WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute kidney injury

  1. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; Heurn, L.W. van; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  2. Neonate acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huandan; Zhu, Bingbing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by the abrupt inability of the kidneys to adequately excrete waste products and regulate fluid and electrolyte homeostasis appropriately. This results in an at least partially reversible increase in the blood concentration of creatinine and nitrogenous waste products. Moreover, medication eliminated via renal routes will accumulate that in turn result in a "second hit" to the already injured kidneys. Furthermore, fluid management and nutrition will be hampered by oliguria. Neonatal AKI is a frequent complication in children admitted to an ICU and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in newborns the diagnosis of AKI is more difficult since at birth serum creatinine (SCr) predominantly reflects maternal renal function. Furthermore, neonates are especially susceptible to hypovolemic kidney injury due to an inadequate renal auto regulation Thus, accurate assessment of renal function in children is important in numerous clinical situations including screening and/or monitoring of renal disease. The present narrative review article will deal with the latest innovations in diagnostic as well as management options available for AKI in children.

  3. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  5. [A jaundiced patient with acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Bekkink, M.; Verhave, J.C.; Vervoort, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with obstructive icterus due to pancreas cysts presented with acute kidney insufficiency and bilirubine casts in the urinary sediment as a sign of bilirubine-associated acute kidney injury.

  6. Acute kidney injury in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a clinical condition considered to be the consequence of a sudden decrease (>25% or discontinuation of renal function. The term AKI is used instead of the previous term acute renal failure, because it has been demonstrated that even minor renal lesions may cause far-reaching consequences on human health. Contemporary classifications of AKI (RIFLE and AKIN are based on the change of serum creatinine and urinary output. In the developed countries, AKI is most often caused by renal ischemia, nephrotoxins and sepsis, rather than a (primary diffuse renal disease, such as glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, renovascular disorder and thrombotic microangiopathy. The main risk factors for hospital AKI are mechanical ventilation, use of vasoactive drugs, stem cell transplantation and diuretic-resistant hypervolemia. Prerenal and parenchymal AKI (previously known as acute tubular necrosis jointly account for 2/3 of all AKI causes. Diuresis and serum creatinine concentration are not early diagnostic markers of AKI. Potential early biomarkers of AKI are neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, interleukins 6, 8 and 18, and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP. Early detection of kidney impairment, before the increase of serum creatinine, is important for timely initiated therapy and recovery. The goal of AKI treatment is to normalize the fluid and electrolyte status, as well as the correction of acidosis and blood pressure. Since a severe fluid overload resistant to diuretics and inotropic agents is associated with a poor outcome, the initiation of dialysis should not be delayed. The mortality rate of AKI is highest in critically ill children with multiple organ failure and hemodynamically unstable patients.

  7. Diuretics in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2011-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI is increasing and despite clinical advances there has been little change in the outcomes associated with AKI. A variety of interventions, including loop diuretics, have been tested for the prevention and treatment of AKI; however, none to date have shown convincing benefits in clinical studies, and the management of AKI remains largely supportive. In this article, we review the pharmacology and experimental and clinical evidence for loop diuretics in the management of AKI. In addition, we also review evidence for other agents with diuretic and/or natriuretic properties such as thiazide diuretics, mannitol, fenoldopam, and natriuretic peptides in both the prevention and treatment of AKI. Implications for current clinical practice are outlined to guide clinical decisions in this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Amardiyanto; Partini Pudjiastuti Trihono; Lily Rundjan; Pusponegoro, Hardiono D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Asphyxia neonatorum may result in multiorgan dysfunction including renal involvement. There is no consensus on the determination of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates making establishment of the diagnosis and its management becomes difficult. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) recommends AKI criteria based on increased serum creatinine level and reduced urine output. Objectives To identify the prevalence of AKI in asphyxiated neonates using the AKIN criteria, to compare ...

  9. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Amardiyanto; Partini Pudjiastuti Trihono; Lily Rundjan; Pusponegoro, Hardiono D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Asphyxia neonatorum may result in multiorgan dysfunction including renal involvement. There is no consensus on the determination of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates making establishment of the diagnosis and its management becomes difficult. The Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) recommends AKI criteria based on increased serum creatinine level and reduced urine output. Objectives To identify the prevalence of AKI in asphyxiated neonates using the AKIN c...

  10. Acute kidney injury due to decompression illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viecelli, Andrea; Jamboti, Jagadish; Waring, Andrew; Banham, Neil; Ferrari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Decompression illness is a rare but serious complication of diving caused by intravascular or extravascular gas bubble formation. We report the first case of acute kidney injury in a 27-year-old diver following three rapid ascents. He presented with transient neurological symptoms and abdominal pain followed by rapidly progressive acute kidney injury (creatinine peak 1210 µmol/L) due to arterial air emboli. He received supportive care and 100% oxygen followed by hyperbaric therapy and recovered fully. Arterial air emboli caused by rapid decompression can affect multiple organs including the kidneys. Early transfer to a hyperbaric unit is important as complications may present delayed. PMID:25852912

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disorder and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. The diversity of the climate and of the socioeconomic and developmental status in Asia has a great influence on the etiology and presentation of AKI in different regions. In view of the International Society of Nephrology's 0by25 initiative, more and more attention has been paid to AKI in Asian countries. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements with regard to the prevalence and clinical patterns of AKI in Asian countries. Epidemiological studies have revealed the huge medical and economic burden of AKI in Eastern Asian countries, whereas the true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropical areas is still not well understood. In high-income Asian regions, the presentation of AKI resembles that in other developed countries in Europe and North America. In low-income regions and tropical areas, infections, environmental toxins, and obstetric complications remain the major culprits in most cases of AKI. Preventive opportunities are missed because of failure to recognize the risk factors and early signs of AKI. Patients often present late for treatment or are recognized late by physicians, which leads to more severe kidney injury, multiorgan involvement, and increased mortality. There is significant undertreatment of AKI in many regions, and medical resources for renal replacement therapy are not universally available. More efforts should be made to increase public awareness, establish preventive approaches in communities, educate health-care practitioner entities to achieve better recognition, and form specialist renal teams to improve the treatment of AKI. The choice of renal replacement therapy should fit patients' needs, and peritoneal dialysis can be practiced more frequently in the treatment of AKI patients. (1) More than 90% of the patients recruited in AKI studies using KDIGO-equivalent criteria originate from North America, Europe, or

  12. [Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in obstetrics may be caused by the same disorders that are observed in the general population or may be specific for a pregnancy such as: preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome or acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The renal changes may be only temporary, and resolve within a few weeks postpartum, or may become irreversible leading to a progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the article the most important pregnancy related syndromes associated with AKI have been shortly reviewed.

  13. Aluminium phosphide induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaiser Saif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide is one of the most common agricultural poisons being consumed in north India. Consumption of a fresh tablet is lethal as no antidote is available. Acute intoxication primarily presents with cardiovascular collapse due to myocardial toxicity. We report here a case of acute severe poisoning along with cardiovascular collapse and oliguria. The patient developed acute kidney injury during the illness (a rare entity in aluminium phosphide poisoning, which completely resolved following prompt conservative treatment.

  14. Novel Therapies for Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaizhen Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common disease with a complex pathophysiology. The old paradigm of identifying renal injury based on location—prerenal, intrarenal, and postrenal—is now being supplanted with a new paradigm based on observable kidney injury patterns. The pathophysiology of AKI on a molecular and microanatomical level includes inflammation, immune dysregulation, oxidative injury, and impaired microcirculation. Treatment has traditionally been supportive, including the avoidance of nephrotoxins, judicious volume and blood pressure management, hemodynamic monitoring, and renal replacement therapy. Fluid overload and chloride-rich fluids are now implicated in the development of AKI, and resuscitation with a balanced, buffered solution at a conservative rate will mitigate risk. Novel therapies, which address specific observable kidney injury patterns include direct oxygen-free radical scavengers such as α-lipoic acid, curcumin, sodium-2-mercaptoethane sulphonate, propofol, and selenium. In addition, angiotensin II and adenosine receptor antagonists hope to ameliorate kidney injury via manipulation of renal hemodynamics and tubulo-glomerular feedback. Alkaline phosphatase, sphingosine 1 phosphate analogues, and dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors counteract kidney injury via manipulation of inflammatory pathways. Finally, genetic modifiers such as 5INP may mitigate AKI via transcriptive processes.

  15. Causes and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury: Gezira Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: A precise operational definition of acute kidney injury remains elusive. Conceptually, acute kidney injury is defined as the loss of renal function, measured by decline in glomerular filtration rate, developing over a period of hours to days. Clinical manifestations of acute kidney injury (AKI) are highly variable; ...

  16. Pathophysiology of ischaemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasundaram, Nigel Suren

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is common, dangerous and costly, affecting around one in five patients emergency admissions to hospital. Although survival decreases as disease worsens, it is now apparent that even modest degrees of dysfunction are not only associated with higher mortality but are an independent risk factor for death. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury secondary to ischaemia - its commonest aetiology. The haemodynamic disturbances, endothelial injury, epithelial cell injury and immunological mechanisms underpinning its initiation and extension will be discussed along with the considerable and complex interplay between these factors that lead to an intense, pro-inflammatory state. Mechanisms of tubular recovery will be discussed but also the pathophysiology of abnormal repair with its direct consequences for long-term renal function. Finally, the concept of 'organ cross-talk' will be introduced as a potential explanation for the higher mortality observed with acute kidney injury that might be deemed modest in conventional biochemical terms. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute kidney injury in the neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Askenazi, David J

    2014-09-01

    Critically ill neonates are at risk for acute kidney injury (AKI). AKI has been associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in adult and pediatric patients, and increasing evidence suggests a similar association in the neonatal population. This article describes the current AKI definitions (including their limitations), work on novel biomarkers to define AKI, diagnosis and management strategies, long-term outcomes after AKI, and future directions for much-needed research in this important area. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Transplantation of Kidneys From Donors With Acute Kidney Injury: Friend or Foe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, C.; van de Leemkolk, F.; Curnow, E.; Homan van der Heide, J.; Gilbert, J.; Sharples, E.; Ploeg, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    The gap between supply and demand in kidney transplantation has led to increased use of marginal kidneys; however, kidneys with acute kidney injury are often declined/discarded. To determine whether this policy is justified, we analyzed outcomes of donor kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) in a

  20. Acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Gude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI, a recognized complication of cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality (15-30% with approximately 1% of all the affected patients requiring dialysis. Early detection of AKI would enable intervention before occurrence of irreversible injury and might minimize the morbidity and mortality. Recently developed biomarkers of AKI facilitate its earlier discovery and help assessment of its severity and prognosis. In this article, we review the causes of well-known yet inexplicable association between CPB and AKI, the advances in pathophysiologic basis, the diagnostics and the management options.

  1. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adediran, Samuel; Dhakarwal, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries.

  2. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney injury. Alternative Names Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal ...

  3. Acute Kidney Injury in the Geriatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mitchell H; La Manna, Gaetano; Ronco, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    The aging kidney is more susceptible to injury. Thus, it is not surprising that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disorder with a relative high incidence in the elderly population, especially those with critical illness. Given the comorbid conditions common in the geriatric population as well as the increase in exposure to various nephrotoxic insults, it is likely that the incidence of AKI will grow in the coming decades. Thus, it is critical to gain an understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways operative in increasing the susceptibility to AKI with an aim to design therapies that will mitigate the risk of AKI. In the meanwhile, meticulous attention to preventative strategic is critical. When AKI does occur and renal replacement therapy is needed, individual decision making is required and should not be based on age alone. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Catalytic iron and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, David E; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and often devastating condition among hospitalized patients and is associated with markedly increased hospital length of stay, mortality, and cost. The pathogenesis of AKI is complex, but animal models support an important role for catalytic iron in causing AKI. Catalytic iron, also known as labile iron, is a transitional pool of non-transferrin-bound iron that is readily available to participate in redox cycling. Initial findings related to catalytic iron and animal models of kidney injury have only recently been extended to human AKI. In this review, we discuss the role of catalytic iron in human AKI, focusing on recent translational studies in humans, assay considerations, and potential therapeutic targets for future interventional studies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both unadjusted and adjusted time to event analyses, patients with pneumonia + acute kidney injury

  6. The Role of the Complement System in Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, James W.; Renner, Brandon; Thurman, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Acute kidney injury is a common and severe clinical problem. Patients who develop acute kidney injury are at increased risk of death in spite of supportive measures such as hemodialysis. Research in recent years has revealed that tissue inflammation is central to the pathogenesis of renal injury, even after non-immune insults such as ischemia/reperfusion and toxins. Examination of clinical samples and pre-clinical models demonstrate that activation of the complement system is a critical cause of acute kidney injury. Furthermore, complement activation within the injured kidney is a proximal trigger of many downstream inflammatory events within the renal parenchyma that exacerbate injury to the kidney. Complement activation may also account for the systemic inflammatory events that contribute to remote organ injury and patient mortality. Complement inhibitory drugs have now entered clinical use and may provide an important new therapeutic approach for patients suffering from or at high risk of developing acute kidney injury. PMID:24161039

  7. Metabolic acidosis aggravates experimental acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Patrícia Andréa da Fonseca; de Brito, Teresinha Silva; Freire, Rosemayre Souza; da Silva, Moisés Tolentino Bento; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Vale, Mariana Lima; de Menezes, Dalgimar Beserra; Martins, Alice Maria Costa; Libório, Alexandre Braga

    2016-02-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and metabolic acidosis (MA) are two critical conditions that may simultaneously occur in clinical practice. The result of this combination can be harmful to the kidneys, but this issue has not been thoroughly investigated. The present study evaluated the influence of low systemic pH on various parameters of kidney function in rats that were subjected to an experimental model of renal I/R injury. Metabolic acidosis was induced in male Wistar rats by ingesting ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) in tap water, beginning 2 days before ischemic insult and maintained during the entire study. Ischemia/reperfusion was induced by clamping both renal arteries for 45 min, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. Four groups were studied: control (subjected to sham surgery, n=8), I/R (n=8), metabolic acidosis (MA; 0.28 M NH4Cl solution and sham surgery, n=6), and MA+I/R (0.28 M NH4Cl solution plus I/R, n=9). Compared with I/R rats, MA+I/R rats exhibited higher mortality (50 vs. 11%, p=0.03), significant reductions of blood pH, plasma bicarbonate (pBic), and standard base excess (SBE), with a severe decline in the glomerular filtration rate and tubular function. Microscopic tubular injury signals were detected. Immunofluorescence revealed that the combination of MA and I/R markedly increased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), but it did not interfere with the decrease in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression that was caused by I/R injury. Acute ischemic kidney injury is exacerbated by acidic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Acute kidney injury : A clinical syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienholz, A; Kribben, A

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome occurring in the context of multiple and diverse disease entities. Although the term AKI implies renal damage as well as functional impairment or a combination of both, diagnosis is solely based on the functional parameters serum creatinine and urine output. Independent of the underlying disease and even assuming full recovery of renal function, AKI is associated with increased morbidity and mortality not only during the acute situation, but also long term. Awareness of the individual risk profile of each patient and the variety of causes and clinical manifestations of AKI is pivotal for prophylaxis, diagnosis, and therapy. The complexity of the clinical syndrome in the context of sepsis, solid organ transplantation, malignancy, and autoimmune diseases requires differentiated diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and interdisciplinary care.

  9. Serum uric acid and acute kidney injury: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury causes great morbidity and mortality in both the community and hospital settings. Understanding the etiological factors and the pathophysiological principles resulting in acute kidney injury is essential in prompting appropriate therapies. Recently hyperuricemia has been recognized as a potentially modifiable risk factor for acute kidney injury, including that associated with cardiovascular surgery, radiocontrast administration, rhabdomyolysis, and associated with heat stress. This review discussed the evidence that repeated episodes of acute kidney injury from heat stress and dehydration may also underlie the pathogenesis of the chronic kidney disease epidemic that is occurring in Central America (Mesoamerican nephropathy. Potential mechanisms for how uric acid might contribute to acute kidney injury are also discussed, including systemic effects on renal microvasculature and hemodynamics, and local crystalline and noncrystalline effects on the renal tubules. Pilot clinical trials also show potential benefits of lowering uric acid on acute kidney injury associated with a variety of insults. In summary, there is mounting evidence that hyperuricemia may have a significant role in the development of acute kidney injury. Prospective, placebo controlled, randomized trials are needed to determine the potential benefit of uric acid lowering therapy on kidney and cardio-metabolic diseases.

  10. Acute Kidney Injury – An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Varrier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of acute kidney injury (AKI occurs frequently in hospitalised patients, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare expenditure. In the context of a precipitating insult, disturbances in both global and microcirculatory renal blood flow, tubular cell damage, and activation of pro- inflammatory pathways lead to impairment of numerous elements of renal function. Classification systems, including the recent ‘Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification, typically define and stage AKI in terms of the magnitude of rise in serum creatinine (SCr and the presence of oliguria. At present there is no cure for AKI and the key principles of its management include early recognition, haemodynamic optimisation, correction of hypovolaemia, ceasing and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications, and treatment of the underlying cause. Recent data show that the type and volume of fluid therapy can affect renal function and that further guidance is required. In the future it is hoped that novel technologies, including biomarkers and real-time measurement of glomerular filtration rate will allow the earlier identification of patients with AKI, whilst a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of AKI will lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Despite SCr usually recovering after an episode of AKI, there is growing recognition that survivors of AKI are at an increased risk of subsequent chronic kidney disease, including end-stage renal failure and premature death.

  11. Acute kidney injury: definition, diagnosis and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in hospitalized patients and great efforts by leading experts have been made in order to establish common definitions of AKI. The clinical use of these consensus definitions has led to a substantially improved understanding of AKI. In addition, the consensus definitions allow to compare AKI incidence and outcomes between different patient populations. As a result, it has become evident that AKI in the Western population represents a clinical syndrome with an incidence close to that of myocardial infarction. The aim of this review is to revisit the current concepts and definitions of AKI, to highlight its diagnosis, and to emphasize its epidemiological characteristics. Here, we will focus on the available literature reporting the epidemiology of AKI in critically ill patients. Sepsis, major surgery, and nephrotoxic drugs are the main causes of AKI in these patients, and its occurrence is associated with an increased risk for sustained chronic kidney injury. We also discuss the concept of renal angina as a possible future concept for improved clinical risk stratification to detect AKI. In this regard, we emphasize the importance of the use of novel biomarkers in the diagnosis of AKI, as they hold the potential to improve early diagnosis and prevention in the clinical setting.

  12. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakarwal, Pradeep; Adediran, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs.Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously.Conclusion: Refl...

  13. Energy drink-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Elisa; Oman, Kristy; Lefler, Mary

    2014-10-01

    To report a case of acute renal failure possibly induced by Red Bull. A 40-year-old man presented with various complaints, including a recent hypoglycemic episode. Assessment revealed that serum creatinine was elevated at 5.5 mg/dL, from a baseline of 0.9 mg/dL. An interview revealed a 2- to 3-week history of daily ingestion of 100 to 120 oz of Red Bull energy drink. Resolution of renal dysfunction occurred within 2 days of discontinuation of Red Bull and persisted through 10 months of follow-up. Rechallenge was not attempted. Energy-drink-induced renal failure has been reported infrequently. We identified 2 case reports via a search of MEDLINE, one of which occurred in combination with alcohol and the other of which was not available in English. According to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition Adverse Event Reporting System, between 2004 and 2012, the FDA has received 166 reports of adverse events associated with energy drink consumption. Only 3 of the 166 (0.18%) described renal failure, and none were reported with Red Bull specifically. A defined mechanism for injury is unknown. Assessment of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicates a probable relationship between the development of acute renal failure and Red Bull ingestion in our patient. Acute kidney injury has rarely been reported with energy drink consumption. Our report describes the first English language report of acute renal failure occurring in the context of ingestion of large quantities of energy drink without concomitant alcohol. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Matheny

    Full Text Available Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort.We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients.A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients.Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  15. Acute Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong; Lee, Yu-Ji; Kim, Sung-Rok

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, complications, and mortality rate associated with acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). A total of 75 patients who were treated at Samsung Changwon Hospital between February 2005 and March 2016 were included in the study sample. The outcomes included in-hospital survival, renal recovery, metabolic and fluid control rates, and technical success rates. Refractory heart failure was the most frequent cause of acute PD (49.3%), followed by hepatic failure (20.0%), septic shock (14.7%), acute pancreatitis (9.3%), and unknown causes (6.7%). The hospital survival of patients in the acute PD was 48.0%. Etiologies of acute kidney injury (AKI) (refractory heart failure, acute pancreatitis compared with hepatic failure, septic shock or miscellaneous causes), use of inotropes, use of a ventilator, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II were associated with survival differences. Maintenance dialysis required after survival was high (80.1% [29/36]) due to AKI etiologies (heart or hepatic failures). Metabolic and fluid control rates were 77.3%. The technical success rate for acute PD was 93.3%. Acute PD remains a suitable treatment modality for patients with AKI in the era of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Nearly all patients who require dialysis can be dialyzed with acute PD without mechanical difficulties. This is particularly true in patients with refractory heart failure and acute pancreatitis who had a weak requirement for inotropes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  16. Acute kidney injury: definition, epidemiology, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisawat, Nattachai; Kellum, John A

    2011-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical syndrome whose definition has standardized as a result of consensus by leading experts around the world. As a result of these definitions, reported AKI incidences can now be compared across different populations and settings. Evidence from population-based studies suggests that AKI is nearly as common as myocardial infarction, at least in the western world. This review aims to highlight the recent advances in AKI epidemiology as well as to suggest future directions for prevention and management. This review will focus on the recent studies exploring the AKI epidemiology in and outside the ICU. In particular, the risk of AKI in less severe sepsis is notable as is evidence linking AKI to chronic kidney disease. New emphasis on renal recovery is shaping current thinking as is the use and utility of new biomarkers. This article reviews the recent information about the definition, classification, and epidemiology of AKI. Although new biomarkers are being developed, the 'tried and true' markers of serum creatinine and urine output, disciplined by current criteria, will be important components in the definition and classification of AKI for some time to come.

  17. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Adediran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Conclusion: Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries.

  18. Acute kidney injury: Global health alert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kam Tao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is increasingly prevalent in developing and developed countries and is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. Most etiologies of AKI can be prevented by interventions at the individual, community, regional and in-hospital levels. Effective measures must include community-wide efforts to increase an awareness of the devastating effects of AKI and provide guidance on preventive strategies, as well as early recognition and management. Efforts should be focused on minimizing causes of AKI, increasing awareness of the importance of serial measurements of serum creatinine in high risk patients, and documenting urine volume in acutely ill people to achieve early diagnosis; there is as yet no definitive role for alternative biomarkers. Protocols need to be developed to systematically manage prerenal conditions and specific infections. More accurate data about the true incidence and clinical impact of AKI will help to raise the importance of the disease in the community, increase awareness of AKI by governments, the public, general and family physicians and other health care professionals to help prevent the disease. Prevention is the key to avoid the heavy burden of mortality and morbidity associated with AKI.

  19. Chloroquine prevents acute kidney injury induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: CQ treatment significantly decreased the blood concentrations of tissue necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-18, BUN, and Cr in the model control rats. There were also significant decreases in the levels of high mobility group protein 1 and kidney injury molecule-1 in the renal injury rats compared to ...

  20. Pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Edelstein, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    .... A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI). The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal...

  1. Acute kidney injury: can we improve prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Christine W; Symons, Jordan M

    2010-12-01

    The incidence of pediatric acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasing. AKI has been found to be independently associated with increased mortality, and current management options are limited in that they are mainly supportive. The use of various definitions of AKI can still be found in the literature, making it difficult to discern the epidemiology behind pediatric AKI. The use of a more uniform definition is a necessary first step to clarify AKI epidemiology and direct our research efforts, and it will ultimately improve prognosis. There is evidence that neonates and infants may be at higher risk for AKI than adults. However, the least amount of research is found for this youngest age group, and more focused efforts on this population are necessary. This paper reviews existing data on and definitions for pediatric AKI, general preventive and treatment strategies, as well as ongoing research efforts on AKI. We are hopeful that the prognosis of AKI will improve with collaboration on a multicenter, multinational scale in the form of prospective, long-term studies on pediatric AKI.

  2. The Economic Consequences of Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Samuel A; Chertow, Glenn M

    2017-06-09

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an increasingly common condition associated with poor health outcomes. Combined with its rising incidence, AKI has emerged as a major public health concern with high human and financial costs. In England, the estimated inpatient costs related to AKI consume 1% of the National Health Service budget. In the United States, AKI is associated with an increase in hospitalization costs that range from $5.4 to $24.0 billion. The most expensive patients are those with AKI of sufficient severity to require dialysis, where cost increases relative to patients without AKI range from $11,016 to $42,077 per hospitalization. Even with these high costs, significant hospital-level variation still exists in the cost of AKI care. In this article, we review the economic consequences of AKI for both the general and critically ill AKI population. Our primary objective is to shed light on an opportunity for hospitals and policymakers to develop new care processes for patients with AKI that have the potential to yield substantial cost savings. By exposing the high rates of death and disability experienced by affected patients and the immense financial burden attributable to AKI, we also hope to motivate scientists and entrepreneurs to pursue a variety of innovative therapeutic strategies to combat AKI in the near term. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Acute Kidney Injury and Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küllmar, Mira; Zarbock, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication that occurs in critically ill patients and it is associated with a worse outcome. Since therapy options are limited, prevention and early detection are the essential cornerstones to improve patient outcomes. Therefore, using health information technology (HIT) to detect AKI early might be useful for clinicians. Patient data can be extracted real-time from electronic health records. Programmed electronic alert systems (e-alerts) can increase clinicians' awareness for AKI. Integrated into clinical decision support systems, implementation of HIT might improve clinical processes and patient outcomes. Several studies show the application of e-alerts in AKI detection and the implementation in processes of care. Monitoring nephrotoxic medication is one successful approach of implementing e-alerts in prevention of AKI. Information technology in AKI is in an early phase of development and further multicenter prospective studies are required to draw optimally on the maximum potential of this concept. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Prevalence and outcomes of acute kidney injury in term neonates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The kidney is the most damaged organ in asphyxiated full-term infants. The severity of its damage is correlated with the severity of neurological damage. We determined the prevalence of perinatal asphyxia-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study including 60 ...

  5. Biomarkers in acute kidney injury: Evidence or paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombi, Fernando; Muryan, Alexis; Canzonieri, Romina; Trimarchi, Hernán

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury in the critically ill represents an independent risk factor of morbidity and mortality in the short and long terms, with significant economic impacts in terms of public health costs. Currently its diagnosis is still based on the presence of oliguria and/or a gradual increase in serum creatinine, which make the diagnosis a delayed event and to detriment of the so-called 'therapeutic window'. The appearance of new biomarkers of acute kidney injury could potentially improve this situation, contributing to the detection of 'subclinical acute kidney injury', which could allow the precocious employment of multiple treatment strategies in order to preserve kidney function. However these new biomarkers display sensitive features that may threaten their full capacity of action, which focus specifically on their additional contribution in the early approach of the situation, given the lack of specific validated treatments for acute kidney injury. This review aims to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of these new tools in the early management of acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  7. Acute kidney injury secondary to iatrogenic bilateral ureteric ligation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bilateral ureteric injury, although rare is a complication that could follow obstetric, gynaecologic and other pelvic surgeries. Majority of cases are diagnosed postoperatively, hence a high index of suspicion is required in patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI) following abdomino-pelvic surgeries.

  8. Acute Kidney Injury in Western Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Josée; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased mortality, higher risk of chronic kidney disease, and prolonged hospital lengths of stay. The epidemiology of AKI mainly derives from studies performed in Western high-income countries. More limited data are available from Western low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) located in Central and South America. In this review, we summarize the most recent data on the epidemiology of AKI in Western countries, aiming to contrast results from industrialized high-income countries with LMICs. The global picture of AKI in LMICs is not as well characterized as in the USA and Europe. In addition, in some LMICs, the epidemiology of AKI may vary depending on the region and socioeconomic status, which contributes to the difficulty of getting a better portrait of the clinical condition. In low-income regions and tropical countries, AKI is frequently attributed to diarrhea, infections, nephrotoxins, as well as obstetric complications. As opposed to the situation in high-income countries, access to basic care in LMICs is limited by economic constraints, and treatment is often delayed due to late presentation and recognition of the condition, which contribute to worse outcomes. In addition, dialysis is often not available or must be paid by patients, which further restricts its use. There are great disparities in the epidemiology of AKI between Western high-income countries and Western LMICs. In LMICs, education and training programs should increase the public awareness of AKI and improve preventive and basic treatments to improve AKI outcomes. (1) More than 90% of the patients recruited in AKI studies using KDIGO-equivalent criteria originate from North America, Europe, or Oceania, although these regions represent less than a fifth of the global population. However, the pooled incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients reaches 20% globally with moderate variance between regions. (2

  9. Acute kidney injury in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cosentino, Nicola; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2015-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly being seen in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs). This condition has a complex pathogenesis, an incidence that can reach 30% and it is associated with higher short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, AKI is still characterised by lack of a single accepted definition, unclear pathophysiology understanding and insensitive diagnostic tools that make its detection difficult, particularly in the setting of ACS. Recent data suggested that patients with AKI during ACS, even those in whom renal function seems to fully recover, face an increased, persisting risk of future AKI and may develop chronic kidney disease. Thus, in these patients, nephrology follow-up, after hospital discharge, and secondary preventive measures should possibly be implemented. In this review, we aim at providing a framework of knowledge to increase cardiologists' awareness of AKI, with the goal of improving the outcome of patients with ACS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain...... and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905...... patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days...

  11. Intestinal microbiota-kidney cross talk in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Sanjeev; Martina-Lingua, Maria N; Bandapalle, Samatha; Pluznick, Jennifer; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A; Peterson, Daniel A; Rabb, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) involves multiple and overlapping immunological, biochemical, and hemodynamic mechanisms that modulate the effects of both the initial insult and the subsequent repair. Limited but recent experimental data have revealed that the intestinal microbiota significantly affects outcomes in AKI. Additional evidence shows significant changes in the intestinal microbiota in chronic kidney disease patients and in experimental AKI. In this minireview, we discuss the current status of the effect of intestinal microbiota on kidney diseases, the immunomodulatory effects of intestinal microbiota, and the potential mechanisms by which microbiota can modify kidney diseases and vice versa. We also propose future studies to clarify the role of intestinal microbiota in kidney diseases and to explore how the modification of gut microbiota may be a potential therapeutic tool. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Non-dialytic management of acute kidney injury in newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Vishal; Kumar, Deepak; Vijayaraghavan, Prashant; Chaturvedi, Tushar; Raina, Rupesh

    2016-01-01

    Treating acute kidney injury (AKI) in newborns is often challenging due to the functional immaturity of the neonatal kidney. Because of this physiological limitation, renal replacement therapy (RRT) in this particular patient population is difficult to execute and may lead to unwanted complications. Although fluid overload and electrolyte abnormalities, as seen in neonatal AKI, are indications for RRT initiation, there is limited evidence that RRT initiated in the first year of life improves ...

  13. Dialysis Requiring Acute Kidney Injury in Acute Cerebrovascular Accident Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint A; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Kamat, Sunil; Annapureddy, Narender; Benjo, Alexandre; Thakar, Charuhas V

    2015-11-01

    The epidemiology of dialysis requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admissions is poorly understood with previous studies being from a single center or year. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the yearly incidence trends of AKI-D in hospitalizations with AIS and ICH from 2002 to 2011. We also evaluated the trend of impact of AKI-D on in-hospital mortality and adverse discharge using adjusted odds ratios (aOR) after adjusting for demographics and comorbidity indices. We extracted a total of 3,937,928 and 696,754 hospitalizations with AIS and ICH, respectively. AKI-D occurred in 1.5 and 3.5 per 1000 in AIS and ICH admissions, respectively. Incidence of admissions complicated by AKI-D doubled from 0.9/1000 to 1.7/1000 in AIS and from 2.1/1000 to 4.3/1000 in ICH admissions. In AIS admissions, AKI-D was associated with 30% higher odds of mortality (aOR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.48; Paccident continues to grow and is associated with increased mortality and adverse discharge. This highlights the need for early diagnosis, better risk stratification, and preparedness for need for complex long-term care in this vulnerable population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Thrombotic microangiopathies and acute kidney injury induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare, but potentially lethal condition requiring rapid recognition, diagnosis and initiation of therapy. Here, we present two cases of women with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury shortly after surgical termination of pregnancy. Histological examination of their ...

  15. Acute kidney injury following Paraquat poisoning in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Malleshappa

    2013-01-01

    Paraquat is highly toxic to human and is widely used in agriculture as a contact herbicide. Paraquat poisoning is associated with high mortality varying from 35% to 50%. Six cases of paraquat poisoning were treated in our center. Acute kidney injury developed in all the cases and mortality was 66%. Respiratory and multiorgan failure are the main causes for mortality.

  16. Outcome of pregnancy related acute kidney injury requiring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pregnancy related acute kidney injury (AKI) severe enough to require dialysis is now rare in developed countries but is still a significant cause of maternal mortality in many resource constrained countries. However, there is scanty information from many sub-Saharan countries about outcomes of patient who ...

  17. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI. Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a "gravitational" pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp.

  18. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, A.; Datta, J.; Das, A.; Agarwal, A. K.; Sinha, D.; Mondal, S.; Ete, T.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a “gravitational” pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp). PMID:25097339

  19. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation

    OpenAIRE

    A Nag; J. Datta; Das, A; Agarwal, A. K.; D Sinha; Mondal, S; Ete, T.; Chakraborty, A.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-01-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a "gravitational" pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp).

  20. Acute kidney injury and dermonecrosis after Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, A; Datta, J; Das, A; Agarwal, A K; Sinha, D; Mondal, S; Ete, T; Chakraborty, A; Ghosh, S

    2014-07-01

    Spiders of the Loxosceles species can cause dermonecrosis and acute kidney injury (AKI). Hemolysis, rhabdomyolysis and direct toxin-mediated renal damage have been postulated. There are very few reports of Loxoscelism from India. We report a case of AKI, hemolysis and a "gravitational" pattern of ulceration following the bite of the brown recluse spider (Loxosceles spp).

  1. Acute kidney injury from Paraquat poisoning: a case report. | Slater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a fatal case of a16 year old girl who presented with dysphagia, cough and dyspnoea following ingestion of paraquat. She subsequently developed acute kidney injury (AKI) that resolved but she succumbed to respiratory complications despite use of antibiotics, corticosteroids and haemodialysis. Key words: ...

  2. Determinants of modality of management of acute kidney injury in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The cost of taking care of children with acute kidney injury (AKI) is enormous and beyond the reach of many caregivers in sub-Saharan Africa which are largely resource poor. It is therefore imperative to determine those who may benefit from conservative management which is comparatively cheaper to the ...

  3. Assessment of knowledge of acute kidney injury among non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adequate knowledge of acute kidney injury (AKI) among doctors is essential for its prevention, early diagnosis and management. Assessing knowledge of AKI among doctors is necessary to identify areas of deficiencies and key areas to be emphasized when organizing educational programs aimed at ...

  4. Acute kidney injury risk factor recognition in three teaching hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A key objective of the Nephrology Sister Centre Programme between the renal units in Cardiff and Addis Ababa, sponsored by the International Society of Nephrology, is to facilitate development of the local clinical service in Ethiopia specifically focused on the management of acute kidney injury (AKI).

  5. Acute kidney injury and hepatorenal syndrome in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod Israelsen, Mads; Gluud, Lise Lotte; Krag, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhosis is the eighth leading cause of "years of lost life" in the United States and accounts for approximately 1% to 2% of all deaths in Europe. Patients with cirrhosis have a high risk of developing acute kidney injury. The clinical characteristics of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) are similar...

  6. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate.

  7. Hypothyroidism causing paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Chaturaka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a patient with severe hypothyroidism complicated by paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury. A 65 year old male patient, diagnosed with hypothyroidism one year ago was transferred to our unit in a state of drowsiness and confusion. He was severely hypothyroid and had paralytic ileus and impaired renal function at the time of transfer. Hypokalaemia was present, and was likely to have contributed to the paralytic ileus and this together with dehydration was likely to have contributed to renal injury. Nonetheless, hypothyroidism is very likely to have been the principal precipitant of both these complications, and both paralytic ileus and acute kidney injury improved with thyroxine replacement. Unfortunately, the patient died unexpectedly eight days after admission to the unit. Hypothyroidism may induce de novo acute kidney injury or it may exacerbate ongoing chronic kidney disease. This rare complication is assumed to be due to the hypodynamic circulatory state created by thyroid hormone deficiency. Paralytic ileus is an even rarer fatal manifestation of hypothyroidism and is thought to be due to an autonomic neuropathy affecting the intestines that is reversible with thyroxine replacement. To our knowledge, both these complications have not been observed in a single patient so far. It is important that clinicians are aware of these rare manifestations of hypothyroidism as in most occasions, thyroxine deficiency may be missed, and treatment can reverse the complications.

  8. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy--a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Natarajan; Dhanapriya, Jeyachandran; Muthukumar, Periyasamy; Sakthirajan, Ramanathan; Dineshkumar, Thanigachalam; Thirumurugan, S; Balasubramaniyan, T

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication in pregnancy, resulting in significant maternal morbidity/mortality and fetal loss. Although the incidence of pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (PRAKI) has decreased in developed countries, it is still common in developing nations. A prospective observational study was done between January 2010 and December 2014 to report the incidence, clinical spectrum, maternal and fetal outcome of AKI in pregnancy. Total number of patients: 130; mean age: 25.4 ± 4.73 years. The incidence of AKI in pregnancy was 7.8%. Most of the AKI was noted in postpartum period (68%). Etiology of AKI was sepsis (39%), pre-eclampsia (21%), placental abruption (10%), acute diarrheal disease complicating pregnancy (10%), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) (9%), postpartum hemorrhage (2%) and glomerular diseases (9%). Renal biopsy (n = 46) done in these patients showed renal cortical necrosis (16), TMA (11), acute tubular injury (9), acute tubulointerstitial disease (1) and glomerular disease (9). Live births occurred in 42% of patients with vaginal delivery in 34% cases. Thirty-four patients were managed conservatively, while 96 required dialysis. Complete recovery occurred in 56% and about 36% had persistent renal failure at 3 months. Mortality rate observed was 8%. In univariate analysis, low mean platelet count, higher peak serum creatinine, dialysis dependency at presentation and histopathologically presence of cortical necrosis and TMA predicted the progression to chronic kidney disease. AKI in pregnancy was common in postpartum period and sepsis being the commonest cause.

  9. Pathophysiology of Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozkok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI. The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality.

  10. Pathophysiology of Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Edelstein, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI). The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:25165721

  11. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu Min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice.

  12. Acute kidney injury: changing lexicography, definitions, and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelfarb, J; Ikizler, T A

    2007-05-01

    In recent years, there have been numerous advances in understanding the molecular determinants of functional kidney injury after ischemic and/or toxic exposure. However, translation of successful novel therapies designed to attenuate kidney functional injury from animal models to the clinical sphere has had modest results. This lack of translatability is at least in part due to lack of sufficient standardization in definitions and classification of cases of acute kidney injury (AKI), an incomplete understanding of the natural history of human AKI, and a limited understanding of how kidney injury interacts with other organ system failure in the context of systemic metabolic abnormalities. A concerted effort is now being made by nephrologists and intensivists to arrive at standardized terminology and classification of AKI. There have also been dramatic advances in our understanding of the epidemiology and natural history of AKI, particularly in the hospital and intensive care unit setting. Promising strategies are now being developed which may ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients at risk for or who have developed AKI, which should be readily testable in the coming decade.

  13. Outcomes of kidneys utilized from deceased donors with severe acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, T; Dimassi, W; Elgamal, H; Alabassi, A; Aleid, H; Altalhi, M; Shoukri, M; Almeshari, K

    2015-10-01

    Significant numbers of kidneys are discarded due to raised terminal creatinine of the donor. To determine long-term outcomes of kidneys utilized from donors with severe acute kidney injury (AKI). In this retrospective study, we included all patients who received kidneys from deceased donors between years 2000 and 2012. AKI was defined according to the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) classification. The primary outcomes were patient and graft survival and secondary outcomes were renal function at different time points, delayed graft function, acute rejection and length of hospital stay. Two hundred and eighty-four recipients received kidneys from 261 deceased donors. One hundred and fourteen patients (40%) received kidneys from the donors with AKI. Forty-two patients received kidneys from the donors with severe AKI (AKIN-3 category). Mean age of the donor and recipient was 36 and 37 years, respectively. Main cause of death in donors was road traffic accident (34%) followed by cerebrovascular accident (33%). Terminal creatinine was 85 and 262 μmol/l in non-AKI and AKI groups, respectively (P accepting such kidneys. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Acute Kidney Injury: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Briosa Neves

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common problem highly associated with hospitalisation. AKI is the cause of harmful short-term consequences: longer hospital stays, greater disability after discharge, and greater risk of in-hospital mortality, as well as adverse long-term outcomes, such as progression to chronic kidney disease, development of cardiovascular disease, and increased risk of long-term mortality. The concept of AKI has changed since the introduction of the ‘Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease’ (RIFLE classification. More recently, the ‘Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes’ (KDIGO classification appears to have provided increased diagnostic sensitivity and outcome-prediction capability. Novel biomarkers and further research on the role of the immune system in AKI may help improve the diagnosis, severity, outcome evaluation, and treatment of the condition. In this review we describe the epidemiology, diagnosis, and prognosis of AKI, as well as possible future directions for its clinical management.

  15. Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney injury Epidemiology in Neonates (AWAKEN): Design of a Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Garcia Jetton; Ronnie Guillet; Askenazi, David J.; Lynn Dill; Judd Jacobs; Alison L Kent; Selewski, David T.; Abitbol, Carolyn L.; Kaskel, Fredrick J.; Maroun Jean Mhanna; Namasivayam Ambalavanan; Charlton, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects ~30% of hospitalized neonates. Critical to advancing our understanding of neonatal AKI is collaborative research among neonatologists and nephrologists. The Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC) is an international, multidisciplinary group dedicated to investigating neonatal AKI. The AWAKEN study (Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney injury Epidemiology in Neonates) was designed to describe the epidemiology of neonatal AKI, validate the definition...

  16. Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates: Design of a Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jetton, Jennifer G.; Guillet, Ronnie; Askenazi, David J.; Dill, Lynn; Jacobs, Judd; Alison L Kent; Selewski, David T.; Abitbol, Carolyn L.; Kaskel, Fredrick J.; Mhanna, Maroun J.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Charlton, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects ~30% of hospitalized neonates. Critical to advancing our understanding of neonatal AKI is collaborative research among neonatologists and nephrologists. The Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC) is an international, multidisciplinary group dedicated to investigating neonatal AKI. The AWAKEN study (Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney injury Epidemiology in Neonates) was designed to describe the epidemiology of neonatal AKI, validate the definition ...

  17. Acute kidney injury in the fetus and neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Arwa; Bonachea, Elizabeth M; Askenazi, David J

    2017-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an under-recognized morbidity of neonates; the incidence remains unclear due to the absence of a unified definition of AKI in this population and because previous studies have varied greatly in screening for AKI with serum creatinine and urine output assessments. Premature infants may be born with less than half of the nephrons compared with term neonates, predisposing them to chronic kidney disease (CKD) early on in life and as they age. AKI can also lead to CKD, and premature infants with AKI may be at very high risk for long-term kidney problems. AKI in neonates is often multifactorial and may result from prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal insults as well as any combination thereof. This review focuses on the causes of AKI, the importance of early detection, the management of AKI in neonates, and long-term sequela of AKI in neonates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Warfarin related acute kidney injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, S; Gupta, D; Valsan, A; Tewari, R

    2017-01-01

    Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant used extensively in clinical practice; However, its side-effect of causing renal damage has been recently detected. The mechanism leading to renal damage is glomerular hemorrhage and red blood cell tubular casts prothrombin time. Recently, it was found that warfarin causes renal damage in patients with chronic kidney disease and is also associated with progression of renal disease. Warfarin causing acute kidney injury in patients with normal renal function is a rare manifestation. It is important to be aware of this condition as its innocuous presence can lead to chronic kidney disease if not corrected in time. Further studies have also found that novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran also cause a similar syndrome and hence a new term called anticoagulant-related nephropathy is now in vogue.

  19. Warfarin related acute kidney injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mendonca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Warfarin is an oral anticoagulant used extensively in clinical practice; However, its side-effect of causing renal damage has been recently detected. The mechanism leading to renal damage is glomerular hemorrhage and red blood cell tubular casts prothrombin time. Recently, it was found that warfarin causes renal damage in patients with chronic kidney disease and is also associated with progression of renal disease. Warfarin causing acute kidney injury in patients with normal renal function is a rare manifestation. It is important to be aware of this condition as its innocuous presence can lead to chronic kidney disease if not corrected in time. Further studies have also found that novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran also cause a similar syndrome and hence a new term called anticoagulant-related nephropathy is now in vogue.

  20. Patients at risk for contrast-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Meschi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Subjects with hypovolemia and/or dehydration and pre-existing renal failure are considered at highest risk for radiocontrast-medium-induced acute kidney injury (RCI-AKI, and this risk increases in the presence of glomerular filtration rate or creatinine clearance rates lower than 60 mL/min (stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease according to the National Kidney Foundation. The authors critically review the evidence-based literature on RCI-AKI, its diagnosis, epidemiological aspects, predisposing conditions, and markers of risk, including advanced age. Procedures requiring the use of iodinated contrast media are increasingly performed in patients over 70 years of age, and there is no definitive consensus regarding the role of advanced age as a marker of risk for RCI-AKI.

  1. Role of hypoxia-inducible factors in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Kelly K; Agarwal, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to mammalian survival. Oxygen deprivation, defined as hypoxia, elicits adaptive responses in cells and tissues, a process regulated by proteins known as hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Animal studies have provided compelling data to demonstrate a pivotal role for the HIF pathway in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI) that have led to initial human clinical trials examining this pathway in ischemia-reperfusion injury in various organ systems, including the kidney. HIF are master regulators and mediate adaptive responses to low oxygen in tissues and cells. This review will summarize recent key advances in the field highlighting preclinical and clinical studies relevant to the HIF pathway in the pathophysiology of AKI. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. CE: Preventing Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Yvonne; Taha, Asma Ali; Rutledge, Dana N

    2016-12-01

    : Diagnostic radiographic imaging scans using intravascular iodinated contrast media can lead to various complications. The most salient of these is contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) or contrast-induced nephropathy, a potentially costly and serious patient safety concern. Prevention strategies are the cornerstone of evidence-based clinical management for patients receiving contrast agents. These include preprocedure screening, stratification of patients based on risk factors, and protective interventions, the most important of which is hydration both before and after the radiographic imaging scan. There is a gap, however, between best evidence and clinical practice in terms of exact hydration protocols. Nurses play an important role in nephropathy prevention and need to be familiar with CI-AKI as a potential complication of radiographic imaging scans. In order to ensure safe, high-quality care, nurses must be involved in efforts to prevent CI-AKI as well as interventions that minimize patients' risk of kidney injury.

  3. Risk factors for acute kidney injury after partial hepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredt, Luis Cesar; Peres, Luis Alberto Batista

    2017-06-28

    To identify risk factors for the occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the postoperative period of partial hepatectomies. Retrospective analysis of 446 consecutive resections in 405 patients, analyzing clinical characteristics, preoperative laboratory data, intraoperative data, and postoperative laboratory data and clinical evolution. Adopting the International Club of Ascites criteria for the definition of AKI, potential predictors of AKI by logistic regression were identified. Of the total 446 partial liver resections, postoperative AKI occurred in 80 cases (17.9%). Identified predictors of AKI were: Non-dialytic chronic kidney injury (CKI), biliary obstruction, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, the extent of hepatic resection, the occurrence of intraoperative hemodynamic instability, post-hepatectomy haemorrhage, and postoperative sepsis. The MELD score, the presence of non-dialytic CKI and biliary obstruction in the preoperative period, and perioperative hemodynamics instability, bleeding, and sepsis are risk factors for the occurrence of AKI in patients that underwent partial hepatectomy.

  4. STUDY OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN SNAKE BITE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Dasaraju

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Snake venom is well known to cause toxic damage to the kidneys (Schreiner and Maher, 1965. This study is an attempt to evaluate the snakebite-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with snakebite-induced acute kidney injury were selected randomly and their clinical profile was assessed. Acute kidney injury was evaluated using noninvasive laboratory methods. Inclusion Criteria- 1. History of snakebite; 2. Presence of AKI. Exclusion Criteria- Pre-existing renal diseases, after establishing the diagnosis, patients were started on conservative treatment including ASV, blood/blood products and haemodialysis as required. RESULTS Out of 50 patients included in the study, majority of them were males (62% with mean age of presentation 43.8 ± 12.63 years. The mean interval between snakebite and presentation to hospital was 15.37 hours. In them, 98% patients presented with local signs of inflammation, 52% of patients presented with coagulation abnormality and 60% with decreased urine output. Comparison between good outcome (recovered from AKI and poor outcome (not recovered from AKI shows significant pvalue for ‘lapse of time in hours’ in presenting to the hospital after snakebite (p value 0.005 and ‘alternative treatment taken’ before coming to the hospital (p value 0.001. CONCLUSION Poisonous snakebites have common manifestations of cellulitis, abnormal coagulation profile and decreased urine output. Overall mortality due to snakebite-induced AKI is 6%. Patients who did not recover from AKI had lapse of time in presenting to the hospital and abnormal coagulation profile.

  5. Renal Support for Acute Kidney Injury in the Developing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev A. Annigeri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There is wide variation in the management of acute kidney injury (AKI and the practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT around the world. Clinicians in developing countries face additional challenges due to limited resources, reduced availability of trained staff and equipment, cultural and socioeconomic aspects, and administrative and governmental barriers. In this article, we report the consensus recommendations from the 18th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative conference in Hyderabad, India. We provide the minimal requirements for provision of acute RRT in developing countries, including patient selection, choice of RRT modality and monitoring, transition, and termination of acute RRT. We also discuss areas of uncertainty and propose themes for future research. These recommendations can serve as a foundation for clinicians to implement renal support for AKI in low resource settings.

  6. Development of predisposition, injury, response, organ failure model for predicting acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Suman; Jain, Priyanka; Kumar, Guresh; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Moreau, Richard; Kedarisetty, Chandan Kumar; Abbas, Zaigham; Amarapurkar, Deepak; Bhardwaj, Ankit; Bihari, Chhagan; Butt, Amna Subhan; Chan, Albert; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar; Chowdhury, Ashok; Dhiman, RadhaKrishan; Dokmeci, Abdul Kadir; Ghazinyan, Hasmik; Hamid, Saeed Sadiq; Kim, Dong Joon; Komolmit, Piyawat; Lau, George K; Lee, Guan Huei; Lesmana, Laurentius A; Jamwal, Kapil; Mamun-Al-Mahtab; Mathur, Rajendra Prasad; Nayak, Suman Lata; Ning, Qin; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Alcantara-Payawal, Diana; Rastogi, Archana; Rahman, Salimur; Rela, Mohamed; Saraswat, Vivek A; Shah, Samir; Shiha, Gamal; Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Kapil; Tan, Soek Siam; Chandel, Shivendra Singh; Vashishtha, Chitranshu; Wani, Zeeshan A; Yuen, Man-Fung; Yokosuka, Osamu; Duseja, Ajay; Jafri, Wasim; Devarbhavi, Harshad; Eapen, C E; Goel, Ashish; Sood, Ajit; Ji, Jia; Duan, Z; Chen, Y

    2017-10-01

    There is limited data on predictors of acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure. We developed a PIRO model (Predisposition, Injury, Response, Organ failure) for predicting acute kidney injury in a multicentric cohort of acute on chronic liver failure patients. Data of 2360 patients from APASL-ACLF Research Consortium (AARC) was analysed. Multivariate logistic regression model (PIRO score) was developed from a derivation cohort (n=1363) which was validated in another prospective multicentric cohort of acute on chronic liver failure patients (n=997). Factors significant for P component were serum creatinine[(≥2 mg/dL)OR 4.52, 95% CI (3.67-5.30)], bilirubin [(failure (OR-3.5, 95% CI 2.2-5.5). The PIRO score predicted acute kidney injury with C-index of 0.95 and 0.96 in the derivation and validation cohort. The increasing PIRO score was also associated with mortality (Pfailure patients at risk of developing acute kidney injury. It reliably predicts mortality in these patients, underscoring the prognostic significance of acute kidney injury in patients with acute on chronic liver failure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Kidney injury molecule-1: A urinary biomarker for contrast-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vijayasimha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1 is an early biomarker for renal damage. A few studies have been published analyzing the potential use of urinary KIM-1 as a biomarker for acute kidney injury (AKI. However, no study has been done related to AKI associated with contrast administration. Aim: To search for new markers to identify AKI associated with contrast administration earlier than serum creatinine. Materials and Methods: We studied 100 consecutive patients with normal serum creatinine undergoing angiographic procedure. We assessed urine KIM-1, at 4, 8, and 24 hours after the angiographic procedure. Serum creatinine was measured at basal, 24, and 48 hours after the procedure. Results: There was a significant rise in urinary KIM-1 levels at 24 hours after the angiographic procedure. The presence of contrast induced nephropathy associated with AKI was 12%. Conclusion: The present study highlighted the importance of urinary KIM-1 in detecting AKI associated with contrast administration earlier than Serum creatinine.

  8. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Improves Survival in Severely Burned Military Casualties With Acute Kidney Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Kevin K; Juncos, , Luis A; Wolf, Steven E; Mann, Elizabeth E; Renz, Evan M; White, Christopher E; Barillo, David J; Clark, Richard A; Jones, John A; Edgecombe, Harcourt P

    2007-01-01

    .... We wondered whether early use of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) changes outcomes in severely burned military casualties with predetermined criteria for acute kidney injury. Methods...

  9. Comparison of acute kidney injury between open and laparoscopic liver resection: Propensity score analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young-Jin Moon; In-Gu Jun; Ki-Hun Kim; Seon-Ok Kim; Jun-Gol Song; Gyu-Sam Hwang

    2017-01-01

    .... Considering that laparoscopic surgery is beneficial in reducing the inflammatory response, we compared the incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury between laparoscopic liver resection and open liver resection...

  10. Monitoring treatment of acute kidney injury with damage biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianta, T J; Succar, L; Davidson, T; Buckley, N A; Endre, Z H

    2017-02-15

    Damage biomarkers may identify mechanisms and sites of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the utility of novel AKI biomarkers differs by context, and their utility for monitoring treatment of AKI is unknown. We hypothesized that selected AKI biomarkers would facilitate monitoring of mechanism-specific treatment. We examined this using a panel of biomarkers to monitor cisplatin-induced AKI treatment with alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) that has previously been demonstrated to ameliorate cisplatin induced AKI. AKI was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats using cisplatin (6mg/kg) in the presence or absence of a single dose of α-LA (100mg/kg). A panel of 12 urinary kidney damage biomarkers (CystatinC, NGAL albumin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, clusterin, KIM-1, osteopontin, total protein, cytochrome C, epidermal growth factor, interleukin-18 and malondialdehyde was examined as well as histological injury, serum creatinine and cystatin C, and clinical parameters. Cisplatin treatment modified all parameters, except interleukin-18 and malondialdehyde, with each parameter demonstrating a different temporal profile. α-LA treatment attenuated renal tubular injury scores (P kidney damage biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Fluid balance and acute kidney injury in septic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Jesús Javier; León-Sicairos, Nidia Maribel; Canizalez-Román, Adrián; García-Arellano, Bianca Azucena

    In patients with septic shock, excessive fluid administration can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between fluid balance, acute kidney injury and mortality in patients with septic shock. A study of cases and controls was conducted in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. The fluid balance in the first 72h and the presence of acute kidney injury was compared in patients diagnosed with septic shock who died against patients who survived the same condition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Forty-five cases and forty-five controls were included in the analysis. Mortality was associated with Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM III) ≥ 26 points (OR 7.5, 95% CI 2.8-18.7; p=0.000), Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) ≥ 24 points (OR 11.0, 95% CI 4.1-29.4; p=0.000), creatinine ≥ 0.65mg/dl (OR 5.6, 95% CI 2.2-13.9; p=0.000), lactate ≥ 2.5 mmol/l (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.9; p=0.033), SvO2 9% in 72h (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.6-11.7; p=0.003), acute kidney injury (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 2.2-15.1; p=0.000). In the multivariate model, the values of PRISM ≥26 and PELOD ≥24 points were significant. In patients who died due to septic shock, the multivariate model showed an association with PRISM ≥26 and PELOD ≥24 and a trend toward association with SvO2 9%. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute kidney injury, hyperosmolality and metabolic acidosis associated with lorazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zar, Tausif; Yusufzai, Irfan; Sullivan, Anna; Graeber, Charles

    2007-09-01

    A 54-year-old male with a history of multiple admissions for alcohol intoxication was admitted to hospital with right flank pain. He received a high-dose lorazepam infusion for alcohol withdrawal during hospitalization and developed severe hyperosmolality, high anion gap metabolic acidosis, and acute kidney injury on his eighth day of hospitalization. Serum chemistries, arterial blood gas analysis, and measurement of serum propylene glycol, ethylene glycol and methanol levels. Propylene glycol toxicity. Discontinuation of lorazepam infusion, administration of fomepizole, hemodialysis for five consecutive days, hemodynamic support, and follow-up of serum osmolality as a measure of propylene glycol decay.

  13. Inferior vena cava dimensions in patients with acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Yepes-Hurtado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Volume contraction frequently contributes to the development of acute kidney injury.  The rapid assessment of volume status in patients with acute kidney injury could improve decision making and outcomes. Methods: The maximum and minimum diameters and percent collapsibility of the inferior vena cava (IVC were measured in 30 patients admitted to the medical intensive care unit with laboratory evidence of acute kidney injury.  These measurements were made on the day of admission and 24 hours following admission.  Information about age, gender, body mass index, serum creatinine levels, and fluid balances was recorded. Results: This study included 30 patients with a mean age is 62.4 ±16.0 years.  The mean initial creatinine was 4.3 ± 4.2 mg/dL (range: 1.7 mg/dL to 22.1 mg/dL.  The mean fractional excretion of sodium was 2.06 ± 2.65%.  The mean maximum diameter of inferior vena cava was 1.8 ± 0.5 cm with the range is 0.4-2.65 cm.  The mean percent collapse was 32 ± 20%.  Five patients had evidence of hypovolemia using guidelines from the American Society of Echocardiology; 6 patients had evidence of hypervolemia.  Nineteen patients had measurements between these 2 categories.  There is no significant change in mean diameters following fluid administration for 24 hours.  An initial IVC diameter of 0.94 cm predicted ≥ 30% collapsibility with an area under the curve is 0.748. Discussion: Patients with acute kidney injury based on laboratory measurements had evidence for hypovolemia, euvolemia, and hypervolemia based on IVC measurements.  There was no consistent change in IVC dimensions following fluid administration, even though the creatinine fell in most patients.  Simple bedside measurements of IVC dimensions can facilitate fluid administration decisions but must be used with clinical assessment.

  14. Non-dialytic management of acute kidney injury in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vishal; Kumar, Deepak; Vijayaraghavan, Prashant; Chaturvedi, Tushar; Raina, Rupesh

    2017-01-01

    Treating acute kidney injury (AKI) in newborns is often challenging due to the functional immaturity of the neonatal kidney. Because of this physiological limitation, renal replacement therapy (RRT) in this particular patient population is difficult to execute and may lead to unwanted complications. Although fluid overload and electrolyte abnormalities, as seen in neonatal AKI, are indications for RRT initiation, there is limited evidence that RRT initiated in the first year of life improves long-term outcome. The underlying cause of AKI in a newborn patient should determine the treatment strategies to restore appropriate renal function. However, our understanding of this common clinical condition remains limited, as no standardized, evidence-based definition of neonatal AKI currently exists. Non-dialytic management of AKI in these patients may restore appropriate renal function to these patients without exposure to complications often encountered with RRT.

