WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute irradiation

  1. Technical relapsed testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Delgado Gil, M. M.; Ortiz Siedel, M.; Munoz Carmona, D. M.; Gomez-Barcelona, J.

    2011-01-01

    Testicular irradiation in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia presents difficulties in relation to daily positioning, dosimetry for dose homogenization of complex geometry and volume change during irradiation thereof. This can lead to significant deviations from the prescribed doses. In addition, the usual techniques often associated with unnecessary irradiation of pelvic simphysis, anus and perineum. This, in the case of pediatric patients, is of great importance, since doses in the vicinity of 20 Gy are associated with a deviation of bone growth, low testosterone levels around 24 Gy and high rates of generation of second tumors. To overcome these problems we propose a special restraint in prone and non-coplanar irradiation.

  2. Acute effects of gamma irradiation on vascular arterial tone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourlier, V.; Diserbo, M.; Multon, E.; Verdetti, J.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    In rat aortic rings, we showed an increase in arterial tone during irradiation. This effect is acute reversible. This effect is only observed on pre-contracted rings and needs the integrity of vascular endothelium. The molecular mechanism of this effect is discussed. (author)

  3. Acute monocytic leukemia in an irradiated beagle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolle, D.V.; Seed, T.M.; Fritz, T.E.; Lombard, L.S.; Poole, C.M.; Norris, W.P.

    1979-01-01

    A purebred female Beagle dog that had received 2,000 R of protracted whole-body ..gamma..-irradiation from /sup 60/Co when 14 months old had hematologic changes consistent with a myeloproliferative disorder 3 years after the termination of radiation exposure. Peripheral blood and bone marrow findings during the 7-month period before death showed progressive anemia with increased numbers of platelets; immature granulocytes, monocytes and promonocytes. A period of partial remission occurred during which time the peripheral blood was aleukemic, although there was marked thrombocytosis and abnormal erythropoiesis which was evidenced by bizarre circulating nucleated red cells, anisocytosis, poikilocytosis and Howell-Jolly bodies. The dog had a terminal crisis with marked leukocytosis, most cells in the peripheral blood being bizarre monocytes and promonocytes. Tissues obtained at necroscopy showed diffuse as well as focal infiltration of the spleen, liver, lymph nodes, heart, kidney and gastrointestinal wall with immature neoplastic cells resembling monocytes and monocytic precursors. The monocytic differentiation of the invasive cell population was confirmed by morphological, cytochemical, histological, ultrastructural and in vitro cell culture studies.

  4. Acute irradiation injury and autonomic nervous system. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuu, Mutsumi; Sekine, Ichiro; Shichijo, Kazuko; Ito, Masahiro; Ikeda, Yuzi; Matsuzaki, Sumihiro; Zea-Iriate, W.-L.; Kondo, Takahito

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of occurrence of radiation sickness, whole body irradiation of various doses of X-ray was done on male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) whose sympathetic nervous system is functionally activated and on their original male Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and the change of their body weights was examined. Further, changes of blood pressure in rats irradiated at 7.5 Gy, of norepinephrine contents in their gut as a parameter of sympathetic nervous function and of acetylcholine contents as that of parasympathetic nervous function were measured. Histopathological examinations were also performed. SHR died at smaller dose than WKY. The blood pressure as a parameter of systemic sympathetic nervous system varied greatly in SHR. Norepinephrine contents elevated rapidly and greatly in SHR after irradiation and acetylcholine contents rapidly elevated in WKY. Apoptosis was more frequently observed in the intestinal crypt of SHR. Participation of autonomic nervous system was thus shown in the appearance of acute radiation injury and sickness in SHR, which was thought to be a useful model for the investigation. (K.H.)

  5. Synthetic activity of rat blood lymphocytes under acute and continuous gamma-irradiation - fluorescent microspectral study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhova, N.A.; Sergiyevich, L.A.; Aksenova, G.Y.; Karnaukhov, V.N.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of different doses of acute and continuous gamma-irradiation on the synthetic activity of rat blood lymphocytes stained with acridine orange were studied by fluorescent microspectrometry. Male rats were exposed to acute gamma-irradiation with doses of 7.5, 4 and 3 Gy, or to continuous irradiation with dose rates of 14.4, 2.1, 1.1 and 0.43 cGy/day, respectively. The changes of the synthetic activity of blood lymphocytes occurred in three main stages after acute gamma-irradiation and in four stages under continuous irradiation. The stages reflect the processes of depression and activation of the immune system under irradiation. Essential differences between the acute and continuous effects were observed in the first stage. After acute gamma-irradiation, the synthetic activity decreased sharply, indicating the predominant contribution of the damaging effect of irradiation, whereas under continuous irradiation, as a result of the stimulatory effect of low-dose irradiation, the synthetic activity increased during the first stage. (orig.)

  6. Effect of acute irradiation on the exocrine secretion of the pancreas in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corring, T.; Daburon, F.; Remy, J.

    1975-01-01

    Six fistulated pigs have been used in this experiment to study the effect on the exocrine pancreatic secretion of a partial acute irradiation at 600 rd and 800 rd. Whatever the dose, the irradiation provoked an immediate and temporary decrease of the pancreatic secretion. The normal values were reached after the 8th day post-irradiation. Furthermore, a direct effect on the synthesis of amylase and lipase was shown. The synthesis of trypsin and chymotrypsin was scarcely modified by irradiation. (orig.) [de

  7. Cranial irradiation in acute leukemia: dose estimate in the lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, R.W.; Gillin, M.T.; Kun, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    Cranial irradiation for subclinical arachnoid infiltration is standard treatment in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. The incidental dose received by the ocular lens is of potential importance since these children evidence a significant long-term survival rate. Comparison of the lens dose using 6MV and 4MV photon beams and a cobalt unit is presented in terms of ion chamber measurements in a water phantom and thermo-luminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements in a head phantom. TLD measurements on patients treated for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) are examined and used to estimate the dose to the lens. It is demonstrated that the dose to the lens depends strongly on the choice of field margin and on the daily patient set-up. However, using parallel opposed beams in a clinically determined optimal set-up, the dose to the lens is approximately 20 to 30% of the midline central axis dose. By angling the treatment head to eliminate the geometrical divergence of the beam, it is possible to reduce the lens dose to approximately 15% of the midline dose

  8. Effects of central-nervous-system irradiation on neuropsychologic functioning of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, S.S.; Marten, G.W.; Pitner, S.E.; Duenas, D.A.; Powazek, M.

    1975-01-01

    Two neuropsychologic studies were performed to determine the long-term effects of ''prophylactic'' cranial or craniospinal irradiation on the psychologic and neurologic functions of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia. In a prospective study, 34 patients with leukemia who received either craniospinal irradiation or cranial irradiation combined with intrathecal methotrexate were evaluated by standardized neurologic and psychologic examinations before and after irradiation. Their performance was compared with that of 27 controls who received irradiation to parts of the body other than the cranium. In a retrospective study, 11 patients with leukemia receiving prophylactic craniospinal irradiation and 12 controls with the disease not receiving such therapy were followed from the second year after either irradiation or the initial hematologic remission. Eighteen months after irradiation in the prospective study and four years after irradiation in the retrospective study, no noteworthy neurologic or psychologic differences were found between subjects and controls

  9. Study of acute ecotoxicity of Resveratrol in Daphnia similis irradiated and non-irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ormenio, Matheus B.; Mazieiro, Joana S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, José R. Rogero

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol is synthesized by a wide variety of plants in response to ultraviolet (UV) radiation or action of certain pathogens. It is a compound with ability to protect cells from free radicals, responsible for the natural process of cellular aging. It is known that resveratrol has a radiomodifying effect, in addition to the antioxidant potential, anti-inflammatory, against cardiovascular diseases. The increasing use of resveratrol as a function of biological activities has led to concern about toxicity. In the ecotoxicological area, acute ecotoxicity tests are performed on aquatic organisms that lethal effects of certain substances and / or environmental samples. These tests are important in providing critical information for the development and adoption of criteria for improvement environmental quality. In these tests Cladoceras are widely used as test organisms due to their extreme susceptibility to toxicants in the environment and because they are easy to handle in the laboratory. In this study, it was used Daphnia similis to verify the toxic effect of resveratrol on this non-irradiated organism and irradiated with gamma radiation. First, toxicity studies of resveratrol and gamma Daphnia similis, where the lethal dose (LD50) of the 585.43 Gy radiation was determined and the EC50 concentration of resveratrol that causes immobility in 50% of the organisms in the assay, of 6.08 μM. Based on these data, the study will be continued to assess the toxic effect of radiation on organisms that have been exposed prior to resveratrol, i.e, to verify the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol

  10. The acute toxicity of ethanol extract from irradiated Temulawak (curcuma xanthorrizha roxb.) which have anticancer activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermin Katrin; Susanto; Hendig Winarno

    2011-01-01

    Pasteurization of herbs and herbal medicinal products have been carried out by several herbal industries, but information about the safety of irradiated herbal medicine is still a little, even the influence of gamma irradiation for pasteurization purpose on the toxicity of crude Temulawak has never been investigated. The ethanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrizha Roxb. has cytotoxic activity which potential as an anticancer. In this research, the acute toxicity tests were carried out to the ethanol extract from Curcuma xanthorrizha without irradiation and irradiated with doses of 5 and 10 kGy. The acute toxicity tests of ethanol extract were conducted in mice by observing the effect of extracts on animal behavior (pharmacologic profile) after a single dose of test material, the development of animal body weight and death every day for 14 days and observed several organ weights on day 14. Acute toxicity test results after administration of extracts on male and female mice a dose up to 7500 mg/kg body weight (BW) showed that no deaths and no significant toxic effect, so that the ethanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrizha without irradiation and irradiated with doses of 5 and 10 kGy can be declared safe. Thus LD 50 from ethanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrizha without irradiation and irradiated (5 and 10 kGY) in mice was greater than 7500 mg/kg body weight. (author)

  11. [Effects of microwave acute irradiation on biomechanic properties of rabbit tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Li, X; Zhang, F; Yu, X; Liao, X

    1999-06-01

    The rabbit body was irradiated acutely by 2.45 GHz continuous microwave. After irradiation, the values of blood viscosity, blood viscoelasticity, platelet aggregation, erythrocyte fragility, erythrocyte deformation, erythrocyte aggregation, the compressive mechanic property and flexible property of bones were tested. The data of irradiated group and unirradiated group were compared. The results showed: after microwave irradiation, the rabbit blood viscosity and viscoelasticity decreased; the rabbit platelet aggregation rate decreased and the disaggregation rate increased; the erythrocyte fragility increased; the biomechanic properties of bones did not change considerably.

  12. Acute effect of gamma irradiation on the gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, A.; Dorval, E.D.; Rogers, J.E.; O'Connell, L.; Durakovic, A.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the gastric mucosa has been studied in a primate model by evaluating endoscopically the rate of healing of gastric biopsies. Six male rhesus monkeys were subjected to fiberoptic gastroscopies performed under general anesthesia before and after total body exposure to Cobalt-60 (800 rads). Gastric biopsies were taken 3 hours and 2, 7, and 9 days after irradiation and examined using light microscopy. Gastric biopsies were found to heal in 3 days before irradiation; in contrast, they were still present 7 and 9 days after the biopsies in irradiated animals. Microscopic examination of the biopsies taken outside of the ulcer craters did not demonstrate any significant changes of the gastric surface epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that a gastric ulcer develops at the site of each endoscopic biopsy in irradiated monkeys whereas complete healing is observed in non-irradiated animals. The cause of this observation is unclear but it could be due to radiation induced suppression of the mitotic activity and of the cell renewal of gastric surface epithelial cells

  13. Specific features of the hemorrhagic syndrome manifestation under chronic, prolonged and acute irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlashchenko, N.I.; Gorlov, V.G.; Maksimova, E.N.

    1978-01-01

    To make the hemorrhagic syndrome manifest itself, two phenomena are necessary to coincide in time, they are: a fall in the elasticity of the vascular wall and reduction in the amount of thrombocytes in blood. Depending upon the radiation dose, the vascular wall and the thrombocytic function may be either simultaneously impaired after acute exposure) or dissociated (following prolonged irradiation). Chronic irradiation at small (subliminal) dose rates fails to induce hemorrhagic disorders and death of rats caused by pathologic hemophilia

  14. Life span of animals under acute and chronic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapol'skaya, N.A.; Fedorova, A.V.; Borisova, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The study has been designed to see to what extent a single and long-term external and internal irradiations shorten the life span of animals. LDsub(50/30) for certain radionuclides whose absorbed doses show different spatiotemporal distributions are considered. It has been found that as far as the average life span is concerned, 137 Cs and 90 Sr have approximately the same effect whether they enter the body on a single occasion or repeatedly. With chronic total-body external gamma-irradiation, the decrease in life span is 5 times smaller than than with single-occasion irradiation. The main reason for the observed differences are found to be differences in the rates with which the absorbed doses are formed

  15. Pathology of breast cancer in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoretsky, P.M.; Woodard, E.; Bonfiglio, T.A.; Hempelmann, L.H.; Morse, I.P.

    1980-01-01

    The gross and microscopic pathology of breast cancers in women irradiated for acute postpartum mastitis was compared to the breast cancers found in the sisters of the irradiated women. In considering the lesions in the two populations, the size, location, histologic type, histologic grade, inflammatory response, lymphatic and blood vascular invasion, nipple involvement, axillary lymph node metastases, and menopausal status at the time of diagnosis were statistically indistinguishable. The only parameter that was different in the two populations was the desmoplastic response to the malignant lesion. The control population had more marked fibrosis within the cancers compared with the irradiated women

  16. The effect of acute irradiation on the development of limbs in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajtova, V.; Horak, J.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of acute irradiation on the limb development in sheep was studied. The pelvic area of a pregnant sheep was irradiated locally on the 28th, 29th and 30th days after fertilization. The fetus was removed on the 15th day after irradiation and treated histologically. A single exposure with 250 R (higher exposures killed the fetus) was found to cease the limb development on the 28th day after irradiation (the critical period of the sheep limb development), to induce persistence of the intermedial ray on the 29th and 30th days, an early disappearance of the side finger rays, an early disappearance, fusion or deformation of some carpal and tarsal elements on the 29th and the 30th days after irradiation. (author)

  17. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  18. Usage of low-power laser irradiation in the complex treatment of acute intestinal infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostukhina, Alla I.; Shuldyakov, Andrey A.; Brill, Gregory E.; Zaytseva, Irina A.

    2002-07-01

    46 children with acute intestinal infections were studied. The development of pathological process was associated with the activation of lipid peroxidation, the decrease of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in erythrocytes as well as with the fall of vitamin E content in blood plasma. Vitamin E and IR laser irradiation use in complex treatment showed the best therapeutic effect.

  19. The effect of central nervous system involvement and irradiation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskinen, Mervi; Oskarsson, Trausti; Levinsen, Mette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system irradiation (CNS-RT) has played a central role in the cure of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but due to the risk of long-term toxicity, it is now considered a less-favorable method of CNS-directed therapy. PROCEDURES: Retrospectively, we estimated the effect...

  20. A radiomodifying effect of acute hypoxia on neutron-irradiated mice and dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverdlov, A.G.; Kalmykova, G.I.; Timoshenko, S.I.; Nikanorova, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    Anoxia increased the survival of neutron irradiated mice with DMF=1.66. As to haemopoietic stem cells neutron irradiated in vivo, DMF was 1.8. With X-irradiation DMF was 2.49 and 2.94, respectively. Anoxia decreased the damage of the intestinal mucous membrane after a whole-body neutron irradiation with a dose 3.0 Gy. A protective effect of acute hypoxia was demonstrated on dogs exposed to fast neutrons (4.0 Gy). Breathing of 10% gas hypoxic mixture protected more than half of the exposed animals from death and provided the development of a light form of radiation sickness instead on a serious one. (orig.) [de

  1. Tentative therapy of acute abdominal irradiations of pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.

    1977-01-01

    The anatomical and physiological considerations that make pig an interesting experimental model for radiobiological investigations are first reviewed. The anatomo- and physico-pathological bases of therapy acute abdominal exposure are stated, especially the kinetics and limits of intestinal recovery at various doses. A therapeutic procedure is given and the experimental results on reanimation (parenteral alimentation), re-nutrition (continuous enteral infusion) and intestine grafts are presented [fr

  2. Acute effects of irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, P.; Scanff, P.; Joubert, C.; Vergnet, M.; Grison, S.

    1997-01-01

    Several reports on irradiation damages to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphologic changes but give few informations on pancreatic exocrine function. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of a whole body gamma irradiation on the volume and enzyme activities of the pancreatic juice. The volume of pancreatic juice daily secreted decreased one day after irradiation (-40%, p < 0.01) and remained lower that the control value all over the experimental period (-65%, p < 0.01). Same response was observed for the total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice but significant decrease was observed only the fourth and the fifth days after irradiation. Therefore, concentration of total protein secreted in the pancreatic juice was not altered all over the experimental period. Total activities of proteolytic enzymes, lipase and amylase led to decrease on day after irradiation and except for trypsin, the attenuated activity became significant from the third day after exposure. On the other hand, specific activities of the proteolytic enzymes and amylase did not show marked modifications after irradiation, whereas lipase specific activity was decreased. In conclusion, a whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. These modifications may, in part, contribute to the malabsorption of nutrients and these acute effects may be due to some modifications in the regulation of the exocrine pancreatic secretion

  3. Effects of acute irradiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of acute irradiation on the reproductive success of a relatively low-fecundity species were investigated by exposing pairs of female and male polychaete worms (Neanthes arenaceodentata) to either no radiation (controls) or 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, 10 or 50 Gy of acute irradiation (5 Gy min -1 ) at the time when oocytes were visible in the female. The broods from the pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on the number in the brood, the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and the number of embryos that were living, dying and dead. Developing gametes of N. arenaceodentata appeared to be sensitive to acute irradiation. There was a significant reduction in the percentage of live embryos in the broods from pairs receiving doses as low as 0.5 Gy, which is lower than the lowest dose at which effects in invertebrates have been reported previously. This was most likely due to the induction of lethal mutations in the developing gametes, which affected the survival of embryos in early stages of life. Except for those pairs receiving 10 or 50 Gy, there was no evidence of decreased fertility or fecundity or of reduced fertilization success; the number of embryos in the broods from only these irradiated groups was significantly different from the controls. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Effect of Acute and Chronic Gamma Irradiation on in vitro Growth of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norazlina Noordin; Rusli Ibrahim; Nur Hidayah Mohd Sajahan; Salmah Moosa; Sobri Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a perennial herb that belongs to the family of Asteraceae. It is a natural sweetener plant known as sweet leaf, which is estimated to be 300 times sweeter than cane sugar. In this study, micropropagation and in vitro mutagenesis of this natural herb was successfully conducted. It was found that shoot tips on MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l Kinetin showed the highest shoot induction and multiplication after 3 weeks of culture. Radiosensitivity test was conducted to identify the LD50 for in vitro stevia shoots and to select effective doses to be used for the in vitro mutagenesis. Shoot tips were irradiated with acute and chronic gamma radiation at 0, 10.00, 20.00, 30.00, 40.00, 60.00, and 80.00 Gy. At 60 Gy and 80 Gy, the shoot tips demonstrated 0 % survival, all were killed. LD 50 for stevia (the dose that killed 50 % of the irradiated explants) was at 29 Gy. In this study, LD 50 for the stevia (the dose that killed 50 % of the irradiated explants) was at 29 Gy for acute irradiation and was at 45 Gy for chronic irradiation. The effective doses were selected at 10, 20 and 30 Gy. These three selected doses were applied for the in vitro mutagenesis of the stevia shoots. (author)

  5. Acute irradiation and muscular fibrosis. Development and characteristics in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaix, J.L.; Daburon, F.; Remy, J.

    1989-01-01

    This study was performed in an experimental porcin model of acute local irradiation chosen to simulate human accidents. It enabled to determine the development and the physiopathological characteristics of the fibrous tissue which developed in skeletal muscle. In the first month after irradiation the strong inflammatory reaction initiating the radiation induced fibrosis was characterized by edema as visualized on NMR imaging and by acute phase reactant protein changes, associated with elevations of local and general temperatures in irradiated animals. At the margin of the irradiated tissue, atypical fibroblasts isolated among collagen bundles or bunched in nodullary reinforcement were seen associated with intense capillary neogenesis. Several months after irradiation normal skeletal muscle was replaced by atrophic fibrosis delimited by an inflammatory perifibrotic tissue. The muscular fibrosis was characterized by a high atypical fibroblasts density and by an inflammatory distribution pattern of collagen types I, III, IV, laminin, fibronectin and fibrinogen as visualized by immunohistochemical methods. Biochemical results showed an increase in collagen content and synthesis in fibrotic tissue whereas perifibrotic zone synthesized more non collagenous proteins compared with the normal muscle. The contributions of granulation tissue, cellular mediators and inhibition of muscular regeneration to maintain the atrophic character of the muscular radiation induced fibrosis are discussed [fr

  6. Acute effects of whole body gamma irradiation on exocrine pancreatic secretion in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, P.; Scanff, P.; Joubert, C.; Vergnet, M.; Grison, S.; Griffiths, N.

    2004-01-01

    Reports on radiation damage to the pancreas deal essentially with long-term morphological changes with few data on pancreatic exocrine function. The aim of this work was to study the acute effects of whole body irradiation on volume and enzyme activities in the pancreatic juice. A whole body gamma irradiation (6 Gy) was investigated in pigs with continuous sampling of pancreatic juice before and after exposure via an indwelling catheter in the pancreatic duct. For each sample collected, total protein concentration and enzyme activities of trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, lipase and amylase were determined. Pancreatic juice volume was monitored during all periods of collection. The volume of pancreatic juice secreted daily decreased one day after irradiation and remained lower than the control values over the experimental period. Total proteins secreted in the pancreatic juice and total activities of pancreatic enzymes were reduced similarly. On the other hand, only specific activities of elastase and lipase were affected by irradiation. Whole body gamma irradiation resulted in a rapid and marked decrease of exocrine pancreatic secretion, in terms of volume as well as secreted enzymes. This may contribute in part to the intestinal manifestations of the acute and/or late radiation syndrome. (author)

  7. Radioprotective effect of cimitidine on acutely irradiated mice survival and hematopoietic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-rong WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the radioprotective effect of cimetidine on survival rate and hematopoietic system in acutely irradiated mice. Methods The total body irradiation doses were 6.0Gy and 8.0Gy respectively at 1.01Gy/min rate. Sixty healthy male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into control group, model group, positive-drug (523 group and cimetidine groups (33.3mg/kg, 100mg/kg and 300mg/kg. Each group had ten mice. The mice were given intragastric administration of cimetidine for 6d before the irradiation in cimetidine groups, and 523 was administered before irradiation once a day for one day in 523 group, and at 5h after irradiation, was given again. The 30d survival rate after 8.0Gy irradiation was recorded. The peripheral blood cells, bone marrow DNA content and frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (fMNPCE were determined 30d after 6.0Gy irradiation. Results After 8.0Gy irradiation, all the mice died on 21th day in model control group. The survival rates in cimetidine groups were 50%, 20% and 30%, respectively. After 6.0Gy irradiation on 30th day, compared with control group, the peripheral white blood cells (WBC and bone marrow DNA content were decreased significantly (P<0.01, P<0.05 in model group, and fMNPCE was increased significantly (P<0.05. Compared with model group, WBC was significantly increased in 300mg/kg cimetidine group (P<0.01. In cimetidine groups, the bone marrow DNA content was increased significantly after irradiation (P<0.01 or P<0.05, and the fMNPCE was decreased significantly (P<0.01 or P<0.05and tended towards normal. Conclusion Cimetidine could improve 30d survival rate of acutely irradiated mice and has good protective effect on hematopoietic system. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.01.12

  8. Growth in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with and without prophylactic cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moell, C.; Garwicz, S.; Marky, L.; Melander, L.; Karlberg, J.

    1988-01-01

    Growth and weight gain were studied longitudinally over a period of four years in thirty-nine children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The children were divided into two groups according to treatment. Twenty-eight children were given prophylactic cranial irradiation and eleven children were treated without such irradiation. The duration of cytostatic treatment was three years in all cases. Average growth during the first two years was similar in the two groups, and the standard deviation scores (SDS) were below average. The rate of growth during the fourth year was significantly higher among those children who had not received cranial irradiation. After four years the average attained height had declined 0.5 SD for children treated with cranial irradiation and 0.2 SD for children without such treatment. Attained weight after four years had increased 0.4 SD more among those children who had not received irradiation. The results suggest that prophylactic cranial irradiation is responsible for the greater part of the prepubertal growth inhibition in these children. (authors)

  9. An Acute Transverse Myelitis Attack after Total Body Irradiation: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Keklik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation (TBI combined with chemotherapy is widely used as a pretreatment regimen of bone marrow transplantation (BMT in hematologic disorders. Late complications related to TBI as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been revealed. Acute transverse myelitis (ATM is a neurological syndrome characterized by disorder of motor, sensorial, and autonomic nerves, and tracts at medulla spinalis, which is resulted from involvement of spinal cord. In this paper, we presented an ATM attack developed after TBI in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL as it is a rarely seen case.

  10. Irradiation in the setting of collagen vascular disease: acute and late toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Monica; Powell, Simon

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Based upon reports of greater toxicity from radiation therapy, collagen vascular diseases have been considered a contraindication to irradiation. We assessed the acute and late complication rate of radiation therapy in patients with collagen vascular disease. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was undertaken to analyze acute and late toxicity in the 96 patients with documented collagen vascular disease (CVD) who were irradiated between 1960 and 1995. The majority had rheumatoid arthritis (55); 14 had systemic lupus erythematosus; 7 polymyositis or dermatomyositis; 7 ankylosing spondylitis; 4 scleroderma; 2 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis; and the remainder various mixed connective tissue disorders. Mean follow up of survivors was 6.3 years from time of irradiation. Treatment was megavoltage in all but 8 cases. Doses ranged from 6 to 70Gy, with an average of 41.7Gy. Treatment of 32 sites was combined with chemotherapy, 15 concurrent with irradiation. Surgery was involved in the treatment of 46 sites. Toxicity was scored using the RTOG acute and the RTOG/EORTC Late Effects on Normal Tissues radiation morbidity scoring scales. Results: Overall, 127 sites were evaluable in 96 patients. Significant (grade 3 or higher) acute complications were seen in 15 of 127 (11.8%) of irradiated sites. The actuarial incidence of significant late complications at 5 and 10 years was 16% and 24%, respectively. There was a single in-field sarcoma. 2 patients had treatment-related deaths, one from leukencephalopathy and the other from postoperative wound infection. Univariate analysis revealed late effects to be more severe in those receiving combined modality treatment (p=.03), and in those with significant acute reactions (p=.0001). Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had less severe late effects than those with other collagen vascular diseases (6% vs 37% at 5 years, p=.0001). We did not demonstrate a difference in late effects according to radiation dose, timing

  11. Acute and long-term effects of irradiation on pine (Pinus silvestris) strands post-Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, N P; Kuchma, N D; Askbrant, S; Pasternak, P S; Musica, V V

    1994-12-11

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the viability of pine stands after the fallout from the damaged nuclear energy plant at Chernobyl (ChNPP) was shown within the territory of the 10-km zone. During the period 1986-1991, irradiated and damaged forest stands, so-called 'red forest', located in this area were systematically classified by observation. Mortality rate, re-establishment, development of tree canopies, reproduction anomalies and stand viability were shown to be dependent on absorbed irradiation dose, on the age of the stand and on forest composition. For pine stands in the acutely affected zone, doses of more than 60 Gy resulted in a massive mortality and no regeneration of pine trees since 1987. The injured trees had burned or had dried-up. The drying process was accelerated by a massive production of pathogenic insects invading the dying trees. Specifically, irradiation doses of 10-60 Gy, 1-10 Gy and 0.1-1 Gy caused high, medium and low injury to the forest stands, respectively. Doses of less than 0.1 Gy did not cause any visible damage to the trees. In 1987, repair processes were displayed by the tree canopies and practically the entire viability of the forest stands had recovered except for trees in the acute and highly affected zones. The young forest was reestablished in the same place as the perished trees and new pine saplings were planted on the reclaimed areas.

  12. Acute and long-term effects of irradiation on pine (Pinus silvestris) stands post-Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.P.; Kuchma, N.D. (Department of Radiology and Land Restoration, Pripyat Research and Industrial Association, Chernobyl (Ukraine)); Askbrant, S. (National Radiation Protection Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)); Pasternak, P.S.; Musica, V.V. (Lyes Research and Industrial Association, Kharykov (Ukraine))

    1994-10-14

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the viability of pine stands after the fallout from the damaged nuclear energy plant at Chernobyl (ChNPP) was shown within the territory of the 10-km zone. During the period 1986-1991, irradiated and damaged forest stands, so-called 'red forest', located in this area were systematically classified by observation. Mortality rate, re-establishment, development of tree canopies, reproduction anomalies and stand viability were shown to be dependent on absorbed irradiation dose, on the age of the stand and on forest composition. For pine stands in the acutely affected zone, doses of more than 60 Gy resulted in a massive mortality and no regeneration of pine trees since 1987. The injured trees had burned or had dried-up. The drying process was accelerated by a massive production of pathogenic insects invading the dying trees. Specifically, irradiation doses of 10-60 Gy, 1-10 Gy and 0.1-1 Gy caused high, medium and low injury to the forest stands, respectively. Doses of less than 0.1 Gy did not cause any visible damage to the trees. In 1987, repair processes were displayed by the tree canopies and practically the entire viability of the forest stands had recovered except for trees in the acute and highly affected zones. The young forest was reestablished in the same place as the perished trees and new pine saplings were planted on the reclaimed areas.

  13. Acute and long-term effects of irradiation on pine (Pinus silvestris) stands post-Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, N.P.; Kuchma, N.D.; Askbrant, S.; Pasternak, P.S.; Musica, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ionizing irradiation on the viability of pine stands after the fallout from the damaged nuclear energy plant at Chernobyl (ChNPP) was shown within the territory of the 10-km zone. During the period 1986-1991, irradiated and damaged forest stands, so-called 'red forest', located in this area were systematically classified by observation. Mortality rate, re-establishment, development of tree canopies, reproduction anomalies and stand viability were shown to be dependent on absorbed irradiation dose, on the age of the stand and on forest composition. For pine stands in the acutely affected zone, doses of more than 60 Gy resulted in a massive mortality and no regeneration of pine trees since 1987. The injured trees had burned or had dried-up. The drying process was accelerated by a massive production of pathogenic insects invading the dying trees. Specifically, irradiation doses of 10-60 Gy, 1-10 Gy and 0.1-1 Gy caused high, medium and low injury to the forest stands, respectively. Doses of less than 0.1 Gy did not cause any visible damage to the trees. In 1987, repair processes were displayed by the tree canopies and practically the entire viability of the forest stands had recovered except for trees in the acute and highly affected zones. The young forest was reestablished in the same place as the perished trees and new pine saplings were planted on the reclaimed areas

  14. An investigation into the management of acute skin reactions from tangential breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, M.A.; Haycocks, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This research examined the acute skin reaction of two consecutive groups receiving tangetial breast irradiation for carcinoma of the breast. The first group used the traditional skin care advice of using warm water only within the treatment area, while the second group continued with their normal skin care regime. Data was collected on the physical manifestations of the acute reaction, medical history, the use of concurrent cytotoxic agents, treatment parameters and skin care products used. Statistical analysis using the T-test method showed no difference in the skin reaction between the two groups. The investigation has lead to a change of policy in the management of acute breast reactions. Patients receiving radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall can now use their routine skin care products with no adverse effect on skin reactions. (author)

  15. DNA damage focus analysis in blood samples of minipigs reveals acute partial body irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamkowski

    Full Text Available Radiation accidents frequently involve acute high dose partial body irradiation leading to victims with radiation sickness and cutaneous radiation syndrome that implements radiation-induced cell death. Cells that are not lethally hit seek to repair ionizing radiation (IR induced damage, albeit at the expense of an increased risk of mutation and tumor formation due to misrepair of IR-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs. The response to DNA damage includes phosphorylation of histone H2AX in the vicinity of DSBs, creating foci in the nucleus whose enumeration can serve as a radiation biodosimeter. Here, we investigated γH2AX and DNA repair foci in peripheral blood lymphocytes of Göttingen minipigs that experienced acute partial body irradiation (PBI with 49 Gy (± 6% Co-60 γ-rays of the upper lumbar region. Blood samples taken 4, 24 and 168 hours post PBI were subjected to γ-H2AX, 53BP1 and MRE11 focus enumeration. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL of 49 Gy partial body irradiated minipigs were found to display 1-8 DNA damage foci/cell. These PBL values significantly deceed the high foci numbers observed in keratinocyte nuclei of the directly γ-irradiated minipig skin regions, indicating a limited resident time of PBL in the exposed tissue volume. Nonetheless, PBL samples obtained 4 h post IR in average contained 2.2% of cells displaying a pan-γH2AX signal, suggesting that these received a higher IR dose. Moreover, dispersion analysis indicated partial body irradiation for all 13 minipigs at 4 h post IR. While dose reconstruction using γH2AX DNA repair foci in lymphocytes after in vivo PBI represents a challenge, the DNA damage focus assay may serve as a rapid, first line indicator of radiation exposure. The occurrence of PBLs with pan-γH2AX staining and of cells with relatively high foci numbers that skew a Poisson distribution may be taken as indicator of acute high dose partial body irradiation, particularly when samples are available

  16. Low Doses of Oxygen Ion Irradiation Cause Acute Damage to Hematopoietic Cells in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Chang

    Full Text Available One of the major health risks to astronauts is radiation on long-duration space missions. Space radiation from sun and galactic cosmic rays consists primarily of 85% protons, 14% helium nuclei and 1% high-energy high-charge (HZE particles, such as oxygen (16O, carbon, silicon, and iron ions. HZE particles exhibit dense linear tracks of ionization associated with clustered DNA damage and often high relative biological effectiveness (RBE. Therefore, new knowledge of risks from HZE particle exposures must be obtained. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of low doses of 16O irradiation on the hematopoietic system. Specifically, we exposed C57BL/6J mice to 0.1, 0.25 and 1.0 Gy whole body 16O (600 MeV/n irradiation and examined the effects on peripheral blood (PB cells, and bone marrow (BM hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs at two weeks after the exposure. The results showed that the numbers of white blood cells, lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets were significantly decreased in PB after exposure to 1.0 Gy, but not to 0.1 or 0.25 Gy. However, both the frequency and number of HPCs and HSCs were reduced in a radiation dose-dependent manner in comparison to un-irradiated controls. Furthermore, HPCs and HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant reduction in clonogenic function determined by the colony-forming and cobblestone area-forming cell assays. These acute adverse effects of 16O irradiation on HSCs coincided with an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, enhanced cell cycle entry of quiescent HSCs, and increased DNA damage. However, none of the 16O exposures induced apoptosis in HSCs. These data suggest that exposure to low doses of 16O irradiation induces acute BM injury in a dose-dependent manner primarily via increasing ROS production, cell cycling, and DNA damage in HSCs. This finding may aid in developing novel strategies in the protection of the

  17. Technical relapsed testicular irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia; Tecnica de irradiacion para testiculos en recidiva de leucemia linfoblastica aguda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez Miranda, S.; Delgado Gil, M. M.; Ortiz Siedel, M.; Munoz Carmona, D. M.; Gomez-Barcelona, J.

    2011-07-01

    Testicular irradiation in children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia presents difficulties in relation to daily positioning, dosimetry for dose homogenization of complex geometry and volume change during irradiation thereof. This can lead to significant deviations from the prescribed doses. In addition, the usual techniques often associated with unnecessary irradiation of pelvic simphysis, anus and perineum. This, in the case of pediatric patients, is of great importance, since doses in the vicinity of 20 Gy are associated with a deviation of bone growth, low testosterone levels around 24 Gy and high rates of generation of second tumors. To overcome these problems we propose a special restraint in prone and non-coplanar irradiation.

  18. Plasmatic and thermographic consequences of local acute irradiation; a qualitative and quantitative analysis in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaix, J.L; Daburon, F.; Crechet, F.; Tricaud, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Acute phase reactant proteins associated with thermographic measurements and enzymatic activity assays in plasma were carried out on 39 pigs, following local exposure of the thigh to a collimated source of iridium 192 at doses ranging between 30 and 84 Gy (2 cm depth dose). The inflammatory response after irradiation, from day 1 to day 30 was accompanied by plasma protein changes associated with an elevation of local and general temperatures in irradiated animals. Degenerative processes in muscle led to an increase of plasmatic creatine kinase and lactate-dehydrogenase. Results were developed qualitatively (distribution pattern of proteins, thermographic measurements, enzymatic activities and clinical evolution of the lesions) and qualitatively (plasma level of creatine kinase versus applied radiation doses and pharmalogical treatments) [fr

  19. Brain sarcoma of meningeal origin after cranial irradiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiberin, P.; Maor, E.; Zaizov, R.; Cohen, I.J.; Hirsch, M.; Yosefovich, T.; Ronen, J.; Goldstein, J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report their experience with an unusual case of intracerebral sarcoma of meningeal cell origin in an 8 1/2-year-old girl. This tumor occurred 6 1/2 years after cranial irradiation at relatively low dosage (2200 rads) had been delivered to the head in the course of a multimodality treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor recurred approximately 10 months after the first surgical intervention. Macroscopic total excision of the recurrent growth followed by whole-brain irradiation (4500 rads) failed to eradicate it completely and local recurrence prompted reoperation 18 months later. This complication of treatment in long-term childhood leukemia survivors is briefly discussed, as well as the pathology of meningeal sarcomas

  20. Mutation induction in chrysanthemum through in vitro acute and chronic irradiations with gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamseejan, Siranut; Jompuk, Peeranuch [Kasetsart Univ., Faculty of Science, Bangkok (Thailand); Deeseepan, Surin [Maejo Univ., Office of Agricultural Research and Extension, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    In Vitro culture of chrysanthemum variety 'Reagan Dark Splendid' was established using explants from axillary buds and ray florets. Shoots produced in vitro culture from axillary buds were irradiated with acute gamma rays of 30 Gy. While multiple shoots produced from in vitro culture of ray florets were irradiated with chronic gamma rays of 112 and 140 Gy. The irradiated shoots were then multiplied two times by single-node cuttings from M{sub 1}V{sub 1} to M{sub 1}V{sub 3}. Controls and irradiated shoots were rooted, transferred to soil in the greenhouse, and finally transplanted in the field. Observation and measurement were made at flowering time for height, number of nodes per plant and flower colour mutation frequency. Flower colour mutation frequency among the irradiated plants with 30, 112 and 140 Gy was 8.2, 9.3 and 15.3% respectively. Eleven variants were selected among the M{sub 1}V{sub 3} plants from 30 Gy dose treatment. Selected variants had flower colour varying from red, red-purple and yellow-orange. Nine variants were selected among the M{sub 1}V{sub 3} plants from 112 Gy dose treatment. Selected variants had flower colour varying from red, red-purple, purple and yellow-orange. Sixteen variants were selected from 140 Gy dose treatment. They had flower colour varying from red-purple, purple, orange-red, yellow-orange and yellow. These variants were multiplied through in vitro culture as well as by conventional cutting. They will be evaluated for their performance, stability and uniformity in the field, and for market value during the next planting season. (author)

  1. Safety evaluation of the ethyl acetate extract on irradiated tea parasite: Acute toxicity study on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendig Winarno

    2011-01-01

    Many studies of the pharmacological efficacy of tea parasite and the use of ionizing radiation for decontamination of microbes and extending shelf life have been reported, but there is no information on its safety, such as the acute toxicity. In this study, the acute toxicity of two ethyl acetate extracts from unirradiated and irradiated (irradiation dose of 10 kGy) tea parasites Scurrula atropurpurea on Swiss Webster mice have been examined. The observation was done after the treatment of a single oral dose of ethyl acetate extract in various dose groups, i.e.: control (0 g/kg of mice body weight), D1 (0.625 g/kg), D2 (1.25 g/kg), D3 (2.5 g/kg) D4 (5 g/kg), D5 (10 g/kg) by observing the effect on behavioral response (pharmacological profile), the body weight gains and mortality until the day 14 th . At the last day, the observation of vital organs has also been done. The result showed that no acute toxicity was found in mice treated with a single oral dose of ethyl acetate extract from unirradiated tea parasite and irradiated tea parasite at the dose of 10 kGy. At the dose up to 10 g/kg (equivalent to 77.6 g of extract which administered to human), the normal body weight gains were observed in mice of all dose groups, no mice deaths in any of the dose groups, and no significant change (p > 0.05) in organ weights relative to the body weight i.e.: liver, spleen, kidneys, lung, heart, testes and seminal vesicle (for male), and ovaries and uterus (for female). The approximate lethal doses for male and female mice were determined to be higher than 10 g/kg of mice body weight. It is suggested that the treatment of ethyl acetate extract from unirradiated and irradiated tea parasites until dose up to 10 g/kg of mice body weight was still safe. (author)

  2. Effects of acute {gamma}-irradiation on community structure of the aquatic microbial microcosm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuma, Shoichi, E-mail: fuma@nirs.go.j [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Takeda, Hiroshi [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao [Regulatory Sciences Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shikano, Shuichi [Center for Northeast Asian Studies, Tohoku University, 41 Kawauchi, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8576 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki [Marine Environment Section, Water and Soil Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Inamori, Yuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    To characterise indirect effects of ionising radiation on aquatic microbial communities, effects of acute {gamma}-irradiation were investigated in a microcosm consisting of populations of green algae (Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) and a blue-green alga (Tolypothrix sp.) as producer; a ciliate protozoan (Cyclidium glaucoma), rotifers (Lecane sp. and Philodina sp.) and an oligochaete (Aeolosoma hemprichi) as consumer; and more than four species of bacteria as decomposers. Population changes in the constituent organisms were observed over 160 days after irradiation. Prokaryotic community structure was also examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA. Principle response curve analysis revealed that the populations of the microcosm as a whole were not significantly affected at 100 Gy while they were adversely affected at 500-5000 Gy in a dose-dependent manner. However, some effects on each population, including each bacterial population detected by DGGE, did not depend on radiation doses, and some populations in the irradiated microcosm were larger than those of the control. These unexpected results are regarded as indirect effects through interspecies interactions, and possible mechanisms are proposed originating from population changes in other organisms co-existing in the microcosm. For example, some indirect effects on consumers and decomposers likely arose from interspecies competition within each trophic level. It is also likely that prey-predator relationships between producers and consumers caused some indirect effects on producers.

  3. Acute tolerance of hyperfractionated accelerated total body irradiation; Akuttoleranz bei der hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten Ganzkoerperbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latz, D. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Klinische Radiologie; Schraube, P. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Klinische Radiologie; Wannenmacher, M. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Klinische Radiologie

    1996-12-01

    Background: Acute side effects of total body irradiation lead to intense molestations of the patients. Therefore, it is desirable to take measures to reduce these side effects. In a retrospective study the frequency on acute side effects of a hyperfractionated accelerated total body irradiation was assessed and compared to frequencies of other exposure schedules published in the literature. Additionally the influence of ondansetron on the frequency of nausea and vormiting was investigated. Patients and Method: From 1989 to 1992, 76 patients (47 male, 29 female; median age 38 years) underwent total body irradiation before autologeous bone marrow transplantation. They received 3 daily doses of 1.20 Gy each every 4 h on 4 successive days to a total dose of 14,40 Gy. Thirty-nine patients received 3x8 mg (daily, intravenous or per os) ondansetron during the whole course of irradiation. Results: The most relevant side effects were nausea and vomiting. Patients, who did not receive ondansetron (n=37) showed a nausea and emesis rate of 73%. With ondansetron (n=39) nausea and emesis were reduced to 38%. Also the grade of severity of these side effects was reduced. Conclusions: Ondansetron proved to be an effective medicament for relieving nausea and vormiting during total body irradiation. The results obtained are in concordance with those published in the literature. (orig.) [Deutsch] Hintergrund: Die Akutnebenwirkungen der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung fuehren zu starken Belastungen der Patienten. Massnahmen zur Reduktion dieser Nebenwirkungen sind daher notwendig. In einer retrospektiven Analyse wurde die Haeufigkeit von Akutnebenwirkungen bei einer hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten Granzkoerperbestrahlung untersucht und mit den Auftretenshaeufigkeiten anderer in der Literatur aufgefuehrter Fraktionierungsschemata verglichen. Zusaetzlich wurde der Einfluss des Serotoninantagonisten Ondansetron auf die Haeufigkeit von Uebelkeit und Erbrechen untersucht. Patienten und Methode

  4. The delayed pulmonary syndrome following acute high-dose irradiation: a rhesus macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Michael; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; Harper, Jamie; Ward, Amanda; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Cui, Wanchang; Gibbs, Allison; Lasio, Giovanni; Jackson, William; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Several radiation dose- and time-dependent tissue sequelae develop following acute high-dose radiation exposure. One of the recognized delayed effects of such exposures is lung injury, characterized by respiratory failure as a result of pneumonitis that may subsequently develop into lung fibrosis. Since this pulmonary subsyndrome may be associated with high morbidity and mortality, comprehensive treatment following high-dose irradiation will ideally include treatments that mitigate both the acute hematologic and gastrointestinal subsyndromes as well as the delayed pulmonary syndrome. Currently, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to counteract the effects of acute radiation exposure. Moreover, there are no relevant large animal models of radiation-induced lung injury that permit efficacy testing of new generation medical countermeasures in combination with medical management protocols under the FDA animal rule criteria. Herein is described a nonhuman primate model of delayed lung injury resulting from whole thorax lung irradiation. Rhesus macaques were exposed to 6 MV photon radiation over a dose range of 9.0-12.0 Gy and medical management administered according to a standardized treatment protocol. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 180 d. A comparative multiparameter analysis is provided, focusing on the lethal dose response relationship characterized by a lethal dose50/180 of 10.27 Gy [9.88, 10.66] and slope of 1.112 probits per linear dose. Latency, incidence, and severity of lung injury were evaluated through clinical and radiographic parameters including respiratory rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen, corticosteroid requirements, and serial computed tomography. Gross anatomical and histological analyses were performed to assess radiation-induced injury. The model defines the dose response relationship and time course of the delayed pulmonary sequelae and consequent morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it may provide

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester decreases acute pneumonitis after irradiation in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cheng-Ta

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is relatively resistant to radiation treatment and radiation pneumonitis is a major obstacle to increasing the radiation dose. We previously showed that Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE induces apoptosis and increases radiosensitivity in lung cancer. To determine whether CAPE, an antioxidant and an inhibitor of NF-kappa B, could be a useful adjuvant agent for lung cancer treatment, we examine the effects of CAPE on irradiated normal lung tissue in this study. Methods We compared the effects of CAPE on cytotoxicity and intracellular oxidative stress in normal lung fibroblast and a lung cancer cell line. For in vivo analysis, whole thorax radiation (single dose 10 Gy and 20 Gy was delivered to BALB/c male mice with or without CAPE pretreatment. NF- kappaB activation and the expression levels of acute inflammatory cytokines were evaluated in mice after irradiation. Results The in vitro studies showed that CAPE cause no significant cytotoxicity in normal lung as compared to lung cancer cells. This is probably due to the differential effect on the expression of NF-kappa B between normal and malignant lung cells. The results from in vivo study showed that CAPE treatment decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1 alpha and beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and TGF- beta, after irradiation. Moreover, histological and immunochemical data revealed that CAPE decreased radiation- induced interstitial pneumonitis and TGF-beta expression. Conclusion This study suggests that CAPE decreases the cascade of inflammatory responses induced by thoracic irradiation without causing toxicity in normal lung tissue. This provides a rationale for combining CAPE and thoracic radiotherapy for lung cancer treatment in further clinical studies.

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester decreases acute pneumonitis after irradiation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Keng, Peter C; Lin, Paul-Yang; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liao, Shuen-Kuei; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2005-12-09

    Lung cancer is relatively resistant to radiation treatment and radiation pneumonitis is a major obstacle to increasing the radiation dose. We previously showed that Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) induces apoptosis and increases radiosensitivity in lung cancer. To determine whether CAPE, an antioxidant and an inhibitor of NF-kappa B, could be a useful adjuvant agent for lung cancer treatment, we examine the effects of CAPE on irradiated normal lung tissue in this study. We compared the effects of CAPE on cytotoxicity and intracellular oxidative stress in normal lung fibroblast and a lung cancer cell line. For in vivo analysis, whole thorax radiation (single dose 10 Gy and 20 Gy) was delivered to BALB/c male mice with or without CAPE pretreatment. NF- kappaB activation and the expression levels of acute inflammatory cytokines were evaluated in mice after irradiation. The in vitro studies showed that CAPE cause no significant cytotoxicity in normal lung as compared to lung cancer cells. This is probably due to the differential effect on the expression of NF-kappa B between normal and malignant lung cells. The results from in vivo study showed that CAPE treatment decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines including IL-1 alpha and beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and TGF- beta, after irradiation. Moreover, histological and immunochemical data revealed that CAPE decreased radiation- induced interstitial pneumonitis and TGF-beta expression. This study suggests that CAPE decreases the cascade of inflammatory responses induced by thoracic irradiation without causing toxicity in normal lung tissue. This provides a rationale for combining CAPE and thoracic radiotherapy for lung cancer treatment in further clinical studies.

  7. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal brain CT scan after cranial irradiation for central nervous system leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Junko; Abe, Takanori; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    1988-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with central neurologic symptoms immediately after the second irradiation (20 Gy to the brain and 10 Gy to the spinal cord) for central nervous system (CNS)-leukemia 3 years and 2 months after the first cranial irradiation with 20 Gy. White matter was depicted as diffusely high density area on CT; histology revealed necrosis of leukemic cells. In the present patient with repeated recurrent CNS-leukemia, leukemic cells seemed to have been damaged simultaneously after irradiation because of parenchymal widespread involvement of leukemic cells, resulting in brain edema, an increased intracranial pressure and parenchymal disturbance. This finding may have an important implication for the risk of cranial irradiation in the case of widespread involvement of leukemic cells. Re-evaluation of cranial irradiation in such cases is suggested. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Testicular function in boys after chemotherapy and/or testicular irradiation for acute leukemia and malignant lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujinami, Akira; Nakanishi, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Kimiko; Takubo, Yoshiyuki; Sako, Masahiro; Konishi, Shouzaburo (Osaka City General Hospital (Japan))

    1994-04-01

    Testicular function was investigated by testicular biopsy, testicular volume, testosterone and LH-RH test in 16 prepubertal boys with 15 cases of acute leukemia and one case of malignant lymphoma after chemotherapy and/or testicular irradiation. One of 2 cases who had infiltrated in testes received irradiation at onset. With another 2 cases, testis was resected at testicular relapse and irradiated on opposite side. All continued complete remission for 1-9 years after cessation of chemotherapy. Basal levels of serum testosterone, FSH and LH were normal in 13 cases of unirradiated group recently but spermatogonia in testicular biopsy specimen decreased on cessation of chemotherapy in 8 cases. Primary gonadal dysfunction was detected in 3 cases of irradiated group. And so testicular irradiation induced damage of tubular system and Leydig cell function. It is necessary to follow up about sexual maturation. (author).

