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3 Tesla proton MRI for the assessment of pneumonia/lung infiltrates in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Material and methods: In a prospective study, 3 Tesla MRI was performed in 19 febrile neutropenic patients (5 women, 14 men; mean age 61 years ± 14.2; range 23–77 years). All patients underwent high-resolution CT less than 24 h prior to MRI. The MRI protocol (Magnetom Tim Trio, Siemens) included a T2-weighted HASTE sequence (TE/TR: 49 ms/∞, slice thickness 6 mm) and a high-resolution 3D VIBE sequence with an ultra-short TE < 1 ms (TE/TR 0.8/2.9 ms, slice thickness 2 mm). The VIBE sequence was examined before and after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoterate meglumine (Dotarem, Guerbet). The presence of pulmonary abnormalities, their location within the lung, and lesion type (nodules, consolidations, glass opacity areas) were analyzed by one reader and compared to the findings of HRCT, which was evaluated by a second independent radiologist who served as the reference standard. The findings were compared per lobe in each patient and rated as true positive (TP) findings if all three characteristics (presence, location, and lesion type) listed above were concordant to HRCT. Results: Pulmonary abnormalities were characterized by 3 Tesla MRI with a sensitivity of 82.3% and a specificity of 78.6%, resulting in an overall accuracy of 88% (NPV/PPV 66.7%/89.5%). In 51 lobes (19 of 19 patients), pulmonary abnormalities visualized by MR were judged to be concordant in their location and in the lesion type identified by both readers. In 22 lobes (11 of 19 patients), no abnormalities were present on either MR or HRCT (true negative). In 6 lobes (5 of 19 patients), ground glass opacity areas were detected on MRI but were not visible on HRCT (false positives). In 11 lobes (7 of 19 patients), MRI failed to detect ground glass opacity areas identified by HRCT. However, since the abnormalities were

  18. Survival and treatment response in adults with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with a modified International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia protocol

    Erick Crespo-Solis

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute promyelocytic leukemia has good prognosis in view of the high complete remission and survival rates achieved with therapies containing all-trans retinoic acid or arsenic trioxide. However, there is a significant risk of death during induction due to hemorrhage secondary to disseminated intravascular coagulation. This has contributed to a gap in the prognosis of patients between developed and developing countries. The International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia was created in 2005 and proposed a treatment protocol based on daunorubicin and all-trans retinoic acid stratified by risk geared toward developing countries. Herein are presented the results from the first patient cohort treated in a single developing country hospital employing a slightly modified version of the International Consortium protocol in a real life setting. Twenty patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia were enrolled: 27.8% had low-risk, 55.6% intermediate risk and 16.7% high-risk. The complete remission rate was 94.4% after a median of 42 days. Both relapse rates and death rates were one patient (5.5% each. No deaths were observed during consolidation. After a median follow-up of 29 months, the overall survival rate was 89.1%. Efficacy and safety of the International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia protocol has been reproduced in acute promyelocytic leukemia patients from a developing country.

  19. Outcomes after Induction Failure in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Schrappe, Martin; Hunger, Stephen P.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Saha, Vaskar; Gaynon, Paul S.; Baruchel, André; Conter, Valentino; Otten, Jacques; Ohara, Akira; Versluys, Anne Birgitta; Escherich, Gabriele; Heyman, Mats; Silverman, Lewis B.; Horibe, Keizo; Mann, Georg; Camitta, Bruce M.; Harbott, Jochen; Riehm, Hansjörg; Richards, Sue; Devidas, Meenakshi; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Failure of remission-induction therapy is a rare but highly adverse event in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). METHODS We identified induction failure, defined by the persistence of leukemic blasts in blood, bone marrow, or any extramedullary site after 4 to 6 weeks of remission-induction therapy, in 1041 of 44,017 patients (2.4%) 0 to 18 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL who were treated by a total of 14 cooperative study groups between 1985 and 2000. We analyzed the relationships among disease characteristics, treatments administered, and outcomes in these patients. RESULTS Patients with induction failure frequently presented with high-risk features, including older age, high leukocyte count, leukemia with a T-cell phenotype, the Philadelphia chromosome, and 11q23 rearrangement. With a median follow-up period of 8.3 years (range, 1.5 to 22.1), the 10-year survival rate (±SE) was estimated at only 32±1%. An age of 10 years or older, T-cell leukemia, the presence of an 11q23 rearrangement, and 25% or more blasts in the bone marrow at the end of induction therapy were associated with a particularly poor outcome. High hyperdiploidy (a modal chromosome number >50) and an age of 1 to 5 years were associated with a favorable outcome in patients with precursor B-cell leukemia. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation from matched, related donors was associated with improved outcomes in T-cell leukemia. Children younger than 6 years of age with precursor B-cell leukemia and no adverse genetic features had a 10-year survival rate of 72±5% when treated with chemotherapy only. CONCLUSIONS Pediatric ALL with induction failure is highly heterogeneous. Patients who have T-cell leukemia appear to have a better outcome with allogeneic stem-cell transplantation than with chemotherapy, whereas patients who have precursor B-cell leukemia without other adverse features appear to have a better outcome with chemotherapy. (Funded by Deutsche