  15. RIFLE criteria for acute kidney injury in valvular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, Luca Salvatore; Romano, Gianpaolo; Galdieri, Nicola; Buonocore, Marianna; Bancone, Ciro; De Simone, Vincenzo; Della Corte, Alessandro; Nappi, Gianantonio

    2010-01-01

    The RIFLE classification, which defines three grades of increasing severity of acute kidney injury--risk (RIFLE R), injury (RIFLE I) and failure (RIFLE F), and two outcome classes (L, loss) and E (end-stage kidney disease)--represents a valuable method for evaluating acute renal failure. Risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) according to the RIFLE criteria and for operative mortality were identified in patients undergoing valvular procedures. A single-center prospective cohort study of 1424 patients who were not receiving renal replacement therapy preoperatively was conducted between January 2004 and December 2007. A total of 100 variables was collected from each patient. The main features were: mean age 61.9 +/- 12.9 years (range: 15-88 years), 47% females, 6% endocarditis, 11% redo surgery, 8% urgent/emergent surgery, 30% combined procedures, 5% complex, and 16% associated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The overall AKI prevalence was 10%, with RIFLE scores of I or F being detected in 8% and continuous veno-venous hemofiltration being required in 5%. Risk factors for AKI were age (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.14-4.15), time of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.005-1.013), redo procedure (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.42-3.8), chronic kidney disease (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.6-6.1), and blood transfusion (OR 3.8; 95% CI 2.5-6.5). The transfusion of leukodepleted blood exerted a protective effect on AKI development (OR 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.9). The average overall hospital mortality was 4.8%. Risk factors for operative mortality included: ECC time (OR 1; 95% CI 1.002-1.014), age (OR 1.043; 95% CI 1.01-1.07), chronic kidney disease (OR 4.8; 95% CI 2.2-10.6), blood transfusion (OR 6.43; 95% CI 2.8-14.7), surgical priority (OR 6.5; 95% CI 2.8-14.7), RIFLE class I (OR 11.9; 95% CI 5.5-25.7), and RIFLE class F (OR 30; 95% CI 8.1-111.7). Mortality increased with each RIFLE stratification (Normal 1.7%, RIFLE R = 4.1%, RR = 2.5; RIFLE I = 27.6%, RR = 16.2; and RIFLE F = 43

  16. Renal oxygenation and hemodynamics in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhleen; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Bragadottir, Gudrun; Redfors, Bengt; Nordquist, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Summary 1. Acute kidney injury (AKI) puts a major burden on health systems that may arise from multiple initiating insults, including ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiovascular surgery, radio-contrast administration as well as sepsis. Similarly, the incidence and prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to increase with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, an increasing number of AKI patients survive to develop CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD). 2. Although the mechanisms for development of AKI and progression of CKD remain poorly understood, initial impairment of oxygen balance is likely to constitute a common pathway, causing renal tissue hypoxia and ATP starvation that will in turn induce extracellular matrix production, collagen deposition and fibrosis. Thus, possible future strategies for one or both conditions may involve dopamine, loop-diuretics, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors and atrial natriuretic peptide, substances that target kidney oxygen consumption and regulators of renal oxygenation such as nitric oxide and heme oxygenase-1. PMID:23360244

  17. Acute kidney injury: Renal disease in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seller-Pérez, G; Más-Font, S; Pérez-Calvo, C; Villa-Díaz, P; Celaya-López, M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in the ICU frequently requires costly supportive therapies, has high morbidity, and its long-term prognosis is not as good as it has been presumed so far. Consequently, AKI generates a significant burden for the healthcare system. The problem is that AKI lacks an effective treatment and the best approach relies on early secondary prevention. Therefore, to facilitate early diagnosis, a broader definition of AKI should be established, and a marker with more sensitivity and early-detection capacity than serum creatinine - the most common marker of AKI - should be identified. Fortunately, new classification systems (RIFLE, AKIN or KDIGO) have been developed to solve these problems, and the discovery of new biomarkers for kidney injury will hopefully change the way we approach renal patients. As a first step, the concept of renal failure has changed from being a "static" disease to being a "dynamic process" that requires continuous evaluation of kidney function adapted to the reality of the ICU patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute Kidney Injury by Radiographic Contrast Media: Pathogenesis and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faga, Teresa; Pisani, Antonio; Michael, Ashour

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that iodinated radiographic contrast media may cause kidney dysfunction, particularly in patients with preexisting renal impairment associated with diabetes. This dysfunction, when severe, will cause acute renal failure (ARF). We may define contrast-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) as ARF occurring within 24–72 hrs after the intravascular injection of iodinated radiographic contrast media that cannot be attributed to other causes. The mechanisms underlying contrast media nephrotoxicity have not been fully elucidated and may be due to several factors, including renal ischaemia, particularly in the renal medulla, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduction of nitric oxide (NO) production, and tubular epithelial and vascular endothelial injury. However, contrast-induced AKI can be prevented, but in order to do so, we need to know the risk factors. We have reviewed the risk factors for contrast-induced AKI and measures for its prevention, providing a long list of references enabling readers to deeply evaluate them both. PMID:25197639

  19. Renal and urological diseases of the newborn neonatal acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Kirtida

    2014-01-01

    Survival of critically ill neonates in the intensive care unit has improved over the past decades reflecting improvements in obstetric, delivery room and neonatal intensive care, however, morbidity remains significant. Acute kidney injury is a common occurrence in these neonates and despite improved understanding of the pathophysiology and management of acute kidney injury in full term and preterm infants, the mortality remains as high as 61%. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that despite recovery from the acute injury, these infants are at risk for developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease later in life. Emphasis on improving our capability to detect renal insult and injury early, before renal failure occurs, and identification of novel therapeutic agents to prevent and treat acute kidney injury may impact mortality and morbidity. This review focuses on our current knowledge of acute kidney injury in the newborn, approaches to investigating and managing this complication and what future trends in this field may bring.

  20. [Metformin-associated lactic acidosis and acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Paolo; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Maccari, Caterina; Parenti, Elisabetta; Corrado, Silvia; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is recommended as the treatment of choice in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus because of its efficacy, general tolerability and low cost. Recent guidelines have extended the use of metformin to patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) up to stage III. However, in the recent literature, cases of MALA (metformin-associated lactic acidosis) are increasingly reported. MALA is the most dangerous side effect of the drug, with an incidence rate of 2-9 cases per 100000 person-years of exposure. We report on two patients with accidental metformin overdose, severe lactic acidosis and acute kidney injury. In both cases, the usual dose of metformin was inappropriate with respect to the level of kidney dysfunction (CKD stage III). As both patients met the criteria for renal replacement therapy in metformin poisoning, they were treated effectively with sustained low-efficiency dialysis until normalization of serum lactate and bicarbonate values. Clinical status and kidney function improved and both patients could be discharged from the hospital.

  1. Intensity of continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Alicia I; Buamscha, Daniel G; Ciapponi, Agustín

    2016-10-04

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common condition among patients in intensive care units (ICU), and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) is a blood purification technique used to treat the most severe forms of AKI but its effectiveness remains unclear. To assess the effects of different intensities (intensive and less intensive) of CRRT on mortality and recovery of kidney function in critically ill AKI patients. We searched Cochrane Kidney and Transplant's Specialised Register to 9 February 2016 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE; handsearching conference proceedings; and searching the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also searched LILACS to 9 February 2016. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included all patients with AKI in ICU regardless of age, comparing intensive (usually a prescribed dose ≥35 mL/kg/h) versus less intensive CRRT (usually a prescribed dose post-surgical AKI. Based on the current low quality of evidence identified, more intensive CRRT did not demonstrate beneficial effects on mortality or recovery of kidney function in critically ill patients with AKI. There was an increased risk of hypophosphataemia with more intense CRRT. Intensive CRRT reduced the risk of mortality in patients with post-surgical AKI.

  2. Metformin-Associated Acute Kidney Injury and Lactic Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Arroyo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Metformin is the preferred oral antidiabetic agent for type 2 diabetes. Lactic acidosis is described as a rare complication, usually during an acute kidney injury (AKI. Material and Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study of metformin-associated AKI cases during four years. 29 cases were identified. Previous renal function, clinical data, and outcomes were recorded. Results. An episode of acute gastroenteritis precipitated the event in 26 cases. Three developed a septic shock. Three patients died, the only related factor being liver dysfunction. More severe metabolic acidosis hyperkalemia and anemia were associated with higher probabilities of RRT requirement. We could not find any relationship between previous renal dysfunction and the outcome of the AKI. Conclusions. AKI associated to an episode of volume depletion due to gastrointestinal losses is a serious complication in type 2 diabetic patients on metformin. Previous renal dysfunction (mild-to-moderate CKD has no influence on the severity or outcome.

  3. Acute kidney injury from herbal vaginal remedy in Ilorin: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of traditional herbal remedy is very common worldwide, and it is associated with complications such as acute kidney injury. Herbal remedy accounts for 35% of acute kidney injury in Africa. As with orthodox medicines, herbal remedies are administered orally in the majority of cases but other routes such as topical ...

  4. Acute kidney injury in the paediatric intensive care unit: identification by modified RIFLE criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, W F; Chan, Winnie K Y; Miu, T Y

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and outcome of acute kidney injury in paediatric intensive care units using the modified RIFLE score (pRIFLE). Historical cohort study. A paediatric intensive care unit in a regional Hong Kong hospital. PATIENTS; All paediatric patients aged 1 month to 18 years admitted to a local paediatric intensive care unit in the years 2005 to 2007. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES; For every paediatric intensive care unit admission, acute kidney injury was classified according to the pRIFLE criteria ("R" for risk, "I" for injury, "F" for failure, "L" for loss, and "E" for end-stage). Prevalence and outcome of acute kidney injury were therefore categorised according to the pRIFLE staging. A total of 140 such patient admissions constituted the study population. The point prevalence of acute kidney injury in these patients on admission was 46% (n=59), whilst 56% (n=78) endured acute kidney injury at some time during their paediatric intensive care unit stay. Worsening of pRIFLE grading during their intensive care unit admission was observed in 20% of the patients who had no acute kidney injury on admission, in 30% of those who had an initial "R" grade, and in 40% of those who had an initial "I" grade of acute kidney injury. Overall mortality in this cohort was 12%, which was significantly higher among patients with acute kidney injury. Having acute kidney injury of grade "F" on admission to the paediatric intensive care unit was an independent predictor of mortality (hazard ratio=5.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-33.36; P=0.043). Among critically ill paediatric patients, the pRIFLE score serves as a suitable classification of acute kidney injury when stratified according to clinical severity. It also provides prognostic information on mortality and renal outcomes.

  5. Acute Kidney Injury and Renal Replacement Therapy in Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Canver

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in patients with severe burn injury and one of the major causes of death. It has a negative prognostic value and almost always develops in the context of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS induced by sepsis. Over the last 20 years, according to data avaliable, the mortality rate has been reported to reach about 75%. Several definitions of AKI have been used , but nowadays the RIFLE classification is considered the gold standard, enabling a more objective comparison of populations. There are several ways to treat AKI in burn patients, including peritoneal dialysis (PD, intermittent hemodialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. CRRT is generally used in patients in whom intermittent hemodialysis has failed to control hypovolemia, as well as in patients who cannot tolerate intermittent hemodialysis. Additionally, PD is not suitable for patients with burns within the abdominal area. For these reasons, most patients with unstable hemodynamic conditions receive CRRT. In burn patients with acute renal failure the dialytic treatment with continuous renal replacement therapies permitted us to achieve a survival and dialytic adequacy; however, mortality rate is high and related to septic shock and MODS. Despite the wide variation of the analysed burn populations and definitions of AKI, this review clearly showed that AKI remains prevalent and is associated with increased mortality in patients with severe burn injury. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 46-50

  6. Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Finerenone Protects Against Acute Kidney Injury-Mediated Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattenist, Lionel; Lechner, Sebastian M; Messaoudi, Smail; Le Mercier, Alan; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Prince, Sonia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism has shown to be helpful against renal IR consequences; however, the potential benefit of novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as finerenone has to be further explored. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of finerenone to prevent the acute and chronic consequences of ischemic acute kidney injury. For the acute study (24 hours), 18 rats were divided into sham, bilateral renal ischemia of 25 minutes, and rats that received 3 doses of finerenone at 48, 24, and 1 hour before the ischemia. For the chronic study (4 months), 23 rats were divided into sham, rats that underwent 45 minutes of bilateral ischemia, and rats treated with finerenone at days 2 and 1 and 1 hour before IR. We found that after 24 hours of reperfusion, the untreated IR rats presented kidney dysfunction and tubular injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin mRNA levels were increased. In contrast, the rats treated with finerenone displayed normal kidney function and significantly lesser tubular injury and kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin levels. After 4 months, the IR rats developed chronic kidney disease, evidenced by kidney dysfunction, increased proteinuria and renal vascular resistance, tubular dilation, extensive tubule-interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in kidney transforming growth factor-β and collagen-I mRNA. The transition from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease was fully prevented by finerenone. Altogether, our data show that in the rat, finerenone is able to prevent acute kidney injury induced by IR and the chronic and progressive deterioration of kidney function and structure. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis in the tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluyomi O Okunola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity and mortality from acute kidney injury (AKI have remained relatively high over the last six decades. The triad of infections, nephrotoxins and obstetric complications are still major causes of acute kidney injury in the tropics. This retrospective study is a five-year audit of acute renal failure (ARF (or stage 3 AKI in patients requiring hemodialysis at the renal unit of the Department of Medicine of the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. A total of 80 patients with AKI were treated over a five-year period at our center, of which 45 (56.2% were in ARF, i.e. stage 3 AKI requiring hemodialysis. There were 24 males and 21 females. The most common cause of ARF among the patients was sepsis syndrome 16 (35.5%, while pregnancy-related cases accounted for 15 (33.3% and nephrotoxins for 6 (13.3%. Five (33% of the 15 pregnancy-related patients survived, and all were cases of septic abortion. Of the other 10 patients that did not survive, three (30% had post-partum hemorrhage and seven (70% post-partum eclampsia. In all, the mortality rate among our AKI presenting for hemodialysis at our center over a given year period was 28.8%. Majority of these were eclampsia related. The causes of ARF still remain the same in the tropics, eclampsia portends poor prognosis. Concerted efforts should be made at limiting this trend by active preventive services and early recognition of high-risk obstetrics cases.

  8. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of neonatal encephalopathy (NE). The accurate diagnosis of neonatal AKI, irrespective of the cause, relies on suboptimal methods such as identification of rising serum creatinine, decreased urinary output and glomerular filtration rate. Studies of AKI biomarkers in adults and children have shown that biomarkers can improve the early diagnosis of AKI. Hypoxia-ischaemia is the proposed aetiological basis of AKI in both NE and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, there is a paucity of studies examining the role of AKI biomarkers specifically in NE. Urinary cystatin C (CysC), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18, kidney injury molecule-1, liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, serum CysC and serum NGAL all show good ability to predict early AKI in a heterogeneous critically ill neonatal population including infants post-CPB. Moreover, serum and urinary NGAL and urinary CysC are early predictors of AKI secondary to NE. These findings are promising and open up the possibility of biomarkers playing a significant role in the early diagnosis and treatment of NE-related AKI. There is an urgent need to explore the role of AKI biomarkers in infants with NE as establishing the diagnosis of AKI earlier may allow more timely intervention with potential for improving long-term outcome.

  9. Autophagy, Innate Immunity and Tissue Repair in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Duann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Kidney is a vital organ with high energy demands to actively maintain plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis. Among the nephron segments, the renal tubular epithelium is endowed with high mitochondria density for their function in active transport. Acute kidney injury (AKI is an important clinical syndrome and a global public health issue with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapy. AKI results in acute cell death and necrosis of renal tubule epithelial cells accompanied with leakage of tubular fluid and inflammation. The inflammatory immune response triggered by the tubular cell death, mitochondrial damage, associative oxidative stress, and the release of many tissue damage factors have been identified as key elements driving the pathophysiology of AKI. Autophagy, the cellular mechanism that removes damaged organelles via lysosome-mediated degradation, had been proposed to be renoprotective. An in-depth understanding of the intricate interplay between autophagy and innate immune response, and their roles in AKI pathology could lead to novel therapies in AKI. This review addresses the current pathophysiology of AKI in aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction, innate immunity, and molecular mechanisms of autophagy. Recent advances in renal tissue regeneration and potential therapeutic interventions are also discussed.

  10. Acute kidney injury in a teaching hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Balushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the incidence, etiology and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI at a teaching hospital in Oman, we studied all adult cases that developed AKI at our hospital from July 2006 to June 2007. Data from the hospital information system (HIS for all adult admissions in the wards and intensive care units for the study period were obtained, and included baseline serum creatinine, serum creatinine on the day of diagnosis, peak serum creatinine, urine output in the last six and 12 hours at the time of diagnosis, etiology of acute renal failure, presence of any co-morbid conditions, and renal replacement therapy and outcome. Of the 19,738 adult admissions, there were 108 episodes of AKI in 100 patients. The incidence of acute renal failure was 0.54%. The etiology of AKI was pre-renal in 55 (50.9%, obstructive in 5 (4.6% and acute tubular necrosis (ATN in the remaining 48 (44.4% patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT was required in 24.1% of cases. Of the patients who developed AKI, 36 (33.33% died during same hospital admission, 37 (34.26% recovered to discharge with no renal impairment, 32 (29.63% recovered with residual renal impairment and 2 (1.85% recovered with dialysis dependence.

  11. Pharmacological management of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Sorenson, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are seen more frequently in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as advances in supportive care improve the survival of critically ill infants as well as those with severe, congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies. Many aspects of the infant's care, including fluid balance, electrolyte and mineral homeostasis, acid-base balance, and growth and nutrition require close monitoring by and collaboration among neonatologists, nephrologists, dieticians, and pharmacologists. This educational review summarizes the therapies widely used for neonates with AKI and CKD. Use of these therapies is extrapolated from data in older children and adults or based on clinical experience and case series. There is a critical need for more research on the use of therapies in infants with kidney disease as well as for the development of drug delivery systems and preparations scaled more appropriately for these small patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinetic Glomerular Filtration Rate Estimation Compared With Other Formulas for Evaluating Acute Kidney Injury Stage Early After Kidney Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Reza; Eshraghi, Hamid; Esmailpour, Maryam; Hassankhani, Golnaz Ghayyem

    2017-02-01

    Kinetic glomerular filtration rate estimation may have more power and versatility than the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or Cockcroft-Gault formula for evaluating kidney function when plasma creatinine fluctuates rapidly. After kidney donation, glomerular filtration rate rapidly fluctuates in otherwise healthy patients. We compared 3 formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate: kinetic, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, and Cockcroft-Gault, for determining stages of acute kidney injury early after kidney donation. In 42 living kidney donors, we measured serum creatinine, cystatin C, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and glomerular filtration rates before uninephrectomy and 3 days afterward. To estimate glomerular filtration rate, we used Cockcroft-Gault, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease, and kinetic equations. We sought the most accurate formula for staging acute kidney injury according to the risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage criteria. The kinetic glomerular filtration rate model found more cases of stage 3 acute kidney injury than did the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or Cockcroft-Gault formula. Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the kinetic glomerular filtration rate model had more sensitivity and specificity than the Cockroft-Gault formula for discriminating among risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage criteria stages of acute kidney injury, based on serum creatinine changes. On day 2 after donation, a more sensitive marker with a shorter half-life (serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) was more significantly correlated with kinetic glomerular filtration rate estimation. The kinetic glomerular filtration rate model was able to discriminate stages of acute kidney injury early after kidney donation according to risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage criteria better than the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease or Cockcroft-Gault formulas. The kinetic model detected failure

  13. Predictors of Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Koziolek

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Criteria that may guide early renal replacement therapy (RRT initiation in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI currently do not exist. Methods: In 120 consecutive patients with AKI, clinical and laboratory data were analyzed on admittance. The prognostic power of those parameters which were significantly different between the two groups was analyzed by receiver operator characteristic curves and by leave-1-out cross validation. Results: Six parameters (urine albumin, plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, daily urine output, fluid balance and plasma sodium were combined in a logistic regression model that estimates the probability that a particular patient will need RRT. Additionally, a second model without daily urine output was established. Both models yielded a higher accuracy (89 and 88% correct classification rate, respectively than the best single parameter, cystatin C (correct classification rate 74%. Conclusions: The combined models may help to better predict the necessity of RRT using clinical and routine laboratory data in patients with AKI.

  14. Current practice of conventional intermittent hemodialysis for acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Schiffl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional intermittent hemodialysis (IHD represents a mainstay of supportive care of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. However, a number of fundamental questions regarding the optimal management of IHD remain unanswered after more than six decades of renal replacement therapy (RRT. This review summarizes current evidence regarding the timing of initiation of intermittent hemodialysis, the comparative outcomes (mortality and recovery of renal function, the prescription of the intensity of this therapy and discontinuation of dialysis. The way conventional IHD is performed has an impact on the outcome of sick patients with AKI. The value of regular education and training of those who provide IHD cannot be emphasized enough. However, we must be realistic in our expectations that no mode of RRT per se will substantially alter the excessive mortality of critically ill-patients with AKI.

  15. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Case

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI in the intensive care unit (ICU has increased during the past decade due to increased acuity as well as increased recognition. Early epidemiology studies were confounded by erratic definitions of AKI until recent consensus guidelines (RIFLE and AKIN standardized its definition. This paper discusses the incidence of AKI in the ICU with focuses on specific patient populations. The overall incidence of AKI in ICU patients ranges from 20% to 50% with lower incidence seen in elective surgical patients and higher incidence in sepsis patients. The incidence of contrast-induced AKI is less (11.5%–19% of all admissions than seen in the ICU population at large. AKI represents a significant risk factor for mortality and can be associated with mortality greater than 50%.

  16. Acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Giuseppe; Presta, Piera; Saturno, Laura; Fuiano, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery ranges from 7.7% to 28.1% in different studies, probably in relation to the criteria adopted to define AKI. AKI markedly increases mortality risk. However, despite the development of less invasive techniques, cardiac surgery remains the first option in many conditions such as severe coronary artery disease, valve diseases and complex interventions. The risk of postsurgery AKI can be reduced by adopting less invasive approaches, such as off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting or transcatheter aortic valve implantation, but these options cannot be employed in all cases. Thus, since traditional cardiac surgery remains the only option in many cases, it is important to adopt strategies helping the clinician to prevent AKI or diagnose it early. Old age, preprocedural chronic kidney disease, obesity, some comorbidities, wide pulse pressure and some pharmacological regimens represent risk factors for postsurgery AKI and mortality. Important intraoperative factor are use and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative efforts should be aimed toward maximizing cardiac output, avoiding drugs vasoconstricting the renal artery, providing adequate crystalloid infusion and alkalinizing urine. Fluid management should not be based on the measurements for cardiac filling pressures, which are mostly unreliable in these patients. Novel biomarkers such as cystatin C, kidney injury molecule-1 and human neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin have been found to change earlier than creatinine, particularly when measured in combination, so their use in clinical practice can facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of AKI. The occurrence of oliguria despite adequate cardiovascular therapy can be managed with furosemide, possibly using continuous infusion, or renal replacement therapy.

  17. An unusual case of reversible acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathina, Gangadhar; Yadla, Manjusha; Burri, Srikanth; Enganti, Rama; Prasad Ch, Rajendra; Deshpande, Pradeep; Ch, Ramesh; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine dioxide is a commonly used water disinfectant. Toxicity of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites is rare. In experimental studies, it was shown that acute and chronic toxicity were associated with insignificant hematological changes. Acute kidney injury due to chlorine dioxide was not reported. Two cases of renal toxicity due to its metabolites, chlorate and chlorite were reported. Herein, we report a case of chlorine dioxide poisoning presenting with acute kidney injury.

  18. Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Pathophysiology and Clinical Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a clinical syndrome that complicates the course and worsens the outcome in a significant number of hospitalised patients. Recent advances in clinical and basic research will help with a more accurate definition of this syndrome and in the elucidation of its pathogenesis. With this knowledge we will be able to conduct more accurate epidemiologic studies in an effort to gain a better understanding of the impact of this syndrome. AKI is a syndrome that rarely has a sole and distinct pathophysiology. Recent evidence, in both basic science and clinical research, is beginning to change our view for AKI from a single organ failure syndrome to a syndrome where the kidney plays an active role in the progress of multi-organ dysfunction. Accurate and prompt recognition of AKI and better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the various clinical phenotypes are of great importance to research for effective therapeutic interventions. In this review we provide the most recent updates in the definition, epidemiology and pathophysiology of AKI. PMID:28303073

  19. Are diuretics harmful in the management of acute kidney injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, A Ahsan; Mohandas, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    To assess the role of diuretics in acute kidney injury (AKI) and their effectiveness in preventing AKI, achieving fluid balance, and decreasing progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diuretics are associated with increased risk for AKI. The theoretical advantage of diuretic-induced preservation of renal medullary oxygenation to prevent AKI has not been proven. A higher cumulative diuretic dose during the dialysis period can cause hypotension and increase mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Data on the use of forced euvolemic diuresis to prevent AKI remains controversial. Positive fluid balance has emerged as an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. Post-AKI furosemide dose had a favorable effect on mortality due in part to the reduction of positive fluid balance. There are exciting experimental data suggesting that spironolactone may prevent AKI once an ischemic insult has occurred and thus prevent the progression to CKD. Diuretics are ineffective and even detrimental in the prevention and treatment of AKI, and neither shorten the duration of AKI, nor reduce the need for renal replacement therapy. Diuretics have an important role in volume management in AKI, but they are not recommended for the prevention of AKI. There is increased emphasis on the prevention of progression of AKI to CKD.

  20. Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Definition, Epidemiology, and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix G. Meinel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI is commonly defined as a decline in kidney function occurring in a narrow time window after administration of iodinated contrast material. The incidence of AKI after contrast material administration greatly depends on the specific definition and cutoff values used. Although self-limiting in most cases, postcontrast AKI carries a risk of more permanent renal insufficiency, dialysis, and death. The risk of AKI from contrast material, in particular when administered intravenously for contrast-enhanced CT, has been exaggerated by older, noncontrolled studies due to background fluctuations in renal function. More recent evidence from controlled studies suggests that the risk is likely nonexistent in patients with normal renal function, but there may be a risk in patients with renal insufficiency. However, even in this patient population, the risk of CI-AKI is probably much smaller than traditionally assumed. Since volume expansion is the only preventive strategy with a convincing evidence base, liberal hydration should be encouraged to further minimize the risk. The benefits of the diagnostic information gained from contrast-enhanced examinations will still need to be balanced with the potential risk of CI-AKI for the individual patient and clinical scenario.

  1. Acute kidney injury in patients with pulmonary embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fu, Chung-Ming; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Shao-Wei; Chang, Su-Wei; Mao, Chun-Tai; Tian, Ya-Chung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chen, Tien-Hsing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI) is overlooked in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). Risk factors for and long-term outcomes of this complication remain unknown. This study evaluated the predictors and prognosis of AKI in patients with PE. This retrospective cohort study used Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We enrolled a total of 7588 patients who were admitted to a hospital for PE from January1997 to December 2011 and administered anticoagulation or thrombolytic agents. All demographic data, risk factors, and outcomes were analyzed. AKI was diagnosed in 372 (4.9%) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed pre-existing chronic kidney disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, massive PE, anemia, and sepsis as independent risk factors for AKI. In the long-term follow-up, the survival rate was similar in the AKI and non-AKI groups. Careful risk factor screening and intensive intervention in patients with AKI might yield outcomes similar to those in patients without AKI. PMID:28248851

  2. Does Furosemide Increase Oxidative Stress in Acute Kidney Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbert, Benjamin I; Ho, Kwok M; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A; Corcoran, Tomas B; Morgan, David J; Pavey, Warren; Mas, Emilie; Barden, Anne E; Mori, Trevor A

    2017-02-10

    Furosemide, a loop diuretic, is used to increase urine output in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). It remains uncertain whether the benefits of furosemide in AKI outweigh its potential harms. We investigated if furosemide influenced oxidative stress in 30 critically ill patients with AKI by measuring changes in F 2 -isoprostanes (F 2 -IsoPs), markers of in vivo oxidative stress, in plasma and urine following intravenous furosemide. Urine F 2 -IsoPs were higher in sepsis (p = 0.001) and increased in proportion to urine furosemide (p = 0.001). The furosemide-induced increase in urine F 2 -IsoPs differed depending on AKI severity (p Furosemide had no effect on plasma F 2 -IsoPs. We demonstrate for the first time that furosemide increases renal oxidative stress in AKI and find that patients with the most severe AKI-to whom the largest doses are likely to be administered-showed the greatest increase in oxidative stress. These findings lead to the hypothesis that the common practice of administering high-dose furosemide to convert oliguric to nonoliguric AKI may induce harmful oxidative stress in the kidneys, and an adequately powered, randomized controlled trial is required to determine if clinical benefits of this dosing strategy justify its potential harms. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 221-226.

  3. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury: definition, epidemiology, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Felix G; De Cecco, Carlo N; Schoepf, U Joseph; Katzberg, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is commonly defined as a decline in kidney function occurring in a narrow time window after administration of iodinated contrast material. The incidence of AKI after contrast material administration greatly depends on the specific definition and cutoff values used. Although self-limiting in most cases, postcontrast AKI carries a risk of more permanent renal insufficiency, dialysis, and death. The risk of AKI from contrast material, in particular when administered intravenously for contrast-enhanced CT, has been exaggerated by older, noncontrolled studies due to background fluctuations in renal function. More recent evidence from controlled studies suggests that the risk is likely nonexistent in patients with normal renal function, but there may be a risk in patients with renal insufficiency. However, even in this patient population, the risk of CI-AKI is probably much smaller than traditionally assumed. Since volume expansion is the only preventive strategy with a convincing evidence base, liberal hydration should be encouraged to further minimize the risk. The benefits of the diagnostic information gained from contrast-enhanced examinations will still need to be balanced with the potential risk of CI-AKI for the individual patient and clinical scenario.

  4. B-type natriuretic peptide and risk of acute kidney injury in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltrasio, Marco; Cabiati, Angelo; Milazzo, Valentina; Rubino, Mara; De Metrio, Monica; Discacciati, Andrea; Rumi, Paola; Marana, Ivana; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2014-03-01

    To investigate whether admission B-type natriuretic peptide levels predict the development of acute kidney injury in acute coronary syndromes. Prospective study. Single-center study, 13-bed intensive cardiac care unit at a University Cardiological Center. Six-hundred thirty-nine acute coronary syndromes patients undergoing emergency and urgent percutaneous coronary intervention. None. We measured B-type natriuretic peptide at hospital admission in acute coronary syndromes patients (55% ST-elevation myocardial infarction and 45% non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction). Acute kidney injury was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria: stage 1 was defined as a serum creatinine increase greater than or equal to 0.3 mg/dL from baseline; stage 2 as a serum creatinine increase greater than two- to three-fold from baseline; stage 3 as a serum creatinine increase greater than three-fold from baseline, or greater than or equal to 4.0 mg/dL with an acute increase greater than 0.5 mg/dL, or need for renal replacement therapy. Acute kidney injury was developed in 85 patients (13%) and had a higher in-hospital mortality than patients without acute kidney injury (14% vs 1%; p < 0.001). B-type natriuretic peptide levels were higher in acute kidney injury patients than in those without acute kidney injury (264 [112-957] vs 98 [44-271] pg/mL; p < 0.001) and showed a significant gradient according to acute kidney injury severity (224 [96-660] pg/mL in stage 1 and 939 [124-1,650] pg/mL in stage 2-3 acute kidney injury; p < 0.001). The risk of developing acute kidney injury increased in parallel with B-type natriuretic peptide quartiles (5%, 9%, 15%, and 24%, respectively; p < 0.001). When B-type natriuretic peptide was evaluated, in terms of capacity to predict acute kidney injury, the area under the curve was 0.702 (95% CI, 0.642-0.762). In patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes, B-type natriuretic peptide levels measured at admission are

  5. Current trends in the management of acute kidney injury in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-06

    Feb 6, 2013 ... oped by the Kidney Disease: Im- proving Global Outcomes. (KDIGO). Despite these ... (GFR). The kidneys are intrinsically normal with no evidence of renal parenchyma damage and prerenal .... Table 4: Protein biomarkers for early detection of acute kidney injury. Cystatin C is a protein secreted by all ...

  6. Urinary Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1 in Early Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury in Pediatric Critically Ill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Lestari Paramastuty

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI often associated with a high hospital morbi-mortality rate in the intensive care unit patients. Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, has many characteristics of ideal biomarker for kidney injury. The aim of this study was to compared the temporal pattern of elevation urinary KIM-1 level following critically ill children with SCr as standart biomarker of AKI. Prospective analytic observational study was conducted during October to March 2014 in the Saiful Anwar General Hospital and Physiology Laboratory Brawijaya University. There were 13 critically ill as subjects. SCr and KIM-1 levels from all subjects were measured three times ( at admission, after 1st and 6th hour. Subjects were devided into AKI - non-AKI groups by SCr level and survivor - non survivor group at the and of the observations. Results showed that there were significantly increased levels of KIM-1 in the AKI and non-AKI and survivor-non survivor group at time point. However, we found that delta KIM-1 at time point increased significant in non AKI group and survivor group. KIM-1 at admission can diagnosed AKI in critically ill children. We conclude that urinary KIM-1 is a sensitive non-invasive biomarker to diagnosed acute kidney injury in critically ill children. Increase level of KIM-1 by time shows protective and good outcome in critically ill children.

  7. Increased incidence of acute kidney injury with aprotinin use during cardiac surgery detected with urinary NGAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagener, G.; Gubitosa, G.; Wang, S.

    2008-01-01

    if the use of aprotinin is associated with an increased incidence of acute kidney injury and increased levels of urinary NGAL. METHODS: In this prospective, observational study 369 patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled. 205 patients received aprotinin and 164 received epsilon amino-caproic acid......: 51 of 205 patients (25%) who received aprotinin developed acute kidney injury compared to 19 of 164 patients (12%) who received epsilon amino-caproic acid (p = 0.0013). Aprotinin use was associated with a two-fold higher risk of acute kidney injury when adjusted for potential confounders (age...

  8. Acute kidney injury after percutaneous nephrolithotomy for stones in solitary kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nahas, Ahmed R; Taha, Diaa-Eldin; Ali, Hussien M; Elshal, Ahmed M; Zahran, Mohamed H; El-Tabey, Nasr A; El-Assmy, Ahmed M; Harraz, Ahmed M; Moawad, Hazem E; Othman, Mahmoud M

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report the incidence, severity, outcome and risk factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) in solitary kidneys. The study included consecutive adult patients who underwent PNL for treatment of calculi in a solitary kidney between May 2012 and July 2015. Patients with congenital renal anomalies or with stages 4 and 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) were excluded. Serum creatinine levels were measured the day before PNL, daily after PNL for 2-5 days and after 3 months. AKI was depicted according to changes in early postoperative serum creatinine levels and its severity was determined based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) classification. The outcome of AKI was evaluated after 3 months by changes in the stage of CKD. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted to determine risk factors for developing AKI. The study included 100 patients (62 males) with a mean ± SD age of 50 ± 11.7 years. Complications were reported for 27 patients. AKI developed in 25 patients; at the 3 month follow-up, 23 of them (92%) had completely recovered from AKI and two (8%) had developed stage 4 CKD. Independent risk factors for developing AKI were multiple PNL tracts and postoperative ureteric obstruction (relative risks were 14 and 22, respectively). The incidence of AKI was 25% after PNL for a solitary kidney. The likelihood of renal function recovery was 92%. Multiple PNL tracts and postoperative ureteric obstruction were risk factors for developing AKI.

  9. Acute kidney injury in AIDS: frequency, RIFLE classification and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.B. Silva Júnior

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the characteristics of acute kidney injury (AKI in AIDS patients and the value of RIFLE classification for predicting outcome. The study was conducted on AIDS patients admitted to an infectious diseases hospital inBrazil. The patients with AKI were classified according to the RIFLE classification: R (risk, I (injury, F (failure, L (loss, and E (end-stage renal disease. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the factors associated with AKI. A total of 532 patients with a mean age of 35 ± 8.5 years were included in this study. AKI was observed in 37% of the cases. Patients were classified as "R" (18%, "I" (7.7% and "F" (11%. Independent risk factors for AKI were thrombocytopenia (OR = 2.9, 95%CI = 1.5-5.6, P < 0.001 and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST (OR = 3.5, 95%CI = 1.8-6.6, P < 0.001. General mortality was 25.7% and was higher among patients with AKI (40.2 vs17%, P < 0.001. AKI was associated with death and mortality increased according to RIFLE classification - "R" (OR 2.4, "I" (OR 3.0 and "F" (OR 5.1, P < 0.001. AKI is a frequent complication in AIDS patients, which is associated with increased mortality. RIFLE classification is an important indicator of poor outcome for AIDS patients.

  10. Relation between acute kidney injury and pregnancy-related factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monchai Siribamrungwong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious problem during pregnancy. Once occurred, it brings about devastating maternal and fetal outcomes. Among developed nations, the trend of pregnancy-related AKI (PRAKI is on a decline due to the advances in obstetrics care and the legality of abortion. On the contrary, this situation remains one of the major health problems in the developing countries. Though some improvements have been observed, PRAKI still causes high maternal morbidity and mortality, leading to fetal losses. This article aims to review current studies with regards to obstetrics related AKI. Most of the studies in this review were carried out in observational, both prospective and retrospective, studies. Results demonstrated a variety of major PRAKI causes such as hypertensive disorders in pregnancy, obstetric hemorrhage, sepsis, thrombotic microangiopathy and acute fatty liver in pregnancy. Aside from awareness of the etiologies of PRAKI, understanding the physiological renal adaptation during pregnancy is crucial for early detection, diagnosis, and proper management to prevent the obstetric complications.

  11. Acute Kidney Injury and Atypical Features during Pediatric Poststreptococcal Glomerulonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M. Ayoob

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common acute glomerulonephritis in children is poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN usually occurring between 3 and 12 years old. Hypertension and gross hematuria are common presenting symptoms. Most PSGN patients do not experience complications, but rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hypertensive encephalopathy have been reported. This paper reports 17 patients seen in 1 year for PSGN including 4 with atypical PSGN, at a pediatric tertiary care center. Seventeen children (11 males, mean age of 8 years, were analyzed. Ninety-four percent had elevated serum BUN levels and decreased GFR. Four of the hospitalized patients had complex presentations that included AKI along with positive ANA or ANCAs. Three patients required renal replacement therapy and two were thrombocytopenic. PSGN usually does not occur as a severe nephritis. Over the 12-month study period, 17 cases associated with low serum albumin in 53%, acute kidney injury in 94%, and thrombocytopenia in 18% were treated. The presentation of PSGN may be severe and in a small subset have associations similar to SLE nephritis findings including AKI, positive ANA, and hematological anomalies.

  12. Thrombotic microangiopathies and acute kidney injury induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-29

    Jul 29, 2013 ... injury shortly after surgical termination of pregnancy. Histological examination of their kidneys revealed ... associated with variable signs of organ injury due to platelet thrombi in the microcirculation.[1,2] Several ... schistocytes in the peripheral blood smear. Case 2. A 38‑year‑old woman was admitted to our ...

  13. Acute Kidney Injury After Efavirenz/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate/Emtricitabine (Atripla) Overdose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, T.; Burger, D.M.; Visschers, M.J.; Schippers, J.; Lashof, A.O.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a patient with acute renal failure and irreversible kidney damage after an overdose with the fixed dose combination of efavirenz/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine (Atripla). The acute kidney injury was most probably caused by tenofovir. Efavirenz and emtricitabine seemed

  14. IL-34 mediates acute kidney injury and worsens subsequent chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jea-Hyun; Zeng, Rui; Weinmann-Menke, Julia; Valerius, M. Todd; Wada, Yukihiro; Ajay, Amrendra K.; Colonna, Marco; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (Mø) are integral in ischemia/reperfusion injury–incited (I/R-incited) acute kidney injury (AKI) that leads to fibrosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD). IL-34 and CSF-1 share a receptor (c-FMS), and both cytokines mediate Mø survival and proliferation but also have distinct features. CSF-1 is central to kidney repair and destruction. We tested the hypothesis that IL-34–dependent, Mø-mediated mechanisms promote persistent ischemia-incited AKI that worsens subsequent CKD. In renal I/R, the time-related magnitude of Mø-mediated AKI and subsequent CKD were markedly reduced in IL-34–deficient mice compared with controls. IL-34, c-FMS, and a second IL-34 receptor, protein-tyrosine phosphatase ζ (PTP-ζ) were upregulated in the kidney after I/R. IL-34 was generated by tubular epithelial cells (TECs) and promoted Mø-mediated TEC destruction during AKI that worsened subsequent CKD via 2 distinct mechanisms: enhanced intrarenal Mø proliferation and elevated BM myeloid cell proliferation, which increases circulating monocytes that are drawn into the kidney by chemokines. CSF-1 expression in TECs did not compensate for IL-34 deficiency. In patients, kidney transplants subject to I/R expressed IL-34, c-FMS, and PTP−ζ in TECs during AKI that increased with advancing injury. Moreover, IL-34 expression increased, along with more enduring ischemia in donor kidneys. In conclusion, IL-34-dependent, Mø-mediated, CSF-1 nonredundant mechanisms promote persistent ischemia-incited AKI that worsens subsequent CKD. PMID:26121749

  15. Acute kidney injury in symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Milena; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Zgraggen, Lorenzo; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Kottanattu, Lisa; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2017-06-01

    Textbooks and reviews do not mention the association of symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis with acute kidney injury in subjects without immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. Stimulated by our experience with two cases, we performed a review of the literature. The literature documents 38 cases (26 male and 12 female individuals ranging in age from 0.3 to 51, median 18 years) of symptomatic primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis complicated by acute kidney injury: 27 acute interstitial nephritides, 1 jaundice-associated nephropathy, 7 myositides and 3 hemolytic uremic syndromes. Acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy was observed in 18 (47%) cases. Acute kidney injury did not resolve in one patient with acute interstitial nephritis. Two patients died because of systemic complications. The remaining 35 cases fully recovered. In individuals with acute symptomatic Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis, a relevant kidney injury is rare but the outcome potentially fatal. It results from interstitial nephritis, myositis-associated acute kidney injury, hemolytic uremic syndrome or jaundice-associated nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute Kidney Injury as a Risk Factor for Delirium and Coma during Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D; Fissell, William H; Tripp, Christina M; Blume, Jeffrey D; Wilson, Matthew D; Clark, Amanda J; Vincz, Andrew J; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P; Girard, Timothy D

    2017-06-15

    Acute kidney injury may contribute to distant organ dysfunction. Few studies have examined kidney injury as a risk factor for delirium and coma. To examine whether acute kidney injury is associated with delirium and coma in critically ill adults. In a prospective cohort study of intensive care unit patients with respiratory failure and/or shock, we examined the association between acute kidney injury and daily mental status using multinomial transition models adjusting for demographics, nonrenal organ failure, sepsis, prior mental status, and sedative exposure. Acute kidney injury was characterized daily using the difference between baseline and peak serum creatinine and staged according to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Mental status (normal vs. delirium vs. coma) was assessed daily with the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale. Among 466 patients, stage 2 acute kidney injury was a risk factor for delirium (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-2.26) and coma (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.25-3.34) as was stage 3 injury (OR for delirium, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.57-4.16) (OR for coma, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.85-6.03). Daily peak serum creatinine (adjusted for baseline) values were also associated with delirium (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.18-1.55) and coma (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.20-1.74). Renal replacement therapy modified the association between stage 3 acute kidney injury and daily peak serum creatinine and both delirium and coma. Acute kidney injury is a risk factor for delirium and coma during critical illness.

  17. Acute Kidney Injury: It's not just the 'big' burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, L A; Wilson, S; Walker, R G; Singer, Y; Cleland, H

    2017-11-16

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) complicates the management of at least 25% of patients with severe burns and is associated with long term complications. Most research focuses on the patients with more severe burns, and whether the same factors are associated with the development of AKI in patients with burns between 10 and 19% total body surface area (TBSA) is unknown. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of, and factors associated with, the development of AKI in patients with%TBSA≥10, as well as the relationship with hospital metrics such as length of stay (LOS). Retrospective medical record review of consecutive burns patients admitted to The Alfred Hospital, the major adult burns centre in Victoria, Australia. Demographic and injury details were recorded. Factors associated with AKI were determined using multiple logistic regression. Between 2010 and June 2014, 300 patients were admitted with burn injury and data on 267 patients was available for analysis. Median age was 54.5 years with 78% being male. Median%TBSA was 15 (IQR 12, 20). The AKI incidence, as measured by the RIFLE criteria, was 22.5%, including 15% (27/184) in patients with%TBSA 10-19. Factors associated with AKI included increasing age and%TBSA (OR 1.05 paccounting for confounding factors, the probability of discharge from hospital in Non-AKI group was greater than for the AKI patients at all time points (P<0.001). This is the first study to show an association between patients with%TBSA 10-19 and AKI. Given the association between AKI and complications, prospective research is needed to further understand AKI in burns with the aim of risk reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Postpartum acute kidney injury: a review of 99 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswarappa, Mahesh; Madhyastha, P Rakesh; Puri, Sonika; Varma, Vijay; Bhandari, Aneesh; Chennabassappa, Gurudev

    2016-07-01

    Postpartum acute kidney injury (PPAKI) constitutes an important cause of obstetric AKI. It is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality in developing nations. The aim of this study is to survey the etiology and outcomes of PPAKI in a tertiary care Indian hospital. Ninety-nine patients, without prior comorbidities, treated for PPAKI, between 2005-2014 at M.S. Ramaiah Medical College, were included for analysis in this retrospective, observational study. AKI was analyzed in terms of maximal stage of renal injury attained as per RIFLE criteria. Outcomes included requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternal and fetal outcomes. PPAKI constituted 60% of all obstetric AKI cases. Median maternal age was 23 years and 52% of patients were primigravidas. Mean serum creatinine was 4.1 mg/dL. Failure (33%) and injury (31%) were the major categories as per RIFLE criteria. Thirty-nine percent of cases required RRT. Sepsis, particularly puerperal sepsis, was the leading causes of PPAKI (75% of cases) and maternal mortality (94% of deaths). Maternal and fetal mortality were 19% and 22% respectively. The incidence of cortical necrosis was 10.3%. Three patients required long-term RRT. In conclusion, consistent with other Indian literature, we report a high incidence of PPAKI. We found incremental mortality on moving from "Risk" to "Failure" category of RIFLE. PPAKI was associated with high maternal and fetal mortality with sepsis being the leading cause. Our study highlights the need for provision of better quality of maternal care and fetal monitoring to decrease mortality associated with PPAKI in developing countries.

  19. Acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting: assessment using RIFLE and AKIN criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, Vinicius José da Silva; Matias, Maryanne Miranda; Brito, Dyego José de Araújo; Figueiredo Neto, José Albuquerque de; Coutinho, Léa Barroso; Rodrigues, Rayssa Fiterman; Mendes, Vinícius Giuliano Gonçalves; Gaspar, Shirlyne Fabianni Dias

    2013-06-01

    To compare the RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage Renal Failure) and AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) criteria for diagnosis of acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting. Retrospective cohort. 169 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting from January 2007 through December 2008 were analyzed. Information was entered into a database and analyzed using STATA 9.0. Patients' mean age was 63.43 1 9.01 years old. Predominantly male patients (66.86%) were studied. Acute Kidney Injury was present in 33.14% by AKIN and in 29.59% by RIFLE. Hemodialysis was required by 3.57% and 4.0% of the patients when AKIN and RIFLE were applied respectively. There was 4.0% and 3.57% mortality of patients with Acute Kidney Injury according to the RIFLE and AKIN criteria, respectively. In 88.76% of the cases, there was good agreement between the two methods in the detection (kappa=0.7380) and stratification (kappa=0.7515) of Acute Kidney Injury. This study showed that the RIFLE and AKIN criteria have a good agreement in the detection and stratification of acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting.

  20. Acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting: assessment using RIFLE and AKIN criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius José da Silva Nina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage Renal Failure and AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for diagnosis of acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS: Retrospective cohort. 169 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting from January 2007 through December 2008 were analyzed. Information was entered into a database and analyzed using STATA 9.0. RESULTS: Patients' mean age was 63.43 1 9.01 years old. Predominantly male patients (66.86% were studied. Acute Kidney Injury was present in 33.14% by AKIN and in 29.59% by RIFLE. Hemodialysis was required by 3.57% and 4.0% of the patients when AKIN and RIFLE were applied respectively. There was 4.0% and 3.57% mortality of patients with Acute Kidney Injury according to the RIFLE and AKIN criteria, respectively. In 88.76% of the cases, there was good agreement between the two methods in the detection (kappa=0.7380 and stratification (kappa=0.7515 of Acute Kidney Injury. CONCLUSION: This study showed that the RIFLE and AKIN criteria have a good agreement in the detection and stratification of acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting.

  1. Antioxidant protection of statins in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele do Nascimento Santos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Evaluating the effect of preconditioning with simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis. Method Male adult Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: SHAM (control; SHAM+Statin (0.5 mg/kg simvastatin, orally; Sepsis (cecal puncture ligation – CPL; Sepsis+Statin. Physiological parameters, peritoneal fluid culture, renal function, oxidative metabolites, severity of acute kidney injury and animal survival were evaluated. Results The treatment with simvastatin in induced sepsis showed elevation of creatinine clearance with attenuation of generation of oxidative metabolites, lower severity of acute kidney injury and reduced mortality. Conclusion This investigation confirmed the renoprotection with antioxidant principle of the simvastatin in acute kidney injury induced by sepsis in an experimental model.

  2. Risk prediction models for acute kidney injury following major noncardiac surgery: systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Todd; Quan, Samuel; Cheema, Kim; Zarnke, Kelly; Quinn, Rob; de Koning, Lawrence; Dixon, Elijah; Pannu, Neesh; James, Matthew T

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication of major noncardiac surgery. Risk prediction models for AKI following noncardiac surgery may be useful for identifying high-risk patients to target with prevention strategies...

  3. Acute kidney injury is independently associated with higher mortality after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Jensen, Mathias E; Nilsson, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery and its association with mortality in a patient population receiving ibuprofen and gentamicin perioperatively. DESIGN: Retrospective study with Cox regression analysis to control for possible preoperative......, previous nephrectomy, preoperative sCr >2.26 mg/dL and selective cerebral perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass were used as exclusion criteria. Acute kidney injury was defined, using the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Six hundred eight patients were included in the study. Mean age was 68.......2 ± 9.7 years, and 81% were males. Acute kidney injury was seen in 28.1% of the patients. Overall mortality at one year was 7% and 3% in the no-AKI group. At one year, mortality was 15% in patients with AKIN stage 1 and AKIN stage 2 compared to 70% in AKIN stage 3. A hazard ratio of 2.34 (95% CI: 1...

  4. Predicting Acute Kidney Injury Following Mitral Valve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Shao-Wei; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Wu, Victor Chien-Chia; Lin, Pyng-Jing; Tsai, Feng-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is associated with short-term and long-term adverse outcomes. Novel biomarkers have been identified for the early detection of AKI; however, examining these in every patient who undergoes cardiac surgery is prohibitively expensive. Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) and Age, Creatinine, and Ejection Fraction (ACEF) scores have been proven to predict mortality in bypass surgery. The aim of this study was to determine whether these scores can be used to predict AKI after mitral valve repair. Between January 2010 and December 2013, 196 patients who underwent mitral valve repair were enrolled. The clinical characteristics, outcomes, and scores of prognostic models were collected. The primary outcome was postoperative AKI, defined using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome 2012 clinical practice guidelines for AKI. A total of 76 patients (38.7%) developed postoperative AKI. The STS renal failure (AUROC: 0.797, P < .001) and ACEF scores (AUROC: 0.758, P < .001) are both satisfactory tools for predicting all AKI. The STS renal failure score exhibited superior accuracy compared with the ACEF score in predicting AKI stage 2 and 3. The overall accuracy of both scores was similar for all AKI and AKI stage 2 and 3 when the cut-off points of the STS renal failure and ACEF scores were 2.2 and 1.1, respectively. In conclusion, the STS renal failure score can be used to accurately predict stage 2 and 3 AKI after mitral valve repair. The ACEF score is a simple tool with satisfactory power in screening patients at risk of all AKI stages. Additional studies can aim to determine the clinical implications of combining preoperative risk stratification and novel biomarkers.

  5. R1 autonomic nervous system in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rapid loss of kidney function resulting in accumulation of end metabolic products and associated abnormalities in fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis. The pathophysiology of AKI is complex and multifactorial involving numerous vascular, tubular and inflammatory pathways. Neurohumoral activation with heightened activity of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system play a critical role in this scenario. Inflammation and/or local renal ischaemia are underlying mechanisms triggering renal tissue hypoxia and resultant renal microcirculation dysfunction; a common feature of AKI occurring in numerous clinical conditions leading to a high morbidity and mortality rate. The contribution of renal nerves to the pathogenesis of AKI has been extensively demonstrated in a series of experimental models over the past decades. While this has led to better knowledge of the pathogenesis of human AKI, therapeutic approaches to improve patient outcomes are scarce. Restoration of autonomic regulatory function with vagal nerve stimulation resulting in anti-inflammatory effects and modulation of centrally-mediated mechanisms could be of clinical relevance. Evidence from experimental studies suggests that a therapeutic splenic ultrasound approach may prevent AKI via activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. This review briefly summarizes renal nerve anatomy, basic insights into neural control of renal function in the physiological state and the involvement of the autonomic nervous system in the pathophysiology of AKI chiefly due to sepsis, cardiopulmonary bypass and ischaemia/reperfusion experimental model. Finally, potentially preventive experimental pre-clinical approaches for the treatment of AKI aimed at sympathetic inhibition and/or parasympathetic stimulation are presented. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with hemolysis and acute kidney injury in neonates, infants, and children*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamikonian, Lara S; Mamo, Lisa B; Smith, P Brian; Koo, Jeannie; Lodge, Andrew J; Turi, Jennifer L

    2014-03-01

    This pilot study assesses the degree of hemolysis induced by cardiopulmonary bypass and determines its association with acute kidney injury in pediatric patients. Further, it evaluates the degree to which the use of urinary biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C correlate with the presence of acute kidney injury and hemolysis following cardiopulmonary bypass. Prospective observational study. A 13-bed pediatric cardiac ICU in a university hospital. Children undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. None. Blood and urine samples were obtained at multiple time points before and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Hemolysis was assessed by measuring levels of plasma hemoglobin and haptoglobin. Acute kidney injury was defined as a doubling in serum creatinine from preoperative baseline and by using the pediatric-modified RIFLE criteria. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C levels were measured. A total of 40 patients (range, 3 d to 4.8 yr) were enrolled. Plasma hemoglobin levels increased markedly on separation from cardiopulmonary bypass with a concurrent decrease in haptoglobin. This was associated with an increase in protein oxidation in the plasma. Hemolysis was more evident in younger patients with a longer duration of bypass and in those requiring a blood-primed circuit. Forty percent of patients had a doubling in serum creatinine and acute kidney injury was developed in 88% of patients when defined by the pediatric-modified RIFLE criteria. Controlling for cardiopulmonary bypass time, persistently elevated levels of plasma hemoglobin were associated with a five-fold increase in acute kidney injury. Further, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin measured 2 hours after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass was associated with acute kidney injury and with elevations in plasma hemoglobin. Cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric patients results in significant hemolysis, which is

  7. Community-acquired acute kidney injury in adults in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Dwomoa; Okyere, Perditer; Boima, Vincent; Matekole, Michael; Osafo, Charlotte

    We review recent published data on demographics, causes, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) in Africa. A review of the incidence, etiology, diagnoses, and treatment of AKI in adults in Africa from studies published between the years 2000 and 2015. The incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients in Africa ranges from 0.3 to 1.9% in adults. Between 70 and 90% of cases of AKI are community acquired. Most patients with AKI are young with a weighted mean age of 41.3 standard deviation (SD) 9.3 years, and a male to female ratio of 1.2 : 1.0. Medical causes account for between 65 and 80% of causes of AKI. This is followed by obstetric causes in 5 - 27% of cases and surgical causes in 2 - 24% of cases. In the reported studies, between 17 and 94% of patients who needed dialysis received this. The mortality of AKI in adults in Africa ranged from 11.5 to 43.5%. Most reported cases of AKI in Africa originate in the community. The low incidence of hospital-acquired AKI is likely to be due to under ascertainment. Most patients with AKI in Africa are young and have a single precipitating cause. Prominent among these are infection, pregnancy complications and nephrotoxins. Early treatment can improve clinical outcomes.

  8. Rare acute kidney injury secondary to hypothyroidism-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying; Tang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) caused by hypothyroidism-induced rhabdomyolysis is a rare and potentially life-threatening syndrome. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of such patients. We retrospectively analyzed five patients treated at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University with AKI secondary to hypothyroidism- induced rhabdomyolysis from January 2006 to December 2010. Of the five cases reviewed (4 males, age range of 37 to 62 years), adult primary hypothyroidism was caused by amiodarone (1 case), chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (1 case), and by uncertain etiologies (3 cases). All patients presented with facial and lower extremity edema. Three patients presented with weakness, while two presented with blunted facies and oliguria. Only one patient reported experiencing myalgia and proximal muscle weakness, in addition to fatigue and chills. Creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and renal function normalized after thyroid hormone replacement, except in two patients who improved through blood purification. Hypothyroidism should be considered in patients presenting with renal impairment associated with rhabdomyolysis. Moreover, further investigation into the etiology of the hypothyroidism is warranted.

  9. Acute kidney injury in adults receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Chang Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO has been utilized for critically ill patients such as patients with postcardiotomy cardiogenic shock or life-threatening respiratory failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI that develops during ECMO is associated with a very poor outcome, possibly because of accumulated extravascular water causing interstitial overload, impaired oxygen transport through tissues, and increased extravascular lung water volume with impaired O2 transport. Increased water is associated with subsequent organ dysfunction, particularly of the heart, lungs, and brain. Based on single-center studies, the incidence of AKI is 70–85% in ECMO patients. Therefore, renal replacement therapy is required in approximately 50% of these patients. This review summarizes three modalities that can be used to introduce renal replacement therapy to patients on ECMO, the pathophysiology of AKI in ECMO, and the impact of AKI on mortality. This review also identifies specific research-focused questions that need to be addressed to predict AKI early and to improve outcomes in this at-risk adult population.

  10. Acute kidney injury in stable COPD and at exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat MF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MF Barakat,1 HI McDonald,1 TJ Collier,1 L Smeeth,1 D Nitsch,1 JK Quint1,2 1Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK Background: While acute kidney injury (AKI alone is associated with increased mortality, the incidence of hospital admission with AKI among stable and exacerbating COPD patients and the effect of concurrent AKI at COPD exacerbation on mortality is not known.Methods: A total of 189,561 individuals with COPD were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. Using Poisson and logistic regressions, we explored which factors predicted admission for AKI (identified in Hospital Episode Statistics in this COPD cohort and concomitant AKI at a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. Using survival analysis, we investigated the effect of concurrent AKI at exacerbation on mortality (n=36,107 and identified confounding factors.Results: The incidence of AKI in the total COPD cohort was 128/100,000 person-years. The prevalence of concomitant AKI at exacerbation was 1.9%, and the mortality rate in patients with AKI at exacerbation was 521/1,000 person-years. Male sex, older age, and lower glomerular filtration rate predicted higher risk of AKI or death. There was a 1.80 fold (95% confidence interval: 1.61, 2.03 increase in adjusted mortality within the first 6 months post COPD exacerbation in patients suffering from AKI and COPD exacerbation compared to those who were AKI free.Conclusion: In comparison to previous studies on general populations and hospitalizations, the incidence and prevalence of AKI is relatively high in COPD patients. Coexisting AKI at exacerbation is prognostic of poor outcome. Keywords: acute renal failure, mortality, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, prognosis

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy-specific Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, J.; Ganiger, V. C.