  9. Prospective neurodevelopmental studies of two children treated with total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleita, T.; Tesler, A.; Feig, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Five-year neurodevelopmental studies of two infants with acute leukemia are presented. Both patients underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after conditioning with cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI). Neither patient was treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Their outcome is remarkable for normal development of intelligence, language, perception, and motor coordination. These results suggest that TBI and BMT should be considered in future therapeutic studies of infants with acute leukemia, who are at great risk for failure of conventional therapy

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on acute oral toxicity of ethanolic extract of red ginger (zingiber officinale)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermin Katrin; Winarti Andayani; Susanto; Hendig Winarno

    2014-01-01

    Red ginger is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various types of diseases. Evaluation of the toxic properties of red ginger is very important to know the negative harmful impact to human health. Therefore, before it is consumed by humans, it is needed to conduct acute oral toxicity of red ginger extract in mice. Thin rhizome of red ginger in poly ethylene plastic packaging was irradiated by gamma rays at a dose of 10 kGy with a dose rate of 10 kGy/h. The ethanol extract of unirradiated as well as irradiated red ginger was then tested for the acute oral toxicity using OECD Guideline test method. The results showed that throughout the 14 days of treatment there was a change in behavior pattern, clinical symptoms and body weight of control mice and treatment groups. Histopathological examination of kidneys, heart, liver, lungs and spleen of the dose less than 1250 mg/kg body weight showed normal condition and no significant side effects observation. While central venous damage and a reduced number of hepatocyte cells in male mice occurred in the test dose higher than 2000 mg/kg body weight, whereas in female mice it occurred in the test group dose higher than 1250 mg/kg bw. Based on renal histology of male and female mice at doses higher than 1250 mg/kg body weight, there were damage to Bowman's capsule, glomerulus, proximal vessel and distal vessels. LD50 of unirradiated and irradiated with 10 kGy of ethanol extract of red ginger were 1887 mg/kg body weight and 2639 mg/kg body weight, respectively, and it can be categorized as moderately toxic. Oral administration of ethanol extract of red ginger with dose of 1250 mg/kg body weight gave an effect in mice organs. From these results it can be concluded that oral administration of both unirradiated and irradiated with a dose 10 kGy of ethanol extract consider safe at a dose less than 1250 mg/kg body weigh. (author)

  11. Antioxidant Capacities and Total Phenolic Contents Enhancement with Acute Gamma Irradiation in Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae) Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Sima; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee; Karimi, Ehsan; Oskoueian, Ehsan; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted in order to assess the effect of various doses of acute gamma irradiation (0, 10, 15, and 20 Gy) on the improvement of bioactive compounds and their antioxidant properties of Curcuma alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) analysis uncovered that various types of phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and fatty acids gradually altered in response to radiation doses. On the other hand, antioxidant activities determined by 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH), ferric reduction, antioxidant power (FRAP), and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging assay showed a higher irradiation level significantly increased the antioxidant properties. This study revealed an efficient effect of varying levels of gamma radiation, based on the pharmaceutical demand to enhance the accumulation and distribution of bioactive compounds such as phenolic and flavonoid compounds, fatty acids, as well as their antioxidant activities in the leaves of C. alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. PMID:25056545

  12. A Biomathematical Model of Lymphopoiesis and Its Application to Acute and Chronic Irradiation Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    After the events of September 11, 2001, there is an increasing concern of the occurrence of radiological terrorism that may result in significant casualties in densely populated areas. Much effort has been made to establish various biomarkers to rapidly assess radiation dose in mass-casualty and population-monitoring scenarios, which are demanded for effective medical management and treatment of the exposed victims. Among these the count of lymphocytes in peripheral blood and their depletion kinetics are the most important early indicators of the severity of the radiation injury. In this study, we examine a biomathematical model of lymphopoiesis which has been successfully utilized to simulate and interpret experimental data of acute and chronic irradiations on rodents [1]. With revised parameters for humans, we find this model can reproduce several sets of clinical lymphocyte data of accident victims over a wide range of absorbed doses. In addition, the absolute lymphocyte counts and the depletion rate constants calculated by this model also show good correlation with the Guskova formula and the Goans model, the two empirical tools which have been widely recognized for early estimation of the exposed dose after radiation accidents [2]. We also use the model to analyze the hematological data of the Techa River residents which were exposed to chronic low-dose irradiation during 1950-1956 [3]. This model can serve as a computational tool in radiation accident management, military operations involving nuclear warfare, radiation therapy, and space radiation risk assessment.

  13. A Multiscale Computational Model of the Response of Swine Epidermis After Acute Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure from Solar Particle Events can lead to very high skin dose for astronauts on exploration missions outside the protection of the Earth s magnetic field [1]. Assessing the detrimental effects to human skin under such adverse conditions could be predicted by conducting territorial experiments on animal models. In this study we apply a computational approach to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis [2]. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters into a multiscale tissue modeling framework, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation index comparable to unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments [3]. It is noted the basal cell doubling time is 10 to 16 days in the intact population, but drops to 13.6 hr in the regenerating populations surviving irradiation. This complex 30-fold variation is proposed to be attributed to the shortening of the G1 phase duration. We investigate this radiation induced effect by considering at the sub-cellular level the expression and signaling of TGF-beta, as it is recognized as a key regulatory factor of tissue formation and wound healing [4]. This integrated model will allow us to test the validity of various basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and should lead to a fuller understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on the skin.

  14. Antioxidant Capacities and Total Phenolic Contents Enhancement with Acute Gamma Irradiation in Curcuma alismatifolia (Zingiberaceae Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Taheri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in order to assess the effect of various doses of acute gamma irradiation (0, 10, 15, and 20 Gy on the improvement of bioactive compounds and their antioxidant properties of Curcuma alismatifolia var. Sweet pink. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography (GC analysis uncovered that various types of phenolic, flavonoid compounds, and fatty acids gradually altered in response to radiation doses. On the other hand, antioxidant activities determined by 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH, ferric reduction, antioxidant power (FRAP, and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS radical scavenging assay showed a higher irradiation level significantly increased the antioxidant properties. This study revealed an efficient effect of varying levels of gamma radiation, based on the pharmaceutical demand to enhance the accumulation and distribution of bioactive compounds such as phenolic and flavonoid compounds, fatty acids, as well as their antioxidant activities in the leaves of C. alismatifolia var. Sweet pink.

  15. Whole body proton irradiation causes acute damage to bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Yingying; Pathak, Rupak; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Jones, Tamako; Mao, Xiao Wen; Nelson, Gregory; Boerma, Marjan; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to proton irradiation during missions in deep space can lead to bone marrow injury. The acute effects of proton irradiation on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells remain undefined and thus were investigated. We exposed male C57BL/6 mice to 0.5 and 1.0 Gy proton total body irradiation (proton-TBI, 150 MeV) and examined changes in peripheral blood cells and bone marrow (BM) progenitors and LSK cells 2 weeks after exposure. 1.0 Gy proton-TBI significantly reduced the numbers of peripheral blood cells compared to 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated animals, while the numbers of peripheral blood cell counts were comparable between 0.5 Gy proton-TBI and unirradiated mice. The frequencies and numbers of LSK cells and CMPs in BM of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy irradiated mice were decreased in comparison to those of normal controls. LSK cells and CMPs and their progeny exhibited a radiation-induced impairment in clonogenic function. Exposure to 1.0 Gy increased cellular apoptosis but not the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CMPs two weeks after irradiation. LSK cells from irradiated mice exhibited an increase in ROS production and apoptosis. Exposure to proton-TBI can induce acute damage to BM progenitors and LSK cells.

  16. One hundred patients with acute leukemia treated by chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and allogeneic marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.; Buckner, C.D.; Banaji, M.

    1977-01-01

    One hundred patients, 54 with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and 46 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), considered to be in the end stages of their disease, after combination chemotherapy were treated by marrow transplantation. All patients were given a marrow graft from an HLA-identical sibling after receiving 1000-rad total body irradiation (TBI). One group of 43 patients was given cyclophosphamide (CY), 60 mg/kg on each of 2 days, 5 and 4 days before TBI. In a second group of 31 patients, additional chemotherapy was given before CY and TBI. In a third group of 19 patients, BCNU was given before CY and TBI. A fourth group of 7 patients received other chemotherapy regimens before TBI. Six patients died 3 to 17 days after marrow infusion without evidence of engraftment. Ninety-four patients were engrafted rejected and only one patient rejected the graft. Thirteen patients are alive with a marrow graft, on no maintenance antileukemic therapy, and without recurrent leukemia 1--4 1 / 2 yr after transplantation. Three have chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The relapse rate appeared to be relatively constant over the first 2 yr and was extremely low after that time. Neither survival nor leukemic relapse appeared to be influenced by the type of leukemia nor by the preparative chemotherapy regimen given before TBI. Patients in fair clinical condition at the time of transplantation showed significantly longer survival times than patients in poor condition (p = 0.001). This observation, coupled with the observation that some patients may be cured of their disease, indicates that marrow transplantation should now be undertaken earlier in the management of patients with acute leukemia who have an HLA-matched sibling marrow donor

  17. The Effect of Local Irradiation in Prevention and Reversal of Acute Rejection of Transplanted Kidney with High-dose Steroid Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. H.; Ha, S. W.; Park, C. I.; Kim, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    From 1979 to 1984, 39 local allograft irradiations were given to 29 patients: 10 irradiations were administered for prevention and 29 for reversal of acute rejection of transplanted kidney. Three doses of 150 cGy every other day were combined with high-dose of methylprednisolone pulse (1 gm/day) for 3 days. For prevention of acute rejection, local irradiation was delivered on the days 1, 3, and 5 after the transplantation, and for reversal, irradiation started after the diagnosis of acute rejection. Eight out of 10 patients irradiated for prevention had acute allograft rejection, and, what is more, there was no surviving graft at 15 months after transplantation. Reversal of acute rejection was achieved in 71%. When the pre-irradiation level of serum creatinine was below 5.5 mg%, the reversal rate was 93%, but above 5.5 mg% the reversal rate was only 17% (p<0.01). Reirradiation after failure was not successful. Among 15 reversed patients, 7 (47%) had subsequent rejection (s). The functional graft survivals at 6 month, 1, 2, and 3 year were 70%, 65%, 54%, and 65%, respectively. Therapeutic irradiation resulted in better graft survival when serum creatinine was below 5.5 mg% (p<0.001) or when irradiation started within 15 days after the diagnosis of acute rejection (p<0.001)

  18. The influence of the hypoxia on bio electric activity of myocardium cells after acute gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malykhina, A.P.; Lobanok, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate bio electric activity of the heart after acute gamma-irradiation and the hypoxia. Female rats (5 - 6 month old) was acute irradiated at 0,5 Gy dose (dose rate 0,1 mGy/sec) and was examined in a 10, 30, 90 and 180 days later. Electrophysiological study of the isolated right rat auricle was conducted by means of microelectrode registration of intracellular bio electric activity. It was shown that gamma-irradiation at 0,5 Gy resulted in decrease of amplitude and duration of action potentials of right auricle cells, attenuation of the dependence of the electrophysiological characteristics upon the stimulation frequency. Exposure of the rats to acute gamma-irradiation leaded to the depression of the interval of the cardio myocyte reaction on the hypoxia. The revealed post-radiation changes determined the reduction in function resistance of heart cells bio electric activity and can promote the initiation of arrhythmias

  19. Effects of acute gamma-irradiation on reproduction of the collembolan (Folsomia candida) in a standard laboratory test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Taizo; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Ban-nai, Tadaaki

    2006-01-01

    The abstract of this study was to provide data for radiological protection of the environment, the dose-effect relationship of acute gamma irradiation on the reproduction of the soil invertebrate Folsomia candida (Collembola) was studied according to a standard laboratory test. Juvenile collembolans were exposed to 137 Cs gamma-radiation at a dose range of 4-110 Gy. After four weeks' rearing, the number of neonate juveniles was compared with that of the non-irradiated control. The value of the 10% effective dose for reproduction was estimated to be 7.1 Gy. (author)

  20. Total body irradiation for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in acute leukemia: A cooperative study from the TBI Subcommittee in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, T.; Masaoka, T.; Shibata, H.

    1986-01-01

    By means of national survey, records of 78 acute leukemia patients who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from September 1975 through September 1983 were collected from 14 participating institutions in Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Subcommittee in Japan. Patients were classified into 37 of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and 41 of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia (ANLL). One-year survivals were 51% and 33% in ALL and ANLL patients, respectively. Uninfected patients in remission had significantly better survival than infected ones and/or in relapse. Overall incidence of interstitial pneumonia was 43%. Rejection and relapse were encountered in 26% of patients. Concerning cause of death, interstitial pneumonia was the most frequent cause (44%). Uni- and multivariate analyses strongly suggested that favorable prognostic factors were remission, uninfection, preparation of low-dose-rate fractionated TBI and cyclophosphamide, and mild graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) for acute leukemia patient treated with allogeneic BMT. (orig.) [de

  1. Acute effects of thoracic irradiation on lung function and structure in awake sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyd, J.E.; Bolds, J.M.; Sheller, J.R.; Duke, S.S.; Gillette, A.W.; Malcolm, A.W.; Meyrick, B.O.; Brigham, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the acute physiological and structural changes after lung irradiation, the effects of whole-lung irradiation were investigated in fourteen sheep. Ten sheep were prepared with vascular and chronic lung lymph catheters, then a week later were given 1,500 rad whole-lung radiation and monitored for 2 days. Four sheep were given the same dose of radiation and were killed 4 h later for structural studies. Lung lymph flow increased at 3 h after radiation (14.6 +/- 2.1 ml/h) to twice the base-line flow rate (7.5 +/- 1.3), with a high lymph-to-plasma protein concentration. Pulmonary arterial pressure increased twofold from base line (18 +/- 1.6 cmH2O) at 2 h after radiation (33 +/- 3.8). Cardiac output and systemic pressure in the aorta did not change after lung radiation. Arterial O 2 tension decreased from 85 +/- 3 to 59 +/- 4 Torr at 1 day after radiation. Lymphocyte counts in both blood and lung lymph decreased to a nadir by 4 h and remained low. Thromboxane B2 concentration in lung lymph increased from base line (0.07 +/- 0.03 ng/ml) to peak at 3 h after radiation (8.2 +/- 3.7 ng/ml). The structural studies showed numerous damaged lymphocytes in the peripheral lung and bronchial associated lymphoid tissue. Quantitative analysis of the number of granulocytes in peripheral lung showed no significant change (base line 6.2 +/- 0.8 granulocytes/100 alveoli, 4 h = 10.3 +/- 2.3). The most striking change involved lung airways. The epithelial lining of the majority of airways from intrapulmonary bronchus to respiratory bronchiolus revealed damage with the appearance of intracellular and intercellular cell fragments and granules. This new large animal model of acute radiation lung injury can be used to monitor physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes after lung radiation. It is relevant to the investigation of diffuse oxidant lung injury as well as to radiobiology per se

  2. [Acute toxicity of breast cancer irradiation with modulated intensity by tomotherapy®].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoulad, N; Massabeau, C; de Lafontan, B; Vieillevigne, L; Hangard, G; Ciprian, C; Chaltiel, L; Moyal, É; Izar, F

    2017-05-01

    Helical radiation intensity modulated by tomotherapy improves dose distribution to complex and large volumes. The aim of the study was to assess acute toxicity of this technique during breast cancer irradiation after conserving surgery or mastectomy. Cutaneous toxicities, lung and oesophageal side effects, and breast lymphedema were retrospectively collected according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 4.0 (CTCAE v4.0) in 292 patients treated for a breast cancer by tomotherapy between May 2010 and December 2014. After conservative surgery, the dose administered to breast volume and the tumour bed was respectively 52.2Gy and 63.8Gy in 29 fractions. After mastectomy, the dose was 50Gy in 25 fractions. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to highlight risk factors for dermatitis and breast oedema. The rate of dermatitis grade 2 and 3 were 22.9% and 1.7% respectively. In univariate analysis, factors associated with acute radiation dermatitis were breast volume (P=0.002), body mass index (BMI) (Pacute radiation dermatitis (mastectomy: OR 0.64, 95% CI [0.04-0.43]; mastectomy with immediate reconstruction with prosthesis: OR 0.13 95% CI [0.10-0.38] P=0.0003). The incidence of breast oedema grade 2 or above was 19.5%, in univariate analysis, there was a correlation with BMI (P=0.003) and smoking (P=0.009). In multivariate analysis, smoking and BMI greater than 25kg/m 2  increased the risk of breast oedema (OR 2.47, respectively [95% CI 1.22-5.01] P=0.012 and OR 2.37 [95% CI 1.22-4.59] P=0.01). The rate of radiation pneumonitis of grade 2 or above was 1.4%. Among the patients, 19.9% had esophagitis grade 1 or 2. The helical irradiation intensity modulation tomotherapy is a well-tolerated treatment for breast cancer that reduces the high radiation doses to organs at risk. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Proton Beam Craniospinal Irradiation Reduces Acute Toxicity for Adults With Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Aaron P.; Barney, Christian L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Groot, John F. de; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Tucker, Susan L.; Crawford, Cody N.; Khan, Meena; Khatua, Soumen; Gilbert, Mark R.; Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Efficacy and acute toxicity of proton craniospinal irradiation (p-CSI) were compared with conventional photon CSI (x-CSI) for adults with medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Forty adult medulloblastoma patients treated with x-CSI (n=21) or p-CSI (n=19) at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 2003 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Median CSI and total doses were 30.6 and 54 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up was 57 months (range 4-103) for x-CSI patients and 26 months (range 11-63) for p-CSI. Results: p-CSI patients lost less weight than x-CSI patients (1.2% vs 5.8%; P=.004), and less p-CSI patients had >5% weight loss compared with x-CSI (16% vs 64%; P=.004). p-CSI patients experienced less grade 2 nausea and vomiting compared with x-CSI (26% vs 71%; P=.004). Patients treated with x-CSI were more likely to have medical management of esophagitis than p-CSI patients (57% vs 5%, P<.001). p-CSI patients had a smaller reduction in peripheral white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets compared with x-CSI (white blood cells 46% vs 55%, P=.04; hemoglobin 88% vs 97%, P=.009; platelets 48% vs 65%, P=.05). Mean vertebral doses were significantly associated with reductions in blood counts. Conclusions: This report is the first analysis of clinical outcomes for adult medulloblastoma patients treated with p-CSI. Patients treated with p-CSI experienced less treatment-related morbidity including fewer acute gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities

  4. Effects of acute gamma-irradiation on the aquatic microbial microcosm in comparison with chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuma, Shoichi, E-mail: fuma@nirs.go.j [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Kiriko; Yanagisawa, Kei [Environmental Radiation Effects Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao [Regulatory Sciences Research Group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki [Environmental Chemistry Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Inamori, Yuhei [Faculty of Symbiotic Systems Science, Fukushima University, 1 Kanayagawa, Fukushima 960-1296 (Japan); Polikarpov, Gennady G. [The A.O. Kovalevsky Institute of Biology of Southern Seas, Sevastopol 99011 (Ukraine)

    2009-12-15

    Effects of acute gamma-irradiation were investigated in the aquatic microcosm consisting of green algae (Chlorella sp. and Scenedesmus sp.) and a blue-green alga (Tolypothrix sp.) as producers; an oligochaete (Aeolosoma hemprichi), rotifers (Lecane sp. and Philodina sp.) and a ciliate protozoan (Cyclidium glaucoma) as consumers; and more than four species of bacteria as decomposers. At 100 Gy, populations were not affected in any taxa. At 500-5000 Gy, one or three taxa died out and populations of two or three taxa decreased over time, while that of Tolypothrix sp. increased. This Tolypothrix sp. increase was likely an indirect effect due to interspecies interactions. The principal response curve analysis revealed that the main trend of the effects was a dose-dependent population decrease. For a better understanding of radiation risks in aquatic microbial communities, effect doses of gamma-rays compared with copper, herbicides and detergents were evaluated using the radiochemoecological conceptual model and the effect index for microcosm.

  5. Effect of acute sup(60)Co-gamma-irradiation on the in vivo lipid peroxidation in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronai, Eva; Benkoe, Gy.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of sublethal (6.0 Gy) and LDsub(50/30) (9.0 Gy) doses of sup(60)Co-gamma-irradiation on malondialdehyde (MDA) level was studied in rats. The findings suggest that in the organs investigated (brain, liver, spleen, kidneys, testicles, stomach, small intestines) acute sup(60)Co gamma-irradiation increased the formation of MDA, the main product of lipid peroxidation, in a time-related manner to an extent characteristic of the organ investigated. Differences in the degree and temporal development of the changes allow some conclusions as to the radiosensitivity of individual organs. On this basis it can be assumed that the increase in MDA level caused by irradiation considerably contributes to the development of certain symptoms of radiation sickness. (author)

  6. Safety of dried sambiloto Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F.) nees gamma irradiated based on acute toxicity aspect in mice swiss webster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermin Katrin; Susanto; Hendig Winarno

    2014-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata nees (Family: Acanthaceae) is a medicinal plant commonly cultivated in Asian countries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of gamma irradiated sambiloto against to animal test (mice) and to support the application of nuclear techniques for radiation pasteurization of sambiloto as health products without changing the properties. In the acute toxicity test was observed the effects of the tested material on behavioral changes, abnormalities in the function of several organs and body weight changes in animal test every day for 2 weeks. The results showed that the ethanol extract of unirradiated and irradiated with dose of 7.5 kGy) sambiloto were not toxic to mice. Lethal Dose 50 (DL 50 ) of ethanol extract from sambiloto unirradiated or irradiated at the dose of 7.5 kGy was > 5000 mg/kg BW. At the highest dose tested 5000 mg/kg BW mice there were no significant toxic effects and no mice that died during the experiment, therefore ethanol extracts of un irradiated and irradiated samples could be declared safe. (author)

  7. Acute Toxicity Grade 3 and 4 After Irradiation in Children and Adolescents: Results From the IPPARCA Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pixberg, Caroline [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Koch, Raphael [Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor, E-mail: Hans.Eich@ukmuenster.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Koeln, Koeln (Germany); Martinsson, Ulla [Department of Oncology, University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden); Kristensen, Ingrid [Department of Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Matuschek, Christiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Pohl, Fabian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Elsayad, Khaled [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Willich, Normann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Lindh, Jack [Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå (Sweden); Steinmann, Diana [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: In the context of oncologic therapy for children, radiation therapy is frequently indicated. This study identified the frequency of and reasons for the development of high-grade acute toxicity and possible sequelae. Materials and Methods: Irradiated children have been prospectively documented since 2001 in the Registry for the Evaluation of Side Effects After Radiation in Childhood and Adolescence (RiSK) database in Germany and since 2008 in the registry for radiation therapy toxicity (RADTOX) in Sweden. Data were collected using standardized, published forms. Toxicity classification was based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Results: As of June 2013, 1500 children have been recruited into the RiSK database and 485 into the RADTOX registry leading to an analysis population of 1359 patients (age range 0-18). A total of 18.9% (n=257) of all investigated patients developed high-grade acute toxicity (grades 3/4). High-grade toxicity of the bone marrow was documented for 63.8% (n=201) of those patients, oral mucositis for 7.6% (n=24), and dermatitis for 7.6% (n=24). Patients with high-grade acute toxicity received concomitant chemotherapy more frequently (56%) than patients with no or lower acute toxicity (31.5%). In multivariate analyses, concomitant chemotherapy, diagnosis of Ewing sarcoma, and total radiation dose showed a statistically noticeable effect (P≤.05) on acute toxicity, whereas age, concomitant chemotherapy, Hodgkin lymphoma, Ewing sarcoma, total radiation dose, and acute toxicity influenced the time until maximal late toxicity. Conclusions: Generally, high-grade acute toxicity after irradiation in children and adolescence occurs in a moderate proportion of patients (18.9%). As anticipated, the probability of acute toxicity appeared to depend on the prescribed dose as well as concomitant chemotherapy. The occurrence of chronic toxicity correlates with the prior acute

  8. Evaluation of circulating endothelial cells in the rat after acute and fractionated whole-body gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Massarani Ghassan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Damage to vascular endothelial cells is a well recognised complication of the irradiation. Our objective was to determine the gamma-irradiation effect on the rat circulating endothelial cells (CEC. Material and methods: Eight-week old rats were divided into four groups: group 1 - rats were exposed to acute whole- -body gamma irradiation with a wide range of single doses (0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 Gy, group 2 - rats were exposed to fractionated low doses of irradiation (0.1, 0.5 and 1 Gy every three days for two months, group 3 as group 2, but followed by two months of rest, group 4 were control animals. CEC (CD146 positive cells in group 1 were counted following CD146-based immuno-magnetic separation after one day and one week, as well as at the end of experiment in the other groups. Results: Quantified CEC showed that there was a dose-dependent reduction in CEC count in group 1 (one week after irradiation and group 2. A partial re-population of CEC was observed at the end of experiment in both group 1 and group 2 compared to control group. Group 3 showed a significant increase in CEC levels as compared with group 2 without reaching the control level. Conclusion: The number of CEC (CD146 positive cells in rats exposed to whole-body gamma irradiation was reduced in a dose-dependent manner and it partly recovered during the two-month interval after irradiation. We suggest that CEC count may be an indicator of the radiation-induced vascular damage.

  9. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver; Martus, Peter; Arnold, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  10. Selective brain responses to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray irradiation in males and females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silasi, Greg; Diaz-Heijtz, Rochellys; Besplug, Jill; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Titov, Viktor; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2004-01-01

    Radiation exposure is known to have profound effects on the brain, leading to precursor cell dysfunction and debilitating cognitive declines [Nat. Med. 8 (2002) 955]. Although a plethora of data exist on the effects of high radiation doses, the effects of low-dose irradiation, such as ones received during repetitive diagnostic and therapeutic exposures, are still under-investigated [Am. J. Otolaryngol. 23 (2002) 215; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97 (2000) 889; Curr. Opin. Neurol. 16 (2003) 129]. Furthermore, most studies of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have been performed using a single acute dose, while clinically and environmentally relevant exposures occur predominantly under chronic/repetitive conditions. Here, we have used a mouse model to compare the effects of chronic/repetitive and acute low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure (0.5 Gy) to ionizing radiation on the brain in vivo. We examined the LDR effects on p42/44 MAPK (ERK1/ERK2), CaMKII, and AKT signaling-the interconnected pathways that have been previously shown to be crucial for neuronal survival upon irradiation. We report perturbations in ERK1/2, AKT, and CREB upon acute and chronic/repetitive low-dose exposure in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of mice. These studies were paralleled by the analysis of radiation effects on neurogenesis and cellular proliferation. Repetitive exposure had a much more pronounced effect on cellular signaling and neurogenesis than acute exposure. These results suggest that studies of single acute exposures might be limited in terms of their predictive value. We also present the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced signaling in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. We show the role of estrogens in brain radiation responses and discuss the implications of the observed changes

  11. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu YS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yanshun Mu,* Maoquan Qin,* Bin Wang, Sidan Li, Guanghua Zhu, Xuan Zhou, Jun Yang, Kai Wang, Wei Lin, Huyong Zheng Beijing Key Laboratory of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, National Key Discipline of Pediatrics, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Ministry of Education, Hematology Oncology Center, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD. The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Keywords: haploidentical, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, myeloablative regimen, total body irradiation, acute leukemia, pediatric

  12. Acute response of pig skin to irradiation with 12C-ions or 200 kV X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, T.; Doerr, W.; Enghardt, W.; Roethig, H.; Herrmann, T.; Kumpf, R.

    1997-01-01

    The acute response of pig skin to treatment with high energy carbon ions (plateau region) at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) was compared with changes after 200 kV X-irradiation. Carbon doses isoeffective to the X-ray doses were computed with a recently estbalished model for calculation of the biological effect of heavy ions. Clinical changes and physiological symptoms (blood flow, erythema, trans-epidermal water loss, skin hydration) were scored. The parameters analyzed were maximum and mean values of each symptom during days 24 to 70 after irradiation, and the quantal endpoints for the establishment of dose-effect curves were the median values of these. With exception of the maximum change in the red blood cell concentration (p 12 C-ions (plateau region) and may at least for epidermis be applied to treatment planning. (orig.)

  13. Effect of acute gamma irradiation on Curcuma alismatifolia varieties and detection of DNA polymorphism through SSR marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Sima; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee; Ahmad, Zaiton; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay

    2014-01-01

    The effects of eight different doses (0, 10, 20, 25, 35, 40, 60, and 100 Gy) of acute gamma irradiation on 44 (three varieties of Curcuma alismatifolia: Chiang Mai Red, Sweet Pink, Kimono Pink, and one Curcuma hybrid (Doi Tung 554) individual plants were investigated. Radiation sensitivity tests revealed that the LD50 values of the varieties were achieved at 21 Gy for Chiang Mai Red, 23 Gy for Sweet Pink, 25 Gy for Kimono Pink, and 28 Gy for Doi Tung 554. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA), significant variations were observed for vegetative traits, flowering development, and rhizome characteristics among the four varieties of Curcuma alismatifolia and dose levels as well as the dose × variety interaction. In irradiated plants, the leaf length, leaf width, inflorescence length, the number of true flowers, the number of pink bracts, number of shoots, plant height, rhizome size, number of storage roots, and number of new rhizomes decreased significantly (P Curcuma alismatifolia varieties.

  14. Neuropsychological effects of irradiation and chemotherapy treatments upon children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a case study of monozygotic twins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.T.; Souheaver, G.T.; Berry, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to determine the effects of irradiation and chemotherapy upon cognitive functioning when used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). While many studies have demonstrated a deleterious effect, others have found no significant changes in neuropsychological functioning. The uncertainty regarding the cognitive effects of these treatments is exemplified via a presentation of monozygotic twins who were evaluated via neuropsychological tests. The children received similar induction-consolidation therapy which included intrathecal methotrexate and cranial irradiation. Neuropsychological tests yielded almost identical I.Q. patterns, however, subtle differences were noted between the children when abstract reasoning abilities, achievement tests scores, motor speed, grip strength, performance on complex tasks requiring haptic sensitivity, and fingertip sensitivity were observed. This discussion also summarizes the previous findings related to cognitive function after chemotherapy and radiation therapy and some of the confounding factors which have been noted

  15. ACUTE IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON MORPHOLOGY AND FUNCTION OF RAT SUBMANDIBULAR GLANDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSINK, A; KALICHARAN, D; GRAVENMADE, EJ; JONGEBLOED, WL; LIGEON, EE; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KONINGS, AWT

    1991-01-01

    In this study the morphologic and functional changes were compared after irradiation (single dose, 15 Gy) of rat submandibular salivary glands. Before and 1-10 days after local irradiation of the gland region, samples of submandibular saliva were collected after stimulation by pilocarpine. At the

  16. The Basel experience with total body irradiation for conditioning patients with acute leukemia for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speck, B.; Cornu, P.; Nissen, C.; Gratwohl, A.; Sartorius, J.

    1979-01-01

    We are reporting our experience with 13 patients suffering from end stage acute leukemia that were prepared for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by combined chemotherapy followed by high dose cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI). Only one patient became a long term survivor. Of the evaluable 12 patients, 6 died of interstitial pneumonia, 4 of GvH and 1 of recurrent leukemia. We conclude that adding combined chemotherapy to the standard conditioning program with Cy and TBI probably increases the risk of developing fatal interstitial pneumonia without eliminating the risk of recurrent leukemia. We suggest that allogenic marrow grafts should be performed earlier in the course of refractory acute leukemias, because in patients with end stage disease its chances of being curative are small

  17. Acute Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Gastric Acid Secretion and Gastric Mucosal Integrity in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar M. E. Abdel Salam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 3- or 6-Gray (Gy whole-body gamma irradiation on basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion was studied in pylorus-ligated rats. Different groups of rats were irradiated with a single 3- or 6-Gy fraction and examined 7 days after irradiation. Exposure to 3-Gy fraction led to marked increase in basal (nonstimulated gastric acid output in the 4-h pylorus-ligated rat (47.5% compared with unirradiated controls. After exposure to 6 Gy, only 18.2% increase in gastric acid output was noted compared with unirradiated controls. Under pentagastrin or histamine stimulation, gastric acid secretion in those irradiated with 3- or 6-Gy fraction was markedly reduced compared to that of unirradiated controls. Exposure to 3- or 6-Gy gamma irradiation intensified the degree of gastric mucosal injury evoked by indomethacin or 50% ethanol in a dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that in the pylorus-ligated rat model, lower doses of gamma irradiation increase basal gastric acid secretion and impair the gastric mucosal barrier with marked increase in its permeability to H+ following stimulation of acid secretion or exposure to barrier breakers. Exposure to irradiation is likely to result in failure of the parietal cell to respond to direct stimulation with histamine or pentagastrin.

  18. Long-term results of total body irradiation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone; Zich, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Jahn, Ulrich; Neumann, Oliver [Charite University Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Martus, Peter [University Tuebingen, Institute of Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biostatistics, Tuebingen (Germany); Arnold, Renate [Charite University Medicine, Campus CVK, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this chart review of adult patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with total body irradiation (TBI) was to evaluate early and late toxicity and long-term outcome. A total of 110 adult patients (34 ± 12 years) with ALL underwent TBI (6 fractions of 2 Gy for a total of 12 Gy) as a part of the treatment regimen before transplantation. Treatment-related toxicity, mortality, and hematologic outcome are reported. Mean follow-up was 70 months. The 2- and 5-year leukemia-free survival rates were 78 and 72 %, respectively. In all, 29 % (32/110) patients suffered from medullary recurrence after a median time of 7 months. Gender was the only statistically significant prognostic factor in terms of overall survival in favor of female patients. Treatment-related mortality and overall survival after 2 and 5 years were 16 and 22 %, and 60 and 52.7 %, respectively. The most frequent late reaction wascGVHD of the skin (n = 33, 30 %). In addition, 15.5 % (17/110 patients) suffered pulmonary symptoms, and 6 patients developed lung fibrosis. Eyes were frequently affected by the radiation (31/110 = 28 %); 12 of 110 patients (11 %) presented with symptoms from osteoporosis, 5 of 110 patients (4.5 %) developed hypothyreosis and 2 patients diabetes mellitus. Of the male patients, 11 % reported erectile dysfunction or loss of libido, while 2 of 36 women reported menopausal syndrome at the mean time of 28 months after treatment with requirement for substitution. No women became pregnant after treatment. No acute or late cardiac toxicities were documented in our patients. No secondary malignancies were documented. Although hematologic outcome was in the upper range of that reported in the literature, treatment-related mortality (TRM) and medullary recurrences remain a challenge. Sophisticated radiation techniques allow for decreasing toxicity to certain organs and/or dose escalation to the bone marrow in highly selected patients in order to improve therapeutic

  19. Side effects and late sequelae of combined irradiation- and chemotherapy of the neurocranium in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zippel, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Therapeutical procedures are not only judged according to their efficacy, but also with respect to their affection to the patient. For acute side effects as headaches, nausea, tiredness and fever, which occurred in several children, cranial irradiation and intrathecal MTX injections have to be considered as responsible factors. These accompanying symptoms, for example also alopecia, have to be tolerated with respect to the successful course of phase II, i.e. the prevention of a leukaemic meningo-encephalitis. The somnolence syndrome can be observed also after cerebral irradiation with a different indication; in several patients the occurrence of this syndrome has to be expected. Up to the present no secondary damages caused by this syndrome have been observed. Severe neurologic disorders only rarely appear within the course of the ALL; nevertheless it is necessary to determine at the earliest possible date also more subtle disturbances in the neurologic and psychic development of the children by neurologic examinations, regular ECG registrations, and psychologic tests. A delineation of late damages of ZNS therapy is only possible on the basis of the cerebral post-mortem findings. Since the dose of the brain irradiations of phase II are within the limits of the generally accepted tolerance range, a late necrosis induced by irradiation, has not to be expected. Single cases of leukoencephalopathies are ascribed to the ALL therapy. Growth retardations - which in the most cases are reversible - are found in children treated with ALL therapy; as possibly damaging agent also neurocranial irradiation might be considered as responsible. Regular control examinations of the length show a possibly occuring growth reduction, which should be accessible by hormone therapy if necessary. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Optimization by orthogonal design of treatment of acutely irradiated dogs with ethinylestradiol (EED)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Fengtong; Xu Chengxiong; Liu Shuhua

    1985-01-01

    The results were obtained from 117 dogs exposed to 3 Gy of 60 Co γ-rays. When 1.25 mg/kg of EED was injected intramuscularly to dogs 6 h after irradiation, the therapeutic effect was the best. The survival rate increased from 14.3% in the control to 68.4% (P < 0.01) in the treated dogs. The other tested conditions (the amounts of EED given orally or intramuscularly varied from 0.5 mg/kg to 2.5 mg/kg, 24 h after irradiation) also exhibited some protective effect. If the agent was given orally, the doses should be larger (1.25-2.5 mg/kg) and the time interval between irradiation and treatment be shorter (within 24 h). When the agent was injected intramuscularly 48 h after irradiation, the effect was not remarkable

  1. Remote effects in treated dogs survived acute radiation sickness. Hemodynamics at various times after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostesha, N.Ya.; Lopukhova, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Dogs were exposed to X-radiation at a dose of 15 Gy; part of them received a complex treatment. The morphological of internal organs of control dogs were made before death (on days 4 to 15 after irradiation). The treated dogs were killed 0.5-2 years following irradiation. Hemodynamics normalization was noted in 1.5-2 years in the liver, brain cortex, adrenals, insular tissue of the pancreas, and lymph nodes

  2. Study of food intake dynamics in rats following acute whole-body irradiation with X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smajda, B.; Ahlers, I.; Datelinka, I.

    1987-01-01

    The effects were studied of whole-body X-irradiation with sublethal (2.39 Gy) and medium lethal (5.74 Gy) doses on food intake by rats. The lower dose caused a temporary decrease in food intake, with a minimum of 63.3% of the control level on the 2nd day after irradiation. The decrease was statistically significant up to the 4th day after irradiation. No substantial changes were observed in the parameters of the circadian rhythm in food intake with the maximum on the 3rd day after irradiation, with only 8% of the initial value. The food intake was reduced until the 9th day after irradiation. The daily thythm of food intake was strongly disturbed during the first three days after irradiation, then restoring gradually and on the 9th day showing the original phasing and shape. The results obtained were in agreement with the assumed neural regulation mechanism of food intake and its circadian rhythm in the rat. (author). 5 figs., 12 refs

  3. Acute central nervous system (CNS) toxicity of total body irradiation (TBI) measured using neuropsychological testing of attention functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Frederik; Steinvorth, Sarah; Lohr, Frank; Hacke, Werner; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate acute normal tissue damage of low irradiation doses to the healthy, adult central nervous system (CNS) using neuropsychological testing of attention functions. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological testing (IQ, attention [modified Trail-Making Test A, Digit Symbol Test, D2 Test, Wiener Determination Machine]) was used to examine 40 patients (43 ± 10 years) before and immediately after the first fraction (1.2 Gy) of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) at the University of Heidelberg. The patients received antiemetic premedication. Test results are given as mean percentiles ± standard deviation, with 50 ± 34 being normal. Thirty-eight control patients (53 ± 15 years) were studied to quantify the influence of hospitalization, stress, and repeated testing. Results: The patients showed normal baseline test results (IQ = 101 ± 14, attention = 54 ± 28) and no decrease in test results after 1.2 Gy TBI. Attention functions improved (66 ± 25) corresponding to a practice effect of repeated testing that was seen in the control group, although alternate versions of the tests were used (IQ = 104 ± 10, attention before = 42 ± 29, attention after = 52 ± 31). Conclusion: Our data show no deterioration of neuropsychologic test results acutely after 1.2 Gy whole body exposure in adult patients without CNS disease receiving antiemetic medication

  4. The Effect of Acute Gamma Irradiation on the Growth of Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) V36 Seedlings Under Controlled Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustapha Akil; Faiz Ahmad; Mohd Zulmadi Sani; Zaiton Ahmad; Affrida Abu Hassan; Abdul Rahim Harun

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear technology has long been applied by plant breeders worldwide to improve crop in their home country. One of the potential crops for mutation breeding in Malaysia is Hibiscus cannabinus L. or commonly known as kenaf which is mainly planted for fiber production. One of preliminary procedures for an excellent mutation breeding program is the radiosensitivity study to determine the optimal doses for irradiation. In this study, kenaf seeds from V36 variety were selected as materials to be used for radiosensitivity test. A total of 10 different doses of acute gamma rays (0, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1000, 1200, 1500, 1700 and 2000 Gy) from Cesium-137 source were applied to the seeds of kenaf. The irradiated seeds including the control were planted in trough for 30 days. The gamma irradiation effects were analysed on several parameters such as seedling survival percentages, plant height, root length, shoot fresh weight, root fresh weight, shoot dry weight and root dry weight. In general, it was found that survival rates as well as the other parameters were decreased as the doses of gamma rays increased. From the radiosensitivity curve, the values for LD 50 and LD 25 were estimated at 810 and 310 Gy, respectively. The radiosensitivity data obtained from this study is very useful in determining suitable doses for subsequent mutation induction on kenaf. (author)

  5. Effects of acute gamma irradiation on physiological traits and flavonoid accumulation of Centella asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Sina Siavash; Jaafar, Hawa; Ibrahim, Rusli; Rahmat, Asmah; Aziz, Maheran Abdul; Philip, Elizabeth

    2011-06-17

    In the present study, two accessions of Centella asiatica (CA03 and CA23) were subjected to gamma radiation to examine the response of these accessions in terms of survival rate, flavonoid contents, leaf gas exchange and leaf mass. Radiation Sensitivity Tests revealed that based on the survival rate, the LD(50) (gamma doses that killed 50% of the plantlets) of the plantlets were achieved at 60 Gy for CA03 and 40 Gy for CA23. The nodal segments were irradiated with gamma rays at does of 30 and 40 Gy for Centella asiatica accession 'CA03' and 20 and 30 Gy for accession 'CA23. The nodal segment response to the radiation was evaluated by recording the flavonoid content, leaf gas exchange and leaf biomass. The experiment was designed as RCBD with five replications. Results demonstrated that the irradiated plantlets exhibited greater total flavonoid contents (in eight weeks) significantly than the control where the control also exhibited the highest total flavonoid contents in the sixth week of growth; 2.64 ± 0.02 mg/g DW in CA03 and 8.94 ± 0.04 mg/g DW in CA23. The total flavonoid content was found to be highest after eight weeks of growth, and this, accordingly, stands as the best time for leaf harvest. Biochemical differentiation based on total flavonoid content revealed that irradiated plantlets in CA23 at 20 and 30 Gy after eight weeks contained the highest total flavonoid concentrations (16.827 ± 0.02; 16.837 ± 0.008 mg/g DW, respectively) whereas in CA03 exposed to 30 and 40 Gy was found to have the lowest total flavonid content (5.83 ± 0.11; 5.75 ± 0.03 mg/g DW). Based on the results gathered in this study, significant differences were found between irradiated accessions and control ones in relation to the leaf gas. The highest PN and gs were detected in CA23 as control followed by CA23 irradiated to 20Gy (CA23G20) and CA23G30 and the lowest PN and gs were observed in CA03 irradiated to 40Gy (CA03G40). Moreover, there were no significant differences in

  6. Evaluation of acute and chronic toxicity of DSS and LAS surfactants undergoing the irradiation with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Maria Fernanda

    2004-01-01

    Surfactants are synthetic organic compounds widely used in cosmetic, food, textile, dyers and paper production industries and in particular detergents and others cleaning products industries. The world consumption is nearly 8 million tons per year. One of the main environmental issues coming from the use of these compounds is their toxicity that compromises the biological treatment of effluents and the quality of receiving waters. The objective of this work was the application of ionizing radiation by electron beam in the degradation and reduction of acute and chronic toxicities of surfactants sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate acid (LAS) and sodium dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate (LAS). This treatment technology has been studied as a pre-treatment for effluents containing toxic and non-biodegradable compounds, before the biological treatment. Two acute toxicity assays were employed, one with the micro-crustacean Daphnia similis and the other with the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri along with a chronic toxicity assay with the micro-crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia (just for SDS and acid LAS) for the non-irradiated and irradiated samples and radiation doses 3.0 kGy, 6.0 kGy, 9.0 kGy and 12.0 kGy. Physical-chemical parameters were evaluated for the following up the degradation of the surfactant molecules. The reductions of acute toxicity varied between 72.49% and 90.98% for SDS, 18.22% and 78.98% for acid LAS and 82.66% and 94.26% for sodium LAS. For the chronic toxicity, the reduction percentages varied between 64.03% and 83.01% for SDS and 47.48% and 64.91% for acid LAS. When one considers the application of the electron beam as a pre-treatment of effluents containing high concentrations of surfactants, the toxicity is an essential parameter allowing the further biological treatment of these effluents. (author)

  7. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragun, Anthony E.; Quillo, Amy R.; Riley, Elizabeth C.; Roberts, Teresa L.; Hunter, Allison M.; Rai, Shesh N.; Callender, Glenda G.; Jain, Dharamvir; McMasters, Kelly M.; Spanos, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes

  8. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Quillo, Amy R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Riley, Elizabeth C. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Roberts, Teresa L.; Hunter, Allison M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Rai, Shesh N. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Callender, Glenda G. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Jain, Dharamvir [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); McMasters, Kelly M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Spanos, William J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes.

  9. Acute Effects of Irradiation on People and Animals from Soviet Underground Nuclear Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    of leukopenia occurred toward the end of the 3rd week, when the leukocyte content was at 5.4E+9/liter + 0.7E+9/liter. In individual animals, the...radiation illness. In those subjected to only external irradiation at a dose of 0.71 Gy, we noted a relatively shallow leukopenia in the first 2 to 8 days...were not protected at the same doses of external irradiation (0.71 to 0.72 Gy) experienced leukopenia , which was much more clearly expressed during the

  10. Dose-response relations for dicentric yields in G0 lymphocytes of man and crab-eating monkey following acute and chronic γ-irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, E.; Hirai, M.; Tobari, I.; Nakai, S.A.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison has been made of dicentric yields in G 0 lymphocytes between man and crab-eating monkey, Macaca fascicularis, after acute and chronic γ-irradiations. With acute irradiation (49.6 rad/min) there was no significant difference between them, but for the chronic irradiation (17.1 rad/h) a significant difference was observed between the species. When the dose-response relations were fitted to the linear-quadratic model (Y = αD + βD 2 ), the species-difference observed for chronic irradiation was almost entirely due to change in the value of β. In addition, after chronic irradiation the β-value for monkey was almost negligible, but that for man was significant. Post-irradiation incubation experiment showed that cells with dicentrics were partly eliminated during the course of chronic irradiation, because there were appreciable reductions of dicentric yields (ca. 25% for both man and monkey at 400 rad) together with mitotic indices (ca. 30% and 60% for man and monkey, respectively, at 400 rad). Accordingly, it would be reasonable to postulate that G 0 repair for dicentrics other than selection mechanism must play a major role in the effects of low dose rate. It can be further suggested that G 0 -repair capacity for chromosal damages leading to dicentrics may be different among different primate species. (Auth.)

  11. Effect of Acute Gamma Irradiation on Curcuma alismatifolia Varieties and Detection of DNA Polymorphism through SSR Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Taheri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of eight different doses (0, 10, 20, 25, 35, 40, 60, and 100 Gy of acute gamma irradiation on 44 (three varieties of Curcuma alismatifolia: Chiang Mai Red, Sweet Pink, Kimono Pink, and one Curcuma hybrid (Doi Tung 554 individual plants were investigated. Radiation sensitivity tests revealed that the LD50 values of the varieties were achieved at 21 Gy for Chiang Mai Red, 23 Gy for Sweet Pink, 25 Gy for Kimono Pink, and 28 Gy for Doi Tung 554. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA, significant variations were observed for vegetative traits, flowering development, and rhizome characteristics among the four varieties of Curcuma alismatifolia and dose levels as well as the dose × variety interaction. In irradiated plants, the leaf length, leaf width, inflorescence length, the number of true flowers, the number of pink bracts, number of shoots, plant height, rhizome size, number of storage roots, and number of new rhizomes decreased significantly (P<0.05 as the radiation dose increased. The cophenetic correlation coefficient (CCC between genetic dissimilarity matrix estimated from the morphological characters and the UPGMA clustering method was r=0.93, showing a proof fit. In terms of genetic variation among the acutely irradiated samples, the number of presumed alleles revealed by simple sequence repeats ranged from two to seven alleles with a mean value of 3.1, 4.5, and 5.3 alleles per locus for radiation doses of 0, 10, and 20 Gy, respectively. The average values of the effective number of alleles, Nei’s gene diversity, and Shannon’s information index were 2.5–3.2, 0.51–0.66, and 0.9–1.3, respectively. The constructed dendrogram grouped the entities into seven clusters. Principal component analysis (PCA supported the clustering results. Consequently, it was concluded that irradiation with optimum doses of gamma rays efficiently induces mutations in Curcuma alismatifolia varieties.

  12. Effect of acute whole-body neutron gamma irradiation on the dopamine neuronal uptake-sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Mahfoudi, H.; Lambert, F.; Burckhart, M.F.; Fatome, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of (neutron-gamma) irradiation on the dopamine uptake sites distribution were investigated, using quantitative autoradiography. Brain ares examined are striatum, lateral septum, substantia nigra, gyrus dentatus, ventral tegmental area, interfascicular nu and antero-ventral thalamic nu. Three hours after exposure at the dose of 4 Gy, a decrease (- 33 %) of dopamine uptake sites was observed in the gyrus dentatus. (authors)

  13. C-fos protein expression in central nervous system. Effects of acute whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Chollat, S.; Mahfoudi, H.; Lambert, F.; Baille Le Crom, V.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    Study of c-Fos protein expression in the rat striatum after gamma or (neutron-gamma) irradiation was carried on. c-Fos protein is expressed one hour after gamma exposure at the dose of 15 Gy but specificity of the response must be verified. (author)

  14. The Total Body Irradiation Schedule Affects Acute Leukemia Relapse After Matched T Cell–Depleted Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristei, Cynthia; Carotti, Alessandra; Palazzari, Elisa; Amico, Lucia; Ruggeri, Loredana; Perrucci, Elisabetta; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Lancellotta, Valentina; Palumbo, Isabella; Falzetti, Franca; Aversa, Franco; Merluzzi, Mara; Velardi, Andrea; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether the total body irradiation (TBI) schedule affected outcome in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission who received T cell–depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA identical siblings. Methods and Materials: The study recruited 55 patients (median age, 48 years; age range, 20-66 years; 30 men and 25 women; 34 with acute myeloid leukemia and 21 with acute lymphoid leukemia). Hyperfractionated TBI (HTBI) (1.2 Gy thrice daily for 4 days [for a total dose of 14.4 Gy] from day −12 to day −9) was administered to 29 patients. Single-dose TBI (STBI) (8 Gy, at a median dose rate of 10.7 cGy/min on day −9) was given to 26 patients. Results: All patients achieved primary, sustained engraftment with full donor-type chimerism. At 10 years, the overall cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 11% (SE, ±0.1%). It was 7% (SE, ±0.2%) after HTBI and 15% (SE, ±0.5%) after STBI (P=.3). The overall cumulative incidence of relapse was 33% (SE, ±0.5). It was 13% (SE, ±0.5%) after HTBI and 46% (SE, ±1%) after STBI (P=.02). The overall probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 59% (SE, ±7%). It was 67% (SE, ±0.84%) after HTBI and 37% (SE, ±1.4%) after STBI (P=.01). Multivariate analyses showed the TBI schedule was the only risk factor that significantly affected relapse and DFS (P=.01 and P=.03, respectively). Conclusions: In patients with acute leukemia, HTBI is more efficacious than STBI in eradicating minimal residual disease after HLA-matched T cell–depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus affecting DFS.

