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Sample records for acute intracranial subarachnoid

  1. Intracranial pressure after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerle, Tommaso; Lombardo, Alessandra; Colombo, Angelo; Longhi, Luca; Zanier, Elisa R; Rampini, Paolo; Stocchetti, Nino

    2015-01-01

    To describe mean intracranial pressure after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, to identify clinical factors associated with increased mean intracranial pressure, and to explore the relationship between mean intracranial pressure and outcome. Analysis of a prospectively collected observational database. Neuroscience ICU of an academic hospital. One hundred sixteen patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracranial pressure monitoring. None. Episodes of intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg lasting at least 5 minutes and the mean intracranial pressure for every 12-hour interval were analyzed. The highest mean intracranial pressure was analyzed in relation to demographic characteristics, acute neurologic status, initial radiological findings, aneurysm treatment, clinical vasospasm, and ischemic lesion. Mortality and 6-month outcome (evaluated using a dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale) were also introduced in multivariable logistic models. Eighty-one percent of patients had at least one episode of high intracranial pressure and 36% had a highest mean intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg. The number of patients with high intracranial pressure peaked 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage and declined after day 7. Highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg was significantly associated with initial neurologic status, aneurysmal rebleeding, amount of blood on CT scan, and ischemic lesion within 72 hours from subarachnoid hemorrhage. Patients with highest mean intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg had significantly higher mortality. When death, vegetative state, and severe disability at 6 months were pooled, however, intracranial pressure was not an independent predictor of unfavorable outcome. High intracranial pressure is a common complication in the first week after subarachnoid hemorrhage in severe cases admitted to ICU. Mean intracranial pressure is associated with the severity of early brain injury and with mortality.

  2. Lumbosacral Subdural Hematoma and Concomitant Acute Lower Extremity Monoparesis After Intracranial Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Myeong Jin; Yoo, Chan Jong; Park, Cheol Wan

    2016-11-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs rarely and can cause neurologic deficits. A 52-year-old man was diagnosed with SAH caused by rupture of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated by coil embolization on the day of admission. After embolization, the patient's left lower extremity strength had decreased and a spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed subarachnoid hematoma and SDH with severe thecal sac compression at L4-S2. On postbleed day 6, L4-S1 laminectomy was performed, and the strength in all muscle of the left leg improved. Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm may cause symptomatic SDH in the lumbosacral spine as well as subarachnoid hematoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnosis of ruptured intracranial aneurysm in acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyama, Masataka; Nakagawa, Toshifumi

    1980-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage at an acute stage within one day from the onset to the first CT scan was classified into subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm, subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin and subarachnoid hemorrhage of which angiography could not be carried out, and the first CT findings, the severity, and the prognosis of these subarachnoid hemorrhage were compared and discussed. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to intracranial aneurysm showed various changes according to progress in the severity with time, and intracranial hematoma, intraventricular clots and ventricular dilatation increased according to progress in the severity. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery could be found easily by CT, but that in internal carotid artery and vertabral basilar artery was difficult to be detected by CT. When cerebral angiography was carried out repeatedly for ruptured intracranial aneurysm of unknown origin, the time of performance must be consifered with attention to angiospasms or hematoma. (Tsunoda, M.)

  4. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  5. Intracranial extension of spinal subarachnoid hematoma causing severe cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Hyup; Lee, Jae Il; Choi, Byung Kwan; Han, In Ho

    2014-12-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH) can extend into the intracranial subarachnoid space, but, severe cerebral vasospasm is rare complication of the extension of intracranial SAH from a spinal subarachnoid hematoma. A 67-year-old woman started anticoagulant therapy for unstable angina. The next day, she developed severe back pain and paraplegia. MRI showed intradural and extramedullar low signal intensity at the T2-3, consistent with intradural hematoma. High signal intensity was also noted in the spinal cord from C5 to T4. We removed subarachnoid hematoma compressing the spinal cord. The following day, the patient complained of severe headache. Brain CT revealed SAH around both parietal lobes. Three days later, her consciousness decreased and left hemiplegia also developed. Brain MRI demonstrated multiple cerebral infarctions, mainly in the right posterior cerebral artery territory, left parietal lobe and right watershed area. Conventional cerebral angiography confirmed diffuse severe vasospasm of the cerebral arteries. After intensive care for a month, the patient was transferred to the rehabilitation department. After 6 months, neurologic deterioration improved partially. We speculate that surgeons should anticipate possible delayed neurological complications due to cerebral vasospasm if intracranial SAH is detected after spinal subarachnoid hematoma.

  6. Intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage following child abuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Pamela H.; Burrowes, Delilah M.; Ali, Saad; Shaibani, Ali [Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bowman, Robin M. [Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Child abuse is often suspected based on particular patterns of injury. We report a case of intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 3-month-old boy following child abuse. The mechanisms of injury and the clinical and imaging findings are discussed. This particular pattern of injury has rarely been reported in association with child abuse. We hope to raise physician awareness of child abuse when faced with these imaging findings. (orig.)

  7. Intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage following child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Pamela H.; Burrowes, Delilah M.; Ali, Saad; Shaibani, Ali; Bowman, Robin M.

    2007-01-01

    Child abuse is often suspected based on particular patterns of injury. We report a case of intracranial vertebral artery dissection with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 3-month-old boy following child abuse. The mechanisms of injury and the clinical and imaging findings are discussed. This particular pattern of injury has rarely been reported in association with child abuse. We hope to raise physician awareness of child abuse when faced with these imaging findings. (orig.)

  8. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of adult medulloblastoma seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-wei WANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical diagnosis and treatment of adult medulloblastoma seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space. Methods Eleven cases of adult medulloblastoma seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space were retrospectively analyzed on the clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF cytology, radiological characteristics and treatments. Results All patients underment neurosurgical procedures to remove medulloblastomas. In 10 patients, tumor was removed through suboccipital posterior midline approach and in one patient through post-sigmoid sinus approach. In 7 patients tumor cell seeding was found in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space before postoperative radiotherapy and disappeared after radiological and chemical treatment, while in other 4 patients tumor cell seeding was found in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space at 3 months to 3 years follow-up period (average 20 months after radiotherapy. In 2 of all the patients tumor cells were found by CSF cytology before operation. All the patients were treated with radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Two patients were still alive, while 9 patients were dead. Conclusions Patients with adult medulloblastoma seeding in intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space have a poor prognosis. In the diagnosis of adult medulloblastomas seeding in the intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space, MRI is more sensitive than CSF cytology. Once the seeding in intracranial-spinal subarachnoid space was found, the patients should be treated with radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, which can prolong the survival time and improve the quality of life. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.10.012 

  10. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Determination in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noraky, James; Verghese, George C; Searls, David E; Lioutas, Vasileios A; Sonni, Shruti; Thomas, Ajith; Heldt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) should ideally be measured in many conditions affecting the brain. The invasiveness and associated risks of the measurement modalities in current clinical practice restrict ICP monitoring to a small subset of patients whose diagnosis and treatment could benefit from ICP measurement. To expand validation of a previously proposed model-based approach to continuous, noninvasive, calibration-free, and patient-specific estimation of ICP to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), we made waveform recordings of cerebral blood flow velocity in several major cerebral arteries during routine, clinically indicated transcranial Doppler examinations for vasospasm, along with time-locked waveform recordings of radial artery blood pressure (APB), and ICP was measured via an intraventricular drain catheter. We also recorded the locations to which ICP and ABP were calibrated, to account for a possible hydrostatic pressure difference between measured ABP and the ABP value at a major cerebral vessel. We analyzed 21 data records from five patients and were able to identify 28 data windows from the middle cerebral artery that were of sufficient data quality for the ICP estimation approach. Across these windows, we obtained a mean estimation error of -0.7 mmHg and a standard deviation of the error of 4.0 mmHg. Our estimates show a low bias and reduced variability compared with those we have reported before.

  11. Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms by neurosurgeons in Colombia: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Gutiérrez Paternina, Juan J.; Buendía de Ávila, María E.; Preciado Mesa, Edgar I.; Barrios, Rubén Sabogal; Niño-Hernández, Lucía M.; Jaramillo, Keith Suárez

    2011-01-01

    Background: Trends in management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms among neurosurgeons is very variable and had not been previously described in any Latin American country. This study was conducted to determine the preferences of Colombian neurosurgeons in pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Methods: A survey-based descriptive study was performed in a sample of members from the Colombian Association of Neurosurgery. Questions about pharmacologic, surgical, and endovascular management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and unruptured intracranial aneurysm were carried out. We calculated the mean and the standard deviation of the results obtained from the continuous variables. The results of the categorical variables are presented as percentages. Results: The preference of medication with poor clinical evidence, such as magnesium sulfate, aspirin, statins, and anti-fibrinolytics was lower than 10%. The use of intravenous nimodipine and systemic glucocorticoids was as high as 31%. The availability of endovascular therapy was 69%. The indication for treatment of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms that required intervention was less than 13.8%. In patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms, coiling was the preferred method for exclusion. Conclusions: Reported compliance of evidence-based clinical guidelines was similar to that described in developed countries, and even better. However, there is little agreement in treating patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. For other issues, the conducts reported by Colombian neurosurgeons are in accordance with the current guidelines. PMID:22059120

  12. Long-term recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage after adequate coiling versus clipping of ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Sprengers, Marieke E.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coiling is increasingly used as treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Despite its favorable short-term outcome, concerns exist about long-term reopening and inherent risk of recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized a higher risk for recurrent SAH after

  13. Long-Term Recurrent Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Adequate Coiling Versus Clipping of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Joanna D.; Sprengers, Marieke E.; van Rooij, Willem Jan; Sluzewski, Menno; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    Background and Purpose-Coiling is increasingly used as treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Despite its favorable short-term outcome, concerns exist about long-term reopening and inherent risk of recurrent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized a higher risk for recurrent SAH after adequate

  14. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik

    1988-01-01

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm

  15. Radiological analysis of subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The CT findings of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysmal rupture were analyzed and compared with cerebral angiography for the purpose of preangiographic prediction of aneurysmal location as well as evaluation of the CT features corresponding to the vasospasm or ischemic neurologic dysfunctions. The results were as follows: 1.Aneurysms could be identified on initial cerebral angiography in 82 out of 98 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and anterior communicating artery aneurysms were most common (42 cases), followed by MCA, posterior communicating artery, ICA, basilar artery in order of frequency. 2.The CT findings of those patients were hemorrhage in subarachnoid space (69%), localized hematoma (47%), ventricular dilatation (31%), enhancing nodule (23%), cisternal enhancement (20%), cerebral infarction (15%), ventricular hemorrhage (14%), and epidural hemorrhage (3%). 3.Localized hematoma was more prevalent in anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture (54%), and less frequently in MCA, posterior communicating artery and ICA aneurysms. 4.Most of aneurysmal sac could be identified as enhancing nodule on CT when the real size were over 1 cm. 5.The size of ruptured aneurysm could be predicted in many patients with ACA and MCA aneurysm according to the CT features such as hemorrhagic patterns, location of hematomas or enhancing nodules. 6.Localized hematoma or blood clots and cerebral infarction are considered to be the CT features corresponding to the angiographic vasospasm.

  16. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) correlation in the optic nerve chamber: the Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruowu; Zhang, Zheng; Yang, Diya; Wang, Huaizhou; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Zhen; Sang, Jinghong; Liu, Sumeng; Cao, Yiwen; Xie, Xiaobin; Ren, Ruojin; Zhang, Yazhuo; Sabel, Bernhard A; Wang, Ningli

    2016-03-15

    Because a lowered intracranial pressure (ICP) is a possible mechanism of optic neuropathy, we wished to study the CSF dynamics in the optic nerve chamber by recording possible changes in the optic nerve subarachnoid space pressure (ONSP) and the impact on it when acutely lowering ICP. In eight normal dogs pressure probes were implanted in the left brain ventricle, lumbar cistern, optic nerve subarachnoid space and in the anterior eye chamber. Following CSF shunting from the brain ventricle we monitored changes of ICP, lumbar cistern pressure (LCP), ONSP and intraocular pressure (IOP). At baseline, the pressures were different with ICP>LCP>ONSP but correlated with each other (PICP (PICP gradually decreased in a linear fashion together with the ONSP ("ICP-depended zone"). But when the ICP fell below a critical breakpoint, ICP and ONSP became uncoupled and ONSP remained constant despite further ICP decline ("ICP-independent zone"). Because the parallel decline of ICP and ONSP breaks down when ICP decreases below a critical breakpoint, we interpret this as a sign of CSF communication arrest between the intracranial and optic nerve SAS. This may be caused by obstructions of either CSF inflow through the optic canal or outflow into the intra-orbital cavity. This CSF exchange arrest may be a contributing factor to optic nerve damage and the optic nerve chamber syndrome which may influence the loss of vision or its restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Toward understanding non-coding RNA roles in intracranial aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fengzhen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is a common and frequently life-threatening cerebrovascular disease, which is mostly related with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. Its complications include rebleeding, early brain injury, cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, chronic hydrocephalus, and also non neurological problems. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, comprising of microRNAs (miRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, play an important role in intracranial aneurysms and SAH. Here, we review the non-coding RNAs expression profile and their related mechanisms in intracranial aneurysms and SAH. Moreover, we suggest that these non-coding RNAs function as novel molecular biomarkers to predict intracranial aneurysms and SAH, and may yield new therapies after SAH in the future.

  18. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of disability and death in the late phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the change in intracranial pressure or the extravasated blood causes....... The effects in all parameters were more pronounced for SAH than for saline injection. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that both the elevation of intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood per se contribute approximately equally to the late CBF reductions and receptor upregulation following SAH....