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy (P-AKI) has declined significantly over the last three decades in developing countries. However, it is still associated with significant fetomaternal mortality and morbidity. The diagnosis of P-AKI is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are not validated in this population. The incidence of P-AKI with respect to total AKI cases has decreased in the last three decades from 25% in 1980s to 9% in 2000s at our centre. During the first trimester of gestation, AKI develops most often due to septic abortion or hyperemesis gravidarum. Septic abortion related AKI with respect to total AKI decreased from 9% to 5% in our study. Prevention of unwanted pregnancy and avoidance of septic abortion are keys to eliminate abortion associated AKI in early pregnancy. However, we have not seen AKI on account of hyperemesis gravidarum over a period of 33 years at our center. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis of AKI in association with pregnancy specific conditions namely preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies of pregnancy (P-TMA) is more challenging, because these 3 conditions share several clinical features of thrombotic microangiopathy which makes the diagnosis very difficult on clinical grounds. It is imperative to distinguish these conditions to make appropriate therapeutic decisions. Typically, AFLP and HELLP syndrome improve after delivery of the fetus, whereas plasma exchange is the first-line treatment for pregnancy associated thrombotic microangioathies (P-TMA). We observed that preclampsia/eclampsia is the most common cause of AKI in late third trimester and postpartum periods followed by puerperal sepsis and postpartum hemorrhage. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic microangiopathies (aHUS/TTP) and AFLP are rare causes of AKI during pregnancy in developing countries. PMID:28761227

  12. Acute Kidney Injury in Pregnancy-specific Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, J; Ganiger, V C

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy (P-AKI) has declined significantly over the last three decades in developing countries. However, it is still associated with significant fetomaternal mortality and morbidity. The diagnosis of P-AKI is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are not validated in this population. The incidence of P-AKI with respect to total AKI cases has decreased in the last three decades from 25% in 1980s to 9% in 2000s at our centre. During the first trimester of gestation, AKI develops most often due to septic abortion or hyperemesis gravidarum. Septic abortion related AKI with respect to total AKI decreased from 9% to 5% in our study. Prevention of unwanted pregnancy and avoidance of septic abortion are keys to eliminate abortion associated AKI in early pregnancy. However, we have not seen AKI on account of hyperemesis gravidarum over a period of 33 years at our center. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis of AKI in association with pregnancy specific conditions namely preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies of pregnancy (P-TMA) is more challenging, because these 3 conditions share several clinical features of thrombotic microangiopathy which makes the diagnosis very difficult on clinical grounds. It is imperative to distinguish these conditions to make appropriate therapeutic decisions. Typically, AFLP and HELLP syndrome improve after delivery of the fetus, whereas plasma exchange is the first-line treatment for pregnancy associated thrombotic microangioathies (P-TMA). We observed that preclampsia/eclampsia is the most common cause of AKI in late third trimester and postpartum periods followed by puerperal sepsis and postpartum hemorrhage. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic microangiopathies (aHUS/TTP) and AFLP are rare causes of AKI during pregnancy in developing countries.

  13. Acute kidney injury in pregnancy-specific disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury in pregnancy (P-AKI has declined significantly over the last three decades in developing countries. However, it is still associated with significant fetomaternal mortality and morbidity. The diagnosis of P-AKI is based on the serum creatinine increase. The usual formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR are not validated in this population. The incidence of P-AKI with respect to total AKI cases has decreased in the last three decades from 25% in 1980s to 9% in 2000s at our centre. During the first trimester of gestation, AKI develops most often due to septic abortion or hyperemesis gravidarum. Septic abortion related AKI with respect to total AKI decreased from 9% to 5% in our study. Prevention of unwanted pregnancy and avoidance of septic abortion are keys to eliminate abortion associated AKI in early pregnancy. However, we have not seen AKI on account of hyperemesis gravidarum over a period of 33 years at our center. In the third trimester, the differential diagnosis of AKI in association with pregnancy specific conditions namely preeclampsia/HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies of pregnancy (P-TMA is more challenging, because these 3 conditions share several clinical features of thrombotic microangiopathy which makes the diagnosis very difficult on clinical grounds. It is imperative to distinguish these conditions to make appropriate therapeutic decisions. Typically, AFLP and HELLP syndrome improve after delivery of the fetus, whereas plasma exchange is the first-line treatment for pregnancy associated thrombotic microangioathies (P-TMA. We observed that preclampsia/eclampsia is the most common cause of AKI in late third trimester and postpartum periods followed by puerperal sepsis and postpartum hemorrhage. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic microangiopathies (aHUS/TTP and AFLP are rare causes of AKI during pregnancy in developing countries.

  14. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    pathways and involvement of TGF-β1 growth factor, VDD could be considered as an aggravating factor for tubulointerstitial damage and fibrosis progression following acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion.

  15. Comparison of acute kidney injury between open and laparoscopic liver resection: Propensity score analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Moon

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response has been shown to be a major contributor to acute kidney injury. Considering that laparoscopic surgery is beneficial in reducing the inflammatory response, we compared the incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury between laparoscopic liver resection and open liver resection. Among 1173 patients who underwent liver resection surgery, 222 of 926 patients who underwent open liver resection were matched with 222 of 247 patients who underwent laparoscopic liver resection, by using propensity score analysis. The incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury assessed according to the creatinine criteria of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes definition was compared between those 1:1 matched groups. A total 77 (6.6% cases of postoperative acute kidney injury occurred. Before matching, the incidence of acute kidney injury after laparoscopic liver resection was significantly lower than that after open liver resection [1.6% (4/247 vs. 7.9% (73/926, P < 0.001]. After 1:1 matching, the incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury was still significantly lower after laparoscopic liver resection than after open liver resection [1.8% (4/222 vs. 6.3% (14/222, P = 0.008; odds ratio 0.273, 95% confidence interval 0.088-0.842, P = 0.024]. The postoperative inflammatory marker was also lower in laparoscopic liver resection than in open liver resection in matched set data (white blood cell count 12.7 ± 4.0 × 103/μL vs. 14.9 ± 3.9 × 103/μL, P < 0.001. Our findings suggest that the laparoscopic technique, by decreasing the inflammatory response, may reduce the occurrence of postoperative acute kidney injury during liver resection surgery.

  16. Splenectomy exacerbates lung injury after ischemic acute kidney injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Hernando, Ana; Altmann, Christopher; Ahuja, Nilesh; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nemenoff, Raphael; He, Zhibin; Ishimoto, Takuji; Simpson, Pete A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.; Bacalja, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) have increased serum proinflammatory cytokines and an increased occurrence of respiratory complications. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of renal and extrarenal cytokine production on AKI-mediated lung injury in mice. C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham surgery, splenectomy, ischemic AKI, or ischemic AKI with splenectomy and kidney, spleen, and liver cytokine mRNA, serum cytokines, and lung injury were examined. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, CXCL1, IL-1β, and TNF-α were increased in the kidney, spleen, and liver within 6 h of ischemic AKI. Since splenic proinflammatory cytokines were increased, we hypothesized that splenectomy would protect against AKI-mediated lung injury. On the contrary, splenectomy with AKI resulted in increased serum IL-6 and worse lung injury as judged by increased lung capillary leak, higher lung myeloperoxidase activity, and higher lung CXCL1 vs. AKI alone. Splenectomy itself was not associated with increased serum IL-6 or lung injury vs. sham. To investigate the mechanism of the increased proinflammatory response, splenic production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was determined and was markedly upregulated. To confirm that splenic IL-10 downregulates the proinflammatory response of AKI, IL-10 was administered to splenectomized mice with AKI, which reduced serum IL-6 and improved lung injury. Our data demonstrate that AKI in the absence of a counter anti-inflammatory response by splenic IL-10 production results in an exuberant proinflammatory response and lung injury. PMID:21677145

  17. The potential of alkaline phosphatase as a treatment for sepsis-associated acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Esther; Masereeuw, R.; Pickkers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with a high attributable mortality and an increased risk of developing chronic kidney failure in survivors. As a successful therapy is, as yet, unavailable, a pharmacological treatment option is clearly warranted. Recently, two small phase II

  18. ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN PATIENTS WITH CIRRHOSIS- CAUSES AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Hanmant Shejal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute Kidney Injury (AKI is a common complication in patients with cirrhosis leading to high mortality. Creatinine-based criteria for defining AKI are validated in general hospitalised patients, but their application to cirrhotic patients is less certain. This study was undertaken to evaluate current definition of AKI by International Club of Ascites (ICA and assess clinical course of hospitalised cirrhosis patients with AKI and to study the impact of AKI on mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS We prospectively studied patients with AKI and cirrhosis for a period of 1 year and assessed the association between AKI severity and progression with complications, including death. RESULTS 48 cirrhotic patients with AKI were enrolled in the study period. Mean age of patients was 56.81 ± 9.78 years. The aetiology of cirrhosis included alcohol (52.1%, HBV (2.2%, HCV (4.2%, NASH (27.1% and cryptogenic (14.6%. 13 patients (27.1% had mortality while 35 patients (72.9% survived. 39 patients (81.25% had AKI at admission while 9 patients (18.75% developed later after admission. Patients achieved a peak severity of AKI stage 1, 10.41%; stage 2, 60.41%; and stage 3, 37.5%. The incidence of mortality, increased with severity of AKI in stepwise manner with peak AKI stage 1 has no mortality; stage 2 has 4 (30.76%; stage 3, 9 (69.23%. SIRS was present in 17 patients (35.4% and was significantly associated with mortality. CONCLUSION AKI, as defined by new ICA criteria, in patients with cirrhosis is associated with mortality in a stage-dependent fashion. Early intervention and preventing progression by timely and specific treatment may improve outcomes.

  19. Nitrite-induced acute kidney injury with secondary hyperparathyroidism: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tao; Hu, Zhao; Yang, Xiangdong; Gao, Yanxia; Ma, Chengjun

    2018-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) with hyperparathyroidism caused by nitrite was rare, and renal function and parathyroid hormone (PTH) decreased to normal range after therapy. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed in a 40-year-old male with hyperparathyroidism and cyanosis of his hands and both forearms. The patient ate some recently pickled vegetables, and he experienced nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea without oliguria or anuria; Additionally, his hands and both forearms had a typical blue ash appearance. After admission, the laboratory findings indicated theincreasing serum creatinine (Scr) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). He was diagnosed as acute kidney injury with hyperparathyroidism caused by nitrite. The patient stopped eating the pickled vegetables and was given rehydration, added calories and other supportive therapy without any glucocorticoids. According to his clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and imaging results, the patient was diagnosed with acute kidney injury with secondary hyperparathyroidism. He was given symptomatic supportive care therapy. After one week, the serum creatinine, parathyroid hormone (PTH), hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, proteinuria, and urine red blood cell values decreased to normal range. Nitrite-induced acute kidney injury with secondary hyperparathyroidism was relatively rare. After therapy, the function of the kidney and parathyroid returned to normal. This case suggests that detailed collection of medical history, physical examination and correct symptomatic treatment is very important.

  20. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagener, G.; Gubitosa, G.; Wang, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is proposed as an early marker of kidney injury. We report the association of urinary NGAL with indexes of intraoperative renal hypoperfusion (cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time) and acute kidney injury (AKI) after...... for cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamp time to predict AKI were 0.592 (95% CI, 0.518 to 0.666) and 0.593 (95% CI, 0.523 to 0.665), respectively. LIMITATIONS: Limited sensitivity of changes in serum creatinine levels for kidney injury. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary NGAL has limited diagnostic accuracy...

  1. Comparison of acute kidney injury between open and laparoscopic liver resection: Propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Young-Jin; Jun, In-Gu; Kim, Ki-Hun; Kim, Seon-Ok; Song, Jun-Gol; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory response has been shown to be a major contributor to acute kidney injury. Considering that laparoscopic surgery is beneficial in reducing the inflammatory response, we compared the incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury between laparoscopic liver resection and open liver resection. Among 1173 patients who underwent liver resection surgery, 222 of 926 patients who underwent open liver resection were matched with 222 of 247 patients who underwent laparoscopic liver resection, by using propensity score analysis. The incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury assessed according to the creatinine criteria of the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes definition was compared between those 1:1 matched groups. A total 77 (6.6%) cases of postoperative acute kidney injury occurred. Before matching, the incidence of acute kidney injury after laparoscopic liver resection was significantly lower than that after open liver resection [1.6% (4/247) vs. 7.9% (73/926), P kidney injury was still significantly lower after laparoscopic liver resection than after open liver resection [1.8% (4/222) vs. 6.3% (14/222), P = 0.008; odds ratio 0.273, 95% confidence interval 0.088-0.842, P = 0.024]. The postoperative inflammatory marker was also lower in laparoscopic liver resection than in open liver resection in matched set data (white blood cell count 12.7 ± 4.0 × 103/μL vs. 14.9 ± 3.9 × 103/μL, P kidney injury during liver resection surgery.

  2. Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: an integrated clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kimmel, Paul L

    2012-09-01

    The previous conventional wisdom that survivors of acute kidney injury (AKI) tend to do well and fully recover renal function appears to be flawed. AKI can cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) directly, and increase the risk of developing incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsening of underlying CKD. In addition, severity, duration, and frequency of AKI appear to be important predictors of poor patient outcomes. CKD is an important risk factor for the development and ascertainment of AKI. Experimental data support the clinical observations and the bidirectional nature of the relationships between AKI and CKD. Reductions in renal mass and nephron number, vascular insufficiency, cell cycle disruption, and maladaptive repair mechanisms appear to be important modulators of progression in patients with and without coexistent CKD. Distinction between AKI and CKD may be artificial. Consideration should be given to the integrated clinical syndrome of diminished GFR, with acute and chronic stages, where spectrum of disease state and outcome is determined by host factors, including the balance of adaptive and maladaptive repair mechanisms over time. Physicians must provide long-term follow-up to patients with first episodes of AKI, even if they presented with normal renal function.

  3. Prevalence of Acute Kidney Injury in neonates admitted at a referral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Harare Central Hospital, Neonatal Unit. ... Neonatal clinical examination was performed. ... Outcome Measure:Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) defined by decrease of estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) by ≥ 25% from baseline value, using RIFLE criteria (an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End stage).

  4. Current trends in the management of acute kidney injury in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) previously known as acute renal failure (ARF) is a common problem in the paediatric emergency wards with infections like sepsis and malaria being the commonest causes in Nigeria. It has been known by various nomenclatures with a lack of standardised definition. This has made comparison of ...

  5. Acute kidney injury in neonatal intensive care: Medicines involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, A I; Daminova, M A; Abdullina, G A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates in the intensive care units and neonatal intensive care (NICU) according Plotz et al. ranges from 8% to 22% [3]. According to Andreoli, neonatal death due to AKI in NICU amounts up to 10-61% [1]. It should be in the reasons of AKI emphasize.The role of certain drugs, which are widely used in modern neonatology: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antibiotics (aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, carbapenems, 3rd generation cephalosporins), furosemide, enalapril, in contributing to AKI should be emphasized [2]. To identify risk factors for acute kidney injury in neonates in intensive care units and intensive care. We performed a prospective observational case-control study of full-term newborns who were treated in the intensive care unit and neonatal intensive care of the "Children's city hospital №1" Kazan and NICU №3 "Children's Republican Clinical Hospital" in 2011-2014 years.The study included 86 term infants in critical condition, who were hospitalized to the NICU on the first days of life, - the main group. The main criterion of AKI in neonates according to neonatal AKIN classification (2011) is a serum creatinine concentration ≥1.5 mg/dL. We subdivided the main group into two subgroups:subgroup I, AKI+ consisted of 12 term infants in critical condition with the serum creatinine level ≥ 1,5 mg/dL at the age of not younger than 48 hours after birth, which was 14% of all full-term newborns who were at the NICU;subgroup II, AKI- consisted of 74 term infants in critical condition with the serum creatinine level Excel 2007. The study results were subjected to statistical analysis using parametric and non-parametric methods of analysis. We present the findings as arithmetic means (M) with, standard deviation (σ) and standard error of the mean (m) according to standard formulas. All children were admitted to primary and emergency care with subsequent transfer to the NICU at 1-2 days of life and

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Kes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common clinical syndrome with a broad aetiological profile. It complicates about 5% of hospital admissions and 30% of admissions to intensive care units (ICU. During last 20 years has been a significant change in the spectrum of severe AKI such that it is no longer mostly a single organ phenomenon but rather a complex multisystem clinical problem. Despite great advances in renal replacement technique (RRT, mortality from AKI, when part of MOF, remains over 50%. The changing nature of AKI requires a new approach using the new advanced technology. Clinicians can provide therapies tailored to time constraints (intermittent, continuous, or extended intermittent, haemodynamic, and metabolic requirements and aimed at molecules of variable molecular weight. Peritoneal dialysis (PD is technically the simplest form of RRT and is still commonly used worldwide. The problems include difficulty in maintaining dialysate flow, peritoneal infection, leakage, protein losses, and restricted ability to clear fluid and uraemic wastes. PD is the preferred treatment modality for AKI in pediatric practice. Patients that are hemodynamically stable can be managed with intermittent hemodyalisis (IHD, whereby relatively short (3 to 4 h dialysis sessions may be performed every day or every other day. Patients who are haemodynamically unstable are best managed using continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT, which allow for continuous fine-tuning of intravascular volume, easier correction of hypervolemia, better solute removal, more accurately correction of metabolic acidosis, and offers possibilities for unlimited energy support. Recently, “hybrid” or sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED was introduced as a method which combines the advantages of IHD with those of CRRT. In this technique, classic dialysis hardware is used at low blood and dialysate flow rates, for prolonged period of time (6 to 12 h/day. SLED offers more haemodynamic

  7. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients. A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr. The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%–9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770–0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  8. Acute kidney injury and electrolyte disorders in the critically ill patient with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Capasso, Giovambattista; Perazella, Mark A

    2017-12-01

    Patients with cancer increasingly make up a significant proportion of patients receiving care in the intensive care unit (ICU). Acute kidney injury and cancer-associated electrolyte disorders are encountered in many of these patients and can significantly impact both short-term and long-term outcomes. Advances in chemotherapeutic regimens as well as in our understanding of cancer-associated kidney disease highlight the need for specialized knowledge of the unique causes and therapies required in this subset of critically ill patients. This is especially the case as targeted cancer therapies may have off-target effects that need to be recognized in a timely manner. This review outlines key knowledge areas for critical care physicians and nephrologists caring for patients with cancer and associated kidney issues such as acute kidney injury and electrolyte disorders. Specifically, understanding kidney-specific effects of new chemotherapeutic approaches is outlined, and provides an up-to-date compendium of these effects.

  9. RIFLE criteria for acute kidney injury in the intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifipour, Farzaneh; Hami, Maryam; Naghibi, Massih; Zeraati, Abbasali; Arian, Sanaz; Azarian, Amir Abbas

    2013-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is commonly occurred in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of the study was a comparison of RIFLE (Risk of renal injury/Injury to the kidney/Failure of kidney function/Loss of kidney function/End stage disease) classification with other scoring systems in the evaluation of AKI in ICUs. We performed a retrospective study on 409 ICU patients who were admitted during the 5 years period. At the 1(st) day of admission and time of discharge, the total and non-renal Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and sequential organ failure assessment scores were compared to max RIFLE criteria. In this assessment, there was concordance among the results (P < 0.05). The RIFLE classification can be used for detection of AKI in ICU patients.

  10. RIFLE criteria for acute kidney injury in the intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Sharifipour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is commonly occurred in intensive care unit (ICU patients. The aim of the study was a comparison of RIFLE (Risk of renal injury/Injury to the kidney/Failure of kidney function/Loss of kidney function/End stage disease classification with other scoring systems in the evaluation of AKI in ICUs. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective study on 409 ICU patients who were admitted during the 5 years period. Results: At the 1 st day of admission and time of discharge, the total and non-renal Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and sequential organ failure assessment scores were compared to max RIFLE criteria. In this assessment, there was concordance among the results (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The RIFLE classification can be used for detection of AKI in ICU patients.

  11. The RIFLE and AKIN classifications for acute kidney injury: a critical and comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, José António; Jorge, Sofia

    2013-02-01

    In May 2004, a new classification, the RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) classification, was proposed in order to define and stratify the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI). This system relies on changes in the serum creatinine (SCr) or glomerular filtration rates and/or urine output, and it has been largely demonstrated that the RIFLE criteria allows the identification of a significant proportion of AKI patients hospitalized in numerous settings, enables monitoring of AKI severity, and is a good predictor of patient outcome. Three years later (March 2007), the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) classification, a modified version of the RIFLE, was released in order to increase the sensitivity and specificity of AKI diagnosis. Until now, the benefit of these modifications for clinical practice has not been clearly demonstrated. Here we provide a critical and comprehensive discussion of the two classifications for AKI, focusing on the main differences, advantages and limitations.

  12. Transient and Persistent Acute Kidney Injury and the Risk of Hospital Mortality in Critically Ill Patients: Results of a Multicenter Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinel, Sophie; Vincent, François; Lautrette, Alexandre; Dellamonica, Jean; Mariat, Christophe; Zeni, Fabrice; Cohen, Yves; Tardy, Bernard; Souweine, Bertrand; Darmon, Michael

    2015-08-01

    To assess the prognostic impact of transient and persistent acute kidney injury in critically ill patients. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected patient data : Six hospital ICUs. Critically-ill patients with ICU stay longer than three days. None. Assessment of hospital survival with respect to acute kidney injury duration. A total of 447 patients were included in this study, including 283 patients (63.3%) with an acute kidney injury at admission (175 and 108 patients with persistent and transient acute kidney injury, respectively). Patients with persistent acute kidney injury more frequently had stage 3 acute kidney injury (42.9% vs 30.6%; p = 0.04). Hospital survival was 76.2% (n = 125) in patients without acute kidney injury, 70.4% (n = 76) in patients with transient acute kidney injury, and 61.1% (n = 107) in patients with persistent acute kidney injury. After adjustment for confounding factors, the factors associated with lower hospital survival were the need for vasopressors (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.43-0.98) and the presence of persistent acute kidney injury (odds ratio, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.36-0.95). When included in the final model, stage 3 acute kidney injury was independently associated with a lower hospital survival (odds ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.70-0.98), and persistent acute kidney injury was no longer associated with outcome. Two thirds of the critically ill patients with acute kidney injury have persistent acute kidney injury. Although mortality increased progressively with the duration of acute kidney injury, we found no independent association between this duration and patient outcome when the acute kidney injury severity is taken into account. Our results suggest that the classical "prerenal acute kidney injury" and "acute tubular necrosis" paradigm might be of limited interest from a pathophysiological or prognostic point of view.

  13. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robinson, Sian I.; Zincuk, A.; Larsen, U. L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded...... from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize...... assign eligible critically ill adults with acute kidney injury into a treatment (1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) or control arm (40 mg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) upon commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy.We calculated that with 133 patients in each group...

  14. Risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease after acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Jorge Pereira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing with the increasing age of the population and the increasing number of elderly survivors of acute kidney injury (AKI. The risk factors for the progression of CKD after AKI are unclear. Objective: To investigate the association between AKI and its progression to CKD and the risk factors involved. Methods: An observational, retrospective study of AKI patients followed from 2009 to 2012 was carried out. We evaluated the etiology of AKI, the use of vasoactive drugs and mechanical ventilation, the need for dialysis, the presence of comorbidities, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR, the length of stay and the progression of CKD. Statistical analyses, including the Chi-square test and Pearson's correlation, were performed using SPSS. Results: The 207 patients analyzed had a mean age of 70.1 ± 13.1, and 84.6% of the male patients exhibited decreased renal function and CKD (vs. 60.4% of the female patients. The progression of AKI to CKD was more frequent in patients admitted to wards (63.8%, cancer patients (74.19%, patients with sepsis (67.18% and patients with obstruction (91.66%. Dialyses were performed in 16.4% of the patients, but this was not correlated with the progression of CKD. Conclusions: Being an elderly male patient with AKI due to sepsis and obstruction was correlated with progression to CKD following discharge.

  15. The path to chronic kidney disease following acute kidney injury: a neonatal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Swasti; Ng, Kar Hui; Mammen, Cherry

    2017-02-01

    The risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized critically ill neonatal populations without primary renal disease continues to be high, in both term and premature infants. Observational studies have revealed high rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in survivors of neonatal AKI. Proposed mechanisms underlying the progression of CKD following AKI include nephron loss and hyperfiltration, vascular insufficiency and maladaptive repair mechanisms. Other factors, including prematurity and low birth weight, have an independent relationship with the development of CKD, but they may also be positive effect modifiers in the relationship of AKI and CKD. The large degree of heterogeneity in the literature on AKI in the neonatal population, including the use of various AKI definitions and CKD outcomes, has hampered the medical community's ability to properly assess the relationship of AKI and CKD in this vulnerable population. Larger prospective cohort studies with control groups which utilize recently proposed neonatal AKI definitions and standardized CKD definitions are much needed to properly quantify the risk of CKD following an episode of AKI. Until there is further evidence to guide us, we recommend that all neonates with an identified episode of AKI should have an appropriate longitudinal follow-up in order to identify CKD at its earliest stages.

  16. Dynamic changes in Bach1 expression in the kidney of rhabdomyolysis-associated acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Yamaoka

    Full Text Available Free heme, a pro-oxidant released from myoglobin, is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of rhabdomyolysis-associated acute kidney injury (RM-AKI, because renal overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, confers protection against RM-AKI. BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1 is a heme-responsive transcription factor that represses HO-1. Here, we examined the changes with time in the gene expression of Bach1, HO-1, and δ-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS1, a heme biosynthetic enzyme in the rat kidney using an RM-AKI model induced by the injection of 50% glycerol (10 mL/kg body weight into bilateral limbs. We also examined the protein expression of Bach1 in the nucleus and cytosol, and HO-1 in the rat kidney. Glycerol treatment induced significant elevation of serum creatinine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase levels followed by the marked elevation of serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, which caused serious damage to renal tubules. Following glycerol treatment, HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly up-regulated, while ALAS1 mRNA expression was down-regulated, suggesting an increase in the free renal heme concentration. The Bach1 mRNA level was drastically increased 3 h after glycerol treatment, and the increased level was maintained for 12 h. Nuclear Bach1 protein levels were significantly decreased 3 h after treatment. Conversely, cytosolic Bach1 protein levels abruptly increased after 6 h. In conclusion, we demonstrate the dynamic changes in Bach1 expression in a rat model of RM-AKI. Our findings suggest that the increase in Bach1 mRNA and cytosolic Bach1 protein expression may reflect de novo Bach1 protein synthesis to compensate for the depletion of nuclear Bach1 protein caused by the induction of HO-1 by free heme.

  17. Dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury in Denmark 2000-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Hommel, Kristine; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury is a severe illness associated with poor prognosis. However, information pertaining to incidence rates and prevalence of risk factors remains limited in spite of increasing focus. We evaluate time trends of incidence rates and changing patterns...... in prevalence of comorbidities, concurrent medication, and other risk factors in nationwide retrospective cohort study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients with dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury were identified between January 1st 2000 and December 31st 2012. By cross-referencing data from national...

  18. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 deficiency attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang Joo; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Choi, Young-Keun; Park, Sungmi; Choe, Mi Sun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Huh, Yang Hoon; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Lee, Ji-Min; Lee, Sun Joo; Jeon, Jae-Han; Harris, Robert A; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Clinical prescription of cisplatin, one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents, is limited by its side effects, particularly tubular injury-associated nephrotoxicity. Since details of the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, we investigated the role of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Among the PDK isoforms, PDK4 mRNA and protein levels were markedly increased in the kidneys of mice treated with cisplatin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation was involved in cisplatin-induced renal PDK4 expression. Treatment with the PDK inhibitor sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) or genetic knockout of PDK4 attenuated the signs of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, including apoptotic morphology of the kidney tubules along with numbers of TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase-3, and renal tubular injury markers. Cisplatin-induced suppression of the mitochondrial membrane potential, oxygen consumption rate, expression of electron transport chain components, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and disruption of mitochondrial morphology were noticeably improved in the kidneys of DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice. Additionally, levels of the oxidative stress marker 4-hydroxynonenal and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species were attenuated, whereas superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase expression and glutathione synthetase and glutathione levels were recovered in DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice. Interestingly, lipid accumulation was considerably attenuated in DCA-treated or PDK4 knockout mice via recovered expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and coactivator PGC-1α, which was accompanied by recovery of mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, PDK4 mediates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, suggesting that PDK4 might be a therapeutic target for attenuating cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anesthetics influence the incidence of acute kidney injury following valvular heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young-Chul; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Song, Young; Yang, So-Young; Kwak, Young-Lan

    2014-08-01

    Propofol has been shown to provide protection against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury experimentally, but clinical evidence is lacking. Here we studied the effect of propofol anesthesia on the occurrence of acute kidney injury following heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. One hundred and twelve patients who underwent valvular heart surgery were randomized to receive either propofol or sevoflurane anesthesia, both with sufentanil. Using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, significantly fewer patients developed acute kidney injury postoperatively in the propofol group compared with the sevoflurane group (6 compared with 21 patients). The incidence of severe renal dysfunction was significantly higher in the sevoflurane group compared with the propofol group (5 compared with none). The postoperative cystatin C was significantly lower in the propofol group at 24 and 48 h. Serum interleukin-6 at 6 h after aorta cross-clamp removal, C-reactive protein at postoperative day 1, and segmented neutrophil counts at postoperative day 3 were also significantly lower in the propofol group. Thus, propofol anesthesia significantly reduced the incidence and severity of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass compared with sevoflurane. This beneficial effect of propofol may be related to its ability to attenuate the perioperative increase in proinflammatory mediators.

  20. [Oxalate nephropathy: a new entity of acute kidney injury in diabetic patients?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muji, A; Moll, S; Saudan, P

    2015-02-25

    Acute oxalate nephropathy is a severe cause of acute kidney injury characterized by tubule-interstitial oxalate deposits with an inflammatory infiltrate. Three cases of AKI occuring in diabetic patients, and whose renal biopsy gave a diagnosis of acute oxalate nephropathy are reported. This cristal deposit AKI is due to either primary hyperoxaluria or secondary to enteric hyperabsorption. Its prognosis is dismal and rapid recognition by renal biopsy and determination of the cause of hyperoxaluria is mandatory in order to avoid end-stage kidney disease. This diagnosis should be suspected in cases of non resolving AKI, especially in diabetic patients who may have undetected pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

  1. Acute kidney injury aggravated by treatment initiation with apixaban: Another twist of anticoagulant-related nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Brodsky

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant-related nephropathy (ARN was initially described in patients on warfarin (as warfarin-related nephropathy and recently in those using dabigatran. Herein, we report clinical history and kidney biopsy findings in a patient on apixaban (Eliquis. Initiation of treatment with apixaban resulted in aggravation of preexisting mild acute kidney injury (AKI. A few days after apixaban therapy, the patient became oligoanuric, and kidney biopsy showed severe acute tubular necrosis with numerous occlusive red blood cell casts. Only one out of 68 glomeruli with open capillary loops had small segmental cellular crescent. Therefore, there was major discrepancy between the degree of glomerular injury and the glomerular hematuria. Considering that the onset of this AKI was associated with apixaban treatment initiation, we propose that this patient had ARN associated with factor Xa inhibitor (apixaban, which has not previously been described. Monitoring of kidney function is recommended after initiation of anticoagulant therapy.

  2. Acute coronary syndrome and acute kidney injury: role of inflammation in worsening renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Hernández, Jorge; Springall, Rashidi; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Arana-Martinez, Julio-C; González-Pacheco, Héctor; Bojalil, Rafael

    2017-07-26

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), a common complication of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with higher mortality and longer hospital stays. The role of cytokines and other mediators is unknown in AKI induced by an ACS (ACS-AKI), leading to several unanswered questions. The worsening of renal function is usually seen as a dichotomous phenomenon instead of a dynamic change, so evaluating changes of the renal function in time may provide valuable information in the ACS-AKI setting. The aim of this study was to explore inflammatory factors associated to de novo kidney injury induced by de novo cardiac injury secondary to ACS. One hundred four consecutive patients with ACS were initially included on the time of admission to the Coronary Unit of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in Mexico City, from February to May 2016, before any invasive procedure, imaging study, diuretic or anti-platelet therapy. White blood count, hemoglobin, NT-ProBNP, troponin I, C-reactive protein, albumin, glucose, Na + , K + , blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, creatinine (Cr), endothelin-1 (ET-1), leukotriene-B4, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, resolvin-D1 (RvD1), lipoxin-A4 (LXA4), interleukin-1β, -6, -8, and -10 were measured. We finally enrolled 78 patients, and subsequently we identified 15 patients with ACS-AKI. Correlations were obtained by a Spearman rank test. Low-rank regression, splines regressions, and also protein-protein/chemical interactions and pathways analyses networks were performed. Positive correlations of ΔCr were found with BUN, admission Cr, GRACE score, IL-1β, IL-6, NT-ProBNP and age, and negative correlations with systolic blood pressure, mean-BP, diastolic-BP and LxA4. In the regression analyses IL-10 and RvD1 had positive non-linear associations with ΔCr. ET-1 had also a positive association. Significant non-linear associations were seen with NT-proBNP, admission Cr, BUN

  3. A novel therapy to attenuate acute kidney injury and ischemic allograft damage after allogenic kidney transplantation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faikah Gueler

    Full Text Available Ischemia followed by reperfusion contributes to the initial damage to allografts after kidney transplantation (ktx. In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tetrapeptide EA-230 (AQGV, might improve survival and attenuate loss of kidney function in a mouse model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI and ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. IRI was induced in male C57Bl/6N mice by transient bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 35 min. Treatment with EA-230 (20-50mg/kg twice daily i.p. for four consecutive days was initiated 24 hours after IRI when acute kidney injury (AKI was already established. The treatment resulted in markedly improved survival in a dose dependent manner. Acute tubular injury two days after IRI was diminished and tubular epithelial cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by EA-230 treatment. Furthermore, CTGF up-regulation, a marker of post-ischemic fibrosis, at four weeks after IRI was significantly less in EA-230 treated renal tissue. To learn more about these effects, we measured renal blood flow (RBF and glomerular filtration rate (GFR at 28 hours after IRI. EA-230 improved both GFR and RBF significantly. Next, EA-230 treatment was tested in a model of ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. The recipients were treated with EA-230 (50 mg/kg twice daily i.p. which improved renal function and allograft survival by attenuating ischemic allograft damage. In conclusion, EA-230 is a novel and promising therapeutic agent for treating acute kidney injury and preventing IRI-induced post-transplant ischemic allograft injury. Its beneficial effect is associated with improved renal perfusion after IRI and enhanced regeneration of tubular epithelial cells.

  4. Proteome analysis of acute kidney injury - Discovery of new predominantly renal candidates for biomarker of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagrino, Pamella Araujo; Venturini, Gabriela; Yogi, Patrícia Schneider; Dariolli, Rafael; Padilha, Kallyandra; Kiers, Bianca; Gois, Tamiris Carneiro; Cardozo, Karina Helena Morais; Carvalho, Valdemir Melechco; Salgueiro, Jéssica Silva; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Titan, Silvia Maria de Oliveira; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2017-01-16

    The main bottleneck in studies aiming to identify novel biomarkers in acute kidney injury (AKI) has been the identification of markers that are organ and process specific. Here, we have used different tissues from a controlled porcine renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model to identify new, predominantly renal biomarker candidates for kidney disease. Urine and serum samples were analyzed in pre-ischemia, ischemia (60min) and 4, 11 and 16h post-reperfusion, and renal cortex samples after 24h of reperfusion. Peptides were analyzed on the Q-Exactive™. In renal cortex proteome, we observed an increase in the synthesis of proteins in the ischemic kidney compared to the contralateral, highlighted by transcription factors and epithelial adherens junction proteins. Intersecting the set of proteins up- or down-regulated in the ischemic tissue with both serum and urine proteomes, we identified 6 proteins in the serum that may provide a set of targets for kidney injury. Additionally, we identified 49, being 4 predominantly renal, proteins in urine. As prove of concept, we validated one of the identified biomarkers, dipeptidyl peptidase IV, in a set of patients with diabetic nephropathy. In conclusion, we identified 55 systemic proteins, some of them predominantly renal, candidates for biomarkers of renal disease. The main bottleneck in studies aiming to identify novel biomarkers in acute kidney injury (AKI) has been the identification of markers that are predominantly renal. In fact, putative biomarkers for this condition have also been identified in a number of other clinical scenarios, such as cardiovascular diseases, chronic kidney failure or in patients being treated in intensive care units from a number of conditions. Here we propose a comprehensive, sequential screening procedure able to identify and validate potential biomarkers for kidney disease, using kidney ischemia/reperfusion as a paradigm for a kidney pathological event. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  5. Plasma Symmetric Dimethylarginine Concentration in Dogs with Acute Kidney Injury and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, D P; Neiger, R; Schweighauser, A; Francey, T; Yerramilli, M; Obare, E; Steinbach, S M L

    2017-05-01

    Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) is considered a biomarker for early detection of renal dysfunction in human patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). At present, no studies exist analyzing the relevance of SDMA in dogs with AKI. SDMA would correctly identify dogs with renal disease but would not be able to differentiate between AKI and CKD. Eighteen healthy control dogs, 48 dogs with AKI, and 29 dogs with CKD. Prospective study. Dogs with kidney disease were categorized as having AKI or CKD according to the history, clinical signs, laboratory findings, and results of diagnostic imaging. Plasma SDMA concentration was measured by IDEXX Laboratories. SDMA/creatinine ratio was calculated in dogs with AKI or CKD. Median SDMA concentrations were 8.5 μg/dL (6-12 μg/dL), 39.5 μg/dL (8->100 μg/dL), and 35 μg/dL (12->100 μg/dL), in healthy, AKI, and CKD, respectively. SDMA concentrations were significantly higher in dogs with AKI (P dogs. Median SDMA/creatinine ratio in dogs with AKI and CKD was 6.5 (1.7-20.9) and 10 (2.4-33.9) (P = .0004), respectively. Although there was overlap of the SDMA/creatinine ratio in dogs with AKI or CKD, it was significantly higher in dogs with CKD compared to dogs with AKI (P = .0004). In this population, SDMA was suitable for identifying dogs affected by AKI or CKD, but could not differentiate between them. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Endothelial Damage Signals Refractory Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) are heterogeneous on pathophysiology and prognosis. The role of endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of refractory AKI has not been clarified. The aim was to determine if biomarkers of endothelial damage, independently of the inflammatory...... in the pathogenesis of AKI that is refractory to treatment....

  7. Acute kidney injury in children – not just for the nephrologist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AKI from any cause increases the risk of CKD developing, and vice versa. There are absolute indications for renal replacement therapy, e.g. anuria, whereas other patients can be managed successfully conservatively. Keywords: acute kidney injury, AKI, children, fluid management, pRIFLE, renal replacement therapy ...

  8. Current trends in the management of acute kidney injury in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-06

    Feb 6, 2013 ... Oliguria: Reduction in urine output to less than 300ml/ m² per day or <1ml/kg/hr. Anuria: Defined as urine ... Table 4: Protein biomarkers for early detection of acute kidney injury. Cystatin C is a protein ... neurologic symptoms (altered mental status, seizures), blood urea nitrogen greater than 100–150 mg/.

  9. A review of oxidative stress in acute kidney injury: protective role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the common clinical syndrome which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The severity extends from less to more advanced spectrums which link to biological, physical and chemical agents. Oxidative stress (OS)-related AKI has demonstrated the increasing of reactive oxygen ...

  10. An unusual case of insecticide poisoning presenting as acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Yadla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning due to insecticides such as organophosphorus and super vasmol presenting as acute kidney injury (AKI is well-reported. Poisoning due to fipronil (phenylpyrazole is known to present with mild neurological and dermatological complaints. However, fipronil poisoning presenting as AKI and hepatic dysfunction is not known. Herein, we are presenting a case of fipronil poisoning presenting with severe AKI.

  11. Aetiologies and Short-term Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2016-01-01

    Jan 1, 2016 ... Aetiologies and Short Term Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury … Oluseyi A. 39 failure or following medical treatment such as use of nephrotoxic medications. Data were analyzed using the statistical. Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.0 by Chicago Inc. Results were presented in tabular form.

  12. Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children as. Seen in the Emergency Unit of a Tertiary Hospital in Enugu, Southeast. Nigeria. Address for correspondence: Dr. OI Odetunde,. Paediatric Nephrology Unit, Department of Paediatrics,. College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/University ...

  13. Acute kidney injury in children with heart failure: any relationship to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute kidney injury was based on absolute serum creatinine level > 0.5 mg/dl on admission. Age, gender, and out come we r e document ed. Laboratory results of electrolyte, urea , creatinine and clinical outcomes were also documented. Results: One hundred and twenty patients were studied. The mean electrolytes were ...

  14. Acute kidney injury in children – not just for the nephrologist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a non-specific predictor of AKI in critically ill children with septic shock.19 Liver fatty acid-binding protein is an early predictor of. AKI in children specifically after cardiac surgery.18 None of these biomarkers are commercially available in South Africa. The management of acute kidney injury. Fluids and electrolytes.

  15. Hypercalcaemia and acute kidney injury following administration of vitamin D in granulomatous disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tollitt, James; Solomon, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common. It causes osteomalacia, may contribute to osteoporosis and is an independent risk factor for cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. We describe patients with a history of sarcoidosis who developed acute kidney injury due to hypercalcaemia following treatment with colecalciferol.

  16. Association between renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagshaw, Sean M.; Uchino, Shigehiko; Kellum, John A.; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morgera, Stanislao; Schetz, Miet; Tan, Ian; Bouman, Catherine; Macedo, Etienne; Gibney, Noel; Tolwani, Ashita; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.; Ronco, Claudio; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) treated and not treated with renal replacement therapy (RRT). Secondary analysis of a multi-centre cohort study. Primary exposure was RRT. Primary outcome was propensity and multi-variable

  17. The meaning of acute kidney injury and its relevance to intensive care and anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, E M; Bellomo, R; Nichol, A D

    2012-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the new consensus term for acute renal failure. The term describes a continuum of kidney injury, a common condition in the critically ill and after major surgery, which is associated with increased mortality. The incidence of AKI in intensive care unit patients in Australia is >30% and sepsis is a major contributory factor. However, there is limited knowledge about its incidence after major surgery, except for cardiac surgery. The creation of staged AKI classification systems (RIFLE [Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage], Acute Kidney Injury Network and the new Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria) has accelerated progress in critical care nephrology research by showing that even small changes in serum creatinine are associated with increased risk of death and that this risk increases progressively with severity of AKI. Recent thought and research has cast doubt over previously accepted pathophysiological views of AKI. Moreover, terms such as 'prerenal azotaemia' and 'acute tubular necrosis' are now being challenged as lacking validity, having little supportive evidence and carrying limited clinical utility. In this review, we explore the limitations of animal and human models of AKI and the implications of recent research on our current understanding of the pathophysiology of AKI. In addition, we describe conventional and novel diagnostic methods and therapies, and explore the clinical implications of the effect of fluid administration and perioperative management. Finally, we identify priorities for clinical investigations and future directions in AKI research.

  18. Alkaline phosphatase : a possible treatment for sepsis-associated acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Esther; Heemskerk, Suzanne; Masereeuw, R.; Pickkers, Peter

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disease in the intensive care unit and accounts for high morbidity and mortality. Sepsis, the predominant cause of AKI in this setting, involves a complex pathogenesis in which renal inflammation and hypoxia are believed to play an important role. A new therapy

  19. Aetiologies and Short-term Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) has become a global health problem and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and overall health expenditure. Information on the epidemiology and outcomes of AKI will help to audit practice and advocate for policies that will reduce this burden. This study determined ...

  20. Acute kidney injury in Lagos: Pattern, outcomes, and predictors of in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The pattern of acute kidney injury (AKI) differs significantly between developed and developing countries. Aims: The aim of th study was to determine the pattern and clinical outcomes of AKI in Lagos, Southwest Nigeria. Settings and Design: A retrospective review of hospital records of all patients with a diagnosis of ...

  1. Urinary apolipoprotein M as a biomarker of acute kidney injury in children undergoing heart surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarrer, Eva Martha Madsen; Andersen, Henrik Ørbæk; Helvind, Morten

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether apoM is excreted in urine of children undergoing heart surgery and the potential of apoM as early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI). MATERIALS & METHODS: Urine was collected in children undergoing heart surgery. ApoM was measured with ELISA. U-apoM was characterized...

  2. Outcome in acute heart failure: prognostic value of acute kidney injury and worsening renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra, Gregory; Garin, Nicolas; Stirnemann, Jérôme; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Perrier, Arnaud; Carballo, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    The prognostic value of worsening renal function (WRF) in acute heart failure is debated. Moreover, it is not clear if the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in this context is detrimental. In a retrospective cohort study of 646 patients hospitalized for acute heart failure, the risk of death or readmission associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) present at admission, WRF during the 1st 7 days, and up-titration of ACEI/ARB were analyzed in a Cox proportional hazards model. AKI, WRF, hemoglobin concentration, ACEI/ARB up-titration, and use of loop diuretics before admission were significantly associated with the primary outcome in univariate analysis. In a multivariate model, the association remained significant for AKI (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.47; P = .0002), WRF (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.45; P = .0059), and ACEI/ARB up-titration (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.97; P = .026). There was no excess mortality in patients with ACEI/ARB up-titration despite WRF. Both AKI and WRF are strongly associated with poor outcome in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. ACEI/ARB up-titration seems to be protective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Tissue Inflammation Using an Animal Model of Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Warram, Jason M; Wang, Dezhi; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of molecular ultrasound (US) imaging for monitoring the early inflammatory effects following acute kidney injury. A population of rats underwent 30 min of renal ischemia (acute kidney injury, N = 6) or sham injury (N = 4) using established surgical methods. Animals were divided and molecular US imaging was performed during the bolus injection of a targeted microbubble (MB) contrast agent to either P-selectin or vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). Imaging was performed before surgery and 4 and 24 h thereafter. After manual segmentation of renal tissue space, the molecular US signal was calculated as the difference between time-intensity curve data before MB injection and after reaching steady-state US image enhancement. All animals were terminated after the 24 h imaging time point and kidneys excised for immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. Renal inflammation was analyzed using molecular US imaging. While results using the P-selectin and VCAM-1 targeted MBs were comparable, it appears that the former was more sensitive to biomarker expression. All molecular US imaging measures had a positive correlation with IHC findings. Acute kidney injury is a serious disease in need of improved noninvasive methods to help diagnose the extent of injury and monitor the tissue throughout disease progression. Molecular US imaging appears well suited to address this challenge and more research is warranted.

  4. The inflammatory response in blood and in remote organs following acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Anne Craveiro; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Højberg-Holm, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    In patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) mortality remains high, despite the fact that the patients are treated with continuous renal replacement therapy. The interaction between the kidney and the immune system might explain the high mortality observed in AKI. In order to elucidate...... the interaction between the kidney and immune system we developed a two-hit model of AKI and endotoxemia. Our hypothesis was that ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) of the kidney simultaneously with endotoxemia would generate a more extensive inflammatory response compared to I/R of the hind legs. Our expectation...... was that elevated levels of cytokines would be found in both blood and in organs distant to the kidneys. Forty mice were divided into five groups. The mice were subjected to the following operations: A: Sham only, no lipopolysaccharide (LPS); B: I/R of both kidneys + LPS; C: LPS only; D: Nephrectomy + LPS; E: I...

  5. Synergistic impact of acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury on the weaning outcome of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kuang; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Ho, Li-Ing; Wang, Jia-Horng; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory neuromuscular impairment severity is known to predict weaning outcome among patients with cervical spinal cord injury; however, the impact of non-neuromuscular complications remains unexplored. This study was to evaluate possible neuromuscular and non-neuromuscular factors that may negatively impact weaning outcome. From September 2002 to October 2012, acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury patients who had received mechanical ventilation for >48h were enrolled and divided into successful (n=54) and unsuccessful weaning groups (n=19). Various neuromuscular, non-neuromuscular factors and events during the intensive care unit stay were extracted from medical charts and electronic medical records. Variables presenting with a significant difference (pspinal cord injury (C1-3), lower pulse rates, and lower Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, higher peak blood urea nitrogen, lower trough albumin, and lower trough blood leukocyte counts. Furthermore, unsuccessful weaning patients had a higher incidence of pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, shock and acute kidney injury during the intensive care unit stay. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed acute kidney injury and high level of cervical spinal cord injury were independent risk factors for failure of weaning. Importantly, patients with both risk factors showed a large increase in odds ratio for unsuccessful weaning from mechanical ventilation (pinjury during the intensive care unit stay and high level of cervical spinal injury are two independent risk factors that synergistically work together producing a negative impact on weaning outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Star fruit as a cause of acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaranello, Karilla Lany; Alvares, Valeria Regina de Cristo; Carneiro, Daniely Maria Queiroz; Barros, Flávio Henrique Soares; Gentil, Thais Marques Sanches; Thomaz, Myriam José; Pereira, Benedito Jorge; Pereira, Mariana Batista; Leme, Graziella Malzoni; Diz, Mary Carla Esteves; Laranja, Sandra Maria Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    The star fruit belongs to the family Oxalidacea, species Averrhoa carambola. It is rich in minerals, vitamin A, C, B complex vitamins and oxalic acid. Recent studies show that the toxicity of the fruit differs between the patients and may be explained by single biological responses, age, and the intake quantity of the neurotoxin in each fruit in addition to glomerular filtration rate given by each patient. Additionally, the nephrotoxicity caused by the fruit is dose-dependent and may lead to the deposition of crystals of calcium oxalate intratubular, as well as by direct injury to the renal tubular epithelium, leading to apoptosis of the same. We report the case of a patient who after ingestion of the juice and fresh fruit, developed acute renal failure requiring dialysis, evolving with favourable outcome and recovery of renal function.

  7. Hemoglobin A1c Levels Predicts Acute Kidney Injury after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in Non-Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevdet Ugur Kocogulları

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Elevated hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with diabetes mellitus have been known as a risk factor for acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the relationship between hemoglobin A1c levels in non-diabetics and acute kidney injury is under debate. We aimed to investigate the association of preoperative hemoglobin A1c levels with acute kidney injury in non-diabetic patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS: 202 non-diabetic patients with normal renal function (serum creatinine <1.4 mg/dl who underwent isolated coronary bypass were analyzed. Hemoglobin A1c level was measured at the baseline examination. Patients were separated into two groups according to preoperative Hemoglobin A1c level. Group 1 consisted of patients with preoperative HbA1c levels of < 5.6% and Group 2 consisted of patients with preoperative HbA1c levels of ≥ 5.6%. Acute kidney injury diagnosis was made by comparing baseline and postoperative serum creatinine to determine the presence of predefined significant change based on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO definition. RESULTS: Acute kidney injury occurred in 19 (10.5% patients after surgery. The incidence of acute kidney injury was 3.6% in Group 1 and 16.7% in Group 2. Elevated baseline hemoglobin A1c level was found to be associated with acute kidney injury (P=0.0001. None of the patients became hemodialysis dependent. The cut off value for acute kidney injury in our group of patients was 5.75%. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that, in non-diabetics, elevated preoperative hemoglobin A1c level may be associated with acute kidney injury in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Prospective randomized studies in larger groups are needed to confirm these results.

  8. Rescue therapy with Tanshinone IIA hinders transition of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease via targeting GSK3β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Xiang; Shao, Qiuyuan; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Miao; Gong, Rujun

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains challenging for clinical practice and poses a risk of developing progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) with no definitive treatment available yet. Tanshinone IIA, an active ingredient of Chinese herbal Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been widely used in Asia for the remarkable organoprotective activities. Its effect on established AKI, however, remains unknown. In mice with folic acid-induced AKI, delayed treatment with Tanshinone IIA, commenced early or late after injury, diminished renal expression of kidney injury markers, reduced apoptosis and improved kidney dysfunction, concomitant with mitigated histologic signs of AKI to CKD transition, including interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, and with an ameliorated inflammatory infiltration in tubulointerstitium and a favored M2-skewed macrophage polarization. Mechanistically, Tanshinone IIA blunted glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β overactivity and hyperactivation of its downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases that are centrally implicated in renal fibrogenesis and inflammation. Inhibition of GSK3β is likely a key mechanism mediating the therapeutic activity of Tanshinone IIA, because sodium nitroprusside, a GSK3β activator, largely offset its renoprotective effect. In confirmatory studies, rescue treatment with Tanshinone IIA likewise ameliorated ischemia/reperfusion-induced kidney destruction in mice. Our data suggest that Tanshinone IIA represents a valuable treatment that improves post-AKI kidney salvage via targeting GSK3β. PMID:27857162

  9. Xenon Protects Against Septic Acute Kidney Injury via miR-21 Target Signaling Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ping; Teng, Jie; Zou, Jianzhou; Fang, Yi; Wu, Xie; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Septic acute kidney injury is one of the most common and life-threatening complications in critically ill patients, and there is no approved effective treatment. We have shown xenon provides renoprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury and nephrotoxicity in rodents via inhibiting apoptosis. Here, we studied the effects of xenon preconditioning on septic acute kidney injury and its mechanism. Design: Experimental animal investigation. Setting: University research laboratory. Subjects: Experiments were performed with male C57BL/6 mice, 10 weeks of age, weighing 20–25 g. Interventions: We induced septic acute kidney injury by a single intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide at a dose of 20 mg/kg. Mice were exposed for 2 hours to either 70% xenon or 70% nitrogen, 24 hours before the onset of septic acute kidney injury. In vivo knockdown of miR-21 was performed using locked nucleic acid-modified anti-miR, the role of miR-21 in renal protection conferred by the xenon preconditioning was examined, and miR-21 signaling pathways were analyzed. Measurements and Main Results: Xenon preconditioning provided morphologic and functional renoprotection, characterized by attenuation of renal tubular damage, apoptosis, and a reduction in inflammation. Furthermore, xenon treatment significantly upregulated the expression of miR-21 in kidney, suppressed proinflammatory factor programmed cell death protein 4 expression and nuclear factor-κB activity, and increased interleukin-10 production. Meanwhile, xenon preconditioning also suppressed the expression of proapoptotic protein phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10, activating protein kinase B signaling pathway, subsequently increasing the expression of antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2, and inhibiting caspase-3 activity. Knockdown of miR-21 upregulated its target effectors programmed cell death protein 4 and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10

  10. Xenon Protects Against Septic Acute Kidney Injury via miR-21 Target Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ping; Teng, Jie; Zou, Jianzhou; Fang, Yi; Wu, Xie; Liang, Mingyu; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2015-07-01

    Septic acute kidney injury is one of the most common and life-threatening complications in critically ill patients, and there is no approved effective treatment. We have shown xenon provides renoprotection against ischemia-reperfusion injury and nephrotoxicity in rodents via inhibiting apoptosis. Here, we studied the effects of xenon preconditioning on septic acute kidney injury and its mechanism. Experimental animal investigation. University research laboratory. Experiments were performed with male C57BL/6 mice, 10 weeks of age, weighing 20-25 g. We induced septic acute kidney injury by a single intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide at a dose of 20 mg/kg. Mice were exposed for 2 hours to either 70% xenon or 70% nitrogen, 24 hours before the onset of septic acute kidney injury. In vivo knockdown of miR-21 was performed using locked nucleic acid-modified anti-miR, the role of miR-21 in renal protection conferred by the xenon preconditioning was examined, and miR-21 signaling pathways were analyzed. Xenon preconditioning provided morphologic and functional renoprotection, characterized by attenuation of renal tubular damage, apoptosis, and a reduction in inflammation. Furthermore, xenon treatment significantly upregulated the expression of miR-21 in kidney, suppressed proinflammatory factor programmed cell death protein 4 expression and nuclear factor-κB activity, and increased interleukin-10 production. Meanwhile, xenon preconditioning also suppressed the expression of proapoptotic protein phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10, activating protein kinase B signaling pathway, subsequently increasing the expression of antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2, and inhibiting caspase-3 activity. Knockdown of miR-21 upregulated its target effectors programmed cell death protein 4 and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 expression, resulted in an increase in apoptosis, and exacerbated lipopolysaccharide

  11. Molecular Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara Panizo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome caused by injury to skeletal muscle that usually leads to acute kidney injury (AKI. Rhabdomyolysis has been linked to different conditions, including severe trauma and intense physical exercise. Myoglobin-induced renal toxicity plays a key role in rhabdomyolysis-associated kidney damage by increasing oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, vasoconstriction, and apoptosis. New drugs that target the harmful effects of myoglobin have been recently developed, and some have been proven to be successful in animal models of acute renal failure secondary to rhabdomyolysis. This review aims to provide a comprehensive and updated overview of the pathological mechanisms of renal damage and describes new therapeutic approaches to this condition based on novel compounds that target key pathways involved in myoglobin-mediated kidney damage.

  12. Nephroprotection of punicalagin in rat model of endotoxemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Amr A; Qutub, Hatem O; Al-Melhim, Walid N

    2016-09-01

    The potential nephroprotection of punicalagin (PNG) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury in rats was investigated. Rats received a single i.v. dose of LPS (5 mg/kg), and treated with PNG (50 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 h before, and 1 h following LPS administration. LPS caused significant increases of serum creatinine and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. LPS also resulted in significant increases in interleukin-18, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and myeloperoxidase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, caspases 3, 8 and 9 activities, and a significant decrease in total antioxidant capacity in kidney tissues. PNG significantly ameliorated the alterations in the measured parameters. Additionally, PNG attenuated the histopathological injury and reduced kidney injury molecule-1 expression in kidneys of rats that received LPS. It was concluded that PNG ameliorated endotoxemic acute kidney injury in rats by counteracting inflammation, oxidative/nitrative stress and apoptosis.

  13. Incidence and risk factors for acute kidney injury after spine surgery using the RIFLE classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Bhiken I; Colquhoun, Douglas A; McKinney, William E; Smith, Andrew Bryant; Titus, Brian; McMurry, Timothy L; Raphael, Jacob; Durieux, Marcel E

    2014-05-01

    Earlier definitions of acute renal failure are not sensitive in identifying milder forms of acute kidney injury (AKI). The authors hypothesized that by applying the RIFLE criteria for acute renal failure (Risk of renal dysfunction, Injury to the kidney, Failure of kidney function, Loss of kidney function, and End-stage kidney disease) to thoracic and lumbar spine surgery, there would be a higher incidence of AKI. They also developed a model to predict the postoperative glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A hospital data repository was used to identify patients undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar spine surgery over a 5-year period (2006-2011). The lowest GFR in the first week after surgery was used to identify and categorize kidney injury if present. Risk factors were identified and a model was developed to predict postoperative GFR based on the defined risk factors. A total of 726 patients were identified over the study period. The incidence of AKI was 3.9% (n = 28) based on the RIFLE classification with 23 patients in the risk category and 5 in the injury category. No patient was classified into the failure category or required renal replacement therapy. The baseline GFR in the non-AKI and AKI groups was 80 and 79.8 ml/min, respectively. After univariate analysis, only hypertension was associated with postoperative AKI (p = 0.02). A model was developed to predict the postoperative GFR. This model accounted for 64.4% of the variation in the postoperative GFRs (r(2) = 0.644). The incidence of AKI in spine surgery is higher than previously reported, with all of the patients classified into either the risk or injury RIFLE categories. Because these categories have previously been shown to be associated with poor long-term outcomes, early recognition, management, and follow-up of these patients is important.

  14. Lung-protective mechanical ventilation does not protect against acute kidney injury in patients without lung injury at onset of mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortjens, Bart; Royakkers, Annick A. N. M.; Determann, Rogier M.; van Suijlen, Jeroen D. E.; Kamphuis, Stephan S.; Foppen, Jannetje; de Boer, Anita; Wieland, Cathrien W.; Spronk, Peter E.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that mechanical ventilation contributes to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), particularly in the setting of lung-injurious ventilator strategies. Objective: To determine whether ventilator settings in critically ill patients without

  15. Acute Kidney Injury Complicated Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Ozgurhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious mononucleosis is an acute lymphoproliferative disorder caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and seen most commonly in children and young adults. Clinical presentation of the disease is characterized by fever, tonsillopharyngitis, lymphadenopathy, and hepatosplenomegaly, whereas serological findings of this benign disorder include positive heterophilic antibody formation (transient increase in heterophilic antibodies and prominence of hematological lymphocytosis of more than 10% of atypical lymphocytes. An EBV infection is usually asymptomatic in childhood, but acute kidney injury can be a rare complication during its course. Most cases recover from the disease completely. Early recognition of EBV infection and estimation of its complication are important for its prognosis. In light of previous literature, we discuss the case evaluated as an EBV infection complicated by acute kidney injury in early childhood and results of tubulointerstitial nephritis shown on a renal biopsy that was later diagnosed as an EBV infection by serological examination.