  15. The Total Body Irradiation Schedule Affects Acute Leukemia Relapse After Matched T Cell–Depleted Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristei, Cynthia, E-mail: cynthia.aristei@unipg.it [Radiation Oncology Section, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia and Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Carotti, Alessandra [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Palazzari, Elisa [Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Amico, Lucia; Ruggeri, Loredana [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Perrucci, Elisabetta; Falcinelli, Lorenzo [Radiation Oncology Division, Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Lancellotta, Valentina [Radiation Oncology Section, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Palumbo, Isabella [Radiation Oncology Section, Department of Surgery and Biomedical Sciences, University of Perugia and Perugia General Hospital, Perugia (Italy); Falzetti, Franca [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy); Aversa, Franco [Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Parma General Hospital and University, Parma (Italy); Merluzzi, Mara; Velardi, Andrea; Martelli, Massimo Fabrizio [Division of Hematology and Clinical Immunology and Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Department of Medicine, Perugia General Hospital and University, Perugia (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether the total body irradiation (TBI) schedule affected outcome in patients with acute leukemia in complete remission who received T cell–depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from HLA identical siblings. Methods and Materials: The study recruited 55 patients (median age, 48 years; age range, 20-66 years; 30 men and 25 women; 34 with acute myeloid leukemia and 21 with acute lymphoid leukemia). Hyperfractionated TBI (HTBI) (1.2 Gy thrice daily for 4 days [for a total dose of 14.4 Gy] from day −12 to day −9) was administered to 29 patients. Single-dose TBI (STBI) (8 Gy, at a median dose rate of 10.7 cGy/min on day −9) was given to 26 patients. Results: All patients achieved primary, sustained engraftment with full donor-type chimerism. At 10 years, the overall cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 11% (SE, ±0.1%). It was 7% (SE, ±0.2%) after HTBI and 15% (SE, ±0.5%) after STBI (P=.3). The overall cumulative incidence of relapse was 33% (SE, ±0.5). It was 13% (SE, ±0.5%) after HTBI and 46% (SE, ±1%) after STBI (P=.02). The overall probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 59% (SE, ±7%). It was 67% (SE, ±0.84%) after HTBI and 37% (SE, ±1.4%) after STBI (P=.01). Multivariate analyses showed the TBI schedule was the only risk factor that significantly affected relapse and DFS (P=.01 and P=.03, respectively). Conclusions: In patients with acute leukemia, HTBI is more efficacious than STBI in eradicating minimal residual disease after HLA-matched T cell–depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus affecting DFS.

  16. Association of 1800 cGy cranial irradiation with intellectual function in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankovic, Momcilo; Masera, G.; Brouwers, Pim

    1994-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia has been associated with adverse neuropsychological effects, such as low intelligence. We evaluated 203 children for six years in a multi-centre European study. The patients were divided into two groups: 129 children treated with 1800 cGy of cranial radiation therapy and 74 children who received high-dose methotrexate but no radiation therapy. We found a significant decline in full scale intelligence quotient in the irradiated group that increased with the length of time from diagnosis. Younger age at diagnosis was associated with lower full scale intelligence quotient in the radiated group. Our results indicate that a radiation dose of 1800 cGy can have negative effects on neurocognitive function and we continue to question the benefit of low-dose cranial radiation therapy. (author)

  17. Cytogenetic study of skin fibroblasts in a case of accidental acute irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouthuy, M.; Dutrillaux, B.

    1982-01-01

    The cytogenetic study of skin fibroblasts from a young boy, heavily irradiated by handling of an iridium-192 source of 25 curies is reported. About half of the cells examined had chromosomal abnormalities. The same clone, with multiple chromosome rearrangement, was observed in cultures from biopsies obtained 25 and 35 months after the accident. Several other clones were detected in vitro. The results obtained from cultures of biopsies from different locations show that no direct relationships were found between the absorbed dose and the frequency of stable chromosomal rearrangements. The comparison of the intrachromosomal rearrangements, mostly inversions, observed in this study with those detected in human pathology, in irradiation experiments in vitro, and in various species of primates indicates that these rearrangements do not occur at random. (orig.)

  18. Tissue breathing and topology of rats thymocytes surface under acute total γ-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, I A; Gritsuk, A I

    2017-12-01

    Assessment of the effect of single total γ irradiation to the parameters of mitochondrial oxidation and the topology of the thymocyte surface. The study was performed in sexually mature white outbreeding male rats divided into three groups: two experimental and one control. The states of energy metabolism were determined by the rate of oxygen consumption by the thymus tissues on endogenous substrates at the presence of 2,4 dinitrophenol, uncoupler of a tissue breathing (TB) and oxidative phosphorylation (OP) after a single total γ irradiation at a dose of 1.0 Gy at 3, 10, 40 and 60 days. The topology of thymus cells was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the 3rd and 10th days after total gamma irradiation at a dose of 1.0 Gy, a significant decrease in respira tory activity was determined in thymus tissues on endogenous substrates. Simultaneously, on the 3rd day, pro nounced changes in the morphological parameters of thymocytes (height, volume, area of contact with the sub strate) and the topology of their surface were also observed. On the 10th day after irradiation, most of the morpho logical parameters of thymocytes, except for their volume, were characterized by restoration to normal. In the long term (on the 30th and 60th days after exposure), a gradual but not complete recovery of the respiratory activity of thymocytes was observed, accompanied by an increase in the degree of dissociation of TD and OP. The obtained data reflect and refine mechanisms of post radiation repair of lymphopoiesis, showing the presence of conjugated changes in the parameters of aerobic energy metabolism of thymocytes, morphology and topology of their surface. The synchronism of changes in the parameters under study is a reflection of the state of the cytoskeleton, the functional activity of which largely depends on the level and efficiency of mitochondrial oxidation. І. A. Nikitina, A. I. Gritsuk.

  19. The effects of gut commensal bacteria depletion on mice exposed to acute lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Bing; Xu Zhiwei; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    The prevention and management of bacterial infection are the mainstays of therapies for irradiation victims. However, worries about adverse effects arise from gut commensal flora depletion owing to the broad-spectrum antibiotics treatment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of gut bacteria depletion on the mice receiving total-body irradiation (TBI) at a single dose of 12 Gy. One group of mice was merely exposed to TBI but was free of antibiotic treatment throughout the experiment, while the other two groups of mice were additionally given broad-spectrum antibiotics, either from 2 weeks before or immediately after irradiation. The survival time of each animal in each group was recorded for analysis. Results showed that the mean survival time of mice was longest in the group without antibiotic treatment and shortest in the group treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics from 2 weeks before TBI. In conclusion, our data suggested that depletion of gut commensal bacteria with broad-spectrum antibiotics seemed deleterious for mammals receiving lethal TBI. (author)

  20. Anatomical and clinical predictors of acute bowel toxicity in whole pelvis irradiation for prostate cancer with Tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, Barbara; Berardi, Genoveffa; Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Cozzarini, Cesare; Deli, Aniko; La Macchia, Mariangela; Perna, Lucia; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2011-12-01

    Assessing predictors of acute bowel toxicity after whole-pelvis irradiation (WPRT) Image-guided Tomotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost on prostate/prostate bed. In the period March 2005-April 2009, 178 patients were treated with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent with WPRT Tomotherapy. Median dose to the pelvic nodes was 51.8 Gy/28 fractions while concomitantly delivering 65.5-74.2 Gy to prostate/prostatic bed. The impact of many anatomical and clinical parameters on ≥ Grade 2 acute bowel toxicity was investigated by logistic analyses. Only 15/178 patients (8.4%) experienced Grade 2 toxicity (none Grade 3). Main predictors at univariate analysis were nodal CTV (CTVN ≥ 380 cc; OR: 3.7, p=0.017), treatment duration (bowel toxicity after WPRT Tomotherapy is mild, relatively rare and associated to larger CTVN and older age. While efforts to further reduce it do not appear to be relevant, the pre-treatment assessment of "high-risk" patients may help physicians in better managing symptoms. A prospective validation would be very important in confirming these results and in better refining dose-volume bowel effects including symptoms milder that the ones here investigated and retrospectively assessed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relative biological effectiveness (R.B.E.) of Cf-252 vs. acute Co-60 and low dose rate Cs-137 irradiation by spleen weight loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Feola, J.M.; Magura, C.; Beach, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    R.B.E. of Cf-252 on lymphoid tissue was assessed by radiation study of spleen weight loss following acute Co-60, and low dose rate (L.D.R.) Cs-137 and Cf-252 irradiations. Acute Co-60 and L.D.R. Cs-137 dose-response followed two component exponential curves with a 1.3-fold greater effect of L.D.R. Cs-137 vs. acute Co-60 on the first slope and 1.9-fold greater effect for the 2nd slope. L.D.R. Cf-252 response was 1.3 x greater than acute Co-60 but was 1.0 vs. L.D.R. Cs-137 for the first slope indicating a similar effect of Cf-252 mixed neutron/gamma radiation to L.D.R. gamma radiation in producing spleen shrinkage. There was no effect of different sequences and schedules of mixing acute Co-60 with Cf-252 irradiation observed by endogenous CFU-S survival. The R.B.E. of 1.0 - 1.9 indicates that lymphohemopoietic in vivo, presumably well oxygenated, does not respond acutely or as sensitively as hypoxic tumor where R.B.E. is 5 - 7. (author)

  2. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cario-Andre, M.

    2000-11-01

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  3. Utility of cranial boost in addition to total body irradiation in the treatment of high risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Brian M.; Wechsler, Daniel; Braun, Thomas M.; Levine, John; Herman, Joseph; Yanik, Gregory; Hutchinson, Raymond; Pierce, Lori J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) as part of a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is an important component in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that has relapsed or has other certain high-risk features. Controversy exists, however, as to whether a cranial boost in addition to TBI is necessary to prevent central nervous system (CNS) recurrences in these high-risk cases. Previous national trials have included a cranial boost in the absence of data to justify its use. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess risk of CNS recurrence in ALL patients treated with TBI, to identify subsets of these high-risk patients at an increased or decreased risk of CNS recurrence after TBI, and to investigate whether regimens with higher doses of cranial irradiation further reduce the risk of CNS recurrence. Methods and Materials: Charts of 67 consecutively treated patients with ALL who received TBI before HSCT were reviewed. Data including patient demographics, clinical features at presentation, conditioning regimen, donor source, use of a cranial boost, remission stage at transplant, histologic subtype, cytogenetics, and extramedullary site of presentation were retrospectively collected and correlated with the risk of subsequent CNS recurrence. Results: At the time of analysis, 30 (45%) patients were alive with no evidence of disease, 8 (12%) were alive with recurrence of leukemia, 7 (10.5%) had recurrent ALL but with successful salvage, 7 (11%) died subsequent to recurrence, 14 (21%) died from complications related to HCST, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up (1.5%). Of the patients who recurred after HSCT, the relapses were hematologic in 13 (57%), CNS with or without simultaneous marrow involvement in 3 (13%), and other sites in 7 (30%). Forty-one (61%) patients did not receive an extracranial boost of irradiation with TBI. Two of these patients (4.9%) suffered CNS failures compared with 1 of 26 (3.8%) who received a

  4. Light irradiation for treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Taku; Kashimura, Takeshi; Ise, Marii; Lohman, Brandon D; Taira, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Because treatment modalities for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, especially normobaric oxygen and hyperbaric oxygen therapies, have limited effects and hyperbaric oxygen is not available at the scene where treatment is most needed, we conducted a study to determine and compare rates of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) dissociation achieved in human in vitro blood samples under light radiation emitted at three levels of illuminance. This was done with a view toward eventual on-site application. We drew blood from 10 volunteers, prepared 10 red blood cell solutions, and subjected each solution to a CO bubbling procedure to increase the COHb saturation. Samples of each bubbled solution were then divided between 3 beakers (beakers A, B, and C) for a total of 30 beakers. The solution in each beaker was exposed to a continuous flow of oxygen at 50 mL/min, and simultaneously for a period of 15 min, the beaker A and B solutions were irradiated with light emitted at 500,000 and 100,000 lux, respectively, from a halogen light source. The beaker C solutions were exposed to room light. At 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 min, a 50-μL sample was pipetted from each of the 30 beakers for determination of its light absorbance and the COHb dissociation rate. Under each of the experimental conditions, dissociation progressed but at different rates, and starting at 3 min, the differences in rates between conditions were significant (P poisoning.

  5. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  6. Pathological study on the acute effect of irradiation on normal mouse brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Maki, Yutaka; Tsunemoto, Hiroshi; Koike, Sachiko; Kasuga, Tsutomu.

    1981-01-01

    A total of five hundred and five mice were exposed to different X-ray doses in the range of 500 to 40,000 R. at 200 kVp, 20 mA, 1.15 mm Cu, HVL (0.5 mm Cu + 0.5 mm Al), as a single dose for the whole head. Mean life span (LD50-time) of these mice exposed to 2,000 R. was 11.04 days and that of those exposed to 30,000 R. was 0.87 days. The LD50 (5 days) was 19,700 R.. High incidences of gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and brain edema were found after head exposure to 2,000 and 20,000 R.. None of the mice exposed to 500 and 1,000 R. died within 300 days. Fifty-six mice were exposed to 2,000 or 20,000 R. by the same method. All the mice were sacrificed at some postirradiation period, and pathological examinations were performed. The degree of the brain tissue damage was microscopically classified into four grades of scoring with respect to severity. These microscopic evaluations were made in at least, three mice at 18 locations in the cerebellum, 36 locations in the brainstem, and six locations in the hypothalamus under 400-fold magnification. Brain tissue damage appearing before the mean life span (LD50-time) at each irradiation dosage was observed in the cerebellum and the brain stem at the higher dosage, and in the hypothalamus at the lower dosage. It was suggested that the damage in the brain stem, cerebellum, and hypothalamus caused death after the high dose of 20,000 R., and that the hypothalamic damage caused death after the low dose of 2,000 R. In addition, the intracranial bleeding may have affected their life spans. (author)

  7. Pathological study on the acute effect of irradiation on normal mouse brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Y.; Maki, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan)); Tsunemoto, H.; Koike, S.; Kasuga, T.

    1981-10-01

    A total of five hundred and five mice were exposed to different X-ray doses in the range of 500 to 40,000 R. at 200 kVp, 20 mA, 1.15 mm Cu, HVL (0.5 mm Cu + 0.5 mm Al), as a single dose for the whole head. Mean life span (LD50-time) of these mice exposed to 2,000 R. was 11.04 days and that of those exposed to 30,000 R. was 0.87 days. The LD50 (5 days) was 19,700 R.. High incidences of gastrointestinal bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and brain edema were found after head exposure to 2,000 and 20,000 R.. None of the mice exposed to 500 and 1,000 R. died within 300 days. Fifty-six mice were exposed to 2,000 or 20,000 R. by the same method. All the mice were sacrificed at some postirradiation period, and pathological examinations were performed. The degree of the brain tissue damage was microscopically classified into four grades of scoring with respect to severity. These microscopic evaluations were made in at least, three mice at 18 locations in the cerebellum, 36 locations in the brainstem, and six locations in the hypothalamus under 400-fold magnification. Brain tissue damage appearing before the mean life span (LD50-time) at each irradiation dosage was observed in the cerebellum and the brain stem at the higher dosage, and in the hypothalamus at the lower dosage. It was suggested that the damage in the brain stem, cerebellum, and hypothalamus caused death after the high dose of 20,000 R., and that the hypothalamic damage caused death after the low dose of 2,000 R. In addition, the intracranial bleeding may have affected their life spans.

  8. Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning allogenic sem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: A single-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Moo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT.

  9. Effects of total body irradiation-based conditioning allogenic sem cell transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia: A single-institution study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Moo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2014-09-15

    To evaluate the effects of total body irradiation (TBI), as a conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), in pediatric acute leukemia patients. From January 2001 to December 2011, 28 patients, aged less than 18 years, were treated with TBI-based conditioning for allo-SCT in our institution. Of the 28 patients, 21 patients were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, 75%) and 7 were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, 25%). TBI was completed 4 days or 1 day before stem cell infusion. Patients underwent radiation therapy with bilateral parallel opposing fields and 6-MV X-rays. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival outcomes. The 2-year event-free survival and overall survival rates were 66% and 56%, respectively (71.4% and 60.0% in AML patients vs. 64.3% and 52.4% in ALL patients, respectively). Treatment related mortality rate were 25%. Acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease was a major complication; other complications included endocrine dysfunction and pulmonary complications. Common complications from TBI were nausea (89%) and cataracts (7.1%). The efficacy and toxicity data in this study of TBI-based conditioning to pediatric acute leukemia patients were comparable with previous studies. However, clinicians need to focus on the acute and chronic complications related to allo-SCT.

  10. Assessment of testicular function after acute and chronic irradiation: Further evidence for an influence of late spermatids on Sertoli cell function in the adult rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineau, C.; Velez de la Calle, J.F.; Pinon-Lataillade, G.; Jegou, B.

    1989-01-01

    To study cell to cell communications within the testis of adult Sprague-Dawley rats, we used acute whole body neutron plus gamma-irradiation over 7-121 days postirradiation and chronic whole body gamma-irradiation over 14-84 days of irradiation and 7-86 days postirradiation. Neither irradiation protocol had an effect on the body weight of the animals. Neutron plus gamma-rays induced dramatic damages to spermatogonia, preleptotene spermatocytes, spermatozoa, and, to a lesser extent, pachytene spermatocytes. In contrast, gamma-rays induced a selective destruction of spermatogonia. Subsequently, in both experiments a maturation-depletion process led to a marked decrease in all germ cell types. A complete or near complete recovery of the different germ cell types and spermatozoa took place during the two postirradiation periods. Under both irradiation protocols Sertoli cells number was unchanged. Androgen-binding protein and FSH levels were normal in spite of the disappearance of most germ cells from spermatogonia to early spermatids. However, the decline of androgen-binding protein as well as the rise of FSH and their subsequent recovery were highly correlated to the number of late spermatids and spermatozoa. Moreover, it appeared that spermatocytes may also interfere with the production of inhibin (Exp B). With neither irradiation was Leydig cell function altered, except in Exp B in which elevated LH levels were temporarily observed. Correlation analysis suggested a relationship between preleptotene spermatocytes and Leydig cell function. In conclusion, this study establishes that chronic gamma-irradiation is particularly useful in the study of intratesticular paracrine regulation in vivo and provides further support to the concept that late spermatids play a major role in controlling some aspects of Sertoli cell function in the adult rat

  11. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  12. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C., E-mail: jwong@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Rosenthal, Joseph [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Pediatrics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Palmer, Joycelynne [Department of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Stein, Anthony [Department of Hematology/Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  13. Acute toxicity profile of craniospinal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in children with medulloblastoma: A prospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Maurice C.; Kusters, Johannes M.; Gidding, Corrie E.; Schieving, Jolanda H.; Lindert, Erik J. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.; Janssens, Geert O.

    2015-01-01

    To report on the acute toxicity in children with medulloblastoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with daily intrafractionally modulated junctions. Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3–21, with standard-risk (SR) or high-risk (HR) medulloblastoma were eligible. A dose of 23.4 or 36.0Gy in daily fractions of 1.8Gy was prescribed to the craniospinal axis, followed by a boost to the primary tumor bed (54 or 55.8Gy) and metastases (39.6–55.8Gy), when indicated. Weekly, an intravenous bolus of vincristine was combined for patients with SR medulloblastoma and patients participating in the COG-ACNS-0332 study. Common toxicity criteria (CTC, version 2.0) focusing on skin, alopecia, voice changes, conjunctivitis, anorexia, dysphagia, gastro-intestinal symptoms, headache, fatigue and hematological changes were scored weekly during radiotherapy. From 2010 to 2014, data from 15 consecutive patients (SR, n = 7; HR, n = 8) were collected. Within 72 h from onset of treatment, vomiting (66 %) and headache (46 %) occurred. During week 3 of treatment, a peak incidence in constipation (33 %) and abdominal pain/cramping (40 %) was observed, but only in the subgroup of patients (n = 9) receiving vincristine (constipation: 56 vs 0 %, P = .04; pain/cramping: 67 vs 0 %, P = .03). At week 6, 73 % of the patients developed faint erythema of the cranial skin with dry desquamation (40 %) or moist desquamation confined to the skin folds of the auricle (33 %). No reaction of the skin overlying the spinal target volume was observed. Headache at onset and gastro-intestinal toxicity, especially in patients receiving weekly vincristine, were the major complaints of patients with medulloblastoma undergoing craniospinal irradiation with IMRT

  14. Image-Guided Total-Marrow Irradiation Using Helical Tomotherapy in Patients With Multiple Myeloma and Acute Leukemia Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Rosenthal, Joseph; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Total-body irradiation (TBI) has an important role in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but is associated with significant toxicities. Targeted TBI using helical tomotherapy results in reduced doses to normal organs, which predicts for reduced toxicities compared with standard TBI. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated in an autologous tandem transplantation Phase I trial with high-dose melphalan, followed 6 weeks later by total-marrow irradiation (TMI) to skeletal bone. Dose levels were 10, 12, 14, and 16 Gy at 2 Gy daily/twice daily. In a separate allogeneic HCT trial, 8 patients (5 with acute myelogenous leukemia, 1 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1 with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 with multiple myeloma) were treated with TMI plus total lymphoid irradiation plus splenic radiotherapy to 12 Gy (1.5 Gy twice daily) combined with fludarabine/melphalan. Results: For the 13 patients in the tandem autologous HCT trial, median age was 54 years (range, 42-66 years). Median organ doses were 15-65% that of the gross target volume dose. Primarily Grades 1-2 acute toxicities were observed. Six patients reported no vomiting; 9 patients, no mucositis; 6 patients, no fatigue; and 8 patients, no diarrhea. For the 8 patients in the allogeneic HCT trial, median age was 52 years (range, 24-61 years). Grades 2-3 nausea, vomiting, mucositis, and diarrhea were observed. In both trials, no Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was observed, and all patients underwent successful engraftment. Conclusions: This study shows that TMI using helical tomotherapy is clinically feasible. The reduced acute toxicities observed compare favorably with those seen with standard TBI. Initial results are encouraging and warrant further evaluation as a method to dose escalate with acceptable toxicity or to offer TBI-containing regimens to patients unable to tolerate standard approaches

  15. Research on the use of microwave thermography in the case of an acute irradiation of pig; the interest of this experimental model for the diagnosis and assessment of an accidental irradiation of man. Final report for the period 1 March 1984 - 30 September 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.

    1989-01-01

    Thermography, x-ray tomography and NMR imaging, and scintigraphy have been used for the early diagnosis of an acute localized irradiation of a pig. The combination of these methods allows the evaluation of the radiation injury and its possible evolution. The methods could be applied to detect an accidental irradiation of man. 2 refs

  16. Exploitation of the speckle field statistics as an aid to diagnosis of the acute irradiation cutaneous syndrome: comparison of biophysical and biological results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, O.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to demonstrate the possibility of using a non-invasive optical method for the in-vivo diagnosis and prognosis of the acute irradiation cutaneous syndrome. The author first describes the choice of an optical investigation method for application in dermatology. A conventional frequency analysis of the speckle field sampling is completed by a stochastic approach in order to extract parameters which characterize speckle patterns. An experimental protocol is then tested in order to better understand the parameter behaviour with respect to some physical properties of synthetic diffusing media. The author then reports the in-vivo application of this method to the acute irradiation cutaneous syndrome in the case of swine. Results obtained on several animals demonstrate the possibility of discrimination between irradiated areas of normal areas several weeks before the emergence of the first clinical signs. The author tries to understand the results obtained on a radiological burn comparing with histological results. A correlation appears between speckle parameters and histological analysis. Results are also compared with those obtained on other tested media

  17. Changes in the content of somatotropic hormone (STH) in the blood plasma of rats, acutely irradiated with different doses of gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Milanov, S.; Visheva, N.

    1986-01-01

    Male rats of Wistar breed in sexual maturity were acutely and whole-bodily irradiated with cesium gamma source at 0,5, 1,0, 2,0 and 4,0 Gy. On the 1st, 2nd, 3d, 6th, 12th, 20th, 30th and 40th day after treatment of the effect, by 10 animals of each dose-group were submited to overbleeding and in the blood plasma the content of the somatotropic hormone (STH) was assessed by radioimmunological methods. It was established that at the lowest dose of irradiation the STH level in the blood plasma was slightly decreased under the norm. At a dose of 1,0 Gy there was slightly inhibit release of STH in the blood plasma on the 6th day, while on the 12th to the 40th day it was close to the norm. In the rats irradiated with higher doses of 2,0 and 4,0 Gy the STH level in the first three days was strongly raised, and in the animals irradiated with 2,0 Gy the STH level from the 6th to the 20th day decreased, but remined with statistical reliability higher than the norm. On the 30th day STH level increased again, while on the 40th day it returned to the norm. The animals irradiated with the highest dose of 4,0 Gy maintained strongly increased STH level in the plasma, where the peaks were most vividly expressed on the second, 6th and 30th day after irradiation

  18. Comparison of intermediate-dose methotrexate with cranial irradiation for the post-induction treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, A.I.; Weinberg, V.; Brecher, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    The authors compared two regimens with respect to their ability to prolong disease-free survival in 506 children and adolescents with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All responders to induction therapy were randomized to treatment with 2400 rad of cranial irradiation plus intrathecal methotrexate or to treatment with intermediate-dose methotrexate plus intrathecal methotrexate, as prophylaxis for involvement of the central nervous system and other sanctuary areas. Complete responders were stratified into either standard-risk or increased-risk groups on the basis of age and white-cell count at presentation. Among patients with standard risk, hematologic relapses occurred in 9 of 117 given methotrexate and 24 of 120 given irradiation. The rate of central-nervous-system relapse was higher in the methotrexate group (23 of 117) than in the irradiation group. Among patients with increased risk, radiation offered greater protection to the central nervous system than methotrexate; there was no difference in the rate of hematologic relapse. Methotrexate offered better protection against systemic relapse in standard-risk patients and better protection against testicular relapse overall, but it offered less protection against relapses in the central nervous system than cranial irradiation

  19. A comparison of busulphan versus total body irradiation combined with cyclophosphamide as conditioning for autograft or allograft bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringden, O. [Huddinge Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Immunology; Labopin, M.; Gorin, N.C. [Hopital Saint-Antoine, Paris (France). Centre International Greffes de Moelle; Tura, S. [Orsola University Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Arcese, W. [University `La Sapienza`, Rome (Italy). Haematology; Iriondo, A. [Hospital National, Santander (Spain); Zittoun, R. [Hotel-Dieu, Paris (France). Service d`Hematologie; Sierra, J. [Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-06-01

    We retrospectively compared the outcome in patients in the EBMT database transplanted for acute leukaemia from January 1987 to January 1994 who received busulphan and cyclophosphamide (BU/CY) as a pretransplant regimen versus those who received cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation (CY-TBI). The patients were matched for type of transplant (autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) versus allogenic (BMT)), diagnosis (acute lymphoblast leukaemia (ALL) ora cute myeloid leukaemia (AML)), status (early first complete remission, CR-1) versus intermediate (second or later remission, first relapse), age, FAB classification for AML, prevention of graft-versus-host disease and year of transplantation. BU/CY and CY/TBI as pretransplant regimens gave similar results in all situations, except ABMT for ALL intermediate stages with more than 2 years from diagnosis to transplantation, where a lower RI and a higher LFS were associated with CY/TBI. (author).

  20. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With IMRT: New Technical Approach and Interim Analysis of Acute Toxicity in a Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livi, Lorenzo; Buonamici, Fabrizio Banci; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Scotti, Vieri; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Compagnucci, Antonella; Paiar, Fabiola; Scoccianti, Silvia; Pallotta, Stefania; Detti, Beatrice; Agresti, Benedetta; Talamonti, Cinzia; Mangoni, Monica; Bianchi, Simonetta; Cataliotti, Luigi; Marrazzo, Livia; Bucciolini, Marta; Biti, Giampaolo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate with a randomized clinical trial the possibility of treating the index quadrant with external intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a selected group of patients with early-stage breast cancer and to analyze the acute toxicity. Methods and Materials: From September 2005, a randomized Phase III clinical trial has been conducted to compare conventional (tangential field) fractionated whole breast treatment (Arm A) with accelerated partial breast irradiation plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (Arm B). For intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the clinical target volume was drawn with a uniform 1-cm margin around the surgical clips in three dimensions. The ipsilateral and contralateral breast, ipsilateral and contralateral lung, heart, and spinal cord were contoured as organs at risk. All the regions of interest were contoured according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements reports 50 and 62 recommendations. Results: In September 2008, 259 patients were randomized and treated. The mean clinical target volume in Arm B was 44 cm 3 and the mean planning target volume was 123 cm 3 . The mean value of the ratio between the planning target volume and the ipsilateral breast volume was 21%. The rate of Grade 1 and Grade 2 acute skin toxicity was 22% and 19% in Arm A (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale), respectively. The tolerance in Arm B was excellent with only 5% Grade 1 and 0.8% Grade 2 acute skin toxicity. The planning constraints were fully satisfied in most patients. In a very few cases, this was not possible because of very unfavorable anatomy. Quality assurance procedures were performed according to our internal quality assurance protocol, with excellent results. Conclusion: In the present preliminary analysis, we have demonstrated that accelerated partial breast irradiation is feasible, with very low acute toxicity.

  1. Is high dose methotrexate without irradiation of the brain sufficiently effective in prevention of CNS disease in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cap, J.; Foltinova, A.; Kaiserova, E.; Mojzesova, A.; Sejnova, D.; Jamarik, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present 5-year results of treatment in 93 children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia using two therapeutic protocols containing multidrug chemotherapy including high dose methotrexate. We could ascertain different results in standard and high risk patients. In a group of 62 children with standard risk we observed improvement in complete remission rate being 98.9% after induction phase of therapy, only one patient died on septicemia. Relapse rate in this group was 21.2% and that 14. 7% in the bone marrow and 6.5% in CNS and no testicular relapse at all. In the group of 31 children with high risk leukemia all patients achieved complete remission. Only one of them died on acute pancreatitis due to toxicity. Overall relapse rate in this group was 28.9% with 12.8% of medullary relapse and 16.1 % of CNS relapse. The last one was significantly higher than in the previous study when brain irradiation was a part of therapeutic procedure. It seems that this treatment is effective mainly in the standard risk leukemia, however, in the high risk leukemias this procedure appears to be less effective in preventing CNS leukemia. In this group of patients irradiation of the brain need to be enclosed in the therapy. (authors)

  2. Total body irradiation in a patient with fragile X syndrome for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in preparation for stem cell transplantation: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, D T; Mannina, E M; Mendonca, M

    2015-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a congenital disorder caused by expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeat at the 5' end of the fragile X mental retardation gene 1 (FMR1) on the X chromosome that leads to chromosomal instability and diminished serum levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Afflicted individuals often have elongated features, marfanoid habitus, macroorchidism and intellectual impairment. Evolving literature suggests the condition may actually protect from malignancy while chromosomal instability would presumably elevate the risk. Increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation should also be predicted by unstable sites within the DNA. Interestingly, in this report, we detail a patient with FXS diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with induction followed by subsequent cycles of hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone) with a complete response who then was recommended to undergo peripheral stem cell transplantation. The patient underwent total body irradiation (TBI) as a component of his conditioning regimen and despite the concern of his clinicians, developed minimal acute toxicity and successful engraftment. The pertinent literature regarding irradiation of patients with FXS is also reviewed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Prospective study of treatment techniques to minimize the volume of pelvic small bowel with reduction of acute and late effects associated with pelvic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, M.J.; Brereton, H.D.; Rostock, R.A.; Zero, J.M.; Zekoski, D.A.; Poyss, L.F.; Richter, M.P.; Kligerman, M.M.

    1986-09-01

    The volume, distribution, and mobility of opacified pelvic small bowel (PSB) were determined by fluoroscopy and orthogonal radiographs in 150 consecutive patients undergoing pelvic irradiation. Various techniques including uteropexy, omental transposition, bladder distention, inclining the patient, and anterior abdominal wall compression in the supine and prone treatment position were studied for their effect on the volume and location of small bowel within the pelvis. Abdominal wall compression in the prone position combined with bladder distention was selected for further investigation because of its simplicity, reproducibility, patient comfort, and ability to displace the small bowel. Factors correlating with the volume of pelvic small bowel (PSB) included prior pelvic surgery, pelvic irradiation (XRT), and body mass index. After pelvic surgery, especially following abdominoperineal resection (APR), there was a greater volume of PSB which was also less mobile. The severity of acute gastrointestinal effects positively correlated with the volume of irradiated small bowel. Overall, 67% of patients experienced little or no diarrhea, 30% developed mild diarrhea, and no patient required treatment interruption. Late gastrointestinal effects correlated with the prior pelvic surgery and with the volume of small bowel receiving greater than 45 Gy. Small bowel obstruction was not observed in 75 patients who had no previous pelvic surgery. However, following pelvic surgery excluding APR, 2/50 patients and following APR, 3/25 patients developed small bowel obstruction.

  4. Does prophylactic treatment with proteolytic enzymes reduce acute toxicity of adjuvant pelvic irradiation? Results of a double-blind randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Thomas; Uhder, Kerstin; Kurek, Ralf; Roeddiger, Sandra; Schneider, Lida; Vogt, Hans-Georg; Heyd, Reinhard; Zamboglou, Nikolaos

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Does prophylactic treatment with proteolytic enzymes reduce acute toxicity of adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy? Material and methods: Fifty-six patients with an indication for adjuvant pelvic irradiation after curative surgery were double-blind randomized. All patients took 3x4 capsules study medication daily during radiotherapy. Twenty-eight patients in the enzyme group (EG) received capsules containing papain, trypsin and chymotrypsin, 28 in the placebo group (PG) received placebo capsules. All patients were irradiated with 5x1.8 Gy weekly to 50.4 Gy using four-field-box technique after CT-based planning. Primary objective was the grade of diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and epitheliolysis during radiotherapy. Secondary objectives were the number of supportive medications and treatment interruptions due to acute toxicity. Results: None/mild diarrhea: 43% EG, 64% PG. Moderate/severe diarrhea: 57% EG, 36% PG (P=0.11). Mean duration: 11 days in EG, 10 days in PG. None/mild nausea: 93% EG, 93% PG. Moderate/severe nausea: 7% EG, 7% PG. None/mild vomiting: 100% EG, 97% PG. None/mild fatigue: 82% EG, 93% PG. Moderate/severe fatigue: 18% EG, 7% PG (P=0.23). None/mild epitheliolysis: 75% EG, 93% PG. Moderate/severe epitheliolysis: 25% EG, 7% PG (P=0.16). Treatment interruption (mean days): 2.44 in EG, 1.46 in PG. Number of supportive medication: 29 in EG, 19 in PG. Conclusions: The prophylactic use of proteolytic enzymes does not reduce acute toxicities, treatment interruptions and number of supportive medication and therefore does not improve tolerance of adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

  5. Carbon Ion irradiation in the treatment of grossly incomplete or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheaths tumors: acute toxicity and preliminary outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Uhl, Matthias; Chaudhri, Naved; Herfarth, Klaus K; Debus, Juergen; Roeder, Falk

    2015-01-01

    To report our early experience with carbon ion irradiation in the treatment of gross residual or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). We retrospectively analysed 11 patients (pts) with MPNST, who have been treated with carbon ion irradiation (C12) at our institution between 2010 and 2013. All pts had measurable gross disease at the initiation of radiation treatment. Median age was 47 years (29-79). Tumors were mainly located in the pelvic/sacral (5 pts) and sinunasal/orbital region (5 pts). 5 pts presented already in recurrent situation, 3 pts had been previously irradiated, and in 3 pts MPNST were neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) associated. Median cumulative dose was 60 GyE. Treatment was carried out either as a combination of IMRT plus C12 boost (4 pts) or C12 only (7 pts). Median follow-up was 17 months (3-31 months). We observed 3 local progressions, translating into estimated 1- and 2-year local control rates of 65%. One patient developed distant failure, resulting in estimated 1- and 2-year PFS rates of 56%. Two patients have died, therefore the estimated 1- and 2-year OS rates are 75%. Acute radiation related toxicities were generally mild, no grade 3 side effects were observed. Severe late toxicity (grade 3) was scored in 2 patients (trismus, wound healing delays). Carbon ion irradiation yields very promising short term local control and overall survival rates with low morbidity in patients suffering from gross residual or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and should be further investigated in a prospective trial

  6. Acute changes in canine small bowel muscle prostaglandin synthesis and function after x-irradiation with 9.38 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.W.; Loven, D.P.; Flatt, A.; Prihoda, M.

    1984-01-01

    Abdominal radiotherapy is often limited by radiation-induced enteritis. Prostaglandin (PG) synthesis may play a role in the altered function of small bowel (SB) muscle and mucosa. Therefore, the authors have investigated the effects of X-radiation on PG synthesis, and other aspects of canine SB smooth muscle function. Canine SB received 9.38 Gy of 250 kVp X-radiation in situ. Electrodes were used to monitor spike burst and propagation of electrical activity in the SB muscle pre- and post-exposure. Animals were sacrificed prior to irradiation and at 1 and 4 days post-irradiation. Serum PG levels were assayed from mesenteric artery and vein samples, and SB muscle was removed for analysis of PG synthesis. SB muscle myoelectric activity decreased after irradiation until sacrifice (day 4). The PG synthesis in irradiated SB muscle at days 1 and 4 increased in PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2/α and in thromboxane A/sub 2/ metabolite, while the PGI/sub 2/ metabolite decreased. PG levels in venous blood indicate similar changes after passage through the intestine. Although causality is not established, radiation does induce changes in PG synthesis which correlate with changes in myoelectric activity (motility)

  7. An experimental model of acute encephalopathy after total body irradiation in the rat: effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761); Effet de l'extrait de Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) chez le rat sur un modele experimental d'encephalopathie aigue apres irradiation corporelle totale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamproglou, I.; Bok, B. [Hopital Bichat, 75 - Paris (France); Boisserie, G.; Mazeron, J.J.; Baillet, F. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Drieu, K. [IHB-IPSEN, 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-06-01

    To define the therapeutic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) in an experimental model of acute encephalopathy following total body irradiation in rats. Ninety four-month-old rats received 4.5 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) at day 1 while 15 rats received sham irradiation. A behavioural study based on a conditioning test of negative reinforcement, the one-way avoidance test, was performed test, was performed after irradiation. Orally treatment was started one day (study A) or twenty two days (study B) after irradiation and repeated daily for twelve days. In the irradiated group, three subgroups were defined according to the treatment received: EGb 761 (50 mg/kg), EGb 761 (100 mg/kg), water. This work comprised two consecutive studies. In study A (45 rats) the one-way avoidance test was administered daily from day 7 to day 14. In study B (45 rats) the behavioural test was performed from day 28 to day 35. Study A (three groups of 15 rats): following TBI, irradiated rats treated with water demonstrated a significant delay in a learning the one-way avoidance test in comparison with sham-irradiated rats (P < 0.0002) or irradiated rats treated with EGb 761 (50 mg/kg; P < 0.007) or EGb 761 (100 mg/kg; P < 0.0002). The irradiated rats, treated with EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. Study B (three groups of 15 rats): the irradiated rats, treated with water of EGb 761 (50 or 100 mg/kg) did not differ from the sham-irradiated controls. (authors)

  8. Differential effects of 18- and 24-Gy cranial irradiation on growth rate and growth hormone release in children with prolonged survival after acute lymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cicognani, A.; Cacciari, E.; Vecchi, V.; Cau, M.; Balsamo, A.; Pirazzoli, P.; Tosi, M.T.; Rosito, P.; Paolucci, G.

    1988-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of two different doses of cranial irradiation on growth and growth hormone (GH) release, we studied 61 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia who had survived at least five years in continuous complete remission. Forty-three children received 24 Gy (group 1) and 18 children received 18 Gy (group 2). Height was evaluated at diagnosis, at the end of treatment, and 6, 12, and 24 months later. Growth hormone release was evaluated by arginine and levodopa tests after the end of treatment. After diagnosis, the height SD score decreased significantly in both groups; two years after the end of treatment, only group 1 showed an SD score for height that was still significantly lower than at diagnosis. Group 1 showed impaired GH responses to the tests and, compared with controls, group 1 in fact included a percentage of subjects with a normal response to levodopa (ie, greater than 8 micrograms/L) that was significantly lower (56.4% vs 83.3%) and a percentage of nonresponders to both tests that was significantly higher (21.6% vs 0%). These data indicate that only patients treated with lower cranial irradiation dosage (18 Gy) had complete growth recovery and normal GH responses to pharmacologic tests.

  9. Quantitative response of bone marrow colony-forming units (CFU-C and PFU-C) in weaning beagles exposed to acute whole-body γ irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, F.D.; Stitzel, K.A.; Klein, A.K.; Shifrine, M.; Graham, R.; Jones, M.; Bradley, E.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1978-01-01

    Using a methylcellulose-supported bone marrow culture system, the dose-response relationships of suspended granulocyte-monocyte colonies (CFU-C) and adherent fibroblastic colonies (PFU-C) were investigated in 2- to 3-month-old beagles exposed to acute whole-body γ irradiation. Groups of weanling beagles were exposed at a rate of 140 R/hr delivered from a 60 Co γ source achieving total exposures ranging from 0 to 586 R. Twenty-four hours following irradiation, bone marrow was collected, plated into methylcellulose, and after 1 week of incubation both colony types were quantitated. In addition, bone marrow cellularity determinations were made for a variety of bones using an 59 Fe-labeling technique. The results show a D 37 for the linear part of the slope of 70 R for CFU-C. Although within the limits of the experiment a D 37 could not be established for the fibroblastic populations, the results indicate a substantial degree of radioresistance for these elements supporting our previous studies on PFU-C, performed on mice, which suggested a D 37 of approximately 400 R for the progenitors of these fibroblastic elements

  10. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  11. Study of acute ecotoxicity of Resveratrol in Daphnia similis irradiated and non-irradiated; Estudo da toxicidade aguda do Resveratrol em Daphnia similis irradiadas e não irradiadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormenio, Matheus B.; Mazieiro, Joana S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, José R. Rogero, E-mail: matheus.ormenio@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Resveratrol is synthesized by a wide variety of plants in response to ultraviolet (UV) radiation or action of certain pathogens. It is a compound with ability to protect cells from free radicals, responsible for the natural process of cellular aging. It is known that resveratrol has a radiomodifying effect, in addition to the antioxidant potential, anti-inflammatory, against cardiovascular diseases. The increasing use of resveratrol as a function of biological activities has led to concern about toxicity. In the ecotoxicological area, acute ecotoxicity tests are performed on aquatic organisms that lethal effects of certain substances and / or environmental samples. These tests are important in providing critical information for the development and adoption of criteria for improvement environmental quality. In these tests Cladoceras are widely used as test organisms due to their extreme susceptibility to toxicants in the environment and because they are easy to handle in the laboratory. In this study, it was used Daphnia similis to verify the toxic effect of resveratrol on this non-irradiated organism and irradiated with gamma radiation. First, toxicity studies of resveratrol and gamma Daphnia similis, where the lethal dose (LD50) of the 585.43 Gy radiation was determined and the EC50 concentration of resveratrol that causes immobility in 50% of the organisms in the assay, of 6.08 μM. Based on these data, the study will be continued to assess the toxic effect of radiation on organisms that have been exposed prior to resveratrol, i.e, to verify the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol.

  12. Influence of melanocytes in the ex-vivo reconstructed epidermal melanin unit following an acute UV irradiation; Role des melanocytes dans l'unite epidermique de melanisation reconstruite ex-vivo apres une irradiation UV aigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cario-Andre, M

    2000-11-15

    Influence of melanocytes in skin pigmentation is well documented, however its photo-protective role has given rise to controversy. The role of melanocytes have been investigated on reconstructed epidermis with 100 % of keratinocytes or 95 % of keratinocytes and 5 % of melanocytes. In a first time, the effect of an acute UVB dose has been studied on both reconstructed epidermis, next we have investigated UVA and UVA+B effects on these epidermis. Following irradiation, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis protects against apoptosis without protecting significantly against DNA damage formation (CPD, 6-4PP) and protects against UV-induced unbalance of the SOD/catalase ratio (antioxidants enzymes). On the contrary, the presence of melanocytes in reconstructed epidermis amplifies lipids and proteins oxidations but seems to protect against DNA oxidations. Melanocytes differ from keratinocytes by their melanin content and their more important concentration in polyunsaturated fatty acids. To evaluate what is the part of melanin and the part of polyunsaturated fatty acids in epidermal UV responses, reconstructed epidermis with keratinocytes have been supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid. This study indicates that polyunsaturated fatty acids are responsible for lipids and proteins oxidations and that melanin protect against DNA oxidation induced by lipid peroxidation. All these studies demonstrate that, model of reconstructed epidermis and epidermis in-vivo have the same behaviour following UV irradiation. In the last part, sunscreens and antioxidants have been tested on reconstructed epidermis and have demonstrated that model of reconstructed epidermis is suitable for photo-protective molecules screening. (author)

  13. In vitro germination and the effect of acute gamma irradiation on pollen of Pinus patula Schiede et Deppe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, M.L.; Dobriyal, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    In-vitro study revealed that the best medium for germinating P. patula pollen was 12,5% Sucrose with 0.001% Boron in 2% agar medium. After gamma irradiation the LD-50 based on pollen germination and germination energy index was 1.174 kr and 1.148 kr respectively. Pollen was viable on the 90th day when used after storing at 10 0 C in desiccator. Gamma doses for haploid breeding and mutation breeding are suggested. ANOVA showed that differences between the different media used for germination and gamma-ray doses were highly significant. (orig.) [de

  14. The Dose-Volume Relationship of Small Bowel Irradiation and Acute Grade 3 Diarrhea During Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, John M.; Lockman, David; Yan Di; Wallace, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous work has found a highly significant relationship between the irradiated small-bowel volume and development of Grade 3 small-bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer. This study tested the previously defined parameters in a much larger group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 96 consecutive patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy for rectal cancer had treatment planning computed tomographic scans with small-bowel contrast that allowed the small bowel to be outlined with calculation of a small-bowel dose-volume histogram for the initial intended pelvic treatment to 45 Gy. Patients with at least one parameter above the previously determined dose-volume parameters were considered high risk, whereas those with all parameters below these levels were low risk. The grade of diarrhea and presence of liquid stool was determined prospectively. Results: There was a highly significant association with small-bowel dose-volume and Grade 3 diarrhea (p ≤ 0.008). The high-risk and low-risk parameters were predictive with Grade 3 diarrhea in 16 of 51 high-risk patients and in 4 of 45 low-risk patients (p = 0.01). Patients who had undergone irradiation preoperatively had a lower incidence of Grade 3 diarrhea than those treated postoperatively (18% vs. 28%; p = 0.31); however, the predictive ability of the high-risk/low-risk parameters was better for preoperatively (p = 0.03) than for postoperatively treated patients (p = 0.15). Revised risk parameters were derived that improved the overall predictive ability (p = 0.004). Conclusions: The highly significant dose-volume relationship and validity of the high-risk and low-risk parameters were confirmed in a large group of patients. The risk parameters provided better modeling for the preoperative patients than for the postoperative patients

  15. Total Body Irradiation without Chemotherapy as Conditioning for an Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Altouri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML, failing induction, are rarely effective. We report our experience in 4 patients with AML who received 16 Gy TBI prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT, between June 2010 and May 2011. Patients were 20 to 55 years of age, 2 with relapsed disease and 2 with AML failing induction. An HLA-matched graft from related or unrelated donor was infused on day 0. All but one, who received a CD34+-selected graft, received methotrexate and tacrolimus +/− antithymocyte globulin, as GVHD prophylaxis. The other patient received tacrolimus alone. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred at a median of 18 and 14 days, respectively. Patients were discharged at a median of 28 days. There were no unexpected toxicities in the first 30 days. One patient had cytomegalovirus (CMV viremia and anorexia, at two months. One patient had grade 2 acute GVHD of the skin. One patient developed chronic GVHD of the eyes, mouth, skin, joints, and lung at 4 months. Two patients died from relapse of their leukemia at days 65 and 125. Two patients remain in remission beyond day 1500. 16 Gy TBI followed by an alloHCT for AML, failing induction, is feasible and tolerable.

  16. Increased viability and resilience of haemolymph cells in blue mussels following pre-treatment with acute high-dose gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B. [Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    In an initial experiment, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to a range of acute high doses of gamma radiation in the laboratory. Haemolymph was extracted and the haemocytes (blood cells) were scored for cell viability (% living cells) under a microscope, directly after irradiation (0.04, 0.4 or 4 Gy) and again after a subsequent treatment with hydrogen peroxide in vitro (final H{sub 2}O{sub 2} conc.: 0.2 μM). Cell viability in controls (0 Gy) was approximately 100% and no cell death was observable from radiation exposure alone. When treated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} a decrease in cell viability was seen across all treatments, however this decrease in viability was reduced with increasing radiation pre-treatment (0 Gy = 53%; 0.04 Gy = 66%; 0.4 Gy = 75%; 4 Gy = 83%). To investigate the mechanism for this therapeutic effect observed, the experiment was repeated. Using mussels from a different location, the same, but more extensive method of irradiation (0[control], 0.04, 0.4 Gy, 5 or 40 Gy) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment was used. Additional haemolymph sub-samples were taken for analysis of catalase concentration. In this second experiment, viability of cells from controls was only 62%, indicating the mussels were in a poorer condition than those of the previous experiment. The lowest level of radiation exposure (0.04 Gy) further decreased the viability (56%). However, at higher doses the viability was increased compared to control, which then gradually declined with increasing dose (0.4 Gy = 75%; 5 Gy = 72%; 40 Gy = 65%). Catalase analysis demonstrated a complimentary pattern of activity of the antioxidant in the haemolymph, directly correlating with radiation dose (0 Gy = 0.2 U; 0.04 Gy = 0.1 U; 0.4 Gy = 1.3 U; 5 Gy = 0.9 U; 40 Gy = 0.1 Gy). Treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased cell viability across all treatments, but no pattern between radiation treatments was discernable. The results indicate that an acute dose of radiation not only has negligible

  17. Augmenting Total Body Irradiation with a Cranial Boost before Stem Cell Transplantation Protects Against Post-Transplant Central Nervous System Relapse in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Robert W; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Cao, Qing; Smith, Angela R; Yuan, Jianling

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a pretransplant cranial boost (CB) on post-transplant central nervous system (CNS) relapse and survival in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using a total body irradiation (TBI)-containing preparation regimen. Two hundred thirteen ALL patients were treated consecutively at our institution with allogeneic HSCT. Conditioning included TBI (1320 cGy in 8 fractions given twice daily) and cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) with or without fludarabine (75 mg/m 2 ). Patients were divided into 4 groups based on history of CNS disease and whether a CB was given. Of the 160 patients with no history of CNS disease, none received a CB (CNS-/CB-). Of the 53 patients with prior CNS disease, 41 had not received prior cranial irradiation. Thirty of these 41 received a CB of 900 to 1000 cGy in 5 daily fractions (CNS+/CB+), whereas the other 11 did not receive a CB because of physician preference (CNS+/CB-). The remaining 12 patients with prior CNS involvement had previously received cranial irradiation and thus were not candidates for a CB (CNS + PriorRT). Two-year CNS relapse risk, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Seven patients experienced post-transplant CNS relapse: 4 in the CNS-/CB- group, 2 in the CNS+/CB- group, and 1 in the CNS + PriorRT group. None of the 30 patients who received a CB relapsed in the CNS. Two-year CNS relapse risk was 0% in the CNS+/CB+ group compared with 21% (95% CI, 0% to 45%) in the CNS+/CB- group (P = .03). Two-year OS and DFS did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, among ALL patients with prior CNS leukemia, there was a trend toward a reduced risk of post-transplant CNS relapse in patients who received a CB. However, the addition of a CB did not appear to have an impact on OS or DFS. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for

  18. Frequency of reciprocal translocations as a function of gamma-ray dose in acute spermatogonial irradiation of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyglenov, A.; Benova, D.; Baev, I.; Karadzhov, A.