  19. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: Cerebral ischemia remains the key cause of disability and death in the late phase after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and its pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the change in intracranial pressure or the extravasated blood causes the...

  20. Acute surgical management in idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zakaria, Zaitun

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a headache syndrome with progressive symptoms of raised intracranial pressure. Most commonly, it is a slow process where surveillance and medical management are the main treatment modalities. We describe herein an acute presentation with bilateral sixth nerve palsies, papilloedema and visual deterioration, where acute surgical intervention was a vision-saving operation.

  1. Type A interrupted aortic arch accompanied by intracranial aneurysms causing subarachnoid hemorrhage in an adult man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Suat; Kantarci, Mecit; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Cakir, Murteza; Ogul, Hayri

    2014-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch anomaly (IAA) characterized by complete luminal dissociation between the ascending and descending aorta and accounting for less than 1% of all cases of congenital heart disease. IAA is a rare condition in infants that occurs approximately three times per million births. It is usually diagnosed and repaired during the neonatal period and is extremely rare in adults. We present the case of an adult man who was diagnosed with IAA accompanied by intracranial aneurysms causing subarachnoid hemorrhage and demonstrate the imaging findings with 256-slice computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage and the mysterious ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating neurological insult, and is increasingly understood as a multi-system condition initiated in the central nervous system. Perioperative investigation of patients presenting for aneurysm surgery often includes a routine electrocardiogram (ECG) which frequently reveals an ...

  3. Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy as the Sole Manifestation of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage from a Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kook; Shin, Sun Young; Park, Shin Hae

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm is the most common form of intracranial aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the common presenting feature of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. In general, patients with SAH from anterior communicating artery aneurysm present with neurological deficit. We report an interesting case of a 60-year-old man who presented with acute monocular vision loss accompanied by periorbital pain without any neurological deficit, finally diagnosed with S...

  4. International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial 2009 : Endovascular Coiling of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms Has No Significant Advantage Over Neurosurgical Clipping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Nicolaas A.; Metzemaekers, Jan D. M.; Groen, Rob J. M.; Mooij, Jan Jakob A.; Van Dijk, J. Marc C.

    In the May 2009 issue of The Lancet Neurology, the 5-year follow-up results of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) were published. The authors concluded that, although the significant difference between coiling and neurosurgical clipping of ruptured intracranial aneurysms in terms

  5. The Role of Bone Subtraction Computed Tomographic Angiography in Determining Intracranial Aneurysms in Non-Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayhan, Aysegul; Koc, Osman; Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    The presence of blood in the subarachnoid space is an acute pathology with a serious risk of death and complications. The most common etiology (approximately 80%) is intracranial aneurysm. The aim of this study was to assess the role of bone subtracted computed tomographic angiography (BSCTA), a novel and noninvasive method for determining and characterizing intracranial aneurysms. Sixty consecutive patients with clinically suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were considered to enter the study. The subtraction quality was inadequate in ten patients; thus, they were excluded, leaving 50 patients (84.4%) in the study. Bone subtracted and non-subtracted 3D images were obtained from the BSCTA raw data sets. All images obtained by digital subtraction angiography (DSA), BSCTA, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) were evaluated for the presence or absence of an aneurysm and the location, minimal sac diameter, and neck size ratio of the aneurysm. DSA was considered as the gold standard during the evaluation of the data. Of the 50 patients who participated in this study, 11 had no aneurysms as determined by both CTA and DSA. Examination of the remaining 39 patients revealed the presence of 51 aneurysms. While 3D-CTA could not detect six aneurysms that were located in the base of the skull, 3D-BSCTA easily detected them. Moreover, five aneurysms were only partially detected by 3D-CTA. According to this data, the sensitivity of 3D-BSCTA and 3D-CTA was calculated as 98% and 86.3%, respectively; the specificity was calculated as 100% and 90.9%, respectively, per aneurysm; and the sensitivity of 100% for 3D-BSCTA and 98% for 3D-CTA was achieved by using combined images with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). BSCTA detected and characterized the aneurysms as well as DSA, and BSCTA and DSA gave concordant results in detecting aneurysms. BSCTA is easily accessible, less time consuming, and most importantly, a non

  6. The Role of Bone Subtraction Computed Tomographic Angiography in Determining Intracranial Aneurysms in Non-Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Aysegul; Koc, Osman; Keskin, Suat; Keskin, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Background: The presence of blood in the subarachnoid space is an acute pathology with a serious risk of death and complications. The most common etiology (approximately 80%) is intracranial aneurysm. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the role of bone subtracted computed tomographic angiography (BSCTA), a novel and noninvasive method for determining and characterizing intracranial aneurysms. Patients and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with clinically suspected non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were considered to enter the study. The subtraction quality was inadequate in ten patients; thus, they were excluded, leaving 50 patients (84.4%) in the study. Bone subtracted and non-subtracted 3D images were obtained from the BSCTA raw data sets. All images obtained by digital subtraction angiography (DSA), BSCTA, and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) were evaluated for the presence or absence of an aneurysm and the location, minimal sac diameter, and neck size ratio of the aneurysm. DSA was considered as the gold standard during the evaluation of the data. Results: Of the 50 patients who participated in this study, 11 had no aneurysms as determined by both CTA and DSA. Examination of the remaining 39 patients revealed the presence of 51 aneurysms. While 3D-CTA could not detect six aneurysms that were located in the base of the skull, 3D-BSCTA easily detected them. Moreover, five aneurysms were only partially detected by 3D-CTA. According to this data, the sensitivity of 3D-BSCTA and 3D-CTA was calculated as 98% and 86.3%, respectively; the specificity was calculated as 100% and 90.9%, respectively, per aneurysm; and the sensitivity of 100% for 3D-BSCTA and 98% for 3D-CTA was achieved by using combined images with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP). BSCTA detected and characterized the aneurysms as well as DSA, and BSCTA and DSA gave concordant results in detecting aneurysms. Conclusions: BSCTA is

  7. Isolated acute nontraumatic cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage: Etiologies based on MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eun; Kang, Myung Jin; Kim, Sang Hyeon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify common underlying etiologies that may be responsible for isolated acute nontraumatic cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) by analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brain. From August 2005 to February 2014, 15 cSAH patients were admitted to our institution. All patients with cSAH underwent brain MRI and magnetic resonance angiography as a part of their initial evaluation. An analysis of the patients' medical history, clinical presentations, and brain MRI findings was retrospectively performed. Among the combined pathologies that were suspected causes of cSAH, 11 patients showed acute or subacute cerebral infarctions at the ipsilateral hemisphere of cSAH on the diffusion-weighted images. Four of 11 patients had only cerebral infarction, but the other 7 had combined vasculopathy of extra- and intracranial arteries. Four of 15 patients who did not have cerebral infarction, had intracranial artery stenosis, or showed possible cerebral amyloid angiopathy, or no abnormal findings on the brain MRI. Ischemic stroke, such as cerebral infarction or vasculopathy of the extra and intracranial arteries is regarded as a common underlying etiology of the cSAH based on MRI findings

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage complicating thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uglietta, J.P.; Boyko, O.B.; O'Connor, C.M.; Aldrich, H.; Massey, E.W.; Heinz, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the incidence and types of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 1,696 patients treated with thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Thirteen of 1,696 patients experienced ICH, and their nonenhanced brain CT scans were reviewed. Their mean age was 62 years (range, 53-74 years), and nine of 13 were male. Six patients received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), four streptokinase, two urokinase, and one tPA and urokinase. The hemorrhages were classified according to CT location: intraparenchymal (IPH), subarachnoid (SAH), subdural (SDH), and intraventricular (IVH). The incidence of ICH was 0.76%. There were 31 hemorrhages in 13 patients. Twelve hemorrhages were IPH, 10 were SDH, seven were SAH, and two were IVH. Excluding IVH, 24 of 29 hemorrhages (83%) were supratentorial

  9. Usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT in Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage due to Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C. W.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kwark, C. E.; Lee, D. S.; Chung, J. K.; Lee, M. C.; Han, D. H.; Koh, C. S. [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    We evaluated the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT in 21 Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm and in 3 patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm. SPECT study could detect the bilaterally hypoperfused cases in 10 patients(48%), but CT/MRI showed the bilateral abnormalities in only 3 patients(14%). The number of abnormal lesions were 56 in SPECT and 25 in CT/MRI. The lesions found in SPECT were well correlated with the neurological signs of the patients such as aphasia or hemiplegia. SPECT study during Matas test was helpful in evaluating the risk for carotid artery occlusion therapy. We thought that {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO brain SPECT is helpful in evaluating the functional changes in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  10. Risk of rebleeding after treatment of acute hydrocephalus in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellingman, Catharine A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Beijer, Inge S.; van Dijk, Gert W.; Algra, Ale; van Gijn, Jan; Rinkel, Gabriël J. E.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebrospinal fluid drainage is often indicated in patients with acute hydrocephalus after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage but is believed to increase the risk of rebleeding. We studied the risk of rebleeding in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage during treatment for

  11. Prevalence of superficial siderosis following singular, acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummel, N.; Bochmann, K. [Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Bernau, C. [Leibniz-Rechenzentrum, Munich (Germany); Thon, N. [Ludwig-Maximilian-University, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Linn, J. [Technical University, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Superficial siderosis is presumably a consequence of recurrent bleeding into the subarachnoid space. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of superficial siderosis after singular, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the long term. We retrospectively identified all patients who presented with a singular, acute, aneurysmal SAH at our institution between 2010 and 2013 and in whom a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including T2*-weighted imaging was available at least 4 months after the acute bleeding event. MRI scans were judged concerning the presence and distribution of superficial siderosis. Influence of clinical data, Fisher grade, localization, and cause of SAH as well as the impact of neurosurgical interventions on the occurrence of superficial siderosis was tested. Seventy-two patients with a total of 117 MRIs were included. Mean delay between SAH and the last available MRI was 47.4 months (range 4-129). SAH was Fisher grade 1 in 2 cases, 2 in 4 cases, 3 in 10 cases, and 4 in 56 cases. Superficial siderosis was detected in 39 patients (54.2 %). In all patients with more than one MRI scan, localization and distribution of superficial siderosis did not change over time. Older age (p = 0.02) and higher degree of SAH (p = 0.03) were significantly associated with the development of superficial siderosis. Superficial siderosis develops in approximately half of patients after singular, aneurysmal SAH and might be more common in patients with an older age and a greater amount of blood. However, additional factors must play a role in whether a patient is prone to develop superficial siderosis or not. (orig.)

  12. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok; Ciolino, Jody D.; Alden, Tord

    2016-01-01

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  13. Rapid MRI evaluation of acute intracranial hemorrhage in pediatric head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Maura E.; Jaju, Alok [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Ciolino, Jody D. [Northwestern University, Biostatistics Collaboration Center, Department of Preventive Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Alden, Tord [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Neurosurgery, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Rapid MRI with ultrafast T2 sequences can be performed without sedation and is often used in place of computed tomography (CT) to evaluate pediatric patients for indications such as hydrocephalus. This study investigated the sensitivity of rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection and follow-up of acute intracranial hemorrhage in comparison to CT, which is commonly the first-line imaging. Patients presenting to a pediatric hospital with acute intracranial hemorrhage on CT and follow-up rapid MRI within 48 h were included. Rapid MRI studies consisted of three plane ultrafast T2 sequences either with or without axial gradient echo (GRE) sequences. Identification of hemorrhage on rapid MRI was assessed by readers both blinded and unblinded to prior CT results. One hundred two acute hemorrhages in 61 patients were identified by CT. Rapid MRI detection of subdural and epidural hemorrhages was modest in the absence of prior CT for comparison (sensitivity 61-74 %), but increased with review of the prior CT (sensitivity 80-86 %). Hemorrhage size was a significant predictor of detection (p < 0.0001). Three plane fast T2 images alone without GRE sequences were poor at detecting subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 10-25 %); rapid MRI with GRE sequences identified the majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage (sensitivity 71-93 %). GRE modestly increased detection of other extra-axial hemorrhages. Rapid MRI with GRE sequences is sensitive for most acute intracranial hemorrhages only when a prior CT is available for review. Rapid MRI is not adequate to replace CT in initial evaluation of intracranial hemorrhages but may be helpful in follow-up of known hemorrhages. (orig.)

  14. CT and MRI of ruptured intracranial dermoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, G.; Demaerel, P.; Baert, A.L. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Casselman, J. (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Plets, C. (Leuven Univ. Hospital (Belgium). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Haene, I. de (Akademisch Ziekenhuis St. Jan, Brugge (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology)

    1991-04-01

    Two patients with ruptured intracranial dermoids, examined with both CT and MRI are reported. Clinical presentation was transient cerebral ischemia in one patient and acute meningeal signs in the other. CT scan showed typical fat density of the tumor and the subarachnoid space. On MRI both the tumor and the subarachnoid fat, were strongly hyperintense on T1-weighted images. (orig.).

  15. Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy as the Sole Manifestation of Subarachnoid Haemorrhage from a Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kook; Shin, Sun Young; Park, Shin Hae

    2013-01-01

    Anterior communicating artery aneurysm is the most common form of intracranial aneurysm and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is the common presenting feature of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. In general, patients with SAH from anterior communicating artery aneurysm present with neurological deficit. We report an interesting case of a 60-year-old man who presented with acute monocular vision loss accompanied by periorbital pain without any neurological deficit, finally diagnosed with SAH from ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Five months after immediate craniotomy with aneurysm neck clipping, his visual acuity was improved to 20/63 with a pale optic disc appearance. Acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy may be the sole manifestation of SAH from ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Unilateral decrease of visual acuity with periorbital pain, in the absence of other neurological change, may be the initial and isolated sign.