  16. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in a Young Adult Presenting as Hepatitis and Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Heincelman MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults is a relatively rare malignancy. The typical presentation includes signs and symptoms associated with bone marrow failure, including fevers, infections, fatigue, and excessive bruising. In this article, we report an unusual systemic presentation of ALL in a previously healthy 18-year-old man. He initially presented with several-day history of nausea and vomiting, 10-pound weight loss, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain with evidence of acute hepatocellular liver injury (elevations in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase and elevation in serum creatinine. Further history revealed that he just joined the Marine Corp; in preparation, he had been lifting weights and taking protein and creatine supplements. A complete serological evaluation for liver disease was negative and creatine phosphokinase was normal. His aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase declined, and he was discharged with expected improvement. However, he returned one week later with continued symptoms and greater elevation of aminotransferases. Liver biopsy was nondiagnostic, revealing scattered portal and lobular inflammatory cells (primarily lymphocytes felt to be consistent with drug-induced liver injury or viral hepatitis. Given his elevated creatinine, unresponsive to aggressive volume expansion, a kidney biopsy was performed, revealing normal histology. He subsequently developed an extensive left lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. Given his deep venous thrombosis, his peripheral blood was sent for flow cytometry, which revealed lymphoblasts. Bone marrow biopsy revealed 78% blasts with markers consistent with acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. This report emphasizes that right upper quadrant abdominal pain with liver test abnormalities may be the initial presentation of a systemic illness such as ALL.

  17. Acute kidney injury and post-reperfusion syndrome in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbro, Ilaria; Tinti, Francesca; Scalera, Irene; Evison, Felicity; Gunson, Bridget; Sharif, Adnan; Ferguson, James; Muiesan, Paolo; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2016-11-14

    In the past decades liver transplantation (LT) has become the treatment of choice for patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD). The chronic shortage of cadaveric organs for transplantation led to the utilization of a greater number of marginal donors such as older donors or donors after circulatory death (DCD). The improved survival of transplanted patients has increased the frequency of long-term complications, in particular chronic kidney disease (CKD). Acute kidney injury (AKI) post-LT has been recently recognized as an important risk factor for the occurrence of de novo CKD in the long-term outcome. The onset of AKI post-LT is multifactorial, with pre-LT risk factors involved, including higher Model for End-stage Liver Disease score, more sever ESLD and pre-existing renal dysfunction, either with intra-operative conditions, in particular ischaemia reperfusion injury responsible for post-reperfusion syndrome (PRS) that can influence recipient's morbidity and mortality. Post-reperfusion syndrome-induced AKI is an important complication post-LT that characterizes kidney involvement caused by PRS with mechanisms not clearly understood and implication on graft and patient survival. Since pre-LT risk factors may influence intra-operative events responsible for PRS-induced AKI, we aim to consider all the relevant aspects involved in PRS-induced AKI in the setting of LT and to identify all studies that better clarified the specific mechanisms linking PRS and AKI. A PubMed search was conducted using the terms liver transplantation AND acute kidney injury; liver transplantation AND post-reperfusion syndrome; acute kidney injury AND post-reperfusion syndrome; acute kidney injury AND DCD AND liver transplantation. Five hundred seventy four articles were retrieved on PubMed search. Results were limited to title/abstract of English-language articles published between 2000 and 2015. Twenty-three studies were identified that specifically evaluated incidence, risk factors

  18. Ibuprofen-associated acute kidney injury in dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Alejandro; Ezquer, Mauricio; Elmo, María Eugenia; Molini, Andrea; Thorel, Claudia; Torrents, Milagros; Toledo, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) induce acute kidney injury (AKI) in volume-depleted patients; however the prevalence of this complication is likely underestimated. We assessed the impact of ibuprofen exposure on renal function among dehydrated children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) to further characterize NSAID-associated AKI. Over a 1-year period dehydrated children with AGE (n = 105) were prospectively enrolled and grouped as cases, presenting with AKI (n = 46) or controls, not presenting with AKI (n = 59). AKI was defined by pediatric RIFLE (pRIFLE) criteria. Among the children enrolled in the study, AKI prevalence was 44 %, and 34 (54 %) of the 63 patients who received ibuprofen developed renal impairment. Relative to the controls, children presenting with AKI were younger (median age 0.66 vs. 1.74 years; p ibuprofen more frequently (74 vs. 49 %, p = 0.01). After adjusting for the degree of dehydration, ibuprofen exposure remained an independent risk factor for AKI (p ibuprofen exposure. All cases fulled recovered from AKI. Ibuprofen-associated AKI was 54 % in our cohort of dehydrated children with AGE. Drug exposure increased the risk for developing AKI by more than twofold, independent of the magnitude of the dehydration.

  19. The role of phosphodiesterase 3 in endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Jeong Wook

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute kidney injury frequently accompanies sepsis. Endotoxin is known to reduce tissue levels of cAMP and low levels of cAMP have been associated with renal injury. We, therefore, hypothesized that endotoxin induced renal injury by activating phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3 which metabolizes cAMP and that amrinone an inhibitor of PDE3 would prevent the renal injury. Methods Animals were divided into three groups (n = 7/group: 1 Control (0.9% NaCl infusion without LPS; 2 LPS (0.9% NaCl infusion with LPS; 3 Amrinone+LPS (Amrinone infusion with LPS. Either lipopolysaccharide (LPS or vehicle was injected via the jugular vein and the rats followed for 3 hours. We explored the expression of PDE3 isoenzymes and the concentrations of cAMP in the tissue. Results The PDE3B gene but not PDE3A was upregulated in the kidney of LPS group. Immunohistochemistry also showed that PDE3B was expressed in the distal tubule in the controls and LPS caused PDE3B expression in the proximal as well. However, PDE3A was not expressed in the kidney either in the control or LPS treated groups. Tissue level of cAMP was decreased after LPS and was associated with an increase in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, ultrastructural proximal tubular changes, and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the endotoxemic kidney. In septic animals the phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor, amrinone, preserved the tissue cAMP level, renal structural changes, and attenuated the increased blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and iNOS expression in the kidney. Conclusion These findings suggest a significant role for PDE3B as an important mediator of LPS-induced acute kidney injury.

  20. Octreotide Attenuates Acute Kidney Injury after Hepatic Ischemia and Reperfusion by Enhancing Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiping; Zou, Shuangfa; Candiotti, Keith A; Peng, Yanhua; Zhang, Qinya; Xiao, Weiqiang; Wen, Yiyun; Wu, Jiao; Yang, Jinfeng

    2017-02-16

    Octreotide exerts a protective effect in hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (HIR) injury. However, whether octreotide preconditioning could also reduce acute kidney injury (AKI) after HIR is unknown. This study was designed to investigate the role of octreotide in AKI after HIR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with octreotide or octreotide combined with 3-methyladenine (autophagy inhibitor, 3MA). Plasma creatinine, inflammation markers (e.g., TNF-α and IL-6 etc.), apoptosis, autophagy and phosphorylation of protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (Akt/mTOR/p70S6K) in the kidney were measured after 60 minutes of liver ischemia and 24 hours of reperfusion for each rat. Octreotide pretreatment significantly preserved renal function and reduced the severity of renal injury. Moreover, octreotide alleviated inflammation and apoptosis in the kidney after HIR. Additionally, octreotide induced autophagy and autophagy inhibition with 3MA markedly reversed the renoprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects of octreotide after HIR. Finally, octreotide abrogated the activation of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR and p70S6K in the kidney after HIR. Our results indicate that octreotide reduced renal injury after HIR due to its induction of autophagy. The enhancement of autophagy may be potentially linked to the octreotide mediated Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway deactivation and reduction of kidney inflammation and apoptosis after HIR.

  1. The role of medications and their management in acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDaniel BL

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bradford L McDaniel,1 Michael L Bentley1,2 1Department of Pharmacy, Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, VA, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Science, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA, USA Abstract: Prior to 2002, the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF varied as there was no standard definition. To better understand its incidence and etiology and to develop treatment and prevention strategies, while moving research forward, the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative workgroup developed the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage kidney disease classification. After continued data suggesting that even small increases in serum creatinine lead to worse outcomes, the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN modified the RIFLE criteria and used the term acute kidney injury (AKI instead of ARF. These classification and staging systems provide the clinician and researcher a starting point for refining the understanding and treatment of AKI. An important initial step in evaluating AKI is determining the likely location of injury, generally classified as prerenal, renal, or postrenal. There is no single biomarker or test that definitively defines the mechanism of the injury. Identifying the insult(s requires a thorough assessment of the patient and their medical and medication histories. Prerenal injuries arise primarily due to renal hypoperfusion. This may be the result of systemic or focal conditions or secondary to the effects of drugs such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors (CIs, and modulators of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. Renal, or intrinsic, injury is an overarching term that represents complex conditions leading to considerable damage to a component of the intrinsic renal system (renal tubules, glomerulus, vascular structures, interstitium, or renal tubule obstruction. Acute tubular necrosis and acute interstitial nephritis are the more common types of intrinsic renal injury. Each type of

  2. Severe acute dehydration in a desert rodent elicits a transcriptional response that effectively prevents kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManes, Matthew David

    2017-08-01

    Animals living in desert environments are forced to survive despite severe heat, intense solar radiation, and both acute and chronic dehydration. These animals have evolved phenotypes that effectively address these environmental stressors. To begin to understand the ways in which the desert-adapted rodent Peromyscus eremicus survives, reproductively mature adults were subjected to 72 h of water deprivation, during which they lost, on average, 23% of their body weight. The animals reacted via a series of changes in the kidney, which included modulating expression of genes responsible for reducing the rate of transcription and maintaining water and salt balance. Extracellular matrix turnover appeared to be decreased, and apoptosis was limited. In contrast to the canonical human response, serum creatinine and other biomarkers of kidney injury were not elevated, suggesting that changes in gene expression related to acute dehydration may effectively prohibit widespread kidney damage in the cactus mouse. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Systemic and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalins are poor predictors of acute kidney injury in unselected critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, Annick A.; Bouman, Catherine S.; Stassen, Pauline M.; Korevaar, Joke C.; Binnekade, Jan M.; van de Hoek, Willem; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in serum and urine have been suggested as potential early predictive biological markers of acute kidney injury (AKI) in selected critically ill patients. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a multicenter prospective

  4. Systemic and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalins are poor predictors of acute kidney injury in unselected critically ill patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Royakkers, A.A.; Bouman, C.S.; Stassen, P.M.; Korevaar, J.C.; Binnekade, J.M.; Hoek, W. van der; Kuiper, M.A.; Spronk, P.E.; Schultz, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in serum and urine have been suggested as potential early predictive biological markers of acute kidney injury (AKI) in selected critically ill patients. Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a multicenter prospective

  5. Kidney biomarkers in MCPA-induced acute kidney injury in rats: reduced clearance enhances early biomarker performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunnapuk, Klintean; Liu, Xin; Gobe, Glenda C; Endre, Zoltan H; Peake, Philip W; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2014-03-21

    For improved early detection and assessment of severe acute kidney damage following accidental or intentional ingestion of the herbicide MCPA, we compared a panel of 14 novel kidney injury biomarkers with plasma creatinine. Male Wistar rats received four different oral doses of MCPA and plasma and urine biomarker levels were measured at 8, 24 and 48 h after MCPA exposure. Diagnostic performances using absolute levels, urine levels normalized to urine creatinine or urinary excretion rate were determined by ROC analysis. Plasma creatinine remained the best early biomarker for predicting histological changes at 48 h. The performance of plasma cystatin C in mirroring kidney function was similar to that of plasma creatinine. While urine concentrations were generally less predictive, normalization by urine creatinine greatly improved the performance of several biomarkers. This may be due to an apparent amplification of the biomarker signal on normalizing to creatinine, in the presence of a declining glomerular filtration rate prior to reaching steady state. Normalized 8 h osteopontin and albumin concentrations outperformed other normalized biomarkers in predicting histological changes at later times. Normalized urinary kidney injury molecule-1 at 48 h also correlated well with the degree of kidney damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of Acute Kidney Injury and Acid-Base Balance in the Septic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyker, Paul D; Pérez, Xosé L; Liu, Kathleen D

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an abrupt decrease in kidney function that takes place over hours to days. Sepsis is the leading cause of AKI and portends a particularly high morbidity and mortality, although the severity may vary from a transient rise in serum creatinine to end-stage renal disease. With regard to acid-base management in septic AKI, caution should be used with hyperchloremic crystalloid solutions, and dialysis is often used in the setting of severe acidosis. In the future, biomarkers may help clinicians identify AKI earlier and allow for potential interventions before the development of severe AKI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ameliorative effects of pine bark extract on cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Chul; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, Na-Rae; Shin, In-Sik; Kim, Yun-Bae; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the dose-response effects of pine bark extract (PBE, pycnogenol®) on oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic changes induced by cisplatin (Csp) in rats. The ameliorating potential of PBE was evaluated after orally administering PBE at doses of 10 or 20 mg/kg for 10 days. Acute kidney injury was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Csp at 7 mg/kg on test day 5. Csp treatment caused acute kidney injury manifested by elevated levels of serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (CRE) with corresponding histopathological changes, including degeneration of tubular epithelial cells, hyaline casts in the tubular lumen, and inflammatory cell infiltration (interstitial nephritis). Csp also induced significant apoptotic changes in renal tubular cells. In addition, Csp treatment induced high levels of oxidative stress, as evidenced by an increased level of malondialdehyde, depletion of the reduced glutathione (GSH) content, and decreased activities of glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in kidney tissues. On the contrary, PBE treatment lowered BUN and CRE levels and effectively attenuated histopathological alterations and apoptotic changes induced by Csp. Additionally, treatment with PBE suppressed lipid peroxidation, prevented depletion of GSH, and enhanced activities of the antioxidant enzymes in kidney tissue. These results indicate that PBE has a cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic changes caused by Csp in the rat kidney, which may be attributed to both increase of antioxidant enzyme activities and inhibition of lipid peroxidation.

  8. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E. M.; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children’s Specialized Hospit...

  9. Perioperative risk factors for acute kidney injury after liver resection surgery: an historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomozawa, Arisa; Ishikawa, Seiji; Shiota, Nobuhiro; Cholvisudhi, Phantila; Makita, Koshi

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the incidence and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) after liver resection surgery and to clarify the relationship between postoperative AKI and outcome. We conducted a historical cohort study of patients who underwent liver resection surgery with sevoflurane anesthesia from January 2004 to October 2011. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network classification within 72 hr after the surgery. Patient data, surgical and anesthetic data, and laboratory data were extracted manually from the patients' electronic charts. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify perioperative risk factors for postoperative AKI. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed in 78 of 642 patients (12.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.7 to 14.9). Multivariable analysis showed an independent association between postoperative AKI and preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.74; 95% CI: 0.64 to 0.85), preoperative hypertension (aOR 2.10; 95% CI: 1.11 to 3.97), and intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (aOR 1.04; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.07). Development of AKI within 72 hr after liver resection surgery was associated with increased hospital mortality, prolonged length of stay, and increased rates of mechanical ventilation, reintubation, and renal replacement therapy. Perioperative risk factors for AKI after liver resection surgery are similar to those established for other surgical procedures. Further studies are needed to establish causality and to determine whether interventions on modifiable risk factors can reduce the incidence of postoperative AKI and improve patient outcome. This study was registered at the University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) Center (UMIN 000008089).

  10. Hashimoto's thyroiditis presenting as Hoffman's syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Gasim Salaheldin; Zaid, Hassan Musa; Moloney, Manus

    2014-01-01

    An otherwise healthy young man presented with gradual progressive fatigue for the past 12 months disturbing his daily activities. Clinical examination revealed marked generalised muscular hypertrophy including the temporalis muscles bilaterally. Investigation revealed that the patient was grossly hypothyroid due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis with rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. The finding of muscle weakness and pseudohypertrophy in association with hypothyroidism is called Hoffman’s syn...

  11. Implications of dynamic changes in miR-192 expression in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Yuan; Xue, Song; Wang, Xudong; Dai, Huili; Qian, Jiaqi; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng

    2017-03-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) with poor outcomes. While many important functions of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in various diseases, few studies reported miRNAs in acute kidney IRI, especially the dynamic changes in their expression and their implications during disease progression. The expression of miR-192, a specific kidney-enriched miRNA, was assessed in both the plasma and kidney of IRI rats at different time points after kidney injury and compared to renal function and kidney histological changes. The results were validated in the plasma of the selected patients with AKI after cardiac surgery compared with those matched patients without AKI. The performance characteristics of miR-192 were summarized using area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC-ROC). MiRNA profiling in plasma led to the identification of 42 differentially expressed miRNAs in the IRI group compared to the sham group. MiR-192 was kidney-enriched and chosen for further validation. Real-time PCR showed that miR-192 levels increased by fourfold in the plasma and decreased by about 40% in the kidney of IRI rats. Plasma miR-192 expression started increasing at 3 h and peaked at 12 h, while kidney miR-192 expression started decreasing at 6 h and remained at a low level for 7 days after reperfusion. Plasma miR-192 level in patients with AKI increased at the time of ICU admission, was stable for 2 h and decreased after 24 h. AUC-ROC was 0.673 (95% CI: 0.540-0.806, p = 0.014). Plasma miR-192 expression was induced in a time-dependent manner after IRI in rats and patients with AKI after cardiac surgery, comparably to the kidney injury development and recovery process, and may be useful for the detection of AKI.

  12. Oliguric acute kidney injury as a main symptom of bradycardia and arteriosclerosis resolved by pacemaker implantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliquett, Rainer U; Radler, Daniel; Tamm, Alexander; Greinert, Daniel; Greinert, Robin; Girndt, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular comorbidities regularly determine renal function. We report a case of acute kidney injury (Acute Kidney Injury Network stage 3) due to an intermittent third-degree atrioventricular block, which had not been diagnosed before. A 76-year-old Caucasian man with liver cirrhosis due to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and type-2 diabetes was cognitively impaired and had reduced vigilance presumably caused by hepatic encephalopathy and/or Alzheimer dementia. Within 2 years, two hospitalizations occurred for syncope attributed to orthostatic failure and hypovolemia. During the last hospitalization, oliguric acute kidney injury occurred. Sonography ruled out a post-renal cause. His renal resistive index was 1.0; his heart rate was below 50 beats per minute. After cessation of beta-blocker therapy, Holter electrocardiogram showed a new intermittent third-degree atrioventricular block with pauses for less than 3 seconds. Pacemaker insertion resolved his acute kidney injury, despite resumption of beta-blocker therapy. During four months of follow-up, syncope has not occurred, and vigilance was stable. However, his renal resistive index of 1.0 remained. Here, typical neurologic symptoms of bradycardia were misclassified. Diagnostic work-up of oliguric acute kidney injury revealed intermittent third-degree heart block. The pathomechanism of acute kidney injury relates to relevant bradycardia and increased vascular stiffness attenuating arterial diastolic renal blood flow.

  13. Outpatient Nephrology Referral Rates after Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Edward D.; Peterson, Josh F.; Eden, Svetlana K.; Hung, Adriana M.; Speroff, Theodore; Ikizler, T. Alp

    2012-01-01

    AKI associates with an increased risk for the development and progression of CKD and mortality. Processes of care after an episode of AKI are not well described. Here, we examined the likelihood of nephrology referral among survivors of AKI at risk for subsequent decline in kidney function in a US Department of Veterans Affairs database. We identified 3929 survivors of AKI hospitalized between January 2003 and December 2008 who had an estimated GFR (eGFR) nephrology referral before dying, initiating dialysis, or experiencing an improvement in kidney function was 8.5% (95% confidence interval, 7.6–9.4). Severity of AKI did not affect referral rates. These data demonstrate that a minority of at-risk survivors are referred for nephrology care after an episode of AKI. Determining how to best identify survivors of AKI who are at highest risk for complications and progression of CKD could facilitate early nephrology-based interventions. PMID:22158435

  14. Incidence and relevance of acute kidney injury in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cabiati, Angelo; Bertoli, Silvio V; Assanelli, Emilio; Marana, Ivana; De Metrio, Monica; Rubino, Mara; Moltrasio, Marco; Grazi, Marco; Campodonico, Jeness; Milazzo, Valentina; Veglia, Fabrizio; Lauri, Gianfranco; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2013-03-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and is associated with adverse short- and long-term outcomes. To date, however, no standardized definition of AKI has been used for patients with ACS. As a result, information on its true incidence and the clinical and prognostic relevance according to the severity of renal function deterioration are still lacking. We retrospectively studied 3,210 patients with ACS. AKI was identified on the basis of the changes in serum creatinine during hospitalization according to the AKI Network criteria. Overall, 409 patients (13%) developed AKI: 262 (64%) had stage 1, 25 (6%) stage 2, and 122 (30%) stage 3 AKI. In-hospital mortality was greater in patients with AKI than in those without AKI (21% vs 1%; p <0.001). The adjusted risk of death increased with increasing AKI severity. Compared to no AKI, the adjusted odds ratio for death was 3.5 (95% confidence interval 1.79 to 6.83) with stage 1 AKI and 31.2 (95% confidence interval 16.96 to 57.45) with stage 2 to 3 AKI. A significant parallel increase in major adverse cardiac events was also observed comparing patients without AKI and those with stage 2 to 3 AKI. In conclusion, in patients with ACS, AKI is a frequent complication, and the graded increase of its severity, as assessed using the AKI Network classification, is associated with a progressive increased risk of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute kidney injury due to rhabdomyolysis after status epilepticus: Two pediatric case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Midhat Elmacı

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is defined as degeneration of skeletal muscle due to traumatic or non-traumatic causes. With the injury of sarcolemma, myocyte contents (myoglobin, enzymes and electrolytes leakage into the plasma and urine occurs. If rhabdomyolysis is not recognized and untreated, severe even fatal complications such as acute kidney injury (AKI, hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia, hypovolemia, muscle necrosis, cardiac arrythmias and compartment syndrome may occur. Status epilepticus is an uncommon cause of rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. We report here two pediatric patients, who developed myoglobinuria and AKI due to status epilepticus. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 517-520

  16. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Dhanapriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months.

  17. Low-dose hydralazine prevents fibrosis in a murine model of acute kidney injury-to-chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampe, Björn; Steinle, Ulrike; Tampe, Désirée; Carstens, Julienne L; Korsten, Peter; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Müller, Gerhard A; Kalluri, Raghu; Zeisberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) are intrinsically tied syndromes. In this regard, the acutely injured kidney often does not achieve its full regenerative capacity and AKI directly transitions into progressive CKD associated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Underlying mechanisms of such AKI-to-CKD progression are still incompletely understood and specific therapeutic interventions are still elusive. Because epigenetic modifications play a role in maintaining tissue fibrosis, we used a murine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury to determine whether aberrant promoter methylation of RASAL1 contributes causally to the switch between physiological regeneration and tubulointerstitial fibrogenesis, a hallmark of AKI-to-CKD progression. It is known that the antihypertensive drug hydralazine has demethylating activity, and that its optimum demethylating activity occurs at concentrations below blood pressure-lowering doses. Administration of low-dose hydralazine effectively induced expression of hydroxylase TET3, which catalyzed RASAL1 hydroxymethylation and subsequent RASAL1 promoter demethylation. Hydralazine-induced CpG promoter demethylation subsequently attenuated renal fibrosis and preserved excretory renal function independent of its blood pressure-lowering effects. In comparison, RASAL1 demethylation and inhibition of tubulointerstitial fibrosis was not detected upon administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor Ramipril in this model. Thus, RASAL1 promoter methylation and subsequent transcriptional RASAL1 suppression plays a causal role in AKI-to-CKD progression. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Role of Eugenol in the Prevention of Acute Pancreatitis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markakis, Charalampos; Tsaroucha, Alexandra; Papalois, Apostolos E.; Lambropoulou, Maria; Spartalis, Eleftherios; Tsigalou, Christina; Romanidis, Konstantinos; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory intra-abdominal disease, which takes a severe form in 15–20% of patients and can result in high mortality especially when complicated by acute renal failure. The aim of this study is to assess the possible reduction in the extent of acute kidney injury after administration of eugenol in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Materials and Methods. 106 male Wistar rats weighing 220–350 g were divided into 3 groups: (1) Sham, with sham surgery; (2) Control, with induction of acute pancreatitis, through ligation of the biliopancreatic duct; and (3) Eugenol, with induction of acute pancreatitis and eugenol administration at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Serum urea and creatinine, histopathological changes, TNF-α, IL-6, and MPO activity in the kidneys were evaluated at predetermined time intervals. Results. The group that was administered eugenol showed milder histopathological changes than the Control group, TNF-α activity was milder in the Eugenol group, and there was no difference in activity for MPO and IL-6. Serum urea and creatinine levels were lower in the Eugenol group than in the Control group. Conclusions. Eugenol administration was protective for the kidneys in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis in rats. PMID:26884642

  19. Loxosceles gaucho venom-induced acute kidney injury--in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui V Lucato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accidents caused by Loxosceles spider may cause severe systemic reactions, including acute kidney injury (AKI. There are few experimental studies assessing Loxosceles venom effects on kidney function in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to test Loxosceles gaucho venom (LV nephrotoxicity and to assess some of the possible mechanisms of renal injury, rats were studied up to 60 minutes after LV 0.24 mg/kg or saline IV injection (control. LV caused a sharp and significant drop in glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow and urinary output and increased renal vascular resistance, without changing blood pressure. Venom infusion increased significantly serum creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase. In the LV group renal histology analysis found acute epithelial tubular cells degenerative changes, presence of cell debris and detached epithelial cells in tubular lumen without glomerular or vascular changes. Immunohistochemistry disclosed renal deposition of myoglobin and hemoglobin. LV did not cause injury to a suspension of fresh proximal tubules isolated from rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Loxosceles gaucho venom injection caused early AKI, which occurred without blood pressure variation. Changes in glomerular function occurred likely due to renal vasoconstriction and rhabdomyolysis. Direct nephrotoxicity could not be demonstrated in vitro. The development of a consistent model of Loxosceles venom-induced AKI and a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the renal injury may allow more efficient ways to prevent or attenuate the systemic injury after Loxosceles bite.

  20. Acute Superoxide Radical Scavenging Reduces Blood Pressure but Does Not Influence Kidney Function in Hypertensive Rats with Postischemic Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Miloradović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in hypertensive surroundings. We investigated superoxide radical molecules influence on systemic haemodynamic and kidney function in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with induced postischemic AKI. Experiment was performed in anesthetized adult male SHR. The right kidney was removed, and left renal artery was subjected to ischemia by clamping for 40 minutes. The treated group received synthetic superoxide dismutase mimetic TEMPOL in the femoral vein 5 minutes before, during, and 175 minutes after the period of reperfusion, while the control AKI group received the vehicle via the same route. All parameters were measured 24 h after renal reperfusion. TEMPOL treatment significantly decreased mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance P<0.05 compared to AKI control. It also increased cardiac output and catalase activity P<0.05. Lipid peroxidation and renal vascular resistance were decreased in TEMPOL P<0.05. Plasma creatinine and kidney morphological parameters were unchanged among TEMPOL treated and control groups. Our study shows that superoxide radicals participate in haemodynamic control, but acute superoxide scavenging is ineffective in glomerular and tubular improvement, probably due to hypertension-induced strong endothelial dysfunction which neutralizes beneficial effects of O2− scavenging.

  1. Kidney injury in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Krag, Aleksander; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent in patients with cirrhosis. AKI and hyponatraemia are major determinants of the poor prognosis in advanced cirrhosis. The hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) denotes a functional and potential reversible impairment of renal function. Type 1 HRS, a special type of AKI,...

  2. Influence of Acute Kidney Injury Defined by the Pediatric Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage Renal Disease Score on the Clinical Course of PICU Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Felipe Cezar; Ramos Garcia, Pedro Celiny; Mattiello, Rita; Dresser, Daiane; Fiori, Humberto Holmer; Korb, Cecilia; Dalcin, Tiago Chagas; Piva, Jefferson Pedro

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of the pediatric-modified Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage renal disease criteria for disease course severity in patients with or without acute kidney injury admitted to a PICU. Retrospective cohort study. A 12-bed PICU at a tertiary referral center in Southern Brazil. All patients admitted to the study unit over a 1-year period. A database of all eligible patients was analyzed retrospectively. Patients were classified by pediatric-modified Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage renal disease score at admission and worst pediatric-modified Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage renal disease score during PICU hospitalization. The outcomes of interest were length of PICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of vasoactive drug therapy, and mortality. The Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 was used to assess overall disease severity at the time of PICU admission. Of 375 patients, 169 (45%) presented acute kidney injury at the time of admission and 37 developed acute kidney injury during PICU stay, for a total of 206 of 375 patients (55%) diagnosed with acute kidney injury during the study period. The median Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 score predicted a mortality rate of 9% among non-acute kidney injury patients versus a mortality rate of 16% among acute kidney injury patients (p = 0.006). The mortality of patients classified as pediatric-modified Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage renal disease F was double that predicted by Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 (7 vs 3.2). Patients classified as having severe acute kidney injury (pediatric-modified Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-stage renal disease I + F) exhibited higher mortality (14.1%; p = 0.001) and prolonged PICU length of stay (median, 7 d; p = 0.001) when compared with other patients. Acute kidney injury is a very frequent occurrence among patients admitted to PICUs. The degree of acute kidney injury severity, as assessed by the pediatric-modified Risk

  3. Mechanisms of acute kidney injury induced by experimental Lonomia obliqua envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Santi, Lucélia; Beys-da-Silva, Walter O; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus Silva; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Yates, John R; Vieira, Maria Aparecida Ribeiro; Guimarães, Jorge Almeida

    2015-03-01

    Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation causes acute kidney injury (AKI), which can be responsible for its deadly actions. This study evaluates the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. To characterize L. obliqua venom effects, we subcutaneously injected rats and examined renal functional, morphological and biochemical parameters at several time points. We also performed discovery-based proteomic analysis to measure protein expression to identify molecular pathways of renal disease. L. obliqua envenomation causes acute tubular necrosis, which is associated with renal inflammation; formation of hematic casts, resulting from intravascular hemolysis; increase in vascular permeability and fibrosis. The dilation of Bowman's space and glomerular tuft is related to fluid leakage and intra-glomerular fibrin deposition, respectively, since tissue factor procoagulant activity increases in the kidney. Systemic hypotension also contributes to these alterations and to the sudden loss of basic renal functions, including filtration and excretion capacities, urinary concentration and maintenance of fluid homeostasis. In addition, envenomed kidneys increase the expression of proteins involved in cell stress, inflammation, tissue injury, heme-induced oxidative stress, coagulation and complement system activation. Finally, the localization of the venom in renal tissue agrees with morphological and functional alterations, suggesting also a direct nephrotoxic activity. In conclusion, the mechanisms of L. obliqua-induced AKI are complex involving mainly glomerular and tubular functional impairment and vascular alterations. These results are important to understand the mechanisms of renal injury and may suggest more efficient ways to prevent or attenuate the pathology of Lonomia's envenomation.

  4. Mechanisms of Acute Kidney Injury Induced by Experimental Lonomia obliqua Envenomation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Markus; Santi, Lucélia; Beys-da-Silva, Walter O.; Oliveira, Fabrício Marcus Silva; Caliari, Marcelo Vidigal; Yates, John R.; Ribeiro, Maria Aparecida; Guimarães, Jorge Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Background Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation causes acute kidney injury (AKI), which can be responsible for its deadly actions. This study evaluates the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. Methods To characterize L. obliqua venom effects we subcutaneously injected rats and examined renal functional, morphological and biochemical parameters at several time points. We also performed discovery based proteomic analysis to measure protein expression to identify molecular pathways of renal disease. Results L. obliqua envenomation causes acute tubular necrosis, which is associated with renal inflammation; formation of hematic casts, resulting from intravascular hemolysis; increase in vascular permeability and fibrosis. The dilation of Bowman’s space and glomerular tuft is related to fluid leakage and intra-glomerular fibrin deposition, respectively, since tissue factor procoagulant activity increases in the kidney. Systemic hypotension also contributes to these alterations and to the sudden loss of basic renal functions, including filtration and excretion capacities, urinary concentration and maintenance of fluid homeostasis. In addition, envenomed kidneys increases expression of proteins involved in cell stress, inflammation, tissue injury, heme-induced oxidative stress, coagulation and complement system activation. Finally, the localization of the venom in renal tissue agrees with morphological and functional alterations, suggesting also a direct nephrotoxic activity. Conclusions Mechanisms of L. obliqua-induced AKI are complex involving mainly glomerular and tubular functional impairment and vascular alterations. These results are important to understand the mechanisms of renal injury and may suggest more efficient ways to prevent or attenuate the pathology of Lonomia’s envenomation. PMID:24798088

  5. Nonpharmacological Strategies to Prevent Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweena Susantitaphong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced AKI (CI-AKI has been one of the leading causes for hospital-acquired AKI and is associated with independent risk for adverse clinical outcomes including morbidity and mortality. The aim of this review is to provide a brief summary of the studies that focus on nonpharmacological strategies to prevent CI-AKI, including routine identification of at-risk patients, use of appropriate hydration regimens, withdrawal of nephrotoxic drugs, selection of low-osmolar contrast media or isoosmolar contrast media, and using the minimum volume of contrast media as possible. There is no need to schedule dialysis in relation to injection of contrast media or injection of contrast agent in relation to dialysis program. Hemodialysis cannot protect the poorly functioning kidney against CI-AKI.

  6. Hyperpolarized 13 C,15 N2 -urea T2 relaxation changes in acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Christian Østergaard; Nielsen, Per Mose; Qi, Haiyun

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the correlation between renal ischemia and 13 C-urea T2 relaxation rate in an acute kidney injury (AKI) rat model. METHODS: Six rats subjected to unilateral renal ischemia were investigated. Creatinine clearance, urine output, plasma creatinine as well as blood-urea nitrogen...... (BUN) values were acquired before and after the procedure. 1 H T2* mapping was acquired using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) MRI and hyperpolarized 13 C-urea T2 mapping was acquired using a 2D golden-angle radial approach. Kidney perfusion was estimated using noncontrast flow alternating...... inversion recovery arterial spin labeling. RESULTS: All rats showed clinical signs of AKI with increased plasma creatinine and increased BUN. Whole kidney 13 C-urea T2 significantly decreased 26% (P = 0.001) 24 h after reperfusion. A significantly different (3.7 times steeper; P = 0.008) osmolality gradient...

  7. The potential use of biomarkers in predicting contrast-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreucci M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Michele Andreucci,1 Teresa Faga,1 Eleonora Riccio,2 Massimo Sabbatini,2 Antonio Pisani,2 Ashour Michael,1 1Department of Health Sciences, University “Magna Graecia” of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, 2Department of Public Health, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy Abstract: Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI is a problem associated with the use of iodinated contrast media, causing kidney dysfunction in patients with preexisting renal failure. It accounts for 12% of all hospital-acquired kidney failure and increases the length of hospitalization, a situation that is worsening with increasing numbers of patients with comorbidities, including those requiring cardiovascular interventional procedures. So far, its diagnosis has relied upon the rise in creatinine levels, which is a late marker of kidney damage and is believed to be inadequate. Therefore, there is an urgent need for biomarkers that can detect CI-AKI sooner and more reliably. In recent years, many new biomarkers have been characterized for AKI, and these are discussed particularly with their use in known CI-AKI models and studies and include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, cystatin C (Cys-C, kidney injury molecule-1, interleukin-18, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase, and L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP. The potential of miRNA and metabolomic technology is also mentioned. Early detection of CI-AKI may lead to early intervention and therefore improve patient outcome, and in future any one or a combination of several of these markers together with development in technology for their analysis may prove effective in this respect. Keywords: radiocontrast media, acute renal failure, markers, renal injury

  8. Autophagy Limits Endotoxemic Acute Kidney Injury and Alters Renal Tubular Epithelial Cell Cytokine Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy S Leventhal

    Full Text Available Sepsis related acute kidney injury (AKI is a common in-hospital complication with a dismal prognosis. Our incomplete understanding of disease pathogenesis has prevented the identification of hypothesis-driven preventive or therapeutic interventions. Increasing evidence in ischemia-reperfusion and nephrotoxic mouse models of AKI support the theory that autophagy protects renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC from injury. However, the role of RTEC autophagy in septic AKI remains unclear. We observed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a mediator of gram-negative bacterial sepsis, induces RTEC autophagy in vivo and in vitro through TLR4-initiated signaling. We modeled septic AKI through intraperitoneal LPS injection in mice in which autophagy-related protein 7 was specifically knocked out in the renal proximal tubules (ATG7KO. Compared to control littermates, ATG7KO mice developed more severe renal dysfunction (24hr BUN 100.1mg/dl +/- 14.8 vs 54.6mg/dl +/- 11.3 and parenchymal injury. After injection with LPS, analysis of kidney lysates identified higher IL-6 expression and increased STAT3 activation in kidney lysates from ATG7KO mice compared to controls. In vitro experiments confirmed an altered response to LPS in RTEC with genetic or pharmacological impairment of autophagy. In conclusion, RTEC autophagy protects against endotoxin induced injury and regulates downstream effects of RTEC TLR4 signaling.

  9. The role of hypertriglyceridemia for acute kidney injury in the course of acute pancreatitis and an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Congye; Zou, Lei; Shi, Shujing; Tong, Zhihui; Shen, Xiao; Yang, Dongliang; Ke, Lu; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of hypertriglyceridemia for acute kidney injury (AKI) in the course of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis were retrospectively divided into four groups according to admission triglyceride: normal group, mild HTG group, moderate HTG group and severe HTG group. Clinical characteristics were compared among these groups. Wild type (WT) mice and Human ApoC III transgenic (ApoCIIItg) mice were used in the next animal experiments. Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) model was established by retrograde injection of 0.5% sodium taurocholate (0.1 ml/100 g) from duodenum to pancreatic duct. Histological scores, serum amylase, creatinine, usea nitrogen were compared between WT mice and ApoCIIItg mice. Two hundred and sixty-two patients were classified into 4 groups: normal TG (104, 39.7%), mild HTG (72, 27.5%), moderate HTG (47, 17.9%), and severe HTG (39, 14.9%) groups. The proportions of AKI were 13.5% (14/104, normal), 13.9% (10/72, mild), 21.3% (10/47, moderate), and 38.5% (15/39, severe), respectively. After establishing SAP model, the levels of serum amylase (P HTG has little adverse impact on disease severity of acute pancreatitis; severe HTG can aggravate kidney injury in the course of acute pancreatitis. ApoCIII-SAP mice have more serious pancreatic damage and kidney injury than WT-SAP mice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel; Wacker, Frank; Hartung, Dagmar [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Peperhove, Matti; Tewes, Susanne; Barrmeyer, Amelie [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Rong, Song [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zunyi Medical College, Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Zunyi (China); Gerstenberg, Jessica; Haller, Herman; Gueler, Faikah [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Mengel, Michael [University of Alberta, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Edmonton (Canada); Meier, Martin [Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Institute for Animal Science, Hannover (Germany); Chen, Rongjun [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zhejiang University, The Kidney Disease Center of the First Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  11. Acute Rejection After Kidney Transplantation Associates With Circulating MicroRNAs and Vascular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijkerk, Roel; Florijn, Barend W.; Khairoun, Meriem; Duijs, Jacques M. G. J.; Ocak, Gurbey; de Vries, Aiko P.J.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Mallat, Marko J. K.; de Fijter, Johan W.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reinders, Marlies E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute rejection (AR) of kidney transplants is associated with the loss of endothelial integrity, microvascular rarefaction and, ultimately, graft dysfunction. Circulating angiogenic microRNAs (miRNAs) may serve as markers for microvascular injury. Here, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of AR after kidney transplantation on systemic vascular injury and the associated circulating miRNA profile. Methods Systemic vascular injury was determined by measuring capillary tortuosity and density within the oral mucosa as well as by assessing circulating levels of angiopoietin-2/angiopoietin-1 ratio, vascular endothelial growth factor and soluble thrombomodulin. After a pilot study, we selected 48 miRNAs to assess the AR- and microvascular injury associated circulating miRNAs. Results In stable transplant recipients (n = 25) and patients with AR (n = 13), which were also studied longitudinally (1, 6, and 12 months post-AR), we found an AR-associated increase in markers of systemic vascular injury, of which vascular endothelial growth factor and soluble thrombomodulin normalized within 1 year after AR. Of the 48 selected miRNAs, 8 were either decreased (miR-135a, miR-199a-3p, and miR-15a) or increased (miR-17, miR-140-3p, miR-130b, miR-122 and miR-192) in AR. Of these, miR-130b, miR-199a, and miR-192 associated with markers of vascular injury, whereas miR-140-3p, miR-130b, miR-122, and miR-192 normalized within 1 year after AR. Conclusions AR after kidney transplantation is characterized by systemic microvascular injury and associates with specific circulating miRNA levels. PMID:28706977

  12. Protective role of testosterone in ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soljancic, Andrea; Ruiz, Arnaldo Lopez; Chandrashekar, Kiran; Maranon, Rodrigo; Liu, Ruisheng; Juncos, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Men are at greater risk for renal injury and dysfunction after acute ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) than are women. Studies in animals suggest that the reason for the sex difference in renal injury and dysfunction after I/R is the protective effect of estrogens in females. However, a reduction in testosterone in men is thought to play an important role in mediating cardiovascular and renal disease, in general. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that I/R of the kidney reduces serum testosterone, and that contributes to renal dysfunction and injury. Male rats that were subjected to renal ischemia of 40 min followed by reperfusion had a 90% reduction in serum testosterone by 3 h after reperfusion that remained at 24 h. Acute infusion of testosterone 3 h after reperfusion attenuated the increase in plasma creatinine and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) at 24 h, prevented the reduction in outer medullary blood flow, and attenuated the increase in intrarenal TNF-α and the decrease in intrarenal VEGF at 48 h. Castration of males caused greater increases in plasma creatinine and KIM-1 at 24 h than in intact males with renal I/R, and treatment with anastrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, plus testosterone almost normalized plasma creatinine and KIM-1 in rats with renal I/R. These data show that renal I/R is associated with sustained reductions in testosterone, that testosterone repletion protects the kidney, whereas castration promotes renal dysfunction and injury, and that the testosterone-mediated protection is not conferred by conversion to estradiol. PMID:23552495

  13. A retrospective analysis of the effect of blood transfusion on cerebral oximetry entropy and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engoren, Milo; Brown, Russell R; Dubovoy, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Acute anemia is associated with both cerebral dysfunction and acute kidney injury and is often treated with red blood cell transfusion. We sought to determine if blood transfusion changed the cerebral oximetry entropy, a measure of the complexity or irregularity of the oximetry values, and if this change was associated with subsequent acute kidney injury. This was a retrospective, case-control study of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at a tertiary care hospital, comparing those who received a red blood cell transfusion to those who did not. Acute kidney injury was defined as a perioperative increase in serum creatinine by ⩾26.4 μmol/L or by ⩾50% increase. Entropy was measured using approximate entropy, sample entropy, forbidden word entropy and basescale4 entropy in 500-point sets. Forty-four transfused patients were matched to 88 randomly selected non-transfused patients. All measures of entropy had small changes in the transfused group, but increased in the non-transfused group (pentropy (odds ratio = 1.609, 95% confidence interval = 1.057-2.450, p = 0.027) and the interaction between basescale entropy and transfusion were significantly associated with subsequent development of acute kidney injury. The transfusion of red blood cells was associated with a smaller rise in entropy values compared to non-transfused patients, suggesting a change in the regulation of cerebral oxygenation, and these changes in cerebral oxygenation are also associated with acute kidney injury.

  14. An intracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 isoform induces tubular regulated necrosis: implications for acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceron, Carla S; Baligand, Celine; Joshi, Sunil; Wanga, Shaynah; Cowley, Patrick M; Walker, Joy P; Song, Sang Heon; Mahimkar, Rajeev; Baker, Anthony J; Raffai, Robert L; Wang, Zhen J; Lovett, David H

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) causes severe morbidity, mortality, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Mortality is particularly marked in the elderly and with preexisting CKD. Oxidative stress is a common theme in models of AKI induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury. We recently characterized an intracellular isoform of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) induced by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the first intron of the MMP-2 gene. This generates an NH2-terminal truncated MMP-2 (NTT-MMP-2) isoform that is intracellular and associated with mitochondria. The NTT-MMP-2 isoform is expressed in kidneys of 14-mo-old mice and in a mouse model of coronary atherosclerosis and heart failure with CKD. We recently determined that NTT-MMP-2 is induced in human renal transplants with delayed graft function and correlated with tubular cell necrosis. To determine mechanism(s) of action, we generated proximal tubule cell-specific NTT-MMP-2 transgenic mice. Although morphologically normal at the light microscopic level at 4 mo, ultrastructural studies revealed foci of tubular epithelial cell necrosis, the mitochondrial permeability transition, and mitophagy. To determine whether NTT-MMP-2 expression enhances sensitivity to I-R injury, we performed unilateral I-R to induce mild tubular injury in wild-type mice. In contrast, expression of the NTT-MMP-2 isoform resulted in a dramatic increase in tubular cell necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. NTT-MMP-2 mice had enhanced expression of innate immunity genes and release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules. We conclude that NTT-MMP-2 "primes" the kidney to enhanced susceptibility to I-R injury via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction. NTT-MMP-2 may be a novel AKI treatment target.

  15. Circulating Kidney Injury Molecule-1 Levels in Acute Heart Failure Insights From the ASCEND-HF Trial (Acute Study of Clinical Effectiveness of Nesiritide in Decompensated Heart Failure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grodin, Justin L.; Perez, Antonio L.; Wu, Yuping; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Butler, Javed; Metra, Marco; Felker, G. Michael; Voors, Adriaan A.; McMurray, John J.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Califf, Robert M.; Starling, Randall C.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Tang, W. H. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine the relationship of KIM-1 levels with adverse clinical outcomes in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). BACKGROUND Kidney injury molecule (KIM)-1 is a biomarker expressed by the nephron in acute tubular injury, and is a sensitive and specific marker for

  16. Etiology and outcomes of anuria in acute kidney injury: a single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Min; Kim, Sun Chul; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won Yong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu

    2015-03-01

    It was previously known that anuric acute kidney injury (AKI) is uncommon and its occurrence suggests complete ureteral obstruction, shock, or a major vascular event. As the epidemiology of AKI has significantly changed over the past decade, it is possible that the incidence, etiology, or clinical characteristics of anuric AKI have also changed. A prospective cohort study was conducted that included all patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) for AKI during a 2-year period in a tertiary hospital. Patients were classified as having anuric, oliguric, or nonoliguric AKI based on their volume of urine when RRT started using the modified Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria. Of the 203 patients included in the study, 21.2% met the criteria for anuric AKI. Septic and postoperative AKI were the main causes of anuric AKI, with 60.5% of incidences occurring in hospital. Anuric AKI was associated with a younger age, a lower prevalence of pre-morbid chronic kidney disease and diabetes, more frequent continuous RRT requirement, and multi-organ dysfunction. In addition, patients with anuric AKI had a higher rate of in-hospital mortality and long-term dependence on RRT than patients with nonanuric AKI. Anuric AKI is common, with sepsis as the main etiological insult, and is associated with adverse outcomes among patients with AKI who require RRT.

  17. Cystatin C in the diagnostics of acute kidney injury after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Strokov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the assumption that significant concentrations of cystatin C in urine are the manifestation of the tubular necrosis and, respectively, the severity of kidney damage after heart transplantation (HTx.Materials and methods. In this study we evaluated 33 heart recipients (6 women and 27 men, aged from 24 to 68 years old who had risk factors of acute kidney injury: serum creatinine level >113 μmol/l and/or mechanical circulatory support requirement (20 patients, in 14 cases before HTx. Cystatin C concentration in serum and in urine was measured by DyaSis particle-enhanced immunoturbidimetric assay test «Cystatin C FS».Results. Recipients were divided into two groups according to the levels of cystatinuria. In the group with the significant (more than 0.18 mg/l urinary cystatin C concentrations the requirement of renal replacement therapy (RRT was 2.5-fold higher, and the mean duration of RRT was more than 10-fold longer. In 2 patients with the significant cystatinuria acute kidney injury (AKI has transformed into end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Conclusion. Due to data obtained we may suppose that significant concentrations of cystatin C in urine are the marker of the tubular necrosis with the prolonged RRT requirement. Further studies are needed to justify this relationship.

  18. The multifaceted role of the renal microvasculature during acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maringer, Katherine; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a complex disease process for clinicians as it is multifactorial in cause and only limited treatment or preventatives are available. The renal microvasculature has recently been implicated in AKI as a strong therapeutic candidate involved in both injury and recovery. Significant progress has been made in the ability to study the renal microvasculature following ischemic AKI and its role in repair. Advances have also been made in elucidating cell-cell interactions and the molecular mechanisms involved in these interactions. The ability of the kidney to repair post AKI is closely linked to alterations in hypoxia, and these studies are elucidated in this review. Injury to the microvasculature following AKI plays an integral role in mediating the inflammatory response, thereby complicating potential therapeutics. However, recent work with experimental animal models suggests that the endothelium and its cellular and molecular interactions are attractive targets to prevent injury or hasten repair following AKI. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the renal endothelium in AKI, as well as repair and recovery, and potential therapeutics to prevent or ameliorate injury and hasten repair.

  19. Resuscitation Bundle in Pediatric Shock Decreases Acute Kidney Injury and Improves Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcan Arikan, Ayse; Williams, Eric A; Graf, Jeanine M; Kennedy, Curtis E; Patel, Binita; Cruz, Andrea T

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the impact of an early emergency department (ED) protocol-driven resuscitation (septic shock protocol [SSP]) on the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI). This was a retrospective pediatric cohort with clinical sepsis admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) from the ED before (2009, PRE) and after (2010, POST) implementation of the SSP. AKI was defined by pRIFLE (pediatric version of the Risk of renal dysfunction; Injury to kidney; Failure of kidney function; Loss of kidney function, End-stage renal disease creatinine criteria). A total of 202 patients (PRE, n = 98; POST, n = 104) were included (53% male, mean age 7.7 ± 5.6 years, mean Pediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction [PELOD] 8.9 ± 12.7, mean Pediatric Risk of Mortality score 5.3 ± 13.9). There were no differences in demographics or illness severity between the PRE and POST groups. POST was associated with decreased AKI (54% vs 29%, P pediatric ED decreased AKI and need for renal-replacement therapy, as well as PICU and hospital LOS and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased susceptibility to structural acute kidney injury in a mouse model of presymptomatic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleasant, LaTawnya; Ma, Qing; Devarajan, Mahima; Parameswaran, Priyanka; Drake, Keri; Siroky, Brian; Shay-Winkler, Kritton; Robbins, Jeffrey; Devarajan, Prasad

    2017-09-01

    The early events that signal renal dysfunction in presymptomatic heart failure are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that functional and mechanistic changes occur in the kidney that precede the development of symptomatic heart failure. We employed a transgenic mouse model with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of mutant α-B-crystallin that develops slowly progressive cardiomyopathy. Presymptomatic transgenic mice displayed an increase in serum creatinine (1.17 ± 0.34 vs. wild type 0.65 ± 0.16 mg/dl, P kidneys exhibited a twofold upregulation of the Ren1 gene, marked overexpression of renin protein in the tubules, and a worsened response to ischemia-reperfusion injury based on serum creatinine (2.77 ± 0.66 in transgenic mice vs. 2.01 ± 0.58 mg/dl in wild type, P kidney that occur in early presymptomatic heart failure, which increase the susceptibility to subsequent acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Oxidative stress caused by activation of NADPH oxidase 4 promotes contrast-induced acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Young Jeong

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI is a leading cause of acute kidney injury following radiographic procedures. Intrarenal oxidative stress plays a critical role in CIAKI. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 3-phosphate (NADPH oxidases (Noxs are important sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Among the various types of Noxs, Nox4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney in rodents. Here, we evaluated the role of Nox4 and benefit of Nox4 inhibition on CIAKI using in vivo and in vitro models. HK-2 cells were treated with iohexol, with or without Nox4 knockdown, or the most specific Nox1/4 inhibitor (GKT137831. Effects of Nox4 inhibition on CIAKI mice were examined. Expression of Nox4 in HK-2 cells was significantly increased following iohexol exposure. Silencing of Nox4 rescued the production of ROS, downregulated pro-inflammatory markers (particularly phospho-p38 implicated in CIAKI, and reduced Bax and caspase 3/7 activity, which resulted in increased cellular survival in iohexol-treated HK-2 cells. Pretreatment with GKT137831 replicated these effects by decreasing levels of phospho-p38. In a CIAKI mouse model, even though the improvement of plasma blood urea nitrogen was unclear, pretreatment with GKT137831 resulted in preserved structure, reduced expression of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, and reduced number of TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells. These results suggest Nox4 as a key source of reactive oxygen species responsible for CIAKI and provide a novel potential option for prevention of CIAKI.

  2. Comparison of different definitions of acute kidney injury in extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Vikas; Vajpeyajula, Ramya; Jain, Mohit; Maqsood, Syeda; Raina, Rupesh; Kumar, Deepak; Mhanna, Maroun J

    2017-06-14

    The definition of acute kidney injury (AKI) has evolved over the years, and three definitions have been adapted including pediatric risk injury failure, loss of kidney function (pRIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN), and Neonatal Modified Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO). We sought to report the prevalence and outcome of (AKI) according to the three existing definitions in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. In a retrospective cohort study, medical records of all ELBW infants (unit (NICU) between Jan 2002 and Dec 2011 were reviewed. Infants' demographics, anthropometric measurements, and clinical characteristics were collected at the time of birth and at discharge from the NICU. Infants were staged according to the three different definitions. During the study period, 483 ELBW infants met our inclusion criteria. The incidence of AKI was 56, 59, and 60% according to pRIFLE, AKIN, and KDIGO, respectively. Mortality, NICU length of stay, and serum creatinine (SCr) at NICU discharge were higher in infants with advanced AKI stages regardless of the definition. In addition, discharge NICU weight and length z scores were lower in infants with advanced AKI stages. SCr at 72 h of life and SCr peak were predictable of NICU mortality [AUC 0.667 (95% CI 0.604-0.731), p < 0.001 and AUC 0.747 (95% CI 0.693-0.801), p < 0.001, respectively]. Regardless of the definition, advanced AKI is associated with increased mortality, prolonged NICU length of stay, and poor growth in ELBW infants. SCr at 72 h of life and SCr peak may be predictable of NICU mortality.

  3. Incidence of acute kidney injury among patients with chronic kidney disease: a single-center retrospective database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Yutaka; Horino, Taro; Kataoka, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tatsuki; Ode, Kazu; Shimamura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Koji; Inoue, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Terada, Yoshio; Okuhara, Yoshiyasu

    2017-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication among hospitalized individuals and is closely associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This retrospective cohort study evaluated the incidences of AKI according to CKD stage at Kochi Medical School hospital during 1981-2011. AKI was defined and staged according to the kidney disease improving global outcomes criteria, using serum creatinine levels. We analyzed data from 122,653 Japanese patients (57,105 men, 46.6 %). The incidence of AKI was 7.8 % (95 % confidence interval 7.7-8.0 %). Compared to non-AKI patients, patients with stage 1-2 AKI were more likely to be men. Patients with stage 1-2 AKI were significantly older than non-AKI or stage 3 AKI patients. The incidences of AKI were 6.7, 5.9, 10.4, 18.4, 30.0, and 48.8 % among individuals with estimated glomerular filtration rates of ≥90, 60-89, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, and kidney function, and the proportions among outpatients exhibited step-wise increases with milder pre-existing reduced kidney function. CKD was a risk factor for AKI, and the incidence of AKI was positively associated with pre-existing reduced kidney function (CKD stage). We also found that the prevalence of AKI at early-stage CKD among outpatients was higher than expected. We suggest that outpatients should be monitored for AKI, given its unexpected incidence in that population.

  4. Blocking junctional adhesion molecule C promotes the recovery of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Chul; Ko, Yoon Sook; Lee, Hee Young; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won-Yong

    2017-11-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated the occurrence of neutrophil transendothelial migration in the reverse direction (reverse TEM) and that endothelial junctional adhesion molecule C (JAM-C) is a negative regulator of reverse TEM. In this study, we tested the effects of a JAM-C blocking antibody on the resolution of kidney injuries and inflammation in a mouse model of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Cisplatin was administered via intraperitoneal injection. A JAM-C blocking antibody or a control immunoglobulin G was administered intraperitoneal at 1.5 mg/kg, with the injection being delayed until day 4 following cisplatin administration to restrict the effect of antibodies on recovery. After cisplatin injection, serum creatinine and histologic injuries peaked on day 4. Treatment with a JAM-C blocking antibody on days 4 and 5 promoted the functional and histologic recovery of cisplatin-induced AKI on days 5 and 6. Facilitating recovery with a JAM-C blocking antibody correlated with significantly increased circulating intercellular adhesion molecule 1+ Tamm-Horsfall protein+ neutrophils and significantly decreased renal neutrophil infiltration, indicating that facilitating reverse the TEM of neutrophils from the kidney to the peripheral circulation partially mediated the resolution of inflammation and recovery. These results demonstrated that reverse TEM is involved in the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation in cisplatin-induced AKI and that JAM-C is an important regulator of this process.

  5. [RIFLE and AKIN criteria for mortality and risk factors of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shaobin; Liu, Qing; Pan, Peng; Xu, Jun; Liu, Na; Li, Ying; Liu, Hong; Peng, Youming; Sun, Lin; Liu, Fuyou

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the mortality and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients by the risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease (RIFLE) and acute kidney injury network (AKIN). We constructed a retrospective study of all AKI patients in the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University between February 2006 and January 2011. The diagnosis and classification of AKI were reconfirmed and categorized by RIFLE and AKIN criteria. To compare the clinical characteristics, mortality and associated risk factors in AKI patients by the RIFLE and AKIN stage, univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed. The patients were diagnosed as AKI by AKIN (n=1027) or by RIFLE criteria (n=1020). There was no significant difference in the hospital mortality, hospital length stay (days), or the proportion of complete recovery in each stage of AKI patients by RIFLE and AKIN (P>0.05). In the univariate analysis, age, pre-renal causes, proportion of hospital acquired AKI, mechanical ventilation, hypotension, the number of failed organs, acute tubular necrosis-index severity score (ATN-ISS), and the peak of serum potassium ion concentration were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that age older than 65, hospital acquired AKI, hypotension, number of failed organs, ATN-ISS scores, and the peak of serum potassium ion concentration were independent risk factors for hospital mortality. Both RIFLE and AKIN criteria have similar scientific value in assessing hospital mortality. AKI stage is associated with the recent prognosis of AKI patients.

  6. Star fruit toxicity: a cause of both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, R A; Wijetunge, S; Nanayakkara, N; Wazil, A W M; Ratnatunga, N V I; Jayalath, T; Medagama, A

    2015-12-17

    Star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) is commonly consumed as a herbal remedy for various ailments in tropical countries. However, the dangers associated with consumption of star fruit are not commonly known. Although star fruit induced oxalate nephrotoxicity in those with existing renal impairment is well documented, reports on its effect on those with normal renal function are infrequent. We report two unique clinical presentation patterns of star fruit nephrotoxicity following consumption of the fruit as a remedy for diabetes mellitus-the first, in a patient with normal renal function and the second case which we believe is the first reported case of chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to prolonged and excessive consumption of star fruits. The first patient is a 56-year-old female diabetic patient who had normal renal function prior to developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after consuming large amount of star fruit juice at once. The second patient, a 60-year-old male, also diabetic presented with acute on chronic renal failure following ingestion of a significant number of star fruits in a short duration with a background history of regular star fruit consumption over the past 2-3 years. Both had histologically confirmed oxalate induced renal injury. The former had histological features of acute tubulo-interstitial disease whilst the latter had acute-on-chronic interstitial disease; neither had histological evidence of diabetic nephropathy. Both recovered over 2 weeks without the need for haemodialysis. These cases illustrate the importance of obtaining the patient's detailed history with respect to ingestion of herbs, traditional medication and health foods such as star fruits especially in AKI or CKD of unknown cause.