  20. Addition of cladribine to the standard induction treatment improves outcomes in a subset of elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. Results of a randomized Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) phase II trial.

    Pluta, Agnieszka; Robak, Tadeusz; Wrzesien-Kus, Agata; Katarzyna Budziszewska, Bozena; Sulek, Kazimierz; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Czemerska, Magdalena; Zwolinska, Malgorzata; Golos, Aleksandra; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Kloczko, Janusz; Mordak-Domagala, Monika; Lange, Andrzej; Razny, Małgorzata; Madry, Krzysztof; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Grosicki, Sebastian; Butrym, Aleksandra; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Giebel, Sebastian; Szydlo, Richard; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    Intensive induction chemotherapy using anthracycline and cytarabine backbone is considered the most effective upfront therapy in physically fit older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, outcomes of the standard induction in elderly AML are inferior to those observed in younger patients, and they are still unsatisfactory. As addition of cladribine to the standard induction therapy is known to improve outcome in younger AML patients. The present randomized phase II study compares efficacy and toxicity of the DAC (daunorubicin plus cytarabine plus cladribine) regimen with the standard DA (daunorubicin plus cytarabine) regimen in the newly diagnosed AML patients over 60 years of age. A total of 171 patients were enrolled in the study (DA, 86; DAC, 85). A trend toward higher complete remission (CR) was observed in the DAC arm compared to the DA arm (44% vs. 34%; P = .19), which did not lead to improved median overall survival, which in the case of the DAC group was 8.6 months compared to in 9.1 months in the DA group (P = .64). However, DAC appeared to be superior in the group of patients aged 60-65 (CR rate: DAC 51% vs. DA 29%; P = .02). What is more, a subgroup of patients, with good and intermediate karyotypes, benefited from addition of cladribine also in terms of overall survival (P = .02). No differences in hematological and nonhematological toxicity between the DA and DAC regimens were observed.

  1. Acute Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis following L-Asparaginase/Prednisone Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Dania Lizet Quintanilla-Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis and diabetic ketoacidosis are unusual adverse events following chemotherapy based on L-asparaginase and prednisone as support treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We present the case of a 16-year-old Hispanic male patient, in remission induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia on treatment with mitoxantrone, vincristine, prednisone, and L-asparaginase. He was hospitalized complaining of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Hyperglycemia, acidosis, ketonuria, low bicarbonate levels, hyperamylasemia, and hyperlipasemia were documented, and the diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis was made. Because of uncertainty of the additional diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as the cause of abdominal pain, a contrast-enhanced computed tomography was performed resulting in a Balthazar C pancreatitis classification.

  2. Early warning and prevention of pneumonia in acute leukemia by patient education, spirometry, and positive expiratory pressure: A randomized controlled trial.

    Møller, Tom; Moser, Claus; Adamsen, Lis; Rugaard, Grith; Jarden, Mary; Bøtcher, Tina S; Wiedenbein, Liza; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2016-03-01

    Long-lasting neutropenia associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its treatment gives rise to a high risk of pneumonia. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis during outpatient management has not completely protected patients against admission due to infections and neutropenic fever, emphasizing the need to approach infection protection with complementary efforts. In a randomized controlled design, we examined the applicability of patient-performed daily spirometry [forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)] as an early warning tool and explored the effectiveness of positive expiratory pressure (PEP) in preventing pneumonia among 80 AML patients. Twenty-five incidences of pneumonia were detected among 23 patients (6 interventions, 17 controls), giving a prevalence of 28.75% during 5420 days of observation. We found a significant difference in incidence between intervention versus control group (2.17 per 1000 days vs. 6.52 per 1000 days, P = 0.021, respectively). A cross point at 80-76% of the personal FEV1 reference value showed high sensitivity and specificity on pneumonia development. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of educating AML patients in their continuous daily measurement of FEV1 and use of PEP. Daily measures of FEV1 may be an important early warning tool for assessment of pulmonary deterioration during critical phases of neutropenia. We suggest that strategic patient education in the use of spirometry and PEP should be part of standard of care for AML patients undergoing induction chemotherapy.