  16. CT findings of fulminant subarachnoid hemorrhages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1985-01-01

    We studied the clinical features and CT findings of 20 cases with fulminant subarachonid hemorrhages in the acute stage. They were admitted to our hospital within 3 hours after the attack as DOA (dead on arrival) or near DOA. CT-visualized subarachnoid hemorrhages were located in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain stem in all cases. In 90 % of the cases, the subarachnoid hemorrhage formed a clot or a thick layer. Massive intracerebral hematomas were observed in 10 % of the cases. Acute intraventricular hemorrhages were seen in 80 % of the cases. The mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage in 70 % of the cases was of the reflux type, which was characterized by a reflux of the severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Acute and diffuse brain swelling on CT scan was observed in several cases, which also showed initial increased intracranial pressures. The major mechanisms leading to acute death or a very severe state soon after subarachnoid hemorrhage might be caused by acute brain-stem failure due to severe subarachnoid hemorrhages in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain-stem and an acute increase in intracranial pressure by cerebral edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage and secondary cerebral ischemia due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. (author)

  17. Acute subarachnoid haemorrhage: 3D time-of-flight MR angiography versus intra-arterial digital angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzalone, N. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Scientific Inst. H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Triulzi, F. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Scientific Inst. H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Scotti, G. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Scientific Inst. H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and reliability of 3D time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF MRA) as a noninvasive procedure, 27 patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were studied with MRA immediately before or after intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA). 3DTOF MRA was performed with an axial slab of 60 mm centred on the circle of Willis and isotropic voxels. DSA showed 22 aneurysms and 1 dural arteriovenous fistula in 21 patients; the aneurysms ranged in size from 2 to 8 mm. MRA failed to show 2 small aneurysms, at the origin of the posterior and anterior communicating arteries. The 3D display of the intracranial vessels obtained with maximum intensity projection (MIP) or targetted MIP sometimes rendered the aneurysms better than DSA. However, due to its high spatial resolution, DSA more clearly defined the overall anatomy of the walls of the normal and abnormal vessels. (orig.)

  18. Remote acute subarachnoid hemorrhage after drainage of chronic subdural hematoma: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangming; Yu, Jinlu

    2018-03-03

    Chronic subdural hematoma(CSDH) can be treated by a relatively simple burr hole surgery. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurring after surgery for CSDH has been reported as a rare but severe complication. An 88-year-old female complained of progressive headache and dizziness for one month. A right fronto-temporo-parietal CSDH with a shift in the midline structures and lateral ventricle compression was shown by computed tomography (CT) scans. Closed-system drainage of the hematoma was performed via one burr hole under general anesthesia. Two hours after we began draining the hematoma at the patient's bedside, the patient complained of headache and exhibited impaired consciousness that progressively degenerated. The drainage bag collected 200 ml of bloody liquid overa short time. A subsequent CT scan revealed SAH and an acute subdural hematoma. A CT angiogram excluded the presence of intracranial aneurysms. The patient died of hypostatic pneumonia after 15 days despite conservative medical management. Relevant literature was reviewed, and we believe that the occurrence of a hematoma in the opposite hemisphere and the hyperperfusion resulted from the rapid drainage of the hematoma, which caused the rupture of weak bridging veins during drainage. Slow decompression with closed-system drainage is recommended to avoid rapid dynamic intracranial changes during drainage of a subdural hematoma, including brain shift or restoration of normal perfusion,to prevent devastating complications. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma...... as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest...... treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves....

  20. The relationship between intracranial pressure and lactate/pyruvate ratio in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesak, T; Adamkov, J; Habalova, J; Poczos, P; Kanta, M; Bartos, M; Hosszu, T

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between intracranial pressure (intracranial pressure monitoring) and lactate pyruvate ratio (cerebral microdialysis) in patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms. In a group of fifteen patients, intracranial pressure and lactate/pyruvate ratios were measured and logged in hourly intervals. The relationship between these two variables was subsequently analysed in two ways. 1) Intracranial hypertension (ICP > 20 mmHg) in the presence of energy deprivation (L/P ratio > 30) was noted. 2) The dynamics of L/P ratio changes in relation to immediate ICP and CPP values was analysed. Out of a total of 1873 monitored hours we were able to record lactate/pyruvate ratios higher than 30 in 832 hours (44 %). Of those 832 hours during which lactate/pyruvate ratios were higher than 30, ICP was higher than 20 in 193 hours (23 %). Out of 219 hours of monitoring, in which ICP was higher than 20, a simultaneously increased L/P ratio higher than 30 was recorded in 193 hours (88 %). L/P ratio values above 30 were associated with decreased CPP values (p = 0.04), but not with increased ICP values (p = 0.79). Intracranial hypertension coincides with energetic imbalance in approximately one quarter of cases. This points to the shortcomings of the most common form of neuromonitoring in SAH patients - ICP monitoring. This method may not be reliable enough in detecting hypoxic damage, which is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in SAH patients (Fig. 5, Ref. 11).

  1. Intracranial Biodegradable Silica-Based Nimodipine Drug Release Implant for Treating Vasospasm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in an Experimental Healthy Pig and Dog Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Koskimäki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nimodipine is a widely used medication for treating delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI after subarachnoid hemorrhage. When administrated orally or intravenously, systemic hypotension is an undesirable side effect. Intracranial subarachnoid delivery of nimodipine during aneurysm clipping may be more efficient way of preventing vasospasm and DCI due to higher concentration of nimodipine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The risk of systemic hypotension may also be decreased with intracranial delivery. We used animal models to evaluate the feasibility of surgically implanting a silica-based nimodipine releasing implant into the subarachnoid space through a frontotemporal craniotomy. Concentrations of released nimodipine were measured from plasma samples and CSF samples. Implant degradation was followed using CT imaging. After completing the recovery period, full histological examination was performed on the brain and meninges. The in vitro characteristics of the implant were determined. Our results show that the biodegradable silica-based implant can be used for an intracranial drug delivery system and no major histopathological foreign body reactions were observed. CT imaging is a feasible method for determining the degradation of silica implants in vivo. The sustained release profiles of nimodipine in CSF were achieved. Compared to a traditional treatment, higher nimodipine CSF/plasma ratios can be obtained with the implant.

  2. Psychosocial impact of screening for intracranial aneurysms in relatives with familial subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermer, M. J. H.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; van Nunen, P.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; Anderson, C. S.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose - In families with >= 2 relatives with intracranial aneurysms (IAs), screening for IAs in asymptomatic first-degree relatives is often recommended. We assessed the long-term psychosocial impact of such screening. Methods - We identified all persons with IA (screen-positives)

  3. Considerable delay in diagnosis and acute management of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Eskesen, Vagn; Hauerberg, John

    2010-01-01

    Rebleeding from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) usually occurs within the first six hours after the initial bleeding. Rebleeding can be prevented effectively with tranexamic acid (TXA). Although a broad consensus has evolved that SAH should be treated as an emergency, it is likely that delays do e...... exist in the diagnosis and treatment of SAH patients. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the interval between symptom onset, emergency room (ER) admission, initial diagnosis and treatment, and final closure of the aneurysm....

  4. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Nanba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, to our knowledge, rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm following PRES has not been reported. We describe a patient with atypical PRES involving the brainstem, thalamus, and periventricular white matter without cortical or subcortical edema of the parietooccipital lobe on magnetic resonance imaging, with rupture of a concomitant cerebral aneurysm. Preexisting extremely high blood pressure may trigger atypical PRES, and failure to lower blood pressure may lead to a concomitant aneurysm rupture. In the future treatment of hypertensive urgency with a recurrence of symptoms and mean arterial blood pressure >150 mmHg, it is advisable to immediately hospitalize the patient for aggressive blood pressure management, especially if PRES is suspected based on clinical and radiological features.

  5. Intracranial hematoma as the cause of headache after subarachnoid anesthesia for cesarean section--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skret-Magierło, Joanna; Barnaś, Edyta; Sek-Kłebukowska, Barbara; Nicpoń, Jakub; Kloc, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma is an exceptionally rare but life-threating complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. The diagnosis is rather difficult because the initial symptoms mimic post-dural puncture headache. A 33-year-old primipara was admitted to the hospital at 38 weeks gestation for a cesarean section due to premature rupture of membranes and meconium stained amniotic fluid. During the procedure a single puncture between L2 and L3 vertebrae was made with the use of a 26-gauge, pencil-point needle. The amount of 2.8 ml of analgesic solution was administered in order to obtain subarachnoid analgesia at the level of Th4 and Th5 vertebrae. Postpartum recovery was uneventful for the first two days. On the third day the patient developed strong headache in the forehead area and tinnitus. An anesthesiologist diagnosed post-dural puncture headache (PDPH). The patient received 1 g of Paracetamol every 6 hours intravenously together with 3000 ml of crystalloid solution for 24 hours. As a result, the patient recovered and was discharged home with her infant. Five days later the patient presented at the neurology clinic because of strong and chronic temporal lobe headache. No other complaints were reported. Upon admission, the patient had a head CT followed by an MRI examination, which revealed cranial hematomas localized bilaterally in the area of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, spreading from the cranial vault to the skull base. The width of the hematomas was: 3-4 mm on the left and 5-6 mm on the right side. Hematomas infiltrated the anterior part of the medial longitudinal fissure. Magnetic resonance angiography showed normal images of the arteries, veins, and the dural venous sinuses. No vascular malformations, which may be a source of intracranial hemorrhage, were found. Other tests showed normal results. Patient condition during hospitalization was stable. Conservative treatment was implemented, i.e. fluids administered intravenously anti

  6. Use of Near Infrared Transillumination / Back Scattering Sounding (NIR-T/BSS) to assess effects of elevated intracranial pressure on width of subarachnoid space and cerebrovascular pulsation in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrychowski, Andrzej F; Wszedybyl-Winklewska, Magdalena; Guminski, Wojciech; Przyborska, Agata; Kaczmarek, Jacek; Winklewski, Pawel J

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to assess changes in the width of the subarachnoid space (SAS) and amplitude of cerebrovascular pulsation (CVP) during acute elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP) using Near Infrared Transillumination/Back Scattering Sounding (NIR-T/BSS). Changes in the width of the SAS and amplitude of CVP were observed in rabbits during experimental ICP elevation induced by: (1) quick injections of saline into the subdural space of the spinal cord, and (2) distension of a surgical catheter balloon placed intracranially in the subdural space. The amplitude of CVP was also assessed during acute elevation of blood pressure in the intracranial portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) induced by adrenaline. Each of the injections of saline caused a transient rise in the width of the SAS and amplitude of CVP. The amplitude of the increase in CVP was dependent on changes in blood pressure in the ICA (r=-0.82, P<0.01). Distension of the intracranial balloon resulted in elimination of the respiratory oscillations in the CVP and increased its systolic-diastolic amplitude. An increase in the amplitude of CVP was evoked by adrenaline without an increase in the carotid blood flow. We demonstrated that during elevation of ICP the amplitude of CVP depends on blood pressure rather than on blood flow in large cerebral vessels. Elimination of the respiratory oscillations by a minute ("sub-critical") ICP increase may be used as an early indicator of rising ICP. The direction of changes recorded using NIR-T/BSS was consistent with changes recorded using tensometric transducers.

  7. Predictors of acute symptomatic seizures after intracranial hemorrhage in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Kebede, Tewodros; Dean, Nathan P; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute symptomatic seizures in infants with supratentorial intracranial hemorrhage, to identify potential risk factors, and to determine the effect of acute seizures on long-term morbidity and mortality. Children less than 24 months with intracranial hemorrhage were identified from a neurocritical care database. All patients who received seizure prophylaxis beginning at admission were included in the study. Risk factors studied were gender, etiology, location of hemorrhage, seizure(s) on presentation, and the presence of parenchymal injury. Acute clinical and electrographic seizures were identified from hospital medical records. Subsequent development of late seizures was determined based on clinical information from patients' latest follow-up. Patients with idiopathic neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, premature infants, and those with prior history of seizures were excluded from analysis. Seventy-two infants met inclusion criteria. None. Forty percent of infants had acute symptomatic seizures. The prevalence was similar regardless of whether etiology of hemorrhage was traumatic or nontraumatic. Seizures on presentation and parenchymal injury were independent risk factors of acute seizures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Younger children and women were also at higher risk (p Acute seizures were not predictive of mortality, but nearly twice as many patients with acute seizures developed late seizures when compared with those without. Electrographic seizures and parenchymal injury were also predictive of development of late seizures (p hemorrhage are at high risk for acute symptomatic seizures. This is regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage. Younger patients, women, patients with parenchymal injury, and patients presenting with seizure are most likely to develop acute seizures. Although the benefits of seizure prophylaxis have not been studied in this specific population, these results suggest that it is an important component

  8. The genetics of primary haemorrhagic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and ruptured intracranial aneurysms in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Peck

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of haemorrhagic stroke has proved difficult to unravel, partly hampered by the small numbers of subjects in any single study. A meta-analysis of all candidate gene association studies of haemorrhagic stroke (including ruptured subarachnoid haemorrhage and amyloid angiopathy-related haemorrhage was performed, allowing more reliable estimates of risk.A systematic review and meta-analysis of all genetic studies in haemorrhagic stroke was conducted. Electronic databases were searched until and including March 2007 for any candidate gene in haemorrhagic stroke. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were determined for each gene disease association using fixed and random effect models.Our meta-analyses included 6,359 cases and 13,805 controls derived from 55 case-control studies, which included 12 genes (13 polymorphisms. Statistically significant associations with haemorrhagic stroke were identified for those homozygous for the ACE/I allele (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83; p = 0.0003 and for the 5G allele in the SERPINE1 4G/5G polymorphism (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03-1.96; p = 0.03. In addition, both epsilon2 and epsilon4 alleles of APOE were significantly associated with lobar haemorrhage (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.26-2.62; p = 0.002 and OR, 1.49; 95% 1.08-2.05; p = 0.01 respectively. Furthermore, a significant protective association against haemorrhagic stroke was found for the factor V Leiden mutation (OR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.10-0.87; p = 0.03.Our data suggests a genetic contribution to some types of haemorrhagic stroke, with no overall responsible single gene but rather supporting a polygenic aetiology . However, the evidence base is smaller compared to ischaemic stroke. Importantly, for several alleles previously found to be associated with protection from ischaemic stroke, there was a trend towards an increased risk of haemorrhagic stroke.