  7. Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury: An analysis of 165 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury (PRAKI contributes to 3–7% of overall acute kidney injury (AKI cases in Indian subcontinent. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of PRAKI and risk factors associated with renal injury and maternal mortality. One hundred and sixty-five patients with PRAKI, seen at M. S. Ramaiah Medical College between 2005 and 2014, were included in this, observational study. AKI was analyzed in terms of maximal stage of renal injury attained as per Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of function, and End-stage renal disease (RIFLE criteria. Outcomes included requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT, maternal, and fetal mortality. Incidence of PRAKI was 1.56%, and the mean age of the study population was 25 years. Fifty percent of the patients were diagnosed with PRAKI during their first pregnancy. PRAKI was observed most commonly in the postpartum period (60%, followed by third trimester (32%; as per RIFLE criteria, failure was seen in 36% and injury in 34%. Thirty percent of cases required RRT. Sepsis (59%, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia (56% were the leading causes of PRAKI, while sepsis was the leading cause of maternal mortality. Maternal and fetal mortality were 20% and 22%, respectively. In univariate analysis, shock, hemorrhage requiring transfusion of >5 units packed red blood cells, oliguria, and “Loss” category of RIFLE were significantly associated with mortality. Majority of the patients (57% required Intensive Care Unit care with a mean duration of admission at 7.3 days, and 75% was diagnosed with AKI at the time of admission. We report the lowest incidence of PRAKI in contemporary Indian literature. PRAKI was associated with high maternal and fetal mortality, with sepsis being the leading cause. No association was noted between mortality and initial stages of RIFLE criteria.

  8. Early intervention with erythropoietin does not affect the outcome of acute kidney injury (the EARLYARF trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endre, Zoltán H; Walker, Robert J; Pickering, John W; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Frampton, Christopher M; Henderson, Seton J; Hutchison, Robyn; Mehrtens, Jan E; Robinson, Jillian M; Schollum, John B W; Westhuyzen, Justin; Celi, Leo A; McGinley, Robert J; Campbell, Isaac J; George, Peter M

    2010-06-01

    We performed a double-blind placebo-controlled trial to study whether early treatment with erythropoietin could prevent the development of acute kidney injury in patients in two general intensive care units. As a guide for choosing the patients for treatment we measured urinary levels of two biomarkers, the proximal tubular brush border enzymes gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase. Randomization to either placebo or two doses of erythropoietin was triggered by an increase in the biomarker concentration product to levels above 46.3, with a primary outcome of relative average plasma creatinine increase from baseline over 4 to 7 days. Of 529 patients, 162 were randomized within an average of 3.5 h of a positive sample. There was no difference in the incidence of erythropoietin-specific adverse events or in the primary outcome between the placebo and treatment groups. The triggering biomarker concentration product selected patients with more severe illness and at greater risk of acute kidney injury, dialysis, or death; however, the marker elevations were transient. Early intervention with high-dose erythropoietin was safe but did not alter the outcome. Although these two urine biomarkers facilitated our early intervention, their transient increase compromised effective triaging. Further, our study showed that a composite of these two biomarkers was insufficient for risk stratification in a patient population with a heterogeneous onset of injury.

  9. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in a tertiary care university hospital according to the RIFLE criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Thorir Einarsson; Sigurdsson, Martin Ingi; Indridason, Olafur Skuli; Sigvaldason, Kristinn; Sigurdsson, Gísli Heimir

    2013-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in hospitalized patients, requiring extensive treatment and carries a high mortality rate. This study was designed to assess the epidemiology of AKI, and risk factors and outcome of patients with severe AKI in a tertiary care university hospital in Iceland. All adult patients with measured serum creatinine (SCr) in Landspitali University Hospital from January 2008 to December 2011, who had a measured baseline SCr in the preceeding six months, were included. Patients were categorized according to the RIFLE-criteria into risk (stage 1), injury (stage 2) and failure (stage 3) groups based on their highest SCr, using the lowest SCr in the previous six months as baseline. A total of 17,693 individuals (out of 74,960) had a baseline SCr and their data were used for analysis. AKI occurred in 3,686 (21%) with 12%, 5% and 4% of stage 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There were more females in stage 1 and stage 2 and more males in stage 3 (p 90 days. One year survival was 52%. Acute kidney injury is common in Iceland and the prognosis of those with severe AKI is dismal. Majority of those patients were taking drugs that increase risk of AKI, providing a target for preventive measures.

  10. [Rare differential diagnosis of acute kidney injury--Case 09/2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizer, Peter; Prayon, Berenike; Gröne, Elisabeth; Müssig, Karsten

    2009-10-01

    A 44-year-old male and his 40-year-old wife, both previously in good health, were admitted for abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, severe headache, and oliguria after ingestion of wild mushrooms two weeks earlier. Physical examination revealed costo-vertebral-angular tenderness in the husband and abdominal tenderness in both patients. Laboratory showed acute renal injury with markedly increased serum concentrations of creatine and urea. On abdominal ultrasound, the kidneys were slightly increased in size with echogenic parenchyma and prominent medullary pyramids. Signs of an immunological or infectious etiology were missing. Histological investigation of the renal biopsy showed acute interstitial nephritis with marked tubular damage in both cases. History and histological findings were consistent with Orellanus syndrome following ingestion of mushrooms of the Cortinarius species. In both patients, haemodialysis was initiated. In the husband, dialysis was discontinued on day 8 and a follow-up visit after one month revealed stage 5 chronic kidney disease. In the wife, continuation of haemodialysis in an ambulatory setting required implantation of a temporary vascular catheter. In cases of acute renal injury of unknown origin, ingestion of mushrooms of the Cortinarius species should be included in the differential diagnoses. In particular, initial gastrointestinal complaints may point to this rare differential diagnosis.

  11. MMP9 and SCF Protect from Apoptosis in Acute Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bengatta, Soraya; Arnould, Catherine; Letavernier, Emmanuel; Monge, Matthieu; de Préneuf, Hélène Martinan; Werb, Zena; Ronco, Pierre; Lelongt, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells is a hallmark of acute kidney injury (AKI), but the cellular events preceding apoptosis in this setting are incompletely understood. Because matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) degrades matrix components involved in cell survival, we studied the role of MMP9 in AKI. In the mouse model of folic acid–induced AKI, we observed a marked increase of MMP9 activity in the S3 segment of the proximal tubule (S3PT), correlating with the apoptotic phase. MMP9 deficienc...

  12. Acute kidney injury on admission to the intensive care unit: where to go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Marlies

    2008-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem, especially in critically ill patients. In Critical Care, Kolhe and colleagues report that 6.3% of 276,731 patients in 170 intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK had evidence of severe AKI within the first 24 hours of admission to ICU. ICU and hospital mortality as well as length of stay in hospital were significantly increased. In light of this serious burden on individuals and the health system in general, the following commentary discusses the current state of knowledge of AKI in ICU and calls for more attention to preventive strategies.

  13. EARLY ALLOGRAFT DYSFUNCTION AND ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: DEFINITIONS, RISK FACTORS AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Moysyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses issues related to intensive care in recipients of transplanted liver in the early postoperative period, with an emphasis on contemporary conditions and attitudes that are specific for this group of patients. Early allograft dysfunction (EAD requires immediate diagnosis and appropriate treatment in case. The causes of the EAD and therapeutic tactics are discussed. Acute kidney injury (AKI and renal failure are common in patients after transplantation. We consider etiology, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment guidelines for AKI. The negative impact of EAD and AKI on the grafts survival and recipients is demonstrated. 

  14. Hashimoto's thyroiditis presenting as Hoffman's syndrome, rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Gasim Salaheldin; Zaid, Hassan Musa; Moloney, Manus

    2014-07-04

    An otherwise healthy young man presented with gradual progressive fatigue for the past 12 months disturbing his daily activities. Clinical examination revealed marked generalised muscular hypertrophy including the temporalis muscles bilaterally. Investigation revealed that the patient was grossly hypothyroid due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis with rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury. The finding of muscle weakness and pseudohypertrophy in association with hypothyroidism is called Hoffman's syndrome. The patient was hydrated and thyroxine replacement initiated. On follow-up, the patient showed clinical as well as biochemical improvement. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Transplantation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived renal stem cells improved acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Tian, Shou-Fu; Guo, Ye; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Guo, Shang-Chun; Wang, Nian-Song; Wang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a severe disease with high morbidity and mortality. Methods that promote repair of the injured kidney have been extensively investigated. Cell-based therapy with mesenchymal stem cells or renal progenitor cells (RPCs) resident in the kidney has appeared to be an effective strategy for the treatment of AKI. Embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are also utilized for AKI recovery. However, the therapeutic effect of iPSC-derived RPCs for AKI has yet to be determined. In this study, we induced iPSCs differentiation into RPCs using a nephrogenic cocktail of factors combined with the renal epithelial cell growth medium. We then established the rat ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) model and transplanted the iPSC-derived RPCs into the injured rats in combination with the hydrogel. Next, we examined the renal function-related markers and renal histology to assess the therapeutic effect of the injected cells. Moreover, we investigated the mechanism by which iPSC-derived RPCs affect AKI caused by IR. We showed that the differentiation efficiency of iPSCs to RPCs increased when cultured with renal epithelial cell growth medium after stimulation with a nephrogenic cocktail of factors. The transplantation of iPSC-derived RPCs decreased the levels of biomarkers indicative of renal injury and attenuated the necrosis and apoptosis of renal tissues, but resulted in the up-regulation of renal tubules formation, cell proliferation, and the expression of pro-renal factors. Our results revealed that iPSC-derived RPCs can protect AKI rat from renal function impairment and severe tubular injury by up-regulating the renal tubules formation, promoting cell proliferation, reducing apoptosis, and regulating the microenvironment in the injured kidney.

  16. The Role of M2 Macrophages in the Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease following Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a major risk factor in the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, the mechanisms linking AKI to CKD remain unclear. We examined the alteration of macrophage phenotypes during an extended recovery period following ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI and determine their roles in the development of fibrosis.The left renal pedicle of mice was clamped for 40 min. To deplete monocyte/macrophage, liposome clodronate was injected or CD11b-DTR and CD11c-DTR transgenic mice were used.Throughout the phase of IRI recovery, M2-phenotype macrophages made up the predominant macrophage subset. On day 28, renal fibrosis was clearly shown with increased type IV collagen and TGF-β. The depletion of macrophages induced by the liposome clodronate injection improved renal fibrosis with a reduction of kidney IL-6, type IV collagen, and TGF-β levels. Additionally, the adoptive transfer of the M2c macrophages partially reversed the beneficial effect of macrophage depletion, whereas the adoptive transfer of the M1 macrophages did not. M2 macrophages isolated from the kidneys during the recovery phase expressed 2.5 fold higher levels of TGF-β than the M1 macrophages. The injection of the diphtheria toxin into CD11b or CD11c-DTR transgenic mice resulted in lesser depletion or no change in M2 macrophages and had little impact on renal fibrosis.Although M2 macrophages are known to be indispensible for short-term recovery, they are thought to be main culprit in the development of renal fibrosis following IRI.

  17. Hyperoncotic colloids and acute kidney injury: a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been hypothesized that hyperoncotic colloids might contribute to acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the validity of this hypothesis remains unclear. Methods A meta-analysis was conducted of randomized controlled trials evaluating AKI after infusion of hyperoncotic albumin and hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions. Mortality was a secondary endpoint. Eligible trials were sought by multiple methods, and the pooled odds ratios (OR) for AKI and death and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed under a random effects model. Results Eleven randomized trials with a total of 1220 patients were included: 7 evaluating hyperoncotic albumin and 4 hyperoncotic HES. Clinical indications were ascites, surgery, sepsis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Hyperoncotic albumin decreased the odds of AKI by 76% (OR, 0.24; CI, 0.12-0.48; P colloid solutions per se injure the kidney. Renal effects appear instead to be colloid-specific, with albumin displaying renoprotection and HES showing nephrotoxicity. PMID:21029460

  18. Acute kidney injury biomarkers: renal angina and the need for a renal troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldstein Stuart L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI in hospitalized patients is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality in pediatric and adult populations. Continued reliance on serum creatinine and urine output to diagnose AKI has resulted in our inability to provide successful therapeutic and supportive interventions to prevent and mitigate AKI and its effects. Research efforts over the last decade have focused on the discovery and validation of novel urinary biomarkers to detect AKI prior to a change in kidney function and to aid in the differential diagnosis of AKI. The aim of this article is to review the AKI biomarker literature with a focus on the context in which they should serve to add to the clinical context facing physicians caring for patients with, or at-risk for, AKI. The optimal and appropriate utilization of AKI biomarkers will only be realized by understanding their characteristics and placing reasonable expectations on their performance in the clinical arena.

  19. Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) ameliorates aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury through Nrf2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Liu, Xinhui; Fan, Jinjin; Chen, Wenfang; Wang, Juan; Zeng, Youjia; Feng, Xiaorang; Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2014-04-06

    Bardoxolone methyl (BARD) is an antioxidant modulator that acts through induction of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. This study aimed to investigate the role of BARD in protecting kidneys from aristolochic acid (AA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Male C57BL/6 mice received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of aristolochic acid I (AAI) (5mg/kg/day) for 5 days to produce acute AA nephropathy (AAN) model. BARD (10mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for 7 consecutive days, starting 2 days prior to AAI administration. The mice in the AA group showed AKI as evidenced by worsening kidney function evaluated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) levels, and severe tubulointerstitial injury marked by massive tubule necrosis in kidney tissues. BARD significantly reduced BUN and SCr levels which were elevated by AAI. Additionally, AAI-induced histopathological renal damage was ameliorated by BARD. Furthermore, the expression of Nrf2 was reduced, and its repressor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) was increased significantly, whereas heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was upregulated and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) was barely increased in the cytoplasm of tubules in kidneys after treatment with AAI. BARD significantly upregulated renal Nrf2, NQO1 and HO-1 expression and downregulated Keap1 expression compared with those in the AA group. Moreover, it was found that Nrf2 was expressed both in the cytoplasm and nuclear of glomeruli and tubules, whereas NQO1 and HO-1 were localized in the cytoplasm of tubules only. In conclusion, AA-induced acute renal injury was associated with impaired Nrf2 activation and expression of its downstream target genes in renal tissues. BARD prevented renal damage induced by AAI, and this renoprotective effect may be exerted by activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway and increasing expression of the downstream target genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ulinastatin Protects against Acute Kidney Injury in Infant Piglets Model Undergoing Surgery on Hypothermic Low-Flow Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaocou; Xue, Qinghua; Yan, Fuxia; Liu, Jinping; Li, Shoujun; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants are more vulnerable to kidney injuries induced by inflammatory response syndrome and ischemia-reperfusion injury following cardiopulmonary bypass especially with prolonged hypothermic low-flow (HLF). This study aims to evaluate the protective role of ulinastatin, an anti-inflammatory agent, against acute kidney injuries in infant piglets model undergoing surgery on HLF cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Eighteen general-type infant piglets were randomly separated into the ulinastatin group (Group U, n = 6), the control group (Group C, n = 6), and the sham operation group (Group S, n = 6), and anaesthetized. The groups U and C received following experimental procedure: median thoracotomy, routine CPB and HLF, and finally weaned from CPB. The group S only underwent sham median thoracotomy. Ulinastatin at a dose of 5,000 units/kg body weight and a certain volume of saline were administrated to animals of the groups U and C at the beginning of CPB and at aortic declamping, respectively. Venous blood samples were collected at 3 different time points: after anesthesia induction in all experimental groups, 5 minutes, and 120 minutes after CPB in the Groups U and C. Markers for inflammation and acute kidney injury were tested in the collected plasma. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) from urine, markers of oxidative stress injury and TUNEL-positive cells in kidney tissues were also detected. Results The expressions of plasma inflammatory markers and acute kidney injury markers increased both in Group U and Group C at 5 min and 120 min after CPB. Also, numbers of TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney rose in both groups. At the time point of 120-min after CPB, compared with the Group C, some plasma inflammatory and acute kidney injury markers as well as TUNEL-positive cells and oxidative stress markers in kidney were significantly reduced in the Group U. Histologic analyses showed that HLF promoted acute tubular necrosis and dilatation

  1. Cholestatic jaundice, acute kidney injury and acute pancreatitis secondary to the recreational use of methandrostenolone: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Peter

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Over the last few years the use of anabolic steroids has become increasingly common amongst amateur athletes and for aesthetic purposes. As a result, the adverse events related to their use are being seen more frequently. Methandrostenolone is an anabolic steroid which is widely available and has been used for both performance enhancement and aesthetic purposes. This drug has also been reported to cause cholestasis of the intra-hepatic bile ducts resulting in elevated aminotransferases, hyperbilirubinemia and clinical jaundice. However, to the best of our knowledge this agent has not been previously reported to cause pancreatitis or acute kidney injury. Case presentation In this paper, we report the case of a 50-year-old man of Indian descent who presented with a six week history of diffuse abdominal pain, anorexia and weight loss following an eight week cycle of methandrostenolone use. At initial presentation, his lipase level was 785 U/L, bilirubin was 922 μmol/L and creatinine was 200 U/L while his aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were only mildly elevated at 61 U/L and 56 U/L respectively. His lipase peaked on day nine at >3000 U/L whilst his creatinine level was 299 U/L. Imaging was consistent with acute pancreatitis while a liver biopsy was consistent with intra-hepatic cholestasis and a kidney biopsy revealed evidence of acute tubular necrosis. Conclusion Both acute pancreatitis and acute kidney injury have rarely been reported with anabolic steroid use and they have not been previously reported to occur in the same patient. This case demonstrates some potentially new and serious adverse consequences occurring with the use of anabolic steroids, of which physicians need to be aware.

  2. Changes in renal markers and acute kidney injury after marathon running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M; Gallagher, Michael J; Colar, James M; Geddes, Timothy; Gold, Jeffrey M; Trivax, Justin E

    2011-02-01

    The impact of marathon running on kidney function has not been previously described. From 425 marathon runners, 13 women and 12 men were randomly selected and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood/urine biomarkers were performed 4 weeks before (baseline), immediately after (peak), and 24 h after the race (recovery). Participants were 38.7 ± 9.0 years old and completed the marathon in 256.2 ± 43.5 min. A total of 10/25 (40.0%) met the Acute Kidney Injury Network definition of acute kidney injury (AKI) based on a rise in serum creatinine. There were parallel and similar mean rises in serum creatinine and cystatin C from baseline, to peak, and return to normal in recovery. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin rose from 8.2 ± 4.0 to 47.0 ± 28.6 and returned to 10.6 ± 7.2 ng/mL, P < 0.0001. Likewise, the mean urinary kidney injury molecule-1 levels were 2.6 ± 1.6, 3.5 ± 1.6 and 2.7 ± 1.6 ng/mL (P = 0.001). The mean and minimum pre- and post-IVC (inferior vena cava) diameters by MRI were 24.9, 18.8 and 25.3, 17.5 mm, respectively, suggesting that runners were not volume depleted at the first post-race measurement. Approximately 40% of marathon runners experience a transient rise in serum creatinine that meets criteria of AKI with a parallel elevation of cystatin C, and supportive elevations of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and kidney injury molecule-1 in the urine. All biomarker elevations resolved by 24 h. These data suggest that AKI with a transient and minor change in renal filtration function occurs with the stress of marathon running. The impact of repetitive episodes of AKI with long-distance running is unknown. © 2010 The Authors. Nephrology © 2010 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Predictors of Acute Kidney Injury in Neurocritical Care Patients Receiving Continuous Hypertonic Saline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Michael J; Riha, Heidi; Bode, Lauren; Chang, Jason J; Jones, G Morgan

    2017-01-01

    Continuous intravenous 3% hypertonic saline (HTS) infusions are commonly used for the management of cerebral edema following severe neurologic injuries. Despite widespread use, data regarding the incidence and predictors of nephrotoxicity are lacking. The purpose of this study was to describe the incidence and identify predictors of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neurocritical care patients administered continuous infusion HTS. This was an institutional review board-approved, multicenter, retrospective cohort study of patients receiving HTS infusions at 2 academic medical centers. A univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to identify predictors of AKI. Data regarding AKI were evaluated during treatment with HTS and up to 24 hours after discontinuation. A total of 329 patients were included in our analysis, with 54 (16%) developing AKI. Those who developed AKI experienced significantly longer stays in the intensive care unit (14.8 vs 11.5 days; P = .006) and higher mortality (48.1% vs 21.9%; P < .001). We identified past medical history of chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR]: 9.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-50.6; P = .007), serum sodium greater than 155 mmol/L (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 2.1-8.0; P < .001), concomitant administration of piperacillin/tazobactam (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.7-9.3; P = .002), male gender (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.5-6.6; P = .002), and African American race (OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.3-5.2; P = .007) as independent predictors of AKI. Acute kidney injury is relatively common in patients receiving continuous HTS and may significantly impact clinical outcomes.

  4. Ascertainment and epidemiology of acute kidney injury varies with definition interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappitelli, Michael; Parikh, Chirag R; Akcan-Arikan, Ayse; Washburn, Kimberley K; Moffett, Brady S; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2008-07-01

    Differences in defining acute kidney injury (AKI) may impact incidence ascertainment. We assessed the effects of different AKI definition interpretation methods on epidemiology ascertainment. Two groups were studied at Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas: 150 critically ill children (prospective) and 254 noncritically ill, hospitalized children receiving aminoglycosides (retrospective). SCr was collected for 14 d in the prospective study and 21 d in the retrospective study. Children with known baseline serum creatinine (bSCr) were classified by the pediatric Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage Kidney Disease (pRIFLE) AKI definition using SCr change (pRIFLE(DeltaSCr)), estimated creatinine clearance (eCCl) change (pRIFLE(DeltaCCl)), and the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) definition. In subjects without known bSCr, bSCR was estimated as eCCl = 100 (eCCl(100)) and 120 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) (eCCl(120)), admission SCr (AdmSCr) and lower/upper normative values (NormsMin, NormsMax). The differential impact of each AKI definition interpretation on incidence estimation and severity distribution was evaluated. pRIFLE(DeltaSCr) and AKIN led to identical AKI distributions. pRIFLE(DeltaCCl) resulted in 14.5% (critically ill) and 11% (noncritical) more patients diagnosed with AKI compared to other methods (P 0.05). Different bSCr estimates led to differences in AKI incidence, from 12% (AdmSCr) to 87.8% (NormsMin) (P 0.05) in the critically ill group and from 4.6% (eCCl(100)) to 43.1% (NormsMin) (P 0.05) in the noncritical group. AKI definition variation causes interstudy heterogeneity. AKI definition should be standardized so that results can be compared across studies.

  5. Epidemiology, outcomes and validation of RIFLE and AKIN criteria in acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients: Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, N Pavan Kumar; Ravi, K P; Dhanalakshmi, P; Annigeri, Rajeev; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Venkataraman, Ramesh

    2014-07-01

    Although the epidemiology and the impact of Acute Kidney Injury on outcomes are well-known in the Western literature, good data is lacking from India. Most studies published from India have not evaluated epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit setting and/or have not used validated criteria. In our observational study of 250 patients, admitted to a tertiary level ICU, we have explored the epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury using both RIFLE and AKIN criteria and have validated them. We have also demonstrated that the severity of AKI is an independent predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. Our results are very much comparable to other studies and we feel that this study will remain as an epidemiological reference point for Indian clinicians dealing with AKI.

  6. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Assessment of acute kidney injury with T1 mapping MRI following solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peperhove, Matti; Vo Chieu, Van Dai; Jang, Mi-Sun; Gutberlet, Marcel; Hartung, Dagmar; Tewes, Susanne; Warnecke, Gregor; Fegbeutel, Christiane; Haverich, Axel; Gwinner, Wilfried; Lehner, Frank; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank; Gueler, Faikah; Hueper, Katja

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate T1 mapping as a non-invasive, functional MRI biomarker in patients shortly after solid organ transplantation to detect acute postsurgical kidney damage and to correlate T1 times with renal function. 101 patients within 2 weeks after solid organ transplantation (49 kidney transplantation, 52 lung transplantation) and 14 healthy volunteers were examined by MRI between July 2012 and April 2015 using the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence. T1 times in renal cortex and medulla and the corticomedullary difference were compared between groups using one-way ANOVA adjusted for multiple comparison with the Tukey test, and T1 times were correlated with renal function using Pearson's correlation. Compared to healthy volunteers T1 times were significantly increased after solid organ transplantation in the renal cortex (healthy volunteers 987 ± 102 ms; kidney transplantation 1299 ± 101 ms, p T1 changes were more pronounced following kidney compared to lung transplantation, were associated with the stage of renal impairment and significantly correlated with renal function. T1 mapping may be helpful for early non-invasive assessment of acute kidney injury and renal pathology following major surgery such as solid organ transplantation. • Renal cortical T1 relaxation times are prolonged after solid organ transplantation. • Cortical T1 values increase with higher stages of renal function impairment. • Corticomedullary difference decreases with higher stages of renal function impairment. • Renal cortical T1 relaxation time and corticomedullary difference correlate with renal function. • T1 mapping may be helpful for non-invasive assessment of post-operative renal pathology.

  8. Strategies to Enhance Rehabilitation After Acute Kidney Injury in the Developing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A. Silver

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is independently associated with new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD, end-stage kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality. However, only a minority of patients receive follow-up care after an episode of AKI in the developing world, and the optimal strategies to promote rehabilitation after AKI are ill-defined. On this background, a working group of the 18th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative applied the consensus-building process informed by a PubMed review of English-language articles to address questions related to rehabilitation after AKI. The consensus statements propose that all patients should be offered follow-up within 3 months of an AKI episode, with more intense follow-up (e.g., <1 month considered based on patient risk factors, characteristics of the AKI event, and the degree of kidney recovery. Patients should be monitored for renal and nonrenal events post-AKI, and we suggest that the minimum level of monitoring consist of an assessment of kidney function and proteinuria within 3 months of the AKI episode. Care should be individualized for higher risk patients, particularly patients who are still dialysis dependent, to promote renal recovery. Although evidence-based treatments for survivors of AKI are lacking and some outcomes may not be modifiable, we recommend simple interventions such as lifestyle changes, medication reconciliation, blood pressure control, and education, including the documentation of AKI in the patient’s medical record. In conclusion, survivors of AKI represent a high-risk population, and these consensus statements should provide clinicians with guidance on the care of patients after an episode of AKI.

  9. Prevention and Therapy of Acute Kidney Injury in the Developing World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Timely recognition of patients at risk or with possible acute kidney injury (AKI is essential for early intervention to minimize further damage and improve outcome. Initial management of patients with suspected and persistent AKI should include thorough clinical assessment of all patients with AKI to identify reversible factors, including fluid volume status, potential nephrotoxins, and an assessment of the underlying health of the kidney. Based on these assessments, early interventions to provide appropriate and adequate fluid resuscitation while avoiding fluid overload, removal of nephrotoxins, and adjustment of drug doses according to the level of kidney function derangement are important. The judicious use of diuretics for fluid overload and/or in cardiac decompensated patients and introduction of early enteral nutritional support need to be considered to improve outcomes in AKI. Although these basic principles are well recognized, their application in clinical practice in low resource settings is often limited due to lack of education, availability of resources, and lack of trained personnel, which limits access to care. We report the consensus recommendations of the 18th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative meeting in Hyderabad, India, on strategies to evaluate patients with suspected AKI and initiate measures for prevention and management to improve outcomes, particularly in low resource settings. These recomendations provide a framework for caregivers, who are often primary care physicians, nurses, and other allied healthcare personnel, to manage patients with AKI in resource poor countries.

  10. Outcomes and characteristics of intermittent hemodialysis for acute kidney injury in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sankarasubbaiyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal replacement therapy in intensive care units (ICUs varies globally and is dependent on medical and non-medical factors. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients initiated on dialysis in an ICU. Patient and clinical characteristics, cause of kidney injury, laboratory parameters, hemodialysis characteristics, and survival were reviewed. Acute physiological and chronic health (APACHE II score was use to study the sickness profile. A total of 92 patients underwent 525 hemodialysis sessions. There were 60 male and 32 female patients. The mean age of the patients was 56.5 ± 16 years. The cause of acute kidney injury included sepsis 64, cardiac 7, malaria 7, postoperative 4, trauma 3, poisoning 2, and others 4. Vasopressors were used in 75% and mechanical ventilation was used in 74 (82% of the cases. APACHE II score was 22.3 + 7.4. The mean creatinine level was 3.6 + 3.7 mg/dl. The duration of dialysis was less than 4 h in 324 (61.2% sessions and greater than 6 h in 118 (22.5% sessions. The percentage of 30-day survival was 30%. Intermittent hemodialysis customized to renal support needs of ICU patients is an appropriate option in resource-limited settings.

  11. The incidence and aetiology of acute kidney injury in children in Norway between 1999 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Gaute Reier; Hovland, Eirik; Bangstad, Hans-Jacob; Nygård, Karin; Vold, Line; Bjerre, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Primary acute kidney injury (AKI) is a direct cause of hospitalisation in children, but can also result from other conditions. There is limited information on the epidemiology of this condition. Our aim was to describe the national incidence rate and aetiology of acute kidney injury in children under the age of 16 in Norway from 1999 to 2008. We carried out a retrospective study of medical records provided by all 18 of the paediatric hospital departments that specialise in treating paediatric patients with AKI. We identified 315 cases of AKI (53% male), with an estimated average annual incidence rate of 3.3 cases per 100 000 children and a median annual occurrence of 33 cases. Most cases (43%) were in children under five. We identified 53 aetiologies and classified these into 30 aetiological groups: 24% of the cases were prerenal (n = 75), 74% were intrinsic/renal (n = 234) and 2% were postrenal (n = 5). Nephritic syndromes was the major cause (44%) of AKI, followed by haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (HUS) (15%). Nephritic syndromes and HUS are the most common aetiologies of AKI in Norway. Although our results could indicate a low incidence of paediatric AKI in Norway, the lack of other national studies makes comparisons difficult. ©2014 The Authors. Acta Paediatrica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  12. Nitrotyrosine level was associated with mortality in patients with acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the characteristics of oxidative stress in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI and investigate the association between plasma nitrotyrosine levels and 90-day mortality in patients with AKI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 158 patients with hospital-acquired AKI were recruited to this prospective cohort study according to RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Lost or End Stage Kidney criteria. Twelve critically ill patients without AKI and 15 age and gender-matched healthy subjects served as control. Plasma 3-nitrotyrosine was analyzed in relation to 90-day all cause mortality of patients with AKI. The patients with AKI were followed up for 90 days and grouped according to median plasma 3-nitrotyrosine concentrations. Highest 3-NT/Tyr was detected in patients with AKI compared with healthy subjects, and critically ill patients without AKI (ANOVA p<0.001. The 90-day survival curves of patients with high 3-NT/Tyr showed significant differences compared with the curves of individuals with low 3-NT/Tyr (p = 0.001 by log rank test. Multivariate analysis (Cox regression revealed that 3-NT/Tyr (p = 0.025 was independently associated with mortality after adjustment for age, gender, sepsis and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is excess plasma protein oxidation in patients with AKI, as evidenced by increased nitrotyrosine content. 3-NT/Tyr level was associated with mortality of AKI patients independent of the severity of illness.

  13. A Case of Primary Hypoparathyroidism Presenting with Acute Kidney Injury Secondary to Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sumnu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism is the most common cause of symmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Herein, a case of primary hypoparathyroidism with severe tetany, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury is presented. A 26-year-old male was admitted to the emergency clinic with leg pain and cramps, nausea, vomiting, and decreased amount of urine. He had been treated for epilepsy for the last 10 years. He was admitted to the emergency department for leg pain, cramping in the hands and legs, and agitation multiple times within the last six months. He was prescribed antidepressant and antipsychotic medications. He had a blood pressure of 150/90 mmHg, diffuse abdominal tenderness, and abdominal muscle rigidity on physical examination. Pathological laboratory findings were as follows: creatinine, 7.5 mg/dL, calcium, 3.7 mg/dL, alanine transaminase, 4349 U/L, aspartate transaminase, 5237 U/L, creatine phosphokinase, 262.000 U/L, and parathyroid hormone, 0 pg/mL. There were bilateral symmetrical calcifications in basal ganglia and the cerebellum on computerized tomography. He was diagnosed as primary hypoparathyroidism and acute kidney injury secondary to severe rhabdomyolysis. Brain calcifications, although rare, should be considered in dealing with patients with neurological symptoms, symmetrical cranial calcifications, and calcium metabolism abnormalities.

  14. Does hypokalemia contribute to acute kidney injury in chronic laxative abuse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged hypokalemia from chronic laxative abuse is recognized as the cause of chronic tubulointerstitial disease, known as “hypokalemic nephropathy,” but it is not clear whether it contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI. A 42-year-old woman with a history of chronic kidney disease as a result of chronic laxative abuse from a purging type of anorexia nervosa (AN-P, developed an anuric AKI requiring hemodialysis and a mild AKI 2 months later. Both episodes of AKI involved severe to moderate hypokalemia (1.2 and 2.7 mmol/L, respectively, volume depletion, and mild rhabdomyolysis. The histologic findings of the first AKI revealed the remnants of acute tubular necrosis with advanced chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis and ischemic glomerular injury. Along with these observations, the intertwined relationship among precipitants of recurrent AKI in AN-P is discussed, and then we postulate a contributory role of hypokalemia involved in the pathophysiology of the renal ischemia-induced AKI.

  15. High altitude-related hypertensive crisis and acute kidney injury in an asymptomatic healthy individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Martin, Daniel; Grocott, Michael; Levett, Denny

    2016-01-01

    High-altitude exposure causes a mild to moderate rise in systolic and diastolic blood pressure. This case report describes the first documented case of a hypertensive crisis at altitude, as well as the first report of the occurrence of acute kidney injury in the context of altitude-related hypertension. A healthy, previously normotensive 30-year old, embarked on a trek to Everest Base Camp (5300 m). During his 11-day ascent the subject developed increasingly worsening hypertension. In the absence of symptoms, the individual initially elected to remain at altitude as had previously been the plan. However, an increase in the severity of his hypertension to a peak of 223/119 mmHg resulted in a decision to descend. On descent he was found to have an acute kidney injury that subsequently resolved spontaneously. His blood pressure reverted to normal at sea level and subsequent investigations including a transthoracic echocardiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, renal ultrasound, and urinary catecholamines were normal. This report challenges the view that transient rises in blood pressure at altitude are without immediate risk. We review the evidence that altitude induces hypertension and discuss the implications for the management of hypertension at altitude.

  16. Calibration drift in regression and machine learning models for acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sharon E; Lasko, Thomas A; Chen, Guanhua; Siew, Edward D; Matheny, Michael E

    2017-11-01

    Predictive analytics create opportunities to incorporate personalized risk estimates into clinical decision support. Models must be well calibrated to support decision-making, yet calibration deteriorates over time. This study explored the influence of modeling methods on performance drift and connected observed drift with data shifts in the patient population. Using 2003 admissions to Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals nationwide, we developed 7 parallel models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury using common regression and machine learning methods, validating each over 9 subsequent years. Discrimination was maintained for all models. Calibration declined as all models increasingly overpredicted risk. However, the random forest and neural network models maintained calibration across ranges of probability, capturing more admissions than did the regression models. The magnitude of overprediction increased over time for the regression models while remaining stable and small for the machine learning models. Changes in the rate of acute kidney injury were strongly linked to increasing overprediction, while changes in predictor-outcome associations corresponded with diverging patterns of calibration drift across methods. Efficient and effective updating protocols will be essential for maintaining accuracy of, user confidence in, and safety of personalized risk predictions to support decision-making. Model updating protocols should be tailored to account for variations in calibration drift across methods and respond to periods of rapid performance drift rather than be limited to regularly scheduled annual or biannual intervals.

  17. Factors associated with mortality in a population with acute kidney injury undergoing hemodialysis in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy Herrera-Añazco

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI in developing countries are described in a profile of young age, with less comorbidities, with unifactorial, and with a lower mortality compared to patients in developed countries. Objective: To assess mortality in patients with acute kidney injury undergoing hemodialysis (HD and its associated factors in a developing country setting. Methods: Retrospective study. Demographic, clinical, and mortality variables were collected from patients who presented AKI and underwent HD between January 2014 and December 2015 at a national reference hospital in Lima, Peru. Risk ratios (RR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI were estimated through Poisson regressions. Results: Data from 72 patients with AKI that underwent HD were analyzed, 66.7% of them were 8.9 mg/dL. The adjusted analysis showed that having had a creatinine level of > 8.9 mg/dL, compared to a creatinine level of < 5.2 mg/dL at the time of initiating HD, was associated with 74% less probability of death. Conclusion: Four out of every ten AKI patients undergoing HD die. Higher levels of creatinine were associated with lower probability of mortality.

  18. Acute and chronic kidney disease in elderly patients with hip fracture: prevalence, risk factors and outcome with development and validation of a risk prediction model for acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christine J; Moppett, Iain K; Juurlink, Irene; Nightingale, Jessica; Moran, Christopher G; Devonald, Mark A J

    2017-01-14

    Hip fracture is a common injury in older people with a high rate of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This patient group is also at high risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), but little is known of the impact of kidney disease on outcome following hip fracture. An observational cohort of consecutive patients with hip fracture in a large UK secondary care hospital. Predictive modelling of outcomes using development and validation datasets. Inclusion: all patients admitted with hip fracture with sufficient serum creatinine measurements to define acute kidney injury. Main outcome measures - development of acute kidney injury during admission; mortality (in hospital, 30-365 day and to follow-up); length of hospital stay. Data were available for 2848 / 2959 consecutive admissions from 2007-2011; 776 (27.2%) male. Acute kidney injury occurs in 24%; development of acute kidney injury is independently associated with male sex (OR 1.48 (1.21 to 1.80), premorbid chronic kidney disease stage 3B or worse (OR 1.52 (1.19 to 1.93)), age (OR 3.4 (2.29 to 5.2) for >85 years) and greater than one major co-morbidities (OR 1.61 (1.34 to 1.93)). Acute kidney injury of any stage is associated with an increased hazard of death, and increased length of stay (Acute kidney injury: 19.1 (IQR 13 to 31) days; no acute kidney injury 15 (11 to 23) days). A simplified predictive model containing Age, CKD stage (3B-5), two or more comorbidities, and male sex had an area under the ROC curve of 0.63 (0.60 to 0.67). Acute kidney injury following hip fracture is common and associated with worse outcome and greater hospital length of stay. With the number of people experiencing hip fracture predicted to rise, recognition of risk factors and optimal perioperative management of acute kidney injury will become even more important.

  19. Urine interleukin-18 in prediction of acute kidney injury: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Yingting; Zha, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) mediates ischemic acute tubular necrosis; it has been proved as a rapid, reliable, and affordable test marker for the early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI), but its predictive accuracy varies greatly. MEDLINE and EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Ovid, and Springerlink (from inception to November 15, 2013) were searched for relevant studies (in English) investigating diagnostic accuracy of urine IL-18 to predict AKI in various clinical settings. The text index was increasing or increased urine IL-18 level and the main outcome was the development of AKI, which was primarily based on serum creatinine level [using risk, injury, failure, loss and end-stage renal disease (RIFLE), acute kidney injury network, or modified pediatric RIFLE criteria in pediatric patients]. Pooled estimates of diagnostic odds ratio (OR), sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the measures of accuracy and Q point value (Q*). Remarkable heterogeneity was explored further by subgroup analysis based on the different clinical settings. We analyzed data from 11 studies of 3 countries covering 2,796 patients. These studies were marked by limitations of threshold and non-threshold effect heterogeneity. Across all settings, the diagnostic OR for urine IL-18 level to predict AKI was 5.11 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.22-8.12], with sensitivity and specificity respectively at 0.51 and 0.79. The area under the ROC curve of urine IL-18 level to predict AKI was 0.77 (95% CI 0.71-0.83). Subgroup analysis showed that urine IL-18 level in pediatric patients (<18 years) and early AKI predictive time (<12 h) were more effective in predicting AKI, with diagnostic ORs of 7.51 (2.99-18.88), 8.18 (2.19-30.51), respectively. Urine IL-18 holds promise as a biomarker in the prediction of AKI but has only moderate diagnostic value.

  20. Acute kidney injury in ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock at admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Assanelli, Emilio; Campodonico, Jeness; De Metrio, Monica; Lauri, Gianfranco; Marana, Ivana; Moltrasio, Marco; Rubino, Mara; Veglia, Fabrizio; Montorsi, Piero; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the clinical and prognostic relevance of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the setting of ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) complicated by cardiogenic shock (CS). Prospective study. Single-center study, 13-bed intensive cardiac care unit at a University Cardiological Center. Ninety-seven consecutive STEMI patients with CS at admission, undergoing intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). None. We measured serum creatinine at baseline and each day for the following 3 days. Acute kidney injury was defined as a rise in creatinine >25% from baseline. Overall, AKI occurred in 52 (55%) patients, and in 12 of these patients, a renal replacement therapy was required. In multivariate analysis, age >75 yrs (p = .005), left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 40% (p = .009), and use of mechanical ventilation (p = .01) were independent predictors of AKI. Patients developing AKI had a longer hospital stay, a more complicated clinical course, and significantly higher mortality rate (50% vs. 2.2%; p <.001) than patients without AKI. In our population, AKI was the strongest independent predictor of in-hospital mortality (relative risk 12.3, 95% confidence intervals 1.78 to 84.9; p <.001). In patients with STEMI complicated by CS, AKI represents a frequent clinical complication associated with a poor prognosis.

  1. Acute Kidney Injury Following Plastic Bronchitis Associated with Influenza B Virus in a Child with Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaga, Shuichiro; Hara, Taichi

    2015-06-01

    Plastic bronchitis is a rare but life-threatening disorder and is usually associated with congenital heart disease or pulmonary disease. A 5-year-old boy with minimal change nephrotic syndrome who developed a relapse along with cough, fever and dyspnea. Chest X-ray showed atelectasis of right upper lobe of lung, and nasal swab was positive for influenza B virus. His respiratory condition worsened, and required ventilation; bronchoscopy revealed bronchial casts. This was followed by acute kidney injury which was successfully managed with hemodialysis. Children with nephrotic syndrome on immunosuppressive agents can develop plastic bronchitis and acute kidney injury, following influenza virus infection.

  2. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-11-01

    Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients.A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr.The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%-9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770-0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors.

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease After Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Its Impact on Long-Term Outcomes: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jung Nam; Hwang, Jin Ho; Kim, Dong Ki; Lee, Hajeong; Ahn, Shin Young; Kim, Sejoong; Park, Jung Tak; Kang, Shin-Wook; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Lim, Chun Soo; Oh, Hyung Jung; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Severe acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy is associated with a high risk of early mortality. Our objectives were to identify a cohort of early survivors and to follow their renal progress and long-term mortality. Multicenter, observational, retrospective cohort study. ICUs in tertiary academic hospitals in Korea. From 2009 to 2013, we identified 1,764 severe acute kidney injury patients who were started on continuous renal replacement therapy at four hospitals. Of these, we identified 331 survivors for whom we could identify renal function at baseline and at 3 months. None. The 331 patients were separated into two groups based on their renal function at 3 months after the start of continuous renal replacement therapy. Those who displayed significant deterioration in renal function compared to baseline, defined as greater than or equal to 50% increase in serum creatinine or greater than or equal to 35% decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, or those who continued to receive renal replacement therapy were designated as a "3-month chronic kidney disease progression" group. Those with a return to baseline, less than 50% increase in serum creatinine or less than 35% decrease in the estimated glomerular filtration rate, were designated as a "3-month chronic kidney disease nonprogression" group. The acute kidney injury patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy showed a higher risk of progression to end-stage renal disease compared to that of stage 3 chronic kidney disease patients who did not undergo an acute kidney injury episode, even if the acute kidney injury was recovered at 3 months after continuous renal replacement therapy initiation. Furthermore, "3-month chronic kidney disease progression" was associated with a high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease and long-term mortality over a median follow-up period of 12.7 (3.8-33.2) and 20.4 (7.5-39.7) months, respectively. Older age, higher baseline

  4. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Assessing Renal Perfusion Impairment and Predicting Acute Kidney Injury to Chronic Kidney Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Cui, Shuang; Yang, Li; Wu, Chunyi; Liu, Jian; Yang, Fang; Liu, Youhua; Bin, Jianping; Hou, Fan Fan

    2017-12-10

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor leading to progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the diagnostic tools for predicting AKI to CKD progression are particularly lacking. Here, we tested the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for predicting progression to CKD after AKI by using both mild (20-min) and severe (45-min) bilateral renal ischemia-reperfusion injury mice. Renal perfusion measured by CEUS reduced to 25% ± 7% and 14% ± 6% of the pre-ischemic levels in mild and severe AKI 1 h after ischemia (p < 0.05). Renal perfusion returned to pre-ischemic levels 1 day after mild AKI followed by restoration of kidney function. However, severe AKI caused persistent renal perfusion impairment (60% ± 9% of baseline levels) accompanied by progressive renal fibrosis and sustained decrease in renal function. Renal perfusion at days 1-21 significantly correlated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis 42 days after AKI. For predicting renal fibrosis at day 42, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of renal perfusion impairment at day 1 was 0.84. Similar changes in the renal image of CEUS were observed in patients with AKI-CKD progression. This study demonstrates that CEUS enables dynamic and noninvasive detection of renal perfusion impairment after ischemic AKI and the perfusion abnormalities shown by CEUS can early predict the progression to CKD after AKI. These results indicate that CEUS enables the evaluation of renal perfusion impairment associated with CKD after ischemic AKI and may serve as a noninvasive technique for assessing AKI-CKD progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1397-1411.

  5. Simvastatin dose and acute kidney injury without concurrent serious muscle injury: A nationwide nested case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianne Parkin

    Full Text Available Inconsistent findings from four observational studies suggest that the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI may increase with increasing statin dose or potency, but none of the studies took statin-related severe muscle injury, including rhabdomyolysis, into account. We undertook a nationwide nested case-control study in New Zealand to examine the risk of AKI without concurrent serious muscle injury according to simvastatin dose in two cohorts: people without a history of renal disease and people with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease.A total of 334,710 people aged ≥ 18 years without a history of renal disease (cohort 1 and 5,437 with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (cohort 2 who initiated simvastatin therapy between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2013 were identified using national pharmaceutical dispensing and hospital discharge data. Patients who developed AKI without concurrent serious muscle injury during follow-up (cases were ascertained using hospital discharge and mortality data (n = 931 from cohort 1, n = 160 from cohort 2. Up to 10 controls per case, matched by date of birth, sex, and cohort entry date were randomly selected from the relevant cohort using risk set sampling.Relative to current use of 20mg simvastatin daily, the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI in cohort 1 for current use of 40mg and 80mg were 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.2 and 1.3 (95% CI 0.7-2.3, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio for 40mg in cohort 2 was 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.9; the numbers taking 80mg were very small and the confidence interval was correspondingly wide.The findings of this study suggest that a relationship between statin dose and AKI may not exist independent of serious muscle injury.

  6. Protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury through sympathetic nervous system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hidenobu; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Yamagata, Masayo; Yukimura, Tokihito; Ohkita, Mamoru; Matsumura, Yasuo

    2013-10-15

    We have found that a series of brief renal ischemia and reperfusion (preconditioning), before the time of ischemia significantly attenuated the ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury through endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In this study, we examined the effects of ischemic preconditioning on renal sympathetic nervous system and kidney function in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury with or without nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury was made by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45-min followed by reperfusion, 2 weeks after the contralateral nephrectomy. Ischemic preconditioning, consisting of three cycles of 2-min ischemia followed by 5-min reperfusion, was performed before the 45-min ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning suppressed the enhanced renal sympathetic nerve activity during ischemia and the elevated renal venous plasma norepinephrine level after reperfusion, and attenuated renal dysfunction and histological damage. The renoprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning was diminished by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (0.3 mg/kg, i.v.), a nonselective nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 5 min before the start of ischemic preconditioning. Thus, ischemic preconditioning decreased renal sympathetic nerve activity and norepinephrine release probably through activating nitric oxide production, thereby improving ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Primary Injuries and Secondary Organ Failures in Trauma Patients with Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Beitland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute kidney injury (AKI treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT is a severe complication in trauma patients. The aim of the study was to assess primary traumatic injuries and secondary organ failures in severe posttraumatic AKI. Methods. Retrospective review of adult trauma patients admitted to the trauma centre at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål. Injury severity score (ISS was used to assess the severity of primary injuries, and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score was utilized to measure secondary organ failures. Results. Forty-two (8% of 506 trauma patients admitted to intensive care unit developed AKI treated with CRRT, whereof 40 (95% suffered blunt trauma mechanisms. Patients had extensive primary organ injuries with median (interquartile range ISS 36 (27–49. The majority of the patients had respiratory (93% intubated and cardiovascular (67% with inotropic and/or vasoactive medication failure within 24 hours after admission. AKI was often part of multiple organ failure, most frequently respiratory and cardiovascular failure, affecting 33 (75% and 30 (71% of the patients, respectively. Conclusion. Trauma patients with AKI undergoing CRRT often had severe primary injuries due to blunt trauma. Most of them suffered from secondary multiple organ failure concomitant to AKI.

  8. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 down-regulates inflammatory responses and protects against endotoxin-induced acute kidney injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiao [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shetty, Sreerama [Center for Biomedical Research, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 75708 (United States); Zhang, Ping [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Gao, Rong; Hu, Yuxin [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Shuxia [Graduate Center for Nutritional Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Zhenyu [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Fu, Jian, E-mail: jian.fu@uky.edu [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The presence of endotoxin in blood can lead to acute kidney injury (AKI) and septic shock. Resolvins, the endogenous lipid mediators derived from docosahexaenoic acid, have been reported to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory action. Using a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced AKI, we investigated the effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) on inflammatory kidney injury. Administration of AT-RvD1 1 h after LPS challenge protected the mice from kidney injury as indicated by the measurements of blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and morphological alterations associated with tubular damage. The protective effects were evidenced by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the kidney indicating reduction in inflammation. AT-RvD1 treatment restored kidney cell junction protein claudin-4 expression, which was otherwise reduced after LPS challenge. AT-RvD1 treatment inhibited endotoxin-induced NF-κB activation and suppressed LPS-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in the kidney. Moreover, AT-RvD1 treatment markedly decreased LPS-induced IL-6 level in the kidney and blocked IL-6-mediated signaling including STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation. Our findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 is a potent anti-inflammatory mediator in LPS-induced kidney injury, and AT-RvD1 has therapeutic potential against AKI during endotoxemia.

  9. Role of TRPV1 channels in ischemia/reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 -positive sensory nerves are widely distributed in the kidney, suggesting that TRPV1-mediated action may participate in the regulation of renal function under pathophysiological conditions. Stimulation of TRPV1 channels protects against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced acute kidney injury (AKI. However, it is unknown whether inhibition of these channels is detrimental in AKI or not. We tested the role of TRPV1 channels in I/R-induced AKI by modulating these channels with capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist, capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist and using Trpv1-/- mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 25 min of renal ischemia and 24 hrs of reperfusion. Mice were pretreated with capsaicin (0.3 mg/kg body weight or capsazepine (50 mg/kg body weight. Capsaicin ameliorated the outcome of AKI, as measured by serum creatinine levels, tubular damage,neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL abundance and Ly-6B.2 positive polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells in injured kidneys. Neither capsazepine nor deficiency of TRPV1 did deteriorate renal function or histology after AKI. Measurements of endovanilloids in kidney tissue indicate that 20-hydroxyeicosatetraeonic acid (20-HETE or epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs are unlikely involved in the beneficial effects of capsaicin on I/R-induced AKI. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of TRPV1 channels ameliorates I/R-induced AKI, but inhibition of these channels does not affect the outcome of AKI. Our results may have clinical implications for long-term safety of renal denervation to treat resistant hypertension in man, with respect to the function of primary sensory nerves in the response of the kidney to ischemic stimuli.

  10. A meta-analysis of the association of estimated GFR, albuminuria, age, race, and sex with acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Grams, Morgan E.; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana H.; Ron T Gansevoort; Kimm, Heejin; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Naimark, David; Oien, Cecilia; Smith, David H; Coresh, Josef; Sarnak, Mark J.; Stengel, Benedicte; Tonelli, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious global public health problem. We aimed to quantify the risk of AKI associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio [ACR]), age, sex, and race (African American and white). STUDY DESIGN: Collaborative meta-analysis. SETTING & POPULATION: 8 general-population cohorts (1,285,049 participants) and 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohorts (79,519 participants). SELECTION CRITERIA FOR STUDIES: Av...

  11. Phosphate induced crystal acute kidney injury – an under-recognized cause of acute kidney injury potentially leading to chronic kidney disease: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lochy S

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available S Lochy,1 R Jacobs,1 PM Honoré,1 E De Waele,1 O Joannes-Boyau,2 J De Regt,1 V Van Gorp,1 HD Spapen1 1Intensive Care Dept, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; 2Haut Leveque University Hospital of Bordeaux, University of Bordeaux 2, Pessac, France Abstract: Acute phosphate nephropathy or nephrocalcinosis is a tubulointerstitial nephropathy characterized by tubular calcium phosphate deposition – crystal nephropathy – and slowly progressive renal insufficiency during or following treatment with preparations containing sodium phosphate. We report a patient who developed nephrocalcinosis (crystal induced acute kidney injury following the administration of a combination of oral and rectal sodium phosphate for treatment of postoperative constipation. A timely renal replacement therapy procedure may reverse the process of crystallization and the irreversible slope towards chronic dialysis. Keywords: hemofiltration, acute phosphate nephropathy, hyperphosphatemie, crystal induced nephropathy, CRRT, worse prognosis, dialysis

  12. Factors associated with the use of preventive care for contrast-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Mor, Maria K; Kim, Sunghee; Hartwig, Kathryn C; Sonel, Ali F; Palevsky, Paul M; Fine, Michael J

    2009-03-01

    The factors that affect the implementation of preventive care for contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) are unknown. To assess patient and provider factors associated with the use of preventive care for CIAKI. Prospective cohort study. Patients with kidney disease undergoing procedures with intravascular iodinated radiocontrast. We recorded the use of preventive care defined as the administration of: (1) pre- and post-procedure isotonic intravenous (IV) fluid, (2) N-acetylcysteine, and (3) iso-osmolal radiocontrast. We surveyed patients' providers to assess their knowledge, experience, and training on CIAKI and used multiple logistic regression to assess the independent associations of patient and provider factors with the use of these preventive interventions. We enrolled 660 patients and 87 providers. Patient factors associated with use of IV fluid and N-acetylcysteine were higher baseline serum creatinine (OR 1.5 and 5.0, p iso-osmolal contrast (OR = 13.4, p < 0.01). The primary provider characteristics associated with the use of IV fluid and N-acetylcysteine were a greater degree of prior training on CIAKI (OR 1.9 and 2.8, p < 0.05) and higher number of prior patients with CIAKI (OR 2.7 and 2.6, p < 0.05). Patient baseline kidney function and provider training and experience with CIAKI are independently associated with the use of preventive care. Efforts to increase and intensify the training providers receive on CIAKI may help decrease the incidence of this costly iatrogenic condition.

  13. Acute Kidney Injury Risk Assessment and the Nephrology Rapid Response Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo-Topete, Lilia Maria; Rosner, Mitchell H; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney Injury (AKI) is a serious medical condition affecting more than 10 million people around the world annually and resulting in poor outcomes. It has been suggested that late recognition of the syndrome may lead to delayed interventions with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and timely therapeutic strategies may be the cornerstone of future improvement in outcomes. The purpose of this article is to provide a practical model to identify patients at high risk for AKI in different environments, with the goal to prevent AKI. We describe the AKI Risk Assessment (ARA) as a proposed algorithm that systematically evaluates the patient in high-risk situations of AKI in a simple way no matter where the patient is located, and allows different medical specialists to approach patients as a team with a nephrologist to improve outcomes. The goal of the nephrology rapid response team (NRRT) is to prevent AKI or start treatment if AKI is already diagnosed as a consequence of progressive events that can lead to progressive deterioration of kidney tissues and eventual decline in renal function and to ensure appropriate follow-up of patients at risk for progressive chronic kidney disease after the episode of AKI. Prevention is the key to avoid mortality and morbidity associated with AKI. Integration of these assessment tools in a global methodology that includes a multi-disciplinary team (NRRT) is critical to success. Video Journal Club 'Cappuccino with Claudio Ronco' at http://www.karger.com/?doi=452402. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Acute kidney injury in the elderly: Only the tip of the iceberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ter Chao, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI is rising in individuals of all ages; however, elderly patients (older than 65 years are particularly susceptible to the development of AKI due to the structural and functional deterioration of the kidneys associated with the aging process, a decreased renal reserve, the presence of comorbidities, and the reduced ability to recover. Older patients with AKI carry an elevated risk of both short-term and long-term mortality, and survivors are often left with chronic kidney disease (CKD that eventually progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Additionally, older patients with AKI suffer from an impaired quality of life and decreased functional status, both of which contribute to adverse outcomes. Maintaining adequate hydration and avoiding nephrotoxic agents are helpful in warding off AKI in elderly individuals. No proven treatment measures exist for AKI in elderly individuals except supportive therapy. A thorough understanding of the pathogenesis, etiology, clinical courses, complications, and prognosis of AKI in the elderly population is vital to preemptively reduce the incidence of AKI and hopefully create a better outcome.

  15. THROMBOCYTOPENIA AND ALBUMINURIA- EARLY PREDICTORS OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN VENOMOUS SNAKEBITE- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Snakebites and accidents caused by venomous arthropods are important public health problem. Envenomation by snakebite, independently of the species responsible for the bite, enforces medical emergencies since different organs and tissues can be affected at the same time. The hypothesis for pathogenesis of venom-induced AKI includes both a direct cytotoxic action of the venom on different renal structures and a secondary response of the whole organism resulting from systemic envenomation. The aim of the study is to assess the early predictors for acute kidney injury due to snakebite by comparing it with the patients who had not developed acute kidney injury after the snakebite. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective comparative study was undertaken at the Government Medical College Hospital, Salem, during the period of April 2015-March 2016. A total of 115 patients were included in the study in which 42 patients were having AKI due to snakebite and 73 patients were without AKI after snakebite. Haematological and biochemical investigations were performed in all patients, including haemoglobin, complete and differential leukocyte counts, platelet count, peripheral blood smear, bleeding and clotting times, Prothrombin Time (PT and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT, blood urea, serum creatinine, serum electrolytes, liver function tests and urine examination. RESULTS Thrombocytopenia and albuminuria, which is to be considered as the major early marker for acute kidney injury among snakebite patients was found to be present in 85.7% and 100% in our patients with AKI whereas it was only 1.3% and 4.1% respectively among the patients without AKI and the difference was found to be statistically significant (p<.05. The survival rate was higher among the patients without AKI when compared to the patients with AKI and the difference is statistically significant (p<.05. CONCLUSION Early detection of AKI due to snakebite should be assessed by

  16. Spectrum of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: A single center study from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eswarappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is common in intensive care unit (ICU and carries a high mortality rate. Reliable and comparable data about the clinical spectrum of AKI is necessary for optimizing management. The study was conducted to describe epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics and outcome of AKI in critically ill patients without pre-existing renal disease, diagnosed using RIFLE criteria. We retrospectively analyzed data of 500 adult patients admitted to ICU with AKI or who developed AKI in ICU. Patients with pre-existing renal disease, renal transplant recipients were excluded. AKI was predominantly encountered in older males. Diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease were the most commonly prevalent comorbidities. Sepsis was the most common cause of AKI, accounting for 38.6% of patients. 24.4% belonged to risk class, 37.0% to injury class, 35.0% to failure class, 3% to loss and 0.6% to ESRD class of the RIFLE criteria. Renal replacement therapy (RRT was required in 37.2% (n = 186 of patients. About 60% recovered complete renal function. Chronic kidney disease (CKD was a sequel in 2.4% (n = 12 of patients. Average duration of ICU stay was 5.6 days. Crude mortality rate was 37.6% (n = 188. In critically ill patients without pre-existing renal disease, elderly age, male sex, type 2 diabetes along with a primary diagnosis of sepsis were most commonly associated with AKI. Majority of the patients′ recovered complete renal function.