  3. TP53 mutations in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients: longitudinal follow-ups show the mutation is stable during disease evolution.

    Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Liu, C-Y; Lin, L-I; Tseng, M-H; Chiang, Y-C; Liu, M-C; Liu, C-W; Tang, J-L; Yao, M; Li, C-C; Huang, S-Y; Ko, B-S; Hsu, S-C; Chen, C-Y; Lin, C-T; Wu, S-J; Tsay, W; Chen, Y-C; Tien, H-F

    2015-07-31

    The TP53 mutation is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with complex karyotype (CK), but the stability of this mutation during the clinical course remains unclear. In this study, TP53 mutations were identified in 7% of 500 patients with de novo AML and 58.8% of patients with CK. TP53 mutations were closely associated with older age, lower white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, FAB M6 subtype, unfavorable-risk cytogenetics and CK, but negatively associated with NPM1 mutation, FLT3/ITD and DNMT3A mutation. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that TP53 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival among the total cohort and the subgroup of patients with CK. A scoring system incorporating TP53 mutation and nine other prognostic factors, including age, WBC counts, cytogenetics and gene mutations, into survival analysis proved to be very useful to stratify AML patients. Sequential study of 420 samples showed that TP53 mutations were stable during AML evolution, whereas the mutation was acquired only in 1 of the 126 TP53 wild-type patients when therapy-related AML originated from different clone emerged. In conclusion, TP53 mutations are associated with distinct clinic-biological features and poor prognosis in de novo AML patients and are rather stable during disease progression.

  4. Total body irradiation in a patient with fragile X syndrome for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in preparation for stem cell transplantation: A case report and literature review.

    Collins, D T; Mannina, E M; Mendonca, M

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a congenital disorder caused by expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeat at the 5' end of the fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1) on the X chromosome that leads to chromosomal instability and diminished serum levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Afflicted individuals often have elongated features, marfanoid habitus, macroorchidism and intellectual impairment. Evolving literature suggests the condition may actually protect from malignancy while chromosomal instability would presumably elevate the risk. Increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation should also be predicted by unstable sites within the DNA. Interestingly, in this report, we detail a patient with FXS diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with induction followed by subsequent cycles of hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone) with a complete response who then was recommended to undergo peripheral stem cell transplantation. The patient underwent total body irradiation (TBI) as a component of his conditioning regimen and despite the concern of his clinicians, developed minimal acute toxicity and successful engraftment. The pertinent literature regarding irradiation of patients with FXS is also reviewed.

  5. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  6. S-1 induced secondary acute erythroid leukemia with a chromosome inv(12)(p13;q13)

    Kensuke Matsumoto; Akira Kitanaka; Makiko Uemura; Fusako Waki; Tetsuya Fukumoto; Hiroaki Ohnishi; Yoshitsugu Kubota; Toshihiko Ishida

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy by S-1 following gastrectomy is considered standard treatment in Japan. Analysis of follow-up data have proved the efficacy of S-1 administration,and that hematological adverse events were relatively rare. PPyrimidine anti-metabolites, including S-1, have shown relatively lower risks for secondary hematological malignancies in comparison to alkylating agents and topoisomerase-Ⅱ inhibitors. We here report a case of therapy-related leukemia after S-1 administration. A patient who had received S-1as the sole adjuvant chemotherapy was diagnosed with acute erythroid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, our patient represents the first report of S-1 induced acute leukemia.

  7. Trombose arterial em leucemia promielocítica aguda Arterial thrombosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Sonia Regina Iantas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyeloclocytic leukemia can present coagulopathies which are frequently very serious due to hemorrhagic conditions. Treatment using anthracyclines and retinoids provide a good response. The development of arterial thrombosis is uncommon. In this work a 56-year-old male patient with acute arterial insufficiency was evaluated. This patient was immediately submitted to thromboembolectomy with the removal of a white thrombus. Postoperative tests showed acute promyelocytic leukemia with transposition (15;17 Treatment with ATRA and Idarubicin chemotherapy was initiated with the patients's response being satisfactory. Currently, the patient is incomplete remission and a recent cytogenetics test does not show the t(15;17.