  9. Subarachnoid hyperattenuation on flat panel detector-based conebeam CT immediately after uneventful coil embolization of unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Y; Sakamoto, M; Takeuchi, H; Uno, T; Watanabe, T; Kaminou, T; Ogawa, T

    2013-03-01

    Flat panel detector-based CBCT can provide CT-like images of the brain without transferring patients from the angiography suite to a conventional CT facility. Conventional brain CT after uneventful endovascular treatment sometimes shows focal subarachnoid hyperattenuation with contrast leakage, mimicking SAH. Differentiating this finding from SAH is important for immediate postprocedural medical management. We investigated CBCT for detecting subarachnoid hyperattenuation immediately after coil embolization of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Thirty-six patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms undergoing CBCT immediately after uncomplicated coil embolization were included. The relationship between the presence of subarachnoid hyperattenuation and total volume of contrast medium injected, aneurysm size and location, and balloon and stent assistance during embolization was investigated. Statistical analyses were performed with the χ(2) test (P < .05). Nine of the 36 patients (25.0%) showed focal subarachnoid hyperattenuation within the relevant parent artery territory harboring the aneurysm. Subarachnoid hyperattenuation locations included the ipsilateral superior frontal sulcus (n = 5), the bilateral superior frontal sulcus (n = 1), and the ipsilateral superior frontal and precentral sulci (n = 3). Statistically significant differences were observed between the presence of a subarachnoid hyperattenuation and the total volume of contrast medium injected (P < .001) and aneurysm size (P < .05). Subarachnoid hyperattenuation can be detected by CBCT immediately after coil embolization for unruptured aneurysms. The increased amounts of contrast medium to be given before CBCT and the specific location of the hyperattenuation may help differentiate benign subarachnoid contrast leakage from SAH.

  10. The safety of vasopressor-induced hypertension in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients with coexisting unruptured, unprotected intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Buckley, Robert T; Indrakanti, Santoshi S; Turkmani, Ali H; Oh, Gerald; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Fargen, Kyle M; El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y; Naidech, Andrew M; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Hoh, Brian L; Bendok, Bernard R; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2015-10-01

    Vasopressor-induced hypertension (VIH) is an established treatment for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who develop vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). However, the safety of VIH in patients with coincident, unruptured, unprotected intracranial aneurysms is uncertain. This retrospective multiinstitutional study identified 1) patients with aneurysmal SAH and 1 or more unruptured, unprotected aneurysms who required VIH therapy (VIH group), and 2) patients with aneurysmal SAH and 1 or more unruptured, unprotected aneurysms who did not require VIH therapy (non-VIH group). All patients had previously undergone surgical or endovascular treatment for the presumed ruptured aneurysm. Comparisons between the VIH and non-VIH patients were made in terms of the patient characteristics, clinical and radiographic severity of SAH, total number of aneurysms, number of ruptured/unruptured aneurysms, aneurysm location/size, number of unruptured and unprotected aneurysms during VIH, severity of vasospasm, degree of hypervolemia, and degree and duration of VIH therapy. For the VIH group (n = 176), 484 aneurysms were diagnosed, 231 aneurysms were treated, and 253 unruptured aneurysms were left unprotected during 1293 total days of VIH therapy (5.12 total years of VIH therapy for unruptured, unprotected aneurysms). For the non-VIH group (n = 73), 207 aneurysms were diagnosed, 93 aneurysms were treated, and 114 unruptured aneurysms were left unprotected. For the VIH and non-VIH groups, the mean sizes of the ruptured (7.2 ± 0.3 vs 7.8 ± 0.6 mm, respectively; p = 0.27) and unruptured (3.4 ± 0.2 vs 3.2 ± 0.2 mm, respectively; p = 0.40) aneurysms did not differ. The authors observed 1 new SAH from a previously unruptured, unprotected aneurysm in each group (1 of 176 vs 1 of 73 patients; p = 0.50). Baseline patient characteristics and comorbidities were similar between groups. While the degree of hypervolemia was similar between the VIH and non-VIH patients

  11. Experimental model of intracranial arteriovenous shunting in the acute stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Shinichi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Sato, Sonomi; Watanabe, Yoichi; Watanabe, Zenichiro; Kodama, Namio

    2005-06-01

    A model of intracranial arteriovenous (AV) shunting must incorporate local hypoperfusion and simulate the hemodynamics of arteriovenous malformations. In this study, the hemodynamics of an intracranial AV shunt model in the acute stage were clarified. End-to-side anastomoses with a femoral vein graft were performed between a cortical branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the superior sagittal sinus in anesthetized dogs. Local cerebral blood flow (l-CBF) was measured by laser Doppler blood flowmetry. l-CBF decreased suddenly by 34.2% when the shunt was opened in the ipsilateral MCA territory. Upon re-occlusion, l-CBF immediately equaled or exceeded the pre-opening value and returned to the pre-opening value within the next 15 minutes. Opening the shunt produced little change in l-CBF in the territory of the ipsilateral or contralateral anterior cerebral artery. The decrease in l-CBF was correlated with shunt volume only in the MCA territory. l-CBF manifested a PaCO(2)-dependent increase before shunt opening, but CO(2) reactivity was impaired after opening the shunt only in the MCA territory. This dog model features local hypoperfusion due to intracranial AV shunting and disturbance of CO(2) reactivity in the acute stage. The hemodynamics of this model will be confirmed in the chronic stage.

  12. Computed tomographic findings of intracranial acute leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Ryu, Weon Don; Kim, Jong Sung; Koh, Byung Hee; Jeon, Seok Chol; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities in the brain were retrospectively analyzed in 16 of 103 patients with acute leukemia confirmed by CSF cytology or combined surgery at Hanyang University Hospital, from August 1980 to August 1989. The results were as follows : 1. With FAB classification, the most frequent pathologic type was L1 : 8 cases (50%) 2. The range of age distribution showed typical pattern that ALL occurred below the 15 years old, and AML, over 15 years old. 3. Abnormal CT findings were ; Meningitis(2 cases), Mass(3), Thrombosis(1), Infarction(2), Edema(1), Hemorrhage(7), Hydrocephalus(2), Atrophy(2). 4. Most of infracranial hemorrhage were seen in M{sub 2} and M{sub 3} type.

  13. Doppler Non-invasive Monitoring of ICP in an Animal Model of Acute Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robba, Chiara; Donnelly, Joseph; Bertuetti, Rita; Cardim, Danilo; Sekhon, Mypinder S; Aries, Marcel; Smielewski, Peter; Richards, Hugh; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-12-01

    In many neurological diseases, intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated and needs to be actively managed. ICP is typically measured with an invasive transducer, which carries risks. Non-invasive techniques for monitoring ICP (nICP) have been developed. The aim of this study was to compare three different methods of transcranial Doppler (TCD) assessment of nICP in an animal model of acute intracranial hypertension. In 28 rabbits, ICP was increased to 70-80 mmHg by infusion of Hartmann's solution into the lumbar subarachnoid space. Doppler flow velocity in the basilar artery was recorded. nICP was assessed through three different methods: Gosling's pulsatility index PI (gPI), Aaslid's method (AaICP), and a method based on diastolic blood flow velocity (FVdICP). We found a significant correlation between nICP and ICP when all infusion experiments were combined (FVdICP: r = 0.77, AaICP: r = 0.53, gPI: r = 0.54). The ability to distinguish between raised and 'normal' values of ICP was greatest for FVdICP (AUC 0.90 at ICP >40 mmHg). When infusion experiments were considered independently, FVdICP demonstrated again the strongest correlation between changes in ICP and changes in nICP (mean r = 0.85). TCD-based methods of nICP monitoring are better at detecting changes of ICP occurring in time, rather than absolute prediction of ICP as a number. Of the studied methods of nICP, the method based on FVd is best to discriminate between raised and 'normal' ICP and to monitor relative changes of ICP.

  14. A case of acute spinal subdural hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage: Rapid spontaneous remission, relapse, and complete resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michito Namekawa

    2017-06-01

    In addition to rostrocaudal spreading of bloody components in the subdural space, rupture of the hematoma into the subarachnoid space must have released pressure, compressing the spinal cord. In this case report, we also describe the serial MRI studies and note the limitations of the resolution of spinal MRI in the acute phase.

  15. A complicated case of antepartum eclamptic fit with HELLP syndrome, acute renal failure and multiple intracranial hemorrhages: A mortality report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Samy El-agwany

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available HELLP is an acronym for hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets count, affecting 0.2–12% of all pregnancies or 4–12% of those with preeclampsia. The maternal mortality reported from the literature is up 4% due to disseminated intravascular coagulation, placental abruption, acute renal failure, eclampsia, and cerebral hemorrhage. A 20 year old, G2P1, at 36 weeks of gestation, was referred to our hospital because of postictal coma state with bilateral mydriasis and epistaxis due to repeated antepartum eclamptic fits. Elevated blood pressure level 170/110 mmHg was accompanied with massive proteinuria. Cesarean section was performed and female newborn were delivered. Laboratory findings were characteristic of preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and renal failure. The patient developed an intraventricular hematoma and an intracerebral hemorrhage with subarachnoid one, which were not suitable to neurosurgical treatment. The patient died from refractory hemolytic anemia, spontaneous bleeding of multiple organs, renal failure and intracranial hemorrhage. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy might overlap and be associated with potentially fatal complications, including intracranial hemorrhage, as in the present case. Early detection and diagnosis are crucial to ensure appropriate management and treatment success.

  16. Ciclosporin does not attenuate intracranial hypertension in rats with acute hyperammonaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rikke Hebo; Kjær, Mette S; Eefsen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective potential of ciclosporin during acute liver failure. We evaluated the effect of intrathecally administered ciclosporin on intracranial pressure, brain water content and aquaporin-4 expression in a rat model with acute hyperammonaemia....

  17. Factors Associated with Acute and Chronic Hydrocephalus in Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter; Raya, Amanda; Zipfel, Gregory J; Dhar, Rajat

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocephalus requiring external ventricular drain (EVD) or shunt placement commonly complicates aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but its frequency is not as well known for nonaneurysmal SAH (NA-SAH). Those with diffuse bleeding may have greater risk of hydrocephalus compared to those with a perimesencephalic pattern. We evaluated the frequency of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH and whether imaging factors could predict the need for EVD and shunting. We collected admission clinical and imaging variables for 105 NA-SAH patients, including bicaudate index (BI), Hijdra sum score (HSS), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) score, modified Fisher scale (mFS), and bleeding pattern. Hydrocephalus was categorized as acute (need for EVD) or chronic (shunt). We applied logistic regression to determine whether hydrocephalus risk was independently related to bleeding pattern or mediated through blood volume or ventriculomegaly. Acute hydrocephalus was seen in 26 (25%) patients but was more common with diffuse (15/28, 54%) versus perimesencephalic (10/59, 17%, p hydrocephalus had worse clinical grade and higher BI, HSS, and IVH scores. Adjusting the relationship between hydrocephalus and diffuse bleeding for HSS (but not BI) nullified this association. Nine (35%) patients requiring EVD eventually required shunting for chronic hydrocephalus, which was associated with greater blood burden but not poor clinical grade. Acute hydrocephalus occurs in one-quarter of NA-SAH patients. The greater risk in diffuse bleeding appears to be mediated by greater cisternal blood volume but not by greater ventriculomegaly. Imaging characteristics may aid in anticipatory management of hydrocephalus in NA-SAH.

  18. The Effect of Gender on Acute Hydrocephalus after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, Hajime; Zhang, Haining; Okubo, Shuichi; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Acute hydrocephalus is a common complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We investigated the effect of gender on acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. SAH was induced in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using endovascular perforation. Sham rats underwent the same procedure without perforation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 24 h after SAH to determine ventricular volume. Hydrocephalus was defined as a ventricular volume that was more than 3 standard deviations from the mean value in sham-operated animals. After MRI, animals were euthanized and the extent of SAH was assessed using a modified grading system. No sham animals died. Mortality rates after SAH induction in male and female animals were 27 and 22 %, respectively. SAH induced significant ventricular enlargement compared with sham-operated rats (p hydrocephalus 24 h after SAH was greater in female (75 %) than in male animals (47 %, p hydrocephalus occurred even though SAH severity grade and ventricular T2* hypointensity volumes were not significantly different between male and female animals. Our data demonstrate that gender influences acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. Future studies should determine the role of estrogen in SAH-induced hydrocephalus.

  19. Functional independence: A comparison of the changes during neurorehabilitation between patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and intracerebral hemorrhage or acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stabel, Henriette Holm; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the changes in functional independence measured by the FIM after specialized neurorehabilitation between patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Design Historical cohort study...