    1981-01-01

    Adult rabbit males were given acute gamma-ray exposures at dose levels of 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, or 5.0 Gy. The reciprocal translocations arisen at the premeiotic cytogenetic techniques at a 5 month postradiation. The findings indicated that increasing the dose up to 3.0 Gy resulted in a rise of translocation yields, while 5.0 Gy doses produced an abrupt fall. For the dose range studied, dose-response data were best described by a linear-quadratic equation. Based on the evidence of peak translocation yields obtained with 3.0 Gy exposures, rabbit spermatogonia were characterized as being more sensitive to radiation cell killing, as compared to mouse spermatogonia, where maximum translocation yields are reportedly observed at 6 to 8 Gy doses. As opposed to this, genetic radiosensitivity of spermatogonia proved lower in the rabbit than in the mouse. (A.B.)

  19. Influence of radiation dose rate and lung dose on interstitial pneumonitis after fractionated total body irradiation: acute parotitis may predict interstitial pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Natsuo; Sasai, Keisuke; Tachiiri, Seiji; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Okada, Takashi; Yano, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Uchiyama, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated patients for the influence of the dose rate and lung dose of fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on the subsequent development of interstitial pneumonitis (IP). Sixty-six patients at our institute were treated with TBI followed by BMT. All of the patients received a total TBI dose of 12 Gy given in 6 fractions over 3 days and were divided into 3 groups according to the radiation dose rate and lung dose: group A, lung dose of 8 Gy (n = 18); group B, lung dose of 12 Gy at 8 cGy/min (n = 25); and group C, lung dose of 12 Gy at 19 cGy/min (n = 23). The overall survival rate, the cumulative incidence of relapse, and the cumulative incidence of IP were evaluated in relation to various potential indicators of future IP. There were no significant differences in survival and relapse rates between patient group A and combined groups B and C. Clinically significant IP occurred in 13 patients. The cumulative incidence of IP was significantly higher in patients who developed acute parotitis as indicated by either an elevation in the serum amylase level or parotid pain of grade 1 to 2. There was no difference in IP incidence among groups A, B, and C. There was no significant difference in IP incidence between lung dose values of 8 Gy (with lung shielding) and 12 Gy (without lung shielding) and between dose rate values of 8 cGy/min and 19 cGy/ min, at least when TBI was given in 6 fractions. The presence of acute parotitis during or just after TBI may be a predictor of IP.

  20. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer during postoperative irradiation. An alleviating effect on acute radiation mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Kouji; Masuko, Noriko; Hayashi, Takafumi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry; Sugita, Tadashi; Sakai, Kunio; Tsuchida, Emiko; Matsumoto, Yasuo; Sasamoto, Ryuta

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral hygiene care of patients with oral cancer on alleviating acute radiation mucositis. Eighteen patients receiving postoperative radiotherapy for tongue and oral floor cancer were evaluated. Radiotherapy was given in 2 Gy per fraction, 5 times a week for a total dose of 50 Gy in most patients. Radiation field included the tongue and oral floor. During radiotherapy, 8 patients were treated by dento-maxillofacial radiologists with special concern on oral hygiene (oral hygiene group) and the remaining 10 patients were treated with routine dental care (standard medication group). Mucositis were evaluated using JCOG grade and EORTC/RTOG score by radiotherapists or dento-maxillofacial radiologists at 10 Gy intervals. Oral hygiene plans comprised motivation to maintain oral hygiene and establishing the habits of oral self care 4 times per day. Once a week, oral hygiene and oral cleaning of patients were checked by dento-maxillofacial radiologists. Oral self care included mechanical tooth brushing and a chemical mouthwash. No patients with grade 3 and score 4 mucositis were noted in the oral hygiene group. Severe mucositis occurred less frequently in the oral hygiene group than in the standard medication group. Interruption of radiotherapy due to severe mucositis did not occur in the oral hygiene group. On the other hand, interruption of radiotherapy occurred in four patients in the standard medication group, and in three it was due to severe oral pain. Our results suggested that our method of oral hygiene was more effective for alleviating acute radiation mucositis than other methods so far reported. In addition, our method is considered to be useful in preventing rampant dental caries and severe periodontitis due to the xerostomia induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  2. Total body irradiation: what schedule(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why a whole-body irradiation is still an essential step before a bone marrow graft. He presents irradiation protocols for acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia. 14 refs

  3. HIT`91 (prospective, co-operative study for the treatment of malignant brain tumors in childhood): accuracy and acute toxicity of the irradiation of the craniospinal axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, R.D.; Timmermann, B.; Bamberg, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kuehl, J. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Children`s Hospital; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Flentje, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Meisner, C. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Medical Information Processing

    1999-04-01

    Background: It was the aim of the quality control program of the randomized trial HIT `91 (intensive chemotherapy before irradiation versus maintenance chemotherapy after irradiation) to assess prospectively the quality of neuroaxis irradiation with respect to the protocol guidelines and to evaluate acute toxicity with respect to treatment arm. Patients, Materials and Methods: Data of 134 patients undergoing irradiation of the craniospinal axis were available. Positioning aids, shielding techniques, treatment machines, choice of energy, total dose and fractionation were evaluated. A total of 651 simulation and verification films were analyzed to assess the coverage of the clinical target volume (whole brain, posterior fossa, sacral nerve roots) and deviations of field alignment between simulation and verification of first treatment. Field matching between whole brain and adjacent cranial spinal fields was analyzed with respect to site and width of junction. Acute maximal side effects were evaluated according to a modified WHO score for neurotoxicity, infections, skin, mucosa and myelotoxicity. Results: In 91.3% of patients contemporary positioning aids and individualized shielding techniques were used to assure a reproducible treatment. In 98 patients (73.1%) linear accelerators and in 36 patients (26.8%) {sup 60}Cobalt machines were used. Single and total dose were administered according to the protocol guidelines in more than 90% of patients. In 20.2% of patients the cribriform plate, in 1.4% the middle cranial fossa and in 21.1% the posterior fossa and in 4.5% the 2nd sacral segment were incompletely encompassed by the treatment portals. Ninety-five percent of deviations of field alignment were less than 13.0 mm (whole brain) and 12 mm (cranial spinal field) with a random error between 4.9 and 7.6 mm (whole brain) and 6.9 mm and 9.9 mm (spinal canal), respectively. In 77.5% of patients the junctions between whole brain and cranial spinal fields were placed

  4. Acute toxicity and treatment interruption related to electron and photon craniospinal irradiation in pediatric patients treated at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric L.; Allen, Pamela; Wu, Catherine; Ater, Joann; Kuttesch, John; Maor, Moshe H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of acute toxicity and treatment interruption associated with electron and photon craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children treated with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study involving a computerized search of the radiotherapy database at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center identified a total of 79 eligible patients ≤18 years old who had received electron (n=46) or photon (n=33) CSI from October 1980 to March 2000. Acute toxicity was graded according to the 1998 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Chemotherapy sequencing was categorized as before or after CSI or no chemotherapy. The incidences of weight loss and skin toxicity were recorded and differences in treatment interruption and hematologic values with respect to modality used (electron vs. photon), age (≤6 or >6 years), and sequencing of chemotherapy were compared using chi-square tests. Results: The median age of the electron group was lower than that of the photon group (6.7 years and 11.7 years, respectively). The two groups were otherwise well matched in terms of median spinal dose (31.1 vs. 33.3 Gy), fraction size (1.57 vs. 1.63 Gy), and total treatment time (32.4 vs. 30.7 days). Only 2 patients in each group (photon and electron) had a treatment break (>3 days). The mean number of days interrupted was 0.94 (photon) and 1.1 (electron) (p=0.72). The electron and photon groups were well balanced in terms of receiving pre-CSI chemotherapy (37% vs. 41%, p=0.776). Chemotherapy given before radiotherapy vs. after or not at all was associated with an increased incidence of Grade 3-4 leukopenia (76% vs. 49%, p=0.02), thrombocytopenia (90% vs. 10%, p=0), and neutropenia (50% vs. 15%, p=0.005). A younger age was associated with Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia (29% vs. 8.7%, p=0.034), and decreased hemoglobin (29% vs. 6.5%, p=0.014). The incidence of leukocyte depression of Grade 3-4 toxicity was 62% in the electron

  5. The Gottingen Minipig Is a Model of the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome: G-Colony Stimulating Factor Stimulates Hematopoiesis and Enhances Survival From Lethal Total-Body γ-Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Maria, E-mail: maria.moroni@usuhs.edu [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ngudiankama, Barbara F. [Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Christensen, Christine [Division of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Olsen, Cara H. [Biostatistics Consulting Center, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Owens, Rossitsa [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lombardini, Eric D. [Veterinary Medicine Department, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok (Thailand); Holt, Rebecca K. [Veterinary Science Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Whitnall, Mark H. [Radiation Countermeasures Program, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: We are characterizing the Gottingen minipig as an additional large animal model for advanced drug testing for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to enhance the discovery and development of novel radiation countermeasures. Among the advantages provided by this model, the similarities to human hematologic parameters and dynamics of cell loss/recovery after irradiation provide a convenient means to compare the efficacy of drugs known to affect bone marrow cellularity and hematopoiesis. Methods and Materials: Male Gottingen minipigs, 4 to 5 months old and weighing 9 to 11 kg, were used for this study. We tested the standard off-label treatment for ARS, rhG-CSF (Neupogen, 10 μg/kg/day for 17 days), at the estimated LD70/30 total-body γ-irradiation (TBI) radiation dose for the hematopoietic syndrome, starting 24 hours after irradiation. Results: The results indicated that granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced survival, stimulated recovery from neutropenia, and induced mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, the administration of G-CSF resulted in maturation of monocytes/macrophages. Conclusions: These results support continuing efforts toward validation of the minipig as a large animal model for advanced testing of radiation countermeasures and characterization of the pathophysiology of ARS, and they suggest that the efficacy of G-CSF in improving survival after total body irradiation may involve mechanisms other than increasing the numbers of circulating granulocytes.

  6. Dose-effect relationship for cataract induction after single-dose total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van; Belkacemi, Yazid; Kal, Henk B.; Labopin, Myriam; Frassoni, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine a dose-effect relationship for cataract induction, the tissue-specific parameter, α/β, and the rate of repair of sublethal damage, μ value, in the linear-quadratic formula have to be known. To obtain these parameters for the human eye lens, a large series of patients treated with different doses and dose rates is required. The data of patients with acute leukemia treated with single-dose total body irradiation (STBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) collected by the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation were analyzed. Methods and Materials: The data of 495 patients who underwent BMT for acute leukemia, who had STBI as part of their conditioning regimen, were analyzed using the linear-quadratic concept. The end point was the incidence of cataract formation after BMT. Of the analyzed patients, 175 were registered as having cataracts. Biologic effective doses (BEDs) for different sets of values for α/β and μ were calculated for each patient. With Cox regression analysis, using the overall chi-square test as the parameter evaluating the goodness of fit, α/β and μ values were found. Risk factors for cataract induction were the BED of the applied TBI regimen, allogeneic BMT, steroid therapy for >14 weeks, and heparin administration. To avoid the influence of steroid therapy and heparin on cataract induction, patients who received steroid or heparin treatment were excluded, leaving only the BED as a risk factor. Next, the most likely set of α/β and μ values was obtained. With this set, the cataract-free survival rates were calculated for specific BED intervals, according to the Kaplan-Meier method. From these calculations, cataract incidences were obtained as function of the BED at 120 months after STBI. Results: The use of BED instead of the TBI dose enabled the incidence of cataract formation to be predicted in a reasonably consistent way. With Cox regression analysis for all STBI data, a maximal chi-square value was

  7. Longevity of irradiated burros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.C.; Brown, D.G.; Frome, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    During the course of external radiation exposures of burros to establish a dose-response curve for acute mortality after total irradiation, some of the animals at the three lowest exposures to gamma photons survived. These groups of 10, 9, and 10 burros were exposed to 320, 425, and 545 R, respectively. There were 10 unirradiated controls. In 1953, 20 burros were exposed to 375 R (gamma) in 25-R/week increments without acute mortality and were added to the life-span study. In 1957, 33 burros were exposed to mixed neutron-gamma radiation from nuclear weapons, and 14 controls were added. The total number of irradiated burros in the study was increased to 88 by the addition of 6 animals irradiated with 180 rads of neutron and gamma radiation (4:1) in a Godiva-type reactor in 1959. In this experiment two acute deaths occurred which were not included in the analysis. In the first 4 years after the single gamma exposures, there were deaths from pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia, obviously related to radiation-induced bone-marrow damage. After that period, however, deaths were from common equine diseases; no death has resulted from a malignant neoplasm. Of the original 112 burros, 15 survive (10 irradiated and 5 controls). Survival curves determined for unirradiated and neutron-gamma- and gamma-irradiated burros showed significant differences. The mean survival times were: controls, 28 years; gamma irradiation only, 26 years; and neutron-gamma irradiation, 23 years. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Expression profiling of murine lung 70 days following exposure to fractionated or acute dose of 1.0 Gy 56Fe- particle irradiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiation of the K-rasLA1 mouse model with a fractionated dose of 1.0Gy 56Fe- particles increases the incidence of invasive carcinoma compared to unirradiated...

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munasiri, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Gives details of sources used for food irradiation, brief description of the process, safety of food irradiation process, practical applications and the amount of doses used for spices, condiments, mangoes etc., limitations of food irradiation, international status of clearance of irradiated foods, versatility of the process

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  12. Effect of acute whole-body neutron gamma irradiation on the dopamine neuronal uptake-sites; Effets d`une irradiation globale aigue a preponderance neutron sur le transporteur de capture neuronale de la dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.; Mahfoudi, H.; Lambert, F.; Burckhart, M.F.; Fatome, M. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, La Tronche, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-12-31

    The effects of (neutron-gamma) irradiation on the dopamine uptake sites distribution were investigated, using quantitative autoradiography. Brain ares examined are striatum, lateral septum, substantia nigra, gyrus dentatus, ventral tegmental area, interfascicular nu and antero-ventral thalamic nu. Three hours after exposure at the dose of 4 Gy, a decrease (- 33 %) of dopamine uptake sites was observed in the gyrus dentatus. (authors)

  13. A prospective neurocognitive evaluation of children treated with additional chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation following isolated central nervous system relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Parvesh; Mulhern, Raymond K.; Regine, William F.; Rivera, Gaston K.; Kun, Larry E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective assessment of neurocognitive performance was conducted in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) following isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse to evaluate the impact of additional systemic/intrathecal (IT) chemotherapy and craniospinal irradiation (CSI) upon long-term intellectual function. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one children with ALL manifesting an isolated CNS relapse between 1984 through 1989 underwent serial evaluations of intellectual function. Neurocognitive function was measured by the full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) as determined by the age-appropriate Wechsler Intelligence Scale and by achievement in reading, math, and spelling as assessed by the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT). Intelligence testing was initiated following isolated CNS relapse after clearance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology but prior to CSI and continued at annual intervals for a minimum of 4 years postmeningeal failure. Protocol treatment for isolated CNS relapse consisted of reinduction and maintenance systemic therapy, intrathecal (IT) triple-agent chemotherapy, and early CSI (cranium to 24 Gy and spine to 15 Gy at 1.5 Gy/fraction) as outlined on the institutional 'Total XI' trial. Results: All 21 children attained secondary CNS remission and underwent the planned additional systemic/IT chemotherapy and CSI. Fourteen of the 21 children remain in secondary continuous remission, while the remaining 7 experienced a second relapse and were removed from further neurocognitive assessment. For the eight female and six male long-term survivors, mean ages at original diagnosis and at CSI were 5.7 years (range = 0.6-16.2) and 7.0 years (range = 1.8-17.0), respectively. At a median follow-up interval of 4.6 years (ranges 1.7-6.8) post-CNS relapse, comparison of group mean initial to final FSIQs revealed no statistically significant difference between the two measures (94.5 vs. 95.9, respectively, n = 11, p = 0.52). None of the

  14. Combined Therapy of Pegylated G-CSF and Alxn4100TPO Improves Survival and Mitigates Acute Radiation Syndrome after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation Alone and Followed by Wound Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Juliann G; Zhai, Min; Bolduc, David L; Smith, Joan T; Anderson, Marsha N; Ho, Connie; Lin, Bin; Jiang, Suping

    2017-11-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation alone or combined with traumatic tissue injury is a crucial life-threatening factor in nuclear and radiological incidents. Radiation injuries occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue and systemic levels; their mechanisms, however, remain largely unclear. Exposure to radiation combined with skin wounding, bacterial infection or burns results in greater mortality than radiation exposure alone in dogs, pigs, rats, guinea pigs and mice. In the current study we observed that B6D2F1/J female mice exposed to 60 Co gamma-photon radiation followed by 15% total-body-surface-area skin wounds experienced an increment of 25% higher mortality over a 30-day observation period compared to those subjected to radiation alone. Radiation exposure delayed wound healing by approximately 14 days. On day 30 post-injury, bone marrow and ileum in animals from both groups (radiation alone or combined injury) still displayed low cellularity and structural damage. White blood cell counts, e.g., neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils and platelets, still remained very low in surviving irradiated alone animals, whereas only the lymphocyte count was low in surviving combined injury animals. Likewise, in surviving animals from radiation alone and combined injury groups, the RBCs, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets remained low. We observed, that animals treated with both pegylated G-CSF (a cytokine for neutrophil maturation and mobilization) and Alxn4100TPO (a thrombopoietin receptor agonist) at 4 h postirradiation, a 95% survival (vehicle: 60%) over the 30-day period, along with mitigated body-weight loss and significantly reduced acute radiation syndrome. In animals that received combined treatment of radiation and injury that received pegylated G-CSF and Alxn4100TPO, survival was increased from 35% to 55%, but did not accelerate wound healing. Hematopoiesis and ileum showed significant improvement in animals from both groups (irradiation

  15. Testis weight loss following low dose rate (LDR) Cf-252, acute Co-60 or LDR Cs-137 irradiation in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, P.I.; Hwang, H.N.; Feola, J.; Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Mouse testis weight loss was measured with time after irradiation using Cf-252, Co-60 and low dose rate Cs-137 radiations. Testes weights were determined between days 5-45 after using large and small dose fraction irradiation. The doses selected were on the sensitive slope of the organ weight loss curve or the less sensitive portion of the curve. From these data we estimated the overall RBE for Cf-252 (Neutron + Gamma) to be 4.0 and 5.5 for neutrons only. (Auth.)

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  17. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  18. Preliminary studies of radiation port in children receiving cranial irradiation for preventing central nervous system (CNS) disease of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Takeyoshi; Sato, Takeyuki; Okimoto, Yuri; Sunami, Shosuke; Komori, Isao; Oda, Hideaki; Shima, Yukichi; Arimizu, Noboru; Nakajima, Hironori

    1986-01-01

    For preventing CNS leukemia in children with ALL, simple whole skull irradiation that included only retro-orbital spaces and not anterior part of the cribriform plate and first two cervical vertebrae had been given until March 1982 to patients who had remission after drug therapy. Since March 1982, however, such patients have received new modified cranial irradiation of Pinkel's method of preventive CNS therapy to include the cribriform plate. Pinkel's method usually includes first two cervical vertebrae in radiation port, but sometimes his method of radiation fails to reach the brain and the meninges on the anterior parts of the lamina cribrosa. In this study, a comparison of CNS-relapes ratio between these two methods of preventive CNS therapy was carried out. The frequency of CNS leukemia was remarkably high in patients given the simple whole skull irradiation. Of 18 patients, 7 developed CNS leukemia. Among these 7, 5 patients (71 %) had occurence of CNS-relapse within 1 year 7 months with the other one patient, making a total of 86 %, having CNS-relapse within 1 year 11 months. On the other hand, 17 of 39 patients who received new modified cranial irradiation were followed up for more than 1 year 9 months, and all patient had no CNS-relapse to date. This result showed that the irradiation of whole circulation areas of cerebrospinal fluid of the brain and the spine at first two cervical vertebra levels had great importance in preventing CNS-relapse after achievement of drug-induced remission. (author)

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  1. High-dose vincristine, fractionated total-body irradiation and cyclophosphamide as conditioning regimen in allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in second remission: a 7-year Italian multicentre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uderzo, C. [Milan Univ. (Italy); Rondelli, R.; Dini, G. [Bologna Univ. (Italy)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility and efficacy of high-dose vincristine (4 mg/m{sup 2} over 4 d) combined with fractionated total body irradiation (F-TBI) (200 cGy x 2 over 3 d) and cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg for 2 d) as a preparative regimen in allogeneic (AlloBMT) and autologous (ABMT) bone marrow transplantation for 75 consecutive children (median age at transplant 8.5 years) with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in second complete remission (CR). Median duration of first CR was 26 and 25 months in the AlloBMT and ABMT group, respectively. We conclude that the conditioning regimen with high-dose vincrostine combined with cyclophosphamide and F-TBI is feasible and promising although its therapeutic advantage should be tested in larger series of patients enrolled in randomized studies. (author).

  2. Flavonoid and leaf gas exchange responses of Centella asiatica to acute gamma irradiation and carbon dioxide enrichment under controlled environment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Sina Siavash; Jaafar, Hawa Binti; Aziz, Maheran Abdul; Ibrahim, Rusli; Rahmat, Asmah Bt; Philip, Elizabeth

    2011-10-25

    The study was couducted to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation and CO₂ on flavonoid content and leaf gas exchange in C.asiatica. For flavonoid determination, the design was a split split plot based on Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). For other parameters, the designs were split plots. Statistical tests revealed significant differences in flavonoid contents of Centella asiatica leaves between different growth stages and various CO₂ treatments. CO₂ 400, G20 (400 = ambient CO₂; G20 = Plants exposed to 20 Gy) showed 82.90% higher total flavonoid content (TFC) in the 5th week than CO₂ 400 as control at its best harvest time (4th week). Increasing the concentration of CO₂ from 400 to 800 μmol/mol had significant effects on TFC and harvesting time. In fact, 800 μmol/mol resulted in 171.1% and 66.62% increases in TFC for control and irradiated plants, respectively. Moreover, increasing CO₂ concentration reduced the harvesting time to three and four weeks for control and irradiated plants, respectively. Enhancing CO₂ to 800 µmol/mol resulted in a 193.30% (CO₂ 800) increase in leaf biomass compared to 400 µmol/mol and 226.34% enhancement in irradiated plants (CO₂ 800, G20) [800 = Ambient CO₂; G20 = Plants exposed to 20 Gy] than CO₂ 400, G20. In addition, the CO₂ 800, G20 had the highest amount of flavonoid*biomass in the 4th week. The results of this study indicated that all elevated CO₂ treatments had higher PN than the ambient ones. The findings showed that when CO₂ level increased from 400 to 800 µmol/mol, stomatal conductance, leaf intercellular CO₂ and transpiration rate had the tendency to decrease. However, water use efficiency increased in response to elevated CO₂ concentration. Returning to the findings of this study, it is now possible to state that the proposed method (combined CO₂ and gamma irradiation) has the potential to increase the product value by reducing the time to harvest, increasing the yield

  3. Flavonoid and Leaf Gas Exchange Responses of Centella asiatica to Acute Gamma Irradiation and Carbon Dioxide Enrichment under Controlled Environment Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa Binti Jaafar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was couducted to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation and CO2 on flavonoid content and leaf gas exchange in C.asiatica. For flavonoid determination, the design was a split split plot based on Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD. For other parameters, the designs were split plots. Statistical tests revealed significant differences in flavonoid contents of Centella asiatica leaves between different growth stages and various CO2 treatments. CO2 400, G20 (400 = ambient CO2; G20 = Plants exposed to 20 Gy showed 82.90% higher total flavonoid content (TFC in the 5th week than CO2 400 as control at its best harvest time (4th week. Increasing the concentration of CO2 from 400 to 800 μmol/mol had significant effects on TFC and harvesting time. In fact, 800 μmol/mol resulted in 171.1% and 66.62% increases in TFC for control and irradiated plants, respectively. Moreover, increasing CO2 concentration reduced the harvesting time to three and four weeks for control and irradiated plants, respectively. Enhancing CO2 to 800 µmol/mol resulted in a 193.30% (CO2 800 increase in leaf biomass compared to 400 µmol/mol and 226.34% enhancement in irradiated plants (CO2 800, G20 [800 = Ambient CO2; G20 = Plants exposed to 20 Gy] than CO2 400, G20. In addition, the CO2 800, G20 had the highest amount of flavonoid*biomass in the 4th week. The results of this study indicated that all elevated CO2 treatments had higher PN than the ambient ones. The findings showed that when CO2 level increased from 400 to 800 µmol/mol, stomatal conductance, leaf intercellular CO2 and transpiration rate had the tendency to decrease. However, water use efficiency increased in response to elevated CO2 concentration. Returning to the findings of this study, it is now possible to state that the proposed method (combined CO2 and gamma irradiation has the potential to increase the product value by reducing the time to harvest, increasing the yield per unit area via

  4. Therapeutic irradiation and brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, G.E.; Wara, W.M.; Smith, V.

    1980-01-01

    This is a review and reanalysis of the literature on adverse effects of therapeutic irradiation on the brain. Reactions have been grouped and considered according to time of appearance. The emphasis of the analysis is on delayed reactions, especially those that occur from a few months to several years after irradiation. All dose specifications were converted into equivalent megavoltage rads. The data were analyzed in terms of total dose, overall treatment time and number of treatment fractions. Also discussed were acute radiation reactions, early delayed radiation reactions, somnolence and leukoencephalopathy post-irradiation/chemotherapy and combined effects of radiation and chemotherapy

  5. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  6. Implication of global environmental changes on chemical toxicity-effect of water temperature, pH, and ultraviolet B irradiation on acute toxicity of several pharmaceuticals in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungkon; Park, Jeongim; Kim, Pan-Gyi; Lee, Chulwoo; Choi, Kyunghee; Choi, Kyungho

    2010-04-01

    Global environmental change poses emerging environmental health challenges throughout the world. One of such threats could be found in chemical safety in aquatic ecosystem. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of several environmental factors, such as water pH, temperature and ultraviolet light on the toxicity of pharmaceutical compounds in water, using freshwater invertebrate Daphnia magna. Seven pharmaceuticals including ibuprofen, acetaminophen, lincomycin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline and sulfathiazole were chosen as test compounds based on their frequent detection in water. The experimental conditions of environmental parameters were selected within the ranges that could be encountered in temperate environment, i.e., water temperature (15, 21, and 25 degrees C), pH (7.4, 8.3, and 9.2), and UV-B light intensity (continuous irradiation of 15.0 microW/cm(2)). For acetaminophen, enrofloxacin and sulfathiazole, decrease in water pH generally led to increase of acute lethal toxicity, which could be explained by the unionized fraction of pharmaceuticals. Increase of water temperature enhanced the acute toxicity of the acetaminophen, enrofloxacin and chlortetracycline, potentially due to alteration in toxicokinetics of chemicals as well as impact on physiological mechanisms of the test organism. The presence of UV-B light significantly increased the toxicity of sulfathiazole, which could be explained by photo-modification of this chemical that lead to oxidative stress. Under the UV light, however, acute toxicity of enrofloxacin decreased, which might be due to photo-degradation. Since changing environmental conditions could affect exposure and concentration-response profile of environmental contaminants, such conditions should be identified and evaluated in order to better manage ecosystem health under changing global environment.

  7. Excellent outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a conditioning regimen with medium-dose VP-16, cyclophosphamide and total-body irradiation for adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Akio; Kondo, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sugita, Junichi; Onozawa, Masahiro; Kahata, Kaoru; Endo, Tomoyuki; Shiratori, Soichi; Ota, Shuichi; Obara, Masato; Wakasa, Kentaro; Takahata, Mutsumi; Takeda, Yukari; Tanaka, Junji; Hashino, Satoshi; Nishio, Mitsufumi; Koike, Takao; Asaka, Masahiro; Imamura, Masahiro

    2008-05-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of 37 adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) conditioned with medium-dose VP-16 (VP, 30 mg/kg), cyclophosphamide (CY, 120 mg/kg), and fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI, 12 Gy) (medium-dose VP/CY/TBI). The median age of the patients was 26 years. Thirteen patients underwent transplantation from HLA-matched related donors (MRD), 18 patients underwent transplantation from HLA-matched unrelated donors (MUD), and 6 patients underwent transplantation from HLA-mismatched donors (MMD). Thirty-two patients received bone marrow and 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cells. Ten patients were Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) and 35 patients were in complete remission (CR) at transplantation. All of the patients achieved engraftment, and grade 3 organ toxicity before engraftment occurred in 27 patients. Grade II-III acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD (cGVHD) occurred in 15 and 18 patients, respectively. No patient developed grade IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) or died of GVHD. At median follow-up of 35.1 months, 32 patients were alive and all Ph(+) patients were alive. Three patients died of relapse and 2 died of transplant-related mortality (TRM). The actuarial 3-year overall survival (OS) rate, relapse rate, and TRM rate were 89.2%, 8.1%, and 5.4%, respectively. Non-CR at transplantation, MRD, and no aGVHD were significant adverse prognostic factors for survival. Medium-dose VP/CY/TBI for adult ALL patients was associated with lower relapse rate and no increase in toxicity, resulting in better survival.

  8. Extreme heterogeneity of myeloablative total body irradiation techniques in clinical practice: a survey of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Sebastian; Miszczyk, Leszek; Slosarek, Krzysztof; Moukhtari, Leila; Ciceri, Fabio; Esteve, Jordi; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Nagler, Arnon; Schmid, Christoph; Mohty, Mohamad

    2014-09-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is widely used for conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. Its efficacy and toxicity may depend on many methodological aspects. The goal of the current study was to explore current clinical practice in this field. A questionnaire was sent to all centers collaborating in the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and included 19 questions regarding various aspects of TBI. A total of 56 centers from 23 countries responded. All centers differed with regard to at least 1 answer. The total maximum dose of TBI used for myeloablative transplantation ranged from 8 grays (Gy) to 14.4 Gy, whereas the dose per fraction was 1.65 Gy to 8 Gy. A total of 16 dose/fractionation modalities were identified. The dose rate ranged from 2.25 centigrays to 37.5 centigrays per minute. The treatment unit was linear accelerator (LINAC) (91%) or cobalt unit (9%). Beams (photons) used for LINAC were reported to range from 6 to 25 megavolts. The most frequent technique used for irradiation was "patient in 1 field," in which 2 fields and 2 patient positions per fraction are used (64%). In 41% of centers, patients were immobilized during TBI. Approximately 93% of centers used in vivo dosimetry with accepted discrepancies between the planned and measured doses of 1.5% to 10%. In 84% of centers, the lungs were shielded during irradiation. The maximum accepted dose for the lungs was 6 Gy to 14.4 Gy. TBI is an extremely heterogeneous treatment modality. The findings of the current study should warrant caution in the interpretation of clinical studies involving TBI. Further investigation is needed to evaluate how methodological differences influence outcome. Efforts to standardize the method should be considered. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  9. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  10. The role of total body irradiation (TBI) as a conditioning regime for paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: A discussion of the evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, G.; Meikle, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The long term effects of TBI with children can be adverse and has resulted in a debate as to whether chemotherapy only based condition regimes could be used as an alternatives. The aim of this article is to critically evaluate the literature relating to the role of TBI as a conditioning regime in ALL in children, and if there are any alternatives to current practices or future developments. Method: Key databases were searched for terms: conditioning regimes, transplantation, TBI, whole body radiation, systemic irradiation, stem cell transplantation, hematopoietic stem cell, and transplant conditioning. Results: Thirteen research articles from a variety of publications and two guidance documents from several sources were uncovered for critical discussion. Discussion/conclusion: There is little evidence for chemotherapy only regimes in paediatric ALL, but the practice continues. Modulating doses to improve homogeneity and use of IGRT could hold a future solution to reducing long-term toxicity and maintain the efficacy of irradiation. - Highlights: • TBI regimes have adverse long term effects on development, particularly on growth. • Chemotherapy only regimes have long term effects that impact on development. • TBI is a superior to chemotherapy only conditioning regimes for paediatric ALL. • Research is being undertaken to refine TBI techniques to reduce overall toxicity.

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodburn, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The use of food preservation by irradiation over 30 years is reviewed in outline. Sprout inhibition, soft fruit preservation, suppression of salmonella in poultry, radiolytic products in foods, the detection of irradiated foods and safety studies so far are considered. (U.K.)

  13. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  15. Irradiation of FDG-PET–Defined Active Bone Marrow Subregions and Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Anal Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Brent S.; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Niemierko, Andrzej; Murphy, Janet E.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Allen, Jill N.; Lee, Leslie K.; Wang, Yingbing; Drapek, Lorraine C.; Hong, Theodore S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Irradiation of pelvic bone marrow (BM) has been correlated with hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients undergoing chemoradiation for anal cancer. We hypothesized that irradiation of hematologically active bone marrow (ABM) subregions defined by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is a principal cause of radiation-associated HT. Methods and Materials: The cohort included 45 patients with nonmetastatic anal cancer who underwent FDG-PET imaging prior to definitive chemoradiation with mitomycin-C and 5-fluorouracil. Total bone marrow (TBM) was defined as the external contour of the pelvic bones from the top of lumbar 5 (L5) to the bottom of the ischial tuberosity. Standardized uptake values (SUV) for all voxels within the TBM were quantified and normalized by comparison to normal liver SUV. Subvolumes of the TBM that exhibited the highest and lowest 50% of the SUVs were designated ABM 50 and IBM 50 , respectively. The primary endpoint was the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir during or within 2 weeks of completion of treatment. Multivariate linear modeling was used to analyze the correlation between the equivalent uniform doses (EUD) with an a value of 0.5, 1 (equivalent to mean dose), 3, 7, and 12 to the BM structures and the ANC. Results: Mean ± SD ANC nadir was 0.77 × 10 9 /L (±0.66 × 10 9 /L). Grades 3 and 4 ANC toxicity occurred in 26.7% and 44.4% of patients, respectively. The EUD a parameter of 0.5 was optimal for all BM models indicating high radiation sensitivity. EUD of TBM and ABM 50 and IBM 50 were all significantly associated with ANC nadir. However, model performance for ABM 50 was not superior to that of the TBM and IBM 50 models. Conclusions: Irradiation of pelvic BM was associated with HT. However, FDG-PET–defined ABM models failed to improve model performance compared to the TBM model.

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, T.; Lang, T.

    1990-01-01

    There is a growing tendency worldwide to apply ionizing radiation for food preservation, or for delaying growth or ripening processes. However, research into the effects of such irradiation with ionizing radiation is lagging behind, leaving the knowledge about effects and possible hazards incomplete. The authors very carefully have analysed the available research results and present a detailed account of the current scientific knowledge and assessments. Their conclusion is: irradiated food is to be considered noxious unless its wholesomeness has been unambiguously proven. Consumers so far had not much chance to raise their voice in the debate about the wholesomeness of food irradiation, or have not been heard, the authors say. They call for establishing a European and a worldwide information network to bring together opponents to and information speaking against food irradiation, in order to create a counterweight to the market strategies of the pro-irradiation industry, and to launch initiatives on the political level. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Methylation changes in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice exposed to acute and chronic low-dose X-ray-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga; Burke, Paula; Besplug, Jill; Slovack, Mark; Filkowski, Jody; Pogribny, Igor

    2004-04-14

    The biological and genetic effects of chronic low-dose radiation (LDR) exposure and its relationship to carcinogenesis have received a lot of attention in the recent years. For example, radiation-induced genome instability, which is thought to be a precursor of tumorogenesis, was shown to have a transgenerational nature. This indicates a possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in LDR-induced genome instability. Genomic DNA methylation is one of the most important epigenetic mechanisms. Existing data on radiation effects on DNA methylation patterns is limited, and no one has specifically studied the effects of the LDR. We report the first study of the effects of whole-body LDR exposure on global genome methylation in muscle and liver tissues of male and female mice. In parallel, we evaluated changes in promoter methylation and expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16{sup INKa} and DNA repair gene O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). We observed different patterns of radiation-induced global genome DNA methylation in the liver and muscle of exposed males and females. We also found sex and tissue-specific differences in p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation upon LDR exposure. In male liver tissue, p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation was more pronounced than in female tissue. In contrast, no significant radiation-induced changes in p16{sup INKa} promoter methylation were noted in the muscle tissue of exposed males and females. Radiation also did not significantly affect methylation status of MGMT promoter. We also observed substantial sex differences in acute and chronic radiation-induced expression of p16{sup INKa} and MGMT genes. Another important outcome of our study was the fact that chronic low-dose radiation exposure proved to be a more potent inducer of epigenetic effects than the acute exposure. This supports previous findings that chronic exposure leads to greater genome destabilization than acute exposure.

  18. Acute toxicity of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer: Impact of irradiated volume, type of surgery, sex and sequence of treatment modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.; Roedel, C.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Kessler, H.; Martus, P.; Sauer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In an attempt to reduce acute toxicity of CRT for rectal cancer we retrospectively evaluated potential factors that influence the severity of toxic side-effects. Materials and Methods: Between 1987 and 1995, 120 patients (pts, 73 with primary tumor, 47 with recurrent disease) received CRT for rectal cancer. RT was given by 3-4 field box technique with 6-10 MV-photons. Daily fraction size was 180 cGy, total dose 5040 cGy including 540 cGy local boost. Dose was specified to the ICRU reference point. During the first and fifth week of RT 5-FU (1000 mg/m 2 /24 h) was administered by continuous infusion for 120 hours. 56 pts received preoperative CRT, 64 pts were treated postoperatively. Toxicity was recorded following (modified) WHO-criteria. Results: Acute grade 4 toxicity was limited to 3 pts (leukopenia, sepsis, arrhythmia). Acute grade 3 toxicity occurred mainly as diarrhea (33%), perineal skin reaction (37%), and leukopenia (9%). Extension of the treatment volume including paraaortic lymph nodes (L3) led to a significant increase of grade 3 diarrhea (68% vs. 25%, p = 0,0003) and grade 3 leukopenia (18% vs. 8%, p = 0,03). After abdominoperineal resection less pts suffered from grade 3 diarrhea (8% vs. 47% after sphincter-preserving procedures, p = 0,0006), whereas severe perineal erythema occurred more frequently (56% vs. 29%, p = 0,02). Women had significantly more toxic side effects (grade 3 diarrhea: 39% vs. 16% in men, p = 0.04; grade 2 to 3 nausea/emesis: 21% vs. 8% in men, p = 0.018; grade 2 to 3 leukopenia: 53% vs. 31% in men, p = 0, 02). After preoperative CRT a significant reduction of grade 3 diarrhea (11% vs. 29%, p = 0.03) and grade 3 erythema (16% vs. 41%, p = 0.04) was noted. Conclusion: In order to reduce acute treatment related toxicity preoperative CRT deserves further evaluation. Careful attention should be paid to the extension of treatment volume to the paraaortic region. Individual adjustment of 5-FU dosage by monitoring its systemic

  19. Low Dose Total Body Irradiation Combined With Recombinant CD19-Ligand × Soluble TRAIL Fusion Protein is Highly Effective Against Radiation-resistant B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih M. Uckun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In high-risk remission B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BPL patients, relapse rates have remained high post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT even after the use of very intensive total body irradiation (TBI-based conditioning regimens, especially in patients with a high “minimal residual disease” (MRD burden. New agents capable of killing radiation-resistant BPL cells and selectively augmenting their radiation sensitivity are therefore urgently needed. We report preclinical proof-of-principle that the potency of radiation therapy against BPL can be augmented by combining radiation with recombinant human CD19-Ligand × soluble TRAIL (“CD19L–sTRAIL” fusion protein. CD19L–sTRAIL consistently killed radiation-resistant primary leukemia cells from BPL patients as well as BPL xenograft cells and their leukemia-initiating in vivo clonogenic fraction. Low dose total body irradiation (TBI combined with CD19L–sTRAIL was highly effective against (1 xenografted CD19+ radiochemotherapy-resistant human BPL in NOD/SCID (NS mice challenged with an otherwise invariably fatal dose of xenograft cells derived from relapsed BPL patients as well as (2 radiation-resistant advanced stage CD19+ murine BPL with lymphomatous features in CD22ΔE12xBCR-ABL double transgenic mice. We hypothesize that the incorporation of CD19L–sTRAIL into the pre-transplant TBI regimens of patients with very high-risk BPL will improve their survival outcome after HSCT.

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormick, C.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of food irradiation are discussed. Research into food irradiation has been going on for 40 years, yet studies have yet to demonstrate conclusively whether it is safe or harmful. The Australian House of Representatives has established an inquiry into food irradiation conducted by the Standing Committee on Environment and Conservation. It will inquire into the use of ionising radiation for commercial sterilisation, disinfestation, food preservation and other purposes with particular reference to human health and safety, environmental impacts and the adequacy of assessment and regulatory procedures

  1. Extended intrathecal methotrexate may replace cranial irradiation for prevention of CNS relapse in children with intermediate-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-based intensive chemotherapy. The Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conter, V; Aricò, M; Valsecchi, M G; Rizzari, C; Testi, A M; Messina, C; Mori, P G; Miniero, R; Colella, R; Basso, G

    1995-10-01

    To assess the effect of treatment intensification and that of extended intrathecal methotrexate substitution for cranial irradiation in intermediate-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) children treated with a Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM)-based intensive chemotherapy. Three hundred ninety-six children with non-B-ALL were enrolled onto the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologic Pediatrica (AIEOP) ALL 88 study. Standard risk (SR) included patients with low tumor burden (BFM risk index [RI], or = 0.8 but less than 1.2; and high risk (HR) were those with an RI > or = 1.2 or CNS involvement at diagnosis. The treatment schedule was a modified version of the ALL-BFM 86 study. CNS-directed treatment consisted of high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX; 5 g/m2 for four courses) plus intrathecal methotrexate (IT-MTX; nine doses); IR patients additionally received extended IT-MTX (nine doses during continuation therapy); cranial irradiation was given only to HR patients. Of the 375 (94.7%) children who achieved remission, 1.3% had an adverse event other than relapse. The estimated event-free survival (EFS) at 6 years was 66.6% (SE 2.4) overall; 80.7% (4.5) in the SR patients, 77.5% (3.9) in the IR patients, and 54.5% (3.7) in the HR patients. Relapse occurred in 107 children (27.0%). Isolated CNS relapse occurred in 20 children (5.0%): 5 (6.3%) in the SR group, 1 (0.8%) in the IR group, and 14 (7.1%) in the HR group. The estimated 6-year CNS leukemia-free survival was 94.6% (1.2) overall: 93.5% (2.8) in the SR group, 99.1% (0.9) in the IR group, and 92.3% (2.0) in the HR group. Cranial irradiation may be omitted safely in IR ALL patients treated with BFM-based intensive chemotherapy when extended intrathecal chemotherapy is given. Because the CNS disease control was less complete in the SR group, these data challenge the effectiveness of HD-MTX for protection from CNS disease and support the protective role of extended intrathecal chemotherapy.

  2. Treatment with a belly-board device significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated and results in low acute toxicity in adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer: results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Joseph; Fitzpatrick, Kathryn; Horan, Gail; McCloy, Roisin; Buckney, Steve; O'Neill, Louise; Faul, Clare

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine whether treatment prone on a belly-board significantly reduces the volume of small bowel irradiated in women receiving adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer, and to prospectively study acute small bowel toxicity using an accepted recording instrument. Material and methods: Thirty-two gynecologic patients underwent simulation with CT scanning supine and prone. Small bowel was delineated on every CT slice, and treatment was prone on the belly-board using 3-5 fields-typically Anterior, Right and Left Lateral, plus or minus Lateral Boosts. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 Gy and all treatments were delivered in 1.8 Gy fractions. Concomitant Cisplatin was administered in 13 patients with cervical carcinoma. Comparison of small bowel dose-volumes was made between supine and prone, with each subject acting as their own matched pair. Acute small bowel toxicity was prospectively measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria: Version 2.0. Results: Treatment prone on the belly-board significantly reduced the volume of small bowel receiving ≥100; ≥95; ≥90; and ≥80% of the prescribed dose, but not ≥50%. This was found whether volume was defined in cubic centimeters or % of total small bowel volume. Of 29 evaluable subjects, 2 (7%) experienced 1 episode each of grade 3 diarrhoea. All other toxicity events were grade 2 or less and comprised diarrhoea (59%), abdominal pain or cramping (48%), nausea (38%), anorexia (17%), vomiting (10%). There were no Grade 4 events and no treatment days were lost due to toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment prone on a belly-board device results in significant small bowel sparing, during adjuvant radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. The absence of Grade 4 events or Treatment Days Lost compares favorably with the published literature

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on the hematopoietic niche and treatment of acute radiation syndrome by gene therapy in highly-irradiated monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrigou, Ph.

    2011-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell niche represents a complex radiosensitive compartment whose protection is required for recovery from radiation-induced myelosuppression. We initially studied RI effects on endothelial and mesenchymal progenitors by an evaluating radiosensitivity and cell death. Then, we have proposed a new gene therapy strategy based on local and short term secretion of Sonic hedgehog morphogen to favour vascular niche repair and to stimulate residual hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We investigated the hematopoietic response of 8-Gy gamma irradiated monkeys to a single intra-osseous injection of xenogeneic multipotent mesenchymal stem cells transduced with a Shh pIRES2 plasmid. Thrombocytopenia and neutropenia duration were significantly reduced in grafted animals and clonogenics normalized from day 42. Areas under the curve of PLTs and ANCs between day 0 and day 30 were significantly higher in treated animals than in controls. Grafting Matrigel TM colonized or not with ASC in immunocompromised mice demonstrated a notable pro-angiogenic activity for Shh-ASC. Long term follow up (180-300 days) confirmed a durable recovery in the four grafted monkeys. Globally this study suggests that grafting Shh-multipotent stem cells may represent a new strategy to cure radiation-induced niche damage. (author)

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  6. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  7. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  8. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  11. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  12. Acute effects of irradiation on cognition: changes in attention on a computerized continuous performance test during radiotherapy in pediatric patients with localized primary brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Kiehna, Erin N.; Miles, Mark A.; Zhu Junhong; Xiong Xiaoping; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess sustained attention, impulsivity, and reaction time during radiotherapy (RT) for pediatric patients with localized primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients (median age 12.3 years, range 5.9-22.9) with primary brain tumors were evaluated prospectively using the computerized Conners' continuous performance test (CPT) before and during conformal RT (CRT). The data were modeled to assess the longitudinal changes in the CPT scores and the effects of clinical variables on these changes during the first 50 days after the initiation of CRT. Results: The CPT scores exhibited an increasing trend for errors of omission (inattentiveness), decreasing trend for errors of commission (impulsivity), and slower reaction times. However, none of the changes were statistically significant. The overall index, which is an algorithm-based weighted sum of the CPT scores, remained within the range of normal throughout treatment. Older patients (age >12 years) were more attentive (p<0.0005), less impulsive (p<0.07), and had faster reaction times (p<0.001) at baseline than the younger patients. The reaction time was significantly reduced during treatment for the older patients and lengthened significantly for the younger patients (p<0.04). Patients with a shunted hydrocephalus (p<0.02), seizure history (p<0.0006), and residual tumor (p<0.02) were significantly more impulsive. Nonshunted patients (p<0.0001), those with more extensive resection (p<0.0001), and patients with ependymoma (p<0.006) had slower initial reaction times. Conclusion: Children with brain tumors have problems with sustained attention and reaction time resulting from the tumor and therapeutic interventions before RT. The reaction time slowed during treatment for patients <12 years old. RT, as administered in the trial from which these data were derived, has limited acute effects on changes in the CPT scores measuring attention, impulsiveness, and reaction time

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  14. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  15. Microwave Irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 3. Microwave Irradiation - Way to Eco-friendly, Green Chemistry. Rashmi Sanghi. General Article Volume 5 Issue 3 March 2000 pp 77-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Gonadal Irradiation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    division either by mitosis or meiosis show the least degree of radiation tolerance. This can be readily demonstrated histologically. Two hours after irradiation the spermatogenetic cell column starts to shrink because of a reduction in the number of spermatogonia, some of which are undergoing abnormal mitosis. Four days ...

  17. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  18. Microwave Irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave Irradiation. Way to Eco-friendly, Green Chemistry. Rashmi Sanghi. This article highlights with examples, the usefulness of microwaves for carrying out a'variety of organic transfor- mations. Introduction and Background. The rapid heating of food in the kitchen using microwave ovens prompted a number of ...

  19. Low-dose total body irradiation and G-CSF without hematopoietic stem cell support in the treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), or AML in second or subsequent remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, Lawrence N.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Storen, Elizabeth; Marcus, Karen; Mauch, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who are not eligible for bone marrow transplantation, have a poor prognosis when treated with chemotherapy alone. Total body irradiation (TBI) is an effective modality against AML when used in doses of 1000-1400 cGy with hematopoietic stem cell support. We undertook a phase I study of TBI with granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support, without stem cell support in patients with AML either in relapse or second or subsequent remission. Methods and Materials: Patients with relapsed AML, or AML in second or subsequent remission were treated in a phase I study of TBI followed by G-CSF. The first dose level was 200 cGy. After the initial cohort of patients it was clear that patients with overt leukemia did not benefit from this treatment, and subsequent patients were required to be in remission at the time of TBI. Results: Eleven patients were treated, 4 in overt relapse, and 7 in remission. 200 cGy was used in all, and dose escalation was not possible due to prolonged thrombocytopenia in all patients but one. Neutrophil recovery was adequate in those patients who remained in remission after TBI. Patients with overt leukemia had transient reduction in blast counts, but rapid recurrence of their leukemia. Patients treated in remission had short remissions, with the exception of one patient who is in remission 32 months after treatment. Conclusion: There is some antileukemic effect of TBI even at 200 cGy, though this dose appears to be too low to help a significant number of patients. If TBI is to be escalated without stem cell support, then a thrombopoietic agent will need to be used

  20. Argon laser irradiation of the otolithic organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, T.; Nomura, Y.; Young, Y.H.; Hara, M. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    An argon laser was used to irradiate the otolithic organs of guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. After stapedectomy, the argon laser (1.5 W x 0.5 sec/shot) irradiated the utricle or saccule without touching the sensory organs. The stapes was replaced over the oval window after irradiation. The animals used for acute observation were killed immediately for morphologic studies; those used for long-term observation were kept alive for 2, 4, or 10 weeks. Acute observation revealed that sensory and supporting cells were elevated from the basement membrane only in the irradiated area. No rupture of the membranous labyrinth was observed. Long-term observation revealed that the otolith of the macula utriculi had disappeared in 2-week specimens. The entire macula utricili had disappeared in 10-week specimens. No morphologic changes were observed in cochlea, semicircular canals, or membranous labyrinth. The saccule showed similar changes.

  1. The response of previously irradiated mouse skin to heat alone or combined with irradiation: influence of thermotolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of previous x-irradiation on the response to hyperthermia (44 0 C), x-irradiation, and irradiation combined with hyperthermia (43 0 C or 44 0 C) was studied in mouse foot skin. Irradiation of mice feet 90 days before, with 20 Gy, increased the subsequent response to heat alone, or combined with irradiation, as well as to irradiation alone. It had little effect on the thermal enhancement ratios for both acute and late skin reactions. Memory of the previous irradiation treatment could be masked when the temperature of the subsequent heat treatment alone, or combined with irradiation, was 44 0 C. Priming heat treatment induced resistance to a subsequent heat treatment and to a subsequent combined irradiation-heat treatment in normal as well as previously irradiated skin. When late skin reaction was considered, a larger 'memory' of the previous irradiation treatment was always evident, compared to acute skin reaction: the 'remembered' dose in the late skin reaction was about twice the 'remembered' dose in the acute reaction. (U.K.)