  17. Spectrum of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: A single center study from South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswarappa, M; Gireesh, M S; Ravi, V; Kumar, D; Dev, G

    2014-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in intensive care unit (ICU) and carries a high mortality rate. Reliable and comparable data about the clinical spectrum of AKI is necessary for optimizing management. The study was conducted to describe epidemiology, etiology, clinical characteristics and outcome of AKI in critically ill patients without pre-existing renal disease, diagnosed using RIFLE criteria. We retrospectively analyzed data of 500 adult patients admitted to ICU with AKI or who developed AKI in ICU. Patients with pre-existing renal disease, renal transplant recipients were excluded. AKI was predominantly encountered in older males. Diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease were the most commonly prevalent comorbidities. Sepsis was the most common cause of AKI, accounting for 38.6% of patients. 24.4% belonged to risk class, 37.0% to injury class, 35.0% to failure class, 3% to loss and 0.6% to ESRD class of the RIFLE criteria. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) was required in 37.2% (n = 186) of patients. About 60% recovered complete renal function. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was a sequel in 2.4% (n = 12) of patients. Average duration of ICU stay was 5.6 days. Crude mortality rate was 37.6% (n = 188). In critically ill patients without pre-existing renal disease, elderly age, male sex, type 2 diabetes along with a primary diagnosis of sepsis were most commonly associated with AKI. Majority of the patients' recovered complete renal function.

  18. Biomarkers of acute kidney injury: the pathway from discovery to clinical adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Kianoush; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-07-26

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication of critical illnesses and has a significant impact on outcomes, including mortality and morbidities. Unfortunately, apart from prophylactic measures, no effective treatment for this syndrome is known. Therefore, early recognition of AKI not only can provide better opportunities for preventive interventions, but also opens many gates for research and development of effective therapeutic options. Over the last few years, several new AKI biomarkers have been discovered and validated to improve early detection, differential diagnosis, and differentiation of patients into risk groups for progressive renal failure, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT), or death. These novel AKI biomarkers complement serum creatinine (SCr) and urine output, which are the standard diagnostic tools for AKI detection. In this article, we review the available literature on characteristics of promising AKI biomarkers that are currently the focus of preclinical and clinical investigations. These biomarkers include neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, interleukin 18 (lL-18), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2), calprotectin, urine angiotensinogen (AGT), and urine microRNA. We then describe the clinical performance of these biomarkers for diagnosis and prognostication. We also appraise each AKI biomarker's advantages and limitations as a tool for early AKI recognition and prediction of clinical outcomes after AKI. Finally, we review the current and future states of implementation of biomarkers in the clinical practice.

  19. Urine biomarkers of acute kidney injury in noncritically ill, hospitalized children treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Maya; Al-Ismaili, Zubaida; McMahon, Kelly R; Piccioni, Melissa; Pizzi, Michael; Mottes, Theresa; Lands, Larry C; Abish, Sharon; Fleming, Adam J; Bennett, Michael R; Palijan, Ana; Devarajan, Prasad; Goldstein, Stuart L; O'Brien, Maureen M; Zappitelli, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Cisplatin (Cis), carboplatin (Carb), and ifosfamide (Ifos) are common nephrotoxic chemotherapies. Biomarkers of tubular injury may allow for early acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis. We performed a two-center (Canada, United States) pilot study to prospectively measure serum creatinine (SCr), urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) in children receiving Cis/Carb (27 episodes), Ifos (30 episodes), and in 15 hospitalized, nonchemotherapy patients. We defined AKI using the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) definition. We compared postchemotherapy infusion NGAL and IL-18 concentrations (immediate postdose to 3 days later) to pre-infusion concentrations. We calculated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for postinfusion biomarkers to discriminate for AKI. Prechemotherapy infusion NGAL and IL-18 concentrations were not higher than nonchemotherapy control concentrations. Increasing chemotherapy dose was associated with increasing postinfusion (0-4 hr after infusion) NGAL (P 0.05). NGAL and IL-18 measured immediately after Ifos infusion discriminated for AKI with AUCs is 0.80 (standard error = 0.13) and 0.73 (standard error = 0.16), respectively. NGAL and IL-18 were not diagnostic of Cis-Carb-associated AKI. When AUCs were adjusted for age, all biomarker AUCs (Cis-Carb and Ifos) improved. Urine NGAL and IL-18 show promise as early AKI diagnostic tests in children treated with ifosfamide and may have a potential role in drug toxicity monitoring. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The definition of acute kidney injury and its use in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark E; Blaine, Caroline; Dawnay, Anne; Devonald, Mark A J; Ftouh, Saoussen; Laing, Chris; Latchem, Susan; Lewington, Andrew; Milford, David V; Ostermann, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common syndrome that is independently associated with increased mortality. A standardized definition is important to facilitate clinical care and research. The definition of AKI has evolved rapidly since 2004, with the introduction of the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage renal disease (RIFLE), AKI Network (AKIN), and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classifications. RIFLE was modified for pediatric use (pRIFLE). They were developed using both evidence and consensus. Small rises in serum creatinine are independently associated with increased mortality, and hence are incorporated into the current definition of AKI. The recent definition from the international KDIGO guideline merged RIFLE and AKIN. Systematic review has found that these definitions do not differ significantly in their performance. Health-care staff caring for children or adults should use standard criteria for AKI, such as the pRIFLE or KDIGO definitions, respectively. These efforts to standardize AKI definition are a substantial advance, although areas of uncertainty remain. The new definitions have enabled the use of electronic alerts to warn clinicians of possible AKI. Novel biomarkers may further refine the definition of AKI, but their use will need to produce tangible improvements in outcomes and cost effectiveness. Further developments in AKI definitions should be informed by research into their practical application across health-care providers. This review will discuss the definition of AKI and its use in practice for clinicians and laboratory scientists.

  1. Blood Transfusion and the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury Among Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrowni, Wassef; Vora, Amit Navin; Dai, David; Wojdyla, Daniel; Dakik, Habib; Rao, Sunil V

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicating percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. To date, no studies have evaluated the association of blood transfusion with AKI in patients undergoing PCI. We used a retrospective cohort study of all patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI from CathPCI Registry (n=1 756 864). The primary outcome was AKI defined as the rise in serum creatinine post procedure ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% above baseline values. AKI developed in 9.0% of study sample. Patients with AKI were older, more often women, and had high prevalence of comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and advanced stages of chronic kidney disease at baseline. Blood transfusion was utilized in 2.2% of patients. In the overall sample, AKI developed in 35.1% of patients who received transfusion versus 8.4% of patients without transfusion (adjusted odds ratio, 4.87 [4.71-5.04]). In the subgroup of patients who sustained bleeding event and received transfusion, the rate of AKI was significantly increased across all preprocedure hemoglobin levels versus no blood transfusion. Similar findings were seen in the subgroup of patients with no bleeding event. Blood transfusion is strongly associated with AKI in patients with acute coronary syndrome undergoing PCI. Further investigation is needed to determine whether a restrictive blood transfusion strategy might improve PCI outcomes by reducing the risk of AKI. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. A Meta-analysis of the Association of Estimated GFR, Albuminuria, Age, Race, and Sex With Acute Kidney Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grams, Morgan E.; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana H.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kimm, Heejin; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Naimark, David; Oien, Cecilia; Smith, David H.; Coresh, Josef; Sarnak, Mark J.; Stengel, Benedicte; Tonelli, Marcello; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van der Harst, Pim; Heerspink, Hiddo J.; Hillege, Hans L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious global public health problem. We aimed to quantify the risk of AKI associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio [ACR]), age, sex, and race (African American and white). Study Design:

  3. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ergin, Bulent; Kapucu, Aysegul; Ince, Can

    2016-01-01

    The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Twenty-seven Wistar albino rats were randomized into

  4. A Meta-analysis of the Association of Estimated GFR, Albuminuria, Diabetes Mellitus, and Hypertension With Acute Kidney Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Matthew T.; Grams, Morgan E.; Woodward, Mark; Elley, C. Raina; Green, Jamie A.; Wheeler, David C.; de Jong, Paul; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Levey, Andrew S.; Warnock, David G.; Sarnak, Mark J.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van der Harst, Pim; Heerspink, Hiddo J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI). Whether estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) remain risk factors for AKI in the presence and absence of these conditions is uncertain. Study Design:

  5. Amino Acid requirements in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury treated with continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Btaiche, Imad F; Mohammad, Rima A; Alaniz, Cesar; Mueller, Bruce A

    2008-05-01

    Acute kidney injury in critically ill patients is often a complication of an underlying condition such as organ failure, sepsis, or drug therapy. In these patients, stress-induced hypercatabolism results in loss of body cell mass. Unless nutrition support is provided, malnutrition and negative nitrogen balance may ensue. Because of metabolic, fluid, and electrolyte abnormalities, optimization of nutrition to patients with acute kidney injury presents a challenge to the clinician. In patients treated with conventional intermittent hemodialysis, achieving adequate amino acid intake can be limited by azotemia and fluid restriction. With the use of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), however, better control of azotemia and liberalization of fluid intake allow amino acid intake to be maximized to support the patient's metabolic needs. High amino acid doses up to 2.5 g/kg/day in patients treated with CRRT improved nitrogen balance. However, to our knowledge, no studies have correlated increased amino acid intake with improved outcomes in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Data from large, prospective, randomized, controlled trials are needed to optimize the dosing of amino acids in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who are treated with CRRT and to study the safety of high doses and their effects on patient morbidity and survival.

  6. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zafrani (Lara); B. Ergin (Bulent); Kapucu, A. (Aysegul); C. Ince (Can)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Methods: Twenty-seven Wistar

  7. Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin (NGAL – Early Biomarker for Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Grigorescu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: NGAL (Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin is a biomarker recently introduced into clinical practice for the early diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI. The aim of this study was to correlate the plasmatic NGAL value determined at admission with clinical progression and severity of AKI in critically ill patients.

  8. Biomarkers for the prediction of acute kidney injury: A narrative review on current status and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R.H. de Geus (Hilde); M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); J. Bakker (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAcute kidney injury (AKI) is strongly associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Efforts to change its clinical course have failed because clinically available therapeutic measures are currently lacking, and early detection is impossible with serum

  9. A comparison of RIFLE with and without urine output criteria for acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wlodzimirow, Kama A.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Slabbekoorn, Mathilde; Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-Stage Renal Disease (RIFLE) is a consensus-based classification system for diagnosing acute kidney insufficiency (AKI), based on serum creatinine (SCr) and urine output criteria (RIFLESCr+UO). The urine output criteria, however, are frequently discarded and

  10. A comparison of observed versus estimated baseline creatinine for determination of RIFLE class in patients with acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagshaw, Sean M.; Uchino, Shigehiko; Cruz, Dinna; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Morgera, Stanislao; Schetz, Miet; Tan, Ian; Bouman, Catherine; Macedo, Etienne; Gibney, Noel; Tolwani, Ashita; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A.; French, Craig; Mulder, John; Pinder, Mary; Roberts, Brigit; Botha, John; Mudholkar, Pradeen; Holt, Andrew; Hunt, Tamara; Honoré, Patrick Maurice; Clerbaux, Gaetan; Schetz, Miet Maria; Wilmer, Alexander; Yu, Luis; Macedo, Ettiene V.; Laranja, Sandra Maria; Rodrigues, Cassio José; Suassuna, José Hermógenes Rocco; Ruzany, Frederico; Campos, Bruno; Leblanc, Martine; Senécal, Lynne; Gibney, R. T. Noel; Johnston, Curtis; Brindley, Peter; Tan, Ian K. S.; Chen, Hui De; Wan, Li; Rokyta, Richard; Krouzecky, Ales; Neumayer, Hans-Helmut; Detlef, Kindgen-Milles; Mueller, Eckhard; Tsiora, Vicky; Sombolos, Kostas; Mustafa, Iqbal; Suranadi, Iwayan; Bar-Lavie, Yaron; Nakhoul, Farid; Ceriani, Roberto; Bortone, Franco; Zamperetti, Nereo; Pappalardo, Federico; Marino, Giovanni; Calabrese, Prospero; Monaco, Francesco; Liverani, Chiara; Clementi, Stefano; Coltrinari, Rosanna; Marini, Benedetto; Fuke, Nobuo; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kurasako, Toshiaki; Hirasawa, Hiroyuki; Oda, Shigeto; Tanigawa, Koichi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Oudemans-van Straaten, Helena Maria; de Pont, Anne-Cornelie J. M.; Bugge, Jan Frederik; Riddervold, Fridtjov; Nilsen, Paul Age; Julsrud, Joar; Teixeira e Costa, Fernando; Marcelino, Paulo; Serra, Isabel Maria; Yaroustovsky, Mike; Grigoriyanc, Rachik; Lee, Kang Hoe; Loo, Shi; Singh, Kulgit; Barrachina, Ferran; Llorens, Julio; Sanchez-Izquierdo-Riera, Jose Angel; Toral-Vazquez, Darío; Wizelius, Ivar; Hermansson, Dan; Gaspert, Tomislav; Maggiorini, Marco; Davenport, Andrew; Lombardi, Raúl; Llopart, Teresita; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Kellum, John; Murray, Patrick; Trevino, Sharon; Benjamin, Ernest; Hufanda, Jerry; Paganini, Emil; Warnock, David; Guirguis, Nabil

    2009-01-01

    The RIFLE classification scheme for acute kidney injury (AKI) is based on relative changes in serum creatinine (SCr) and on urine output. The SCr criteria, therefore, require a pre-morbid baseline value. When unknown, current recommendations are to estimate a baseline SCr by the MDRD equation.

  11. Nuclear DNA as Predictor of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhvantsev, Valery V; Landoni, Giovanni; Grebenchikov, Oleg A; Skripkin, Yuri V; Zabelina, Tatiana S; Zinovkina, Liudmila A; Prikhodko, Anastasia S; Lomivorotov, Vladimir V; Zinovkin, Roman A

    2017-12-01

    To measure the release of plasma nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and to assess the relationship between nuclear DNA level and acute kidney injury occurrence in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Cardiovascular anesthesiology and intensive care unit of a large tertiary-care university hospital. Prospective observational study. Fifty adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Nuclear DNA concentration was measured in the plasma. The relationship between the level of nuclear DNA and the incidence of acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting was investigated. Cardiac surgery leads to significant increase in plasma nuclear DNA with peak levels 12 hours after surgery (median [interquartile range] 7.0 [9.6-22.5] µg/mL). No difference was observed between off-pump and on-pump surgical techniques. Nuclear DNA was the only predictor of acute kidney injury between baseline and early postoperative risk factors. The authors found an increase of nuclear DNA in the plasma of patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass grafting, with a peak after 12 hours and an association of nuclear DNA with postoperative acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomarkers of kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbschat, Anja; Obermüller, Nicholas; Haferkamp, Axel

    2011-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a common serious clinical problem. Up to date mortality due to AKI, especially in intensive care units, has not been changed significantly over the past 50 years. This is partly due to a delay in initiating renal protective and appropriate therapeutic measures since until now there are no reliable early-detecting biomarkers. The gold standard, serum creatinine, displays poor specificity and sensitivity with regard to recognition of the early period of AKI. Our objective was to review established markers versus novel urine and serum biomarkers of AKI in humans, which have progressed to clinical phase with regard to their diagnostic and prognostic value. A review was performed on the basis of literature search of renal failure, acute kidney injury, and biomarkers in Pubmed. Next to established biomarkers as creatinine and cystatin C, other molecules such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), monocyte chemotactic peptide (MCP-1), Netrin-1, and interleukin (IL)-18 are available and represent promising new markers that, however, need to be further evaluated in the clinical setting for suitability. In clinical settings with incipient AKI, not only the development and the implementation of more sensitive biomarkers are required for earlier treatment initiation in order to attenuate the severity of kidney injury, but also equally important remains the substantial improvement and application of refined and prophylactic therapeutic options in these situations. Adequately powered clinical trials testing a row of biomarkers are warranted before they may qualify for full adoption in clinical practice.

  13. Essential Elements as Biomarkers of Acute Kidney Injury and Spontaneous Reversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Regiane Marinho; Ko, Gui Mi; Silva, Rinaldo Florêncio; Vieira, Ludmila Cabreira; de Paula, Rafael Vicente; Marumo, Júlio Takehiro; Ikegami, Amanda; Bellini, Maria Helena

    2017-08-02

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important health problem and can be caused by number of factors. The use of aminoglycosides, such as gentamicin, is one of these factors. Recently, an effort has been made to find biomarkers to guide treatment protocols. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to estimate the contents of Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, and Zn in serum and urine of the healthy, AKI, and spontaneous recovery (SR) groups of animals. The animal model of AKI and SR was validated by measuring serum and urinary urea and creatinine. The quantitative determination of the elements showed a decrease in serum levels of Ca, and Fe in the AKI group (Pelements might be useful as biomarkers for AKI.

  14. Oxidative stress and 'monocyte reprogramming' in septic patients with acute kidney injury requiring CRRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sandra; de Cal, Massimo; Cruz, Dinna; Lentini, Paolo; Corradi, Valentina; Gallo, Giampiero; Salvatori, Gabriella; Verbine, Anton; Pogoshyan, Lusine; Nalesso, Federico; Brendolan, Alessandra; Piccinni, Pasquale; Ronco, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and monocyte HLA-DR expression are known to be predictive of mortality in sepsis; nevertheless, limited information exists regarding sepsis with acute kidney injury (AKI). The aim of the study was to correlate these markers with outcome in septic patients with AKI requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) were measured in 32 patients on days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. In 14 we assessed the percentage of monocytes expressing HLA-DR (%DR+) and the HLA-DR mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). 20 healthy volunteers, 17 septic patients without AKI and 20 septic AKI patients not treated by CRRT were used for comparison. The mortality rate was 59%. Septic CRRT patients had higher AOPP and lower %DR+ (p CRRT. However, this study was not able to confirm the usefulness of these markers in predicting survival in this subset of patients. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Dipstick albuminuria and acute kidney injury recovery in critically ill septic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyra, Javier A; Li, Xilong; Yessayan, Lenar; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Yee, Jerry; Toto, Robert D

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of sepsis, a pro-inflammatory state that alters tubular handling of filtered albumin. We hypothesized that dipstick albuminuria (DA) is associated with a lower rate of AKI recovery in septic patients. This was a single-centre, retrospective cohort study of adults with sepsis-associated AKI in an urban academic intensive care unit (ICU). Patients with unknown baseline serum creatinine (SCr), absent urinalysis, and those with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) albuminuria ≥30 mg/dL is independently associated with lower rate of AKI recovery at 30 days post-discharge. Our findings emphasize the potential utility of a simple routine test of DA in the risk-stratification of AKI recovery in ICU septic patients. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. Heart block and acute kidney injury due to hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Taylor C; Healy, James M; McDonald, Mary J; Hansson, Joni H; Quinn, Courtney E

    2014-12-01

    We describe a patient who presented with multi-system organ failure due to extreme hypercalcemia (serum calcium 19.8 mg/dL), resulting from primary hyperparathyroidism. He was found to have a 4.8 cm solitary atypical parathyroid adenoma. His course was complicated by complete heart block, acute kidney injury, and significant neurocognitive disturbances. Relevant literature was reviewed and discussed. Hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemic crisis (HIHC) is a rare presentation of primary hyperparathyroidism and only a small minority of these patients develop significant cardiac and renal complications. In cases of HIHC, a multidisciplinary effort can facilitate rapid treatment of life-threatening hypercalcemia and definitive treatment by surgical resection. As such, temporary transvenous cardiac pacing and renal replacement therapy can provide a life-saving bridge to definitive parathyroidectomy in cases of HIHC.

  17. Acute kidney injury due to sodium bromate intoxication: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Dong Hwan; Jang, Kyung Ae; Kim, Seok Min; Park, Jong Won; Do, Jun Young; Yoon, Kyung Woo

    2011-12-01

    Sodium bromate is a strong oxidant used as a neutralizing solution in hair permanents, as well as an auxiliary agent in printing and dyeing. Accidental or deliberate ingestion of bromate solution has rarely been reported in Korea. The clinical manifestations of bromate intoxication are vomiting, diarrhea, central nervous system symptoms, oliguric or non-oliguric acute kidney injury, hemolytic anemia, and deafness; most of these manifestations are reversible, with the exception of renal failure and deafness. Here, we report on two patients who demonstrated distinct clinical progressions. In the first case, a 16-year-old woman was successfully treated with hemodialysis and recovered renal function without hearing loss. However, in the second case, delayed hemodialysis resulted in persistent renal failure and hearing loss in a 77-year-old woman. This suggests that emergency therapeutic measures, including hemodialysis, should be taken as soon as possible, as the rapid removal of bromate may be essential to preventing severe intoxication and its sequelae.

  18. Risk prediction models for acute kidney injury following major noncardiac surgery: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Todd; Quan, Samuel; Cheema, Kim; Zarnke, Kelly; Quinn, Rob; de Koning, Lawrence; Dixon, Elijah; Pannu, Neesh; James, Matthew T

    2016-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication of major noncardiac surgery. Risk prediction models for AKI following noncardiac surgery may be useful for identifying high-risk patients to target with prevention strategies. We conducted a systematic review of risk prediction models for AKI following major noncardiac surgery. MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews and Web of Science were searched for articles that (i) developed or validated a prediction model for AKI following major noncardiac surgery or (ii) assessed the impact of a model for predicting AKI following major noncardiac surgery that has been implemented in a clinical setting. We identified seven models from six articles that described a risk prediction model for AKI following major noncardiac surgeries. Three studies developed prediction models for AKI requiring renal replacement therapy following liver transplantation, three derived prediction models for AKI based on the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) criteria following liver resection and one study developed a prediction model for AKI following major noncardiac surgical procedures. The final models included between 4 and 11 independent variables, and c-statistics ranged from 0.79 to 0.90. None of the models were externally validated. Risk prediction models for AKI after major noncardiac surgery are available; however, these models lack validation, studies of clinical implementation and impact analyses. Further research is needed to develop, validate and study the clinical impact of such models before broad clinical uptake. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  19. Injuria renal aguda en la sepsis grave Acute kidney injury in severe sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Trimarchi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available La sepsis afecta al 40% de los pacientes críticos, siendo su mortalidad de aproximadamente un 30% en el caso de la sepsis grave, y de 75% con injuria renal aguda, la cual sucede en el 20-51% de los casos. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo, observacional, longitudinal, en 80 pacientes sépticos graves en el lapso de 1 año para determinar el desarrollo de injuria renal aguda y su relación con la mortalidad; correlacionar antecedentes clínicos y variaciones del laboratorio con la mortalidad; determinar la tasa de mortalidad de la sepsis grave; relacionar óbito y foco séptico primario; evaluar la predictibilidad de mortalidad según niveles de creatinina de ingreso y sus variaciones finales. Se definieron dos grupos: Obito (n = 25 y No-óbito (n = 55. Analizados según la creatinina de ingreso, 39 tenían valores normales de creatinina (10 óbitos y 41 la presentaban elevada (15 óbitos; según la creatinina de egreso, 48 presentaron creatinina normal y fallecieron 7, mientras que 32 tenían daño renal agudo, de los cuales 18 fallecieron. De los 25 pacientes fallecidos, el 72% presentaron daño renal. De éstos, 7 pacientes vivos y 2 fallecidos requirieron hemodiálisis. El foco primario más frecuente fue el respiratorio (26.4%. El desarrollo de daño renal es un alto predictor de mortalidad en la sepsis, independientemente de los valores iniciales de creatinina. Edad más avanzada, hipertensión arterial, score APACHE más elevado, anemia más grave, hipoalbuminemia, hiperfosfatemia e hiperkalemia se asociaron a mayor mortalidad. La mortalidad global fue 31.3%. La imposibilidad de identificar el foco séptico primario se asoció a mayor mortalidad. El foco respiratorio se relacionó a mayor riesgo de requerir hemodiálisis.Sepsis affects 40% of critically ill patients, with a reported mortality of approximately 30% in severe sepsis, raising to 75% when acute kidney injury ensues, which occurs in about 20-51% of cases. The present study

  20. Swarming hornet attacks: shock and acute kidney injury--a large case series from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Bich Huyen Nguyen; Mai, Hoa Le; Thi, Tan Xuan Nguyen; Thi, Minh Trinh Huynh; Nguyen, Huu Nhan; Rabenou, Rahmin A

    2010-04-01

    Social hornets attack victims in swarms in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The venom consists of multiple proteins with myotoxin, haemotoxin, vasodilatory and anticoagulant effects. We reviewed the records of 65 patients at Cho Ray Hospital (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam) attacked by swarms of the lesser banded hornet, Vespa affinis. Patients were divided into four groups. Groups A and B presented within 3 days of attack and C and D after 3 days with 50 stings, respectively. Varying degrees of acute kidney injury (AKI) were seen in 38 (58.5%) patients in all groups. Twenty nine required renal replacement therapy. AKI was likely to be myoglobin and toxin induced with a clinical course consistent with acute tubular injury. The prognosis for renal recovery is excellent in those who survive. Seven patients (one from Group A and six from Group B) developed non-anaphylactic shock which led to four deaths. The predominant finding in Groups C and D who sought delayed tertiary care is renal failure. This cases which illustrate the varied effects of hornet venom and the need to be vigilant for shock within the first 2 days and persistent AKI beyond 3 days of attack.

  1. Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney Injury Epidemiology in Neonates: Design of a Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Askenazi, David J; Dill, Lynn; Jacobs, Judd; Kent, Alison L; Selewski, David T; Abitbol, Carolyn L; Kaskel, Fredrick J; Mhanna, Maroun J; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Charlton, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects ~30% of hospitalized neonates. Critical to advancing our understanding of neonatal AKI is collaborative research among neonatologists and nephrologists. The Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC) is an international, multidisciplinary group dedicated to investigating neonatal AKI. The AWAKEN study (Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney injury Epidemiology in Neonates) was designed to describe the epidemiology of neonatal AKI, validate the definition of neonatal AKI, identify primary risk factors for neonatal AKI, and investigate the contribution of fluid management to AKI events and short-term outcomes. The NKC was established with at least one pediatric nephrologist and neonatologist from 24 institutions in 4 countries (USA, Canada, Australia, and India). A Steering Committee and four subcommittees were created. The database subcommittee oversaw the development of the web-based database (MediData Rave™) that captured all NICU admissions from 1/1/14 to 3/31/14. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to eliminate neonates with a low likelihood of AKI. Data collection included: (1) baseline demographic information; (2) daily physiologic parameters and care received during the first week of life; (3) weekly "snapshots"; (4) discharge information including growth parameters, final diagnoses, discharge medications, and need for renal replacement therapy; and (5) all serum creatinine values. AWAKEN was proposed as human subjects research. The study design allowed for a waiver of informed consent/parental permission. NKC investigators will disseminate data through peer-reviewed publications and educational conferences. The purpose of this publication is to describe the formation of the NKC, the establishment of the AWAKEN cohort and database, future directions, and a few "lessons learned." The AWAKEN database includes ~325 unique variables and >4 million discrete data points. AWAKEN will be the largest, most inclusive neonatal AKI

  2. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  3. Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney injury Epidemiology in Neonates (AWAKEN: Design of a Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Garcia Jetton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury (AKI affects ~30% of hospitalized neonates. Critical to advancing our understanding of neonatal AKI is collaborative research among neonatologists and nephrologists. The Neonatal Kidney Collaborative (NKC is an international, multidisciplinary group dedicated to investigating neonatal AKI. The AWAKEN study (Assessment of Worldwide Acute Kidney injury Epidemiology in Neonates was designed to describe the epidemiology of neonatal AKI, validate the definition of neonatal AKI, identify primary risk factors for neonatal AKI, and investigate the contribution of fluid management to AKI events and short term outcomes. METHODS and ANALYSIS: The NKC was established with at least one pediatric nephrologist and neonatologist from 24 institutions from 4 countries (USA, Canada, Australia, India. A Steering Committee and four subcommittees were created. The database subcommittee oversaw the development of the web-based database (MediData Rave™ that captured all NICU admissions from 1/1/14-3/31/14. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to eliminate babies with a low likelihood of AKI. Data collection includes: 1 baseline demographic information; 2 daily physiologic parameters and care received during the first week of life; 3 weekly snapshots; 4 discharge information including growth parameters, final diagnoses, discharge medications and need for renal replacement therapy; and 5 all serum creatinine values. ETHICS and DISSEMINATION: AWAKEN was proposed as human subjects research. The study design allowed for a waiver of informed consent/parental permission. NKC investigators will disseminate data through peer-reviewed publications and educational conferences. DISCUSSION: The purpose of this publication is to describe the formation of the NKC, the establishment of the AWAKEN cohort and database, future directions and a few lessons learned. The AWAKEN database includes ~325 unique variables and >4 million discrete data

  4. Ambulatory Care after Acute Kidney Injury: An Opportunity to Improve Patient Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A. Silver

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of review: Acute kidney injury (AKI is an increasingly common problem among hospitalized patients. Patients who survive an AKI-associated hospitalization are at higher risk of de novo and worsening chronic kidney disease, end-stage kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and death. For hospitalized patients with dialysis-requiring AKI, outpatient follow-up with a nephrologist within 90 days of hospital discharge has been associated with enhanced survival. However, most patients who survive an AKI episode do not receive any follow-up nephrology care. This narrative review describes the experience of two new clinical programs to care for AKI patients after hospital discharge: the Acute Kidney Injury Follow-up Clinic for adults (St. Michael's Hospital and University Health Network, Toronto, Canada and the AKI Survivor Clinic for children (Cincinnati Children's Hospital, USA. Sources of information: MEDLINE, PubMed, ISI Web of Science Findings: These two ambulatory clinics have been in existence for close to two (adult and four (pediatric years, and were developed separately and independently in different populations and health systems. The components of both clinics are described, including the target population, referral process, medical interventions, patient education activities, and follow-up schedule. Common elements include targeting patients with KDIGO stage 2 or 3 AKI, regular audits of the inpatient nephrology census to track eligible patients, medication reconciliation, and education on the long-term consequences of AKI. Limitations: Despite the theoretical benefits of post-AKI follow-up and the clinic components described, there is no high quality evidence to prove that the interventions implemented in these clinics will reduce morbidity or mortality. Therefore, we also present a plan to evaluate the adult AKI Follow-up Clinic in order to determine if it can improve clinical outcomes compared to patients with AKI who do not

  5. Incidence of Early Acute Kidney Injury in Lung Transplant Patients: A Single-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, M K; Vayvada, M; Salturk, C; Kutlu, C A; Ari, E

    2017-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in the early period of lung transplantation (LTx). We aimed to describe the incidence and perioperative risk factors associated with AKI following LTx. Clinical data of 30 patients who underwent LTx were retrospectively reviewed. Primary outcomes were development of AKI and patient mortality within 30 postoperative days. Postoperative AKI is determined based on creatinine criteria from Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) classification. Secondary outcomes included the association between AKI and demographic and clinical parameters of patients and treatment modalities in the pre- and postoperative periods. Of the 30 LTx recipients included, AKI occurred in 16 patients (53.4%) within the first 30 days. Length of intensive care unit (P = .06) and hospital stay (P = .008) and mechanical ventilation duration (P = .03) were significantly higher in patients with AKI compared with patients without AKI. Factors independently associated with AKI were intraoperative hypotension (odds ratio [OR] 0.500; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.145 to 26.412, P = .02), longer duration of mechanical ventilation (OR 1.204; 95% CI 0.870 to 1.665, P = .03), and systemic infection (OR 8.067; 95% CI 1.538 to 42.318, P = .014) in the postoperative period. Short-term mortality was similar in patients with and patients without AKI. By the AKIN definition, AKI occurred in half of the patients following LTx. Several variables including intraoperative hypotension, longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and systemic infection in the postoperative period independently predict AKI in LTx recipients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Predialysis hypernatremia is a prognostic marker in acute kidney injury in need of renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Renata S; Soares, Márcio; Valente, Carla; Suassuna, José Hermógenes; Rocha, Eduardo; Maccariello, Elizabeth R

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the prognostic impact of predialysis dysnatremia in patients with acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). A secondary analysis of a prospective multicenter cohort study was performed. Serum sodium (Na) concentrations were categorized immediately before the first RRT as normonatremia (135≤Na ≤145mEq/L), hyponatremia (mild [130≤Na ≤134mEq/L] or severe [Na ≤129mEq/L]), and hypernatremia (mild [146≤Na ≤155mEq/L] or severe [Na ≥156mEq/L]). Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the impact of sodium levels categories on hospital mortality. Dysnatremia occurred in 47.3% of 772 included patients. Hypernatremia was more frequent than hyponatremia (33.7% vs 13.6%, P=.001). Intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality rates were 64.6% and 69%, respectively. Hospital mortality was higher in severe hypernatremia (89.1% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 78.7%-95.8%] vs 64.6% [CI, 59.8%-69.2%], Phypernatremia (odds ratio, 2.87; 95% CI, 1.2-6.9), poor chronic heath status, severity of illness, sepsis, and lactate were independently associated with outcome. Almost 50% of patients with acute kidney injury in need of RRT in the ICU had mild or severe dysnatremia before dialysis initiation. Hypernatremia was the main sodium disturbance and independently associated with poor outcome in the study population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical outcomes of acute kidney injury developing outside the hospital in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgutalp, K; Bardak, S; Horoz, M; Helvacı, I; Demir, S; Kiykim, A A

    2017-01-01

    Although various studies have improved our knowledge about the clinical features and outcomes of acute kidney injury developing in the hospital (AKI-DI) in elderly subjects, data about acute kidney injury developing outside the hospital (AKI-DO) in elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years) are still extremely limited. This study was performed to investigate prevalence, clinical outcomes, hospital cost and related factors of AKI-DO in elderly and very elderly patients. We conducted a prospective, observational study in patients (aged ≥ 65 years) who were admitted to our center between May 01, 2012, and May 01, 2013. Subjects with AKI-DO were divided into two groups as "elderly" (group 1, 65-75 years old) and "very elderly" (group 2, >75 years old). Control group (group 3) consisted of the hospitalized patients aged 65 years and older with normal serum creatinine level. In-hospital outcomes and 6-month outcomes were recorded. Rehospitalization rate within 6 months of discharge was noted. Hospital costs and mortality rates of each group were investigated. Risk factors for AKI-DO were determined. The incidence of AKI-DO that required hospitalization in elderly and very elderly patients was 5.8 % (136/2324) and 11 % (100/905), respectively (p elderly patients (p elderly patients than elderly ones, especially in male gender. Use of ACEI, ARB, NSAID and radiocontrast agents is the main risk factors for the development of AKI-DO in the elderly.

  8. Defining the cause of death in hospitalised patients with acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Selby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high mortality rates that follow the onset of acute kidney injury (AKI are well recognised. However, the mode of death in patients with AKI remains relatively under-studied, particularly in general hospitalised populations who represent the majority of those affected. We sought to describe the primary cause of death in a large group of prospectively identified patients with AKI. METHODS: All patients sustaining AKI at our centre between 1(st October 2010 and 31(st October 2011 were identified by real-time, hospital-wide, electronic AKI reporting based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN diagnostic criteria. Using this system we are able to generate a prospective database of all AKI cases that includes demographic, outcome and hospital coding data. For those patients that died during hospital admission, cause of death was derived from the Medical Certificate of Cause of Death. RESULTS: During the study period there were 3,930 patients who sustained AKI; 62.0% had AKI stage 1, 20.6% had stage 2 and 17.4% stage 3. In-hospital mortality rate was 21.9% (859 patients. Cause of death could be identified in 93.4% of cases. There were three main disease categories accounting for three quarters of all mortality; sepsis (41.1%, cardiovascular disease (19.2% and malignancy (12.9%. The major diagnosis leading to sepsis was pneumonia, whilst cardiovascular death was largely a result of heart failure and ischaemic heart disease. AKI was the primary cause of death in only 3% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality associated with AKI remains high, although cause of death is usually concurrent illness. Specific strategies to improve outcomes may therefore need to target not just the management of AKI but also the most relevant co-existing conditions.

  9. Effects of acute kidney injury after liver resection on long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Seiji; Tanaka, Manami; Maruyama, Fumi; Fukagawa, Arisa; Shiota, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Satoshi; Makita, Koshi

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effects of acute kidney injury (AKI) after liver resection on the long-term outcome, including mortality and renal dysfunction after hospital discharge. We conducted a historical cohort study of patients who underwent liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma with sevoflurane anesthesia between January 2004 and October 2011, survived the hospital stay, and were followed for at least 3 years or died within 3 years after hospital discharge. AKI was diagnosed based on the Acute Kidney Injury Network classification within 72 hours postoperatively. In addition to the data obtained during hospitalization, serum creatinine concentration data were collected and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated after hospital discharge. AKI patients (63%, P = 0.002) were more likely to reach the threshold of an estimated GFR (eGFR) of 45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) within 3 years than non-AKI patients (31%) although there was no significant difference in mortality (33% vs. 29%). Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that postoperative AKI was significantly associated with the composite outcome of mortality or an eGFR of 45 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (95% CI of hazard ratio, 1.05-2.96, P = 0.033), but not with mortality (P = 0.699), the composite outcome of mortality or an eGFR of 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P =0.347). After liver resection, AKI patients may be at higher risk of mortality or moderate renal dysfunction within 3 years. These findings suggest that even after discharge from the hospital, patients who suffered AKI after liver resection may need to be followed-up regarding renal function in the long term.

  10. Acute Kidney Injury and Risk of Incident Heart Failure Among US Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Matheny, Michael E; Greevy, Robert A; Eden, Svetlana K; Perkins, Amy M; Parr, Sharidan K; Fly, James; Abdel-Kader, Khaled; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Hung, Adriana M; Speroff, Theodore; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2017-11-18

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and associated with poor outcomes. Heart failure is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease among patients with chronic kidney disease. The relationship between AKI and heart failure remains unknown and may identify a novel mechanistic link between kidney and cardiovascular disease. Observational study. We studied a national cohort of 300,868 hospitalized US veterans (2004-2011) without a history of heart failure. AKI was the predictor and was defined as a 0.3-mg/dL or 50% increase in serum creatinine concentration from baseline to the peak hospital value. Patients with and without AKI were matched (1:1) on 28 in- and outpatient covariates using optimal Mahalanobis distance matching. Incident heart failure was defined as 1 or more hospitalization or 2 or more outpatient visits with a diagnosis of heart failure within 2 years through 2013. There were 150,434 matched pairs in the study. Patients with and without AKI during the index hospitalization were well matched, with a median preadmission estimated glomerular filtration rate of 69mL/min/1.73m(2). The overall incidence rate of heart failure was 27.8 (95% CI, 19.3-39.9) per 1,000 person-years. The incidence rate was higher in those with compared with those without AKI: 30.8 (95% CI, 21.8-43.5) and 24.9 (95% CI, 16.9-36.5) per 1,000 person-years, respectively. In multivariable models, AKI was associated with 23% increased risk for incident heart failure (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.19-1.27). Study population was primarily men, reflecting patients seen at Veterans Affairs hospitals. AKI is an independent risk factor for incident heart failure. Future studies to identify underlying mechanisms and modifiable risk factors are needed. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictors of progression to chronic dialysis in survivors of severe acute kidney injury: a competing risk study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Survivors of acute kidney injury are at an increased risk of developing irreversible deterioration in kidney function and in some cases, the need for chronic dialysis. We aimed to determine predictors of chronic dialysis and death among survivors of dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury. Methods We used linked administrative databases in Ontario, Canada, to identify patients who were discharged from hospital after an episode of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis and remained free of further dialysis for at least 90 days after discharge between 1996 and 2009. Follow-up extended until March 31, 2011. The primary outcome was progression to chronic dialysis. Predictors for this outcome were evaluated using cause-specific Cox proportional hazards models, and a competing risk approach was used to calculate absolute risk. Results We identified 4 383 patients with acute kidney injury requiring temporary in-hospital dialysis who survived to discharge. After a mean follow-up of 2.4 years, 356 (8%) patients initiated chronic dialysis and 1475 (34%) died. The cumulative risk of chronic dialysis was 13.5% by the Kaplan-Meier method, and 10.3% using a competing risk approach. After accounting for the competing risk of death, previous nephrology consultation (subdistribution hazard ratio (sHR) 2.03; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-2.58), a history of chronic kidney disease (sHR3.86; 95% CI 2.99-4.98), a higher Charlson comorbidity index score (sHR 1.10; 95% CI 1.05-1.15/per unit) and pre-existing hypertension (sHR 1.82; 95% CI 1.28-2.58) were significantly associated with an increased risk of progression to chronic dialysis. Conclusions Among survivors of dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury who initially become dialysis independent, the subsequent need for chronic dialysis is predicted by pre-existing kidney disease, hypertension and global comorbidity. This information can identify patients at high risk of progressive kidney disease who may benefit from

  12. Long-term follow-up of patients after acute kidney injury: patterns of renal functional recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Macedo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Patients who survive acute kidney injury (AKI, especially those with partial renal recovery, present a higher long-term mortality risk. However, there is no consensus on the best time to assess renal function after an episode of acute kidney injury or agreement on the definition of renal recovery. In addition, only limited data regarding predictors of recovery are available. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: From 1984 to 2009, 84 adult survivors of acute kidney injury were followed by the same nephrologist (RCRMA for a median time of 4.1 years. Patients were seen at least once each year after discharge until end stage renal disease (ESRD or death. In each consultation serum creatinine was measured and glomerular filtration rate estimated. Renal recovery was defined as a glomerular filtration rate value ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2. A multiple logistic regression was performed to evaluate factors independently associated with renal recovery. RESULTS: The median length of follow-up was 50 months (30-90 months. All patients had stabilized their glomerular filtration rates by 18 months and 83% of them stabilized earlier: up to 12 months. Renal recovery occurred in 16 patients (19% at discharge and in 54 (64% by 18 months. Six patients died and four patients progressed to ESRD during the follow up period. Age (OR 1.09, p<0.0001 and serum creatinine at hospital discharge (OR 2.48, p = 0.007 were independent factors associated with non renal recovery. The acute kidney injury severity, evaluated by peak serum creatinine and need for dialysis, was not associated with non renal recovery. CONCLUSIONS: Renal recovery must be evaluated no earlier than one year after an acute kidney injury episode. Nephrology referral should be considered mainly for older patients and those with elevated serum creatinine at hospital discharge.

  13. Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy. A Spanish retrospective case-cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Fernandez Nuria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute kidney injury is among the most serious complications after cardiac surgery and is associated with an impaired outcome. Multiple factors may concur in the development of this disease. Moreover, severe renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT presents a high mortality rate. Consequently, we studied a Spanish cohort of patients to assess the risk factors for RRT in cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI. Methods A retrospective case-cohort study in 24 Spanish hospitals. All cases of RRT after cardiac surgery in 2007 were matched in a crude ratio of 1:4 consecutive patients based on age, sex, treated in the same year, at the same hospital and by the same group of surgeons. Results We analyzed the data from 864 patients enrolled in 2007. In multivariate analysis, severe acute kidney injury requiring postoperative RRT was significantly associated with the following variables: lower glomerular filtration rates, less basal haemoglobin, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, diabetes, prior diuretic treatment, urgent surgery, longer aortic cross clamp times, intraoperative administration of aprotinin, and increased number of packed red blood cells (PRBC transfused. When we conducted a propensity analysis using best-matched of 137 available pairs of patients, prior diuretic treatment, longer aortic cross clamp times and number of PRBC transfused were significantly associated with CSA-AKI. Patients requiring RRT needed longer hospital stays, and suffered higher mortality rates. Conclusion Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring RRT is associated with worse outcomes. For this reason, modifiable risk factors should be optimised and higher risk patients for acute kidney injury should be identified before undertaking cardiac surgery.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Acute Kidney Injury Under Hypoxia and Deprivation of Food and Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the renal pathophysiologyin rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI in rats under hypoxia and deprivation of food and water (HDFW, thus broadening the knowledge about rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI in massive earthquake. Methods: Male Wistar rats weighing 200-230g were randomized into control, rhabdomyolysis (R, HDFW and rhabdomyolysis in combination with HDFW (R/HDFW group. Experimental rhabdomyolysis rat model was established through clamping hind limb muscles, HDFW model rats were kept in 10% hypoxic chamber unavailable to food and water. At 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11d after treatment, serum creatinine (Scr level, renal index, renal structural changes and cell apoptosis were analyzed. Results: After R, HDFW, R/HDFW treatment, the animals showed significantly higher Scr levels than the control group. Renal index in R and R/HDFW groups elevated remarkably compared with that in control and HDFW group. The results of histopathology, ultra-structure and apoptosis assay suggested that rhabdomyolysis caused renal tubular injury, HDFW treatment resulted in renal vascular dilation, tissue congestion and tubular cell damage. In addition, more severe renal lesion appeared in R/HDFW. Conclusions: We conclude that the association of experimental rhabdomyolysis with HDFW results in a different functional and histological pattern. The rhabdomyolysis-HDFW combination causes more severe renal injury.

  15. Recent advances in pathophysiology and biomarkers of sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbro, Ilaria; Gentile, Giuseppe; Tinti, Francesca; Muiesan, Paolo; Mitterhofer, Anna Paola

    2016-02-01

    Sepsis is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by a systemic inflammatory response to an infective insult. This process often leads to widespread tissue injury and multiple organ dysfunction. In particular, the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most frequent complications, which increases the complexity and cost of care, and is an independent risk factor for mortality. Previous suggestions highlighting systemic hypotension, renal vasoconstriction and ischaemia-reperfusion injury as the primary pathophysiological mechanisms involved in sepsis-induced AKI have been challenged. Recently it has been shown that sepsis-induced AKI occurs in the setting of microvascular dysfunction with release of microparticles, inflammation and energetic adaptation of highly metabolic organs to cellular stress. The intolerable high mortality rate associated with sepsis-induced AKI is partially explained by an incomplete understanding of its pathophysiology and a delay in diagnosis. The aim of this review is to focus on advances in understanding the sepsis pathophysiology, with particular attention to the fundamental mechanisms of sepsis-induced AKI and the potential diagnostic and prognostic markers involved. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dexamethasone Modifies Cystatin C-Based Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury During Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Pianta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Plasma cystatin C (pCysC may be superior to serum creatinine (sCr as a surrogate of GFR. However, the performance of pCysC for diagnosing acute kidney injury (AKI after cisplatin-based chemotherapy is potentially affected by accompanying corticosteroid anti-emetic therapy and hydration. Methods: In a prospective observational study pCysC, sCr, urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1, and urinary clusterin were measured over 2 weeks in 27 patients given first-cycle chemotherapy. The same variables were measured over 2 weeks in Sprague–Dawley rats given a single intraperitoneal injection of dexamethasone, cisplatin, or both, and in controls. Results: In patients, pCysC increases were greater than sCr 41% vs. 16%, mean paired difference 25% (95% CI: 16–34%], relative increases were ≥ 50% in 9 patients (35% for pCysC compared with 2 (8% for sCr (p = 0.04 and increases in sCr were accompanied by increased KIM-1 and clusterin excretion, but increases in pCysC alone were not. In rats, dexamethasone administration produced dose-dependent increases in pCysC (and augmented cisplatin-induced increases in pCysC, but did not augment histological injury, increases in sCr, or KIM-1 and clusterin excretion. Conclusions: In the presence of dexamethasone, elevation of pCysC does not reliably diagnose AKI after cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  17. Effects of Schizolobium parahyba extract on experimental Bothrops venom-induced acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Silva Martines

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Venom-induced acute kidney injury (AKI is a frequent complication of Bothrops snakebite with relevant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Schizolobium parahyba (SP extract, a natural medicine with presumed anti-Bothrops venom effects, in an experimental model of Bothrops jararaca venom (BV-induced AKI. METHODOLOGY: Groups of 8 to 10 rats received infusions of 0.9% saline (control, C, SP 2 mg/kg, BV 0.25 mg/kg and BV immediately followed by SP (treatment, T in the doses already described. After the respective infusions, animals were assessed for their glomerular filtration rate (GFR, inulin clearance, renal blood flow (RBF, Doppler, blood pressure (BP, intra-arterial transducer, renal vascular resistance (RVR, urinary osmolality (UO, freezing point, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, kinetic method, hematocrit (Hct, microhematocrit, fibrinogen (Fi, Klauss modified and blinded renal histology (acute tubular necrosis score. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BV caused significant decreases in GFR, RBF, UO, HcT and Fi; significant increases in RVR, NGAL and LDH; and acute tubular necrosis. SP did not prevent these changes; instead, it caused a significant decrease in GFR when used alone. CONCLUSION: SP administered simultaneously with BV, in an approximate 10∶1 concentration, did not prevent BV-induced AKI, hemolysis and fibrinogen consumption. SP used alone caused a decrease in GFR.

  18. STUDY OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN CHILDREN: ITS AETIOLOGY, CLINICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garuda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES : To determine the incidence , age & sex ratio , analyse the spectrum of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI in its aetiopathology , complications including mortality , prognostic factors and the role of dialysis in the management. METHODS : This prospective observational study was conducted on serial cases of 30 patients a dmitted in Paediatrics department from Feb 2012 - Aug 2014 (30 months. RESULTS : The incidence of AKI was 0.44%. Children in age group of 0 - 4 yrs were affected most , predominantly males. Distribution of AKI according to aetiopathogenesis was Acute Tubular Necrosis (ATN 50% , Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (HUS 19.8% , Glomerulonephritis (GN 13.2% , Obstructive uropathy 9.9% and Acute on Chronic renal failure (CRF 6.6%. Dialysis was required in 53.3% of patients. Mortality was 57%. Patients with complications of sepsis , neurological & respiratory problems , hyperkalemia , metabolic acidosis and gastrointestinal bleeding were associated with high mortality. CONCLUSIONS : AKI is a common life threatening condition seen in childhood. Early referral , proper assessment , adequate & timely treatment and prompt institution of dialysis helps in decreasing mortality.

  19. Acute and Chronic Kidney Injury in a Non-Human Primate Model of Partial-Body Irradiation with Bone Marrow Sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eric P; Hankey, Kim G; Bennett, Alexander W; Farese, Ann M; Parker, George A; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2017-12-01

    The development of medical countermeasures against acute and delayed multi-organ injury requires animal models predictive of the human response to radiation and its treatment. Late chronic injury is a well-known feature of radiation nephropathy, but acute kidney injury has not been reported in an appropriate animal model. We have established a single-fraction partial-body irradiation model with minimal marrow sparing in non-human primates. Subject-based medical management was used including parenteral fluids according to prospective morbidity criteria. We show herein that 10 or 11 Gy exposures caused both acute and chronic kidney injury. Acute and chronic kidney injury appear to be dose-independent between 10 and 11 Gy. Acute kidney injury was identified during the first 50 days postirradiation and appeared to resolve before the occurrence of chronic kidney injury, which was progressively more severe up to 180 days postirradiation, which was the end of the study. These findings show that mitigation of the acute radiation syndrome by medical management will unmask delayed late effects that occur months after partial-body irradiation. They further emphasize that both acute and chronic changes in kidney function must be taken into account in the use and timing of mitigators and medical management for acute radiation syndrome and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure (DEARE).

  20. The experimental investigation of fibrinolytic system under the influence of flocalin in conditions of acute hypoxic kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Gozhenko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the experiments on rats subjected to acute hypoxic histochemical nephropathy, caused by sodium nitrite and 2,4-dinitrophenol, fibrinolytic activities of blood plasma, urine, renal cortex, medulla, and papilla after treatment with flocalin – the activator of KATP channels, were studied­. It was shown that in the conditions of acute kidney hypoxic injury flocalin administration resulted in the increase and essential restoration of fibrinolysis in blood plasma diminished under hypoxia, which was due to the growth of non-enzymatic fibrinolysis, whereas in urine and renal medulla the appreciable increase of enzymatic fibrinolytic activity took place. Moreover, the treatment of hypoxic nephropathy animals by flocalin resulted in the marked restoration of kidney ion regulatory and protein excretory functions that proves the positive influence of KATP channels activation on the one of the biochemical mechanisms of acute kidney injury as well as the protective effect of flocalin in relation to tubular cells of nephron. The obtained results testify to the beneficial effects of KATP channels activation in the conditions of acute hypoxic kidneys injury.

  1. Spectrum of community-acquired acute kidney injury in India: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupma Kaul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the epidemiology of community-acquired acute kidney injury (CAAKI is necessary to establish its overall burden and plan potential preventive strategies. This study was done in an urban tertiary care center in northern India with the aim to identify the etiology and outcomes as well as the factors associated with in-hospital mortality of CAAKI patients. A five year retrospective analysis of all patients with CAAKI admitted to the Nephrology Department from January 2005 to December 2009 was done. From 5499 consecutive patients, 240 patients (2.5%, with a mean age of 39.8 ± 14.48 years, were diagnosed to have CAAKI as per our specified criteria. The most common cause of CAAKI was medical (77.5%, followed by obstetrical (14.2% and surgical (8.3% causes. Among the medical causes, acute diarrheal disease was the most common cause (29%, followed by malaria (18.8% and sepsis (13.9%. Sepsis had the highest in-hospital mortality (46%. Nephrolithiasis was the most common surgical cause. Puerperal sepsis (44.1%, pre-eclampsia (23.5%, intrauterine death (11.8%, antenatal hemorrhage (11.8% and post-partal hemorrhage (8.8% were the obstetric causes of CAAKI. Among 45 patients who underwent a renal biopsy, acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (33.3% was the most common, followed by acute tubular necrosis (22.2%, glomerulonephritis (17.7%, thrombotic microangiopathy (17.7% and acute cortical necrosis (8.89%. Of the 83% patients who underwent dialytic therapy, 44.5% underwent hemodialysis, 22.5% continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration, 21.6% sustained low efficiency dialysis and 11.4% peritoneal dialysis. The overall in-hospital mortality among patients with CAAKI was 26.20%. CAAKI remains a common problem affecting nearly 2.5% of patients attending nephrology units.

  2. Osthole protects sepsis-induced acute kidney injury via down-regulating NF-κB signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen; Li, Peng; Qi, Dong; Wang, Lei; Qu, Hong-Lin; Zhang, Yue-Juan; Wang, Xue-Kai; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2017-01-17

    As a natural coumarin derivative from the Cnidium monnieri(L)Cusson fruit, osthole consists of 7-methoxy-8-isopentenoxy-coumarin. The purpose of this research is to study the mechanism and effect of osthole on sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. The protective effect of osthole on mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 and HK-2 cells induced by LPS in vitro and on acute kidney injury model induced by sepsis and established by puncture and cecal ligation (CLP) in vivo were tested. Osthole (20, 40 mg·kg-1) group can greatly attenuate the changes of the score and kidney histopathology damage and enhance the survival time of septic mice. After the CLP surgery, degrees of SCr and BUN related to kidney injury were upregulated. The concentrations of SCr and BUN can be greatly reduced by treatment with osthole. Furthermore, osthole could increase bacterial killing activity and phagocytic activities of macrophages impaired after CLP partly and attenuate blood bacterial counts and leukocyte infiltration markedly. Furthermore, osthole can suppress NF-κB signal pathway through the inhibition of the nuclear translocation by regulating phosphorylation of IκBα and IKKβ and hinder the production of chemoattractant (MCP-1 and IL-8) and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6). Mainly because of its immunomodulatory properties and anti-inflammatory activity, which might be closely associated with suppression of the stimulation of the NF-κB signal pathway, osthole has protective effect on sepsis-induced kidney injury. It can be seen from such evidence that osthole can be potentially applied in the treatment of acute kidney injury.

  3. Patient and kidney survival by dialysis modality in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uchino, S.; Bellomo, R.; Kellum, J. A.; Morimatsu, H.; Morgera, S.; Schetz, M. R.; Tan, I.; Bouman, C.; Macedo, E.; Gibney, N.; Tolwani, A.; Oudemans-van Straaten, H. M.; Ronco, C.

    2007-01-01

    Using a large, international cohort, we sought to determine the effect of initial technique of renal replacement therapy (RRT) on the outcome of acute renal failure (ARF) in the intensive care unit (ICU). We enrolled 1218 patients treated with continuous RRT (CRRT) or intermittent RRT (IRRT) for ARF

  4. Outcomes After Kidney injury in Surgery (OAKS): protocol for a multicentre, observational cohort study of acute kidney injury following major gastrointestinal and liver surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality following cardiac surgery. Data focusing on the patterns of AKI following major gastrointestinal surgery could inform quality improvement projects and clinical trials, but there is a lack of reliable evidence. This multicentre study aims to determine the incidence and impact of AKI following major gastrointestinal and liver surgery. This prospective, collaborative, multicentre cohort study will include consecutive adults undergoing gastrointestinal resection, liver resection or reversal of ileostomy or colostomy. Open and laparoscopic procedures in elective and emergency patients will be included in the study. The primary end point will be the incidence of AKI within 7 days of surgery, identified using an adaptation of the National Algorithm for Detecting Acute Kidney Injury, which is based on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) AKI guidelines. Secondary outcomes will include persistent renal dysfunction at discharge and 1 year postoperatively. The 30-day adverse event rate will be measured using the Clavien-Dindo scale. Data on factors that may predispose to the development of AKI will be collected to identify variables associated with AKI. Based on our previous collaborative studies, a minimum of 114 centres are expected to be recruited, contributing over 6500 patients in total. This study will be registered as clinical audit at each participating hospital. The protocol will be disseminated through local and national medical student networks in the UK and Ireland. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. (R)evolution in the Management of Acute Kidney Injury in Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Claudio; Ricci, Zaccaria; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2015-08-01

    The application of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in children, before roller pumps and dialysis monitors were available in the intensive care unit, was realized by continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration. Then hemofiltration was coupled with dialysis in order to increase dialytic dose and system efficiency, and the circuit and filters were specifically modified to optimize patency and session life span. After about 30 years, another revolution is ongoing, in that pediatric acute kidney injury (AKI) and fluid accumulation (for which critically ill newborns and children with multiple-organ dysfunction are greatly at risk) are recognized as independently associated with mortality and identified as primary conditions to prevent and aggressively treat. Today, novel technology specifically dedicated for very young patients will allow feasible and straightfoward application of CRRT to infants and children. This article discusses the authors' personal perspectives on how clinical and technical issues of dialysis in children have been addressed and how today, severe pediatric AKI can be managed with accurate and safe CRRT machines that will likely yield outcome improvements in the coming decades. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fluid overload independent of acute kidney injury predicts poor outcomes in neonates following congenital heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Kenneth E; Hao, Shiying; Sutherland, Scott M; Kwiatkowski, David M; Axelrod, David M; Almond, Christopher S; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Shin, Andrew Y

    2017-11-11

    Fluid overload (FO) is common after neonatal congenital heart surgery and may contribute to mortality and morbidity. It is unclear if the effects of FO are independent of acute kidney injury (AKI). This was a retrospective cohort study which examined neonates (age Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes serum creatinine criteria were calculated. Outcomes were all-cause, in-hospital mortality and median postoperative hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay. Overall, 167 neonates underwent cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass in the study period, of whom 117 met the inclusion criteria. Of the 117 neonates included in the study, 76 (65%) patients developed significant FO (>10%), and 25 (21%) developed AKI ≥ Stage 2. When analyzed as FO cohorts ( 20% FO), patients with greater FO were more likely to have AKI (9.8 vs. 18.2 vs. 52.4%, respectively, with AKI ≥ stage 2; p = 0.013) and a higher vasoactive-inotrope score, and be premature. In the multivariable regression analyses of patients without AKI, FO was independently associated with hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay [0.322 extra days (p = 0.029) and 0.468 extra days (p neonates following congenital heart surgery. Careful fluid management after cardiac surgery in neonates with and without AKI is warranted.