  20. Intracranial Myeloid Sarcoma Metastasis Mimicking Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandip S. Gill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma, a rare consequence of myeloproliferative disorders, is rarely seen in the central nervous system, most commonly in the pediatric population. Although there are a handful of case reports detailing initial presentation of CNS myeloid sarcoma in the adult population, we have been unable to find any reports of CNS myeloid sarcoma presenting as a large mass lesion in a herniating patient. Here, we present the case of a patient transferred to our facility for a very large subdural hematoma. Based on imaging characteristics, it was felt to be a spontaneous hematoma secondary to coagulopathy. No coagulopathy was found. Interestingly, he did have a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML diagnosed 2 months previously, and intraoperatively he was found to have a confluent white mass invading both the subdural and subarachnoid spaces. There was minimal associated hemorrhage and final pathology showed myeloid sarcoma. This is the first report we are aware of in which CNS myeloid sarcoma presented as a subdural metastasis and also the first report in which we are aware of this etiology causing a herniation syndrome secondary to mass effect.

  1. Treatments for Reversing Warfarin Anticoagulation in Patients with Acute Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Structured Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    rapid INR normalization and decreased intracranial hematoma expansion [36-40]. The medical literature’s reporting of these reversal agents’ impact on... intracranial haemorrhages. Scott Med J 2000, 45:105-109. 42. Huttner HB, Schellinger PD, Hartmann M, et al. Hematoma growth and outcome in...available soon. Treatments for reversing warfarin anticoagulation in patients with acute intracranial hemorrhage: a structured literature review

  2. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is a Novel Risk Factor for Rebleeding in Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing-Song; Ping-Chen; Lin, Yuan-Xiang; Lin, Zhang-Ya; Yu, Liang-Hong; Dai, Lin-Sun; Kang, De-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rebleeding of an aneurysm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whereas numerous studies have demonstrated predictors of rebleeding and effect of systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) on stroke, few data on the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Here, we sought to identify the effect of SBPV on rebleeding in acute aneurysmal SAH. Case–control study. From January 2010 to June 2015, 612 patients with aneurysmal SAH were enrolled in our tertiary care medical center. Main outcome measures: Consecutive patients with acute (ictus) aneurismal rebleeding or repair or death were retrospectively included. Antihypertensive therapy based on a predefined standardized protocol was prescribed to lower and maintain SBP between 120 and 160 mm Hg. SBP was measured hourly until a censoring event occurred. SBPV was determined as standard deviation (SD) and successive variation (SV). Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between SBPV and rebleeding. Rebleeding occurred in 61 (10.0%) of the 612 patients. We identified 47 acute rebleeding as cases and 382 early repair or early death as controls. On binary logistic regression analysis, rebleeding was associated with the SD of SBP (odds ratio [OR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.131–1.391; P < 0.001) and the SV of SBP (OR, 1.131; 95% CI, 1.039–1.231; P = 0.004). No significant difference was seen between rebleeding and mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP). SBPV is associated with increased rates of acute aneurysmal rebleeding. Further prospective research is warranted to confirm that SBP stability prevents acute aneurysm rebleeding. PMID:26986118

  3. Enterprise stent-assisted coiling for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms during ultra-early (48hours) subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center experience in 59 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aihua; Peng, Tangming; Qian, Zenghui; Li, Youxiang; Jiang, Chuhan; Wu, Zhongxue; Yang, Xinjian

    2015-10-01

    Accumulated experience and improvement of stents dedicated to intracranial use have significantly widened the applicability of stent-assisted coiling (SAC) to ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. This retrospective study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of SAC using the Enterprise stent for ruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms during ultra-early subarachnoid hemorrhage. We reviewed data from 59 consecutive patients with ruptured wide-necked aneurysms who had SAC using the Enterprise stent performed within 48hours of onset. Data collected and analyzed included: patient demographics; morphologic features of the aneurysm; treatment results and follow-up results. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by modified Rankin Scale (mRS). In all 59 cases, SAC using the Enterprise stent was performed successfully, with no significant technical difficulties. Initial angiographic results were: complete occlusion in 38 cases; near occlusion in 17; and partial occlusion in four. Angiographic follow-up of 48 patients showed that 46 (95.8%) remained stable or improved, without regrowth, while regrowth was imaged in two patients. Medium-term clinical follow-up of 54 patients (mean, 26.9months) showed that 88.9% had a good outcome (mRS: 0 in 34; 1 in eight; and 2 in six), and 11.1% poor outcomes (mRS: 3 in four; and 4 in two). Enterprise SAC is a safe and viable option for treatment of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms within 48hours of ictus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute Compressive Myelopathy Caused by Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Combined Effect of Asymptomatic Cervical Spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshinari; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yoshitaka; Handa, Akira; Chin, Masaki; Yamagata, Sen

    2016-11-01

    Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by hemorrhagic arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) usually presents with meningeal signs, including headache and nausea, and focal neurologic deficit is found in rare cases. In this article, we report a case of acute compressive cervical myelopathy caused by hemorrhagic AVF at the craniocervical junction. A 73-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital for sudden headache and subsequent left hemiparesis. Head computed tomography scan showed SAH exclusively in the posterior fossa, and catheter angiography revealed a perimedullary arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction as a source of the SAH. Detailed neurologic examination showed the sensory disturbance of bilateral upper extremities and bladder and rectal disturbance, suggesting concurrent cervical myelopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed disk herniation at the C4-5 level, spinal SAH deposition above the C4-5 level, and accompanying myelomalacia. No intramedullary hemorrhage was found. Spinal SAH alone rarely causes focal neurologic deficit. However, this case suggests spinal SAH can cause acute compressive myelopathy when complicated with preexisting spinal canal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi; Kang, Ji-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images.

  7. Endovascular Treatment for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in the Acute Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Toshinari; Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Muraoka, Kenichiro; Terada, Kinya; Hirotsune, Nobuyuki; Nishino, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Severe neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) can occur in a variety of brain insults, including subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and severe case of NPE can cause devastating consequences. But the literature on the treatment strategy about aneurysmal SAH with NPE is very scant. We present that SAH patients with severe NPE, who were treated first by embolization of aneurysm followed by insertion of lumbar spinal drainage, had comparatively good outcome. We present 12 consecutive cases of aneurysmal SAH with NPE in the acute stage, which were treated by endovascular treatment between April 2002 and December 2012. We classified the patients according to the Hunt and Hess grading system as follows: grade-3 (1 patient), grade-4 (4 patients), and grade-5 (7 patients). All patients needed respiratory management, with the assistance of a ventilator, and underwent endovascular treatment for the ruptured aneurysms within 72 hours from onset. For all the patients, immediately after the endovascular treatment, we performed lumbar spinal drainage. The pulmonary edema disappeared rapidly after respiratory management and endovascular treatment. The outcomes were as follows: good recovery (GR; 3 patients), moderate disability (MD; 4 patients), severe disability (SD; 3 patients), and death (D; 2 patients). Five patients (42%) developed pneumonia, and we postponed extubation until recovery from pneumonia. The cause for severe disability and death was symptomatic vasospasm and primary brain damage. No patients had rebleeding from ruptured aneurysms. Endovascular treatment for ruptured aneurysm and placement of lumbar spinal drainage is an excellent treatment option for severe SAH with NPE.

  8. MRI in acute subarachnoid haemorrhage; findings with a standardised stroke protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebach, J.B.; Wilde, P.; Meyer, M.; Sartor, K.; Schellinger, P.D.; Hacke, W.; Geletneky, K.

    2004-01-01

    There is doubt as to whether acute haemorrhage is visible on MRI. We carried out MRI within 6 h of symptom onset on five patients with minor (low Hunt and Hess grades 1 or 2) subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) diagnosed by CT to search for any specific pattern. We used our standard stroke MRI protocol, including multiecho proton density (PD)- and T2-weighted images, echoplanar (EPI) diffusion- (DWI) and perfusion- (PWI) weighted imaging, and MRA. In all cases SAH was clearly visible on PD-weighted images with a short TE. In four patients it caused a low-signal rim on the T2*-weighted source images of PWI, and DWI revealed high signal in SAH. In the fifth patient SAH was perimesencephalic; susceptibility effects from the skull base made it impossible to detect SAH on EPI DWI and T2*-weighted images. Perfusion maps were normal in all cases. MRA and conventional angiography revealed an aneurysm in only one patient. Stroke MRI within 6 h of SAH thus shows a characteristic pattern. (orig.)

  9. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  10. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forester, Craig M.; Braunreiter, Chi L.; Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab; Hedlund, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  11. Local intracranial intraarterial thrombolytic therapy in acute cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of direct intracranial intraarterial thrombolytic therapy in patients with acute atherothrombotic and embolic stroke. Forth-one patients with cerebral thromboembolic disease, all in the area of the middle cerebral artery and including two cases of internal carotid artry occlusion, were treated with microcatheter-directed local intraarterial thrombolysis, using 180,000 to 1,000,000 unit urokinase and 15 to 50 mg of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The time elapsed before treatment ranged from 260 to 470 minute (mean : 380 minutes). The effect of treatment was assessed by cerebral angiography, by the clinical outcome. For 25 patients (61%), complete vessel recanalization was successful. In eight and three cases, respectively, the result was partial recanalization and residual stenosis. In 21 patients (51%), both acute neurologic and functional outcomes improved significantly within 24 hours and in 92% of patients, within one month. Hemorrhagic transformations occurred in five patients (12.2%), and in five others there were high density lesions around the basal ganglia and temporal lobe, which was cleared on CT within 24 hours. This suggested transient extrapolation of the contrast media rather than true hemorrhage. tPA showed better results than urokinase in terms of the rate of recanalization (68.7% vs 56.7%) and the occurrence of hemorrhagic infarction(6.3% vs 16.0%). Local intraarterial cerebral thrombolysis is thought be an effective method in the treatment of acute brain infarction, but in some patients may cause intracerebral hemorrhage in some patients

  12. Local intracranial intraarterial thrombolytic therapy in acute cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of direct intracranial intraarterial thrombolytic therapy in patients with acute atherothrombotic and embolic stroke. Forth-one patients with cerebral thromboembolic disease, all in the area of the middle cerebral artery and including two cases of internal carotid artry occlusion, were treated with microcatheter-directed local intraarterial thrombolysis, using 180,000 to 1,000,000 unit urokinase and 15 to 50 mg of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). The time elapsed before treatment ranged from 260 to 470 minute (mean : 380 minutes). The effect of treatment was assessed by cerebral angiography, by the clinical outcome. For 25 patients (61%), complete vessel recanalization was successful. In eight and three cases, respectively, the result was partial recanalization and residual stenosis. In 21 patients (51%), both acute neurologic and functional outcomes improved significantly within 24 hours and in 92% of patients, within one month. Hemorrhagic transformations occurred in five patients (12.2%), and in five others there were high density lesions around the basal ganglia and temporal lobe, which was cleared on CT within 24 hours. This suggested transient extrapolation of the contrast media rather than true hemorrhage. tPA showed better results than urokinase in terms of the rate of recanalization (68.7% vs 56.7%) and the occurrence of hemorrhagic infarction(6.3% vs 16.0%). Local intraarterial cerebral thrombolysis is thought be an effective method in the treatment of acute brain infarction, but in some patients may cause intracerebral hemorrhage in some patients.

  13. Acute neurocognitive impairment during cranial radiation therapy in patients with intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welzel, Grit; Mai, Sabine K.; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Wenz, Frederik; Fleckenstein, Katharina; Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the acute effects of cranial radiation therapy (CNS-RT) using different radiation doses (0, 1.8, 2, 3, ≤ 20 Gy) on cognitive function with special emphasis on memory. We assessed patients with and without intracranial tumors to distinguish between direct and indirect radiation effects on brain tissue. Eighty-two patients were evaluated with neuropsychological testing before and acutely after radiotherapy (RT). Sixty-four patients received RT to the brain (55 with, 9 without intracranial tumor). Eighteen patients treated with RT to the breast served as controls. Patients with intracranial tumor demonstrated attention (19-38th percentile) and verbal memory scores (34-46th percentile) below the population average at baseline. The average Verbal Memory score was significantly different between patients with intracranial tumor and controls both at baseline (38th vs. 58th percentile) and after irradiation (27th vs. 52th percentile). Patients with preexisting peritumoral edema performed worse than patients without edema and controls. Radiation dose-related deficits were seen for working memory performance in patients with intracranial tumor. Our data indicate no measurable impairment of cognitive functioning acutely after prophylactic cranial irradiation. Patients with intracranial tumor show a deterioration of almost all memory functions with a dose-dependent impairment in working memory. Patients with preexisting peritumoral brain edema show the strongest deterioration. (orig.)