  8. Chromosomal differences between acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in patients with prior solid tumors and prior hematologic malignancies. A study of 14 cases with prior breast cancer

    Mamuris, Z.; Dumont, J.; Dutrillaux, B.; Aurias, A. (Institut Curie, Paris (France))

    1989-10-01

    A cytogenetic study of 14 patients with secondary acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (S-ANLL) with prior treatment for breast cancer is reported. The chromosomes recurrently involved in numerical or structural anomalies are chromosomes 7, 5, 17, and 11, in decreasing order of frequency. The distribution of the anomalies detected in this sample of patients is similar to that observed in published cases with prior breast or other solid tumors, though anomalies of chromosome 11 were not pointed out, but it significantly differs from that of the S-ANLL with prior hematologic malignancies. This difference is principally due to a higher involvement of chromosome 7 in patients with prior hematologic malignancies and of chromosomes 11 and 17 in patients with prior solid tumors. A genetic determinism involving abnormal recessive alleles located on chromosomes 5, 7, 11, and 17 uncovered by deletions of the normal homologs may be a cause of S-ANLL. The difference between patients with prior hematologic malignancies or solid tumors may be explained by different constitutional mutations of recessive genes in the two groups of patients.

  9. Safety and efficacy of total body irradiation, cyclophosphamide, and cytarabine as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Mori, Takehiko; Aisa, Yoshinobu; Kato, Jun; Yamane, Akiko; Nakazato, Tomonori; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2012-04-01

    Disease relapse still greatly interferes with the success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study retrospectively evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of a conditioning regimen consisting of total body irradiation (TBI; 12 Gy), cyclophosphamide (CY; 60 mg kg(-1) , two doses), and high-dose cytarabine (Ara-C; 2 g m(-2) ; four doses) for patients with ALL. Fifty-five patients (median age: 31-years old) were evaluated. Stem cells were from human leukocyte antigen-identical siblings in 22 patients and from alternative donors in 33. There were no cases of early death before engraftment, and 100-day transplant-related mortality was 7.3%. With a median follow-up period of 9.6 years, 5-year overall and disease-free survival were 63.2% (95% CI: 46.5-79.9%) and 63.6% (95% CI: 47.1-80.1%) in patients with complete remission, respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the values of 27.3% (95% CI: 8.7-46.0%) and 22.7% (95% CI: 5.3-40.1%) for patients in advanced stages (P < 0.01). These results suggest that TBI and CY (TBI-CY) plus Ara-C could be a feasible and effective conditioning regimen for adult patients with ALL both in remission and in advanced stages, and a future study to compare this combination therapy with TBI-CY is required.

  10. Adjustment to Acute Leukemia: The Impact of Social Support and Marital Satisfaction on Distress and Quality of Life Among Newly Diagnosed Patients and Their Caregivers.

    Pailler, Megan E; Johnson, Teresa M; Kuszczak, Sarah; Attwood, Kristopher M; Zevon, Michael A; Griffiths, Elizabeth; Thompson, James; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the specific patterns of adjustment among newly diagnosed acute leukemia patients and their caregivers. This study examined the trajectories of patient and caregiver distress over time as well as the extent to which marital satisfaction and social support moderated these trajectories among those with significant-other caregivers. Forty six patient-caregiver dyads provided ratings at four time points: within 1 week of diagnosis (T1), 2 week follow-up (T2), 6 week follow-up (T3) and 12 week follow-up (T4). As anticipated, patients and caregivers reported higher levels of distress around the time of diagnosis than they did during subsequent time points. Marital satisfaction was a significant predictor of distress among patients, whereas among caregivers, social support predicted distress and quality of life. Results support the inclusion of relational variables such as social support and relationship satisfaction in the assessment of newly diagnosed patients and families in order to best identify those at risk for distress over time.

  11. Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome Following Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Outcome of Patients Registered in the EWOG-MDS 98/06 Studies

    Strahm, Birgitte; Amann, Roland; De Moerloose, Barbara

    Objective: Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (tMDS) following treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the most frequently observed secondary malignancies in survivors of childhood cancer. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only curative treatment....... This analysis was performed to asses the outcome of patients with tMDS following treatment for childhood ALL reported to the EWOG-MDS study group. Patients and Transplant Procedure: Forty-three patients (19 male/24 female) were diagnosed with tMDS between August 1989 and August 2009. The median age at diagnosis...... was 8.9 yrs (3.4–20.5). The median interval from diagnosis of ALL to the diagnosis of tMDS was 3.3 yrs (1.7–7.0). Five patients did not receive SCT and died due to progressive disease at a median of 5.6 mo after diagnosis. Thirty-eight patients were transplanted. One patient was excluded from...