  7. Metabolic acidosis as a risk factor for the development of acute kidney injury and hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiachang; Wang, Yimei; Geng, Xuemei; Chen, Rongyi; Xu, Xialian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lin, Jing; Teng, Jie; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis has been proved to be a risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease, but its relation to acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been investigated. In general, a diagnosis of metabolic acidosis is based on arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis, but the diagnostic role of carbon dioxide combining power (CO2CP) in the venous blood may also be valuable to non-respiratory patients. This retrospective study included all adult non-respiratory patients admitted consecutively to our hospital between October 01, 2014 and September 30, 2015. A total of 71,089 non-respiratory patients were included, and only 4,873 patients were evaluated by ABG analysis at admission. In patients with ABG, acidosis, metabolic acidosis, decreased HCO3(-) and hypocapnia at admission was associated with the development of AKI, while acidosis and hypocapnia were independent predictors of hospital mortality. Among non-respiratory patients, decreased CO2CP at admission was an independent risk factor for AKI and hospital mortality. ROC curves indicated that CO2CP was a reasonable biomarker to exclude metabolic acidosis, dual and triple acid-base disturbances. The effect sizes of decreased CO2CP on AKI and hospital mortality varied according to age and different underlying diseases. Metabolic acidosis is an independent risk factor for the development of AKI and hospital mortality. In non-respiratory patient, decreased CO2CP is also an independent contributor to AKI and mortality and can be used as an indicator of metabolic acidosis.

  8. Clinical profile and hospital outcome of children with severe acute kidney injury in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esezobor, Christopher Imokhuede; Ladapo, Taiwo Augustina; Lesi, Foluso Ebun

    2015-02-01

    In resource-constraint regions of the world, the spectrum of childhood diseases is changing, creating a need to clearly define the epidemiology of severe acute kidney injury (AKI). Medical records of children aged between 1 month and 17 years with stage 3 AKI in a tertiary hospital were reviewed. Ninety-one children, comprising 63 (69.2%) males and 26 (28.6%) infants, were studied. Majority (75.8%) had stage 3 AKI at the point of hospitalization. Sepsis (41.8%), primary kidney diseases (PKD; 29.7%) and malaria (13.2%) were the most common causes of stage 3 AKI. Twenty-eight (30.8%) children died. Mortality was highest in those with sepsis, less than 5 years old and needing dialysis. Sepsis, PKD and malaria were the most common causes of severe AKI. A third of children with severe AKI died. Mortality was highest in those less than 5 years old, with sepsis and needing dialysis. © The Author [2014]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Shock duration after resuscitation is associated with occurrence of post-cardiac arrest acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Won; Cha, Kyoung Chul; Cha, Yong Sung; Kim, Oh Hyun; Jung, Woo Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Han, Byoung Keun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Choi, Eunhee; Hwang, Sung Oh

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective observational study investigated the clinical course and predisposing factors of acute kidney injury (AKI) developed after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Eighty-two patients aged over 18 yr who survived more than 24 hr after cardiac arrest were divided into AKI and non-AKI groups according to the diagnostic criteria of the Kidney Disease/Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guidelines for AKI. Among 82 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, AKI was developed in 66 (80.5%) patients (AKI group) leaving 16 (19.5%) patients in the non-AKI group. Nineteen (28.8%) patients of the AKI group had stage 3 AKI and 7 (10.6%) patients received renal replacement therapy during admission. The duration of shock developed within 24 hr after resuscitation was shorter in the non-AKI group than in the AKI group (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.04, P cardiac arrest AKI was the duration of shock. In conclusion, occurrence and severity of post-cardiac arrest AKI is associated with the duration of shock after resuscitation. Renal replacement therapy is required for patients with severe degree (stage 3) post-cardiac arrest AKI.

  10. Defining the incidence and risk factors of colistin-induced acute kidney injury by KDIGO criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Ryan K; Anand, Rohit; Clarke, Lloyd G; Paronish, Julie A; Weirich, Matthew; Perone, Hanna; Kieserman, Jake; Freedy, Henry; Andrzejewski, Christina; Bonilla, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) remains a treatment-limiting toxicity of colistin. Recently developed clinical practice guidelines from the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group have harmonized definitions of AKI, but have not been widely applied to patients receiving colistin. We retrospectively defined AKI by KDIGO definitions among adult patients receiving intravenous colistin for ≥ 3 days. Risk factors for AKI within 48 hours and 7 days of initiating colistin were determined by multivariable logistic regression. Among 249 patients treated with colistin, rates of AKI were 12% and 29% at 48 hours and 7 days, respectively. At 48 hours, patients in the intensive care unit were at increased risk for AKI. Within 7 days, colistin daily doses >5mg/kg, chronic liver disease, and concomitant vancomycin were independent predictors. Seven percent of patients required renal replacement therapy at a median of 5 days (range: 3-7) following colistin initiation. Safe use of colistin is promoted by early detection of AKI with KDIGO criteria, avoiding nephrotoxins, and limiting duration of therapy.

  11. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as a biomarker for acute canine kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ya-Jane

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarkers for the early prediction of canine acute kidney injury (AKI are clinically important. Recently, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL was found to be a sensitive biomarker for the prediction of human AKI at a very early stage and the development of AKI after surgery. However, NGAL has not yet been studied with respect to dog kidney diseases. The application of NGAL canine AKI was investigated in this study. Results The canine NGAL gene was successfully cloned and expressed. Polyclonal antibodies against canine NGAL were generated and used to develop an ELISA for measuring NGAL protein in serum and urine samples that were collected from 39 dogs at different time points after surgery. AKI was defined by the standard method, namely a serum creatinine increase of greater than or equal to 26.5 μmol/L from baseline within 48 h. At 12 h after surgery, compared to the group without AKI (12 dogs, the NGAL level in the urine of seven dogs with AKI was significantly increased (median 178.4 pg/mL vs. 88.0 pg/mL, and this difference was sustained to 72 h. Conclusion As the increase in NGAL occurred much earlier than the increase in serum creatinine, urine NGAL seems to be able to serve as a sensitive and specific biomarker for the prediction of AKI in dogs.

  12. Acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery: current understanding and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Jason B; Shaw, Andrew D; Billings, Frederic T

    2016-07-04

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates recovery from cardiac surgery in up to 30 % of patients, injures and impairs the function of the brain, lungs, and gut, and places patients at a 5-fold increased risk of death during hospitalization. Renal ischemia, reperfusion, inflammation, hemolysis, oxidative stress, cholesterol emboli, and toxins contribute to the development and progression of AKI. Preventive strategies are limited, but current evidence supports maintenance of renal perfusion and intravascular volume while avoiding venous congestion, administration of balanced salt as opposed to high-chloride intravenous fluids, and the avoidance or limitation of cardiopulmonary bypass exposure. AKI that requires renal replacement therapy occurs in 2-5 % of patients following cardiac surgery and is associated with 50 % mortality. For those who recover from renal replacement therapy or even mild AKI, progression to chronic kidney disease in the ensuing months and years is more likely than for those who do not develop AKI. Cardiac surgery continues to be a popular clinical model to evaluate novel therapeutics, off-label use of existing medications, and nonpharmacologic treatments for AKI, since cardiac surgery is fairly common, typically elective, provides a relatively standardized insult, and patients remain hospitalized and monitored following surgery. More efficient and time-sensitive methods to diagnose AKI are imperative to reduce this negative outcome. The discovery and validation of renal damage biomarkers should in time supplant creatinine-based criteria for the clinical diagnosis of AKI.

  13. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE of urinary protein in acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufi M Suhail

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the importance of urinary proteomics in acute kidney injury (AKI. We analyzed the protein in urine of patients with clinical AKI using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE for its diagnostic value, and followed them up for 40 months to evaluate prognosis. Urine from 31 consecutive cases of AKI was analyzed with SDS-PAGE to determine the low, middle and high molecular weight proteins. Fractional excretion of sodium (FENa was estimated from serum and urine creatinine and sodium (Na. The cases were followed-up for 40 months from the end of the recruitment of study cases. Glomerular protein was higher in the hematuria group when compared with the non-hematuria group (P <0.04 and in the AKI group than in the acute on chronic renal failure (AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.002. Tubular protein was higher in the AKI-on-CRF group (P <0.003 than in the AKI group. Tubular protein correlated with FENa in groups with diabetes mellitus (DM, AKI-on-CRF, and without hematuria (P <0.03, P <0.02 and P <0.004, respectively. Pattern of protein did not differ between groups with and without DM and clinical acute tubular necrosis (ATN. At the end of 40 months follow-up, category with predominantly glomerular protein progressed to chronic renal failure (CRF or end-stage renal failure in higher proportion (P <0.05. In clinical AKI, we observed that glomerular protein dominated in cases with glomerular insult, as indicated by hematuria. Tubular protein was common in the study cases with CRF, DM and cases without hematuria. This indicates tubulo-interstitial injury for AKI in these cases. Patients with predominantly glomerular protein had an adverse outcome.

  14. Acute kidney injury in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock: a comparison between the 'Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease' (RIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marta; Rodrigues, Natacha; Godinho, Iolanda; Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Marta; Gouveia, João; Costa E Silva, Zélia; Lopes, José António

    2017-06-01

    Using the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function, End-stage kidney disease (RIFLE), Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) systems, the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and their ability to predict in-hospital mortality in severe sepsis or septic shock was compared. We performed a retrospective analysis of 457 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock hospitalized between January 2008 and December 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to evaluate the association between the RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO systems with in-hospital mortality. Model fit was assessed by the goodness-of-fit test and discrimination by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. Statistical significance was defined as P < 0.05. RIFLE (84.2%) and KDIGO (87.5%) identified more patients with AKI than AKIN (72.8%) (P < 0.001). AKI defined by AKIN and KDIGO was associated with in-hospital mortality {AKIN: adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.3[95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-4], P = 0.006; KDIGO: adjusted OR 2.7[95% CI 1.2-6.2], P = 0.021} while AKI defined by RIFLE was not [adjusted OR 2.0 (95% CI 1-4), P = 0.063]. The AUROC curve for in-hospital mortality was similar between the three classifications (RIFLE 0.652, P < 0.001; AKIN 0.686, P < 0.001; KDIGO 0.658, P < 0.001). RIFLE and KDIGO diagnosed more patients with AKI than AKIN, but the prediction ability for in-hospital mortality was similar between the three systems.

  15. Prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury by theophylline in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejka, Jan; Varvarovsky, Ivo; Vojtisek, Petr; Herman, Ales; Rozsival, Vladimir; Borkova, Veronika; Kvasnicka, Jiri

    2010-11-01

    Although the optimal strategy for preventing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) has not yet been established, the current strategy focuses on adequate periprocedural hydration, the use of a low amount of low or iso-osmolar contrast medium, and the application of adjunctive therapies, including hemofiltration, hemodialysis and drugs. Previous trials and meta-analyses concerning the use of the adenosine antagonist theophylline have revealed contradictory results. We sought to evaluate the effect of theophylline in CI-AKI prevention in well-hydrated elderly patients with chronic kidney disease. We therefore conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial involving 56 patients who had been referred for cardiac coronary angiography and/or angioplasty. 31 of these patients were randomly assigned to 200 mg theophylline IV before the procedure, and 25 to a placebo. The iso-osmolar contrast medium iodixanol was used. The primary endpoint was an increase in serum creatinine at study termination 48 h after contrast medium administration. Baseline characteristics in the placebo and theophylline groups were similar in terms of median age (75 years), estimated glomerular filtration rate (33 ± 10 vs. 33 ± 10 ml/min/1.73 m²; p = 0.87), diabetes mellitus (80 vs. 71%; p = 0.54), and amount of contrast used (94 ± 35 vs. 95 ± 38 ml; p = 0.89). There was no difference in serum creatinine at baseline (2.06 ± 0.59 vs. 2.02 ± 0.45 mg/dl; p = 0.62) or study termination (2.06 ± 0.68 vs. 2.10 ± 0.53; p = 0.79). A prophylactic effect of theophylline was not observed. The incidence of renal impairment following exposure to the contrast medium was low. This fact can be attributed to adequate parenteral hydratation and the use of the minimum amount of contrast medium necessary.

  16. Renal ultrasound provides low utility in evaluating cardiac surgery associated acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allen; Crawford, Todd; Pierre, Alejandro Suarez; Trent Magruder, J; Fraser, Charles; Conte, John; Whitman, Glenn; Sciortino, Christopher

    2017-09-02

    Renal ultrasonography is part of the algorithm in assessing acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical utility of renal US in postoperative cardiac patients who develop AKI. We conducted a retrospective study of 90 postoperative cardiac surgery patients at a single institution from 1/19/2010 to 3/19/2016 who underwent renal US for AKI. We reviewed provider documentation to determine whether renal US changed management. We defined change as: administration of crystalloid or colloid, addition of inotropic or vasopressor, or procedural interventions on the renal system. Mean age of study patients was 68 ± 13 years. 48/90 patients (53.3%) had pre-existing chronic kidney disease of varying severity. 48 patients (53.3%) had normal renal US with incidental findings and 31 patients (34.4%) had US evidence of medical kidney disease. 10 patients (11.1%) had limited US results due to poor visualization and 1 patient (1.1%) had mild right-sided hydronephrosis. No patients were found to have obstructive uropathy or renal artery stenosis. Clinical management was altered in only 4/90 patients (4.4%), which included 3 patients that received a fluid bolus and 1 patient that received a fluid bolus and inotropes. No vascular or urologic procedures resulted from US findings. Although renal ultrasound is often utilized in the work-up of AKI, our study shows that renal US provides little benefit in managing postoperative cardiac patients. This diagnostic modality should be scrutinized rather than viewed as a universal measure in the cardiac surgery population.

  17. Appropriate blood component therapy can reduce postcardiac surgery acute kidney injury through packed cell transfusion reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Saberi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI can happen due to different factors such as anemia. Packed cell (PC transfusion is an important cause of AKI occurrence. The aim of the study is to investigate whether appropriate blood component (BC therapy can reduce blood transfusion and it would result in AKI decreasing. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cohort study of 1388 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in one university hospital. A serum creatinine higher than 2 mg/dl, renal disease history, renal replacement therapy (chronic dialysis were our exclusion criteria. Results: from our 1088 samples, 701 (64.43% patients had normal kidney function, 277 (25.45% were in the AKI-1 group, 84 (7.72% had an AKI-2 function, and the rest of patients were classified as end stage. A mean of more than three PC units were transfused for the second and third stage of AKI, which was significantly higher than other AKI groups (P = 0.009; this higher demand of blood product was also true about the fresh frozen plasma, platelet, and fibrinogen. However, there were no needs of fibrinogen in the patients with normal kidney function. The cardiopulmonary bypass time had an average of 142 ± 24.12, which obviously was higher than other groups (P = 0.032. Total mortality rate was 14 out of 1088 (1.28%, and expiration among the AKI stages 2 and 3 was meaningfully (P = 0.001 more than the other groups. Conclusion: A more occurrence of AKI reported for the patients who have taken more units of blood. However, BC indicated to be safer for compensating blood loss because of low AKI occurrence among our patients.

  18. RIFLE classification in geriatric patients with acute kidney injury in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Ji; Rhee, Harin; Kim, Il Young; Song, Sang Heon; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Soo Bong; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Seong, Eun Young

    2016-06-01

    The RIFLE classification is widely used to assess the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI), but its application to geriatric AKI patients complicated by medical problems has not been reported. We investigated 256 geriatric patients (≥65 years old; mean age, 74.4 ± 6.3 years) who developed AKI in the intensive care unit (ICU) according to the RIFLE classification. Etiologic, clinical, and prognostic variables were analyzed. They were categorized into RIFLE-R (n = 53), RIFLE-I (n = 102), and RIFLE-F (n = 101) groups. The overall in-hospital mortality was 39.8 %. There were no significant differences in RIFLE category between survivors and non-survivors. Survivors had significantly less needs for a ventilator and vasopressor, and lower number of failing organs. Survivors had higher systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin level, and serum albumin levels. We performed a logistic regression analysis to identify the independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. In a univariate analysis, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, RIFLE classification, number of failing organs, need for a ventilator and vasopressor, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin level, and serum albumin levels were identified as prognostic factors of in-hospital mortality. However, in a multivariate analysis, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, number of failing organs, and serum albumin levels were independent risk factors, with no significant difference for in-hospital mortality with the RIFLE classification. The RIFLE classification might not be associated with mortality in geriatric AKI patients in the ICU. In geriatric patients with AKI, various factors besides severity of AKI should be considered to predict mortality.

  19. Experimental model for acute kidney injury caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Skowron

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute kidney injury (AKI is the rapid deterioration of renal function, diagnosed on the basis of an increase in serum creatinine and abnormal urinary parameters. AKI is associated with increased risk of mortality or chronic kidney disease (CKD.The aim of the study was to develop an experimental model for AKI resulting from Escherichia coli-induced pyelonephritis. E. coli was isolated from a patient with clinical symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI.Material/Methods: The study included three groups of female Wistar rats (groups 1, 2 and 3, in which pyelonephritis was induced by transurethral inoculation with highly virulent E. coli (105, 107 and 109 cfu/ml, respectively. Urine and blood samples for analysis were obtained prior to the inoculation (day 0, as well as 7, 14 and 21 days thereafter.Results: Aside from a microbiological examination of urine samples, daily urine output, serum creatinine (CreaS, creatinine clearance (CrCl, interleukin 6 (IL-6, fractional excretion of sodium (FENa and fractional excretion of urea (FEUrea were determined. A histopathological examination of kidney and urinary bladder specimens was conducted as well. While UTI-related pyelonephritis developed irrespective of E. coli inoculum size, AKI was observed only following transurethral administration of E. coli at the intermediate and high dose, i.e. 107 and 109 cfu/ml, respectively (group 2 and 3. Discussion: An increase in CreaS and abnormal diuresis were accompanied by changes in parameters specific for various forms of AKI, i.e. FENa and FEUrea. Based on these changes, administration of E. coli at 107 cfu/ml was demonstrated to induce renal AKI, whereas inoculation with 109 cfu/ml seemed to cause not only ascending pyelonephritis, but perhaps also bacteremia and urosepsis (prerenal component of AKI.

  20. Urinary biomarkers TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 early predict acute kidney injury after major surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gocze

    Full Text Available To assess the ability of the urinary biomarkers IGFBP7 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 and TIMP-2 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 to early predict acute kidney injury (AKI in high-risk surgical patients.Postoperative AKI is associated with an increase in short and long-term mortality. Using IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 for early detection of cellular kidney injury, thus allowing the early initiation of renal protection measures, may represent a new concept of evaluating renal function.In this prospective study, urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] was measured in surgical patients at high risk for AKI. A predefined cut-off value of [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] >0.3 was used for assessing diagnostic accuracy. Perioperative characteristics were evaluated, and ROC analyses as well as logistic regression models of risk assessment were calculated with and without a [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test.107 patients were included in the study, of whom 45 (42% developed AKI. The highest median values of biomarker were detected in septic, transplant and patients after hepatic surgery (1.24 vs 0.45 vs 0.47 ng/l²/1000. The area under receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC for the risk of any AKI was 0.85, for early use of RRT 0.83 and for 28-day mortality 0.77. In a multivariable model with established perioperative risk factors, the [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test was the strongest predictor of AKI and significantly improved the risk assessment (p<0.001.Urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test sufficiently detect patients with risk of AKI after major non-cardiac surgery. Due to its rapid responsiveness it extends the time frame for intervention to prevent development of AKI.

  1. Acute kidney injury is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia/mortality in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenazi, David; Patil, Neha R; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Balena-Borneman, Jessica; Lozano, David J; Ramani, Manimaran; Collins, Monica; Griffin, Russell L

    2015-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) impairs electrolyte balance, alters fluid homeostasis and decreases toxin excretion. More recent data suggest it also affects the physiology of distant organs. We performed a prospective cohort study which invloved 122 premature infants [birth weight (BW) ≤1200 g and/or gestational age (GA) bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)/mortality. Days until oxygen discontinuation was compared between those with and without AKI in survivors who received oxygen for ≥24 h. Acute kidney disease, defined by a rise in serum creatinine (SCr) of ≥0.3 mg/dl or an increase in SCr of ≥150%, occurred in 36/122 (30%) of the premature infants. Those with AKI had a 70% higher risk of oxygen requirement or of dying at 28 days of life [relative risk (RR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-2.39; p < 0.002]. This association remained after controlling for GA, pre-eclampsia, 5 min Apgar score and percentage maximum weight change (max % weight Δ) in the first 4 days (RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.07-1.97); p < 0.02). Similar findings were noted for receipt of mechanical ventilation/death by day 28 (adjusted RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.22; p < 0.03). Those without AKI were 2.5-fold more likely to come off oxygen [hazard ratio (HR) 1.3-5; p < 0.02) than those with AKI, even when controlling for GA, pre-eclampsia, 5 min Apgar and max % weight Δ (multivariate HR 2.0, 95% CI 0.9-4.0; p < 0.06). In premature infants, AKI is associated with BPD/mortality. As AKI could lead to altered lung physiology, interventions to ameliorate AKI could improve long-term BPD.

  2. Hyponatremia, acute kidney injury, and mortality in HIV-related toxoplasmic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre B. Libório

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are no reports on hyponatremia and acute kidney injury (AKI involved in the course of HIV-related toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. The main objective of this study was to describe the occurrence of hyponatremia and its relationship with AKI and mortality in HIV-related toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study on patients with HIV-related TE. AKI was considered only when the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage criterion was met, after the patient was admitted. RESULTS: A total of 92 patients were included, with a mean age of 36 ± 9 years. Hyponatremia at admission was observed in 43 patients (46.7%, with AKI developing in 25 (27.1% patients during their hospitalization. Sulfadiazine was the treatment of choice in 81% of the cases. Death occurred in 13 cases (14.1%. Low serum sodium level correlated directly with AKI and mortality. Male gender (OR 7.89, 95% CI 1.22-50.90, p = 0.03 and hyponatremia at admission (OR 4.73, 95% CI 1.22-18.30, p = 0.02 were predictors for AKI. Independent risk factors for death were AKI (OR 8.3, 95% CI 1.4-48.2, p < 0.0001 and hyponatremia (or 9.9, 95% ci 1.2-96.3, p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: AKI and hyponatremia are frequent in TE. Hyponatremia on admission is highly associated with AKI and mortality.

  3. Hyponatremia, acute kidney injury, and mortality in HIV-related toxoplasmic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre B. Libório

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are no reports on hyponatremia and acute kidney injury (AKI involved in the course of HIV-related toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. The main objective of this study was to describe the occurrence of hyponatremia and its relationship with AKI and mortality in HIV-related toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study on patients with HIV-related TE. AKI was considered only when the RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage criterion was met, after the patient was admitted. RESULTS: A total of 92 patients were included, with a mean age of 36 ± 9 years. Hyponatremia at admission was observed in 43 patients (46.7%, with AKI developing in 25 (27.1% patients during their hospitalization. Sulfadiazine was the treatment of choice in 81% of the cases. Death occurred in 13 cases (14.1%. Low serum sodium level correlated directly with AKI and mortality. Male gender (OR 7.89, 95% CI 1.22-50.90, p = 0.03 and hyponatremia at admission (OR 4.73, 95% CI 1.22-18.30, p = 0.02 were predictors for AKI. Independent risk factors for death were AKI (OR 8.3, 95% CI 1.4-48.2, p < 0.0001 and hyponatremia (or 9.9, 95% ci 1.2-96.3, p < 0.0001. CONCLUSION: AKI and hyponatremia are frequent in TE. Hyponatremia on admission is highly associated with AKI and mortality.

  4. Peritoneal Dialysis in Renal Replacement Therapy for Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naheed Ansari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis (PD was the first modality used for renal replacement therapy (RRT of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI because of its inherent advantages as compared to Hemodialysis. It provides the nephrologist with nonvascular alternative for renal replacement therapy. It is an inexpensive modality in developing countries and does not require highly trained staff or a complex apparatus. Systemic anticoagulation is not needed, and it can be easily initiated. It can be used as continuous or intermittent procedure and, due to slow fluid and solute removal, helps maintain hemodynamic stability especially in patients admitted to the intensive care unit. PD has been successfully used in AKI involving patients with hemodynamic instability, those at risk of bleeding, and infants and children with AKI or circulatory failure. Newer continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRTs are being increasingly used in renal replacement therapy of AKI with less use of PD. Results of studies comparing newer modalities of CRRT versus acute peritoneal dialysis have been conflicting. PD is the modality of choice in renal replacement therapy in pediatric patients and in patients with AKI in developing countries.

  5. Renal Replacement Therapy in Acute Kidney Injury: Which Method to Use in the Intensive Care Unit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davenport Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades the treatment options for patients with acute kidney injury (AKI requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT have expanded from basic acute peritoneal dialysis and intermittent hemodialysis (IHD, to now include a variety of continuous modalities (CRRT, ranging from hemofiltration, dialysis and/or hemodiafiltration, and a variety of hybrid therapies, variously described as extended daily dialysis and/or hemodiafiltration, with the possibility of additional adjunct therapies encompassing plasma separation and adsorption techniques. Current evidence does not support that one modality is superior to any other in terms of patients′ survival in the intensive care unit, or at discharge. There have been two prospective audits, which have reported improved renal recovery in the survivors who were treated by CRRT rather than IHD, but this has not been confirmed in randomized controlled trials. Thus the choice of RRT modality should be guided by the individual patients′ clinical status, the medical and nursing expertise in the local intensive care unit, and the availability of RRT modality.

  6. Dialysis for acute kidney injury associated with influenza a (H1N1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Vallejos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2009, the World Health Organization declared a novel influenza A, S-OIV (H1N1, pandemic. We observed 44 consecutive patients during the "first wave" of the pandemic. 70.5% of them showed co-morbidities (hypertension, obesity, chronic respiratory diseases, chronic renal disease, diabetes, pregnancy. Serious cases were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU, particularly those with severe acute respiratory failure. Some of them developed acute kidney injury (AKI and required renal replacement therapy (RRT. The average time between admission to the ICU and initiation of RRT was 3.16 ± 2.6 days. At initiation of RRT, most patients required mechanical ventilation. No relationship was found with creatinine-kinase levels. Seventy-five percent of the cases were observed during a 3-week period and mortality, related to respiratory failure, doubling of alanine amino transferase and use of inotropics was 81.8%. In conclusion, the H1N1-infected patients who developed RRT-requiring AKI, in the context of multi-organ failure, showed a high mortality rate. Thus, it is mandatory that elaborate strategies aimed at anticipating potential renal complications associated to future pandemics are implemented.

  7. Metabolic Acidosis and Strong Ion Gap in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Mei Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the influence of physicochemical parameters on survival in metabolic acidosis (MA and acute kidney injury (AKI patients. Materials and Methods. Seventy-eight MA patients were collected and assigned to AKI or non-AKI group. We analyzed the physiochemical parameters on survival at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after AKI. Results. Mortality rate was higher in the AKI group. AKI group had higher anion gap (AG, strong ion gap (SIG, and apparent strong ion difference (SIDa values than non-AKI group. SIG value was higher in the AKI survivors than nonsurvivors and this value was correlated serum creatinine, phosphate, albumin, and chloride levels. SIG and serum albumin are negatively correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV scores. AG was associated with mortality at 1 and 3 months post-AKI, whereas SIG value was associated with mortality at 24 h, 72 h, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months post-AKI. Conclusions. Whether high or low SIG values correlate with mortality in MA patients with AKI depends on its correlation with serum creatinine, chloride, albumin, and phosphate (P levels. AG predicts short-term mortality and SIG value predicts both short- and long-term mortality among MA patients with AKI.

  8. Effect of continuous renal replacement therapy on kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in patients with septic acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiming; Fan, Yinqiang; Xie, Yuliu; Yin, Lu; Zhang, Yuanli; Deng, Liehua; Sun, Xiaocong; Shao, Xin; Tan, Xinzhang; He, Junbing; Zhao, Shiman

    2017-01-01

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) have been investigated as biomarkers for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, they are seldom investigated in patients with septic AKI treated with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The aim of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness and possible mechanisms of CRRT in septic AKI by observing the changes in Kim-1 and NGAL levels. A group of 38 patients with septic AKI was randomly divided into the conventional drug treatment group (group A) and the CRRT group (group B). All patients were treated with standard antisepsis agents, and group B was additionally submitted to CRRT for 24 h. The levels of Kim-1 and NGAL in serum, urine and the ultrafiltrate of CRRT were measured prior to and at 12, 24, and 48 h after treatment. In group A, urinary Kim-1 (uKim-1) levels at 12, 24 and 48 h were lower than prior to treatment (P0.05). In group B, uKim-1 was decreased at 24 and 48 h compared with before treatment (all P0.05), whereas serum NGAL was increased after treatment in group A (P0.05). Kim-1 and NGAL were not detected in the ultrafiltrate of CRRT. uKim-1 and uNGAL decreased significantly after CRRT, and therefore may be used to reflect the change of renal function during CRRT and to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of the method. PMID:28588686

  9. Acute kidney injury defined according to the 'Risk,' 'Injury,' 'Failure,' 'Loss,' and 'End-stage' (RIFLE) criteria after repair for a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Sytse C.; Legemate, Dink A.; Vahl, Anco; Bouman, Catherine S. C.; Vogt, Liffert; Wisselink, Willem; Balm, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a serious complication after repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). In the present Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS)/International Society for CardioVascular Surgery (ISCVS) reporting standards patients are classified as no dialysis (grade I), as

  10. The first description of severe anemia associated with acute kidney injury and adult minimal change disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yimei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute kidney injury in the setting of adult minimal change disease is associated with proteinuria, hypertension and hyperlipidemia but anemia is usually absent. Renal biopsies exhibit foot process effacement as well as tubular interstitial inflammation, acute tubular necrosis or intratubular obstruction. We recently managed a patient with unique clinical and pathological features of minimal change disease, who presented with severe anemia and acute kidney injury, an association not previously reported in the literature. Case presentation A 60-year-old Indian-American woman with a history of hypertension and diabetes mellitus for 10 years presented with progressive oliguria over 2 days. Laboratory data revealed severe hyperkalemia, azotemia, heavy proteinuria and progressively worsening anemia. Urine eosinophils were not seen. Emergent hemodialysis, erythropoietin and blood transfusion were initiated. Serologic tests for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were negative. Complement levels (C3, C4 and CH50 were normal. Renal biopsy unexpectedly displayed 100% foot process effacement. A 24-hour urine collection detected 6.38 g of protein. Proteinuria and anemia resolved during six weeks of steroid therapy. Renal function recovered completely. No signs of relapse were observed at 8-month follow-up. Conclusion Adult minimal change disease should be considered when a patient presents with proteinuria and severe acute kidney injury even when accompanied by severe anemia. This report adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that in addition to steroid therapy, prompt initiation of erythropoietin therapy may facilitate full recovery of renal function in acute kidney injury.

  11. Morbimortality associated to acute kidney injury in patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Polo, J C; Alcaraz Romero, A J; Gil-Ruíz Gil-Esparza, M A; López-Herce Cid, J; García San Prudencio, M; Fernández Lafever, S N; Carrillo Álvarez, Á

    2014-10-01

    To describe the morbimortality associated to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) defined by the pediatric adaptation of the RIFLE criteria in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). A retrospective cohort study was carried out. Children admitted to a PICU in a tertiary care hospital. Patients or participants A total of 320 children admitted to a tertiary care hospital PICU during the year 2011. Neonates and renal transplant patients were excluded. Primary endpoints AKI was defined and classified according to the pediatric adaptation to the RIFLE criteria. PICU and hospital stays, use of mechanical ventilation and mortality were used to evaluate morbimortality. A total of 315 children met the inclusion criteria, with a median age of 19 months (range 6-72). Of these patients, 128 presented AKI (73 reached the Risk category and 55 reached the Injury and Failure categories). Children with AKI presented a longer PICU stay (6.0 [4.0-12.5] vs. 3.5 [2.0-7.0] days) and hospital stay (17 [10-32] vs. 10 [7-15] days), and a greater need for mechanical ventilation (61.7 vs. 36.9%). The development of AKI was an independent factor of morbidity, associated with a longer PICU and hospital stay, and with a need for longer mechanical ventilation, with a proportional relationship between increasing morbidity and the severity of AKI. The development of AKI in critically ill children is associated with increased morbimortality, which is proportional to the severity of renal injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Relation between proteinuria and acute kidney injury in patients with severe burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Proteinuria in burn patients is common, and may be associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) and adverse outcomes. We evaluated the incidences, outcomes, characteristics and determinants of proteinuria and its influence on AKI and outcomes in burn patients. Methods This retrospective study was carried out in a hospital's burn department. The study population consisted of patients with burn injuries admitted during a five-year period. Positive urine dipstick readings were defined as mild (± or 1+) or heavy (≥ 2+) proteinuria, and AKI was diagnosed and staged according to the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End Stage (RIFLE) classification system. Patient characteristics, management and outcomes were evaluated for associations with proteinuria using nonparametric tests, chi-square (χ2) tests and binary logistic regression. Results Of the patients admitted to the burn unit during the study period (n = 2,497), 865 (34.64%) were classified as having proteinuria. In the patients whose total burn surface areas (TBSA) were > 30% (n = 396), 271 patients (68.43%) had proteinuria and 152 of these patients (56.09%) met AKI criteria. No patients without proteinuria developed AKI. Intensive care unit (ICU) mortality rates were 0.8%, 16.67% and 30.77% (P proteinuria, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified proteinuria (OR 4.48; 95% CI, 2.824 to 7.108; P proteinuria in patients with severe burns (> 30% TBSA). Severely burned patients with proteinuria had a high risk of developing AKI and a poor prognosis for survival. This suggests that proteinuria should be used for identifying burn patients at risk of developing AKI. PMID:23021407

  13. Validating the utilisation of venous bicarbonate as a predictor of acute kidney injury in crush syndrome from sjambok injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, David Lee; Laing, Grant L; Bruce, John; Biccard, Bruce; Muckart, David J J

    2017-04-25

    Crush injury secondary to sjambok beatings is a well-described phenomenon in southern Africa. Owing to a number of factors, it can result in acute kidney injury (AKI). In 1992, Muckart et al. described a risk stratification system using venous bicarbonate (VB) that can be used in the management of these patients. To validate this score in the modern era of AKI risk stratification. A retrospective study was performed on a local trauma database from June 2010 to December 2012. All patients with crush injury from sjambok/blunt instrument beatings were included in the analysis. VB was compared with the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes scoring system for AKI. Serum base excess (BE) and creatine kinase were also examined as biomarkers. The endpoints were the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality. Three hundred and ten patients were included. The overall mortality rate was 1.9%, 14.8% of patients had AKI, and 3.9% required RRT. Both VB and BE performed well in RRT prediction, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.847 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.756 - 0.938; p<0.001) and 0.871 (95% CI 0.795 - 0.947; p<0.001), respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of BE were 83.3% and 80.2% at an optimal cut-point of -7.25 mmol/L, while those of VB were 83.3% and 79.5% at an optimal cut-point of 18.85 mmol/L. VB was significantly different across the AKI risk groups (p<0.001), in keeping with the original Muckart risk stratification system. The risk stratification score using VB is valid and should continue to be used as a tool in the management of patients with sjambok injuries. BE performs well in predicting the need for RRT, with a value of <-7.25 mmol/L indicating severe injury.

  14. Dose-dependent effect of statins on the incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Salima; Kuskowski, Michael; Slinin, Yelena; Ishani, Areef; McFalls, Edward; Adabag, Selcuk

    2011-02-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We assessed whether statin treatment is associated with a lower incidence of postoperative AKI in 2,104 consecutive patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft or valve surgery at the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center. Acute kidney injury was defined as absolute increase greater than 0.3 mg/dL or relative increase greater than 50% in serum creatinine from baseline, within 48 hours after surgery or requiring postoperative hemodialysis per AKI network. Propensity scores were utilized to adjust for the differences between the statin and the no-statin treatment groups. All statins were converted to equivalent-dose simvastatin and divided at the median to construct high-dose (≥40 mg) and low-dose (<40 mg) statin groups. Of the 2,104 patients, 1,435 (68%) were taking statins (638 high-dose) and 495 (24%) developed AKI (25% high-dose vs 40% low-dose vs 35% no-statin; p = 0.014). Estimated preoperative glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.003), diabetes mellitus (p=0.02), valve surgery with or without coronary artery bypass graft (p = 0.024), cardiopulmonary bypass time (p = 0.001), and intraaortic balloon pump (p = 0.055) were independent predictors of AKI. After propensity adjustment statin treatment was not associated with postoperative AKI (odds ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.59 to 1.06; p = 0.11 for high-dose v. no-statin). After full adjustment for all independent predictors of AKI, the results did not change. Statins also had no effect on the incidence of postoperative hemodialysis (0.8% high-dose vs 1.9% low-dose vs 1% no-statin; p = 0.15). Statin treatment is not associated with a lower incidence of AKI after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lack of Furosemide Responsiveness Predicts Acute Kidney Injury in Infants After Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakajiwala, Aadil; Kim, Ji Young; Hughes, John Z; Costarino, Andrew; Ferguson, John; Gaynor, J William; Furth, Susan L; Blinder, Joshua J

    2017-10-01

    This was a retrospective study to determine whether lack of furosemide responsiveness (LFR) predicts acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery in infants. Infants (less than 1 year of age) undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, receiving routine postoperative furosemide (0.8 to 1.2 mg/kg per dose between 8 and 24 hours after surgery) were included. Urine output was measured 2 and 6 hours after furosemide dose. Lack of furosemide responsiveness was defined a priori as urine output less than 1 mL · kg -1 · h -1 after furosemide. Serum creatinine was corrected for fluid balance. Acute kidney injury was determined using changes in uncorrected and corrected serum creatinine. The predictive utility of LFR was assessed using receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis. We analyzed 568 infants who underwent cardiopulmonary bypass. Eighty-one (14.3%) had AKI using uncorrected serum creatinine; AKI occurred in 41 (7.2%) after correcting for fluid overload. Patients with AKI had a lower response to furosemide (median urine output 2 hours: 1.2 versus 3.4 mL · kg -1 · h -1 , p = 0.01; median urine output 6 hours: 1.3 versus 2.9 mL · kg -1 · h -1 , p = 0.01). After creatinine correction, LFR predicts AKI development (area under receiver-operating characteristics curve of 0.74 at 2 hours and 0.77 at 6 hours). After adjusting for surgical complexity using The Society of Thoracic Surgeons/European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery mortality categories, the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve was 0.74 at 2 hours and 0.81 at 6 hours. Patients with urine output greater than 1 mL · kg -1 · h -1 were unlikely to have AKI (negative predictive value, 97%). After correcting serum creatinine for fluid balance and adjusting for surgical complexity, LFR performs fairly at 2 hours, whereas at 6 hours, LFR is a good AKI predictor. Prospective studies are needed to validate whether diuretic responsiveness predicts AKI. Copyright

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis by teicoplanin and risk of acute kidney injury in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Daniel P; Holzmann, Martin J; Sartipy, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin in cardiac surgery. Observational cohort study. Data were gathered from patient charts and national registers. University hospital. All adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery at the authors' institution between January 1, 2010 and July 31, 2013 were eligible for the study. The risk for AKI associated with teicoplanin prophylaxis was estimated by multivariate logistic regression. The primary endpoint, AKI, was defined according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria stage 1, as an increase of postoperative serum creatinine by ≥26 μmol/L (≥0.3 mg/dL) or a relative increase of ≥50% compared to the preoperative value. The authors included 2,809 patients, and 1,056 (38%) received a combination of teicoplanin and cloxacillin for antibiotic prophylaxis. The remaining 1,753 (62%) patients received only cloxacillin and constituted the control group. AKI occurred in 32% (n = 343) in the teicoplanin group compared to 29% (n = 517) in the control group. There was a significant association between antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin and AKI; multivariate adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.70). There was a dose-dependent relationship; 600 mg OR: 1.48 (95% CI 1.17-1.87), and 400 mg OR: 1.34 (95% CI 1.06-1.71). The findings were confirmed in several subgroup analyses; men (OR: 1.27; 95% CI 1.03-1.56); women (OR: 1.90; 95% CI 1.30-2.80); normal renal function (OR: 1.31; 95% CI 1.07-1.60), and reduced renal function (OR: 1.80; 95% CI 1.13-2.85). Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin was associated with an increased risk of AKI after cardiac surgery. The relative risk of AKI was higher in women and in patients with impaired renal function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Incidence and mortality of acute kidney injury in acute myocardial infarction patients: a comparison between AKIN and RIFLE criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Yacov; Leshem-Rubinow, Eran; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Gal-Oz, Amir; Steinvil, Arie; Ben Assa, Eyal; Keren, Gad; Roth, Arie; Arbel, Yaron

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with adverse outcomes after acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The recently proposed AKI network (AKIN) suggested modifications to the consensus classification system for AKI known as the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage (RIFLE) criteria. The aim of the current study was to compare the incidence and mortality (early and late) of AKI diagnosed by RIFLE and AKIN criteria in the STEMI patients undergoing primary percutaneous intervention (PCI). We retrospectively studied 1,033 consecutive STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI. Recruited patients were admitted between January 2008 and November 2012 to the cardiac intensive care unit with the diagnosis of acute STEMI. We compared the utilization of RIFLE and AKIN criteria for the diagnosis, classification, and prediction of mortality. The AKIN criteria allowed the identification of more patients as having AKI (9.6 vs. 3.9 %, p < 0.001) and classified more patients with stage 1 (risk in RIFLE) (7.6 vs. 1.9 %, p < 0.001) compared with the RIFLE criteria. Mortality was higher in AKI population defined by either RIFLE (46.3 vs. 6.8 %, OR 11.9, 95 % CI 6.15-23.1; p < 0.001) or AKIN (29 vs. 6.1 %; OR 6.3, 95 % CI 3.8-10.4; p < 0.001) criteria. In a multivariable logistic regression model, AKI defined with both RIFLE and AKIN was an independent predictor of both 30-day and up to 5-year all-cause mortality. However, there was no significant statistical difference in the risk provided by these two scoring systems. AKIN criteria are more sensitive in defining AKI compared with the RIFLE criteria in STEMI. However, no difference exists in the mortality risk provided by these two scoring systems.

  18. Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in medical, surgical, and intensive care unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T B Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in hospitalized patients. There are few comparative studies on hospital-acquired AKI (HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU patients. This study was conducted to compare the epidemiological characteristics, clinical profiles, and outcomes of HAAKI among these three units. All adult patients (>18 years of either gender who developed AKI based on RIFLE criteria (using serum creatinine, 48 h after hospitalization were included in the study. Patients of acute on chronic renal failure and AKI in pregnancy were excluded. Incidence of HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU wards were 0.54%, 0.72%, and 2.2% respectively ( P < 0.0001. There was no difference in age distribution among the groups, but onset of HAAKI was earliest in the medical ward ( P = 0.001. RIFLE-R was the most common AKI in medical (39.2% and ICU (50% wards but in the surgical ward, it was RIFLE-F that was most common (52.6%. Acute tubular necrosis was more common in ICU ( P = 0.043. Most common etiology of HAAKI in medical unit was drug induced (39.2%, whereas in surgical and ICU, it was sepsis (34% and 35.2% respectively. Mortality in ICU, surgical and medical units were 73.5%, 43.42%, and 37.2%, respectively ( P = 0.003. Length of hospital stay in surgical, ICU and medical units were different ( P = 0.007. This study highlights that the characters of HAAKI are different in some aspects among different hospital settings.

  19. Endothelial STAT3 Modulates Protective Mechanisms in a Mouse Ischemia-Reperfusion Model of Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shataakshi Dube

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available STAT3 is a transcriptional regulator that plays an important role in coordinating inflammation and immunity. In addition, there is a growing appreciation of the role STAT3 signaling plays in response to organ injury following diverse insults. Acute kidney injury (AKI from ischemia-reperfusion injury is a common clinical entity with devastating consequences, and the recognition that endothelial alterations contribute to kidney dysfunction in this setting is of growing interest. Consequently, we used a mouse with a genetic deletion of Stat3 restricted to the endothelium to examine the role of STAT3 signaling in the pathophysiology of ischemic AKI. In a mouse model of ischemic AKI, the loss of endothelial STAT3 signaling significantly exacerbated kidney dysfunction, morphologic injury, and proximal tubular oxidative stress. The increased severity of ischemic AKI was associated with more robust endothelial-leukocyte adhesion and increased tissue accumulation of F4/80+ macrophages. Moreover, important proximal tubular adaptive mechanisms to injury were diminished in association with decreased tissue mRNA levels of the epithelial cell survival cytokine IL-22. In aggregate, these findings suggest that the endothelial STAT3 signaling plays an important role in limiting kidney dysfunction in ischemic AKI and that selective pharmacologic activation of endothelial STAT3 signaling could serve as a potential therapeutic target.

  20. Impact of timing of renal replacement therapy initiation on outcome of septic acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is the leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critical patients. The optimal timing of initiating renal replacement therapy (RRT) in septic AKI patients remains controversial. The objective of this study is to determine the impact of early or late initiation of RRT, as defined using the simplified RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal failure) classification (sRIFLE), on hospital mortality among septic AKI patients. Methods Patient with sepsis and AKI requiring RRT in surgical intensive care units were enrolled between January 2002 and October 2009. The patients were divided into early (sRIFLE-0 or -Risk) or late (sRIFLE-Injury or -Failure) initiation of RRT by sRIFLE criteria. Cox proportional hazard ratios for in hospital mortality were determined to assess the impact of timing of RRT. Results Among the 370 patients, 192 (51.9%) underwent early RRT and 259 (70.0%) died during hospitalization. The mortality rate in early and late RRT groups were 70.8% and 69.7% respectively (P > 0.05). Early dialysis did not relate to hospital mortality by Cox proportional hazard model (P > 0.05). Patients with heart failure, male gender, higher admission creatinine, and operation were more likely to be in the late RRT group. Cox proportional hazard model, after adjustment with propensity score including all patients based on the probability of late RRT, showed early dialysis was not related to hospital mortality. Further model matched patients by 1:1 fashion according to each patient's propensity to late RRT showed no differences in hospital mortality according to head-to-head comparison of demographic data (P > 0.05). Conclusions Use of sRIFLE classification as a marker poorly predicted the benefits of early or late RRT in the context of septic AKI. In the future, more physiologically meaningful markers with which to determine the optimal timing of RRT initiation should be identified. PMID:21645350

  1. Ultrasound in Acute Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Nalesso, Federico; Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Kidneys' imaging provides useful information in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnosis and management. Today, several imaging techniques give information on kidneys anatomy, urinary obstruction, differential diagnosis between AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Ultrasound is a safe, non-invasive and repeatable imaging technique so it is widely used in the first level work-up of AKI. The utility of contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in AKI or in AKI during CKD is limited because of renal toxicity associated with contrast agents used. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Forced fluid removal versus usual care in intensive care patients with high-risk acute kidney injury and severe fluid overload (FFAKI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Rasmus Ehrenfried; Itenov, Theis; Perner, Anders

    2017-01-01

    to confirm this association in patients with acute kidney injury. We aim to perform a pilot trial to test the feasibility of forced fluid removal compared to standard care in patients with acute kidney injury and severe fluid overload, the FFAKI trial. METHODS: Then FFAKI trial is a pilot, multicentre......, randomised clinical trial recruiting adult intensive care patients with acute kidney injury and fluid overload, defined as more than 10% of ideal bodyweight. Patients are randomised with concealed allocation to either standard care or forced fluid removal with a therapeutic target of negative net fluid...... to a clinically relevant difference in fluid balance, which could prove beneficial in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT, identifier: 2015-001701-13. Registered on 19 September 2015; ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT02458157 . Registered on 21 May 2015; Danish Ethics...

  3. Acute kidney injury in Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion stung children: Risk factors and clinical features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Valavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is frequently seen in Hemiscorpius lepturus scorpion stung children. We have previously reported several victims with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13 deficiency. Hence, we conducted this study to identify predictive factors and clinical features of AKI in H. lepturus scorpion stung patients. We included all 215 H. lepturus scorpion stung children with no previous renal diseases in two groups (with and without AKI and compared them based on their clinical and laboratory findings. AKI was found in 27.4% of patients, they were significantly younger and with lower body weight (P = 0.006, P = 0.011, respectively. There was a significant difference between groups with and without AKI in findings such as fever (P = 0.003, hypertension (P <0.001, hemolytic anemia (P <0.001, thrombocytopenia (P <0.001, massive proteinuria (P <0.001, hemoglobinuria (P <0.001, pyuria (P <0.001, and hematuria (P = 0.004. HUS was in 5.5% and disseminated intravascular coagulation in 14.6% which had a significant association with AKI (P <0.001.There were several independent predictors for AKI in a multivariate regression model including thrombocytopenia (P = 0.002, pyuria (P = 0.01, proteinuria (P =0.01, and fever (P = 0.02. Hemodialysis was performed in four patients but kidney function improved in all patients and there was no findings of renal impairment after three months follow-up. We found several predictors for AKI in children following H. lepturus scorpion sting including younger age, delay in receiving medical care, pigmenturia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, proteinuria, and pyuria.

  4. Incidence and Risk Factors for Early Acute Kidney Injury in Nonsurgical Patients: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Enrique Cely

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Detecting acute kidney injury (AKI in the first days of hospitalization could prevent potentially fatal complications. However, epidemiological data are scarce, especially on nonsurgical patients. Objectives. To determine the incidence and risk factors associated with AKI within five days of hospitalization (EAKI. Methods. Prospective cohort of patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine Department. Results. A total of 16% of 400 patients developed EAKI. The associated risk factors were prehospital treatment with nephrotoxic drugs (2.21 OR; 95% CI 1.12–4.36, p=0.022, chronic kidney disease (CKD in stages 3 to 5 (3.56 OR; 95% CI 1.55–8.18, p<0.003, and venous thromboembolism (VTE at admission (5.05 OR; 95% CI 1.59–16.0, p<0.006. The median length of hospital stay was higher among patients who developed EAKI (8 [IQR 5–14] versus 6 [IQR 4–10], p=0.008 and was associated with an increased requirement for dialysis (4.87 OR 95% CI 2.54 to 8.97, p<0.001 and in-hospital death (3.45 OR; 95% CI 2.18 to 5.48, p<0.001. Conclusions. The incidence of EAKI in nonsurgical patients is similar to the worldwide incidence of AKI. The risk factors included CKD from stage 3 onwards, prehospital treatment with nephrotoxic drugs, and VTE at admission. EAKI is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased mortality rate, and dialysis requirement.

  5. High-volume hemofiltration for septic acute kidney injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward; Molnar, Amber O; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Honoré, Patrick M; Sikora, Lindsey; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2014-01-08

    High-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) is an attractive therapy for the treatment of septic acute kidney injury (AKI). Small experimental and uncontrolled studies have suggested hemodynamic and survival benefits at higher doses of HVHF than those used for the high-intensity arms of the RENAL and ATN studies. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of high-volume hemofiltration (HVHF) compared with standard-volume hemofiltration (SVHF) for septic AKI. A systematic review and meta-analysis of publications between 1966 and 2013 was performed. The review was limited to randomized-controlled trials that compared HVHF (effluent rate greater than 50 ml/kg per hour) versus SVHF in the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. The primary outcome assessed was 28-day mortality. Other outcomes assessed were recovery of kidney function, lengths of ICU and hospital stays, vasopressor dose reduction, and adverse events. Four trials, including 470 total participants, were included. Pooled analysis for 28-day mortality did not show any meaningful difference between HVHF compared with SVHF (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.29). No included studies reported statistically significant differences between groups for any of the secondary outcomes. Adverse events, including hypophosphatemia and hypokalemia, were more commonly observed in HVHF-treated patients, although reporting was inconsistent across studies. Insufficient evidence exists of a therapeutic benefit for routine use of HVHF for septic AKI, other than on an experimental basis. Given the logistic challenges related to patient recruitment along with an incomplete understanding of the biologic mechanisms by which HVHF may modify outcomes, further trials should focus on alternative extracorporeal therapies as an adjuvant therapy for septic AKI rather than HVHF.

  6. 4-Phenylbutyrate inhibits tunicamycin-induced acute kidney injury via CHOP/GADD153 repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Carlisle

    Full Text Available Different forms of acute kidney injury (AKI have been associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress; these include AKI caused by acetaminophen, antibiotics, cisplatin, and radiocontrast. Tunicamycin (TM is a nucleoside antibiotic known to induce ER stress and is a commonly used inducer of AKI. 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA is an FDA approved substance used in children who suffer from urea cycle disorders. 4-PBA acts as an ER stress inhibitor by aiding in protein folding at the molecular level and preventing misfolded protein aggregation. The main objective of this study was to determine if 4-PBA could protect from AKI induced by ER stress, as typified by the TM-model, and what mechanism(s of 4-PBA's action were responsible for protection. C57BL/6 mice were treated with saline, TM or TM plus 4-PBA. 4-PBA partially protected the anatomic segment most susceptible to damage, the outer medullary stripe, from TM-induced AKI. In vitro work showed that 4-PBA protected human proximal tubular cells from apoptosis and TM-induced CHOP expression, an ER stress inducible proapoptotic gene. Further, immunofluorescent staining in the animal model found similar protection by 4-PBA from CHOP nuclear translocation in the tubular epithelium of the medulla. This was accompanied by a reduction in apoptosis and GRP78 expression. CHOP(-/- mice were protected from TM-induced AKI. The protective effects of 4-PBA extended to the ultrastructural integrity of proximal tubule cells in the outer medulla. When taken together, these results indicate that 4-PBA acts as an ER stress inhibitor, to partially protect the kidney from TM-induced AKI through the repression of ER stress-induced CHOP expression.

  7. Significant Acute Kidney Injury Due to Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs: Inpatient Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul Dixit

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the United States non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID are freely available over-the-counter. Because of the adverse effects on the kidneys and the popularity of these drugs, unregulated use of NSAIDs is an under recognized and potentially dangerous problem. Fifteen inpatients, mean age of 15.2 ± 2.3 years (five males, 10 females, were referred to nephrology for acute kidney injury. All patients admitted to taking ibuprofen and six also consumed naproxen. None of the patients had underlying renal diseases at the time of admission. Nine patients had proteinuria and 12 had hematuria (including one with gross hematuria. One patient had nephrotic syndrome but the condition resolved spontaneously without steroids and has remained in remission for four years. Two patients required dialysis. Only one of the dialyzed patients required steroid therapy for recovery of renal function. The mean duration of hospitalization was 7.4 ± 5.5 days. The serum creatinine peaked at 4.09 ± 4.24 (range 1.2-15.3 mg/dL. All patients recovered renal function with normalization of serum creatinine to 0.71 ± 0.15 mg/dL. The estimated GFR (glomerular filtration rate at peak of renal failure was 38.2 ± 20.5 mL/min but did improve to a baseline of 134 ± 26.2 mL/min (range 89-177, p < 0.01. However, the duration from onset to normalization of serum creatinine was 37 ± 42 days indicating that majority of patients had abnormal renal function for a prolonged period. In conclusion, NSAIDs pose a significant risk of renal failure for significant duration and as an entity may be under recognized.

  8. Assessment of Cell-Cycle Arrest Biomarkers to Predict Early and Delayed Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Bell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 ([TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, and urinary cystatin-C as acute kidney injury predictors (AKI exploring the association of nonrenal factors with elevated biomarker levels. Methods. We studied 94 patients with urine collected within 48 hours of ICU admission and no AKI at sampling. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Predictive performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve. Associations between biomarkers and clinical factors were assessed by multivariate linear regression. Results. Overall, 19 patients (20% developed AKI within 48 hours. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, or cystatin-C admission levels did not differ between patients without AKI and patients developing AKI. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C were poor AKI predictors (ROC areas 0.34–0.51. Diabetes was independently associated with higher [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7] levels (P=0.02 but AKI was not (P=0.24. Sepsis was independently associated with higher NGAL (P<0.001 and cystatin-C (P=0.003 levels. Conclusions. Urinary [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C should be used cautiously as AKI predictors in general ICU patients since urine levels of these biomarkers are affected by factors other than AKI and their performance can be poor.

  9. Maximising Acute Kidney Injury Alerts--A Cross-Sectional Comparison with the Clinical Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sawhney

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is serious and widespread across healthcare (1 in 7 hospital admissions but recognition is often delayed causing avoidable harm. Nationwide automated biochemistry alerts for AKI stages 1-3 have been introduced in England to improve recognition. We explored how these alerts compared with clinical diagnosis in different hospital settings.We used a large population cohort of 4464 patients with renal impairment. Each patient had case-note review by a nephrologist, using RIFLE criteria to diagnose AKI and chronic kidney disease (CKD. We identified and staged AKI alerts using the new national NHS England AKI algorithm and compared this with nephrologist diagnosis across hospital settings.Of 4464 patients, 525 had RIFLE AKI, 449 had mild AKI, 2185 had CKD (without AKI and 1305 were of uncertain chronicity. NHS AKI algorithm criteria alerted for 90.5% of RIFLE AKI, 72.4% of mild AKI, 34.1% of uncertain cases and 14.0% of patients who actually had CKD.The algorithm identified AKI particularly well in intensive care (95.5% and nephrology (94.6%, but less well on surgical wards (86.4%. Restricting the algorithm to stage 2 and 3 alerts reduced the over-diagnosis of AKI in CKD patients from 14.0% to 2.1%, but missed or delayed alerts in two-thirds of RIFLE AKI patients.Automated AKI detection performed well across hospital settings, but was less sensitive on surgical wards. Clinicians should be mindful that restricting alerts to stages 2-3 may identify fewer CKD patients, but including stage 1 provides more sensitive and timely alerting.

  10. Myo-Inositol Oxygenase as a Novel Marker in the Diagnosis of Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertoglu Cuma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the lack of diagnostic efficiency of serum creatinine in acute kidney injury (AKI, there is a pressing need to develop novel diagnostic markers. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated myo-inositol oxygenase (MIOX, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL and cystatin C in terms of their applicability in the diagnosis of AKI. Methods: We enrolled a total of 39 AKI patients and 38 healthy controls in the study. We compared the levels of serum MIOX, NGAL and cystatin C between the two groups. Results: We found that the concentrations of serum creatinine, blood-urea nitrogen, MIOX and cystatin C were higher in the AKI group. According to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under the curve (AUC values were 0.694 (95% CI 0.579-0.794 for MIOX and 0.976 (95% CI; 0.912-0.997 for cystatin C. For MIOX, when the cut-off concentration was set to 77.3 pg/mL, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were found to be 53.8% (95% CI; 37.2-69.9 and 81.5 (95% CI; 65.7-92.3, respectively. For cystatin C, at the cut-off value of 14 mg/L, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 94.8% (95% CI; 82.7-99.4 and 94.7 % (95% CI 82.3-99.4, respectively. Conclusion: The measurement of serum MIOX and cystatin C levels is valuable for the diagnosis of AKI. Further research is needed for the evaluation of the potential use of MIOX as a kidney-specific enzyme in the early diagnosis of AKI.

  11. Obesity, acute kidney injury and mortality in patients with sepsis: a cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gameiro, Joana; Gonçalves, Miguel; Pereira, Marta; Rodrigues, Natacha; Godinho, Iolanda; Neves, Marta; Gouveia, João; Silva, Zélia Costa E; Jorge, Sofia; Lopes, José António

    2018-11-01

    Although the prognostic effect of obesity has been studied in critically ill patients its impact on outcomes of septic patients and its role as a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI) is not consensual. We aimed to analyze the impact of obesity on the occurrence of AKI and on in-hospital mortality in a cohort of critically ill septic patients. This study is retrospective including 456 adult patients with sepsis admitted to the Division of Intensive Medicine of the Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte (Lisbon, Portugal) between January 2008 and December 2014. Obesity was defined as a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes classification was used to diagnose and classify patients developing AKI. AKI occurred in 87.5% of patients (19.5% with stage 1, 22.6% with stage 2 and 45.4% with stage 3). Obese patients developed AKI more frequently than non-obese patients (92.8% versus 85.5%, p = .035; unadjusted OR 2.2 (95% CI: 1.04-4.6), p = .039; adjusted OR 2.31 (95% CI: 1.07-5.02), p = .034). The percentage of obese patients, however, did not differ between AKI stages (stage 1, 25.1%; stage 2, 28.6%; stage 3, 15.4%; p = .145). There was no association between obesity and mortality (p = .739). Of note, when comparing AKI patients with or without obesity in terms of in-hospital mortality there were also no significant differences between those groups (38.4% versus 38.4%, p = .998). Obesity was associated with the occurrence of AKI in critically ill patients with sepsis; however, it was not associated with in-hospital mortality.