  14. Acute postoperative neurological deterioration associated with surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm: incidence, predictors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, Kelly B; Todd, Michael M; Bayman, Emine O; Torner, James C

    2012-06-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant morbidity and mortality, even among patients who reach medical attention in good neurological condition. Many patients have neurological decline in the perioperative period, which contributes to long-term outcomes. The focus of this study is to characterize the incidence of, characteristics predictive of, and outcomes associated with acute postoperative neurological deterioration in patients undergoing surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial (IHAST) was a multicenter randomized clinical trial that enrolled 1001 patients and assesssed the efficacy of hypothermia as neuroprotection during surgery to secure a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. All patients had a radiographically confirmed SAH, were classified as World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) Grade I-III immediately prior to surgery, and underwent surgery to secure the ruptured aneurysm within 14 days of SAH. Neurological assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was performed preoperatively, at 24 and 72 hours postoperatively, and at time of discharge. The primary outcome variable was a dichotomized scoring based on an IHAST version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) in which a score of 1 represents a good outcome and a score > 1 a poor outcome, as assessed at 90-days' follow-up. Data from IHAST were analyzed for occurrence of a postoperative neurological deterioration. Preoperative and intraoperative variables were assessed for associations with occurrence of postoperative neurological deterioration. Differences in baseline, intraoperative, and postoperative variables and in outcomes between patients with and without postoperative neurological deterioration were compared with Fisher exact tests. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare variables reported as means. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for covariates associated with occurrence

  15. Acute Cholecystitis as a Cause of Fever in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Fever is a very common complication that has been related to poor outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH. The incidence of acalculous cholecystitis is reportedly 0.5%–5% in critically ill patients, and cerebrovascular disease is a risk factor for acute cholecystitis (AC. However, abdominal evaluations are not typically performed for febrile patients who have recently undergone aSAH surgeries. In this study, we discuss our experiences with febrile aSAH patients who were eventually diagnosed with AC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 192 consecutive patients who underwent aSAH from January 2009 to December 2012. We evaluated their characteristics, vital signs, laboratory findings, radiologic images, and pathological data from hospitalization. We defined fever as a body temperature of >38.3°C, according to the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. We categorized the causes of fever and compared them between patients with and without AC. Results Of the 192 enrolled patients, two had a history of cholecystectomy, and eight (4.2% were eventually diagnosed with AC. Among them, six patients had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In their pathological findings, two patients showed findings consistent with coexistent chronic cholecystitis, and two showed necrotic changes to the gall bladder. Patients with AC tended to have higher white blood cell counts, aspartame aminotransferase levels, and C-reactive protein levels than patients with fevers from other causes. Predictors of AC in the aSAH group were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR], 8.758; P = 0.033 and the initial consecutive fasting time (OR, 1.325; P = 0.024. Conclusions AC may cause fever in patients with aSAH. When patients with aSAH have a fever, diabetes mellitus and a long fasting time, AC should be suspected. A high degree of suspicion and a thorough abdominal examination of febrile aSAH patients allow for prompt diagnosis and treatment of this

  16. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, D

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm results in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a subtype of stroke with an incidence of 9 per 100,000 person-years and a case-fatality around 35%. In order to prevent SAH, patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms can be treated by neurosurgical or

  17. Bilateral Wyburn-Mason Syndrome presenting as acute subarachnoid haemorrhage - a very rare congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortnum, Søren Ole Stigaard; Sørensen, Preben; Andresen, J

    2008-01-01

    A 30 year old young male was admitted to our department after experiencing clincal symptoms of a subarachnoid haemorrhage. Imaging studies revealed large cerebral AVMs. Fundus examination of the left eye demonstrated a retinal racemose AVM almost completely covering the posterior pole of the eye....... patients in the literature since 1973. The finding of retinal AVMs should warrant cerebral imaging studies including CT- or MR-angiography....

  18. CT-verified intracranial calcifications and contrast enhancement in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, P. [Department of Neuroradiology, Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark)

    1998-08-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating disease which follows viral infection or vaccination. We report the CT findings in a 13-year-old boy with ADEM after infection with Epstein-Barr virus. After 11 days, the patient developed intracranial calcifications in addition to demyelinating lesions. This is a rare finding in ADEM. (orig.) With 4 figs., 15 refs.

  19. High resolution transbulbar sonography in children with suspicion of increased intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinborn, Marc; Friedmann, Melanie; Makowski, Christine; Hahn, Helmut; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Juenger, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of high resolution transbulbar sonography for the estimation of intracranial pressure (ICP) in children. In children and adolescents with acute neurologic symptoms of various origin, transbulbar sonography was performed. Besides measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), the ultrastructure of the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve sheath was evaluated. The results of transbulbar sonography were correlated with clinical data based on cross-sectional imaging, ICP measurement, and ophthalmologic examination. Eighty-one patients (age 3-17.8 years, mean 11.7 years) were included. In 25 children, cross-sectional imaging and ICP measurement revealed increased intracranial pressure. The mean ONSD was 6.85 ± 0.81 mm. Twenty patients (20/25, 80 %) had a microcystic appearance of the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve. In 56 children without evidence of increased intracranial pressure, the mean ONSD was 5.77 ± 0.48 mm. Forty-nine patients (49/56, 87.5 %) had a normal homogenous appearance of the subarachnoid space. The ONSD in children with increased intracranial pressure was significantly higher than in patients without (p intracranial pressure in children. Besides measurement of the optic nerve sheath diameter, evaluation of the ultrastructure of the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve is a helpful parameter.

  20. Elevation of intracranial pressure in acute AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessa, R; Krams, M; Hengge, U; Weiller, C; Reinhardt, V; Volbracht, L; Rauhut, F; Brockmeyer, N H

    1994-12-01

    Prior to the AIDS-era, elevation of intracranial pressure was known to be a typical complication of cryptococcal meningitis associated with an increased risk of early death. In AIDS-patients, however, the prevalence and clinical significance of this complication are as yet unclear. We analysed clinical features and courses, CSF findings, serological results and neuroimaging scans in acute cryptococcal meningitis in eight patients with AIDS. Five showed symptoms and signs compatible with raised intracranial pressure, which was life-threatening in one and the most probable cause of death in another. Serial monitoring of intracranial pressure together with repeated CSF analysis revealed that severe intracranial pressure elevation in AIDS related cryptococcal meningitis can occur in spite of effective antimycotic treatment, does not depend on an increased CSF/serum osmolality ratio or CSF overproduction and can be associated with normal cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings. Our data support the hypothesis that CSF reabsorption failure plays the crucial role in the pathophysiological mechanism. External lumbar drainage may be of benefit in selected cases of acute AIDS related cryptococcal meningitis with persisting life threatening elevation in intracranial pressure and normal computed tomogram.

  1. [Effects of solcoseryl on the cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and EEG in acute intracranial hypertensive cats (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, S; Asakura, T; Kitamura, K

    1976-02-01

    The experiment was performed on 86 cases under intraperitoneal pentobarbital anesthesia. One balloon was placed in the extradural space of right frontal region, and the other balloon was placed in the left extradural space and the intracranial pressure was measured. A needle was stereotaxically inserted into the subcortical area in order to measure the cerebral blood flow. Systemic blood pressure was recorded by inserting a catheter into the femoral artery, and electrocorticogram was also recorded. An expanding intracranial lesion was made by inflating the extradural balloon with physiological saline. The animals were arbitrarily divided into two groups.: 1) light or moderate groups which intracranial pressure before the injection of drug was below 400 mmH2O. 2) severe groups above 400 mmH2O. After the maintenance of the pressure, Solcoseryl was infused intravenously. The investigation was focused to observe whether Solcoseryl reveales any potent effect on cerebral blood flow, intracranial pressure, systemic blood pressure and on electroencephalogram in acute intracranial hypertension. Results 1) Intravenous injection of Solcoseryl had the effect of lowering intracranial pressure in the light or moderate and severe groups. Particularly, dose of 80 mg/kg showed the marked effect, though with a rebound phenomenon in the light or moderate groups. Furthermore, the effect was more marked and lasting by drip infusion of Solcoseryl and also by intravenous injection of Solcoseryl after pretreatment with hydrocortisone, and at this time no rebound phenomenon was recognized. 2) Solcoseryl had the effect of increasing the cerebral blood flow accompained with the lowering of intracranial pressure. 3) Systemic blood pressure was transiently lowered by the injection of Solcoseryl 20 mg/kg or 80 mg/kg and recovered immediately. 4) Solcoseryl had no effect on electroencephalogram in the severe groups. Conclusion On the basis of these results, it is rational to conclude that

  2. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm with fundal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kida, Shinya; Nitta, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1985-01-01

    CT scan and fundus oculi of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm were investigated in 42 patients who were admitted between January, 1980, and August, 1984. Fundal hemorrhage (FH) was observed in 22 patients. The patients with FH showed a worse clinical grade (Hunt Kosnik) on admission than those without FH. The mortality rate of patients with FH was 64 %, much higher than the 5 % rate of those without FH. Moreover, the patients with FH showed more trouble in daily living than those without FH. CT scans of patients with FH usually showed severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), whereas those of patients without FH showed only mild hemorrhage. These findings suggest that fundal hemorrhage is caused by acute intracranial hypertension following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. However, no significant correlation between the laterality of FH and the hemispheric dominancy of SAH could be demonstrated. (author)

  3. Enterprise stent in recanalizing non-acute atherosclerotic intracranial internal carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Zhigang; Ji, Yong; Ding, Xuan; Zang, Yizheng; Wang, Chengwei

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the safety and effectiveness of recanalization in non-acute occlusion of intracranial internal carotid arteries using the flexible Enterprise self-expanding stent. From June 2014 to June 2016, 12 consecutive patients with non-acute occlusion of intracranial internal carotid arteries received endovascular recanalization with Enterprise stenting. All patients received medication for anti-platelet aggregation therapy before and after the operation. The perioperative complications and recanalization efficacy were evaluated with the modified Rankin scoring system and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) follow-up, respectively. Endovascular recanalization was successfully performed in 10 out of 12 patients with Enterprise stenting. Stent implantation following balloon dilatation failed in one patient because the lumen diameter was too small. Another recanalization failed because the guide wire could not pass through the occlusion. No perioperative mortality was observed. One case of acute thrombosis and one case of intraoperative carotid spasm occurred, but these were resolved with thrombolytic therapy by microcatheter exposure treatment and antispasmodic medications, respectively. DSA follow-up in seven patients revealed no re-occlusion. One stroke event occurred in the 10 patients who completed the follow-up. A meaningful improvement in the modified Rankin score during follow-up was suggested by Wilcoxon signed-rank test results. The Enterprise stent was shown to be safe and efficient in recanalizing non-acute atherosclerotic intracranial internal carotid artery occlusion. However, the long-term outcomes need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of multi-factors affecting symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in intraarterial thrombolysis with urokinase for acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Qianlin; Zhou Shi; Wang Xuejian; Wu Qinghua; Song Jie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the causes and preventive measures of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in 217 patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke treated with local intra-arterial urokinase. Methods: From February 1999 to June 2004, 217 patients were treated for acute ischemic stroke with local intra-arterial urokinase in our hospital. Factors associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage of intra-arterial thrombolysis were analyzed by Stepwise logistic regression to identify some factors relating the prediction symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Results: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 8 cases (3.7%). Predictors of the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage were the elevated systolic blood pressure before therapy (odds ratio, 1.096; 95% CI, 1.006 to 1.194) and urokinase (UK) treatment (odds ratio, 1.068 ; 95% CL, 1.053 to 1.247). Risk of secondary symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was increased with elevated systolic blood pressure. Other factors like age, initial treating time, NIHSS, diabetes and collateral circulation did not predict the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage respectively. Conclusions: Predictors of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after local intra-arterial infusion of urokinase for acute ischemic stroke were the elevated systolic blood pressure before therapy and urokinase (UK) treatment. (authors)

  5. Retrospective audit of the investigation of patients with suspected acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammed, O.; Teubnet, D.; Jones, D.N.; Slavotinek, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Recommended investigational care (RIC) of emergency department (ED) patients with suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage comprises lumbar puncture (LP) to detect xanthochromia if the preceding CT scan is negative. Retrospective audit of the investigational care of 100 consecutive ED patients presenting with possible subarachnoid haemorrhage. Of the 100 patients, 91 had negative CT, and 36 (39.6%) of these patients had an LP performed to detect xanthochromia (i.e. RIC). Fifty-five of 91 (60.4%) patients did not receive RIC. Of the 55 patients who did not receive RIC, 25 (45.5%) had a documented senior clinical decision not to perform an LP; 15 (27.3%) had no documented reason; five (9.1%) refused consent; two (3.6%) had an LP but no xanthochromia requested, one patient did not have an LP because of technical issues, six patients underwent CT angiography (CTA), and one patient underwent magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), in the absence of a LP, following a negative CT. Two patients underwent CTA following a negative xanthochromia result. Patients admitted to the emergency extended care unit had 6.85 times the odds of receiving RIC (95% CI 2.20-21.4). Fifty-five (55) of 91 (60%) ED patients did not receive RIC. Fifteen of the 55 did not have any documented justification for not performing an LP with xanthochromia testing. Admission to an emergency extended care unit was a predictor of receiving RIC. Inappropriate use of CTA and MRA was identified. These findings have important implications for patient safety. Multifaceted strategies are required to close this evidence-practice gap.

  6. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Cerebrovascular disease/Stroke http: / / n. neurology. org/ / cgi/ collection/ all_ cerebrovascular_ disease_ stro ke Arteriovenous malformation http: / / n. neurology. org/ / cgi/ collection/ arteriovenous_ malformation Subarachnoid hemorrhage http: / / n. neurology. ...

  7. Subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common injury leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage is motor vehicle crashes. Risks include: Aneurysm in other blood vessels ... goals of treatment are to: Save your life Repair the cause of bleeding Relieve symptoms Prevent complications ...

  8. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chang Hyeun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Chi Heon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Chun Kee; Jung, Hee-Won; Yoo, Heon

    2015-07-01

    There is inconsistency among the perioperative management strategies currently used for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Moreover, postoperative complications such as acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence affect clinical outcome of cSDH surgery. This study evaluated the risk factors associated with acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence and identified an effective perioperative strategy for cSDH patients. A retrospective study of patients who underwent bur hole craniostomy for cSDH between 2008 and 2012 was performed. A consecutive series of 303 cSDH patients (234 males and 69 females; mean age 67.17 years) was analyzed. Postoperative acute intracranial bleeding developed in 14 patients (4.57%) within a mean of 3.07 days and recurrence was observed in 37 patients (12.21%) within a mean of 31.69 days (range 10-104 days) after initial bur hole craniostomy. The comorbidities of hematological disease and prior shunt surgery were clinical factors associated with acute bleeding. There was a significant risk of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus, but recurrence did not affect the final neurological outcome (p = 0.776). Surgical details, including the number of operative bur holes, saline irrigation of the hematoma cavity, use of a drain, and type of postoperative ambulation, were not significantly associated with outcome. However, a large amount of drainage was associated with postoperative acute bleeding. Bur hole craniostomy is an effective surgical procedure for initial and recurrent cSDH. Patients with hematological disease or a history of prior shunt surgery are at risk for postoperative acute bleeding; therefore, these patients should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage. Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence.