  2. Irradiation for conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, K.; Geinitz, H.; Grosu, A.; Molls, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Goetze, K. [Dept. of Hematology and Oncology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Werner, M. [Dept. of Pathology, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Case History and Findings: A 73-year-old woman with a history of myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) presented with bilateral chemosis, redness and burning of the eyes. The ocular motility was severely impaired. Ophthalmological examination revealed markedly distended conjunctivas on both sides. Biopsy disclosed conjunctival granulocytic sarcoma as an initial symptom of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Diagnosis was confirmed by peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration. Treatment and Outcome: The orbital tumor disappeared completely after local external beam irradiation with a total dose of 30 Gy and no further orbital recurrence occurred. With chemotherapy following irradiation transient hematological remission was achieved. 5 months after diagnosis the patient died of respiratory failure following atypical pneumonia as a consequence of her underlying disorder. Conclusion: Detection of orbital granulocytic sarcoma, even in the absence of typical leukemic symptoms is of practical importance, because treatment with irradiation can lead to stabilization or improvement in the patient's vision. (orig.)

  3. Food irradiation: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Rosanna M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  4. Health condition of children irradiated in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanova, E.

    1997-01-01

    Among the children exposed to ionizing radiation, the ones irradiated in utero constitute a group under special surveillance. The greatest sensitivity of the organism to the effects of radiative factors occurs in the neonatal period of development and the forthcoming life span with irradiation effects is the longest for these children. Children with acute exposure, with chronic exposure and control group were encompassed by this study - 1144 children altogether. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  6. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... well it can be treated. Complications of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Long-term lung damage (ARDS) Buildup ...

  7. Influence of thorax irradiation on lactic dehydrogenase isoenzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, C.; Munnich, A.; Pasquier, C.

    The right hemi-thorax of rats was irradiated with 1200 and 3000 rads ( 60 Co) and blood samples were taken sequentially. The five lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes which have proved to be useful as biochemical indicators of acute pulmonary injury in other experimental animals (dogs), were assayed, after irradiation, as a function of time and as a functon of dose. There was no significant change in LDH isoenzyme activities after lung irradiation in rats [fr

  8. Determinants of skin sensitivity to solar irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, W.M.R.; Vink, A.A.; Boelsma, E.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, W.A.A.; Tijburg, L.B.M.; Veer, P. van 't; Poppel, G. van; Kardinaal, A.F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Acute effects of UV irradiation include UV-induced erythema. Sunlight plays an important role in the development of skin cancer. Several predictive factors of UV-induced erythema could also be predictive for skin cancer. Objective: Our objective was to quantitatively assess phenotypical

  9. Synaptosomal ecto-5'-nucleotidases activity modulation after ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drakulic, D.; Stanojevic, I.; Petrovic, S.; Velickovic, N.; Horvat, A.

    2009-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides, such as ATP and adenosine are involved in the regulation of variety of physiological processes in the central nervous system (CNS), including development and tissue remodeling following trauma, stroke, ischemia or neurodegenerative disorders. Ecto-5'- nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT), membrane enzyme, catalyzes the last step of extracellular nucleotide degradation and it is responsible for purinergic signaling modulation and termination. In order to investigate if ionizing irradiation could modulate CNS purinergic signalization in synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) the activity of ecto-5'-NT was monitored after whole-body acute irradiation with low (0,5 Gy) or therapeutic (2 Gy) doses, 1h, 24h and 72h after irradiating juvenile (15-day old), prepubertal (30 days), pubertal (60 days) and adult (90-day old) female rats. Results suggest that acute irradiation could modulate activity of the enzymes that are necessary for purinergic signal termination depended of dose and time after irradiation, as well as brain development stage. (author) [sr

  10. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  11. Radiation therapy in leukemia (total body irradiation excluded)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peiffert, D.; Hoffstetter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation techniques and indications in leukemias have been described in detail, yet prophylactic cranial irradiation in acute leukemia still has few indications. Cerebrospinal and testicular irradiation are reserved for relapsing disease. Radiation usually results in rapid functional improvement when used in neurologic emergencies and symptomatic neurologic or gross tumors relapses. Nevertheless, the improvements recently obtained by systemic chemotherapy have resulted in the reduction in the use of irradiation, especially in children, where it was considered deleterious with neuropsychological sequelae. Splenic irradiation remains useful for symptomatic myelo-proliferative syndrome. (authors)

  12. Perspective on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review summarizes current scientific information on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of foods. Attention is focused on: specifics of the irradiation process and its effectiveness in food preservation; the historical development of food irradiation technology in the US; the response of the Institute of Food Technologists to proposed FDA guidelines for food irradiation; the potential uses of irradiation in the US food industry; and the findings of the absence of toxins and of unaltered nutrient density (except possibly for fats) in irradiated foods. The misconceptions of consumers concerning perceived hazards associated with food irradiation, as related to consumer acceptance, also are addressed

  13. Food irradiation in Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, T.

    1985-01-01

    This report explains the process and issues that concern consumers, workers in the food industry and people involved in food policy, public health and environmental protection. It argues that safety assurances by experts are not enough, and calls for a full public debate on all issues surrounding food irradiation, including a) wholesomeness of irradiated foods - food quality, nutrition losses, chemical and other changes in irradiated foods b) consumers rights to information about irradiated foods c) health and safety of food industry workers d) the economics of irradiation - food prices, changes in patters of employment, environmental impacts e) regulation and monitoring of food irradiation and imported irradiated foods. (U.K.)

  14. Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. Prevention5. Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is acute bronchitis? Acute ... heartburn, you can get acute bronchitis when stomach acid gets into the bronchial tree. How is acute ...

  15. Stillbirths and male irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, John D. Jr. [International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)]. E-mail: boicej@compuserve.com; Robison, Leslie L. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mertens, Ann [University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Green, Daniel M.; Mulvihill, John J.; ); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (US))

    2000-09-01

    Little (1999) recently reviewed the evidence that paternal preconception irradiation in the Sellafield workforce (Parker et al 1999) and among Japanese atomic bomb survivors (Otake et al 1990) might be associated with an increased risk of stillbirth. He concluded that the association reported for radiation workers was statistically incompatible with the absence of an association seen among the exposed Japanese parents. These studies and analyses illustrate the considerable difficulty in assessing stillbirths conceived by men exposed to ionising radiation at work. For example, occupational doses may not be sufficiently large to result in a detectable effect and maternal factors that are associated with stillbirths and important to adjust for may not be available. These papers also bring to focus a relevant but not well-studied public health issue, namely, what are the reproductive risks for men and women exposed to potential mutagens? We wish to emphasise here the theoretical and practical advantages of addressing this issue in persons not with low dose occupational or acute atomic bomb exposures, but with higher dose medical experiences; in particular, in survivors of cancers of childhood, adolescents, and young adulthood (Blatt 1999, Bryne et al 1998, Sankila et al 1998, Green et al 1997, Hawkins and Stevens 1996). Letter-to-the-editor.

  16. Facts about food irradiation: Food irradiation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet gives the cost of a typical food irradiation facility (US $1 million to US $3 million) and of the food irradiation process (US $10-15 per tonne for low-dose applications; US $100-250 per tonne for high-dose applications). These treatments also bring consumer benefits in terms of availability, storage life and improved hygiene. 2 refs

  17. Development of Irradiation Procedure for Gamma Irradiation Chamber Bio beam GM 8000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuhaimi Shamsudin; Affrida Abu Hassan; Zaiton Ahmad; Abdul Rahim Harun; Ahmad Zainuri Mohd Dzomir

    2015-01-01

    Bio Beam GM 8000 gamma irradiation chamber obtained a conditional approval to operate on March 27, 2012, and later acquired a full approval on December 13, 2012. The objective for the procurement of this gamma chamber is to develop an acute irradiation facility for biological samples, including plants tissues, insects, pupae, microorganisms, as well as animal and human cells. To ensure a smooth and efficient operation, irradiation procedures were developed and improved over time. This paper discusses the operation and management of the Bio Beam GM 8000 facility, including irradiation procedures and sample preparation, application for services through online e-client system, consultancy, quality assurance and information dissemination to internal as well as external clients. In addition, this paper also discusses the potential, constraints and improvement measures taken to optimize the use of this facility in order to meet its objectives. (author)

  18. Food irradiation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiang

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the author discussed the recent situation of food irradiation in China, its history, facilities, clearance, commercialization, and with emphasis on market testing and public acceptance of irradiated food. (author)

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Acute Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  20. Food irradiation makes progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooij, J. van

    1984-01-01

    In the past fifteen years, food irradiation processing policies and programmes have been developed both by a number of individual countries, and through projects supported by FAO, IAEA and WHO. These aim at achieving general acceptance and practical implementation of food irradiation through rigorous investigations of its wholesomeness, technological and economic feasibility, and efforts to achieve the unimpeded movement of irradiated foods in international trade. Food irradiation processing has many uses

  1. JMTR irradiation handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    A wide variety of nuclear irradiation and post-irradiation experiments are available using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor, 50 MW (JMTR) and the multi-cell hot laboratory associated with the JMTR. In this Handbook, an application manual for conducting irradiation and post-irradiation experiments using those facilities is provided. The Handbook is primarily designed to aid the experimenter and to serve as a reference for communications between the experimenter and the Department of JMTR Project. (author)

  2. Design of POTON irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, R.P.; Modi, R.K.; Ramakumar, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Clearance by Government of India, for irradiating various food items, to increase either its shelf life or for reducing post harvest losses, has opened up a challenge for designing a multi-product, high throughput and a reliable commercial food irradiator. Various design aspects of mechanical system for such type of commercial food irradiator i.e. POTON irradiator for potatoes and onions, are presented here. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs

  3. Dosimetry for Crystals Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lecomte, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Before shipment to CMS, all PbWO4 crystals produced in China are irradiated there with 60 Co , in order to insure that the induced absorption coefficient is within specifications. Acceptance tests at CERNand at ENEA also include irradiation with gamma rays from 60 Co sources. There were initially discrepancies in quoted doses and doserates as well as in induced absorption coefficients. The present work resolves the discrepancies in irradiation measurements and defines common dosimetry methods for consistency checks between irradiation facilities.

  4. Neurological aspects of acute radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torubarov, F.S.; Bushmanov, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the most important clinical studies of human nervous system reactions to acute radiation, carried out at Neurology Clinic of the State Research Center of Russia - Institute of Biophysics are presented. Clinical picture of changes in the nervous system in acute radiation disease caused by homologous and heterologous external irradiation is described. Main neurological syndrome of extremely severe acute radiation disease: acute radiation encephalopathy, radiation toxic encephalopathy, and hemorrhagic syndrome of the central nervous system is distinguished. Relationship between neurological disorders and the geometry of exposure are considered [ru

  5. Containers in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolumen, S.; Espinosa, R.

    1997-01-01

    The preservation of food by irradiation is promising technology which increases industrial application. Packaging of irradiated foods is an integral part of the process. Judicious selection of the package material for successful trade is essential. In this paper is presented a brief review of important aspects of packaging in food irradiation [es

  6. Irradiation of foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeberg, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Foodstuffs are irradiated to make them keep better. The ionizing radiation is not so strong as to cause radioactivity in the foodstuffs. At least so far, irradiation has not gained acceptance among consumers, although it has been shown to be a completely safe method of preservation. Irradiation causes only slight chemical changes in food. What irradiation does, however, is to damage living organisms, such as bacteria, DNA and proteins, thereby making the food keep longer. Irradiation can be detected from the food afterwards; thus it can be controlled effectively. (orig.)

  7. Delayed effects of low level acute irradiation and chronic environmental radioactive contamination on DNA lymphocytes of people living in Dolon, a settlement located in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenal, C.; Legue, F.; Nourgalieva, K.

    2006-01-01

    During 42 years several hundred nuclear tests were performed by the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS, Kazakhstan), of which more than 100 were done in the atmosphere. We report here the late genetic damage of external exposure to radiation and environmental radioactive contamination in people living in Dolon, a small settlement situated in the vicinity of the STS. The comet assay was applied on DNA lymphocytes of 20 exposed women and 32 non-exposed women living at 500 km from the STS. We observed a statistically significant difference between the exposed and control groups for mean tail moment (MTM) and DNA% in the tail. The mean values of all comet assay parameters (MTM, DNA% in the tail and score) were higher in the group of women born before 1949 as compared to those born after 1950, which could reflect an effect of external irradiation in 1949 due to the most contaminating explosion. These results suggest that people exposed 50 years ago to relatively small doses of external irradiation and/or still living in an environment contaminated by small amounts of long life radionuclides, still present DNA damage which is in agreement with other cytogenetical studies performed at the same site, on the same population

  8. Cranial irradiation of young rats impairs later learning and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmier, J.B.; Carroll, M.E.; Patten, R.; Krivit, W.; Kim, T.H.

    1979-01-01

    Young rats (26 days) were exposed to ionizing radiation of the head of 0, 1200, 2400 or 3000 rads total in 200 rads/day doses. The subsequent growth of irradiated rats was permanently impaired: such impairment was positively related to amount of irradiation. Beginning in adolescence, rats were trained on a horizontal/vertical visual discrimination in a runway task and although all four groups mastered the discrimination, they differed in their patterns of acquisition. These results indicated long term effects and are associated with a cranial irradiation regimen similar to that given to children suffering acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). (author)

  9. The effect of ionizing irradiation on motion of cytoplasm in cells of Elodea canadensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tordyiya, N.V.; Grodzyins'kij, D.M.; Danil'chenko, O.O.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of acute irradiation on the velocity of cytoplasm is investigated. It is shown that, for small doses, there is a strong nonlinearity between the velocity of cytoplasm and dose. The nonlinear behavior disappears with increasing a dose

  10. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, M.; Fritz, H.; Sauer, R.

    1986-01-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored. (author)

  11. Sensory properties of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plestenjak, A.

    1997-01-01

    Food irradiation is a simple and effective preservation technique. The changes caused by irradiation depend on composition of food, on the absorbed dose, the water content and temperature during and after irradiation. In this paper the changes of food components caused by irradiation, doses for various food irradiation treatments, foods and countries where the irradiation is allowed, and sensory properties of irradiated food are reviewed

  12. Debate on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    An amendment moved on the food safety bill provided that any regulations made which relate to irradiation shall only be made after a diagnostic test has been established to determine whether or not food has been subject to irradiation and also that a scientific review has been conducted into the effects of irradiation on pesticide residues and other toxins in food, vitamin content of food, food additives and food packaging materials, and the results thereof published. The debate which followed lasted an hour and a quarter and is reported verbatim. After a short definition of irradiation, the debate was concerned with the nutritional value of irradiated food, the radiation effects for the public, the dose levels which are safe to use, public opinion and the lack of research into the effects of irradiating food. The amendment was withdrawn after the debate. (UK)

  13. Irradiation - who needs it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoular, C.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the public's attitudes to the irradiation of food to ensure it is bacteria free and to prolong shelf-life are considered. The need to label irradiated food and to educate the public about its implications are emphasised. The opinions of the large food retailers who maintain that high standards in food processing, hygiene and refrigeration eliminate the need for food irradiation are discussed. (UK)

  14. Update on irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Vanessa; Kilcast, David

    1988-01-01

    The authors summarize for the food manufacturing industries, the present legal situation and state of the art in the E.E.C., and immediate outlook in the U.K. in relation to food irradiation. They describe in outline the technology of irradiation and its potential in insect and microorganism control, with particular reference to combination processes, labelling, irradiation facilities, and changes in food components. (U.K.)

  15. Irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.; Danielsson-Tham, M.L.; Hoel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A committee has on instructions from the swedish government made an inquiry into the possible effects on health and working environment from irradition of food. In this report, a review is presented on the known positiv and negative effects of food irradiation Costs, availabilty, shelf life and quality of irradiated food are also discussed. According to the report, the production of radiolysis products during irradiation is not easily evaluated. The health risks from irradiation of spices are estimated to be lower than the risks associated with the ethenoxid treatment presently used. (L.E.)

  16. Gamma irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeldiak, Gabor; Stenger, Vilmos.

    1983-01-01

    The main parameters and the preparation procedures of the gamma radiation sources frequently applied for irradiation purposes are discussed. In addition to 60 Co and 137 Cs sources also the nuclear power plants offer further opportunities: spent fuel elements and products of certain (n,γ) reactions can serve as irradiation sources. Laboratory scale equipments, pilot plant facilities for batch or continuous operation, continuous industrial irradiators and special multipurpose, mobile and panorama type facilities are reviewed including those in Canada, USA, India, the Soviet Union, Hungary, UK, Japan and Australia. For irradiator design the source geometry dependence of the spatial distribution of dose rates can be calculated. (V.N.)

  17. Food irradiation: fiction and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation (IGCFI), sponsored by World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), with the intention to provide to governments, especially those of developing countries, scientifically correct information about food irradiation, decided to organize a file and questions of general public interest. The document is composed by descriptive files related with the actual situation and future prospective, technical and scientific terms, food irradiation and the radioactivity, chemical transformations in irradiated food, genetic studies, microbiological safety of irradiated food, irradiation and harmlessness, irradiation and additives, packing, irradiation facilities control, process control, irradiation costs and benefits as well as consumers reaction

  18. Apoptosis supression of cultured mouse brain cells by low dose rate irradiation of heavy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, S.; Nojima, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Suzuki, M.

    2003-01-01

    An environment of low dose rate radiation of heavy particles was achieved in an incubator by using off-centered scattered beam of accelerator (HIMAC). Cultured hole brain cells prepared from newborn mice of C3H, SCID and B6 were incubated in 10% FBS-DMEM medium for five days in the HIMAC incubator irradiating the low dose rate of heavy particles. The heavy particle irradiation was passively occurred while the HIMAC beam port was activated during the other experiments in the night period. The radiation doses inside and outside the incubator were continuously measured by LIULIN detectors. The accumulated dose during incubation varied 0.5-10mGy depend on the frequency of HIMAC operations. The apoptotic sensitivities of the brain cells were evaluated by fixing and Hoechst33342 staining after additional acute exposure of 200 KV X-ray within 4 Gy. A slight increase in apoptotic fraction without the acute irradiation was observed in cells inside the incubator compared to the laboratory control. The apoptosis induction was however suppressed when the additional X-ray irradiation was applied in a range of 0.25- 0.75Gy. This suggested that an adaptive response may be induced when heavy particle irradiation of the low dose rate was applied prior to the acute X-ray irradiation. This paper will discuss effects of the accumulated doses of the preceding irradiation of heavy particles and periods until the subsequent acute irradiation

  19. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  20. Pathological study about two autopsy cases of bilateral irradiation pneumonitis induced by unilateral irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Noriko; Tajima, Yo; Iio, Masaaki; Oshima, Takeo; Iino, Koichi.

    1978-01-01

    The first case is a 73-year-old man with left lung cancer. Seven days after completion of radiotherapy 7,000 rad, a chest roentgenogram showed diffuse bilateral pneumonia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with right lung cancer and about one month after completion of radiotherapy 2,600 rad, a chest roentgenogram showed bilateral pneumonia. Pathological findings, all lobes of both lungs of these cases showed acute interstitial pneumonitis. The pathogenesis of irradiation pneumonitis is poorly understood. Several investigators thought that the pathogenesis of irradiation pneumonitis was caused by autoimmune mechanism, they carried out sero-pathological studies and demonstrated the bilateral pneumonia caused by unilateral irradiation. (author)

  1. Is the irradiated small bowel volume still a predictor for acute lower gastrointestinal toxicity during preoperative concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer when using intensity-modulated radiation therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Benhua; Guo, Yuyan; Chen, Yuangui; Lu, Haijie; Tang, Tianlan; Yue, Zhicao; Guan, Guoxian; Chi, Pan; Lin, Chi

    2015-12-18

    The small bowel (SB) represents the most important dose-limiting structure in pelvic radiotherapy (RT). However, we observed that the majority of rectal cancer patients who received preoperative pelvic intensity modulated RT (IMRT) developed acute tenesmus without watery diarrhea. The objective of this study is to determine if the RT dose to SB affects the acute lower gastrointestinal toxicity (ALGIT) in rectal cancer patients who received neoadjuvant concurrent chemotherapy-IMRT. We will also evaluate if patient and tumor factors affect the ALGIT. We retrospectively analyzed 63 rectal cancer patients that consecutively received preoperative IMRT (45 Gy for pelvis and 50 Gy for gross tumor in 25 fractions) with concurrent chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) on day 1 and capecitabine 825 mg/m(2), twice per day from day 1 to day 14, week 1 and 4) between May 2012 and May 2013. The ALGIT was assessed with Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. The patients were stratified into two groups (with and without grade ≥2 ALGIT). The effect of SB volume receiving 5 to 40 Gy (V5 to V40) at a 5 Gy interval dose level on grade ≥2 ALGIT was evaluated. The volume of small bowel is defined as the volume of the small bowel loop. Other factors evaluated include patient's age and gender, tumor size and location and preexisting number of daily bowel movements. Overall, grade ≥2 ALGIT occurred in 57 % (36/63) patients. There was no significant difference between the two groups of patients (with and without grade ≥2 ALGIT) in SB V5 to V40, patient's age and gender, tumor location and preexisting number of daily bowel movements. There was a significant difference between the two groups of patients in tumor volume (with grade ≥2 ALGIT: 115.5 ± 85.5 cm(3) versus without grade ≥2 ALGIT: 58.5 ± 25.2 cm(3), p = 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no association between the dose SB received (V5 to V40) and the grade ≥2 ALGIT after adjusting

  2. Food irradiation: the facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1990-01-01

    The author explains in simple question and answer form what is entailed in the irradiation of food and attempts to dispel some of the anxieties surrounding the process. Benefits and limitations, controls, labelling safety, and tests for the detection of the use irradiation in food preparation are some of the topics dealt with in outline. (author)

  3. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labots, H.; Huis in 't Veld, G.J.P.; Verrips, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    After a review of several methods for the preservation of food and the routes of food infections, the following chapters are devoted to the preservation by irradiation. Applications and legal aspects of food irradiation are described. Special reference is made to the international situation. (Auth.)

  4. Perspective on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of irradiation treatment for fruit, vegetables and pork has stimulated considerable discussion in the popular press on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of food. This perspective is designed to summarize the current scientific information available on this issue

  5. Food irradiation: the facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Tony; Lang, Tim

    1987-01-01

    The London Food Commission summarizes its concerns about the use of food irradiation in the U.K. resulting from its working group surveys of general public opinion, trading standard officers and the food industry in the U.K., and from experience in countries already permitting irradiation to a variety of foods. (U.K.)

  6. Irradiation damage in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Most superconductors are quite sensitive to irradiation defects. Critical temperatures may be depressed, critical currents may be increased, by irradiation, but other behaviours may be encountered. In compounds, the sublattice in which defects are created is of significant importance. 24 refs

  7. Materials modified by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    Application of radiation in pharmaceutical sciences and cosmetology, polymer materials, food industry, environment, health camre products and packing production is described. Nano-technology is described more detailed, because it is less known as irradiation using technology. Economic influence of the irradiation on the materials value addition is shown

  8. Food irradiation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review is given of the control and monitoring of food irradiation with particular emphasis on the UK situation. After describing legal aspects, various applications of food irradiation in different countries are listed. Other topics discussed include code of practice for general control for both gamma radiation and electron beam facilities, dose specification, depth dose distribution and dosimetry. (U.K.)

  9. Effect of fibrinolysis inhibitors on survival time of irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smok, W.

    1988-01-01

    The possibilities of alleviation of the gastrointestinal syndrome of acute radiation sickness by modification of haemorrhagic diathesis using EACA and traskolan were studied. A significant prolongation of the mean survival time was obtained in the irradiated rats treated with EACA. 7 tabs., 10 refs. (author)

  10. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  11. Issues in food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, S.

    1987-04-01

    This discussion paper has two goals: first, to raise public awareness of food irradiation, an emerging technology in which Canada has the potential to build a new industry, mainly oriented to promising overseas markets; and second, to help build consensus among government and private sector decision makers about what has to be done to realize the domestic and export potential. The following pages discuss the potential of food irradiation; indicate how food is irradiated; outline the uses of food irradiation; examine questions of the safety of the equipment and both the safety and nutritional value of irradiated food; look at international commercial developments; assess the current and emerging domestic scene; and finally, draw some conclusions and offer suggestions for action

  12. Extracorporeal irradiation -Physicist perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayaprabhu, N.; Saravanan, K.S.; Gunaseelan; Vivekanandam, S.; Reddy, K.S.; Parthasarathy; Mourougan, S.; Elangovan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Extracorporeal irradiation (ECI) involves irradiation of body tissues, particularly malignant bones of the extremities, outside the body. This involves en bloc resection of the tumour, extracorporeal irradiation of the bone segment with a single dose of 50 Gy or more, and reimplantation of the irradiated bone with fixation devices. Bone tumours like Ewing's Sarcoma, Chondrosarcoma and Oesteosarcoma; in the involved sites like femur, tibia, humerus, ilium and sacrum can be treated with ECI. The reimplanted bone simply acts as a framework for appositional bone growth from surrounding healthy bones. The conventional indications for postoperative irradiation are still applied. The major advantages of ECI are the precise anatomic fit of the reimplanted bone segment, preservation of joint mobility and its potential in avoiding the growth discrepancy commonly seen in prosthetic replacement. The use of ECI was first described in 1968 and practiced in Australia since 1996. In our center, we have completed six ECIs

  13. Effect of irradiation on analgesia induced by morphine and endorphin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Byoung Hun; Hyun, Soung Hee; Chung, Ki Myung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Morphine and endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) produce analgesia by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Gamma irradiation attenuates the acute analgesic action of i.c.v. injected morphine in mice. This study was done to investigate the effect of-irradiation on the analgesia produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a {sup 60}Co source and the analgesic effects were tested 5, 30, 60, 90 and 180 min after irradiation using the acetic acid-induced writhing test. The analgesic effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for analgesia produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine or endorphin. Irradiation significantly potentiated the analgesia produced by endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results support the hypothesis that morphine and endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinocieception by different neuronal mechanisms.

  14. Effect of irradiation on analgesia induced by morphine and endorphin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Byoung Hun; Hyun, Soung Hee; Chung, Ki Myung

    2003-01-01

    Morphine and endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) produce analgesia by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Gamma irradiation attenuates the acute analgesic action of i.c.v. injected morphine in mice. This study was done to investigate the effect of-irradiation on the analgesia produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a 60 Co source and the analgesic effects were tested 5, 30, 60, 90 and 180 min after irradiation using the acetic acid-induced writhing test. The analgesic effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for analgesia produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine or endorphin. Irradiation significantly potentiated the analgesia produced by endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results support the hypothesis that morphine and endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinocieception by different neuronal mechanisms

  15. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2000-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 μg/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  16. Does granulocyte colony-stimulating factor exacerbate radiation-induced acute lung injury in rats?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Gouji; Awaya, Hitomi; Matsumoto, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) frequently occurs as a complication of thoracic irradiation. However, the mechanism of RP is not well known. Activated neutrophils are a possible pathogenesis of RP. Neutrophil activation induced by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may exacerbate RP. We studied the effects of recombinant human G-CSF on acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation using rats. Animals were divided into three groups: sham irradiation with saline control, irradiation alone, and irradiation with G-CSF. Actual irradiation was given as a single fraction of 16 Gy delivered to the right hemithorax. G-CSF at a dose of 12 {mu}g/body was administered subcutaneously once a day from 14 to 18 days after actual irradiation. Lung injury was evaluated 21 days after irradiation by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid findings and the lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio. Neutrophil and lymphocyte counts in BAL fluid and the W/D ratio were significantly increased in the irradiation alone and the irradiation with G-CSF groups compared with those of the sham irradiation+saline control group. However, there was no significant difference observed between the irradiation alone and irradiation with G-CSF groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that postradiation administration of G-CSF does not exacerbate acute lung injury induced by thoracic irradiation in rats. (author)

  17. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  18. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr; Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G 0 -stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors’ blood irradiated in vitro to 0–40 Gy acute γ-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 ± 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 ± 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 ± 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2–4 Gy and 16.7 ± 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6–10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  19. Food irradiation 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaiz, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation principles; its main applications, advantages and limitations; wholesomeness, present activities at Ezeiza Atomic Centre; research coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency; capacity building; and some aspects on national and international regulations, standards and commercialization are briefly described. At present 56 countries authorize the consumption of varied irradiated foods; trade is performed in 32 countries, with about 200 irradiation facilities. Argentina pioneered nuclear energy knowledge and applications in Latin America, food irradiation included. A steady growth of food industrial volumes treated in two gamma facilities can be observed. Food industry and producers show interest towards new facilities construction. However, a 15 years standstill in incorporating new approvals in the Argentine Alimentary Code, in spite of consecutive request performed either by CNEA or some food industries restricts, a wider industrial implementation, which constitute a drawback to future regional commercialization in areas such as MERCOSUR, where Brazil since 2000 freely authorize food irradiation. Besides, important chances in international trade with developed countries will be missed, like the high fresh fruits and vegetables requirements United States has in counter-season, leading to convenient sale prices. The Argentine food irradiation facilities have been designed and built in the country. Argentina produces Cobalt-60. These capacities, unusual in the world and particularly in Latin America, should be protected and enhanced. Being the irradiation facilities scarce and concentrated nearby Buenos Aires city, the possibilities of commercial application and even research and development are strongly limited for most of the country regions. (author) [es

  20. Burnable poison irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    The topical report describes the irradiation program developed to investigate different burnable poison rod material and designs. The purpose of the report is to present (1) technical support for the irradiation of several test burnable poison rod designs that have not been previously reviewed, and (2) describe the parameters that will be employed in the surveillance program for Combustion Engineering's (CE) standard burnable poison rod for 16 x 16 fuel assemblies. The test burnable poison rods will be placed in a CE reactor using 16 x 16 fuel assemblies, the first such reactor is Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 2. The irradiation program has four phases. Phase I involves the irradiation of 48 standard burnable poison rods which (1) will be extensively precharacterized prior to irradiation and (2) will undergo interim performance evaluation and detailed post-irradiation examination. Phase II, III, and IV involve irradiation and performance evaluation of a small number of burnable poison rods of different proprietary designs. The report discusses the materials to be used in each phase, the methods of fabricating the rods, and the rods expected behavior in a reactor

  1. Irradiation-Induced Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ewing, R.C.; Matzke, Hj.; Meldrum, A.; Newcomer, P.P.; Wang, L.M.; Wang, S.X.; Weber, W.J.

    1999-08-09

    This paper summarizes the results of the studies of the irradiation-induced formation of nanostructures, where the injected interstitials from the source of irradiation are not major components of the nanophase. This phenomena has been observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in a number of intermetallic compounds and ceramics during high-energy electron or ion irradiations when the ions completely penetrate through the specimen. Beginning with single crystals, electron or ion irradiation in a certain temperature range may result in nanostructures composed of amorphous domains and nanocrystals with either the original composition and crystal structure or new nanophases formed by decomposition of the target material. The phenomenon has also been observed in natural materials which have suffered irradiation from the decay of constituent radioactive elements and in nuclear reactor fuels which have been irradiated by fission neutrons and other fission products. The mechanisms involved in the process of this nanophase formation are discussed in terms of the evolution of displacement cascades, radiation-induced defect accumulation, radiation-induced segregation and phase decomposition, as well as the competition between irradiation-induced amorphization and recrystallization.

  2. Irradiation test of Dupic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kee, Chan Song; Myung, Seung Yang; Hyun, Soo Park

    2002-01-01

    Simulated DUPIC fuel that had been fabricated from natural uranium oxide with simulated fission products was irradiated at the HANARO research reactor at KAERI in 1999. The objectives of this irradiation test were to estimate the in-core behaviour of DUPIC fuel, to verify the design of the non-instrumented irradiation rig developed for the irradiation test of DUPIC fuel and to ensure the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO. The post-irradiation examinations, such as dimensional measurement, γ-scanning and EPMA, for irradiated simulated DUPIC fuel have been performed at the IMEF. The irradiation test of DUPIC fuel, fabricated with spent PWR fuel material, was performed at HANARO for two months as of May 2000. The resultant burn-up of irradiated DUPIC fuel was estimated to be 1 800 MWd/MTU. The irradiation behaviour of DUPIC fuel will be investigated based on the data from post-irradiation examinations. (authors)

  3. Alaskan Commodities Irradiation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarling, J.P.; Swanson, R.B.; Logan, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    The ninety-ninth US Congress commissioned a six-state food irradiation research and development program to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. Hawaii, Washington, Iowa, Oklahoma and Florida as well as Alaska have participated in the national program; various food products including fishery products, red meats, tropical and citrus fruits and vegetables have been studied. The purpose of the Alaskan study was to review and evaluate those factors related to the technical and economic feasibility of an irradiator in Alaska. This options analysis study will serve as a basis for determining the state's further involvement in the development of food irradiation technology. 40 refs., 50 figs., 53 tabs

  4. Analysis of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.

    1991-01-01

    Foods, e.g. chicken, shrimps, frog legs, spices, different dried vegetables, potatoes and fruits are legally irradiated in many countries and are probably also exported into countries, which do not permit irradiation of any food. Therefore all countries need analytical methods to determine whether food has been irradiated or not. Up to now, two physical (ESR-spectroscopy and thermoluminescence) and two chemical methods (o-tyrosine and volatile compounds) are available for routine analysis. Several results of the application of these four mentioned methods on different foods are presented and a short outlook on other methods (chemiluminescence, DNA-changes, biological assays, viscometric method and photostimulated luminescence) will be given. (author)

  5. Facts about food irradiation: Irradiated foods and the consumer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet discusses market testing of irradiate food, consumer response to irradiated products has always been positive, and in some countries commercial quantities of some irradiated food items have been sold on a regular basis. Consumers have shown no reluctance to buy irradiated food products. 4 refs

  6. Acute dyspnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhter, A.I.

    1991-01-01

    Radiodiagnosis is applied to determine the causes of acute dyspnea. Acute dyspnea is shown to aggravate the course of pulmonary diseases (bronchial asthma, obstructive bronchitis, pulmonary edema, throboembolism of pulmonary arteries etc) and cardiovascular diseases (desiseas of myocardium). The main tasks of radiodiagnosis are to determine volume and state of the lungs, localization and type of pulmonary injuries, to verify heart disease and to reveal concomitant complications

  7. Myeloproliferative disorders in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urowitz, M.B.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Four patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with total body irradiation administered in two sittings, 300 to 400 rads to each half of the body. All four patients had taken antimetabolites prior to receiving total body irradiation, and two continued to use them after total body irradiation. Two patients had taken alkylating agents before, and one had used them after total body irradiation. All patients showed clinical improvement. However, in two patients myeloproliferative disorders developed: a myelodysplastic preleukemia at 40 months after total body irradiation in one and acute myelogenous leukemia at 25 months in the other. Total body irradiation differs from total nodal irradiation in the total dose of irradiation (300 to 400 rads versus 2,000 to 3,000), and in the duration of the therapy (two sittings versus treatment over several weeks to months). Furthermore, the patients in the total body irradiation study frequently used cytotoxic drugs before and/or after irradiation, whereas in one total nodal irradiation study, azathioprine (2 mg/kg per day or less) was permitted, but no other cytotoxic agents were allowed. Rheumatologists may therefore face a binding decision when deciding to treat a patient with rheumatoid arthritis with either a cytotoxic drug or irradiation

  8. Food irradiation now

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    From the start the Netherlands has made an important contribution to the irradiation of food through microbiological and toxicological research as well as through the setting-up of a pilot plant by the government and through the practical application of 'Gammaster' on a commercial basis. The proceedings of this tenth anniversary symposium of 'Gammaster' present all aspects of food irradiation and will undoubtedly help to remove the many misunderstandings. They offer information and indicate to the potential user a method that can make an important contribution to the prevention of decay and spoilage of foodstuffs and to the exclusion of food-borne infections and food poisoning in man. The book includes 8 contributions and 4 panel discussions in the field of microbiology; technology; legal aspects; and consumer aspects of food irradiation. As an appendix, the report 'Wholesomeness of irradiated food' of a joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee has been added. (orig./G.J.P.)

  9. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oztasiran, I.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation is a physical process for treating food and as such it is comparable to other processing techniques such as heating or freezing foods for preservation. The energy level used in food irradiation is always below that producing radioactivity in the treated food, hence this aspect can be totally excluded in wholesomeness evaluations. Water is readily ionized and may be the primary source of ionization in foods with secondary effects on other molecules, possibly more a result of water ionization than of direct hits. In the presence of oxygen, highly reactive compounds may be produced, such as H, H 3 0+ and H 2 O 2 . Radiation at the energy flux levels used for food (<2 MeV) does not induce radioactivity. Food irradiation applications are already technically and economically feasible and that food so treated is suitable for consumption. Food irradiation techniques can play an important role for an improved preservation, storage and distribution of food products. (author)

  10. Packing for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee approved the use of radiation treatment of foods. Nowadays food packaging are mostly made of plastics, natural or synthetic, therefore effect of irradiation on these materials is crucial for packing engineering for food irradiation technology. By selecting the right polymer materials for food packaging it can be ensured that the critical elements of material and product performance are not compromised. When packaging materials are in contact with food at the time of irradiation that regulatory approvals sometimes apply. The review of the R-and-D and technical papers regarding material selection, testing and approval is presented in the report. The most information come from the USA where this subject is well elaborated, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reports are reviewed as well. The report can be useful for scientists and food irradiation plants operators. (author)

  11. Sterilization by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes Frias, L.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1980 the National Institute of Nuclear Research counts with an Industrial Gamma Irradiator, for the sterilization of raw materials and finished products. Through several means has been promoted the use of this technology as alternative to conventional methods of sterilization as well as steam treatment and ethylene oxide. As a result of the made promotion this irradiator has come to its saturation limit being the sterilization irradiation one of the main services that National Institute of Nuclear Research offers to producer enterprises of disposable materials of medical use also of raw materials for the elaboration of cosmetic products and pharmaceuticals as well as dehydrated foods. It is presented the trend to the sterilization service by irradiation showed by the compilation data in a survey made by potential customers. (Author)

  12. Economics of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitch, J.

    1982-01-01

    This article examines the cost competitiveness of the food irradiation process. An analysis of the principal factors--the product, physical plant, irradiation source, and financing--that impact on cost is made. Equations are developed and used to calculate the size of the source for planned product throughput, efficiency factors, power requirements, and operating costs of sources, radionuclides, and accelerators. Methods of financing and capital investment are discussed. A series of tables show cost breakdowns of sources, buildings, equipment, and essential support facilities for both a cobalt-60 and a 10-MeV electron accelerator facility. Additional tables present irradiation costs as functions of a number of parameters--power input, source size, dose, and hours of annual operation. The use of the numbers in the tables are explained by examples of calculations of the irradiation costs for disinfestation of grains and radicidation of feed

  13. Food irradiation in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henon, Y.M.

    1995-01-01

    Food irradiation already has a long history of hopes and disappointments. Nowhere in the world it plays the role that it should have, including in the much needed prevention of foodborne diseases. Irradiated food sold well wherever consumers were given a chance to buy them. Differences between national regulations do not allow the international trade of irradiated foods. While in many countries food irradiation is still illegal, in most others it is regulated as a food additive and based on the knowledge of the sixties. Until 1980, wholesomeness was the big issue. Then the ''prerequisite'' became detection methods. Large amounts of money have been spent to design and validate tests which, in fact, aim at enforcing unjustified restrictions on the use of the process. In spite of all the difficulties, it is believed that the efforts of various UN organizations and a growing legitimate demand for food safety should in the end lead to recognition and acceptance. (Author)

  14. Hemibody irradiation in lymphomas and related malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, G.M.; Harmer, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    Between 1979 and 1984, 34 patients with advanced lymphoma or leukemia resistant to other treatments have been treated with single or sequential hemibody irradiation (HBI). Good symptomatic relief was obtained in the majority of patients, with minimal acute toxicity. Disease regression occurred in the majority of patients and was maintained in those achieving a complete remission. Stage III disease and good risk histology predicted a good outcome. Marrow toxicity was marked only in those patients with marrow involvement. HBI is recommended as a worthwhile palliative treatment particularly in nodal nodular disease

  15. Dosimetry for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A Manual of Food Irradiation Dosimetry was published in 1977 under the auspices of the IAEA as Technical Reports Series No. 178. It was the first monograph of its kind and served as a reference in the field of radiation processing and in the development of standards. While the essential information about radiation dosimetry in this publication has not become obsolete, other publications on radiation dosimetry have become available which have provided useful information for incorporation in this updated version. There is already a Codex General Standard for Irradiated Foods and an associated Code of Practice for Operation of Irradiation Facilities used for Treatment of Food, issued in 1984 by the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme. The Codex Standard contains provisions on irradiation facilities and process control which include, among other requirements, that control of the processes within facilities shall include the keeping of adequate records including quantitative dosimetry. Appendix A of the Standard provides an explanation of process control and dosimetric requirements in compliance with the Codex Standard. By 1999, over 40 countries had implemented national regulations or issued specific approval for certain irradiated food items/classes of food based on the principles of the Codex Standard and its Code of Practice. Food irradiation is thus expanding, as over 30 countries are now actually applying this process for the treatment of one or more food products for commercial purposes. Irradiated foods are being marketed at retail level in several countries. With the increasing recognition and application of irradiation as a sanitary and phytosanitary treatment of food based on the provisions of the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures of the World Trade Organization, international trade in irradiated food is expected to expand during the next decade. It is therefore essential that proper dosimetry

  16. Food irradiation: progress in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: food irradiation regulatory situation in Canada; non-regulatory developments (poultry irradiation; fish irradiation; Government willingness to fund industry initiated projects; Government willingness to establish food irradiation research and pilot plant facilities; food industry interest is increasing significantly; Canadian Consumers Association positive response; the emergence of new consulting and entrepreneurial firms). (U.K.)

  17. Food irradiation in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Ghazali Hj Abd Rahman.

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has recently been visited as a technology that can contribute to the solution of problems associated with food preservation of Malaysia's agriculture produce and products thereby improving the economic status of the rural sector. However, the history of food irradiation in Malaysia is very recent. Research carried out on food irradiation only began in 1974 as a result of the installation of a 60 Co facility (initially 10,000 Ci) at the National University of Malaysia. Since its installation several studies have been carried out pertaining to the food irradiation. Presently its development has been slow. Research in this area has been confined to laboratory scale and purely academic. This limitation is due to a number of reasons, among others are: a) limited number of facilities; b) lack of expertise to conduct its research; c) other preservation methods can be improved with lower capital output. An important step towards its development was made when Malaysia actively participated in the RCA/IAEA food irradiation project, viz. the irradiation of pepper which was carried out at the National University of Malaysia in the 80's. As a result of this venture, research and development activities in food irradiation have been geared toward semi-plot scale with the view ot commercialization in the future. In 1982, a group of researchers was formed to conduct feasibility studies using irradiation techniques in trying to overcome several problems associated with our local paddy and rice. Another group is being organized by the National University of Malaysia to look into the problems associated with the preservation of frozen shrimps. (author)

  18. Irradiation of chilled lamb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1985-04-01

    Chilled, vacuum-packed New Zealand lamb loins have been irradiated at doses between 1-8 kGy. The report outlines the methods used and provides dosimetry details. An appendix summarises the results of a taste trial conducted on the irradiated meat by the Meat Industry Research Institute of New Zealand. This showed that, even at 1 kGy, detectable flavours were induced by the radiation treatment

  19. AGC-2 Irradiation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled, very high temperature reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) designs.[ , ] Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the new NGNP reactor design. To support the design and licensing of NGNP core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade with a specific emphasis on data related to the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the NGNP candidate graphites. Based on experience with previous graphite core components, the phenomenon of irradiation induced creep within the graphite has been shown to be critical to the total useful lifetime of graphite components. Irradiation induced creep occurs under the simultaneous application of high temperatures, neutron irradiation, and applied stresses within the graphite components. Significant internal stresses within the graphite components can result from a second phenomenon—irradiation induced dimensional change. In this case, the graphite physically changes i.e., first shrinking and then expanding with increasing neutron dose. This disparity in material volume change can induce significant internal stresses within graphite components. Irradiation induced creep relaxes these large internal stresses, thus reducing the risk of crack formation and component failure. Obviously, higher irradiation creep levels tend to relieve more internal stress, thus allowing the

  20. Food irradiation: global aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinning, G.

    1988-01-01

    As a commercial activity, food irradiation is twenty years old, but is backed by nearly eighty years of research on gamma irradiation and sixty years knowledge of application of the technology to food. An overview is given of the global boom and then the hiatus in its legislative and commercial applications. It is emphasised that in Australia, the overseas experience provides a number of models for proceeding further for food manufacturers, consumers and Government. 13 refs

  1. IAEA and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    1995-01-01

    IAEA was founded in 1957. 122 countries take part in it. It is operated with the yearly ordinary budget of about 20 billion yen and the technical cooperation budget of about 6 billion yen and by 2200 personnel. Its two important roles are the promotion of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy and the prevention of nuclear proliferation. The activities of IAEA are shown. The cooperation with developing countries and the international research cooperation program are the important activities. The securing of foods is an urgent subject, and the utilization of radiation and isotopes has been promoted, aiming at sustaining agriculture. The necessity of food irradiation is explained, and at present, commercial food irradiation is carried out in 28 countries including Japan. The irradiation less than 10 kGy does not cause poisonous effect in any food, according to JECFI. The new international agreement is expected to be useful for promoting the international trade of irradiated foods. The international cooperation for the spread of food irradiation and the public acceptance of food irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen

  3. Irradiating strand material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, J.R.; Brown, M.J.; Loan, L.D.

    1975-01-01

    Conductors covered with insulation which is to be irradiated are passed between two groups of coaxial sheaves mounted rotatably individually. Successive sections of the conductors are advanced past the window of one accelerator head, around the associated sheave or sheaves, and then past the window of another accelerator head. The accelerators face in substantially opposite directions and are staggered along the paths of the conductors to avoid any substantial overlap of the electron beams associated therewith. The windows extend vertically to encompass all the generally horizontal passes of the conductors as between the two groups of sheaves. Preferably, conductors are strung-up between the sheaves in a modified figure eight pattern. The pattern is a figure eight modified to intermittently include a pass between the sheaves which is parallel to a line joining the axes of the two groups of sheaves. This reverses the direction of travel of the conductors and optimizes the uniformity of exposure of the cross sectional area of the insulation of the conductors to irradiation. The use of a figure eight path for the conductors causes the successive sections of the conductor to turn about the longitudinal axes thereof as they are advanced around the sheaves. In this way the insulation is more uniformly irradiated. In a preferred embodiment, twisted conductor pairs may be irradiated. The twist accentuates the longitudinal turning of the conductor pair. The irradiation of twisted pairs achieves obvious manufacturing economies while avoiding the necessity of having to twist irradiation cross-linked conductors

  4. Food irradiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi

    1995-01-01

    The basic research on food irradiation in Japan was begun around 1955 by universities and national laboratories. In 1967, food irradiation was designated to the specific general research on atomic energy, and the national project on large scale was continued until 1983. As the result, the treatment of germination prevention for potatoes was approved by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in 1972. The Co-60 gamma ray irradiation facility of Shihoro Agricultural Cooperative is famous as the facility that succeeded in the practical use of food irradiation for the first time in the world. But the practical use of food irradiation stagnates and the research activities were reduced in Japan due to the circumstances thereafter. The effect of radiation to foods and living things is explained. The features of the radiation treatment of foods are small temperature rise, large transmissivity, no residue, the small loss of nutrition and large quantity, continuous treatment. The safety of irradiated foods is explained. The subjects for hereafter are discussed. (K.I.)

  5. Growth hormone reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-de-Segura, I.A.; Miguel, E. de [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Experimental Surgery; Prieto, I. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of General and Digestive Surgery; Grande, A.G. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Oncology Radiotherapy; Garcia, P.; Mendez, J. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry; Guerra, A. [`La Paz` Hospital, Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-09-01

    Growth hormone stimulates the growth of intestinal mucosa and may reduce the severity of injury caused by radiation. Male Wistar rats underwent abdominal irradiation (12 Gy) and were treated with either human growth hormone (hGH) or saline, and sacrificed at day 4 or 7 post-irradiation. Bacterial translocation, and the ileal mucosal thickness, proliferation, and disaccharidase activity were assessed. Mortality was 65% in irradiated animals, whereas hGH caused a decrement (29%, p<0.05). Bacterial translocation was also reduced by hGH (p<0.05). Treating irradiated rats with hGH prevented body weight loss (p<0.05). Mucosal thickness increased faster in irradiated hGH-treated animals. The proliferative index showed an increment in hGH-treated animals (p<0.05). Giving hGH to irradiated rats prevented decrease in sucrose activity, and increment in lactase activity. In conclusion, giving hGH to irradiated rats promotes the adaptative process of the intestine and acute radiation-related negative effects, including mortality, bacterial translocation, and weight loss. (orig.)

  6. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, G; Bartelds, B; van der Veen, S J; Dickinson, M G; Brandenburg, S; Berger, R M F; Langendijk, J A; Coppes, R P; van Luijk, P

    2012-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an important role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity. Therefore, the authors investigated whether irradiation of the lung also induces pulmonary hypertension. Different sub-volumes of the rat lung were irradiated with protons known to induce different levels of pulmonary vascular damage. Early loss of endothelial cells and vascular oedema were observed in the irradiation field and in shielded parts of the lung, even before the onset of clinical symptoms. 8 weeks after irradiation, irradiated volume-dependent vascular remodelling was observed, correlating perfectly with pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary dysfunction. The findings indicate that partial lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resulting from acute pulmonary endothelial cell loss and consequential pulmonary hypertension. Moreover, the close resemblance of the observed vascular remodelling with vascular lesions in PAH makes partial lung irradiation a promising new model for studying PAH.

  7. [Predictive factors for acute radiation pneumonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, D; Mahé, M-A; Servois, V; Claude, L

    2009-06-01

    Thoracic irradiation is a major weapon in the treatment of nonmetastatic primary lung cancer, in particular in patients presenting a locally advanced disease of the mediastinium. Acute radiation pneumonitis (ARP) is one of the main limiting toxicities. The purpose of this work is to sum up the current state of knowledge of the factors of risk of developing ARP. The incidence after conventional irradiation, in patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is about 7 to 10% in the moderate although symptomatic forms of ARP and about 1 to 3% in the severe forms. The factors related to the patient, the tumour or treatments prior to the irradiation do not determine any specific risk of ARP besides an age of over 65 years that remains debatable. The validated predictive factors of ARP are mainly related to the irradiation factors (healthy lung volumes irradiated, average dose of irradiation, etc.). Nevertheless, in spite of the adjustment of these parameters, the individual susceptibility to the toxicity of thoracic radiotherapy remains significant, directing current research to the biological markers intrinsic to the patient. In particular, the involvement of early variations of certain cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, TGF-ss) in the occurrence of ARP during irradiation has been suggested and studies are under way to confirm their involvement and determine their role.