  12. Impact of fluconazole versus posaconazole prophylaxis on the incidence of fungal infections in patients receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia

    Camille Devanlay

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Invasive fungal infections (IFIs remain one of the worrying complications in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML due to their incidence and high level of attributable mortality. In light of these risks, antifungal prophylaxis has always been debated. We conducted a single-center retrospective study of two prophylactic antifungal agents (fluconazole/posaconazole in 91 consecutive patients receiving induction chemotherapy for AML between 2005 and 2009, in order to evaluate the impact on the incidence of IFI and on the mycological flora of the patients. Methods: In total, 39 patients received prophylactic fluconazole versus 52 who received posaconazole. The baseline characteristics of the two groups were comparable. Results: Overall, 17 patients developed an IFI, with no difference in frequency between the two groups. Utilization of empirical or pre-emptive therapy was similar irrespective of the type of prophylaxis used. Mycological examination of stools revealed an increase in non-albicans Candida colonization in the fluconazole group during hospitalization and the appearance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonization in patients receiving posaconazole. Conclusion: The present study does not distinguish between fluconazole and posaconazole as a primary effective prevention against fungal infections. More prospective studies and meta-analyses are warranted.

  13. Data quality in the Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry

    Ostgård, Lene Sofie Granfeldt; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Severinsen, Marianne Tang;

    2013-01-01

    The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data.......The Danish National Acute Leukemia Registry (DNLR) has documented coverage of above 98.5%. Less is known about the quality of the recorded data....

  14. Prospective study on incidence, risk factors, and long-term outcome of osteonecrosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Winkel, M.L. te; Pieters, R.; Hop, W.C.J.; Groot-Kruseman, H.A. de; Lequin, M.H.; Sluis, I.M. van der; Bokkerink, J.P.M.; Leeuw, J.A. de; Bruin, M.C.; Egeler, R.M.; Veerman, A.J.P.; Heuvel-Eibrink, M.M. van den

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: We studied cumulative incidence, risk factors, therapeutic strategies, and outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Cumulative incidence of osteonecrosis was assessed prospectively in 694 patients treated with

  15. Prospective Study on Incidence, Risk Factors, and Long-Term Outcome of Osteonecrosis in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Winkel, Mariel L. Te; Pieters, Rob; Hop, Wim C. J.; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A.; Lequin, Maarten H.; van der Sluis, Inge M.; Bokkerink, Jos P. M.; Leeuw, Jan A.; Bruin, Marrie C. A.; Egeler, R. Maarten; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We studied cumulative incidence, risk factors, therapeutic strategies, and outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods Cumulative incidence of osteonecrosis was assessed prospectively in 694 patients treated with th

  16. Epigenetic Modifications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Michael James Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant epigenetic modifications are well-recognized drivers for oncogenesis. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is no exception and serves as a model toward the significant impact these heritable alterations can have in leukemogenesis. In this brief review, we will focus on the main aspects of epigenetics which control leukemogenesis in pediatric ALL, mainly DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA alterations. As we continue to gain better understanding of the driving mechanisms for pediatric ALL at both diagnosis and relapse, therapeutic interventions directed toward these pathways and mechanisms can be harnessed and introduced into clinical trials for pediatric ALL.

  17. Incidence of secondary neoplasms in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid plus chemotherapy or with all-trans retinoic acid plus arsenic trioxide.

    Eghtedar, Alireza; Rodriguez, Ildefonso; Kantarjian, Hagop; O'Brien, Susan; Daver, Naval; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kadia, Tapan; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-05-01

    The incidence and pattern of secondary neoplasms in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) treated with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-containing regimens is not well described. We compared 160 patients with APL treated with ATRA plus idarubicin (n = 54) or ATRA plus arsenic trioxide (ATO) (n = 106) for the incidence of secondary cancers per unit time of follow-up. Median follow-up times for the two cohorts were 136 and 29 months, respectively. Nine patients developed secondary cancers in the chemotherapy group. These included two breast cancers, three myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia, one vulvar cancer, one prostate cancer, one colon cancer and one soft tissue sarcoma. A melanoma and one pancreatic cancer developed in the ATO group. We conclude that treatment of patients with APL using the non-chemotherapy regimen of ATRA plus ATO is not associated with a higher incidence of secondary cancers (p = 0.29) adjusted for unit time of exposure.