  9. A multicentre randomized controlled trial of moderate hypothermia to prevent intracranial hypertension in acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Murphy, Nicholas; Brown, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Animal models and human case series of acute liver failure (ALF) suggest moderate hypothermia (MH) to have protective effects against cerebral oedema (CO) development and intracranial hypertension (ICH). However, the optimum temperature for patient management is unknown...... above management at 36°C in prevention of ICH or in overall survival. This study did not confirm advantage of its prophylactic use. (ISRCTN registration number 74268282; no funding.) LAY SUMMARY: Studies in animals with acute liver failure (ALF) have suggested that cooling (hypothermia) could prevent...

  10. [A case of acute intracranial epidural hematoma caused by chronic nasal sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Kazunori; Sato, Motoki; Kado, Ken; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-01-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial acute epidural hematoma(EDH)is rare. It is mostly caused by coagulation disorders, dural metastasis, or vascular malformations of the dura. We report a case of non-traumatic acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis and review the literature comprising 10 cases of acute EDH caused by chronic nasal sinusitis. A 16-year-old boy visited our outpatient clinic with a 2-day history of severe headache. He did not have fever or neurological abnormalities and showed no evidence of head trauma. Cranial computed tomography(CT)revealed sphenoid sinusitis and a small amount of epidural air in the middle fossa, but no other intracranial abnormalities. After eight days with no subsequent history of trauma, radiological exams showed a massive acute epidural hematoma in the left middle fossa and temporal convexity without any vascular lesion or skull fracture. The patient underwent a hematoma evacuation that revealed neither a skull fracture nor a vascular abnormality. In this adolescent, chronic nasal sinusitis caused fragility of the meningeal artery wall, an air collection in the epidural space, and the detachment of the dura mater from the inner surface of the skull, thereby resulting in a non-traumatic acute EDH.

  11. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: using 64-slice multidetector CT angiography to ''triage'' patients' treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agid, R.; Lee, S.K.; Willinsky, R.A.; Farb, R.I.; TerBrugge, K.G. [Toronto Western Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    To evaluate the clinical role of CT angiography (CTA) in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for treatment decision-making. Consecutive patients with acute SAH had CTA using a 64-slice scanner for initial clinical decision-making. Image processing included multiplanar volume reformatted (MPVR) maximum intensity projections (MIP) and 3D volume-rendered reconstructions. CTAs were used for (1) evaluating the cause of SAH, and (2) triaging aneurysm-bearing patients to the more appropriate management, either surgical clipping or endovascular coiling. CTA findings were confirmed by neurosurgical exploration or catheter angiography (digital subtraction angiography, DSA). Successful coiling provided evidence that triaging to endovascular treatment was correct. Included in the study were 73 patients. CTA findings were confirmed by DSA or neurosurgical operation in 65 patients, and of these 65, 47 had aneurysmal SAH, 3 had vasculitis, 1 had arterial dissection and 14 had no underlying arterial abnormality. The cause of SAH was detected with CTA in 62 out of the 65 patients (95.4%, sensitivity 94%, specificity 100%). CTA revealed the aneurysm in 46 of 47 patients (98%, sensitivity 98%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 82.3%), 1 of 3 vasculitides and 1 of 1 dissection. Of the 46 patients with aneurysm, 44 (95.7%) were referred for treatment based on CTA. In 2 patients (2 of 46, 4.4%) CTA was not informative enough to choose treatment requiring DSA. Of the 44 patients, 27 (61.4%) were referred to endovascular treatment and successful coiling was achieved in 25 (25 of 27, 92.6%). CTA using a 64-slice scanner is an accurate tool for detecting and characterizing aneurysms in acute SAH. CTA is useful in the decision process whether to coil or clip an aneurysm. (orig.)

  12. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: epidemiological studies on aetiology and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Risselada (Roelof)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSubarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is bleeding into the subarachnoid space ‒ the area between the arachnoid membrane and the pia mater surrounding the brain. SAH occurs spontaneously or can be caused by traumatic injury of the head. Spontaneous SAH is caused by rupture of an intracranial

  13. Hydrogen-rich saline injection into the subarachnoid cavity within 2 weeks promotes recovery after acute spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-long Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen can relieve tissue-damaging oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. Injection of hydrogen-rich saline is an effective method for transporting molecular hydrogen. We hypothesized that hydrogen-rich saline would promote the repair of spinal cord injury induced by Allen′s method in rats. At 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours after injury, then once daily for 2 weeks, 0.25 mL/kg hydrogen-rich saline was infused into the subarachnoid space through a catheter. Results at 24 hours, 48 hours, 1 week and 2 weeks after injury showed that hydrogen-rich saline markedly reduced cell death, inflammatory cell infiltration, serum malondialdehyde content, and caspase-3 immunoreactivity, elevated serum superoxide dismutase activity and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity, and improved motor function in the hindlimb. The present study confirms that hydrogen-rich saline injected within 2 weeks of injury effectively contributes to the repair of spinal cord injury in the acute stage.

  14. Proteomic Expression Changes in Large Cerebral Arteries After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat Are Regulated by the MEK-ERK1/2 Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne H.; Edwards, Alistair V.G.; Larsen, Martin R.

    2017-01-01

    was induced in rats that were treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 or vehicle. Neurological outcome was assessed using a battery of behavioral tests. Specific protein expression of large cerebral arteries was analyzed quantitatively with high-throughput tandem mass spectrometry. SAH resulted in a marked......Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious clinical condition where leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space causes an acute rise in intracranial pressure and reduces cerebral blood flow, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. In experimental SAH, we have previously shown...

  15. Proteomic Expression Changes in Large Cerebral Arteries After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat Are Regulated by the MEK-ERK1/2 Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne H; Edwards, Alistair V G; Larsen, Martin R

    2017-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious clinical condition where leakage of blood into the subarachnoid space causes an acute rise in intracranial pressure and reduces cerebral blood flow, which may lead to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. In experimental SAH, we have previously shown...... that the outcome can be significantly improved by early inhibition of the MAPK/ERK kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK1/2) pathway. The aim of this study was to apply mass spectrometry to investigate the overall late effects of experimental SAH on cerebrovascular protein expression. SAH...

  16. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  17. Hypermagnesemia does not prevent intracranial hypertension and aggravates cerebral hyperperfusion in a rat model of acute hyperammonemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Eefsen, Martin; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2011-01-01

    . These factors are also thought to be involved in the development of brain edema in acute liver failure. We wanted to study whether hypermagnesemia prevented development of intracranial hypertension and hyperperfusion in a rat model of portacaval anastomosis (PCA) and acute hyperammonemia. We also studied...

  18. Repeat neuroimaging of mild traumatic brain-injured patients with acute traumatic intracranial hemorrhage: clinical outcomes and radiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Natalie; Lyons, Michael S; Hart, Kim; Lindsell, Cristopher J; Chung, Sora; Yick, Andrew; Bonomo, Jordan

    2014-10-01

    Emergency department (ED) management of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with any form of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is variable. Since 2000, our center's standard practice has been to obtain a repeat head computed tomography (CT) at least 6 hours after initial imaging. Patients are eligible for discharge if clinical and CT findings are stable. Whether this practice is safe is unknown. This study characterized clinical outcomes in mild TBI patients with acute traumatic ICH seen on initial ED neuroimaging. This retrospective cohort study included patients presenting to the ED with blunt mild TBI with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 14 or 15 and stable vital signs, during the period from January 2001 to January 2010. Patients with any ICH on initial head CT and repeat head CT within 24 hours were eligible. Cases were excluded for initial GCS 24 hours old, pregnancy, concomitant nonminor injuries, and coagulopathy. A single investigator abstracted data from records using a standardized case report form and data dictionary. Primary endpoints included death, neurosurgical procedures, and for discharged patients, return to the ED within 7 days. Differences in proportions were computed with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 1,011 patients who presented to the ED and had two head CTs within 24 hours, 323 (32%) met inclusion criteria. The median time between CT scans was 6 hours (interquartile range = 5 to 7 hours). A total of 153 (47%) patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage, 132 (41%) patients had subdural hemorrhage, 11 (3%) patients had epidural hemorrhage, 78 (24%) patients had cerebral contusions, and 59 (18%) patients had intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Four of 323 (1.2%, 95% CI = 0.3% to 3.2%) patients died within 2 weeks of injury. Three of the patients who died had been admitted from the ED on their initial visits, and one had been discharged home. There were 206 patients (64%) discharged from the ED, 28 (13.6%) of whom returned to the ED

  19. Acute intracranial hematoma formation following excision of a cervical subdural tumor: a report of two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuexiao; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Ting; Li, Guizhi; Zhang, Guoqing; Khan, Hassan; Xiang, Hongfei; Chen, Bohua

    2014-01-01

    An intracranial hematoma is a rare, yet significant, complication following spinal surgery. The authors describe two cases with acute intracranial hematoma formation after excision of a cervical subdural schwannoma. One was a 14-year-old girl who developed bilateral intracranial extradural hematomas immediately following excision of the C4 subdural schwannoma. The other was a 59-year-old woman who had an acute cerebellar hematoma after removal of the C2-C5 subdural schwannoma. During the surgeries of both cases, spinal dura was partially removed together with the tumor and the dural sac could not be repaired, resulting in large amounts of intraoperative CSF loss and persistent postoperative CSF leakage. Both patients failed to regain consciousness from anesthesia after surgery, and a cranial CT scan identified large intracranial hematomas. Urgent hematoma evacuation was ultimately performed to save the patients. Based on the authors' experience and literature review, a conclusion was drawn that considerable CSF leakage and a sharp decrease of CSF pressure are common features during the excision of a spinal subdural tumor, which may lead to acute intracranial hematomas. Continual postoperative monitoring in patients with this condition should be of a very high priority. A CT or MRI should be immediately investigated to exclude intracranial hematomas for any patient with delayed emergence from anesthesia following spinal surgery. Hematoma evacuation is indispensable once an intracranial hematoma is identified in the patient who fails to regain consciousness from anesthesia post surgery. Furthermore, the possible pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the formation of an intracranial hematoma after spinal procedures, particularly after manipulations of a cervical subdural tumor, are discussed.

  20. Intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, T.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Eshghi, O.; De Keyser, J.; Brouns, R.; van Dijk, J.M.C.; Luijckx, G. J.

    The aim of this narrative review is to evaluate the pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of intracranial artery dissection (IAD). IAD is a rare and often unrecognized cause of stroke or subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), especially in young adults. Two types of IAD can be

  1. Hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is due to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and acute glucocorticoid deficiency

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2011-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte abnormality following subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and contributes to increased morbidity and mortality. Retrospective data suggests that the syndrome of inappropriate diuresis (SIAD) is the most common cause of hyponatraemia in SAH, though cerebral salt wasting has been postulated by some workers to be the predominant abnormality. Data which has shown acute glucocorticoid deficiency following SAH has suggested that some cases of euvolaemic hyponatraemia may also be caused by this mechanism.We prospectively studied the hormonal and haemodynamic influences involved in the development of hyponatraemia in 100 patients (61% female, median age 53 (range 16-82)) with non-traumatic aneurysmal SAH. Each patient had plasma sodium (pNa), urea, osmolality, glucose and 0900h cortisol (PC), and urinary sodium and osmolality measured on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 following SAH. Fluid balance and haemodynamic parameters were recorded daily. Results were compared with 15 patients admitted to ITU following vascular surgery. A PC<300nmol\\/L in a patient in ITU was regarded clinically as inappropriately low.49% of patients developed hyponatraemia (pNa<135 mmol\\/L), including 14% who developed clinically significantly hyponatraemia (pNa<130 mmol\\/L). 36\\/49 (73.4%) developed hyponatraemia between days 1 and 3 post SAH. The median duration of hyponatraemia was 3 days (range 1–10 days).In 35\\/49 (71.4%), hyponatraemia was due to SIAD as defined by standard diagnostic criteria. 14% of SAH patients had at least one PC<300nmol\\/L; 5 of these (35.7%) developed hyponatraemia. In 4 patients hyponatraemia was preceded by acute cortisol deficiency and responded to hydrocortisone treatment. In contrast, all controls had PC>500 nmol\\/L on day 1, and >300 nmol on days 3–12. There were no cases of cerebral salt wasting. There was no relationship between the incidence of hyponatraemia and the defined anatomical territory or severity of

  2. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  3. The impact of ocular hemodynamics and intracranial pressure on intraocular pressure during acute gravitational changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Emily S; Mulugeta, Lealem; Feola, Andrew; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G; Samuels, Brian C; Ethier, C Ross

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a bulk fluid shift toward the head, with concomitant changes in blood volume/pressure, and intraocular pressure (IOP). These and other factors, such as intracranial pressure (ICP) changes, are suspected to be involved in the degradation of visual function and ocular anatomical changes exhibited by some astronauts. This is a significant health concern. Here, we describe a lumped-parameter numerical model to simulate volume/pressure alterations in the eye during gravitational changes. The model includes the effects of blood and aqueous humor dynamics, ICP, and IOP-dependent ocular compliance. It is formulated as a series of coupled differential equations and was validated against four existing data sets on parabolic flight, body inversion, and head-down tilt (HDT). The model accurately predicted acute IOP changes in parabolic flight and HDT, and was satisfactory for the more extreme case of inversion. The short-term response to the changing gravitational field was dominated by ocular blood pressures and compliance, while longer-term responses were more dependent on aqueous humor dynamics. ICP had a negligible effect on acute IOP changes. This relatively simple numerical model shows promising predictive capability. To extend the model to more chronic conditions, additional data on longer-term autoregulation of blood and aqueous humor dynamics are needed. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A significant percentage of astronauts present anatomical changes in the posterior eye tissues after spaceflight. Hypothesized increases in ocular blood volume and intracranial pressure (ICP) in space have been considered to be likely factors. In this work, we provide a novel numerical model of the eye that incorporates ocular hemodynamics, gravitational forces, and ICP changes. We find that changes in ocular hemodynamics govern the response of intraocular pressure during acute gravitational change. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Brain hypoxanthine concentration correlates to lactate/pyruvate ratio but not intracranial pressure in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Hauerberg, John; Jørgensen, Linda

    2010-01-01

    of hypoxanthine, inosine, and lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio are increased and correlated in patients with acute liver failure. Furthermore, we expect the purines and L/P ratio to correlate with intracranial pressure (ICP) (positively), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (negatively)....