  8. Re-irradiation for metastatic brain tumors with whole-brain radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, Takeshi; Kunieda, Etsuo; Kogawa, Asuka; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Tamai, Yoshifumi; Ohizumi, Yukio

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether second whole-brain irradiation is beneficial for patients previously treated with whole-brain irradiation. A retrospective analysis was done for 31 patients with brain metastases who had undergone re-irradiation. Initial whole-brain irradiation was performed with 30 Gy/10 fractions for 87% of these patients. Whole-brain re-irradiation was performed with 30 Gy/10 fractions for 42% of these patients (3-40 Gy/1-20 fractions). Three patients underwent a third whole-brain irradiation. The median interval between the initial irradiation and re-irradiation was 10 months (range: 2-69 months). The median survival time after re-irradiation was 4 months (range: 1-21 months). The symptomatic improvement rate after re-irradiation was 68%, and the partial and complete tumor response rate was 55%. Fifty-two percent of the patients developed Grade 1 acute reactions. On magnetic resonance imaging, brain atrophy was observed in 36% of these patients after the initial irradiation and 74% after re-irradiation. Grade ≥2 encephalopathy or cognitive disturbance was observed in 10 patients (32%) after re-irradiation. Based on univariate analysis, significant factors related to survival after re-irradiation were the location of the primary cancer (P=0.003) and the Karnofsky performance status at the time of re-irradiation (P=0.008). A Karnofsky performance status ≥70 was significant based on multivariate analysis (P=0.050). Whole-brain re-irradiation for brain metastases placed only a slight burden on patients and was effective for symptomatic improvement. However, their remaining survival time was limited and the incidence of cognitive disturbance was rather high. (author)

  9. Diamond amorphization in neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaenko, V.A.; Gordeev, V.G.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the results on neutron irradiation of the diamond in a nuclear reactor. It is shown that the neutron irradiation stimulates the diamond transition to the amorphous state. At a temperature below 750 o K the time required for the diamond-graphite transition decreases with decreasing irradiation temperature. On the contrary, in irradiation at higher temperatures the time of diamond conversion into the amorphous state increases with decreasing but always remains shorter than in the absence of irradiation. (author)

  10. Irradiated produce reaches Midwest market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszczola, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    In March 1992, the Chicago-area store gave its shoppers a choice between purchasing irradiated and nonirradiated fruits. The irradiated fruits were treated at Vindicator Inc., the first U.S. food irradiation facility (starting up on January 10, 1992). The plant, located in Mulberry, Fla., then shipped the fruits in trucks to the store where they were displayed under a hand-lettered sign describing the irradiated fruits and showing the irradiation logo

  11. Detection methods for irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyakova, A.; Tsvetkova, E.; Nikolova, R.

    2005-01-01

    In connection with the ongoing world application of irradiation as a technology in Food industry for increasing food safety, it became a need for methods of identification of irradiation. It was required to control international trade of irradiated foods, because of the certain that legally imposed food laws are not violated; supervise correct labeling; avoid multiple irradiation. Physical, chemical and biological methods for detection of irradiated foods as well principle that are based, are introducing in this summary

  12. Blood irradiation: Rationale and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Upon request by the local American Red Cross, the Savannah Regional Center for Cancer Care irradiates whole blood or blood components to prevent post-transfusion graft-versus-host reaction in patients who have severely depressed immune systems. The rationale for blood irradiation, the total absorbed dose, the type of patients who require irradiated blood, and the regulations that apply to irradiated blood are presented. A method of irradiating blood using a linear accelerator is described

  13. food irradiation: activities and potentialities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doellstaedt, R.; Huebner, G.

    1985-01-01

    After the acceptance of food irradiation up to an overall average dose of 10 kGy recommended by the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food in October 1980, the G.D.R. started a programme for the development of techniques for food irradiation. A special onion irradiator was designed and built as a pilot plant for studying technological and economic parameters of the irradiation of onions. (author)

  14. Acute radiation syndrome in human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskova, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    The combination of the different types of irradiation dramatically changes the clinical course of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in the case of short term exposure. The recent experience has been compared mostly with the data on the atomic bomb victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The comparison of the injuries from different radiation exposures resulted in the possibility to receive summarized data and the actual basis of the observed difference. The situation with total relatively uniform irradiation is observed when human position is at long distance from powerful radiation sources or when he changes his position, as seen in atomic bomb survivors, the results of nuclear weapon tests and the patients in the Chernobyl accident. This is connected with the ARS of bone, marrow and intestine. The situation characterized by the clinical signs of the large area of skin and mucosa injuries was observed in nuclear weapon tests and the Chernobyl accident. In the case of the more localized and less severe beta injuries of skin and mucosa, the long term effects may be important. The majority of accidents in peaceful period are related to the uneven exposure from near sources, and the situation of the combination of external and internal irradiation is related to uneven irradiation and the predominance of internal exposure. (K.I.)

  15. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, E.R.; Gregorio, M.A. de; Mateo, P.; Esco, R.; Bascon, N.; Morales, F.; Bellosta, R.; Lopez, P.; Gimeno, M.; Roca, M.; Villavieja, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the ''open-neck'' (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase (< 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Positive ion irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Many questions about the mechanisms of the response of cells to ionizing radiation can best be investigated using monoenergetic heavy charged particle beams. Questions of the role of different types of damage in the LET effect, for example, are being answered by comparing repair kinetics for damage induced by electrons with that produced by helium ions. However, as the models become more sophicated, the differences between models can be detected only with more precise measurements, or by combining high- and low-LET irradiations in split-dose experiments. The design of the authors present cell irradiation beam line has limited the authors to irradiating cells in a partial vacuum. A new way to mount the dishes and bring the beam to the cells was required. Several means of irradiating cells in mylar-bottom dishes have been used at other laboratories. For example at the RARAF Facility, the dual ion experiments are done with the dish bottom serving as the beam exit window but the cells are in a partial vacuum to prevent breaking the window. These researchers have chosen instead to use the dish bottom as the beam window and to irradiate the entire dish in a single exposure. A special, very fast pumping system will be installed at the end of the beam line. This system will make it possible to irradiate cells within two minutes of installing them in the irradiation chamber. In this way, the interaction of electron and ion-induced damage in Chlamydomonas can be studied with time between doses as short as 5 minutes

  17. Gamma Irradiation does not Cause Carcinogenesis of Irradiated Herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongphasuk, Jarunee; Thongphasuk, Piyanuch; Eamsiri, Jarurut; Pongpat, Suchada

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Microbial contamination of medicinal herbs can be effectively reduced by gamma irradiation. Since irradiation may cause carcinogenicity of the irradiated herbs, the objective of this research is to study the effect of gamma irradiation (10 and 25 kGy) from cobalt-60 on carcinogenicity. The herbs studied were Pueraria candollei Grah., Curcuma longa Linn. Zingiber montanum, Senna alexandrina P. Miller, Eurycoma Longifolia Jack, Gymnostema pentaphylum Makino, Ginkgo biloba, Houttuynia cordata T., Andrographis paniculata, Thunbergia laurifolia L., Garcinia atroviridis G., and Cinnamomum verum J.S.Presl. The results showed that gamma irradiation at the dose of 10 and 25 kGy did not cause carcinogenicity of the irradiated herbs

  18. Post-irradiation diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerwaldt, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    In radiotherapy of pelvic cancers, the X-ray dose to be delivered to the tumour is limited by the tolerance of healthy surrounding tissue. In recent years, a number of serious complications of irradiation of pelvic organs were encountered. Modern radiotherapy necessitates the acceptance of a calculated risk of complications in order to achieve a better cure rate. To calculate these risks, one has to know the radiation dose-effect relationship of normal tissues. Of the normal tissues most at risk when treating pelvic tumours only the bowel is studied. In the literature regarding post-irradiation bowel complications, severe and mild complications are often mixed. In the present investigation the author concentrated on the group of patients with relatively mild symptoms. He studied the incidence and course of post-irradiation diarrhea in 196 patients treated for carcinoma of the uterine cervix or endometrium. The aims of the present study were: 1) to determine the incidence, course and prognostic significance of post-irradiation diarrhea; 2) to assess the influence of radiotherapy factors; 3) to study the relation of bile acid metabolism to post-irradiation diarrhea; 4) to investigate whether local factors (reservoir function) were primarily responsible. (Auth.)

  19. Irradiation creep of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Displacement damage of graphite by neutron irradiation causes graphite to change dimensions. This dimensional instability requires careful attention when graphite is used as as moderator and reflector material in nuclear devices. Natural gradients in flux and temperature result in time-varying differential growth generating stresses similar to thermal stresses with an ever increasing temperature gradient. Graphite, however, does have the ability to creep under irradiation, allowing the stress intensity to relax below the fracture strength of the material. Creep strain also serves to average the radiation-induced strains, thus contributing to the stability of the core. As the dimensional instability is a function of temperature, so are the creep characteristics of graphite, and it is of interest to generalize the available data for extension to more extreme conditions of fluence and temperature. Irradiation creep of graphite is characterized by two stages of creep; a primary stage that saturates with time and a secondary stage that is generally assumed to be linear and constant with time. Virtually all past studies have not considered primary creep in detail primarily because there is limited available data at the very low fluences required to saturate primary creep. It is the purpose of this study to carefully examine primary creep in detail over the irradiation temperature range of 150 to 1000 degree C. These studies also include the combined effects of creep, differential growth, and structural changes in graphite by irradiation. 3 refs., 5 figs

  20. irradiated gem stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.S.M

    2006-01-01

    gem stones are those stones which have beauty that can be based on its color, transparency, brilliance (degree to which light is scattered) and the crystalline perfection (no minerals or other inclusions). topaz AL 2 SiO 4 (F,OH) 2 Aluminum fluoro-hydroxyl -silicate, it belongs to class silicates and subclass cyclo silicates and it is used mainly as gemstones, it is most common irradiated gem on the market. high energy such as neutrons, have enough energy to produce color centres .irradiation is most often carried out in nuclear reactors (high-energy neutrons). irradiation of topaz in the egyptian research reactor (ETRR-2) by neutrons changes its cloudy white color to a reddish pink which could be changed to blue by heating. nuclear reactions inside the irradiated stones produce radioisotopes. resulting to residual radioactivity. residual radioactivity is potentially a problem;therefore stones have to be stored in storage for a period of time to reduce the residual radioactivity aiming to reach the safety level of transportation. the storage time of the stones is dependent on trace element concentrations connected with their life-times in topaz . therefore, inspection of the trace elements in the stones and their half-life times are essential before irradiation

  1. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements

  2. Influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of artificial graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junichi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Koide, Shirosaku; Kawada, Shimei; Shotsu, Akira

    1989-01-01

    To examine the acute influences of irradiation on the anastomotic sites of EPTFE vascular grafts, experimental study was performed using canine dogs. After replacement of superior vena cava and bilateral femoral arteries with EPTFE grafts, a total of 20 to 100 Gy doses were given at the anastomotic sites of superior vena cava and right femoral artery. There were no degradation of grafts themselves or rupture in the anastomoses at cumulative anastomotic sites of superior vena cava, stenoses and/or overgrowth of granulation tissues were observed, although at those of right femoral artery, no remarkable differences were observed between dogs which received irradiation and those which did not receive. (author)

  3. Role of irradiation in the suppression of parotid secretions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A.C.R.; Khoury, G.G. (Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (UK)); Robinson, P.M. (Leeds General Infirmary (UK))

    1989-06-01

    Suppression of salivary flow is of value in the management of salivary fistulae and sialectasia. It may also be beneficial in mentally defective patients and those with neurological palsies lacking control of their salivation. Nine patients were treated by irradiation to the parotid gland to control salivary flow; eight had complete resolution of symptoms and one had partial relief. Irradiation was effective as primary treatment and after failed surgery and/or drug treatment. Low doses were effective and there were no significant acute or long-term side effects. Its use avoids long-term medication and its potential side effects and may reduce the need for surgery. (author).

  4. Study of the radioprotective efficiency of combined administration of natural antioxidants and a sulfhydryl compound in feverish irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radwan, R.R.

    2008-01-01

    In the present experiments, a study of the radioprotective effects of natural antioxidants, rutin alone, vitamine E alone or each of them combined with synthetic radioprotector, cysteine have been investigated in irradiated and feverish irradiated rats. Furthermore, the oxidative stress bio markers and certain liver function tests of the irradiated and the feverish whole body irradiated rats were examined. Two main sets of animals were used: The 1st set was constructed in order to study the effect of irradiation, while the second set was used to study the effect of irradiation on feverish rats. The effect of irradiation was evaluated by exposing the whole body of rats to gamma radiation at acute single dose level of 6.5 Gy. Rutin was orally daily administered for two weeks before irradiation in a dose of 1.064 mmol/kg , vitamine E was injected intraperitoneally daily for seven days before irradiation in a dose of 50 mg/100 g. While, cysteine was intraperitoneally administered only 30 min. before irradiation in a dose of 30 mg/kg. In order to determine the antipyretic effect of the drugs, body temperature of each animal was measured before induction of hyperthermia as well as 18 hours following yeast injection. Rats were treated with the tested drugs before induction of fever then exposed to whole body gamma radiation at acute single dose level of 6.5 Gy and body temperature of each animal was measured 3 days after irradiation

  5. Acute pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown, that in the detailed study of various types of acute pneumonia s the roentgenologic method plays a great role. The most characteristic roentge nological signs of primary (bacterial, viral, rickettsial, parasitogenic and fun gous) and secondary pneumonias (in the case of lessions in lesser circulation, changes in bronchi, aspirational and other diseases of organism) are presented

  6. Food irradiation - general aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes research and development experience in food irradiation followed by commercial utilisation of multi-purpose plants. The main design objectives should be high efficiency and uniform dose. Particular care must be given to dosimetry and the use of plastic dosimeters is described. Capital outlay for a 1 MCi Cobalt 60 irradiator is estimated to be 2.5 million dollars giving a unit processing cost of 0.566 dollars/ft 3 of throughput for 8000 hour/year use at a dose of 25 kGy. (2.5 Mrad). The sale of irradiated food for human consumption in Britain is not yet permitted but it is expected that enabling legislation will be introduced towards the end of 1985

  7. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm 2 ) silicon sensors

  8. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dervan, P. [The University of Liverpool, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); French, R.; Hodgson, P. [The University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Marin-Reyes, H., E-mail: h.marin-reyes@sheffield.ac.uk [The University of Sheffield, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Wilson, J. [The University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm{sup 2}) silicon sensors.

  9. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-12-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm2) silicon sensors.

  10. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  11. Neutron irradiation of seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Neutrons are a valuable type of ionizing radiation for seed irradiation and radiobiological studies and for inducing mutations in crop plants. In experiments where neutrons are used in research reactors for seed irradiation it is difficult to measure the dose accurately and therefore to establish significant comparisons between experimental results obtained in various reactors and between repeated experiments in the same reactor. A further obstacle lies in the nature and response of the seeds themselves and the variety of ways in which they are exposed in reactors. The International Atomic Energy Agency decided to initiate international efforts to improve and standardize methods of exposing seeds in research reactors and of measuring and reporting the neutron dose. For this purpose, an International Neutron Seed Irradiation Programme has been established. The present report aims to give a brief but comprehensive picture of the work so far done in this programme. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Energy and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    The energy used in food systems in the US amounts to about 16.5% of total US energy. An analysis has been made of the energy used in the many steps of the food-irradiation process. It is found that irradiation pasteurization uses only 21kJ/kg and radappertization 157kJ/kg, which is much less than the energy used in the other food processes. A comparison has also been made with other methods of preserving, distributing and preparing the meat for servings. It is found that the food irradiation can save significant amounts of energy. In the case of heat-sterilized and radiation-sterilized meats the largest fraction of the energy is used in the packaging, while in the frozen meats the largest energy consumption is by refrigeration in the distribution channels and in the home. (author)

  13. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooij, J. van

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five years of development work on the preservation of food by irradiation have shown that this technology has the potential to reduce post-harvest losses and to produce safe foods. The technological feasibility has been established but general acceptance of food irradiation by national regulatory bodies and consumers requires attention. The positive aspects of food preservation by irradiation include: the food keeps its freshness and its physical state, agents which cause spoilage (bacteria, etc.) are eliminated, recontamination does not take place, provided packaging materials are impermeable to bacteria and insects. It inhibits sprouting of root crops, kills insects and parasites, inactivates bacteria, spores and moulds, delays ripening of fruit, improves the technological properties of food. It makes foods biologically safe, allows the production of shelf-stable foods and is excellent for quarantine treatment, and generally improves food hygiene. The dose ranges needed for effective treatment are given

  14. Irradiation of food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, J.; Stanbrook, I.; Shersby, M.

    1989-01-01

    The House of Commons was asked to support the Government's intention to allow the use of the irradiation of foodstuffs under conditions that will fully safeguard the interests of the consumer. The Government, it was stated, regards this process as a useful additional way to ensure food safety. The effect of the radiation in killing bacteria will enhance safety standards in poultry meat, in some shell-fish and in herbs and spices. The problem of informing the public when the food has been irradiated, especially as there is no test to detect the irradiation, was raised. The subject was debated for an hour and a half and is reported verbatim. The main point raised was over whether the method gave safer food as not all bacteria were killed in the process. The motion was carried. (U.K.)

  15. Food preservation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, M.

    1978-01-01

    In November, 1977, an International Symposium on Food Preservation by Irradiation was held at Wageningen, the Netherlands. About 200 participants attended the Symposium which was organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization; a reflection of the active interest which is being shown in food irradiation processing, particularly among developing countries. The 75 papers presented provided an excellent review of the current status of food irradiation on a wide range of different topics, and the Symposium also afforded the valuable opportunity for informal discussion among the participants and for developing personal contacts. A brief survey of the salient aspects discussed during the course of the meeting are reported on. (orig.) [de

  16. Studies of blood irradiator application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenhong; Lu Yangqiao

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an important means for medical treatment, but it has many syndromes such as transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, it's occurrence rate of 5% and above 90% death-rate. Now many experts think the only proven method is using blood irradiator to prevent this disease. It can make lymphocyte of blood product inactive, so that it can not attack human body. Therefore, using irradiation blood is a trend, and blood irradiator may play an important role in medical field. This article summarized study of blood irradiator application, including the meaning of blood irradiation, selection of the dose for blood irradiation and so on

  17. Development of mutation techniques for farm product ingredients and production of new raw materials by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, T.

    2004-01-01

    An increase of mutation for anti-oxidization competence of buckwheat was investigated by gamma-ray irradiation. An individual and a family of the buckwheat which showed an excellent anti-oxidization competence was selected. Survival rate of irradiated buckwheat decreased at acute irradiation dose of >200 Gy. The divergence of anti-oxidization competence on the irradiated buckwheat showed large value in comparison with untreated buckwheat. The average value of anti-oxidization competence on the irradiated buckwheat was higher than the one on the untreated buckwheat. The relations between anti-oxidization competence and total irradiation dose, however, were not clear. The relations between the anti-oxidization competence and total polyphenol contents in the backwheat showed clearly a positive correlation. (M. Suetake)

  18. The response of peripheral blood and bone marrow to combined irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovleva, N.G.; Zhorno, L.Ya.

    1975-01-01

    Biological effects were examined in rats after X irradiation, oral administration of 90 Sr and 144 Ce as well as combined exposure to X radiation and internal contamination with both radionuclides. Morphological changes of the peripheral blood and the frequency of aberrant mitoses in bone marrow cells were used as criteria. In the case of combined radiation exposure three periods were observed with regard to blood changes. The first period was characterized by changes caused by external irradiation, the second one was a short-term period of normalization, and during the last period additive effects of external and internal irradiation were observed. Considering the changes of the frequency of aberrant mitoses only two periods could be detected according to the effects of external and internal irradiation. It is pointed out that in the case of combined irradiation the acute radiation syndrome caused by external irradiation gradually changes into a chronic stage associated with the long-term retention of radionuclides. (author)

  19. Solar irradiation over Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, P.C.

    1983-11-01

    Angstroem-Page linear regression equation between global irradiation and sunshine duration is fitted for five Zambian locations for which the direct measured values of the global irradiation exist. Excellent correlation is found to exist for all the five places. The values of the correlation coefficients for Lusaka, Livingstone, Ndola, Mansa and Mongu are found to be 0.99, 0.99, 0.98, 0.97 and 0.95, respectively, and the values of the regression coefficients (a,b) are (0.191, 0.534), (0.177, 0.638), (0.253, 0.434), (0.270, 0.483) and (0.235, 0.506), respectively. The regression coefficients are observed to vary with the elevation of the station above sea level. A linear relationship between the elevation and the coefficient a and a quadratic relationship between the elevation and the coefficient b is assumed and is used to estimate the values of the regression coefficients for 14 other stations in the country. Using the estimated values of the coefficients and the measured values of the sunshine duration, estimates of the global irradiation have been made for these locations. No data for the diffuse irradiation is available. The estimates for diffuse irradiation have been made for all the 19 locations using the expression Hsub(D)=H(0.754-0.654 S/S 0 ) used by Lewis, Solar Energy, 31, no. 1, 125-128 (1983), for estimating diffuse irradiation in Zimbabwean locations. (author)

  20. Facts about food irradiation: Nutritional quality of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet briefly considers the nutritional value of irradiated foods. Micronutrients, especially vitamins, are sensitive to any food processing method, but irradiation does not cause any special nutritional problems in food. 4 refs

  1. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    OpenAIRE

    French, R.S; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. ca...

  2. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Dervan, P.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Wilson, J.

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. c...

  3. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  4. Microstructure of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was on the changes produced in the microstructure of metals, ceramics, and semiconductors by irradiation with energetic particles. the symposium brought together those working in the different material systems, which revealed that there are a remarkable number of similarities in the irradiation-produced microstructures in the different classes of materials. Experimental, computational and theoretical contributions were intermixed in all of the sessions. This provided an opportunity for these groups, which should interact, to do so. Separate abstracts were prepared for 58 papers in this book

  5. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-01-01

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins

  6. Economics of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstadt, P.; Steeves, C.; Beaulieu, D.

    1993-01-01

    The number of products being radiation processed worldwide is constantly increasing and today includes such diverse items as medical disposables, fruits and vegetables, spices, meats, seafoods and waste products. This range of products to be processed has resulted in a wide range of irradiator designs and capital and operating cost requirements. This paper discusses the economics of low dose food irradiation applications and the effects of various parameters on unit processing costs. It provides a model for calculating specific unit processing costs by correlating known capital costs with annual operating costs and annual throughputs. It is intended to provide the reader with a general knowledge of how unit processing costs are derived. (author)

  7. Irradiated cocoa beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, R.; Tesh, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Groups of 40 male and 40 female CD rats were fed powdered rodent diet containing 25% (w/w) of either non-irradiated, irradiated or fumigated cocoa beans. The diets were supplemented with certain essential dietary constituents designed to satisfy normal nutritional requirements. An additional 40 male and 40 female rats received basal rodent diet alone (ground) and acted as an untreated control. After 70 days of treatment, 15 male and 15 female rats from each group were used to assess reproductive function of the F 0 animals and growth and development of the F 1 offspring up to weaning; the remaining animals were killed after 91 days of treatment. (orig.)

  8. Microstructure evolution during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.; Was, G.S.; Hobbs, L.W.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1997-01-01

    The symposium focused on the microstructural changes produced in semiconductors, metals, ceramics and polymers by irradiation with energetic particles. The symposium provided an opportunity to bring together those working in different materials systems and revealed that there are a remarkable number of similarities in the changes produced by irradiation in the different classes of materials. Experimental, computational and theoretical contributions were intermixed throughout the sessions, which provided an opportunity for these groups to interact. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  9. Half body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelink, H.; Battermann, J.; Hart, G.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with complaints of severe pain from disseminated breast cancer were treated with half body irradiation with a single dose of 600 to 800 rad. All of them had a relief of pain for periods ranging from 14 to 280 days, with a median duration of 101 days. The objective effects of a single radiation dose was studied in 15 patients with lung metastases. The growth delay observed in these patients was of the same order as the period of pain relief observed in breast cancer patients after half body irradiation. In general a longer lasting palliation was obtained in patients with slowly growing tumors

  10. Effectiveness of gamma-ray chronic irradiation on in vitro mutagenesis in crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeki Nagatomi

    2002-01-01

    Effects of chronic or acute irradiations were compared using in vitro culture on inducing the mutation in model crops. In chrysanthemum, combined method with irradiation and in vitro culture can solve the problem of chimera formation in induced mutants, and provided 10 times greater mutation frequency than usual plant irradiation. The chronic culture method showed the widest color spectrum, whereas, the acute culture indicated a relatively low mutation rate and a very limited flower color spectrum in chrysanthemum. Flower color mutation of the regenerators could be induced more from petals and buds than from leaves. These facts are supposed that the gene loci fully expressed on floral organs may be unstable for mutation by mutagenesis or culture. It may be likely to control a direction of desired mutation on using explants with specific gene loci activated. In sugarcane, the chronic culture method extended quantitative characteristics of regenerated clonal lines toward not only the negative but positive direction. On the other hand, the acute culture method showed lower quantitative mutation as the irradiation dose rose. In chronic irradiation, regenerated mutant lines in sugarcane indicate generally little decrease in chromosome number and wider variations with relatively less damage. In acute irradiation, regenerated mutant lines show remarkable decrease of chromosome numbers in sugarcane mutant lines as the irradiation dose rose. There is close positive correlation between chromosome number and biomass of each mutant line. The chromosome number estimation is a proper indicator to monitor damage of adopted irradiation methods. Possible reason why the chronic culture methods indicate higher frequency and wider spectrum on mutation is demonstrated. . Problems solved and prospect of chronic irradiation and in vitro techniques are discussed. (Author)

  11. Consumer opinions in Argentina on food irradiation: irradiated onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curzio, O.A.; Croci, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Two surveys were carried out in Buenos Aires of consumer attitudes towards irradiated onions [no data given]. The first investigated the general level of consumer knowledge concerning food irradiation, whilst the second (which covered consumers who had actually bought irradiated onions) examined reasons for purchase and consumer satisfaction. Results reveal that more than 90% of consumers surveyed had a very limited knowledge of food irradiation

  12. Mechanical and irradiation properties of zirconium alloys irradiated in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh Hyun; Eom, Kyong Bo; Kim, Jae Ik; Suh, Jung Min; Jeon, Kyeong Lak

    2011-01-01

    These experimental studies are carried out to build a database for analyzing fuel performance in nuclear power plants. In particular, this study focuses on the mechanical and irradiation properties of three kinds of zirconium alloy (Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) irradiated in the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor), one of the leading multipurpose research reactors in the world. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were measured to determine the mechanical properties before and after irradiation, while irradiation growth was measured for the irradiation properties. The samples for irradiation testing are classified by texture. For the irradiation condition, all samples were wrapped into the capsule (07M-13N) and irradiated in the HANARO for about 100 days (E > 1.0 MeV, 1.1 10 21 n/cm 2 ). These tests and results indicate that the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys are similar whether unirradiated or irradiated. Alloy B has shown the highest yield strength and tensile strength properties compared to other alloys in irradiated condition. Even though each of the zirconium alloys has a different alloying content, this content does not seem to affect the mechanical properties under an unirradiated condition and low fluence. And all the alloys have shown the tendency to increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Transverse specimens of each of the zirconium alloys have a slightly lower irradiation growth tendency than longitudinal specimens. However, for clear analysis of texture effects, further testing under higher irradiation conditions is needed

  13. Effect of irradiation and of cysteamine on rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braquet, Monique.

    1979-06-01

    The aim of this work was to determine: the effects of a cobalt 60 gamma irradiation received by an animal, the biological repercussions of the preliminary administration of cysteamine to the animal exposed. To this end the amount of damage caused by in vivo irradiation of rats was estimated at three levels: on the whole body; on an important organ, the liver; on a specific organite, the mitochondrion. The methods of investigation used fall mainly within the province of biochemical technology. Studies on the effects of ionizing radiations on rats irradiated for ten days at 900 roentgens showed a generalized attack on the whole system, known as the ''Acute Irradiation Syndrome'' and divisible into three phases: stage one, initial phase involving loss of weight and destruction of the liver. These symptoms appear early and reach a paroxysm on the 4th day after irradiation. Stage two, remission phase (from the 5th to the 8th day) when the weight variations become stabilised. Stage three, last phase, often leading to the death between the 9th and 10th days. During the same 10-day period, on the same irradiated rats, the changes in enzymatic systems were followed in order to estimate the magnitude of peroxidative phenomena within a subcellular particle such as the mitochondrion. The results obtained prove a strong disorganisation of the mitochondrial function [fr

  14. Childhood Head and Neck Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation Thyroid nodules (see Thyroid Nodule brochure) • Thyroid nodules ...

  15. Food irradiation and consumer values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, C.M.; Schutz, H.G.; Sommer, R.

    1988-01-01

    A mail survey technique was used to determine if value hierarchy, locus of control, innovativeness, and demographic parameters could distinguish between subjects expressing different levels of concern and willingness to buy irradiated food. Concern toward irradiated food was lower than concern for other food safety issues, probably because many expressed uncertainty regarding irradiation. Those ranking the value “an ecologically balanced world” expressed the greatest irradiation concern. Factors which could predict high irradiation concern were being highly concerned about the use of chemical sprays on food, completing more formal education and being female; those believing that life was controlled by luck were less concerned. Irradiation concern was a principal factor determining willingness to buy irradiated foods. Innovative consumers were more likely to try irradiated foods than noninnovative. Implications for consumer education are presented

  16. Irradiation procedures and radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izard, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The design and construction of an irradiation facility and the process controls to monitor safety and performance are discussed. Dose rate distribution in an irradiator, dose distribution within the product and the measurement of radiation dose are outlined

  17. Profitability of irradiation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos R, M.E.; Gonzalez F, C.; Liceaga C, G.; Ortiz A, G.

    1997-01-01

    In any industrial process it is seek an attractive profit from the contractor and the social points of view. The use of the irradiation technology in foods allows keep their hygienically, which aid to food supply without risks for health, an increment of new markets and a losses reduction. In other products -cosmetics or disposable for medical use- which are sterilized by irradiation, this process allows their secure use by the consumers. The investment cost of an irradiation plant depends mainly of the plant size and the radioactive material reload that principally is Cobalt 60, these two parameters are in function of the type of products for irradiation and the selected doses. In this work it is presented the economic calculus and the financial costs for different products and capacities of plants. In general terms is determined an adequate utility that indicates that this process is profitable. According to the economic and commercial conditions in the country were considered two types of credits for the financing of this projects. One utilizing International credit resources and other with national sources. (Author)

  18. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  19. Wholesomeness of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raica, Nicholas; McDowell, Marion E.; Darby, William J.

    1963-01-15

    The wholesomeness of irradiated foods was evaluated in mice, rats, dogs, and monkeys over a 2-year period, or 4 generations. Data are presented on the effects of a diet containing radiation-processed foods on growth, reproduction, hematology, histopathology, carcinogenicity, and life span. (86 references) (C.H.)

  20. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  1. Neutrons from Antiproton Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.

    the volume targeted for irradiation. A major part of this peripheral dose arise from neutrons, which in particular are problematic due to their high RBE for secondary cancer incidence. We have measured the fast and thermal neutron spectrum in different geometrical configurations in order to experimentally...

  2. CERN IRRADIATION FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Fabio; Garcia Alia, Ruben; Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Gkotse, Blerina; Richard Jaekel, Martin; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-09-28

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in dosimetry, metrology, intercomparison of radiation protection devices, benchmark of Monte Carlo codes and radiation damage studies to electronics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Irradiated fuel bundle counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.; Todd, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a prototype safeguards instrument for determining the number of irradiated fuel assemblies leaving an on-power refueled reactor is described. Design details include radiation detection techniques, data processing and display, unattended operation capabilities and data security methods. Development and operating history of the bundle counter is reported. (U.S.)

  4. Centurion -- a revolutionary irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, Dan; Perrins, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The facility characteristics for irradiation of red meat and poultry differ significantly from those of medical disposables. This paper presents the results of the market requirement definition which resulted in an innovative conceptual design. The process and the 'state of the art tools' used to bring this abstract idea into a proof of concept are presented. (author)

  5. Longevity of irradiated burros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.C.; Brown, D.G.; Frome, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The unique radioresistance of burros has resulted in a large-animal life-span study that began in 1951. During the course of radiation exposures, some animals at three low exposures to gamma photons survived (10, 10, and 9 exposed to 320, 425, and 545 R, respectively). In 1953, 20 burros exposed to 375 R (gamma) in 25-R/wk increments were added to this life-span study. In 1957, 33 burros exposed to mixed neutron-gamma radiation from nuclear weapons were added. Six burros exposed to 180 rads of neutron and gamma radiation (4:1) in a ''Godiva-type'' reactor were added in 1959 along with 22 controls. In the first 4 years after the single gamma exposures (320-545 R), there were deaths from pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia). Afterward, however, all deaths have been attributable to common equine diseases; none from malignancies. Today, 20 of the original 112 burros in these studies survive (13 irradiated and 7 controls). Survival curves determined for unirradiated and neutron-gamma and gamma-only irradiated burros show significant differences. Median survival time: controls, 28 yrs; gamma irradiation, 26 yrs; neutron-gamma irradiation, 23 yrs. A Weibull probability analysis predicts maximum life-span to be 42 yrs

  6. Update on meat irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at ∼2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry

  7. Process for irradiation of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, George.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation of polyethylene affects its processabiltiy in the fabrication of products and affects the properties of products already fabricated. The present invention relates to a process for the irradiation of polyethylene, and especially to a process for the irradiation of homopolymers of ethylene and copolymers of ethylene and higher α-olefins, in the form of granules, with low levels of electron or gamma irradiation in the presence of an atomsphere of steam

  8. Acute abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wig J

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available 550 cases of acute abdomen have been analysed in detail includ-ing their clinical presentation and operative findings. Males are more frequently affected than females in a ratio of 3: 1. More than 45% of patients presented after 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Intestinal obstruction was the commonest cause of acute abdomen (47.6%. External hernia was responsible for 26% of cases of intestinal obstruction. Perforated peptic ulcer was the commonest cause of peritonitis in the present series (31.7% while incidence of biliary peritonitis was only 2.4%.. The clinical accuracy rate was 87%. The mortality in operated cases was high (10% while the over-all mortality rate was 7.5%.

  9. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in acute radiation-induced cerebral edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Baoguo; Zhang Baomin; Chen Xiaohua; Gao Yabing; Wang Dewen

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the relation between changes in expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in brain vascular endothelial cells and acute radiation-induced cerebral edema after 60 Co gamma knife irradiation with a high dose. Methods: The right caudate nucleus of rats were irradiated with 200 Gy 60 Co gamma knife. the rats were sacrificed within 14 days after irradiation. By a light microscopy, electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, the authors studied the formation and development of acute radiation-induced cerebral edema as well as the expression of eNOS in brain vascular endothelial cells. Results: Acute radiation-induced cerebral edema was observed morphologically 2 hours after irradiation and peaked on day 3 after irradiation. The expression of eNOS in brain vascular endothelial cells markedly increased 2 hours after irradiation, which could be consistently visualized during the acute developmental phase of radiation-induced cerebral edema. Conclusion: The increased expression of eNOS may be related to the formation and development of acute radiation-induced cerebral edema after 60 Co gamma knife irradiation with a high dose

  10. Food irradiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetinkaya, N.

    1999-01-01

    Trade in food and agricultural products is important to all countries, the economies of many developing countries would be significantly improved if they were able to export more food and agricultural products. Unfortunately, many products can not be traded because they are infested with, or hosts to, harmful pests, contaminated with microorganisms, or spoil quickly. Foods contaminated with microorganisms cause economic losses, widespread illness and death. Several technologies and products have been developed to resolve problems in trading food and to improve food safety, but none can provide all the solutions. Irradiation is an effective technology to resolve technical problems in trade of many food and agricultural products, either as a stand- alone technology or in combination with others. As a disinfestation treatment it allows different levels of quarantine security to be targeted and it is one of few methods to control internal pests. The ability of irradiation virtually to eliminate key pathogenic organisms from meat, poultry, and spices is an important public health advantage. In addition to controlling pests and eliminating harmful bacteria, irradiation also extends the storage life of many foods. In the laboratories of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, many research projects were completed on the effects of gamma irradiation to the storage life of chicken meat, anchovy, Turkish fermented sausage, dried and fresh fruits and vegetables and also research projects were conducted on the effects of gamma irradiation on microorganisms (Salmonella, Campylo-bacteria, E.coli and S.aureus in white and red meat) and parasites (food-borne, trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodes spp.)

  11. Acute ileus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhter, A.I.

    1991-01-01

    Acute ileus backgrounds are multiple. Dynamic ileus may take place during peritonitis, some nervous diseases, parathyroid diseases, hysteria. Mechanical ileus is connected with some obstacle in intestines. Small intestines ileus is rarely seen and may be caused by a tumor gall stones, invagination, swallowed foreign bodies. For exclusion of abdominal organs injury and gall stone ileus, if the roentgenological picture isn't clear enough, ultrasonography or computerized tomography of the abdomen are carried out

  12. Acute epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Aijaz; Joyner-Triplett, Nedra

    1996-05-01

    Preview Acute anterior nosebleeds are frightening because bleeding is often so copious and seemingly unstoppable. But, ironically, this type is usually less severe than posterior epistaxis, in which blood may run briskly but unseen down the throat. The choice among the many treatment methods available depends on the source and cause of epistaxis. The authors present a methodical approach to patient evaluation and describe the best therapy for various situations.

  13. Quantitative regularities of development of endogenous infection in irradiated organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal'tsev, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the literature and the author's own experimental results are reviewed to show the functional relationships between the radiation dose and the development of endogenous infection in irradiated organisms. A direct linear dependence was found between the dose of radiation and the severity of endogenous infection at doses causing death from the ''bone marrow'' syndrome in acute radiation sickness. In case of death from the ''intestinal'' syndrome, an inverse linear dependence can be observed between the radiation dose and the culture yield of microbes from internal organs. In this case, the pathological effect on the organism is due to bacterial endotoxins formed during the disintegration of microbial cells in the organism. Endogenous infection and endotoxinaemia essentially aggravate the progress of acute radiation disease. The importance of endogenous infection for the death of the organism is minimized in irradiation at doses causing death ''under the ray''. (author)

  14. Comparison of /sup 32/P therapy and sequential hemibody irradiation (HBI) for bony metastases as methods of whole body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, H.; Choi, K.; Sohn, C.; Yaes, R.; Rotman, M.

    1986-06-01

    We report a retrospective study of 15 patients with prostate carcinoma and diffuse bone metastases treated with sodium /sup 32/P for palliation of pain at Downstate Medical Center and Kings County Hospital from 1973 to 1978. The response rates, duration of response, and toxicities are compared with those of other series of patients treated with /sup 32/P and with sequential hemibody irradiation. The response rates and duration of response are similar with both modalities ranging from 58 to 95% with a duration of 3.3 to 6 months with /sup 32/P and from 75 to 86% with a median duration of 5.5 months with hemibody irradiation. There are significant differences in the patterns of response and in the toxicities of the two treatment methods. Both methods cause significant bone marrow depression. Acute radiation syndrome, radiation pneumonitis, and alopecia are seen with sequential hemibody irradiation and not with /sup 32/P, but their incidence can be reduced by careful treatment planning. Hemibody irradiation can provide pain relief within 24 to 48 h, while /sup 32/P may produce an initial exacerbation of pain. Lower hemibody irradiation alone is less toxic than either upper hemibody irradiation or /sup 32/P treatment.

  15. Improvement of irradiation effects database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Guohuo; Xu Xi; Jia Wenhai

    2003-01-01

    The design method of irradiation effects database is related in this paper. The structure of irradiation effects database is perfected by Delphi, query and calculation of the data have completed, and printing and outputting data report form have fulfilled. Therefore, data storage platform for reliability and vulnerability analyzing of harden irradiation effects of the component and system is offered

  16. Canadian perspectives on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstadt, P.

    1988-01-01

    Canada has been in the forefront of irradiation technology for some 30 years. Nearly 90 of the 140 irradiators used worldwide are Canadian-built, yet Canadian food processors have been very slow to use the technology. The food irradiation regulatory situation in Canada, the factors that influence it, and some significant non-regulatory developments are reviewed. (author)

  17. Antiradiation Vaccine: Technology Development Of Prophylaxis, Prevention And Treatment Of Biological Consequences And Complications After Neutron Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    Introduction: Neutrons irradiation produce a unique biological effectiveness compare to different types of radiation because their ability to create a denser trail of ionized atoms in biological living tissues[Straume 1982; Latif et al.2010; Katz 1978; Bogatyrev 1982]. The efficacy of an Anti-Radiation Vaccine for the prophylaxis, prevention and therapy of acute radiation pathology was studied in a neutron exposure facility. The biological effects of fast neutrons include damage of central nervous system and cardiovascular system with development of Acute Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular forms of acute radiation pathology. After irradiation by high doses of fast neutron, formation of neurotoxins, hematotoxins,cytotoxins forming from cell's or tissue structures. High doses of Neutron Irradiation generate general and specific toxicity, inflammation reactions. Current Acute Medical Management and Methods of Radiation Protection are not effective against moderate and high doses of neutron irradiation. Our experiments demonstrate that Antiradiation Vaccine is the most effective radioprotectant against high doses of neutron-radiation. Radiation Toxins(biological substances with radio-mimetic properties) isolated from central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals could be working substance with specific antigenic properties for vaccination against neutron irradiation. Methods: Antiradiation Vaccine preparation standard - mixture of a toxoid form of Radiation Toxins - include Cerebrovascular RT Neurotoxin, Cardiovascular RT Neurotoxin, Gastrointestinal RT Neurotoxin, Hematopoietic RT Hematotoxin. Radiation Toxins were isolated from the central lymph of gamma-irradiated animals with different forms of Acute Radiation Syndromes - Cerebrovascular, Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Hematopoietic forms. Devices for Y-radiation were "Panorama","Puma". Neutron exposure was accomplished at the Department of Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, Dubna, Russia. The neutrons

  18. Late renal function after upper abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Monica M.; Willett, Christopher G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the late renal function and complications following upper abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighty-six adult patients were identified who were treated with curative intent to the upper abdomen, received greater than 50% unilateral kidney irradiation to doses of at least 26 Gy, and survived for 1 year or more. Following treatment, the clinical course, blood pressure, addition of anti-hypertensive medications, serum creatinine and creatinine clearance were determined. Creatinine clearance was calculated by the formula: creatinine clearance equals [(140 - age) x (weight in kilograms)] / (72 x serum creatinine), which has a close correlation to creatinine clearances measured by 24 hour urine measurement. The percent change in creatinine clearance from pre-treatment values was analyzed. Mean follow-up was 6.7 years. Seventeen patients were followed for 11 or more years. Results: Of the 16 patients with pre-radiotherapy hypertension, eight required an increase in the number of medications for control and eight required no change in medication. Twenty-one patients developed hypertension in follow-up, 15 of whom required no medication. One patient developed malignant hypertension on the basis of renal artery stenosis. Acute or chronic renal failure was not observed in any patient. The serum creatinine for all 86 patients prior to irradiation was below 2 mg/100 ml; in follow-up it rose to between 2-3 mg/100 ml in five patients. On univariate analysis, older patient age, female sex, pre-existing hypertension and initially abnormal renal function (creatinine clearance <90mg/ml) were significantly correlated with later poor creatinine clearance (<50 mg/ml). Conclusions: After significant unilateral kidney irradiation, patients demonstrated a laboratory trend to increased creatinine and decreased creatinine clearance. With long-term follow-up, these physiologic changes did not appear to translate into a clinically relevant alteration in

  19. The effects of pervanadate given at different times on the proliferation of irradiated NFS-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuan; Yuan Xiaoling; Zhao Zhenhu; Shan Yajun; Chen Jiapei; Cong Yuwen

    2004-01-01

    To comprehend the feasibility of the inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase pervanadate using for therapy of radiation injury and inquire into the effects of tyrosine phosphatases on the radiation injury of hematopoietic cells, the effects of different times of administration on NFS-60 cells irradiated with different doses were observed. It was found that pervanadate could specifically enhance the proliferation of irradiated cells, such effects became obvious with the dose of irradiation increased and displayed time effects. For 3 Gy irradiated NFS-60 cells, good results were achieved when pervanadate was administrated 24h after irradiation, there were no difference between before and 30 mins after irradiation, but for 5 Gy irradiated cells, the best time administration is 24 and 48h after irradiation. Effects of pervanadate administrated before irradiation was better than that administrated 30 min after irradiation. These results suggest that protein tyrosine phosphatase might involve in the course of radiation injury of hematopoietic cells. It is hoped that enhancing receptor signal transduction by PTP inhibitors will become a new way of therapy of acute radiation disease

  20. Development of rat visual system after prenatal X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, G.; Biesold, D.; Mares, V.

    1980-01-01

    Rats pregnant for 16 or 19 days (ED 16 or 19) were irradiated with 1 Gy and killed after 24 hrs or at age 24 or 180 days. The primary influence of X-rays consists in a lethal lesion of cells located in the periventricular zone as well as some of the more differentiated cells in the brain parenchyma. After irradiation on ED 16, the acute damage was greater in the cerebral cortex and the superior colliculus (SC) than in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN). Irradiation on ED 19 damaged mainly the cortical part of the visual system. In adult animals the acute radiation damage results in a deficit in packing density and the total number of neurons. Animals irradiated on ED 16 revealed more pronounced changes in deep layers of the cortex (L VI) than in the superficial layers. The deficit was smaller in the SC, and in the LGN an increase in the packing density of nerve cells was found. In animals irradiated on ED 19, the deficit in neurons density occurred mainly in more superficial layers of the cortex, with a maximum deficit in layer IV. From comparison of acute and final changes it may be concluded that the damage of preneuroblastic cell populations is compensated during later embryonic development, while the damage induced in populations already at early neuroblast stage is irreversible and leads to a permanent deficit. Glia cell population is altered in a similar way as the number of neurons in regions poor in myelin, while in regions rich in myelin the number of glia cells seems to depend on changes in the number of efferent and afferent nerve fibres. (author)

  1. Irradiation of Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae): new irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smittle, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    An irradiation facility financed by a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Dept. of Energy, is near completion in Gainesville, FL. It utilizes a GE-CGR linear accelerator as the irradiation source in a two level design. The lower level has a one meter horn for 10 Me V electrons to irradiate shallow layers of commodities. The upper level has a 2.5 meter horn equipped to produce 5 Me V X-rays to irradiate loads up to pallet size. Automated conveyors transport materials to be irradiated. The facility is divided for irradiated and unirradiated commodities with freezer and refrigerated storage on both sides. The facility is designed for both research and demonstration purposes and has the capacity to irradiate over 10 million Caribbean fruit fly larvae or pupae per minute

  2. Post irradiation test report of irradiated DUPIC simulated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Jung, I. H.; Moon, J. S. and others

    2001-12-01

    The post-irradiation examination of irradiated DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) simulated fuel in HANARO was performed at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility) in KAERI during 6 months from October 1999 to March 2000. The objectives of this post-irradiation test are i) the integrity of the capsule to be used for DUPIC fuel, ii) ensuring the irradiation requirements of DUPIC fuel at HANARO, iii) performance verification in-core behavior at HANARO of DUPIC simulated fuel, iv) establishing and improvement the data base for DUPIC fuel performance verification codes, and v) establishing the irradiation procedure in HANARO for DUPIC fuel. The post-irradiation examination performed are γ-scanning, profilometry, density, hardness, observation the microstructure and fission product distribution by optical microscope and electron probe microanalyser (EPMA)

  3. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T.

    1989-01-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema

  4. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. (Pulmonary Disease Service, Presidio of San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  5. Gynecomastia caused by testicular irradiation. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Hiroki; Umeda, Tadashi; Katayama, Ichiro; Nishioka, Kiyoshi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-09-01

    Gynecomastia in a 20-years-old male is reported. At the age of 2, the patients had contracted acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), at which time irradiation for the testicular ALL invasion was performed. This irradiation induced atrophy of the testis. Obesity was first noted when he was 12 years old, after which enlargement of the bilateral breasts occurred at 14 years of age. When he turned 19, supplementary testosterone therapy was initiated to counter the gynecomastia, but it proved ineffective. Thus, a total mastectomy was performed with free nipple grafting. Pathologically, inspected mammary tissue specimens revealed mammary ducts in a fibrous stroma that had encompassed lobules of adipose tissue. The findings in this case suggest that the testicular irradiation had induced primary hypogonadism and that this had resulted in gynecomastia and obesity. (author)

  6. The return of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerton, K.

    1992-01-01

    In discussing the need for food irradiation the author examines the problems that arise in processing foods of different kinds: spices, meat, fruits and vegetables. It is demonstrated that the relatively low dose of radiation required to eliminate the reproductive capacity of the pest can be tolerated by most fruits and vegetables without damage. Moreover the safety of irradiated food is acknowledged by major national and international food organizations and committees. The author agreed that when food irradiation has been approved by a country, consumers should be able to choose between irradiated and non-irradiated food. To enable the choice, clear and unambiguous labelling must be enforced. 13 refs., 1 tab., ills

  7. Atypical acute reaction associated with radiotherapy. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akamansu, M.; Erel, A. [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Radiation therapy may cause acute and/or chronic skin reactions. In this paper a patient with contact urticaria associated with irradiation is described. We could not determine the agent behind the contact urticaria in our patient in light of the current literature. We are reporting this case because the literature neither mentioned radiotherapy as being among the agents that lead to contact urticaria nor reported contact urticaria as being among the acute reactions to radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Affecting mortality of whole-body gamma-irradiated Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostal, M.; Kuna, P.; Neruda, O.; Petyrek, P.; Simsa, J.; Vavrova, J.; Skopec, F.

    1982-01-01

    The efficacy is compared of radioprotection and the complex treatment of acute radiation syndrome in laboratory dogs. One group of dogs was administered an injection of radioprotectives, the other was a control group. The treated group was administered vitamins and antibiotics in injections after the irradiation. It was found that complex treatment between days 1 and 28 after irradiation is relatively effective. In the treated dogs radioprotection does not significantly influence survival or even reduces survival. (M.D.)

  9. Adrenocorticotrophin and cortisol secretion in children after low dose cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowne, E.C.; Wallace, W.H.B.; Gibson, S.; Moore, C.M.; White, A.; Shalet, S.M. (Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Endocrinology)

    1993-09-01

    We investigated the effect of low dose cranial irradiation (18-24 Gy) on spontaneous ACTH and cortisol secretion in children. We analysed 24-hour plasma ACTH and cortisol profiles sampled at 20-minute intervals. Twenty long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia were studied and results compared with those in 14 normal children. No significant disruption of spontaneous ACTH or cortisol secretion, either in the amount or pattern of hormones secreted, was found in children after low dose cranial irradiation. (Author).