  18. Receipt of maintenance therapy is most predictive of survival in older acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated with intensive induction chemotherapy regimens.

    Landsburg, Daniel J; Stadtmauer, Edward; Loren, Alison; Goldstein, Steven; Frey, Noelle; Nasta, Sunita D; Porter, David L; Tsai, Donald E; Perl, Alexander E; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Luger, Selina

    2013-08-01

    While the prognosis for older adults diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is frequently poor, long-term survival can be achieved in patients treated with curative intent. We reviewed the outcomes of 37 patients age ≥60 treated at our institution with either DVP- or hyperCVAD-based chemotherapy regimens from 2003-2011. In this patient population, a complete response rate of 92%, relapse rate of 56% and median overall survival of 18.1 months was experienced. Univariate analysis revealed that receipt of maintenance therapy vs. no maintenance therapy was associated with a statistically-significant impact on overall survival (p = 0.001, HR 0.15 for death), while disease-related characteristics including high-risk white blood cell count at diagnosis and Philadelphia chromosome status as well as treatment-related factors including chemotherapy regimen or completion of intensive therapy were not. Many patients were unable to initiate or remain on maintenance therapy due to toxicities including infections and cytopenias. Our analysis reveals the benefit of prolonged therapy in the treatment of older adults with ALL as well as the high incidence of treatment-related toxicity experienced by these patients.

  19. Incidence, risk factors, and treatment outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis in Taiwanese children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective cohort study of 245 patients in a single institution.

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Chang, Tsung-Yen; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lee, Mel S; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hung, Iou-Jih; Yang, Chao-Ping

    2015-07-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is a potentially disabling complication encountered in children who receive chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Considering the possible effect of ethnic difference on the clinical features of symptomatic ON in pediatric ALL, we retrospectively evaluated 245 children with ALL who were treated at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, between 2002 and 2011. Six (2.4 %) patients developed symptomatic ON in a total of 17 sites during the follow-up period. Diagnosis of ON was confirmed by X-ray in seven, magnetic resonance imaging in two, and bone scan in three patients. The estimated cumulative incidence of symptomatic ON in newly diagnosed ALL was 3.4 % at 8 years. Four patients received ON-directed surgical interventions, including total hip replacement in three and arthroplasty in one. The incidence of ON was significantly higher among girls (P = 0.03), patients >10 years old (P = 2.2 × 10(-4)), and patients who had received more intensive chemotherapy regimen (P = 0.02). These results indicate that the incidence and risk factors in our institute were similar to those observed in Western countries. Future studies surveying the impact on the quality of life of childhood ALL survivors in Taiwan are warranted.

  20. Phase 1/2 study to assess the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of barasertib (AZD1152) in patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia

    Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Rousselot, Philippe; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Ifrah, Norbert; Martinelli, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; Berman, Ellin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Stockman, Paul; Goudie, Alison; Faderl, Stefan; Jabbour, Elias; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this 2-part phase 1/2 study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of the potent and selective Aurora B kinase inhibitor barasertib (AZD1152) in patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Part A determined the MTD of barasertib administered as a continuous 7-day infusion every 21 days. In part B, the efficacy of barasertib was evaluated at the MTD. In part A, 32 patients were treated with barasertib 50 mg (n = 3), 100 mg (n = 3), 200 mg (n = 3), 400 mg (n = 4), 800 mg (n = 7), 1200 mg (n = 6), and 1600 mg (n = 6). Dose-limiting toxicities (stomatitis/mucosal inflammation events) were reported in the 800 mg (n = 1), 1200 mg (n = 1), and 1600 mg (n = 2) groups. The MTD was defined as 1200 mg. In part B, 32 patients received barasertib 1200 mg. In each part of the study, 8 of 32 patients had a hematologic response according to Cheson AML criteria. The most commonly reported grade ≥ 3 events were febrile neutropenia (n = 24) and stomatitis/mucosal inflammation (n = 16). We concluded that the MTD of barasertib is 1200 mg in patients with relapsed or newly diagnosed AML. Toxicity was manageable and barasertib treatment resulted in an overall hematologic response rate of 25%. This study is registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00497991. PMID:21976672