  12. Prognostic indicators and patterns of renal recovery in patients requiring hemodialysis for acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaddadi Suresh, Usha Bhargavi E, N.S.R.C Guptha, Vinod L, Vijay Kumar P, Ravinder P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The outcome of patients with acute kidney injury (AKI is highly variable. Patients who receive renal replacement therapy (RRT for similar diseases may recover differently. The factors that operate in each patient may alter the prognosis and outcome. Aims: Our study aims at identification of prognostic factors influencing recovery in patients who required hemodialysis for AKI. Material and Methods: Patients admitted in different ICUs with AKI who underwent hemodialysis in a tertiary care hospital over a three year period were included in the study. Time from day one of disease to first dialysis, hematological and biochemical parameters were noted. Patients were grouped based on the time taken for recovery of renal function following hemodialysis into group A (2 weeks. Studied parameters have been statistically analyzed to find any significant association with recovery time. Results: Out of 63 patients, 9 progressed to chronic kidney disease. In the remaining 54, Group A comprised 31 and group B 23. Out of all the factors studied, serum creatinine (7.0±1.3 vs 8.4±3.8; P=0.018, S. bicarbonate (21.7±2.8 vs 19.7±3.8; P=0.03, pH at admission (7.25±0.13 vs 7.1±0.19; P=0.048; number of hemodialysis sessions (3.5 ±1.5 vs 5±2.4; P=0.016 and time lag from day one of disease to first hemodialysis (8.6 ± 3.6 vs 11.5±5.9; P=0.007 showed significant association with recovery time. Conclusion: Recovery following AKI is influenced by factors liked delayed presentation, late initiation of hemodialysis, low pH and low bicarbonate which can predict delayed renal recovery following hemodialysis.

  13. Prevention of iodinated contrast induced acute kidney injury (ICI--AKI - what have we learnt so far?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of imaging modalities and endovascular procedures has escalated phenol-menally in the last two decades. In view of increasing number of elderly patients, rising incidence of chronic kidney disease and diabetes along with the complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis with gadolinium, a large patient population will be at risk of developing iodinated contrast induced acute kidney injury (ICI-AKI which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and increased health care costs. Hence a search for more effective ways to prevent ICI-AKI continues to be a focus within the medical community.

  14. Fluid overload is an independent risk factor for acute kidney injury in critically Ill patients: results of a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Salahuddin, Nawal; Sammani, Mustafa; Hamdan, Ammar; Joseph, Mini; Al-Nemary, Yasir; Alquaiz, Rawan; Dahli, Ranim; Maghrabi, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute Kidney injury (AKI) is common and increases mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU). We carried out this study to explore whether fluid overload is an independent risk factor for AKI. Methods Single-center prospective, observational study. Consecutively admitted, ICU patients were followed for development of AKI. Intravenous fluid volumes, daily fluid balances were measured, hourly urine volumes, daily creatinine levels were recorded. Results Three hundred thirty nine pati...

  15. Cell Therapy Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Renal Progenitors Ameliorates Acute Kidney Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Toyohara, Takafumi; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Sueta, Shin-Ichi; Inoue, Tatsuyuki; Yamagishi, Yukiko; Kawamoto, Tatsuya; Kasahara, Tomoko; Hoshina, Azusa; Toyoda, Taro; Tanaka, Hiromi; Araoka, Toshikazu; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Sato, Yasunori; Yamaji, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is defined as a rapid loss of renal function resulting from various etiologies, with a mortality rate exceeding 60% among intensive care patients. Because conventional treatments have failed to alleviate this condition, the development of regenerative therapies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) presents a promising new therapeutic option for AKI. We describe our methodology for generating renal progenitors from hiPSCs that show potential in ameliora...

  16. Urinary Oxygenation as a Surrogate Measure of Medullary Oxygenation During Angiotensin II Therapy in Septic Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankadeva, Yugeesh R; Kosaka, Junko; Evans, Roger G; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2017-10-26

    Angiotensin II is an emerging therapy for septic acute kidney injury, but it is unknown if its vasoconstrictor action induces renal hypoxia. We therefore examined the effects of angiotensin II on intrarenal PO2 in ovine sepsis. We also assessed the validity of urinary PO2 as a surrogate measure of medullary PO2. Interventional study. Research Institute. Sixteen adult Merino ewes (n = 8/group). Sheep were instrumented with fiber-optic probes in the renal cortex, medulla, and within a bladder catheter to measure PO2. Conscious sheep were infused with Escherichia coli for 32 hours. At 24-30 hours, angiotensin II (0.5-33.0 ng/kg/min) or saline vehicle was infused. Septic acute kidney injury was characterized by hypotension and a 60% ± 6% decrease in creatinine clearance. During sepsis, medullary PO2 decreased from 36 ± 1 to 30 ± 3 mm Hg after 1 hour and to 20 ± 2 mm Hg after 24 hours; at these times, urinary PO2 was 42 ± 2, 34 ± 2, and 23 ± 2 mm Hg. Increases in urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (12% ± 3%) and serum creatinine (60% ± 23%) were only detected at 8 and 24 hours, respectively. IV infusion of angiotensin II, at 24 hours of sepsis, restored arterial pressure and improved creatinine clearance, while not exacerbating medullary or urinary hypoxia. In septic acute kidney injury, renal medullary and urinary hypoxia developed several hours before increases in currently used biomarkers. Angiotensin II transiently improved renal function without worsening medullary hypoxia. In septic acute kidney injury, angiotensin II appears to be a safe, effective therapy, and urinary PO2 may be used to detect medullary hypoxia.

  17. Urine biomarkers give early prediction of acute kidney injury and outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Beitland, Sigrid; Waldum-Grevbo, B?rd Endre; Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Berg, Jens-Petter; Tr?seid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Brusletto, Berit Sletbakk; Brunborg, Cathrine; Andersen, Geir ?ystein; Sunde, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-resuscitation care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is challenging due to the threat of organ failure and difficult prognostication. Our aim was to examine whether urine biomarkers could give an early prediction of acute kidney injury (AKI) and outcome. Methods This was a prospective observational study of comatose OHCA patients at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, Norway. R...

  18. Successful use of combined high cut-off haemodialysis and bortezomib for acute kidney injury associated with myeloma cast nephropathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, F

    2012-05-01

    We present the case of a 58-year old female with de novo dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI) secondary to myeloma cast nephropathy. The patient underwent extended high cut-off haemodialysis (HCO-HD), in conjunction with bortezomib-based chemotherapy, and soon became dialysis independent with normal renal function. To our knowledge, this is the first time this treatment strategy has been employed successfully in an Irish centre.

  19. Automated, electronic alerts for acute kidney injury: a single-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F Perry; Shashaty, Michael; Testani, Jeffrey; Aqeel, Iram; Borovskiy, Yuliya; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Feldman, Harold I.; Fernandez, Hilda; Gitelman, Yevgeniy; Lin, Jennie; Negoianu, Dan; Parikh, Chirag R.; Reese, Peter P.; Urbani, Richard; Fuchs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Acute kidney injury often goes unrecognised in its early stages when effective treatment options might be available. We aimed to determine whether an automated electronic alert for acute kidney injury would reduce the severity of such injury and improve clinical outcomes in patients in hospital. Methods In this investigator-masked, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial, patients were recruited from the hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA, USA. Eligible participants were adults aged 18 years or older who were in hospital with stage 1 or greater acute kidney injury as defined by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes creatinine-based criteria. Exclusion criteria were initial hospital creatinine 4·0 mg/dL (to convert to μmol/L, multiply by 88·4) or greater, fewer than two creatinine values measured, inability to determine the covering provider, admission to hospice or the observation unit, previous randomisation, or end-stage renal disease. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) via a computer-generated sequence to receive an acute kidney injury alert (a text-based alert sent to the covering provider and unit pharmacist indicating new acute kidney injury) or usual care, stratified by medical versus surgical admission and intensive care unit versus non-intensive care unit location in blocks of 4–8 participants. The primary outcome was a composite of relative maximum change in creatinine, dialysis, and death at 7 days after randomisation. All analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01862419. Findings Between Sept 17, 2013, and April 14, 2014, 23 664 patients were screened. 1201 eligible participants were assigned to the acute kidney injury alert group and 1192 were assigned to the usual care group. Composite relative maximum change in creatinine, dialysis, and death at 7 days did not differ between the alert group and the usual care group (p=0·88), or

  20. A study of acute kidney injury in hospitalized preterm neonates in NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, N; Berwal, P K; Srinivas, A; Berwal, A

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the incidence, clinical features, etiology and outcome of functional and intrinsic acute kidney injury (AKI) in preterm neonates. This is a prospective observational study on premature infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over an eight month period. All biochemical parameters of renal function tests were monitored and statically analyzed. The study included 450 infants; of them 300 were inborn and 150 infants were outborn and transported to the NICU. Mean gestational age, weight, and age at the time of AKI diagnosis were 32.3 weeks, 1.66 kg and 3.23 days respectively. The male: female ratio was 1.84:1. Incidence of AKI was higher in low birth weight babies. Sluggishness and refusal for feed were most common symptoms. Birth asphyxia and septicemia were the most common early and late cause of AKI. Hyponatremia was the most common electrolyte disturbance. The incidences of AKI, functional renal failure, and intrinsic renal failure were 12%, 48.14%, and 51.85% respectively. AKI is not uncommon in preterm infants. The early recognition and aggressive management of episodes of shock which often precede AKI could be life-saving.

  1. Prescription medications and their influence on acute kidney injury presentation and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh Hassan, H; Makris, A; Suranyi, M G; Wong, J K W

    2013-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical problem. An increase in the severity of AKI is associated with increased mortality and worse prognosis. Many patients presenting with AKI also take long-term medications that may potentially exacerbate or precipitate AKI. However, no study has examined the role of such medications on AKI outcomes. Our aim was to analyse use of chronic prescription medications by patients presenting with AKI and their impact on outcomes. A retrospective study of discharge data identified 172 patients admitted to a tertiary level metropolitan hospital with a primary diagnosis of AKI over a 2-year period. Patient characteristics, medications that could precipitate or exacerbate AKI, and outcomes based on mortality, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and intensive care unit admission were analysed. Patients taking medications (69.2%) were older (P = 0.04) with more comorbidities such as: congestive cardiac failure (P patients not consuming any. Patients taking medications were less likely to be admitted with severe AKI (P = 0.01) or require RRT (P = 0.04). Multivariate logistic regression analysis did not show a significant impact of medications on outcomes. Prescription medication use in patients presenting with AKI is common. Despite being used in older patients with more comorbidities, these medications had no detrimental effect on need for RRT, intensive care unit admission or mortality, and were associated with a decrease in the incidence of severe AKI. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. [Outcome of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients treated with intermittent hemodialysis versus CRRT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávalos-López, Mariana; Pérez-López, María Juana; Aguilar-Martínez, Carolina; Díaz-Franco, Ana María Del Carmen; Esquivel-Chávez, Alejandro; Baltazar-Torres, José Angel

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in critically ill patients and it is associated with poor outcome. Some patients require renal replacement therapy (RRT), and the most frequently used are intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT). Current evidence is insufficient to conclude which modality is most appropriate to treat critically ill patients with AKI. We reviewed the clinical records of critically ill patients with stage 3 AKI treated with RRT. We recorded demographic and clinical data and serum creatinine. We compared the evolution and prognosis of patients treated with IHD versus those treated with CRRT by Student's t test, chi squared, Kaplan-Meier curves, and Cox regression. Logistic regression was performed to determine the association between RRT and mortality. We analyzed 221 patients; the mean age was 49.8 years, and 55.2% were men. Mortality was 36.7%. IHD was used in 73.8% and CRRT in 26.2% of cases. In the group treated with CRRT, the severity of disease was higher, the recovery of renal function less frequent, the need for long-term RRT less frequent, and mortality higher, compared with those treated with IHD. CRRTs had an odds ratio (OR) of 8.64 for mortality (p = 0.063). IHD is the RRT most frequently used. Mortality is higher in patients treated with CRRT. CRRTs are not an independent risk factor for death.

  3. The Effect of Specialized Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy Team in Acute Kidney Injury Patients Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Youn Kyung; Kim, Eun Jin; Park, Kyoung Sook; Han, Seung Gyu; Han, In Mee; Yoon, Chang Yun; Lee, Eunyoung; Joo, Young Su; Kim, Dae Young; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Beom Seok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has been established for critically ill acute kidney injury (AKI) patients. In addition, some centers consist of a specialized CRRT team (SCT) with physicians and nurses. To our best knowledge, however, ona a few studies have yet been carried out on the superiority of SCT management. Materials and Methods A total of 551 patients, who received CRRT between January 2008 and March 2009, were divided into two groups based on the controller of CRRT. The impact of the CRRT management on 28-day mortality was compared between two groups by Kaplan-Meier curve and Cox analysis. Results During the study period, the number of filters used, down-time per day, and intensive care unit length of day were significantly higher in non-SCT group than in SCT group (6.2 hrs vs. 5.0 hrs, p=0.042; 5.0 hrs vs. 3.8 hrs, pCRRT team could be beneficial for mortality improvement of AKI patients requiring CRRT. PMID:25837170

  4. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in the Critically Ill with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo de Cal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute kidney injury (AKI is common in the intensive care unit (ICU and associated with poor outcome. Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP is a biomarker related to myocardial overload, and is elevated in some ICU patients. There is a high prevalence of both cardiac and renal dysfunction in ICU patients. Aims. To investigate whether plasma BNP levels in the first 48 hours were associated with AKI in ICU patients. Methods. We studied a cohort of 34 consecutive ICU patients. Primary outcome was presence of AKI on presentation, or during ICU stay. Results. For patients with AKI on presentation, BNP was statistically higher at 24 and 48 hours than No-AKI patients (865 versus 148 pg/mL; 1380 versus 131 pg/mL. For patients developing AKI during 48 hours, BNP was statistically higher at 0, 24 and 48 hours than No-AKI patients (510 versus 197 pg/mL; 552 versus 124 pg/mL; 949 versus 104 pg/mL. Conclusion. Critically ill patients with AKI on presentation or during ICU stay have higher levels of the cardiac biomarker BNP relative to No-AKI patients. Elevated levels of plasma BNP may help identify patients with elevated risk of AKI in the ICU setting. The mechanism for this cardiorenal connection requires further investigation.

  5. Risk factors of acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy based on regional registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czempik, Piotr; Cieśla, Daniel; Knapik, Piotr; Krzych, Łukasz J

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common problem in critically ill patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) and is associated with high mortality, particularly when renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required. Our aim was to investigate the risk factors for AKI requiring RRT (AKI-RRT). In our retrospective, multi-centre, observational study, we analysed 14,672 consecutive AKI-RRT patients hospitalized in ICUs in the Silesian Region (Poland) between October 2011 and December 2014. Demographic and clinical data were derived from the Silesian Registry of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Departments. Logistic regression was used to select final risk factors for AKI-RRT. The ROC method was used to analyse the value of clinical parameters to predict the risk of AKI-RRT. Of a total of 14,672 patients, 1,234 (8.4%) developed AKI requiring RRT. Overall 59% of patients were males and the median age in the group was 66 (IQR 55-76) years. There were 16 variables that modified the risk of AKI-RRT. The AUROC for the test scored 0.845 (95% CI: 0.84-0.85; P shock increased, whereas neurological disorders decreased the risk. Measures directed towards AKI prevention should be aimed specifically at patients with cardiological disorders and CKD.

  6. [Severe acute kidney injury in critically ill children: Epidemiology and prognostic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touza Pol, P; Rey Galán, C; Medina Villanueva, J A; Martinez-Camblor, P; López-Herce, J

    2015-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a severe complication in critically ill children. The aim of the study was to describe the characteristics of AKI, as well as to analyse the prognostic factors for mortality and renal replacement therapy (RRT) in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) in Spain. Prospective observational multicentre study including children from 7 days to 16 years old who were admitted to a PICU. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis of the risk factors for mortality and renal replacement therapy at PICU discharge were performed. A total of 139 cases of AKI were analysed. RRT was necessary in 60.1% of cases. Mortality rate was 32.6%. At PICU discharge RRT was necessary in 15% of survivors. Thrombopenia and low creatinine clearance values were prognostic markers of RRT at PICU discharge. High values of platelets, serum creatinine and weight were associated with higher survival. Critically ill children with AKI had a high mortality and morbidity rate. Platelet values and creatinine clearance are markers of RRT at PICU discharge, whereas number of platelets, serum creatinine and weight were associated with mortality. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute hemodialysis in a young man with severe symptomatic hyponatremia and kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courteau, Catherine; Al Khoury, Alex; Michel, Rene P; Weber, Catherine L

    2018-01-30

    A 35-year-old man presented with severe hypo-osmolar hyponatremia (serum sodium 99 mmol/L), profound nonoliguric renal failure (serum creatinine 1240 μmol/L), and nephrotic range proteinuria. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed nephromegaly and no obstruction. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and conventional hemodialysis was initiated. To avoid rapid sodium correction, we prescribed concurrent dialysate flow, a low dialysate sodium concentration, a small surface area dialyzer, and a low blood flow rate. We infused dextrose 5% water into the venous return line and adjusted the infusion rate according to hourly sodium concentration. The rate of sodium correction was 7.7 mmol/day over the first 3 days of admission. A subsequent renal biopsy revealed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and interstitial infiltration with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type. The patient died of massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to lymphomatous involvement day 19 in the ICU. In the setting of acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy and concomitant severe hyponatremia, it is challenging to avoid overcorrection of serum sodium. We describe several key prescription modifications to conventional hemodialysis, factors that affect sodium diffusion at the level of the dialyzer membrane, and the importance of frequent laboratory monitoring. © 2018 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  8. The initial development and assessment of an automatic alert warning of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark; Sitch, Alice; Dowswell, George

    2011-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) recognition by clinicians has been shown to be suboptimal. Little work has focused on the use of an automated warning of a rise in a patient's creatinine, indicating AKI. Over 3 months in 2008 we ran a prospective observational study of 'alerts' sent by our Integrated Clinical Environment pathology system, identifying all patients with a ≥ 75% rise in their creatinine from its previous value. Information was collected on subsequent renal function, comorbidities and other potential predictors of survival. In the 3-month period 463 adults with a first episode of AKI were identified by an alert; 87% were hospital inpatients. Median follow-up was 404 days. In-hospital mortality was 36% for those who were admitted. After performing Weibull survival analysis, significant predictors of poorer survival were the presence of metastatic, haematological or lower risk malignancy, a residential or nursing home address and higher age, number of non-malignant comorbidities or C-reactive protein level. Predictors of better survival were higher serum albumin level or nadir GFR during the episode and Indian subcontinent ethnicity. A receiver-operator curve for a prognostic score developed from the analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.84. The alerts identified a group of AKI patients who are at moderately high risk of death. The prognostic score using a combination of covariates shows early promise. Both the alerts and the score warrant further development as tools for earlier intervention in AKI.

  9. Delayed Nephrology Consultation and High Mortality on Acute Kidney Injury: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Débora M; Pessanha, José F; Sharma, Aashish; Brocca, Alessandra; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a complex syndrome associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and costs. Despite advancements in diagnosis and care practice, AKI remains a disorder usually under/late-recognized with high mortality. One of the hidden reasons for poor outcome might be delayed nephrology consultation, with the involvement of the specialist only in severe stages of AKI when renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required. We searched PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane central register for related work on the subject. Six studies were identified for the meta-analysis, correlating time of nephrology consultation and mortality in AKI. We found that delayed nephrology consultation is associated with higher mortality in AKI, with an OR 0.79 (95% CI 0.48-1.10, p nephrology consultation contributes to higher mortality in AKI. The early involvement of nephrologist may present an advantage in terms of early recognition, prevention and effective treatment of AKI. An early involvement of multidisciplinary task force may contribute to better treatment, before the preventable complications of AKI occur or an emergency RRT is required. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Effects of Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury on Lung Water Balance: Nephrogenic Pulmonary Edema?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajit K. Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary edema worsens the morbidity and increases the mortality of critically ill patients. Mechanistically, edema formation in the lung is a result of net flow across the alveolar capillary membrane, dependent on the relationship of hydrostatic and oncotic pressures. Traditionally, the contribution of acute kidney injury (AKI to the formation of pulmonary edema has been attributed to bulk fluid accumulation, increasing capillary hydrostatic pressure and the gradient favoring net flow into the alveolar spaces. Recent research has revealed more subtle, and distant, effects of AKI. In this review we discuss the concept of nephrogenic pulmonary edema. Pro-inflammatory gene upregulation, chemokine over-expression, altered biochemical channel function, and apoptotic dysregulation manifest in the lung are now understood as “extra-renal” and pulmonary effects of AKI. AKI should be counted as a disease process that alters the endothelial integrity of the alveolar capillary barrier and has the potential to overpower the ability of the lung to regulate fluid balance. Nephrogenic pulmonary edema, therefore, is the net effect of fluid accumulation in the lung as a result of both the macroscopic and microscopic effects of AKI.

  11. The Doppler renal resistive index for early detection of acute kidney injury after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Philippe; Ferre, Fabrice; Labaste, François; Jacques, Loriane; Luzi, Aymeric; Conil, Jean-Marie; Silva, Stein; Minville, Vincent

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is linked to an increase in morbidity and mortality, particularly in elderly populations. This study's aim was to assess the accuracy of the Doppler renal resistive index (RI) in detecting AKI at an early stage after hip fracture surgery. This prospective single-centre study included 48 patients suffering hip fractures requiring surgery and who presented risk factors for the development of AKI. The RI was calculated preoperatively and postoperatively in patients without pain and with haemodynamic and respiratory stability. The occurrence of AKI was determined by measurements of serum creatinine according to AKIN criteria. Twenty-nine patients (60%) developed AKI during the first five postoperative days, without need for dialysis. The RI was increased in patients who developed postoperative AKI 0.68 (0.67-0.71) vs. 0.72 (0.7-0.73); P=0.014 for the preoperative index; and 0.6 (0.58-0.68) vs. 0.74 (0.71-0.76); Pcalculation of the RI during the perioperative periods of hip fracture surgery predicts early and effectively the postoperative occurrence of AKI, thus allowing treatment to be anticipated so as to improve patient prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence, Characteristics and Risk Factors of Acute Kidney Injury among Dengue Patients: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauqeer Hussain Mallhi

    Full Text Available Dengue induced acute kidney injury (AKI imposes heavy burden of illness in terms of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate incidence, characteristics, risk factors and clinical outcomes of AKI among dengue patients.A total 667 dengue patients (2008-2013 were retrospectively evaluated and were stratified into AKI and non-AKI groups by using AKIN criteria. Two groups were compared by using appropriate statistical methods.There were 95 patients (14.2% who had AKI, with AKIN-I, AKIN-II and AKIN-III in 76.8%, 16.8% and 6.4% patients, respectively. Significant differences (P3days was also observed among AKI patients (OR = 1.3, P = 0.044 [corrected].Additionally, 48.4% AKI patients had renal insufficiencies at discharge that were signicantly associated with severe dengue, secondary infection and diabetes mellitus. Overall mortality was 1.2% and all fatal cases had AKI.The incidence of AKI is high at 14.2% among dengue patients, and those with AKI portended significant morbidity, mortality, longer hospital stay and poor renal outcomes. Our findings suggest that AKI in dengue is likely to increase healthcare burden that underscores the need of clinicians' alertness to this highly morbid and potentially fatal complication for optimal prevention and management.

  13. Contrast-induced acute kidney injury: how much contrast is safe?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keaney, John J

    2013-02-14

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) are used in many investigations that a patient may undergo during the course of an in-patient stay. For the vast majority of patients, exposure to CM has no sequelae; however, in a small percentage, it can result in a worsening in renal function termed contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). CI-AKI is one of the leading causes of in-hospital renal dysfunction. It is associated with a significant increase in morbidity and mortality as well as an increased length of hospital stay and costs. Unfortunately, the results of extensive research into pharmacological inventions to prevent CI-AKI remain disappointing. In this article, we briefly outline the pathophysiological mechanisms by which iodinated CM may cause CI-AKI and discuss the evidence for reducing CI-AKI by limiting contrast volumes. In particular, we review the data surrounding the use of contrast volume to glomerular filtration rate ratios, which can be used by clinicians to effectively lower the incidence of CI-AKI in their patients.

  14. Acute kidney injury in severe trauma assessed by RIFLE criteria: a common feature without implications on mortality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa-Pereira Altamiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute kidney injury (AKI has been hard to assess due to the lack of standard definitions. Recently, the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-Stage Kidney (RIFLE classification has been proposed to classify AKI in a number of clinical settings. This study aims to estimate the frequency and levels of severity of AKI and to study its association with patient mortality and length of stay (LOS in a cohort of trauma patients needing intensive care. Methods Between August 2001 and September 2007, 436 trauma patients consecutively admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU, were assessed using the RIFLE criteria. Demographic data, characteristics of injury, and severity of trauma variables were also collected. Results Half of all ICU trauma admissions had AKI, which corresponded to the group of patients with a significantly higher severity of trauma. Among patients with AKI, RIFLE class R (Risk comprised 47%, while I (Injury and F (Failure were, 36% and 17%, respectively. None of these patients required renal replacement therapy. No significant differences were found among these three AKI classes in relation to patient's age, gender, type and mechanism of injury, severity of trauma or mortality. Nevertheless, increasing severity of acute renal injury was associated with a longer ICU stay. Conclusions AKI is a common feature among trauma patients requiring intensive care. Although the development of AKI is associated with an increased LOS it does not appear to influence patient mortality.

  15. Colistin- and polymyxin-induced nephrotoxicity: focus on literature utilizing the RIFLE classification scheme of acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Matthew; Saltiel, Emmanuel

    2014-12-01

    With the reintroduction of colistimethate and polymyxin B into clinical practice, a review of their individual and comparative nephrotoxicity attributes as reported in contemporary literature was undertaken. Given variability in definitions used for acute kidney injury, a particular focus was placed on studies utilizing the Risk-Injury-Failure-Loss-End Stage Kidney Disease (RIFLE) criteria of assessment to provide for standardized comparison. Primary risk factors examined included the influence of dosing and the receipt of concomitant nephrotoxins. The typical severity and time course of renal injury that develops were also analyzed. Nephrotoxicity rates with colistimethate appear to approach 50%, and could be of lower frequency and severity with polymyxin B based on limited literature. Acute kidney injury generally appears to be mild to moderate in magnitude and reversible in nature, though as many as 20% of patients experiencing it may require renal replacement therapy of some duration. The majority of studies showed some relationship with dosing- variably reported as being associated with daily dose or cumulative exposure. Traditional nephrotoxic agents did not appear to confer additional risk individually in the majority of investigations, though receipt of multiple concurrent nephrotoxins did yield a relationship in several. Further studies will be required to better characterize the renal adverse effect profile of these agents, particularly in the case of polymyxin B. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Unique sex- and age-dependent effects in protective pathways in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Ravindra; Fan, Chunlan; Rangarajan, Sunil; Sunil, Bhuvana; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Curtis, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Sex and age influence susceptibility to acute kidney injury (AKI), with young females exhibiting lowest incidence. In these studies, we investigated mechanisms which may underlie the sex/age-based dissimilarities. Cisplatin (Cp)-induced AKI resulted in morphological evidence of injury in all groups. A minimal rise in plasma creatinine (PCr) was seen in Young Females, whereas in Aged Females, PCr rose precipitously. Relative to Young Males, Aged Males showed significantly, but temporally, comparably elevated PCr. Notably, Aged Females showed significantly greater mortality, whereas Young Females exhibited none. Tissue KIM-1 and plasma NGAL were significantly lower in Young Females than all others. IGFBP7 levels were modestly increased in both Young groups. IGFBP7 levels in Aged Females were significantly elevated at baseline relative to Aged Males, and increased linearly through day 3, when these levels were comparable in both Aged groups. Plasma cytokine levels similarly showed a pattern of protective effects preferentially in Young Females. Expression of the drug transporter MATE2 did not explain the sex/age distinctions. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels (~28-kDa species) showed elevation at day 1 in all groups with highest levels seen in Young Males. Exclusively in Young Females, these levels returned to baseline on day 3, suggestive of a more efficient recovery. In aggregate, we demonstrate, for the first time, a distinctive pattern of response to AKI in Young Females relative to males which appears to be significantly altered in aging. These distinctions may offer novel targets to exploit therapeutically in both females and males in the treatment of AKI.

  17. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children's Specialized Hospital during the period between January 2013 and December 2013. A total of 85 full term asphyxiated neonates who were admitted in NICU and diagnosed as HIE were enrolled in this study. with 50 (58.8%) less than 7 days of age, 31(36.5%) between (8-15) days and 4(4.7%) between (16-28) days. Males were found to be more affected than females (58.9% and 41.1%) respectively. Spontaneous vaginal delivery was the mode of delivery in 48(56.4%), assisted vaginal delivery in 14(16.5%), emergency caesarian in 19(22.4%) and elective caesarian section in. Percentage of AKI in those babies was 54.1%(46). With 30(65%) from those had non-oliguric type. Ten babies (21.7%) had serum creatinine between (1.5 - 2mg/dl), 29 (63.04%) between (2 - 3mg/dl) and 7(15.22%) between (3-4mg/ dl). This means that the majority of patients presented in injury stage. Hyperkalemia was found in (37.6%), hyponatremia in (27.1%) and hypocalceamia in (25.8%). Most of the babies with AKI had stage (ii) HIE. All babies were treated conservatively and 4(8.6%) died. In conclusion AKI was observed to be a common complication in asphyxiated neonates.

  18. [Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery: risk factors and outcomes. Proposal for a predictive model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bárbara; Laranjo, Sérgio; Gomes, Inês; Freitas, Isabel; Trigo, Conceição; Fragata, Isabel; Fragata, José; Pinto, Fátima

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the epidemiology and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery in our center, to determine its association with poor short-term outcomes, and to develop a logistic regression model that will predict the risk of AKI for the study population. This single-center, retrospective study included consecutive pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2010 and December 2012. Exclusion criteria were a history of renal disease, dialysis or renal transplantation. Of the 325 patients included, median age three years (1 day-18 years), AKI occurred in 40 (12.3%) on the first postoperative day. Overall mortality was 13 (4%), nine of whom were in the AKI group. AKI was significantly associated with length of intensive care unit stay, length of mechanical ventilation and in-hospital death (p<0.01). Patients' age and postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were included in the logistic regression model as predictor variables. The model accurately predicted AKI in this population, with a maximum combined sensitivity of 82.1% and specificity of 75.4%. AKI is common and is associated with poor short-term outcomes in this setting. Younger age and higher postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were powerful predictors of renal injury in this population. The proposed model could be a useful tool for risk stratification of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute kidney injury: Experience from a state run tertiary care centre in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh L

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AKI (Acute Kidney Injury constitutes approximately 5-7% of hospital admissions and up to 30% of admissions to intensive care units. Large referrals to dialysis units suggest that the condition is more common in India. The study was conducted to identify the etiological factors, co-morbidities and mortality risk in AKI. We conducted prospective cross sectional analysis in 624 adult patients with AKI. The mean age was 48.96±18.3 years. AKI was predominantly encountered in ICU (Intensive Care Unit patients. Diabetes, hypertension, COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, coronary artery disease were the most commonly prevalent co-morbidities. Out of the 624 patients, 460 were admitted with medical causes (73.7%, 124 with obstetrical causes (19.8% and 40 (6.4% with surgical causes. Sepsis was the most common medical cause for AKI accounting for 138(30% of patients. Among pregnancy related AKI majority had puerperal sepsis 65 (52.41% followed by pregnancy induced hypertension in 30(24.1%.There was increase incidence of acute gastroenteritis and parasitic infections during rainy seasons. Hemodialysis was required in 80% (n=499 of patients. The mean duration of hospital stay was 9.41±7.3 days. Multi-organ failure was seen in 106 (16.98% patients. Among them 60 (63.6% patients were expired. Our study highlights the AKI secondary to sepsis followed by pregnancy-related AKI was the most frequent etiological factors for AKI. Multi-organ failure, puerperal sepsis were accounted for the majority of mortality in AKI. AKI among these instances are largely preventable. The timely and aggressive management will certainly reduce the incidence of AKI.

  20. Effect of Access Site Choice on Acute Kidney Injury After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancholy, Maitri S; Skelding, Kimberly; Scott, Thomas; Blankenship, James; Pancholy, Samir B

    2017-12-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with worse outcomes. Consecutive patients undergoing PCI between 2005 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients undergoing PCI using transfemoral access (TFA) were categorized as the TFA Group, and those using transradial access (TRA) were categorized as the TRA Group. Post-PCI AKI was defined as an increase in serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dl or >25% increase from baseline 48 to 72 hours after the procedure. Independent predictors of post-PCI AKI were identified using inverse probability weighted multivariable analysis. There were 7,529 patients included in the analysis, 5,353 (71%) in the TFA Group and 2,176 (29%) in the TRA Group. Patients in the TRA Group were younger, more likely to be female, taller, heavier and have acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and were less likely to have previous coronary artery bypass graft surgery, cardiogenic shock, and intra-aortic balloon pump use and had shorter fluoroscopy time and less contrast use. Bleeding Academic Research Consortium type 3 or 5 was significantly less frequent in the TRA Group. The primary end point of post-PCI AKI was observed significantly less frequently in the TRA Group compared with the TFA Group (1.1% vs 2.4%, p = 0.001). TRA was independently associated with a lower incidence of post-PCI AKI (odds ratio 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.35 to 0.91, p = 0.018). In conclusion, access site choice is an independent predictor of post-PCI AKI with a significant risk reduction associated with TRA compared with TFA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intravascular Administration of Mannitol for Acute Kidney Injury Prevention: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fengying; Zou, Zui; Ye, Chaoyang; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of mannitol administration on acute kidney injury (AKI) prevention remain uncertain, as the results from clinical studies were conflicting. Due to the lack of strong evidence, the KDIGO Guideline for AKI did not propose completely evidence-based recommendations on this issue. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, clinicaltrials.gov and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Randomized controlled trials on adult patients at increased risk of AKI were considered on the condition that they compared the effects of intravascular administration of mannitol plus expansion of intravascular volume with expansion of intravascular volume alone. We calculated pooled risk ratios, numbers needed to treat and mean differences with 95% confidence intervals for dichotomous data and continuous data, respectively. Results Nine trials involving 626 patients were identified. Compared with expansion of intravascular volume alone, mannitol infusion for AKI prevention in high-risk patients can not reduce the serum creatinine level (MD 1.63, 95% CI −6.02 to 9.28). Subgroup analyses demonstrated that serum creatinine level is negatively affected by the use of mannitol in patients undergoing an injection of radiocontrast agents (MD 17.90, 95% CI 8.56 to 27.24). Mannitol administration may reduce the incidence of acute renal failure or the need of dialysis in recipients of renal transplantation (RR 0.34, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.57, NNT 3.03, 95% CI 2.17 to 5.00). But similar effects were not found in patients at high AKI risk, without receiving renal transplantation (RR 0.29, 95% CI 0.01 to 6.60). Conclusions Intravascular administration of mannitol does not convey additional beneficial effects beyond adequate hydration in the patients at increased risk of AKI. For contrast-induced nephropathy, the use of mannitol is even detrimental. Further research evaluating the efficiency of mannitol infusions in the recipients of renal allograft should be undertaken. PMID:24454783

  2. Clinical profile of geriatric acute kidney injury in a tertiary care center from south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshwarappa Mahesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI is high in the elderly, who comprise an ever-growing segment of the population. Elderly patients pose a different set of diagnostic and therapeutic challenge owing to their associated comorbidities. AKI in the elderly is associated with an increased risk of mortality, morbidity, prolonged length of stay, and progression to chronic kidney disease. Data regarding the clinical profile of AKI in the elderly from the South Indian population are limited. Hence, we present this analysis of the etiological and prognostic factors associated with AKI in elderly population from South India. This is a cross-sectional, prospective, observational study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital from Bengaluru, during the period from May 2011 to October 2012. Institutional Ethical Committee clearance was obtained. Informed consents were obtained from patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Elderly patients >60 years of age with features of AKI (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage criteria 1 at admission and those who developed AKI following hospital admission were included in the study. Demographic details, detailed medical history, comorbid conditions, etiological factors, prognostic factors, and outcomes were collected. Statistical analysis was done using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Two hundred patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were enrolled into the study. The mean age was 70.5 years. Fifty-nine percent were males and 41% were females. Peak incidence of AKI was in the age group 60–69 years. Diabetes was seen in 44%, hypertension in 35%, ischemic heart disease in 19%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 12% of cases. Ninety-one percent had AKI at admission, and the rest developed it during hospitalization. The average duration of hospital stay was seven days. Etiological factors for AKI were medical in 87% of the cases, surgical in 11%, and

  3. Hemolysis and Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qi; Nath, Karl A.; Wu, Yiming; Daoud, Tarek M.; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    Deposits of iron and hemosiderosis in the kidney have been observed in diseases with intravascular hemolysis, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and valvular heart diseases and prosthetic heart valve implants. However, the decrease in kidney function associated with hemolysis caused by cardiac valvular disease or prostheses is less well recognized. We present a case of intravascular hemolysis after repair and banding of the mitral valve that resulted in massive renal tubular deposition of hemosiderin with decreased kidney function. We discuss the pathophysiologic process of both acute and chronic tubular injury from heme and heme proteins, including injury to organelles resulting in autophagic vacuoles containing damaged organelles, such as mitochondria. We conclude that tubular injury resulting from heme proteins should be considered as a cause of decreased kidney function in all patients with a cardiac valvular disease or prosthesis. PMID:20605299

  4. Acute Kidney Injury in Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Gevaert, Sofie; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M; Peperstraete, Harlinde; Herck, Ingrid; Decruyenaere, Johan; Hoste, Eric A J

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated the epidemiology and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with cardiorenal syndrome type 1 (CRS-1) and its subgroups: acute heart failure (AHF), acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and after cardiac surgery (CS). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. CRS-1 was defined by AKI (based on RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO), worsening renal failure (WRF) and renal replacement therapy (RRT). We investigated the three most common clinical causes of CRS-1: AHF, ACS and CS. Out of 332 potential papers, 64 were eligible - with AKI used in 41 studies, WRF in 25 and RRT in 20. The occurrence rate of CRS-1, defined by AKI, WRF and RRT, was 25.4, 22.4 and 2.6%, respectively. AHF patients had a higher occurrence rate of CRS-1 compared to ACS and CS patients (AKI: 47.4 vs. 14.9 vs. 22.1%), but RRT was evenly distributed among the types of acute cardiac disease. AKI was associated with an increased mortality rate (risk ratio = 5.14, 95% CI 3.81-6.94; 24 studies and 35,227 patients), a longer length of stay in the intensive care unit [LOSICU] (median duration = 1.37 days, 95% CI 0.41-2.33; 9 studies and 10,758 patients) and a longer LOS in hospital [LOShosp] (median duration = 3.94 days, 95% CI 1.74-6.15; 8 studies and 35,227 patients). Increasing AKI severity was associated with worse outcomes. The impact of CRS-1 defined by AKI on mortality was greatest in CS patients. RRT had an even greater impact compared to AKI (mortality risk ratio = 9.2, median duration of LOSICU = 10.6 days and that of LOShosp = 20.2 days). Of all included patients, almost one quarter developed AKI and approximately 3% needed RRT. AHF patients experienced the highest occurrence rate of AKI, but the impact on mortality was greatest in CS patients.

  5. Cardiorenal syndrome: acute kidney injury secondary to cardiovascular disease and role of protein-bound uraemic toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekawanvijit, Suree; Krum, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and kidney disease are closely interrelated. Disease of one organ can induce dysfunction of the other, ultimately leading to failure of both. Clinical awareness of synergistic adverse clinical outcomes in patients with coexisting CVD and kidney disease or ‘cardiorenal syndrome (CRS)’ has existed. Renal dysfunction, even mild, is a strong independent predictor for poor prognosis in CVD patients. Developing therapeutic interventions targeting acute kidney injury (AKI) has been limited due mainly to lack of effective tools to accurately detect AKI in a timely manner. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and kidney injury molecule-1 have been recently demonstrated to be potential candidate biomarkers in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, further validation of AKI biomarkers is needed in other CVD settings, especially acute decompensated heart failure and acute myocardial infarction where AKI commonly occurs. The other concern with regard to understanding the pathogenesis of renal complications in CVD is that mechanistically oriented studies have been relatively rare. Pre-clininal studies have shown that activation of renal inflammation–fibrosis processes, probably triggered by haemodynamic derangement, underlies CVD-associated renal dysfunction. On the other hand, it is postulated that there still are missing links in the heart–kidney connection in CRS patients who have significant renal dysfunction. At present, non-dialysable protein-bound uraemic toxins (PBUTs) appear to be the main focus in this regard. Evidence of the causal role of PBUTs in CRS has been increasingly demonstrated, mainly focusing on indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (pCS). Both IS and pCS are derived from colonic microbiotic metabolism of dietary amino acids, and hence the colon has become a target of treatment in addition to efforts to improve dialysis techniques for better removal of PBUTs. Novel therapy targeting the site of toxin

  6. Kidney injury after sodium phosphate solution beyond the acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Fernández-Juárez

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: The use of OSP can lead to both acute and chronic renal damage. However, chronic injury was the most common pattern. Both forms of presentation imply a significant and irreversible loss of renal function. Further studies analyzing renal damage secondary to bowel cleaning should consider these two different patterns of injury.

  7. Deficiency of either P-glycoprotein or breast cancer resistance protein protect against acute kidney injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Verfaillie, C.M.; Luttun, A.; Ulloa-Montoya, F.; Menke, A.L.; Bolderen, L.R. van; Woestenenk, R.M.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2010-01-01

    The kidney has a high capacity to regenerate after ischemic injury via several mechanisms, one of which involves bone marrow-derived (stem) cells. The ATP binding cassette transporters, P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein, are determinants for the enriched stem and progenitor cell

  8. Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... The association between the severity of kidney injury and patient mortality was determined for the .... progression of AKI as a dynamic process, progressing through degrees of severity from pRIFLE – R .... fluid therapy and information technology needs‑ the second international consensus conference of the ...

  9. Tolvaptan in the Treatment of Acute Hyponatremia Associated with Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Gopinath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia defined as a plasma sodium concentration of less than 135 mmol/L is a very common disorder, occurring in hospitalized patients. Hyponatremia often results from an increase in circulating arginine vasopressin (AVP levels and/or increased renal sensitivity to AVP, combined with an increased intake of free water. Hyponatremia is subdivided into three groups, depending on clinical history and volume status: hypovolemic, euvolemic, and hypervolemic. Acute symptomatic hyponatremia is usually treated with hypertonic (3% saline. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone hypersecretion (SIADH and hypervolemic hyponatremia caused by heart failure or cirrhosis are treated with vasopressin antagonists (vaptans since they increase plasma sodium (Na2+ concentration via their aquaretic effects (augmentation of free-water clearance. The role of tolvaptan in the treatment of acute hyponatremia and conversion of oliguric to nonoliguric phase of acute tubular necrosis has not been previously described.

  10. Risk of acute kidney injury in patients who undergo coronary angiography and cardiac surgery in close succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Byungsoo; Garcia, Santiago; Mithani, Salima; Tholakanahalli, Venkat; Adabag, Selcuk

    2012-08-01

    Cardiac surgery and coronary angiography are both associated with risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). We hypothesized that the risk of post-operative AKI increases when coronary angiogram and cardiac surgery are performed in close succession, without sufficient time for recovery from the adverse effects of intravenous contrast. We included 2133 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery at the Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center from 2004 to 2010. Acute kidney injury was defined by the AKI network and the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage (RIFLE) criteria. Patients were 66 ± 10 years old. Mean pre-operative creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate were 1.1 ± 0.4 mg/dL and 75 ± 22 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. Cardiac surgery was performed 14 days (range 0-235) after coronary angiography. Acute kidney injury occurred in 680 (32%) patients per AKI network, 390 (18%) patients per RIFLE risk, and 111 (5%) patients per RIFLE injury criteria. Age, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, New York Heart Association class III/IV, cardiopulmonary bypass time, and impaired pre-operative renal function were independent predictors of AKI. However, time between coronary angiogram and cardiac surgery was not a predictor (P = 0.41). AKI occurred in 35% of 433 patients operated within 3 days of coronary angiogram vs. 31% of 1700 patients operated after 3 days (P = 0.17). Results were the same in patients with impaired pre-operative renal function and those with contrast-induced nephropathy. Risk of AKI after cardiac surgery is not influenced by the time between coronary angiogram and cardiac surgery. These results do not support the notion of delaying cardiac surgery for the sole purpose of renal recovery after coronary angiogram.

  11. Raised plasma Robo4 and cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Burke-Gaffney

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction associated with systemic inflammation can contribute to organ injury/failure following cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Roundabout protein 4 (Robo4, an endothelial-expressed transmembrane receptor and regulator of cell activation, is an important inhibitor of endothelial hyper-permeability. We investigated the hypothesis that plasma levels of Robo4 are indicative of organ injury, in particular acute kidney injury (AKI, after cardiac surgery.Patients (n = 32 undergoing elective cardiac surgery with CPB were enrolled, prospectively. Plasma Robo4 concentrations were measured pre-, 2 and 24 h post-operatively, using a commercially available ELISA. Plasma and endothelial markers of inflammation [interleukin (IL -6, -8, -10: von Willibrand factor (vWF and angiopoeitin-2 (Ang-2] and the AKI marker, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL, were also measured by ELISA.Plasma Robo4 increased significantly (p<0.001 from pre-operative levels of 2515 ± 904 pg/ml to 4473 ± 1915 pg/ml, 2 h after surgery; and returned to basal levels (2682 ± 979 pg/ml by 24 h. Plasma cytokines, vWF and NGAL also increased 2 h post-operatively and remained elevated at 24 h. Ang-2 increased 24 h post-operatively, only. There was a positive, significant correlation (r = 0.385, p = 0.0298 between Robo-4 and IL-10, but not other cytokines, 2 h post-operatively. Whilst raised Robo4 did not correlate with indices of lung dysfunction or other biomarkers of endothelial activation; there was a positive, significant correlation between raised (2 h plasma NGAL and Robo4 (r = 0.4322, p = 0.0135. When patients were classed as AKI or non-AKI either using NGAL cut-off of 150 ng/ml, or the AKI Network (AKIN clinical classification; plasma Robo4 was significantly higher (p = 0.0073 and 0.003, respectively in AKI vs. non-AKI patients (NGAL cut-off: 5350 ± 2191 ng/ml, n = 16 vs. 3595 ± 1068 pg/ml, n = 16; AKIN: 6546 pg/ml, IQR 5025

  12. Fas Ligand Has a Greater Impact than TNF-α on Apoptosis and Inflammation in Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Furuichi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Fas ligand (FasL and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α are major pro-apoptotic molecules and also induce inflammation through cytokine and chemokine production. Although precise intracellular mechanisms of action have been reported for each molecule, the differential impact of these molecules on kidney injury in vivo still requires clarification. Methods: We explored the differential impact of FasL and TNF-α upon apoptosis and inflammation in ischemic acute kidney injury using neutralizing anti-FasL antibodies and TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1-deficient mice. Results: TNFR1 deficiency was associated with a lesser anti-inflammatory effect upon leukocyte infiltration and tubular necrosis than treatment with anti-FasL antibody. Furthermore, the number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly reduced in anti-FasL antibody-treated mice, whereas it was only partially diminished in TNFR1-deficient mice. In vitro studies confirmed these findings. FasL administration induced both apoptosis and cytokine/chemokine production from cultured tubular epithelial cells. However, TNF-α had a limited effect upon tubular epithelial cells. Conclusion: In ischemic acute kidney injury, FasL has a greater impact than TNF-α on the apoptosis and inflammatory reaction through cytokine/chemokine production from tubular epithelial cells.

  13. Assessment with unenhanced MRI techniques of renal morphology and hemodynamic changes during acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Zohar; Axelrod, Jonathan H; Heyman, Samuel N; Nachmansson, Nathalie; Abramovitch, Rinat

    2014-01-01

    Changes in renal oxygenation and perfusion have been identified as common pathways to the development and progression of renal disease. Recently, the sensitivity of hemodynamic response imaging (HRI) was demonstrated; this is a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method combined with transient hypercapnia and hyperoxia for the evaluation of renal perfusion and vascular reactivity. The aim of this study was to utilize HRI for the noninvasive evaluation of changes in renal hemodynamics and morphology during acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic renal failures. Renal-HRI maps and true fast imaging with steady-state precession (True-FISP) images were used to evaluate renal perfusion, morphology and corticomedullary differentiation (CMD). MR images were acquired on two mouse models of kidney injury: adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and rhabdomyolysis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Serum urea was measured from these mice in order to determine renal function. Renal-HRI maps revealed a blunted response to hypercapnia and hyperoxia with evolving kidney dysfunction in both models, reflecting hampered renal vascular reactivity and perfusion. True-FISP images showed a high sensitivity to renal morphological changes, with different patterns characterizing each model. Calculated data obtained from HRI and True-FISP during the evolution of renal failure and upon recovery, with and without protective intervention, closely correlated with the degree of renal impairment. This study suggests the potential combined usage of two noninvasive MRI methods, HRI and True-FISP, for the assessment of renal dysfunction without the potential risk associated with contrast-agents administration. HRI may also serve as a research tool in experimental settings, revealing the hemodynamic changes associated with kidney dysfunction.

  14. Blood transfusion improves renal oxygenation and renal function in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ergin, Bulent; Kapucu, Aysegul; Ince, Can

    2016-12-20

    The effects of blood transfusion on renal microcirculation during sepsis are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of blood transfusion on renal microvascular oxygenation and renal function during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Twenty-seven Wistar albino rats were randomized into four groups: a sham group (n = 6), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (n = 7), a LPS group that received fluid resuscitation (n = 7), and a LPS group that received blood transfusion (n = 7). The mean arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal microvascular oxygenation within the kidney cortex were recorded. Acute kidney injury was assessed using the serum creatinine levels, metabolic cost, and histopathological lesions. Nitrosative stress (expression of endothelial (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) within the kidney was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Hemoglobin levels, pH, serum lactate levels, and liver enzymes were measured. Fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion both significantly improved the mean arterial pressure and renal blood flow after LPS infusion. Renal microvascular oxygenation, serum creatinine levels, and tubular damage significantly improved in the LPS group that received blood transfusion compared to the group that received fluids. Moreover, the renal expression of eNOS was markedly suppressed under endotoxin challenge. Blood transfusion, but not fluid resuscitation, was able to restore the renal expression of eNOS. However, there were no significant differences in lactic acidosis or liver function between the two groups. Blood transfusion significantly improved renal function in endotoxemic rats. The specific beneficial effect of blood transfusion on the kidney could have been mediated in part by the improvements in renal microvascular oxygenation and sepsis-induced endothelial dysfunction via the restoration of eNOS expression within the kidney.

  15. Hundred top-cited articles focusing on acute kidney injury: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-Hui; Wang, Sheng-Qi; Xue, Jin-Hua; Liu, Yong; Chen, Ji-Yan; Li, Guo-Feng; He, Peng-Cheng; Tan, Ning

    2016-07-27

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major global health issue, associated with poor short-term and long-term outcomes. Research on AKI is increasing with numerous articles published. However, the quantity and quality of research production in the field of AKI is unclear. To analyse the characteristics of the most cited articles on AKI and to provide information about achievements and developments in AKI, we searched the Science Citation Index Expanded for citations of AKI articles. For the top 100 most frequently cited articles (T100), we evaluated the number of citations, publication time, province of origin, journal, impact factor, topic or subspecialty of the research, and publication type. The T100 articles ranged from a maximum of 1971 citations to a minimum of 215 citations (median 302 citations). T100 articles were published from 1951 to 2011, with most articles published in the 2000s (n=77), especially the 5-year period from 2002 to 2006 (n=51). The publications appeared in 30 journals, predominantly in the general medical journals, led by New England Journal of Medicine (n=17), followed by expert medical journals, led by the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (n=16) and Kidney International (n=16). The majority (83.7%) of T100 articles were published by teams involving ≥3 authors. T100 articles originated from 15 countries, led by the USA (n=81) followed by Italy (n=9). Among the T100 articles, 69 were clinical research, 25 were basic science, 21 were reviews, 5 were meta-analyses and 3 were clinical guidelines. Most clinical articles (55%) included patients with any cause of AKI, followed by the specific causes of contrast-induced AKI (25%) and cardiac surgery-induced AKI (15%). This study provides a historical perspective on the scientific progress on AKI, and highlights areas of research requiring further investigations and developments. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  16. Impact of dialysis practice patterns on outcomes in acute kidney injury in Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Rajeev A.; Nandeesh, Venkatappa; Karuniya, Ramanathan; Rajalakshmi, Sasikumar; Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent advances in dialysis therapy have made an impact on the clinical practice of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in acute kidney injury (AKI) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). We studied the impact of RRT practice changes on outcomes in AKI in ICU over a period of 8 years. Subjects and Methods: AKI patients requiring RRT in ICU referred to a nephrologist during two different periods (period-1: Between May 2004 and May 2007, n = 69; period-2: Between August 2008 and May 2011, n = 93) were studied. The major changes in the dialysis practice during the period-2, compared to period-1 were introduction of prolonged intermittent RRT (PIRRT), early dialysis for metabolic acidosis, early initiation of RRT for anuria and positive fluid balance and use of bicarbonate-based fluids for continuous RRT (CRRT) instead of lactate buffer. The primary study outcome was 28-day hospital mortality. Results: The mean age was 53.8 ± 16.1 years and 72.6% were male. Introduction of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction in utilization of CRRT during period-2 (from 85.5% to 53.7%). The overall mortality was high (68%) but was significantly reduced during period-2 compared to period-1 (59% vs. 79.7%, P = 0.006). Metabolic acidosis but not the mode of RRT, was the significant factor which influenced mortality. Conclusions: Adaption of PIRRT resulted in 37% reduction of utilization of CRRT. The mortality rate was significantly reduced during the period of adaption of PIRRT, possibly due to early initiation of RRT in the latter period for indications such as anuria and metabolic acidosis. PMID:26955212

  17. Malnutrition and inflammation in acute kidney injury due to earthquake-related crush syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yue

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition and inflammation are common and serious complications in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI. However, the profile of these complications in patients with AKI caused by crush syndrome (CS remains unclear. This study describes the clinical characteristics of malnutrition and inflammation in patients with AKI and CS due to the Wenchuan earthquake. Methods One thousand and twelve victims and eighteen healthy adults were recruited to the study. They were divided into five groups: Group A was composed of victims without CS and AKI (904 cases; Group B was composed of patients with CS and AKI who haven't received renal replacement therapy (RRT (57 cases; and Group C was composed of patients with CS and AKI receiving RRT (25 cases; Group D was composed of earthquake victims with AKI but without CS (26 cases; and Group E was composed of 18 healthy adult controls. The C-reactive protein (CRP, prealbumin, transferrin, interleukin-6 and TNF-α were measured and compared between Group E and 18 patients from Group C. Results The results indicate that participants in Group C had the highest level of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and uric acid. Approximately 92% of patients with CS who had RRT were suffering from hypoalbuminemia. The interleukin-6 and CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with CS AKI receiving RRT than in the control group. Patients in Group C received the highest dosages of albumin, plasma or red blood cell transfusions. One patient in Group C died during treatment. Conclusions Malnutrition and inflammation was common in patients with earthquake-related CS and had a negative impact on the prognosis of these subjects. The results of this study indicate that the use of RRT, intensive nutritional supplementation and transfusion alleviated the degree of malnutrition and inflammation in hemodialysis patients with crush syndrome.

  18. Acute kidney injury: effect of hemodialysis membrane on Hgf and recovery of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libetta, Carmelo; Esposito, Pasquale; Sepe, Vincenzo; Rampino, Teresa; Zucchi, Manuela; Canevari, Michele; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with a high mortality and morbidity rate. In this study we investigated whether dialysis membranes influence the recovery of renal function, through the regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). 21 patients were enrolled and assigned to hemodialysis (HD) with cellulose (CE, N=11) versus polymethylacrylate (PMMA, N=10) membranes in alternating order. HGF and IL-1 were measured in serum and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) supernatants collected immediately before the first HD session (T0), at 15 minutes (T15), at 240 minutes (T240) and after the last HD, when renal recovery occurred. Eight healthy volunteers were the controls (CON). Time to renal function recovery was lower in CE than in PMMA patients. Serum HGF in HD patients was significantly higher than in CON. HGF levels were higher in CE than in PMMA patients at T15 (13.4±2.7 vs 8.9±3.0 ng/mL, P=0.004) and T240. At recovery, HGF levels decreased. IL-1 serum levels showed a similar trend (at T15 CE: 20.5±2.9 vs PMMA: 16.9±3.2 pg/mL, P=0.005). HGF release significantly increased in the course of HD, resulting in higher levels in CE than that in PMMA patients. Considering all the patients, basal HGF release negatively correlated with time to renal recovery (r2=0.42, Pprofile in AKI patients, HGF release being higher in patients treated with the CE membrane, in comparison to PMMA. Our results suggest that treatment with CE might improve clinical outcomes, possibly through increased release of HGF. Copyright © 2012 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances in septic acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Su-Young; Kim, Hyunwook; Park, Seohyun; Jhee, Jong Hyun; Yun, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Hyoungnae; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Chang, Tae Ik; Park, Jung Tak; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Lee, Hajeong; Kim, Dong Ki; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electrolyte and mineral disturbances remain a major concern in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT); however, it is not clear whether those imbalances are associated with adverse outcomes in patients with septic acute kidney injury (AKI) undergoing CRRT. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of data from a prospective randomized controlled trial. A total of 210 patients with a mean age of 62.2 years (136 [64.8%] males) in 2 hospitals were enrolled. Levels of sodium, potassium, calcium, and phosphate measured before (0 hour) and 24 hours after CRRT initiation. Before starting CRRT, at least 1 deficiency and excess in electrolytes or minerals were observed in 126 (60.0%) and 188 (67.6%) patients, respectively. The excess in these parameters was greatly improved, whereas hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia became more prevalent at 24 hours after CRRT. However, 1 and 2 or more deficiencies in those parameters at the 2 time points were not associated with mortality. However, during 28 days, 89 (71.2%) deaths occurred in patients with phosphate levels at 0 hour of ≥4.5 mg/dL as compared with 49 (57.6%) in patients with phosphate levels CRRT, hyperphosphatemia conferred a 2.2-fold and 2.6-fold increased risk of 28- and 90-day mortality, respectively. The results remained unaltered when the serum phosphate level was analyzed as a continuous variable. Electrolyte and mineral disturbances are common, and hyperphosphatemia may predict poor prognosis in septic AKI patients undergoing CRRT. PMID:27603344

  20. Leptospirosis-associated acute kidney injury: penicillin at the late stage is still controversial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, E F; Silva, G B; de Abreu, K L S; Mota, R M S; Batista, D V; Rocha, N A; Araújo, S M H A; Libório, A B

    2012-08-01

    Some antimicrobial agents are active in vitro against Leptospiras. The use of penicillins at the late stage of leptospirosis is still controversial. We aimed to evaluate the use of penicillin in patients with leptospirosis-associated acute kidney injury (AKI). A retrospective study was conducted of patients with leptospirosis admitted to two hospitals in Fortaleza city, Brazil, between 1985 and 2008. AKI was defined according to the RIFLE and AKIN classifications. Patients were divided in two groups according to whether they were treated with a penicillin or not. Two hundred and eighty-seven patients were included, with an average age of 36·8±15·6 years and mostly male (80·8%). One hundred and twelve patients (39%) received a penicillin. Patients treated with a penicillin were younger (32±14 years vs. 39±16 years, P=0·0002) and had a shorter hospital stay (8·4±5·0 vs. 11±7·7 days, Ppenicillin group (111±21 vs. 119±22 mmHg, P=0·04). AKI, need of dialysis and renal recovery at the time of hospital discharge were more frequent in patients who did not use a penicillin (Ppenicillin, remains controversial. The main benefit of using penicillin in the present study was a reduction in the length of hospital stay and fewer complications, such as AKI, but i