  10. Vitamin A in irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Vitamin A losses induced by 10 MeV electrons in cream cheese, calf liver sausage, pig liver, whole egg powder and margarine continued to increase during storage for 4-8 weeks in presence of air. Thus, vitamin A loss in sausage irradiated with 5 Mrad was 22% on the day after irradiation, 61% after 4 weeks. Irradiation and storage at 0 0 C instead of at ambient temperature reduced these losses considerably. Exclusion of air (vacuum, nitrogen) or irradiation on dry ice (approx. -80 0 C) were even more effective in preventing destruction of vitamin A. After 4 weeks of storage, cream cheese irradiated at 5 Mrad had lost 60% when irradiated and stored in air at ambient temperature, 20% in nitrogen atmosphere, 5% in vacuum package, and 5% when irradiated on dry ice and stored at ambient temperture. (orig.) [de

  11. Vitamin A in irradiated foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Vitamin A losses induced by 10 MeV electrons in cream cheese, calf liver sausage, pig liver, whole egg powder and magarine continued to increase during storage for 4-8 weeks in presence of air. Thus, vitamin A loss in sausage irradiated with 5 Mrad was 22% on the day after irradiation, 61% after 4 weeks. Irradiation and storage at 0 0 C instead of ambient temperature reduced these losses considerably. Exclusion of air (vacuum, nitrogen) or irradiation on dry ice (approx. -80 0 C) were even more effective in preventing destruction of vitamin A. After 4 weeks of storage, cream cheese irradiated at 5 Mrad had lost 60% when irradiated and stored in air at ambient temperature, 20% in nitrogen atmosphere, 5% in vacuum package, and 5% when irradiated on dry ice and stored at ambient temperature. (orig.) [de

  12. Irradiation of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Although irradiation is being investigated for the last more than 50 years for the application in preservation of food, it has not yet been exploited commercially in some countries like India. No other food processing technique has undergone such close scrutiny. There are many advantages to this process, which few others can claim. The temperature remains ambient during the process and the form of the food does not change resulting in very few changes in the sensory and nutritive quality of the food product. At the same time the microorganisms are effectively destroyed. Most of the spoilage and pathogenic organisms are sensitive to irradiation. Fortunately, most governments are supportive for the process and enacting laws permitting the process for foods

  13. The irradiation of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laizier, J.; Thomas, J.C.; Nairaud, D.

    1998-01-01

    The irradiation of foods opens the way to new products and processes that are potentially very attractive to the agro-food industry. The treatments have been shown to be safe and their implementation can be adequately controlled. However, to date, these methods have only been used in a very restricted way. We discuss here the reasons for this limited use, the factors likely to affect future development of the technique and its current regulation. The next publication of European Community directives should greatly change the nature of French regulation. In particular, there are likely to be major changes in product labelling, with an obligation not only to label treated products but also to label ingredients and ingredients of constituents of the product as being 'treated by irradiation' or 'treated with ionising radiation'. (authors)

  14. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor

  15. Clinical aspects of accidents resulting in acute total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    That the management of whole body radiation injury involves: (1) watchful waiting, (2) observation of the hematologic parameters, (3) use of antibiotics, platelet red cell and possibly granulocyte transfusions, (4) administration of hemopoietic molecular regulators of granulopoiesis, and (5) bone marrow transplantation as the last line of defense. The clinical indication for the preceding will not be discussed, since this will be a subject of later speakers in this conference. Certainly, if a radiation casualty is fortunate enough to have an identical twin, a marrow transplant may be lifesaving and certainly can do no harm to the patient, and there is little risk to the donor.

  16. Alleviation of acute radiation damages by post-irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurishita, A.; Ono, T.

    1992-01-01

    Radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages in mice were tried to alleviate experimentally by post-treatment. Combined treatment of OK-432 and aztreonam clearly prevented the radiation induced sepsis and elevated the survival rate in mice; the survival was 80% in the OK-432 plus aztreonam group while it was 55% in the group treated with OK-432 alone and 0% with saline. Irsogladine maleate, an anti-ulcer drug, increased the survival rate of jejunal crypt stem cells with a clear dose-related trend. The D 0 for irsogladine maleate was 2.8 Gy although it was 2.3 Gy for saline, These findings suggest that some conventional drugs are effective for radiation induced hematopoietic and gastro-intestinal damages and the possibility that they can be applied for people exposed to radiation accidentally. (author)

  17. Food Irradiation. Standing legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1997-01-01

    The standing legislation in Mexico on food irradiation matter has its basis on the Constitutional Policy of the Mexican United States on the 4 Th. article by its refers to Secretary of Health, 27 Th. article to the Secretary of Energy and 123 Th. of the Secretary of Work and Social Security. The laws and regulations emanated of the proper Constitution establishing the general features which gives the normative frame to this activity. The general regulations of Radiological Safety expedited by the National Commission for Nuclear Safety and Safeguards to state the specifications which must be fulfill the industrial installations which utilizing ionizing radiations, between this line is founded, just as the requirements for the responsible of the radiological protection and the operation of these establishments. The project of Regulation of the General Health Law in matter of Sanitary Control of Benefits and Services, that in short time will be officialized, include a specific chapter on food irradiation which considers the International Organizations Recommendations and the pertaining harmonization stated for Latin America, which elaboration was in charge of specialized group where Mexico was participant. Additionally, the Secretary of Health has a Mexican Official Standard NOM-033-SSA1-1993 named 'Food irradiation; permissible doses in foods, raw materials and support additives' standing from the year 1995, where is established the associated requirements to the control registers, service constancies and dose limits for different groups of foods, moreover of the specific guidelines for its process. This standard will be adequate considering the updating Regulation of Benefits and Services and the limits established the Regulation for Latin America. The associated laws that cover in general terms it would be the requirements for food irradiation although such term is not manageable. (Author)

  18. Evidence and analysis of radioresistance induced by protracted gamma irradiation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa chick, green unicellular alga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santier-Riviere, S.

    1984-06-01

    Chlorella cells, unicellular green algae, are a suitable living material to study radiosensitivity of eucaryotic cells after acute or protracted gamma irradiations. Cell survival and survival curves are taken as end-points. Methods of irradiation were defined taking in account interferences of the different factors which can intervene during the experimentation. Survival curves after protracted irradiation of Chlorella cell cultures in plateau-phase have a shape that can be explained by radioresistance. The population of surviving cells becomes radioresistant in front of protracted and acute irradiations, acute irradiation allowing us to analyze radioresistance. Radioresistance increases with the total dose of protracted irradiation. The decrease of radiosensitivity with aging of cells is not able to explain the phenomenon. It is not due to selection of radioresistance cells by protracted irradiation. All the cells get radioresistance. Radioresistance decreases with the time when protracted irradiation is suppressed. It is not found in offspring. It is not a mutation but perhaps the effect of a stimulation of repair processes, but not potentially lethal damage repair [fr

  19. Surface segregation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Lam, N.Q.

    1985-10-01

    Gibbsian adsorption is known to alter the surface composition of many alloys. During irradiation, four additional processes that affect the near-surface alloy composition become operative: preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation. Because of the mutual competition of these five processes, near-surface compositional changes in an irradiation environment can be extremely complex. Although ion-beam induced surface compositional changes were noted as long as fifty years ago, it is only during the past several years that individual mechanisms have been clearly identified. In this paper, a simple physical description of each of the processes is given, and selected examples of recent important progress are discussed. With the notable exception of preferential sputtering, it is shown that a reasonable qualitative understanding of the relative contributions from the individual processes under various irradiation conditions has been attained. However, considerably more effort will be required before a quantitative, predictive capability can be achieved. 29 refs., 8 figs

  20. Irradiation of dates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Al-Charchafchy, F.; Al-Shaikhaly, M.H.; Mirjan, J.; Auda, H.

    1974-01-01

    Testing of the technical feasibility of radurization of fresh dates was attempted. In addition preliminary studies were carried out to investigate the applicability of gamma rays to date syrup manufacture. The varieties Zahdi, Lelwi and Tabarzel were studied at different stages of ripening. The eating quality of fresh dates was not affected significantly by irradiation even with doses of 270 and 540 krad. The duration of the softening process, after-ripening, of dates was prolonged by low doses of 10-30 krad in the majority of the experimental batches. The time period of after-ripening was reduced with 270 krad, as well as with 540 krad as a result of shortening of the induction period, i.e. the time after which the date begins to soften. The microbial spoilage of khalaal Lelwi dates was considerably reduced by irradiation with doses above 90 krad. The dibis yield of fully rutab dates was highly increased by the radiation doses of 375 to 2000 krad. The darkness and viable cell count of dibis pressed from irradiated dates were significantly lower than that of untreated dates. (F.J.)

  1. Apparatus for internal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooft, E.V.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus for internal irradiation wherein the radioactive material is applied in the shape of a ball row consisting of contiguous radioactive and neutral balls. This ball row is prepared beforehand and is pneumatically transferred to an applicator tube adapted to be introduced into a body cavity. In order that the balls may stay exactly in the right places during the irradiation, the applicator tube is provided with an internal channel having a narrow end portion, passing through a shoulder into the remaining wider portion, and a final ball is added to each ball row, this final ball having a larger diameter than the other balls, so that it is not admitted in the narrow end portion of the internal channel in the applicator tube. Thus, upon introduction of a ball row, the final ball is arrested by the shoulder and keeps the other balls in place. A plurality of applicator tubes may be applied, each of which is associated with an intermediate container in which the ball row is composed. After the irradiation, the ball row is returned through the intermediate container to a sorting device directing the balls to appropriate storage containers. However, the final ball is retained in the intermediate container, so that it may be added to the next ball row to be composed

  2. ATF Neutron Irradiation Program Irradiation Vehicle Design Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geringer, J. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cetiner, N. O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; McDuffee, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under the Civil Nuclear Energy Working Group (CNWG) is engaged in a cooperative research effort with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to explore issues related to nuclear energy, including research on accident-tolerant fuels and materials for use in light water reactors. This work develops a draft technical plan for a neutron irradiation program on the candidate accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials and elements using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The research program requires the design of a detailed experiment, development of test vehicles, irradiation of test specimens, possible post irradiation examination and characterization of irradiated materials and the shipment of irradiated materials to Japan. This report discusses the conceptual design, the development and irradiation of the test vehicles.

  3. Regulation of food irradiation and detection of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    The main international standards for irradiated foods are those produced by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. The international regulatory environment is now favourable towards irradiated foods. Most countries still regulate on a food-by-food, case-by-case basis. However in Asia there is movement towards a Harmonised Regulation for Irradiated Foods. The WHO believes that irradiated foods may be safely irradiated at any dose above 10 kGy. This may lead to the Codex maximum dose being raised or abandoned. If this occurs there are opportunities to produce shelf-stable foods in lightweight packaging that last for years at room temperature. Detection methods for irradiated foods are now available and may assist to reassure consumers that labelling regulations can be enforced. (author)

  4. The role of natural antibiotics in storage diseases resistance in irradiated tomato fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharaway, N.S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Tomato (lycopersicum esculantum L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops in egypt. Fruit rot, mainly due to fungi, are essential obstacles facing the nowadays prejects plannings of the yield production and exportation. Tomato fruits, variety money maker at green mature exposed to acute gamma irradiation doses at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 100 K rad after inoculated with spore suspension of alternaria tenuis , the main casual organism of fruit rot of tomato and control without inoculation. The source of irradiation was cobalt 60. After irradiation , 50 tomato fruits were packed into exporting carton boxes and then were stored at room temperature

  5. Responses of cultured mammalian cells to prolonged low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Rongen, E. van; Welleweerd, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were performed to verify the finding of others that prolonged irradiation caused sudden death of cells. Continuous irradiation (dose rate 0.09 Gy/h) was applied to the R-1, RUC-2, V79 and T-1g cells for up to 140 days. End points were: Population growth rate, plating efficiency and radiosensitivity. The population doubling times were increased and plating efficiencies decreased; cell survival after single doses at acute dose rate were lower than that of control cells. Part of the cell parameters returned to control values within three weeks after prolonged irradiation had been terminated. Sudden death after prolonged exposure was not observed. (orig.) [de

  6. Metabolism peculiarities at both children and teenagers irradiated after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplieva, M.P.

    1998-01-01

    The lipid peroxidation intensity and the antioxidant system state reflect the organism's reaction to the irradiation. A reduction of the antioxidant system enzymes activity has been revealed in children and teenagers exposed by acute irradiation and evacuated during the first days after Chernobyl accident. The lipid peroxidation products levels were normal as compared to the control value. A significant inhibition of the antioxidant system protection indices activity and an increase of the lipid peroxidation toxic products concentration have been registered in children and teenagers living in condition of chronic irradiation

  7. The wholesomeness of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, P.S.; Matsuyama, A.

    1978-01-01

    It is apparent that there is a need for protection of the consumer and a need for governmental authorities to insure a safe and wholesome food supply for the population. Based on objective and scientific evidence regarding the safety of food irradiation, national and international health authorities are able to determine whether irradiated food is acceptable for human consumption. Following a thorough review of all available data, the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee unconditionally approved wheat and ground wheat products and papaya irradiated for disingestation at a maximum dose of 100 krad, potatoes irradiated for sprout control at a maximum dose not exceeding 15 krad, and chicken irradiated at a maximum dose of 700 krad to reduce microbiological spoilage. Lastly, it unconditionally approved strawberries irradiated at a maximum dose of 300 krad to prolong storage. Onions at irradiated for sprout control at a maximum dose of 15 krad were temporarily approved, subject to preparation of further data on multigeneration reproduction studies on rats. Codfish and redfish eviscerated after irradiation at a maximum dose of 220 krad to reduce microbiological spoilage were also approved, based on the results of various studies in progress. Temporary, conditional approval of rice irradiated for insect disinfestation at a maximum dose of 100 krad was based on results of long-term studies on rats and monkies, available in the next review. Due to insufficient data, no decision regarding irradiated mushrooms was made. (Bell, E.)

  8. Gemstone dedicated gamma irradiation development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omi, Nelson M.; Rela, Paulo R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: nminoru@ipen.br; prela@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    The gemstones gamma irradiation process to enhance the color is widely accepted for the jewelry industry. These gems are processed in conventional industrial gamma irradiation plant which are optimized for other purposes, using underwater irradiation devices with high rejection rate due to its poor dose uniformity. A new conception design, which states the working principles and manufacturing ways of the device, was developed in this work. The suggested device's design is based on the rotation of cylindrical baskets and their translation in circular paths inside and outside a cylindrical source rack as a planetary system. The device is meant to perform the irradiation in the bottom of the source storage pool, where the sources remain always shielded by the water layer. The irradiator matches the Category III IAEA classification. To verify the physical viability of the basic principle, tests with rotating cylindrical baskets were performed in the Multipurpose Irradiator constructed in the CTR, IPEN. Also, simulations using the CADGAMMA software, adapted to simulate underwater irradiations, were performed. With the definitive optimized irradiator, the irradiation quality will be enhanced with better dose control and the production costs will be significantly lower than market prices due to the intended treatment device's optimization. This work presents some optimization parameters and the expected performance of the irradiator. (author)

  9. Gemstone dedicated gamma irradiation development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omi, Nelson M.; Rela, Paulo R.

    2007-01-01

    The gemstones gamma irradiation process to enhance the color is widely accepted for the jewelry industry. These gems are processed in conventional industrial gamma irradiation plant which are optimized for other purposes, using underwater irradiation devices with high rejection rate due to its poor dose uniformity. A new conception design, which states the working principles and manufacturing ways of the device, was developed in this work. The suggested device's design is based on the rotation of cylindrical baskets and their translation in circular paths inside and outside a cylindrical source rack as a planetary system. The device is meant to perform the irradiation in the bottom of the source storage pool, where the sources remain always shielded by the water layer. The irradiator matches the Category III IAEA classification. To verify the physical viability of the basic principle, tests with rotating cylindrical baskets were performed in the Multipurpose Irradiator constructed in the CTR, IPEN. Also, simulations using the CADGAMMA software, adapted to simulate underwater irradiations, were performed. With the definitive optimized irradiator, the irradiation quality will be enhanced with better dose control and the production costs will be significantly lower than market prices due to the intended treatment device's optimization. This work presents some optimization parameters and the expected performance of the irradiator. (author)

  10. Consumer acceptance of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, M.H.; Scholten, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    Although the first experiments on food irradiation were carried out in 1916 in Sweden, food irradiation, is for consumers, a relatively new technology. From the sixties food irradiation has been applied more and more, so that the consumer movement has become alert to this technology. Since then a lot of controversies have arisen in the literature about wholesomeness, safety, effects, etc. Food irradiation is currently permitted on a small scale in about 30 countries; in some countries or states food irradiation has been put under a ban (e.g. Australia, New Zealand, New Jersey). The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) have, however, chosen food irradiation as a safe and sound method for preserving and improving the safety of food. Reactions on the part of the consumer organizations of many countries are however not in favour of or are even opposed to food irradiation. In this chapter consumer acceptance related to technological developments is described, then the convergence of the consumer movement on public opinion and concern on food irradiation is discussed. The need for labelling of irradiated food products is discussed and finally recommendations are given of ways to change consumers attitudes to food irradiation. (author)

  11. Total body irradiation: current indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Danhier, S.; Dubray, B.; Cosset, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The choice of dose and fractionation for total body irradiation is made difficult by the large number of considerations to be taken into account. The outcome of bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation can be understood in terms of tumor cell killing, engraftment, and normal tissue damage, each of these endpoints being influenced by irradiation-, disease-, transplant-, and patient- related factors. Interpretation of clinical data is further hampered by the overwhelming influence of logistic constraints, the small numbers of randomized studies, and the concomitant variations in total dose and fraction size or dose rate. So far, three cautious conclusions can be drawn in order to tentatively adapt the total body irradiation schedule to clinically-relevant situations. Firstly, the organs at risk for normal tissue damage (lung, liver, lens, kidney) are protected by delivering small doses per fraction at low dose rate. This suggests that, when toxicity is at stake (e.g. in children), fractionated irradiation should be preferred, provided that inter-fraction intervals are long enough. Secondly, fractionated irradiation should be avoided in case of T-cell depleted transplant, given the high risk of graft rejection in this setting. An alternative would be to increase total (or fractional) dose of fractionated total body irradiation, but this approach is likely to induce more normal tissue toxicity. Thirdly, clinical data have shown higher relapse rates in chronic myeloid leukemia after fractionated or low dose rate total body irradiation, suggesting that fractionated irradiation should not be recommended, unless total (or fractional) dose is increased. Total body irradiation-containing regimens, primarily cyclophosphamide / total body irradiation, are either equivalent to or better than the chemotherapy-only regimens, primarily busulfan / cyclophosphamide. Busulfan / cyclophosphamide certainly represents a reasonable alternative, especially in patients who

  12. Facts about food irradiation: Microbiological safety of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet considers the microbiological safety of irradiated food, with especial reference to Clostridium botulinum. Irradiated food, as food treated by any ''sub-sterilizing'' process, must be handled, packaged and stored following good manufacturing practices to prevent growth and toxin production of C. botulinum. Food irradiation does not lead to increased microbiological hazards, nor can it be used to save already spoiled foods. 4 refs

  13. Property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Haag, G.

    1979-07-01

    Design data for irradiated graphite are usually presented as families of isothermal curves showing the change in physical property as a function of fast neutron fluence. In this report, procedures for combining isothermal curves to predict behavior under changing irradiation temperatures are compared with experimental data on irradiation-induced changes in dimensions, Young's modulus, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansivity. The suggested procedure fits the data quite well and is physically realistic

  14. Irradiation-induced hypoxia in bones and soft tissues: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitasalo, K.; Aro, H.

    1986-02-01

    Bone marrow and subcutaneous tissue pO/sub 2/ and pCO/sub 2/ were measured by means of implanted tissue tonometers in irradiated and nonirradiated rabbit hind limbs. The x-ray dose was 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 3000 rads. Tissue gas tensions were measured 1 day and 5 and 11 weeks after radiation. The pCO/sub 2/ changes in both tissues were slight but not statistically significant. The subcutaneous tissue pO/sub 2/ decreased during the acute phase of irradiation injury, and the effect of irradiation was dose-dependent. Later on, irradiation had no significant effects on the subcutaneous pO/sub 2/, although light microscopy of the affected tissues showed fibrosis and blood vessel changes. The response of the subcutaneous pO/sub 2/ to systemic hyperoxia also increased in the chronic phase of irradiation injury as a sign of improved microcirculation. The bone marrow showed a high radiosensitivity. Irradiation caused a rapid dose-dependent decrease of the marrow pO/sub 2/, and the marrow pO/sub 2/ decreased with time during the chronic phase of irradiation injury. The marrow pO/sub 2/ responded slowly and marginally to an increment of arterial pO/sub 2/ during breathing 100% oxygen as further evidence of impaired vascular pattern. The results showed that irradiation causes only a transient impairment of tissue perfusion in the skin. However, irradiation-damaged marrow was characterized by progressive tissue hypoxia.

  15. Irradiation-induced hypoxia in bones and soft tissues: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitasalo, K.; Aro, H.

    1986-01-01

    Bone marrow and subcutaneous tissue pO 2 and pCO 2 were measured by means of implanted tissue tonometers in irradiated and nonirradiated rabbit hind limbs. The x-ray dose was 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, and 3000 rads. Tissue gas tensions were measured 1 day and 5 and 11 weeks after radiation. The pCO 2 changes in both tissues were slight but not statistically significant. The subcutaneous tissue pO 2 decreased during the acute phase of irradiation injury, and the effect of irradiation was dose-dependent. Later on, irradiation had no significant effects on the subcutaneous pO 2 , although light microscopy of the affected tissues showed fibrosis and blood vessel changes. The response of the subcutaneous pO 2 to systemic hyperoxia also increased in the chronic phase of irradiation injury as a sign of improved microcirculation. The bone marrow showed a high radiosensitivity. Irradiation caused a rapid dose-dependent decrease of the marrow pO 2 , and the marrow pO 2 decreased with time during the chronic phase of irradiation injury. The marrow pO 2 responded slowly and marginally to an increment of arterial pO 2 during breathing 100% oxygen as further evidence of impaired vascular pattern. The results showed that irradiation causes only a transient impairment of tissue perfusion in the skin. However, irradiation-damaged marrow was characterized by progressive tissue hypoxia

  16. Evaluation of freshly irradiated wheat for dominant lethal mutations in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawan, S.C.; Aravindakshan, M.; Kumar, N.S.; Subba Rao, V.; Aiyar, A.S.; Sundaram, K.

    1977-01-01

    Three independent, serially performed experiments involving acute and chronic feeding of freshly irradiated wheat (75 krad, gamma-irradiation) were carried out in Wistar rats. In the first experiment groups of 10 males were given wheat for 1 week; irradiated wheat was consumed by the animals within 24 h of irradiation. In the other two experiments feeding of males was continued for 6 (10 males per group) and 12 (13 males per group) weeks, respectively, and the irradiated wheat was fed within 7 days of irradiation. At the end of each treatment period each male was paired with 3 females for 7 days and sequentially at weekly intervals for 5 or 8 weeks. Females were killed and examined for live and dead implantations and corpora lutea. There were no differences between groups with regard to fertility nor was there any inter-group difference as regards pre- and post-implantation losses whether the rats were fed irradiated or non-irradiated wheat. This suggested that even feeding of freshly irradiated wheat does not induce any dominant lethal mutations in rats

  17. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... Symptoms of acute kidney failure may include any of the following: Bloody stools Breath odor and metallic taste in the mouth Bruising easily Changes in ...

  18. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, particularly younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  19. Induction of Lipocalin2 in a Rat Model of Lung Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaf Sultan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we showed that lipocalin2 (LCN2 serum levels increased after liver irradiation and during acute-phase conditions. Here, we evaluate LCN2 expression and serum levels after single-dose lung irradiation with 25 Gy, percutaneously administered to the lung of randomly-paired male Wistar rats. Due to the concave anatomy of the lung recesses, the irradiation field included the upper part of the liver. No rat died due to irradiation. In control tissue, lung immunohistochemistry showed a high constitutive expression of LCN2+ granulocytes. LCN2 mRNA levels in lung tissue increased up to 24 h (9 ± 2.3-fold after irradiation. However, serum LCN2 levels remained undetectable after lung irradiation. LCN2 expression in the upper part of the liver increased up to 4.2-fold after lung irradiation, but the lower liver showed an early decrease. Acute-phase cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α showed a significant increase on transcript level in both lung and upper liver, whilst the lower liver did not show any considerable increase. In conclusion, constitutive expression of LCN2 in local immune cells demonstrates its local role during stress conditions in the lung. The absence of LCN2 in the serum strengthens our previous findings that the liver is the key player in secreting LCN2 during stress conditions with liver involvement.

  20. Irradiation probe and laboratory for irradiated material evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutny, S.; Kupca, L.; Beno, P.; Stubna, M.; Mrva, V.; Chmelo, P.

    1975-09-01

    The survey and assessment are given of the tasks carried out in the years 1971 to 1975 within the development of methods for structural materials irradiation and of a probe for the irradiation thereof in the A-1 reactor. The programme and implementation of laboratory tests of the irradiation probe are described. In the actual reactor irradiation, the pulse tube length between the pressure governor and the irradiation probe is approximately 20 m, the diameter is 2.2 mm. Temperature reaches 800 degC while the pressure control system operates at 20 degC. The laboratory tests (carried out at 20 degC) showed that the response time of the pressure control system to a stepwise pressure change in the irradiation probe from 0 to 22 at. is 0.5 s. Pressure changes were also studied in the irradiation probe and in the entire system resulting from temperature changes in the irradiation probe. Temperature distribution in the body of the irradiation probe heating furnace was determined. (B.S.)

  1. Gamma irradiation service in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liceaga C, G.; Martinez A, L.; Mendez T, D.; Ortiz A, G.; Olvera G, R.

    1997-01-01

    In 1980 it was installed in Mexico, on the National Institute of Nuclear Research, an irradiator model J S-6500 of a canadian manufacture. Actually, this is the greatest plant in the Mexican Republic that offers a gamma irradiation process at commercial level to diverse industries. However, seeing that the demand for sterilize those products were not so much as the irradiation capacity it was opted by the incursion in other types of products. During 17 years had been irradiated a great variety of products grouped of the following form: dehydrated foods, disposable products for medical use, cosmetics, medicaments, various. Nowadays the capacity of the irradiator is saturated virtue of it is operated the 24 hours during the 365 days of the year and only its operation is suspended by the preventive and corrective maintenance. However, the fresh food market does not be attended since this irradiator was designed for doses greater than 10 kGy (1.0 Mrad)

  2. Food irradiation scenario in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Over 3 decades of research and developmental effort in India have established the commercial potential for food irradiation to reduce post-harvest losses and to ensure food safety. Current regulations permit irradiation of onions, potatoes and spices for domestic consumption and operation of commercial irradiators for treatment of food. In May 1997 draft rules have been notified permitting irradiation of several additional food items including rice, wheat products, dry fruits, mango, meat and poultry. Consumers and food industry have shown a positive attitude to irradiated foods. A prototype commercial irradiator for spices set up by Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) is scheduled to commence operation in early 1998. A commercial demonstration plant for treatment of onions is expected to be operational in the next 2 years in Lasalgaon, Nashik district. (author)

  3. Status of irradiation capsule design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Hiroshi; Yamaura, Takayuki; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2013-01-01

    For the irradiation test after the restart of JMTR, further precise temperature control and temperature prediction are required. In the design of irradiation capsule, particularly sophisticated irradiation temperature prediction and evaluation are urged. Under such circumstance, among the conventional design techniques of irradiation capsule, the authors reviewed the evaluation method of irradiation temperature. In addition, for the improvement of use convenience, this study examined and improved FINAS/STAR code in order to adopt the new calculation code that enables a variety of analyses. In addition, the study on the common use of the components for radiation capsule enabled the shortening of design period. After the restart, the authors will apply this improved calculation code to the design of irradiation capsule. (A.O.)

  4. Market testing of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, Ho Minh

    2001-01-01

    Viet Nam has emerged as one of the three top producers and exporters of rice in the world. Tropical climate and poor infrastructure of preservation and storage lead to huge losses of food grains, onions, dried fish and fishery products. Based on demonstration irradiation facility pilot scale studies and marketing of irradiated rice, onions, mushrooms and litchi were successfully undertaken in Viet Nam during 1992-1998. Irradiation technology is being used commercially in Viet Nam since 1991 for insect control of imported tobacco and mould control of national traditional medicinal herbs by both government and private sectors. About 30 tons of tobacco and 25 tons of herbs are irradiated annually. Hanoi Irradiation Centre has been continuing open house practices for visitors from school, universities and various different organizations and thus contributed in improved public education. Consumers were found to prefer irradiated rice, onions, litchi and mushrooms over those nonirradiated. (author)

  5. Irradiation of fruit and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Beirne, David

    1987-01-01

    There is likely to be less economic incentive to irradiate fruits and vegetables compared with applications which increase the safety of foods such as elimination of Salmonella or decontamination of food ingredients. Of the fruit and vegetable applications, irradiation of mushrooms may offer the clearest economic benefits in North-Western Europe. The least likely application appears to be sprout inhibition in potatoes and onions, because of the greater efficiency and flexibility of chemical sprout inhibitors. In the longer-term, combinations between irradiation/MAP/other technologies will probably be important. Research in this area is at an early stage. Consumer attitudes to food irradiation remain uncertain. This will be a crucial factor in the commercial application of the technology and in the determining the balance between utilisation of irradiation and of technologies which compete with irradiation. (author)

  6. Studies on the safety and consumer acceptance of gamma irradiated meats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Il Jun [Hallym University, Kangwon (Korea); Lee, Cherl Ho [Korea University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jung Hee [Seoul Women' s University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    Gamma irradiation was applied to beefs (0-5 kGy) and porks (0-30 kGy) for evaluation of their possible genotoxicity, acute toxicity and four-week oral toxicity. The results were negative in the bacterial reversion assay with S. typhimurium TA98, TA100, TA1535, TA1537. Clastogenic effects of the irradiated samples tested were not shown in vivo mouse micronucleus assay. In an acute toxicity test, the maximal dose of 5,000 mg/kg did not change any toxic parameter examined in this study. In four-week oral toxicity study, no significant differences were found between the control and treatment groups. In the study of rat hepatocarcinogenesis, the consumption of gamma irradiated beef and pork not only does not affect the formation of lipid peroxide and membrane stability but also has a possibility to inhibit hepatocarcinogenesis. Also, the consumption of {gamma} - irradiated beef and pork does not affect antioxidative defense system. In the study of the biological safety of korean red pepper, no difference was found on microbial growth between pepper extract alone or irradiated pepper extract. In the preservation study of korean traditional rice-cake(garedok), irradiation dose below 10kGy had no influence on typical sensory characteristics. The shelf-life in rice-cakes with different conditions was the longest on 10kGy treatment than 5kGy. In investigation of the consumer attitude toward irradiated foods, the main reason for the concern about irradiated foods is that compounds in the products formed by irradiation. Therefore, regulatory authorities must be encouraged to permit the sale of irradiated items when wholesomeness is established. (author). 94 refs.,31 figs., 62 tabs.

  7. Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Qvist, Niels

    2017-01-01

    and treatment of AA it is important that the classifications are consistent. Furthermore, in the clinical settings, incorrect classification might lead to over diagnosing and a prolonged antibiotic treatment. The aim of our study was to investigate the concordance between perioperative diagnosis made......BACKGROUND: The classification of acute appendicitis (AA) into various grades is not consistent, partly because it is not clear whether the perioperative or the histological findings should be the foundation of the classification. When comparing results from the literature on the frequency...... patients were included. In 116 (89 %) of these cases, appendicitis was confirmed histological. There was low concordance between the perioperative and histological diagnoses, varying from 16 to 76 % depending on grade of AA. Only 44 % of the patients receiving antibiotics postoperatively had a positive...

  8. Academic career after treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, A; Rammeloo, LAJ; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Rekers-Mombarg, L; Postma, A

    Aim-To evaluate academic career in long term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), in comparison to their healthy siblings. Patients-Ninety four children treated for ALL with cranial irradiation 18 or 25 Gy and intrathecal methotrexate as CNS prophylaxis. Median age at

  9. Gamma irradiation of fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1983-08-01

    At a Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on Food Irradiation (JECFI) meeting held in 1976, recommendations were made to rationalize the unnecessarily elaborate wholesomeness evaluation procedures for irradiated foodstuffs. Irradiation at the commercially recommended doses did not adversely affect the constituents of mangoes, papayas, litchis and strawberries at the edible-ripe stage. These favourable radiation-chemical results justified the development of a theoretical model mango which could be used for extrapolation of wholesomeness data from an individual fruit species to all others within the same diet class. Several mathematical models of varying orders of sophistication were evolved. In all of them, it was assumed that the radiant energy entering the system reacted solely with water. The extent of the reaction of the other components of the model fruit with the primary water radicals was then determined. No matter which mathematical treatment was employed, it was concluded that the only components which would undergo significant modification would be the sugars. In order to extrapolate these data from the mango to other fruits, mathematical models of three fruits containing less sugar than the mango, viz. the strawberry, tomato and lemon, were compiled. With these models, the conclusion was reached that the theoretical degradation spectra of these fruits were qualitatively similar to the degradation pattern of the model mango. Theory was again substantiated by the practical demonstration of the protective effect of the sugars in the tomato and lemon. The decrease in radiation damage was enhanced by the mutual protection of the components of the whole synthetic fruits with ultimate protection being afforded by the biological systems of the real fruits

  10. Desinfestation of soybeans by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Prieto, E.; Mesa, J.; Fraga, R.; Fung, V.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of irradiation with the doses 0.5 and 1.0 kGy on desinfestation of soy beans and on important chemical compounds of this product was studied in this paper. The results showed the effectiveness of applied doses in the control of insect pests of soy beans during its storage and total proteins, fat and moisture and also the identity and quality characteristics of oil extrated from irradiated product which were not change by irradiation [es

  11. Dose Distribution of Gamma Irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Son, Ki Hong; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kim, Kum Bae; Jung, Hai Jo; Ji, Young Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Gamma irradiator using Cs-137 have been widely utilized to the irradiation of cell, blood, and animal, and the dose measurement and education. The Gamma cell 3000 Elan (Nordion International, Kanata, Ontario, Canada) irradiator was installed in 2003 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.2 Gy/min. And the BioBeam 8000 (Gamma-Service Medical GmbH, Leipzig, Germany) irradiator was installed in 2008 with Cs-137 and dose rate of 3.5 Gy/min. Our purpose was to evaluate the practical dosimetric problems associated with inhomogeneous dose distribution within the irradiated volume in open air state using glass dosimeter and Gafchromic EBT film dosimeter for routine Gamma irradiator dosimetry applications at the KIRAMS and the measurements were compared with each other. In addition, an user guideline for useful utilization of the device based on practical dosimetry will be prepared. The measurement results of uniformity of delivered dose within the device showed variation more than 14% between middle point and the lowest position at central axis. Therefore, to maintain dose variation within 10%, the criteria of useful dose distribution, for research radiation effects, the irradiated specimen located at central axis of the container should be placed within 30 mm from top and bottom surface, respectively. In addition, for measurements using the film, the variations of dose distribution were more then 50% for the case of less than 10 second irradiation, mostly within 20% for the case of more than 20 second irradiation, respectively. Therefore, the irradiation experiments using the BioBeam 8000 irradiator are recommended to be used for specimen required at least more than 20 second irradiation time.

  12. Canadian perspectives on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunstadt, P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada has been in the forefront of irradiation technology for over 30 years. Some 83 of the 147 irradiators used worldwide are Canadian-built, yet Canadian food processors have been very slow to use the technology. This paper is an update on the food irradiation regulatory situation in Canada and the factors that influence it. It also reviews some significant non-regulatory developments. (author)

  13. National symposium on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers delivered at the National symposium on food irradiation held in Pretoria. The abstracts have been grouped into the following sections: General background, meat, agricultural products, marketing and radiation facilities - cost and plant design. Each abstract has been submutted separately to INIS. Tables listing irradiated food products cleared for human consumption in different countries are given as well as a table listing those irradiated food items that have been cleared in South Africa

  14. Perspectives of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J.K.

    1974-01-01

    Food preservation by means of ionizing radiation has been technically feasible for more than a decade. Its utilization could increase food safety, extend the transport and shell life of foods, cut food losses, and reduce dependence upon chemical additives. The prime obstacles have been the strict safety requirements set by health authorities to this preservation method and the high costs of the long-term animal tests necessary to fulfil these requirements. An International Food Irradiation Project, expected to establish the toxicological safety of 10 foods by about 1976, is described in some detail. (author)

  15. Neutron irradiation therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Conventional neutron irradiation therapy machines, based on the use of cyclotrons for producing neutron beams, use a superconducting magnet for the cyclotron's magnetic field. This necessitates complex liquid He equipment and presents problems in general hospital use. If conventional magnets are used, the weight of the magnet poles considerably complicates the design of the rotating gantry. Such a therapy machine, gantry and target facilities are described in detail. The use of protons and deuterons to produce the neutron beams is compared and contrasted. (U.K.)

  16. Irradiated fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, C.P.; Peterson, J.P. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A process for separately recovering uranium, plutonium and neptunium substantially free of fission products from irradiated nuclear fuel is presented in which the fuel is dissolved in a strong mineral acid forming an aqueous dissolved nuclear fuel solution and treated to separate the uranium, plutonium and neptunium therefrom substantially free of said fission products by the sequential steps of solvent extraction, ion exchange and fluorination. The process has an improvement comprising the addition of a sufficient quantity of an additive of a stable metallic complex to the aqueous dissolved nuclear fuel solution prior to solvent extraction. This achieves improved purity of the separated uranium, plutonium and neptunium

  17. Shiva target irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manes, K.R.; Ahlstrom, H.G.; Coleman, L.W.; Storm, E.K.; Glaze, J.A.; Hurley, C.A.; Rienecker, F.; O'Neal, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The first laser/plasma studies performed with the Shiva laser system will be two sided irradiations extending the data obtained by other LLL lasers to higher powers. The twenty approximately 1 TW laser pulses will reach the target simultaneously from above and below in nested pentagonal clusters. The upper and lower clusters of ten beams each are radially polarized so that they strike the target in p-polarization and maximize absorption. This geometry introduces laser system isolation problems which will be briefly discussed. The layout and types of target diagnostics will be described and a brief status report on the facility given

  18. Irradiation of northwest agricultural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, D. E.; Tingey, G. I.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect ocntrol procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, this program was conducted to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  19. Food irradiation and the consumer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    The poster presents a review of research work undertaken on the perception and understanding that consumers have of food irradiation. Food irradiation is not a revolutionary new food processing technique, in fact it is probably one of the most investigated methods presently available. Many countries such as Belgium, France, Denmark, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and the United States of America permit food irradiation. In Britain it is presently banned although this is currently under review. Awareness of food irradiation by the general public in Britain, although not extensively researched would appear to be increasing, especially in the light of recent media coverage. New quantitative and qualitative work indicates that the general public are concerned about the safety and effectiveness of food irradiation. Research has shown that a large proportion of consumers in Britain, if given the opportunity to purchase irradiated food, would not do so. Further exploration into this response revealed the fact that consumers are confused over what food irradiation is. In addition, there is concern over the detection of irradiated food. The views presented in this paper, of the consumer reaction to irradiated food are of great importance to those involved in the food industry and industries allied to it, which are ultimately dependent on the consumer for their commercial survival. (author)

  20. International Developments of Food Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1997-01-01

    Food irradiation is increasingly accepted and applied in many countries in the past decade. Through its use, food losses and food-borne diseases can be reduced significantly, and wider trade in many food items can be facilitated. The past five decades have witnessed a positive evolution on food irradiation according to the following: 1940's: discovery of principles of food irradiation; 1950's: initiation of research in advanced countries; 1960's: research and development were intensified in some advanced and developing countries; 1970's: proof of wholesomeness of irradiated foods; 1980's: establishment of national regulations; 1990's: commercialization and international trade. (Author)

  1. Societal benefits of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Food irradiation has a direct impact on society by reducing the occurrence of food-borne illness, decreasing food spoilage and waste, and facilitating global trade. Food irradiation is approved in 40 countries around the world to decontaminate food of disease and spoilage causing microorganisms, sterilize insect pests, and inhibit sprouting. A recent estimate suggests that 500,000 metric of food is currently irradiated worldwide, primarily to decontaminate spices. Since its first use in the 1960s the use of irradiation for food has grown slowly, but it remains the major technology of choice for certain applications. The largest growth sector in recent years has been phytosanitary irradiation of fruit to disinfest fruit intended for international shipment. For many countries which have established strict quarantine standards, irradiation offers as an effective alternative to chemical fumigants some of which are being phased out due to their effects on the ozone layer. Insects can be sterilized at very low dose levels, thus quality of fruit can be maintained. Irradiation is also highly effective in destroying microbial pathogens such as Salmonella spp., E. coli, and Listeria, hence its application for treatment of spices, herbs, dried vegetables, frozen seafood, poultry, and meat and its contribution to reducing foodborne illnesses. Unfortunately the use of irradiation for improving food safety has been under-exploited. This presentation will provide details on the use, benefits, opportunities, and challenges of food irradiation. (author)

  2. International Developments of Food Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    Food irradiation is increasingly accepted and applied in many countries in the past decade. Through its use, food losses and food-borne diseases can be reduced significantly, and wider trade in many food items can be facilitated. The past five decades have witnessed a positive evolution on food irradiation according to the following: 1940`s: discovery of principles of food irradiation; 1950`s: initiation of research in advanced countries; 1960`s: research and development were intensified in some advanced and developing countries; 1970`s: proof of wholesomeness of irradiated foods; 1980`s: establishment of national regulations; 1990`s: commercialization and international trade. (Author)

  3. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welt, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent positive developments in regulatory matters involving food irradiation appear to be opening the door to commercial implementation of the technology. Experience gained over five years in operating multi-purpose food irradiation facilities in the United States have demonstrated the technical and economic feasibility of the radiation preservation of food for a wide variety of purposes. Public education regarding food irradiation has been intensified especially with the growing favorable involvement of food trade associations, the USDA, and the American Medical Association. After 41 years of development effort, food irradiation will become a commercial reality in 1985. (author)

  4. Irradiation's promise: fewer foodborne illnesses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.

    1986-01-01

    Food irradiation offers a variety of potential benefits to the food supply. It can delay ripening and sprouting of fruits and vegetables, and substitute for chemical fumigants to kill insects. However, one of the most important benefits of food irradiation is its potential use for destroying microbial pathogens that enter the food supply, including the two most common disease causing bacteria: salmonella and campylobacter. Animal products are one of the primary carriers of pathogens. Food borne illnesses are on the rise, and irradiation of red meats and poultry could significantly reduce their occurrence. Food irradiation should be examined more closely to determine its possible benefits in curtailing microbial diseases

  5. JRR-4 medical irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Hori, N.; Kumada, H.; Horiguchi, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    JAERI started Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at JRR-2 in 1990. JRR-2 was performed 33 BNCT until 1996 when JRR-2 operation was terminated for decommissioning the reactor. JRR-4 was constructed to research the reactor shielding of the first Japanese nuclear ship ''Mutsu'' in 1965. JRR-4 was modified for reducing fuel enrichment and constructing a new medical irradiation facility at 1997 when after the terminating operation of JRR-2. The medical irradiation facility is especially using for BNCT of brain cancer. JRR-4 medical irradiation facility was designed for both using of thermal neutron beam and epi-thermal neutron. Thermal neutron is using for conventional Japanese BNCT as inter operative irradiation therapy. Epi-thermal neutron beam will be using advanced BNCT for deep cancer and without craniotomy operation for irradiation at the facility. The first medical irradiation for BNCT of JRR-4 was carried out on October 25, 1999. Since then, seven times of irradiation was performed by the end of June 2000. In BNCT irradiation, boron concentration and thermal flux measurements were performed by JAERI. Boron concentration of patient brood was measured using prompt gamma ray analysis technique. Thermal neutron flux was measured by gold wire activation method using beta - gamma coincidence counting system. There data were furnished to medical doctor for determination the irradiation time of BNCT. (author)

  6. Status of food irradiation worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1992-01-01

    The past four decades have witnessed the steady development of food irradiation technology - from laboratory-scale research to full-scale commercial application. The present status of this technology, approval for processing food items in 37 countries and commerical use of irradiated food in 24 countries, will be discussed. The trend in the use of irradiation to overcome certain trade barriers such as quarantine and hygiene will be presented. Emphasis will be made on the use of irradiation as an alternative to chemical treatments of food. (orig.) [de

  7. An experimental study of skintransplantation on irradiated bed using tubed pedicle flaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutani, Takuya

    1985-01-01

    When surgical procedures were performed on the irradiated tissue, the incidence of complications were more frequent than in normal tissue. And consequently transplant on to irradiated tissue is rather difficult. The author performed an experiment using 84 sides of rabbit's ear to determine the appropriate of reconstruction time after irradiation. X-ray irradiation was performed on the external side of the ear, the dosage of irradiation was 3,000 R. Each 1, 3 and 9 weeks after irradiation, the tubed pedicle flaps, including the middle branch of the posterior aulicular artery and vein, size of 1.3 x 4 cm, were raised and transplanted on to the irradiated field. Each 3rd, 7th and 21st days after transplantation, the pedicle flaps and recipient area were observed macroscopically and microscopically. The vascularization was investigated by means of acryl plastic injection methods. No necrotic area was found on the flaps transplanted on to the normal area. The group transplanted at 3 weeks after irradiation, had the worst ratio of aliving flaps. The next was at 9 weeks, the best was the group at 1 weeks after irradiation. The vasculary recovery after performance of surgical procedures, was the best on the groups transplanted at 1 week after irradiation. The next was 9 weeks, the necrotic areas of the flaps was at 9 weeks. The author judged the appropriate time for reconstruction, at the clinic is the time of subsided acute inflammation, since ''the time of one week after irradiation'' already expired at the time of completion of the treatment, the author judged that ''nine weeks after irradiation'' was a desirable period for reconstruction. (author)

  8. Facts about food irradiation: Packaging of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet considers the effects on packaging materials of food irradiation. Extensive research has shown that almost all commonly used food packaging materials toted are suitable for use. Furthermore, many packaging materials are themselves routinely sterilized by irradiation before being used. 2 refs

  9. Facts about food irradiation: Irradiation and food safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet focusses on the question of whether irradiation can be used to make spoiled food good. No food processing procedures can substitute for good hygienic practices, and good manufacturing practices must be followed in the preparation of food whether or not the food is intended for further processing by irradiation or any other means. 3 refs

  10. The influence of continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate on the survival rote and induction of gene mutations in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feoktistova, T.P.; Elisova, E.V.; Stavrakova, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation at decreasing dose-rate was shown to be less effective than acute exposure with regard to the lethal effect and frequency of mutations of resistance to 6-thioguanine in cultured Chinese hamster cells. The cell population subjected to continuons irradiation was d more radioresistant than the intact one. Lethal and genetic effects of continuous irradiation at decreasing dose-rate were mainly determined by the contribution of the radiation dose received during the first 24 h of exposure

  11. Food irradiation and sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, E.S.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25 to 70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning in achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70 to 80 0 C (bacon to 53 0 C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurrence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40 0 C to -20 0 C). Radappertized foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for 'wholesomeness' (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effects of radappertization on the 'wholesomeness' characteristics of these foods. (author)

  12. Food irradiation and sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  13. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-01-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies. - Highlights: ► The history of phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is given. ► Generic PI treatments in use today are discussed. ► Suggestions for future research are presented. ► A dose of 250 Gy for most insects may suffice.

  14. Storage tests with irradiated and non-irradiated onions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenewald, T.; Rumpf, G.; Troemel, I.; Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung, Karlsruhe

    1978-07-01

    The results of several test series on the storage of irradiated and non-irradiated German grown onion are reported. Investigated was the influence of the irradiation conditions such as time and dose and of the storage conditions on sprouting, spoilage, browning of the vegetation centres, composition of the onions, strength and sensorial properties of seven different onion varieties. If the onions were irradiated during the dormancy period following harvest, a dose of 50 Gy (krad) was sufficient to prevent sprouting. Regarding the irradiated onions, it was not possible by variation of the storage conditions within the limits set by practical requirements to extend the dormancy period or to prevent browning of the vegetation centres, however. (orig.) 891 MG 892 RSW [de

  15. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  16. The wholesomeness of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The acceptance of food irradiation as a safe process of preservation by national authorities concerned with the safety of foodstuffs has hitherto made slow progress. The technology has existed for some 25 years but the general attitude towards official acceptance of the process has been marred by irrational and unscientific fears. As may have been mentioned by previous speakers,'the basic process of food irradiation does not differ in the physical sense from any other food processing techniques which involve the application of radiation energy to food. The energy level used in food irradiation is too low ever to lead to any production of radioactivity in the irradiated food, hence wholesomeness considerations can totally exclude this aspect. The uniqueness of food irradiation rests inherently on the particular type of energy employed and has aroused special attention because of this fact. The wholesomeness of food treated by heat or microwaves has not been questioned to the same extent, yet the very same question has been raised in relation to treatment by gamma rays and electron beams. Being a new process it requires not only a toxicological but also a microbiological as well as nutritional approach to the assessment of the wholesomeness of irradiated food. Studies on the radiation chemistry of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates, the main constituents of foods, when irradiated in the Mrad range, have yielded information which shows that these substances react in a reasonably uniform manner to irradiation. Many of the irradiation-induced compounds identified in irradiated foods can also be found in various non-irradiated foods. For those products that have been identified, the quantities found are in the parts per million range or less. Available data on the structures of radiation chemical products in food and the very low concentrations at which they occur, suggest the general conclusion that the health hazard they might represent is negligible

  17. Food irradiation development: Malaysian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainon Othman

    1997-01-01

    Malaysia recognised the potential of food irradiation as a technology that can contribute to solving some preservation problems associated with local agricultural produce. Research studies in this technology were initiated in late 1970s and since 1985, all activities pertaining to R and D applications, adoption and technology transfer of food irradiation were coordinated by The National Working Committee on Food Irradiation which comprises of members from research institutes, universities, regulatory agencies and consumer association. To date, technical feasibility studies conducted on 7 food items / agricultural commodities of economic importance demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation in extending shelf-life, improving hygienic quality and overcoming quarantine barriers in trade. Presently, 1 multipurpose Co-60 irradiator (I MCi), 2 gammacells and an electron beam machine (3 MeV) are available at MINT for research and commercial runs. The Malaysian Standards on Guidelines for Irradiation of Food was formulated in 1992 to facilitate application by local food industries. However, Malaysia has not yet commercially adopt the technology. Among many factors contributing to the situation is the apparent lack of interest by food industries and consumers. Consumer attitude study indicated majority of consumers are still unaware of the benefits of the technology and expressed concern for the safety of process and irradiated products due to limited knowledge and adverse publicity by established consumer groups. Although the food processors indicate positive attitude towards food irradiation, there remain many factors delaying its commercial application such as limited knowledge, cost-benefit, logistics and consumer acceptance. On the regulatory aspect, approval is required from the Director-General of Ministry of Health prior to application of irradiation on food and sale of irradiated food but efforts are being geared towards approving irradiation of certain food

  18. Consumer acceptance of irradiated poultry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, I.B.; Resurreccion, A.V.A.; McWatters, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    A simulated supermarket setting (SSS) test was conducted to determine whether consumers (n = 126) would purchase irradiated poultry products, and the effects of marketing strategies on consumer purchase of irradiated poultry products. Consumer preference for irradiated poultry was likewise determined using a home-use test. A slide program was the most effective educational strategy in changing consumers' purchase behavior. The number of participants who purchased irradiated boneless, skinless breasts and irradiated thighs after the educational program increased significantly from 59.5 and 61.9% to 83.3 and 85.7% for the breasts and thighs, respectively. Using a label or poster did not increase the number of participants who bought irradiated poultry products. About 84% of the participants consider it either 'somewhat necessary' or 'very necessary' to irradiate raw chicken and would like all chicken that was served in restaurants or fast food places to be irradiated. Fifty-eight percent of the participants would always buy irradiated chicken if available, and an additional 27% would buy it sometimes. About 44% of the participants were willing to pay the same price for irradiated chicken as for nonirradiated. About 42% of participants were willing to pay 5% or more than what they were currently paying for nonirradiated chicken. Seventy-three percent or more of consumers who participated in the home-use test (n = 74) gave the color, appearance, and aroma of the raw poultry products a minimum rating of 7 (= like moderately). After consumers participated in a home-use test, 84 and 88% selected irradiated thighs and breasts, respectively, over nonirradiated in a second SSS test

  19. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  20. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey

    2007-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  1. Food irradiation: contaminating our food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccioni, R.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry has promoted food irradiation as an effective and safe means of preserving food at minimum risk to the public. However, wide-scale food irradiation programmes such as that approved in the United States of America would have an adverse impact on public health in the following ways: through the consumption of carcinogenic substances generated in irradiated foods, through the use of irradiation to mask bacteriological contamination of spoiled food, through the replacement of fresh foods with nutritionally depleted foods, through accidents with leaks or mishandling of the radiation sources used and through the environmental damage resulting from reactor operation or spent fuel reprocessing necessary to produce the required isotopes for food irradiation. The food irradiation market is potentially enormous, requiring a large number of facilities and isotopes, some, such as caesium-137, would come from the production of nuclear weapons. Evidence of the presence of carcinogenic or mutagenic activity in irradiated foods is discussed. Although the US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a food irradiation programme it would actually be against the FDA's legal obligation which is to protect the health and safety of the American people. (UK)

  2. Nutritional aspects of irradiated shrimp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuzzaman, K.

    1989-11-01

    Data available in the literature on the nutritional aspects of irradiated shrimp are reviewed and the indication is that irradiation of shrimp at doses up to about 3.2 kGy does not significantly affect the levels of its protein, fat, carbohydrate and ash. There are no reports on the effect of irradiation of shrimp above 3.2 kGy on these components. Limited information available indicates that there are some minor changes in the fatty acid composition of shrimp as a result of irradiation. Irradiation also causes some changes in the amino acid composition of shrimp; similar changes occur due to canning and hot-air drying. Some of the vitamins in shrimp, such as thiamine, are lost as a result of irradiation but the loss is less extensive than in thermally processed shrimp. Protein quality of shrimp, based on the growth of rats as well as that of Tetrahymena pyriformis, is not affected by irradiation. No adverse effects attributed to irradiation were found either in short-term or long-term animal feeding tests

  3. An overview of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    This outline survey reviews the subject of food irradiation under the following headings:- brief history, the process (sources, main features of a food processing facility, interaction of radiation with food, main applications of the technology, packaging) consumer concerns (safety, nutritional changes, labelling, detection), international use of food irradiation and legal aspects. (UK)

  4. ASEAN workshop on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This proceedings was organized by the ASEAN Food Handling Bureau in Collaboration with the Thai Atomic Energy Commission for Peace. Experts from ASEAN and overseas were invited to present a series of papers covering the state of the art of irradiation technology and the important issues relating to food irradiation

  5. Optical absorption of irradiated carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supe, A.A.; Tiliks, Yu.E.

    1994-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of γ-irradiated carbohydrates (glucose, lactose, sucrose, maltose, and starch) and their aqueous solutions were studied. The comparison of the data obtained with the determination of the concentrations of molecular and radical products of radiolysis allows the absorption bands with maxima at 250 and 310 nm to be assigned to the radicals trapped in the irradiated carbohydrates

  6. National symposium on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.; Brodrick, H.T.; Van Niekerk, W.C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report contains proceedings of papers delivered at the national symposium on food irradiation held in Pretoria. The proceedings have been grouped into the following sections: general background; meat; agricultural products; marketing; and radiation facilities - cost and plant design. Each paper has been submitted separately to INIS. Tables listing irradiated food products cleared for human consumption in different countries are given

  7. World trend of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kooij, J.G. van

    1984-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years several policies and programmes have been developed in the field of food irradiation at the national level and by international organizations concerned, which aim at the general acceptance and practical implementation of food irradiation through rigorous investigations of the wholesomeness, the technological and economic feasibility, and the regulatory aspects of this process. This paper reivews international aspects of the standardization of food irradiation, national regulatory aspects of food irradiation, general remarks on the acceptance of Codex General Standards for irradiated foods, and specific remarks on the Codex General Standard for irradiated foods. An overall average dose for all foods, which was formulated in 1980 by a Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee, is 10 kGy. This 10 kGy is not a level above which irradiated foods become unsafe, rather, it is a level at or below which safety has been established. Irradiation dose is divided into low-dose (up to about 1 kGy) and medium-dose (about 1-10 kGy). Future outlook and needs are discussed. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Consumer attitude toward food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, C.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Consumer attitudes toward food irradiation were evaluated. The influence of educational efforts on consumer concern for the safety of irradiated products and willingness to buy irradiated foods were measured. Demographic and psychological factors were studied in relation to attitudes. An educational leaflet describing current scientific information regarding the safety, advantages, and disadvantages of food irradiation was developed and used in two studies evaluating attitude change. In the first study, attitude change among two groups of consumers with different philosophic orientations was measured. In a second study, the effectiveness of an educational leaflet received through the mail and a poster display were examined. In a third study response to food irradiation was related to value hierarchy, locus of control, innovativeness, and demographic parameters. Initially, subjects showed a higher concern for other areas of food safety, particularly the use of chemicals and sprays on food, than toward food irradiation. After educational efforts, conventional consumers expressed minor concern toward irradiation whereas ecologically sensitive alternative consumers obtained from a food cooperative expressed major concern. A knowledgeable discussion leader lowered irradiation concern among conventional consumers. In contrast, concern among alternative consumers did not diminish when given the opportunity to discuss safety issues with a knowledgeable person

  9. Food irradiation seminar: Asia and the Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The report covers the Seminar for Asia and the Pacific on the practical application of food irradiation. The seminar assessed the practical application of food irradiation processes, commercial utilisation and international trade of irradiated food

  10. Cytokine Treatment Improves Parenchymal and Vascular Damage of Salivary Glands after Irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lombaert, Isabelle M. A.; Brunsting, Jeanette F.; Wierenga, Pieter K.; Kampinga, Harm H.; de Haan, Gerald; Coppes, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: During radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, co-irradiation (IR) of salivary glands results in acute and often lifelong hyposalivation. Recently, we showed that bone marrow-derived cells (BMC) can partially facilitate postradiation regeneration of the mouse submandibular gland. In this

  11. Whole abdominal irradiation for peritoneal dissemination of alimentary tract cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Todoroki, Takeshi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Fuji, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Fukao, Katsushi; Itai, Yuji

    1995-01-01

    Between January 1986 and August 1991, 19 patients with alimentary tract cancers complicated by peritoneal dissemination received whole abdominal irradiation combined with intraperitoneal chemotherapy postoperatively. Using a moving-strip technique of irradiation, 12.0 Gy was delivered in three fractions to the entire abdominal contents with partial liver and kidney shielding. The primary tumor sites were the stomach in 12 patients, the colorectum in five, and the gall bladder in two. Nine patients with gross residual disease also received a limited field boost of 30.6 Gy in 17 fractions after completion of treatment to the whole abdomen. None of the patients failed to complete the planned dose despite acute gastrointestinal toxicity (nausea and vomiting, 84%, diarrhea and cramping, 78%) and acute hematologic toxicity (leukocytopenia, 84%, thrombocytopenia, 68%). Our follow-up study revealed that the actuarial one-year survival rate was 28.4% and the median survival time was 9.0 months. Survival rates at one-year for patients with colorectal and gastric cancer were 75.0% and 16.7%, respectively. Patients with gastric cancer (n=12) had a poorer outcome than those with colorectal cancer (n=5) in the present study. One reason for this difference may have been the presence of cancerous pleuritis, which was frequently observed in patients with gastric cancer. Therefore, more intensive treatment to prevent cancerous pleuritis seems to be necessary to improve the efficacy of whole abdominal irradiation. (author)

  12. Growth in children following irradiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushhouse, S.; Ramsay, N.K.; Pescovitz, O.H.; Kim, T.; Robison, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    Longitudinal height data from 46 pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, including 18 with aplastic anemia (AA), 19 with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), and 9 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), were analyzed to assess growth posttransplantation. Patients were prepared for BMT with high-dose cyclophosphamide followed by 7.5 Gy single-dose irradiation; AA patients received total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), and leukemia patients received total body irradiation (TBI). AA patients demonstrated reduced height posttransplant as reflected in a negative mean standard deviation score. The observed reduction was statistically significant only at 3 years following transplant. In contrast, leukemia patients showed a significant loss in relative height that was first visible at 1 year post-BMT and continued until at least 4 years post-BMT. Mean growth velocities in the leukemia patients were significantly below median for the 3 years following transplant. With a median follow-up of 4 years, antithymocyte globulin plus steroids in combination with methotrexate as graft vs. host prophylaxis was associated with less severe growth suppression than methotrexate alone, while there were no significant associations between growth during the first 2 years following transplant and prepubertal status at transplant (as defined by age), graft vs. host disease, thyroid or gonadal function, or previous therapies received by the leukemia patients. Children undergoing marrow transplantation, particularly those receiving TBI, are at significant risk of subsequent growth suppression

  13. Food irradiation: advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandes, N.K.; Vital, H. de C.; Sabaa-Srur, A.U.O.

    2003-01-01

    Food irradiation is a physical method of processing food (e.g. freezing, canning). It has been thoroughly researched over the last four decades and is recognized as a safe and wholesome method. It has the potential both of disinfesting dried food to reduce storage losses and disinfesting fruits and vegetables to meet quarantine requirements for export trade. Low doses of irradiation inhibit spoilage losses due to sprouting of root and tuber crops. Food- borne diseases due to contamination by pathogenic microorganisms and parasites of meat, poultry, fish, fishery products and spices are on the increase. Irradiation of these solid foods can decontaminate them of pathogenic organisms and thus provide safe food to the consumer. Irradiation can successfully replace the fumigation treatment of cocoa beans and coffee beans and disinfest dried fish, dates, dried fruits, etc. One of the most important advantages of food irradiation processing is that it is a coldprocess which does not significantly alter physico-chemical characters of the treated product. It can be applied to food after its final packaging. Similar to other physical processes of food processing, (e.g. canning, freezing), irradiation is a capital intensive process. Thus, adequate product volume must be made available in order to maximize the use of the facility and minimize the unit cost of treatment. Lack of harmonization of regulations among the countries which have approved irradiated foods hampers the introduction of this technique for international trade. Action at the international level has to be taken in order to remedy this situation. One of the important limitations of food irradiation processing is its slow acceptance by consumers, due inter alia to a perceived association with radioactivity. The food industry tends to be reluctant to use the technology in view of uncertainties regarding consumer acceptance of treated foods. Several market testing and consumer acceptance studies have been carried

  14. Dosimetry of blood irradiator - 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Shinde, S.H.; Bhat, R.M.; Rao, Suresh; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Blood transfusion to an immunodeficient or immunosuppressed patient has a high risk involved due to occurrence of Transfusion Graft Versus Host Disease (T-GVHD). In order to eliminate this problem, blood is routinely exposed to ionizing radiation (gamma) prior to transfusion. Doses ranging from 15 Gy to 50 Gy can prevent T-GVHD. Aim of the present work was to perform dosimetry of 60 Co Blood Irradiator-2000 developed by Board of Radiation and isotope Technology (BRIT), India; using FBX dosimetric system. Dose-rate measured by FBX dosimeter was intercompared with Fricke dosimeter, which is a Reference Standard dosimeter. Experiments included measurement of dose-rate at the centre of irradiation volume, dose mapping in the central vertical plane within the irradiation volume and measurement of average dose received by blood sample using blood bags filled with FBX dosimeter by simulating actual irradiation conditions. During irradiation, the sample chamber is retracted into a cylindrical source cage, so that the sample is irradiated from all sides uniformly. Blood irradiator-2000 has sample rotation facility for increasing the dose uniformity during irradiation. The performance of this was investigated by measuring the central vertical plane dose profile in stationary state as well in rotation using the sample rotation facility (60 rpm). FBX being an aqueous dosimetric system fills container of irregular shape being irradiated hence can be used to integrate the dose over the volume. Dose-rate measured by FBX dosimeter was intercompared with Fricke dosimeter, which was in good agreement. Average dose-rate at the centre of irradiation volume and within the blood bag was measured by FBX and Fricke dosimeters. It was observed that dose profiles measured by FBX and Fricke dosimeters agreed within ± 2%. Dose uniformity within the irradiation volume was found to reduce from 21% to 17% when the sample rotation facility was used. Thus, it is suggested by the

  15. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, M. A.

    In July 1981, the first specifically designed multi-purpose irradiation facility for food irradiation was put into service by the Radiation Technology, Inc. subsidiary Process Technology, Inc. in West Memphis, Arkansas. The operational experience gained, resulted in an enhanced design which was put into commercial service in Haw River, North Carolina, by another subsidiary, Process Technology (N.C.), Inc. in October 1983. These facilities have enabled the food industry to assess the commercial viability of food irradiation. Further impetus towards commercialization of food irradiation was gained in March 1981 with the filing in the Federal Register, by the FDA, of an Advanced Proposed Notice of Rulemaking for Food Irradiation. Two years later in July 1983, the FDA approved the first food additive regulation involving food irradiation in nineteen years, when they approved the Radiation Technology, Inc. petition calling for the sanitization of spices, onion powder and garlic powder at a maximum dosage of 10 kGy. Since obtaining the spice irradiation approval, the FDA has accepted four additional petitions for filing in the Federal Register. One of the petitions which extended spice irradiation to include insect disinfestation has issued into a regulation while the remaining petitions covering the sanitization of herbs, spice blends, vegetable seasonings and dry powdery enzymes as well as the petition to irradiate hog carcasses and pork products for trichinae control at 1 kGy, are expected to issue either before the end of 1984 or early in 1985. More recently, food irradiation advocates in the United States received another vote of confidence by the announcement that a joint venture food irradiation facility to be constructed in Hawaii by Radiation Technology, is backed by a contractual committment for the processing of 40 million pounds of produce per year. Another step was taken when the Port of Salem, New Jersey announced that the Radiation Technology Model RT-4104

  16. Food irradiation: the 'experts' choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, P.

    1990-01-01

    The UK Government has decided to lift the ban on food irradiation. The proponents of food irradiation claim it is an effective and safe means of preserving food, at minimum risk to the public. However, the prospect of irradiated food being on the shelves has created considerable opposition from environmental, consumer, public health groups and trade unions. The long list of unanswered health and safety questions means the public could be exposed to a whole new range of risks. The consumer is justified as saying ''if food has to be irradiated, what was wrong with it, good food does not need irradiating''. The answer to food contamination is improved hygiene and training in farm, factory and shop. (author)

  17. Consumer acceptance of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/ IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    There was a widely held opinion during the 1970`s and 1980`s that consumers would be reluctant to purchase irradiated food, as it was perceived that consumers would confuse irradiated food with food contaminated by radionuclides. Indeed, a number of consumer attitude surveys conducted in several western countries during these two decades demonstrated that the concerns of consumers on irradiated food varied from very concerned to seriously concerned.This paper attempts to review parameters conducting in measuring consumer acceptance of irradiated food during the past three decades and to project the trends on this subject. It is believed that important lessons learned from past studies will guide further efforts to market irradiated food with wide consumer acceptance in the future. (Author)

  18. Irradiation history of meteoritic inclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel

    be coproduced at approximately the value found in CAIs. The required fluence levels can be reached in as little as half a year of particle irradiation at protosolar analog flux levels. We thus conclude that local charged particle irradiation played a significant if not dominating role in forming the 10Be and 41...... and local particle irradiation. If local particle irradiation was powerful, it may have left telltale signs in meteoritic inclusions that can constrain the conditions under which they were formed or stored prior to the formation of chondrites. The underlying research effort relates to answering the larger...... in the early solar system. We demonstrate novel techniques for measuring the isotopic composition of K, and show how such measurements can be related to the irradiation histories of meteoritic materials. We also show how potassium isotope measurement can complement measurements of 10Be, a proven spallogenic...

  19. Irradiation of spices - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadecka, J.

    2007-01-01

    Food irradiation is a process of exposing food to ionising radiation such as gamma rays emitted from the radioisotopes 60Co and 137Cs, or high energy electrons and X-rays produced by machine sources. The use of ionising radiation to destroy harmful biological organisms in food is considered a safe, well proven process that has found many applications. Depending on the absorbed dose of radiation, various effects can be achieved resulting in reduced storage losses, extended shelf life and/or improved microbiological and parasitological safety of foods. The most common irradiated commercial products are spices and vegetable seasonings. Spice irradiation is increasingly recognised as a method that reduces post-harvest losses, ensures hygienic quality, and facilitates trade with food products. This article reviews recent activities concerning food irradiation, focusing on the irradiation of spices and dried vegetable seasonings from the food safety aspect

  20. Eatability of the irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna C, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    A food is eatable and innocuous when it has an acceptable nutritional quality, it is toxicological and microbiologically safe for the human consumption. Not one preservation treatment allows to assure this in absolute form. As it happens with other conservation methods, the irradiation produce biological, chemical and physical changes in the treated food. For to check if such changes could cause damages to the health of the consumer, its have been carried out extensive studies to evaluate the inoculate of the irradiated foods. Analyzing diverse toxicity studies to prove the eatability of the irradiated foods, in this work those are presented but important in chronological order. In summary, until today it exists a great heap of tests that they demonstrate without place to doubts that the foods irradiated with a dose up to 10 KGy its are capable for the human consumption, for what can to be concluded that a safety margin exists to consume foods irradiated. (Author)

  1. Consumer acceptance of irradiated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1997-01-01

    There was a widely held opinion during the 1970's and 1980's that consumers would be reluctant to purchase irradiated food, as it was perceived that consumers would confuse irradiated food with food contaminated by radionuclides. Indeed, a number of consumer attitude surveys conducted in several western countries during these two decades demonstrated that the concerns of consumers on irradiated food varied from very concerned to seriously concerned.This paper attempts to review parameters conducting in measuring consumer acceptance of irradiated food during the past three decades and to project the trends on this subject. It is believed that important lessons learned from past studies will guide further efforts to market irradiated food with wide consumer acceptance in the future. (Author)

  2. Pallet irradiators for food processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinnon, R.G.; Chu, R.D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper looks at the various design concepts for the irradiation processing of food products, with particular emphasis on handling the products on pallets. Pallets appear to offer the most attractive method for handling foods from many considerations. Products are transported on pallets. Warehouse space is commonly designed for pallet storage and, if products are already palletized before and after irradiation, then labour could be saved by irradiating on pallets. This is also an advantage for equipment operation since a larger carrier volume means lower operation speeds. Different pallet irradiator design concepts are examined and their suitability for several applications are discussed. For example, low product holdup for fast turn around will be a consideration for those operating an irradiation 'service' business; others may require a very large source where efficiency is the primary requirement and this will not be consistent with low holdup. The radiation performance characteristics and processing costs of these machines are discussed. (author)

  3. Prediction of intellectual deficits in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautman, P.D.; Erickson, C.; Shaffer, D.; O'Connor, P.A.; Sitarz, A.; Correra, A.; Schonfeld, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Possible predictors of reported lower cognitive functioning in irradiated children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were investigated. Thirty-four subjects, 5-14 years old, with ALL in continuous complete remission and without evidence of current or past central nervous system disease, were examined 9-110 months after diagnosis, using standard measures of intelligence and academic achievement. Subjects with a history of post-irradiation somnolence syndrome were significantly older at diagnosis than nonsomnolent subjects. Intelligence (IQ) was found to be unrelated to history of somnolence syndrome. IQ and achievement were unrelated to age at irradiation, irradiation-examination interval, and radiation dosages. The strongest predictor of IQ by far is parental social class. The importance of controlling for social class differences when searching for treatment effects on IQ and achievement is stressed

  4. Increased expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in lung following 12 Gy local irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Kunyu; Liu Li; Zhang Tao; Wu Gang; Hu Yu; Ruebe, C.; Ruebe, C.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To measure expressions of metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in the lung following thoracic irradiation of 12 Gy, and explore its possible role in the development of radiation-induced lung damage. Methods: C57BL/6J mice at age of 8 weeks were thoracically irradiated with 12 Gy X-rays (10 MV, 2.4 Gy/min, single exposure), and the control mice were sham-irradiated. The mice were sacrificed at 4 or 8 weeks after thoracic irradiation by decapitation. Lung tissues samples were collected. Expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-3, MMP-13, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 in lung samples were measured. Results: There was no significant difference in expressions of MMP-3, MMP-13, TIMP-1 TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 in the lung between the two groups at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracic irradiation (or sham-irradiation). However, the expressions of MMP-2 were enhanced by 1.7 and 1.9 folds, and MMP-9 by 2.7 and 2.6 folds at 4 and 8 weeks after thoracic irradiation, respectively. Conclusion: Enhanced expressions of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the lung were involved in the development of acute lung injury after thoracic irradiation, leading to a disruption of the structure and fibrosis. (authors)

  5. New dahlias through irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.K.; Dube, S.; Dey, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    To induce mutation, a total of 14 cultivars of dahlia were exposed to acute doses of gamma radiation varying from 0 to 8 krad in different years. LD-50 has been found to be between 3-4 krad and lethal dose 6 krad and above. The optimal dose for induction of mutation is found to be between 2-3 krad. After working for 5 years, a total of 19 mutants have been isolated of which 18 are for flower colour and only 1 for flower form. 11 mutants have been named for release. Their salient features are given. (M.G.B.)

  6. Acute otitis externa

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Charles PS

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis externa, also known as ‘swimmer’s ear’, is a common disease of children, adolescents and adults. While chronic suppurative otitis media or acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes or a perforation can cause acute otitis externa, both the infecting organisms and management protocol are different. This practice point focuses solely on managing acute otitis externa, without acute otitis media, tympanostomy tubes or a perforation being present.

  7. Irradiation of fresh fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh-jen, Yen; Jin-lai, Zhou; Shao-chun, Lai

    Occasionally, in China, marine products can not be provided for the markets in good quality, for during the time when they are being transported from the sea port to inland towns or even at the time when they are unloaded from the ship, they are beginning to spoil. Obviously, it is very important that appropiate measures should be taken to prevent them from decay. Our study has proved that the shelf life of fresh Flatfish (Cynoglossue robustus) and Silvery pomfret (stromateoides argenteus), which, packed in sealed containers, are irradiated by 1.5 kGy, 2.2 kGy and 3.0 kGy, can be stored for about 13-26 days at 3° - 5° C.

  8. Solute segregation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Okamoto, P.R.; Lam, N.Q.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation at elevated temperature induces redistribution of the elements in alloys on a microstructural level. This phenomenon is caused by differences in the coupling of the various alloy constituents to the radiation-induced defect fluxes. A simple model of the segregation process based on coupled reaction-rate and diffusion equations is discussed. The model gives a good description of the experimentally observed consequences of radiation-induced segregation, including enrichment or depletion of solute elements near defect sinks such as surfaces, voids and dislocations; precipitation of second phases in solid solutions; precipitate redistribution in two-phase alloys; and effects of defect-production rates on void-swelling rates in alloys with minor solute additions

  9. Container for irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, R.

    1978-01-01

    The transport container for irradiated or used nuclear fuel is provided with an identical heat shield against fires on the top and bottom sides. Each heat shield consists of two inner nickel plates, whose contact surfaces are polished to a mirror finish and an outer plate of stainless steel. The nickel plate on the box is spot welded to it while the second nickel plate is spot welded to the steel plate. Both together are in turn welded so as to be leaktight to the edges of the box. For extreme heat effects and based on the different (bimetal) coefficients of expansion, the steel plate with the nickel plate attached to it bulges away from the box. The second nickel plate remains at the box, so that a subpressure space is formed with the mirror nickel surfaces. The heat radiation and heat conduction to the box are greatly reduced by this. (DG) [de

  10. Irradiation for xenogeneic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, E.C.; Knechtle, S.J.; Harland, R.C.; Yamaguchi, Yasua; Sontag, M.; Bollinger, R.R.; Duke Univ., Durham, NC

    1990-01-01

    Xenogeneic transplantation (XT) is the transplantation of organs or tissues from a member of one species to a member of another. Mammalian species frequently have circulating antibody which is directed against the foreign organ irrespective of known prior antigen exposure. This antibody may lead to hyperacute rejection once it ensues so efforts must be directed towards eliminating the pre-existing antibody. In those species in which hyperacute rejection of xenografts does not occur, cell-mediated refection, similar to allograft rejection, may occur. It is in the prevention of this latter form of refection that radiation is most likely to be beneficial in XT. Both total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and selective lyphoid irradiation (LSI) have been investigated for use in conjunction with XT. TLI has contributed to the prolongation of pancreatic islet-cell xenografts from hamsters to rats. TLI has also markedly prolonged the survival of cardiac transplants from hamsters to rats. A more modest prolongation of graft survival has been seen with the use of TLI in rabbit-to-rat exchanges. Therapy with TLI, cyclosporine, and splenectomy has markedly prolonged the survival of liver transplants from hamsters to rats, and preliminary data suggest that TLI may contribute to the prolongation of graft survival in the transplantation of hearts from monkeys to baboons. SLI appears to have prolonged graft survival, when used in conjunction with anti-lymphocyte globulin, in hamster-to-rat cardiac graft exchanges. The current state of knowledge of the use of irradiaiton in experimental XT is reviewed. (author). 38 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  11. Melatonin, a potential effective protector in whole body γ-irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawfik, S.S; El-Nashar, D.E; Ahmed, M.M; Hanafy, Z.E

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), the chief hormone of pineal gland, is widely distributed in animal kingdom. It is claimed for its antioxidant and free radical properties. The present study aimed to examine the radio protective potentiality and efficacy of melatonin against damages induced in whole body γ-irradiated rats. Animals received melatonin (10 mg/ kg body wt/ day) for 10 successive days pre-exposure to 3 Gy of γ-radiation (acute dose). Rats sacrificed at 10 and 20 days post the irradiation time. The results revealed that the prolonged administration of melatonin has ameliorated the radiation- induced depletion in brain, testis and serum glutathione (GSH) level and a decrease in serum glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity when compared with their matched values in irradiated rats. In addition, remarkable decreases in the concentration of lipid peroxidation (LPO) product; malondialdhyde (MDA) was observed in brain, testis and serum of rats received melatonin pre-radiation exposure. As well as, significant decreases in disulphide glutathione (GSSG) were observed in serum.Histopathological examination of brain and testis showed that administration of melatonin pre-irradiation according to the present regimen has attenuated radiation induced tissue damages and improved tissue architecture. Cytogenetically, the chromosomal aberration (CA) assay in bone marrow pointed out a significant difference between rats received melatonin pre-irradiation and γ-irradiated rats in most CA types. Accordingly, it could be postulated the tissue diversity and cytogenetic impact of the administrated melatonin against acute ion syndrome in rat model.

  12. Time-dose relationship of erythema in high energy photon irradiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hidetoshi (Gifu Prefectural Tajimi Hospital (Japan)); Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1992-01-01

    Skin doses of 100 patients who were treated with high energy ionizing irradiation during conventional irradiation therapy were measured by thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). In 87 of the 100 patients, acute hyperemic change of the skin (erythema) of the irradiated region was observed. In the other 13 patients, alopetia of the scalp was observed. The following conclusions were reached. The time-dose relationship was linear when erythema tolerance was used as an index, but not when alopecia was used. The tolerance dose for erythema was lower than previously reported. The slope of the isoeffect curve on the log-log plot of total absorbed skin dose against total number of days after the first irradiation was 0.68 when erythema was used as an index. This number is larger than previously reported results. We considered that erythema is significantly influenced by fraction size and that hyperfractionation is a promising method of irradiation, especially in Japan. Combined use of chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-FU, accelerated erythema. The slope of combined treatment was 0.86. Observing acute hyperemic change of skin is considered to be a useful method of investigating the combined effects of chemotherapeutic agents on irradiation. (author).

  13. Neonatal irradiation: neurotoxicity and modulation of pharmacological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieher, Luis M.; Guelman, Laura R.

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal loss may be responsible of many acute and chronic diseases. For this reason, is very important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to neuronal cell death in order to develop pharmacological strategies for the treatment of these disorders. Developing CNS is very sensitive to ionizing radiations. In particular, irradiation of immature cerebellum induce motor (impaired gait), morphological (disarrangement of cytoarchitecture) and biochemical (increase in noradrenaline levels) alterations, mainly related to cerebellar granule cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after radiation exposure. Cellular changes triggered by ROS include increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels, activation of NMDA glutamatergic receptors and apoptosis. With an excitatory neurotransmitter as glutamate and a multifacetic ion as calcium, their regulation in synapses and cytoplasm, respectively, is very vulnerable. Moreover, the highly aerobic condition of neuronal metabolism determines that an oxidative injury lead to ROS accumulation. The neuro protection therapy attempts to interfere with these few processes by using antioxidants, metal chelators, calcium antagonists or glutamatergic antagonists. In the protocol used in our laboratory, neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy gamma radiations in their cephalic ends, and pre or post-treated with selected putative neuro protective agents. After 30-90 days, motor, morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and compared with irradiated and sham-irradiated (control) animals. Drugs as GM1 ganglioside or amifostine were able to restore abnormal parameters. Cerebellar granule cell irradiated 'in vitro' were treated with neuro protective agents prior or after irradiation. Cell viability and several biochemical parameters were analysed after 48 hours. GM1 ganglioside and amifostine were effective in preventing cell death and increase in ROS induced by ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  14. Gamma greenhouse for chronic irradiation in plant mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Rusli Ibrahim; Sobri Hussein

    2009-01-01

    The gamma greenhouse makes use of chronic irradiation from a 137 Cs source (double encapsulated 800 Ci caesium-137 pencil) producing a low dose rate, which is considered to be more effective in recovering and producing useful mutants in comparison to acute irradiation. The irradiation facility comprises an open topped irradiation area 30 m in diameter, protected by a partial concrete wall with entry maze and site topography. For safety, the facility is protected by a sophisticated interlock system, which only allows the source to be exposed when all the prerequisite safety conditions are met, and automatically returns the source to the safe storage position if any safety device is compromised. The main irradiation area is further protected by a 300 m diameter exclusion zone that is also protected by the safety interlock circuit. The facility can accommodate a wide range of plant materials such as seeds, seedlings in pots, cuttings, callus, somatic embryos and suspension cell cultures. Plant samples will be exposed to low dose gamma radiation over long periods of time (hours, weeks, months), depending on their nature and sensitivity. There was evidence whereby exposure of tissue culture materials to continuous low dose gamma irradiation resulting in considerably elevated somaclonal variation frequency without negative effects on culture response. It is not surprising that in vitro culture generating somaclonal variation together with in vitro mutagenesis inducing mutation lead to a higher variation frequency due to possible addition of mutagenic effect by in vitro mutagenesis to somaclonal variability arising from in vitro culture as well as the interaction between them. (Author)

  15. Pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate blunted p53 response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Asakawa, I.; Tamamoto, T.; Yasumoto, J.; Yuki, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Tachibana, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We have studied whether the p53-centered signal transduction pathway induced by acute radiation is interfered with chronic pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate in human cultured cells and whole body of mice. In squamous cell carcinoma cells, we found that a challenge irradiation with X-ray immediately after chronic irradiation resulted in lower levels of p53 than those observed after the challenge irradiation alone. In addition, the induction of p53-centered apoptosis and the accumulation of its related proteins after the challenge irradiation were strongly correlated with the above-mentioned phenomena. In mouse spleen, the induction of apoptosis and the accumulation of p53 and Bax were observed dose-dependently at 12 h after a challenge irradiation. In contrast, we found significant suppression of them induced by challenge irradiation at a high dose-rate when mice were pre-irradiated with chronic irradiation at a low dose-rate. These findings suggest that chronic pre-irradiation suppressed the p53 function through radiation-induced p53-dependent signal transduction processes. There are numerous papers about p53 functions in apoptosis, radiosensitivity, genomic instability and cancer incidence in cultured cells or animals. According to our data and other findings, since p53 can prevent carcinogenesis, pre-irradiation at a low dose-rate might enhance the predisposition to cancer. Therefore, it is possible that different maximal permissible dose equivalents for the public populations are appropriate. Furthermore, concerning health of human beings, studies of the adaptive responses to radiation are quite important, because the radiation response strongly depends on experience of prior exposure to radiation

  16. Impact of Preexisting Interstitial Lung Disease on Acute, Extensive Radiation Pneumonitis: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Abe, Takefumi; Omae, Minako; Matsui, Takashi; Kato, Masato; Hasegawa, Hirotsugu; Enomoto, Yasunori; Ishihara, Takeaki; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the clinical characteristics and predictive factors for developing acute extended radiation pneumonitis with a focus on the presence and radiological characteristics of preexisting interstitial lung disease. Of 1429 irradiations for lung cancer from May 2006 to August 2013, we reviewed 651 irradiations involving the lung field. The presence, compatibility with usual interstitial pneumonia, and occupying area of preexisting interstitial lung disease were retrospectively evaluated by pretreatment computed tomography. Cases of non-infectious, non-cardiogenic, acute respiratory failure with an extended bilateral shadow developing within 30 days after the last irradiation were defined as acute extended radiation pneumonitis. Nine (1.4%) patients developed acute extended radiation pneumonitis a mean of 6.7 days after the last irradiation. Although preexisting interstitial lung disease was found in 13% of patients (84 patients), 78% of patients (7 patients) with acute extended radiation pneumonitis cases had preexisting interstitial lung disease, which resulted in incidences of acute extended radiation pneumonitis of 0.35 and 8.3% in patients without and with preexisting interstitial lung disease, respectively. Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the presence of preexisting interstitial lung disease (odds ratio = 22.6; 95% confidence interval = 5.29-155; p acute extended radiation pneumonitis (odds ratio = 6.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.0-37.4); p = 0.038). Pretreatment computed tomography evaluations of the presence of and area size occupied by preexisting interstitial lung disease should be assessed for safer irradiation of areas involving the lung field.

  17. Acute Pericarditis Following Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Akio; Aburadani, Isao; Kontani, Koichirou; Hirota, Satoshi

    2017-12-12

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old Japanese man who developed acute pericarditis following an acute pulmonary thromboembolism. He had developed shortness of breath 7 days prior to hospitalization and was admitted with severe dyspnea. Echocardiography and laboratory results were compatible with acute pulmonary thromboembolism, which was confirmed by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography. On the third hospital day, he experienced chest pain exacerbated by inspiration. On the fourth hospital day, his body temperature increased to 39°C and echocardiography revealed circumferential pericardial effusion. A diagnosis of acute pericarditis was made and the patient was treated with colchicine and aspirin. On the fifth hospital day, his symptoms largely subsided. Auscultation revealed pericardial friction rub. Electrocardiography demonstrated diffuse ST-segment elevations. Twenty-four days later, computed tomography revealed the disappearance of both the pericardial effusion and pulmonary arterial emboli. This case was thought to be one of acute pericarditis following acute pulmonary thromboembolism.

  18. Immunization of zebu calves against Fasciola gigantica, using irradiated metacercariae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younis, S.A.; Yagi, A.I.; Haroun, E.M.; Gameel, A.A.; Taylor, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The pathogenesis of unirradiated, 3 krad-irradiated and 20 krad-irradiated metacercarial infections was compared in zebu calves studied over 10 weeks. Calves exposed to 1000 unirradiated metacercariae (mc) became hypoalbuminaemic, and showed elevated serum concentrations of liver enzymes, whereas neither of the other groups was significantly affected. At slaughter, a mean of 332 flukes was recovered from the 0 krad group, while only 23% and 12% of this number were recovered from the 3 krad and 20 krad groups, respectively. All the worms recovered from the 20 krad group were stunted, but a mean of 13% of the flukes recovered from the 3 krad group were large. Liver lesions typical of acute fascioliasis were present in the 0 krad group, but lesions in the other groups, were far less severe. A single vaccination of calves with 10003 krad-irradiated mc induced partial resistance to a challenge with 1000 normal mc eight weeks later, but the reduction in worm recovery was not statistically significant. There was less evidence of protection when two vaccinating doses of 3 krad mc were given within four weeks, with challenge at week 8, and a single vaccination was ineffective against a challenge four weeks later. However, when the irradiation dose was increased to 20 krad, a high level of resistance was induced by a single vaccination, given eight weeks before challenge, and liver pathology was strikingly reduced in the vaccinated animals. (author)

  19. Pollen irradiation method to obtain mutants in cucumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, S.; Amano, E.

    1988-01-01

    Seed irradiation for mutation induction in dioecious crops like cucumber is not very useful because chimerism of the mutated tissues makes the segregation of mutants in the M 2 generation nearly impossible. This problem does not exist with pollen irradiation. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. var. Nishikisuyo) was used for a model experiment. The petals of male and female flowers were closed by pinching with binding wire before flowering to prevent pollination by insects. On the flowering day, the male flowers were collected and irradiated with 1kR to 10 kR of acute gamma rays (137-Cs), then used to pollinate the female flowers. The M 1 seeds thus obtained are not chimeric but heterozygous for induced mutations. When planted, no mutant phenotype appeared. Selfing within a plant lead to segregation of mutants in the M 2 generation. Seedling examination revealed eight mutants. One mutant line, in which the shape of leaves changed from pentagonal to round heart shape, was found under field conditions. The optimal dose for pollen irradiation seems to be between 2 kR and 4kR

  20. Phytosanitary irradiation - Development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Guy J.; Loaharanu, Paisan

    2016-12-01

    Phytosanitary irradiation, the use of ionizing radiation to disinfest traded agricultural commodities of regulated pests, is a growing use of food irradiation that has great continued potential for increase in commercial application. In 2015 approximately 25,000 t of fresh fruits and vegetables were irradiated globally for phytosanitary purposes. Phytosanitary irradiation has resulted in a paradigm shift in phytosanitation in that the final burden of proof of efficacy of the treatment has shifted from no live pests upon inspection at a port of entry (as for all previous phytosanitary treatments) to total dependence on certification that the treatment for target pests is based on adequate science and is commercially conducted and protected from post-treatment infestation. In this regard phytosanitary irradiation is managed more like a hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) approach more consistent with food safety than phytosanitation. Thus, phytosanitary irradiation offers a more complete and rigorous methodology for safeguarding than other phytosanitary measures. The role of different organizations in achieving commercial application of phytosanitary irradiation is discussed as well as future issues and applications, including new generic doses.

  1. Operation of the irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Young-Soo; Chung, Hai-Won; Jin, Joong-Ha; Park, Soon-Cheol

    1985-04-01

    In 1984, 72 companies utilized the 100kCi Co-60 irradiation facility for sterilization of medical products such as surgical gloves, cotton tips and etc. or for preservation of food products. A total of 45,491 cartons of 46 different items were irradiated with 8,162 hours of operation time, and the total income of this year was 195,035,800 wons. Routine radiation dosimetry was performed 526 times with ceric sulfate dosimeters, in order to guarantee the radiation dose. Instead of photometric system, potentiometric reading system of ceric sulfate dosimeter was established by measuring potential difference of concentration cell and some costants involved in this system was determined. In order to develop radioresistent polypropylene, protective effect of liquid or solid paraffin addition was studied on month 1 and 4 after irradiation by observing the changes of physical strenth between control and irradiated polypropylenes. The presterilization counting of contaminated microorganisms was carried out on 6 items of medical products and 1 food product, and sterility of irradiated medical products was confirmed. 10kCi Co-60 irradiator was operated for basic researches such as food preservation, the quality improvement of polymeric material and etc. and for the coloration of crystal. A total of 143 items of 39 different samples were irradiated with 7,338.8 hours of operation time. The second UNDP/IAEA.RCA Industrial Training-Demonstration on Radiation Sterilization of medical products was held for 12 participants from 8 Asian countries for 5 days. (Author)

  2. Irradiation preservation of Korean shellfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, J.R.; Kim, S.I.; Lee, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Pacific oyster, hard clam and mussel were irradiated at doses up to 0.5 Mrad, the optimum dose rather than the maximum permissible was sought for in each species and post-irradiation storage characteristics studied at 0 0 and 5 0 C. No shellfish meat irradiated at doses as high as 0.5 Mrad produced any adverse odor. However the organoleptic quality of each sample irradiated at lower doses was superior to those irradiated at the higher during the early storage period. The optimum dose was determined to be 0.2 Mrad for Pacific oyster and mussel and 0.1 Mrad for hard clam. By irradiating at the optimum dose, the storage life of Pacific oyster could be extended from less than 14 days to 35 days at 0 0 C and from only 3 days to 21 days at 5 0 C. A similar storage extension was observed from 7 days to 14 days at 0 0 C and from 3 days to 12 days at 5 0 C. The hard clam meats were particularly susceptible to tissue softening by irradiation; an earlier onset and more extensive softening were observed with increasing dose. (author)

  3. Detection of some irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NASR, E.H.A

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the possibility of using two rapid methods namely Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) and Direct Solvent Extraction (DSE) methods for extraction and isolation of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) followed by detecting this chemical marker by Gas chromatography technique and used this marker for identification of irradiated some foods containing fat (beef meat, chicken, camembert cheese and avocado) post irradiation, during cold and frozen storage. Consequently, this investigation was designed to study the following main points:- 1- The possibility of applying SFE-GC and DSE-GC rapid methods for the detection of 2-DCB from irradiated food containing fat (beef meat, chicken, camembert cheese and avocado fruits) under investigation.2-Studies the effect of gamma irradiation doses on the concentration of 2-DCB chemical marker post irradiation and during frozen storage at -18 degree C of chicken and beef meats for 12 months.3-Studies the effect of gamma irradiation doses on the concentration of 2-DCB chemical marker post irradiation and during cold storage at 4±1 degree C of camembert cheese and avocado fruits for 20 days.

  4. Irradiation effects on perfluorinated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappan, U.; Geissler, U.; Haeussler, L.; Pompe, G.; Scheler, U.; Lunkwitz, K.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. High-energy radiation affects the properties of polymers by chain scission and crosslinking reactions. Both types of reaction occur simultaneously in irradiated polymers. However, one process will usually predominate, depending on the chemical structure of the polymer and the irradiation conditions such as temperature and atmosphere. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) undergoes predominantly chain scission, if the irradiation is performed at room temperature. This shortcoming is exploited by converting PTFE into low molecular weight micropowders. The use of PTFE micropowders functionalized with COOH groups as additive in polyamides to improve the sliding properties of the materials has been studied. During the compounding process in a twin screw extruder the COOH groups of the irradiated PTFE react with the polyamides. For these studies, it became necessary to investigate the content of end groups in irradiated PTFE by FTIR and 19 F solid-state NMR. These date were used to calculate number-average molecular weights. The ratios of COOH groups to CF 3 groups are discussed in terms of the mechanism of PTFE degradation. If PTFE is irradiated at temperatures above its crystalline melting point in an oxygen-free atmosphere, branching and crosslinking occur. The dependence of radiation effects on perfluorinated copolymers (FEP, PFA) on temperature has been studied. Melt flow index measurements have shown that branching and crosslinking predominate over chain scission with increasing irradiation temperature both in FEP and in PFA. Quantitative analysis of 19 F solid-state NMR data has shown that the content of branching groups (>CF-) exceeds the content of end groups in the case of PFA irradiated above its crystalline melting point. The formation of COF and COOH groups in the irradiated PFA is interpreted as a result of partial degradation of perfluorovinyl ether comonomer units

  5. Facts about food irradiation: Irradiation and food additives and residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet considers the issue of the irradiation of food containing food additives or pesticide residues. The conclusion is that there is no health hazard posed by radiolytic products of pesticides or food additives. 1 ref

  6. Chronic gamma irradiation and hypothalamo-pituitary system in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendarcik, J.; Praslicka, M.; Molnarova, M.

    1982-01-01

    After seven days of irradiation with gamma radiation to a total dose of 6.7 Gy the biochemical, morphological and hematological changes were observed in the bodies of sheep. A chromosomal analysis found a very low number of mitoses. A decrease was found in the total trypsin inhibition activity of the plasma. In the hypothalamus were found significant changes in the representation of catecholamines and a decrease was observed in the weight of ovaries and their follicular system was found to be damaged. This damage is more significant from the functional point of view than the damage caused by an acute local irradiation of the ovaries with doses of 4.7 and 9.5 Gy. (M.D.)

  7. The effects of professional irradiation, fields of research, results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okladnikova, N.D.; Pesternikova, V.S.; Sumina, M.V. [Institute of Biophysics, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    1993-12-31

    Main results of research of after effects of professional irradiation of the personnel of the first atomic power industry enterprise in the country ({open_quotes}Mayak{close_quotes}) are presented. The earliest determinated effects (chronic and acute radiation sickness, local radiation traumae, plutonium pneumosclerosis) and the late effects of external gamma-irradiation and combined (pu-239, tritium) radiation effect in a wide range of doses have been studied. The basis of the paper are the results of a complex medical research of the personnel: the state of haemopoietic, nerve, cardiovascular systems, alimentary canal, other organs and systems, immunity, somatic cells genome and the frequency of tumor and non-tumor diseases. The observation and research period covered is 40 years from the first contact with the ionized radiation source.

  8. Dosimetry of radiation during homogeneous experimental irradiation of animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljajic, R.; Horsic, E.; Milosevic, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Irradiation of experimental animals with homogeneous dose of high x radiation and adding of known dose to the experimental animal, for the purpose of investigating acute radiation syndrome are reported. Irradiation was performed by use of a linear accelerator of maximum energy of 4 MeV with two opposite fields. For dosimetric control an ionization chamber with a Farmer dosimeter was used while distribution dose was measured with TLD. Dose distribution was calculated using a computer. The distribution of the dose on the level of the sternum, the middle of the abdomen and middle of the neck varied from 105-170 relative units and the total variation for the whole body amounted to +-24%. (author)

  9. Food irradiation: Facts or fiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1990-01-01

    Food irradiation is at a political crossroad. In one direction, it is moving forward supported by overwhelming scientific evidence of its safety and benefits to economy and health. In the opposite direction, it threatens to be derailed by misleading claims about its safety and usefulness. Whether people will ultimately benefit from the use of irradiation to help fight serious food problems, or whether they will allow the technology to go to waste, will be determined by how successful people are in separating the facts from the fiction of food irradiation

  10. ESR signals of irradiated insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Kameya, Hiromi; Imamura, Taro; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Todoriki, Setsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of irradiated insects using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was reported. The insects were maize weevil, red flour beetle, Indian meal moth and cigarette beetle that are hazardous to crops. The ESR spectra were consisted of a singlet at g=2 and a sextet centered at the similar g-value. The singlet signal is due to an organic free radical. The sextet signal is attributable to the hyperfine interactions from Mn 2+ ions. Upon irradiation, new signals were not detected. The relaxation times, T 1 and T 2 , showed no variations before and after irradiation. (author)

  11. International status of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1982-09-01

    Recent international moves that are likely to result in an increasing acceptance of irradiated foods are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the activities of the FAO, WHO, Codex Alimentarius and to attitudes in the United States and the Asian-Pacific region. In 1979, the Codex Alimentarius Commission adopted a Recommended General Standard for Irradiated Food. A resume is given of a revised version of the standard that is presently under consideration. However, remaining barriers to trade in irradiated food are briefly discussed, such as legal and regulatory problems, labelling, public acceptance and economic viability

  12. Luminescence detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The need for forensic tests to identify irradiated foods has been widely recognised at a time of growing international trade in such products and impending changes in UK and EEC legislation to control the process. This paper outlines the requirements for and of such tests, and discusses recent developments in luminescence approaches aimed at meeting the needs of public analysts, retailers and consumers. Detecting whether or not food has been irradiated, and if so to what dose, is one of the challenges which food irradiation poses to the scientist. (author)

  13. Bone cell viability after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, M.; Kaelebo, P.; Tjellstroem, A.; Turesson, I.; Goeteborg Univ.; Goeteborg Univ.; Goeteborg Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Adult rabbits were irradiated to one proximal tibial metaphysis while the contralateral tibia served as a control. Each animal was thus its own control. Single doses of 15, 25 and 40 Gy 60 Co were used. The follow-up time was 11 to 22 weeks after irradiation. A histochemical method, recording diaphorase (NADH 2 and NADPH 2 ) activity in osteocytes, was employed. This method is regarded as superior to conventional histology. No evidence of osteocyte death was found even after 22 weeks following 40 Gy irradiation. This is interpreted as an indication that the osteocytes, which are end stage cells, are relatively radioresistant. (orig.)

  14. Food irradiation, profits and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna C, P.C.

    1992-05-01

    The utility of the irradiation to overcome diverse problems of lost nutritious, it has been demonstrated in multiple investigation works, that its have confirmed the value and the inoculation of the irradiated foods. The quantity of energy applied to each food, is in function of the wanted effect. In this document a guide with respect to the practical application and the utility of the irradiation process in different foods, as well as the suggested dose average is shown. Among the limitations of the use of this technology, its are the costs and not being able to apply it to some fresh foods. (Author)

  15. Intravascular blood coagulation after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sushkevich, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The problems of activation of intravascular blood coagulation (JVBC) at different stages after irradiation, are considered. JVBC peculiarities (disseminated intravascular syndrome (DIV) or thrombo hemorrhagic syndrome) are investigated. Literature on alterations which take place in the organism under effect of ionizing irradiation is analyzed. This analysis proves the characteristic features of thrombinogenesis activation and development of DIV syndrome not only in the early post-radiation period, but in the middle of radiation disease, as well. It is also shown that ionizing radiation activizes the hemocoagulation process and causes IVBC in the case of both local and general irradiation [ru

  16. Irradiated topaz in the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, A.I.; Zahran, N.F.; Gomaac, M.A.M.; Salama, S.

    2007-01-01

    Gem stones are those stones which have beauty that can be based on its color, transparency, brilliance and the crystalline perfection . Topaz is used mainly as gemstones, It is the most common irradiated gem on the market. High energy such as neutrons, have enough energy to produce color centers . Irradiation is most often carried out in nuclear reactors (high-energy neutrons). Irradiation of topaz in the Egyptian research reactor (ETRR-2) by neutrons changes its cloudy white color to a reddish pink which could be changed to blue by heating

  17. Irradiation a boon to farmers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeigh, S.

    1981-01-01

    Irradiation sterilization is emerging as a process of tremendous value to the food marketing industry. Much of the latest research has been done by the Atomic Energy Board at Pelindaba, using the strong gamma rays produced by cobalt-60 to kill the pathogens, microprobes, small insects and other food destroying agents usually found in food and fruit. Irradiation also helps delay ripening and ageing to a slight degree, a property of great value to food and fruit exporters. The advantages of various irradiated food are shortly discussed

  18. Facts about food irradiation: Safety of irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet considers the safety of industrial irradiation facilities. Although there have been accidents, none of them has endangered public health or environmental safety, and the radiation processing industry is considered to have a very good safety record. Gamma irradiators do not produce radioactive waste, and the radiation sources at the facilities cannot explode nor in any other way release radioactivity into the environment. 3 refs

  19. Currently developing opportunities in food irradiation and modern irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, R.

    1997-01-01

    I. Factor currently influencing advancing opportunities for food irradiation include: heightened incidence and awareness of food borne illnesses and causes. Concerns about ensuring food safety in international as well as domestic trade. Regulatory actions regarding commonly used fumigants/pesticides e.g. Me Br. II. Modern irradiator design: the SteriGenics M ini Cell . A new design for new opportunities. Faster installation of facility. Operationally and space efficient. Provides local o nsite control . Red meat: a currently developing opportunity. (Author)

  20. Craniospinal Irradiation for Trilateral Retinoblastoma Following Ocular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Bentel, Gunilla; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.; Light, Kim

    2015-01-15

    A case study is presented. Craniospinal radiotherapy and a three-field pineal boost for trilateral retinoblastoma were delivered to a patient previously irradiated for ocular retinoblastoma. The availability of CT-based three-dimensional treatment planning provided the capability of identifying the previously irradiated volume as a three-dimensional anatomic structure and of designing a highly customized set of treatment beams that minimized reirradiation of that volume.