  5. Evaluation of acute normovolemic hemodilution and autotransfusion in neurosurgical patients undergoing excision of intracranial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqash, Imtiaz A; Draboo, M A; Lone, Abdul Qayoom; Nengroo, Showkat H; Kirmani, Altaf; Bhat, Abdul Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Several blood conservation strategies have been tried with the purpose of reducing homologons blood transfusion. PATIENTS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; In a prospective randomized study, the potential benefits of acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) with autologous transfusion were investigated as a blood conservation technique in surgical excision of intracranial meningioma. Over a period of 2 years, 40 patients undergoing excision of intracranial meningioma were randomly assigned to two groups of 20 patients each. Group I (Control Group) received conventional homologous blood intraoperatively and were not subjected to ANH. In Group II (ANH Group), Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution was initiated to a target hematocrit of 30% after induction of anesthesia. Parameters studied included changes in hemoglobin, hematocrit and hemodynamic parameters. The mean value of blood withdrawn in ANH group was 802.5 ± 208 ml. This was replaced simultaneously with an equal volume of 6% Hydroxyethyl starch to maintain normovolemia. There was no statistically significant variation in mean hemoglobin levels between the two groups at various stages of study. Hematocrit decreased significantly in both the groups at various stages as compared to preoperative values , the decrease being more but insignificant in group II. Changes in heart rate and mean blood pressure were similar and without statistically significant differences in either group at various stages of study. The amount of surgical blood loss in group I was 835.29 ± 684.37 ml, as compared to 865 + 409.78 ml in group II. The difference was statistically insignificant (p>0.05). The mean volume of homologous blood transfused in group I was 864.71 ± 349.89 ml, as compared to 165 ± 299.6 ml in group II which was statistically significant (p<0.05). In group II (ANH Group) only 5 patients (25%) required homologous blood whereas in group I I all patients (100%) needed homologous blood. We conclude that acute normovolemic hemodilution up to

  6. Evaluation of acute normovolemic hemodilution and autotransfusion in neurosurgical patients undergoing excision of intracranial meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imtiaz A Naqash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Several blood conservation strategies have been tried with the purpose of reducing homologons blood transfusion. Patients & Methods : In a prospective randomized study, the potential benefits of acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH with autologous transfusion were investigated as a blood conservation technique in surgical excision of intracranial meningioma. Over a period of 2 years, 40 patients undergoing excision of intracranial meningioma were randomly assigned to two groups of 20 patients each. Group I (Control Group received conventional homologous blood intraoperatively and were not subjected to ANH. In Group II (ANH Group, Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution was initiated to a target hematocrit of 30% after induction of anesthesia. Parameters studied included changes in hemoglobin, hematocrit and hemodynamic parameters. Results : The mean value of blood withdrawn in ANH group was 802.5 ± 208 ml. This was replaced simultaneously with an equal volume of 6% Hydroxyethyl starch to maintain normovolemia. There was no statistically significant variation in mean hemoglobin levels between the two groups at various stages of study. Hematocrit decreased significantly in both the groups at various stages as compared to preoperative values , the decrease being more but insignificant in group II. Changes in heart rate and mean blood pressure were similar and without statistically significant differences in either group at various stages of study. The amount of surgical blood loss in group I was 835.29 ± 684.37 ml, as compared to 865 + 409.78 ml in group II. The difference was statistically insignificant (p>0.05. The mean volume of homologous blood transfused in group I was 864.71 ± 349.89 ml, as compared to 165 ± 299.6 ml in group II which was statistically significant (p<0.05. In group II (ANH Group only 5 patients (25% required homologous blood whereas in group I I all patients (100% needed homologous blood. Conclusion : We conclude

  7. Central Hemodynamics and Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Acute Cerebral Circulatory Disorders

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    K. V. Lukashev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the central hemodynamics (CH and intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (ICP and CPP in acute cerebral circulatory disorders (ACCD and their possible relationships for further development of intensive differential therapy for the detected disorders. Material and methods. Hemodynamic studies using the transpulmonary thermodilu-tion technique, measurements of ICP, calculations of CPP, and currently available X-ray studies were conducted in 18 patients on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of ACCD. All the patients were found to have essential hypertension and coronary heart disease. Results. In the first 5 days of ACCD, there was a normodynamic type of circulation in hemorrhagic stroke (HS and a hypodynamic type in ischemic stroke (IS. ICP remained at the baseline elevated level in the IS group and increased over time in the HS group. CPP was significantly unchanged. Myocardial dysfunction was detected when there was a significant preload caused by a high postload. In IS, an inverse correlation was found between ICP and global ejection fraction (GEF, cardiac performance index (CPI and on day 7, the correlation was direct. In HS, ICP had a direct correlation with CPI and an inverse correlation with GEF. These changes during treatment failed to progress and were revealed in the presence of brain dislocation, as evidenced by spiral computed tomography. Conclusion. Thus, the pattern of CH disorders depends on the type of ACCD. In the first 5 days of ACCD, a hypokinetic circulatory type is registered in IS and a normokinetic type is in HS. Evolving dislocation of the brain with impaired function of its stem structures due to ICP elevation is one of the causes of central hemodynamic changes. The value of ICP in ACCD is a crucial indicator in the diagnosis of secondary brain damages and determines treatment policy. Key words: acute ischemic attack, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, central hemodynamics, myocardial depression.

  8. Predictors for Symptomatic Intracranial Hemorrhage After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yonggang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Huaiming; Zi, Wenjie; Zhang, Meng; Geng, Yu; Zhou, Zhiming; Wang, Wei; Xu, Haowen; Tian, Xiguang; Lv, Penghua; Liu, Yuxiu; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Xinfeng; Xu, Gelin

    2017-05-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (SICH) pose a major safety concern for endovascular treatment of acute ischemic stroke. This study aimed to evaluate the risk and related factors of SICH after endovascular treatment in a real-world practice. Patients with stroke treated with stent-like retrievers for recanalizing a blocked artery in anterior circulation were enrolled from 21 stroke centers in China. Intracranial hemorrhage was classified as symptomatic and asymptomatic ones according to Heidelberg Bleeding Classification. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors for SICH. Of the 632 enrolled patients, 101 (16.0%) were diagnosed with SICH within 72 hours after endovascular treatment. Ninety-day mortality was higher in patients with SICH than in patients without SICH (65.3% versus 18.8%; P 0.83 (odds ratio [OR], 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-3.46), pretreatment Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score of stroke of cardioembolism type (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.13-3.25), poor collateral circulation (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.16-3.36), delay from symptoms onset to groin puncture >270 minutes (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.03-2.80), >3 passes with retriever (OR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.40-4.65) were associated with SICH after endovascular treatment. Incidence of SICH after thrombectomy is higher in Asian patients with acute ischemic stroke. Cardioembolic stroke, poor collateral circulation, delayed endovascular treatment, multiple passes with stent retriever device, lower pretreatment Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score, higher baseline neutrophil ratio may increase the risk of SICH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Trends in monitoring patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, J B; Frederiksen, H-J; Eskesen, V

    2005-01-01

    After aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), the clinical outcome depends upon the primary haemorrhage and a number of secondary insults in the acute post-haemorrhagic period. Some secondary insults are potentially preventable but prevention requires prompt recognition of cerebral or systemic...... implemented monitoring system provides answers but it also raises valuable new questions challenging our current understanding of the brain injury after SAH....... complications. Currently, several neuro-monitoring techniques are available; this review describes the most frequently used techniques and discusses indications for their use, and their value in diagnosis and prognosis. None of the techniques, when considered in isolation, has proved sufficient after SAH...... with the conventional monitoring systems, for example intracranial pressure measurements, transcranial Doppler ultrasound and modern neuro-imaging, direct assessment of biochemical markers by intracerebral microdialysis is promising in the advancement of neurointensive care of patients with SAH. A successfully...

  10. A Systematic Review of the Usefulness of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein for Predicting Acute Intracranial Lesions following Head Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu M. Luoto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe extensive use of computed tomography (CT after acute head injury is costly and carries potential iatrogenic risk. This systematic review examined the usefulness of blood-based glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP for predicting acute trauma-related CT-positive intracranial lesions following head trauma. The main objective was to summarize the current evidence on blood-based GFAP as a potential screening test for acute CT-positive intracranial lesions following head trauma.MethodsWe screened MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, the Cochrane Database, Scopus, Clinical Trials, OpenGrey, ResearchGate, and the reference lists of eligible publications for original contributions published between January 1980 and January 2017. Eligibility criteria included: (i population: human head and brain injuries of all severities and ages; (ii intervention: blood-based GFAP measurement ≤24 h post-injury; and (iii outcome: acute traumatic lesion on non-contrast head CT ≤24 h post-injury. Three authors completed the publication screening, data extraction, and quality assessment of eligible articles.ResultsThe initial search identified 4,706 articles, with 51 eligible for subsequent full-text assessment. Twenty-seven articles were ultimately included. Twenty-four (89% studies reported a positive association between GFAP level and acute trauma-related intracranial lesions on head CT. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for GFAP prediction of intracranial pathology ranged from 0.74 to 0.98 indicating good to excellent discrimination. GFAP seemed to discriminate mass lesions and diffuse injury, with mass lesions having significantly higher GFAP levels. There was considerable variability between the measured GFAP averages between studies and assays. No well-designed diagnostic studies with specific GFAP cutoff values predictive of acute traumatic intracranial lesions have been published.ConclusionIntracranial

  11. Invasive intracranial pressure monitoring is a useful adjunct in the management of severe hepatic encephalopathy associated with pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip; Kunde, Sachin; Vos, Miriam; Vats, Atul; Gupta, Nitika; Heffron, Thomas; Romero, Rene; Fortenberry, James D

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure is often accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy, cerebral edema, and raised intracranial pressure. Elevated intracranial pressure can be managed more effectively with intracranial monitoring, but acute-liver-failure-associated coagulopathy is often considered a contraindication for invasive monitoring due to risk for intracranial bleeding. We reviewed our experience with use of early intracranial pressure monitoring in acute liver failure in children listed for liver transplantation. Retrospective review of all intubated pediatric acute liver failure patients with grade III and grade IV encephalopathy requiring intracranial pressure monitoring and evaluated for potential liver transplant who were identified from an institutional liver transplant patient database from 1999 to 2009. None. A total of 14 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. Their ages ranged from 7 months to 20 yrs. Diagnoses of acute liver failure were infectious (three), drug-induced (seven), autoimmune hepatitis (two), and indeterminate (two). Grade III and IV encephalopathy was seen in ten (71%) and four (29%) patients, respectively. Computed tomography scans before intracranial pressure monitor placement showed cerebral edema in five (35.7%) patients. Before intracranial pressure monitor placement, fresh frozen plasma, vitamin K, and activated recombinant factor VIIa were given to all 14 patients, with significant improvement in coagulopathy (p liver transplant, with 100% surviving neurologically intact. Four of 14 (28%) patients had spontaneous recovery without liver transplant. Two of 14 (14%) patients died due to multiple organ failure before transplant. One patient had a small 9-mm intracranial hemorrhage but survived after receiving a liver transplant. No patient developed intracranial infection. In our series of patients, intracranial pressure monitoring had a low complication rate and was associated with a high survival rate despite severe

  12. NADH fluorescence imaging and the histological impact of cortical spreading depolarization during the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Tomohisa; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Nishihiro, Shingo; Shinji, Yukei; Takasugi, Yuji; Haruma, Jun; Hiramatsu, Masafumi; Kawase, Hirokazu; Sato, Sachiko; Mizoue, Ryoichi; Takeda, Yoshimasa; Sugiu, Kenji; Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Date, Isao

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) has been observed during the early phase of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in clinical settings, the pathogenicity of CSD is unclear. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of loss of membrane potential on neuronal damage during the acute phase of SAH. METHODS Twenty-four rats were subjected to SAH by the perforation method. The propagation of depolarization in the brain cortex was examined by using electrodes to monitor 2 direct-current (DC) potentials and obtaining NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) fluorescence images while exposing the parietal-temporal cortex to ultraviolet light. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was monitored in the vicinity of the lateral electrode. Twenty-four hours after onset of SAH, histological damage was evaluated at the DC potential recording sites. RESULTS Changes in DC potentials (n = 48 in total) were sorted into 3 types according to the appearance of ischemic depolarization in the entire hemisphere following induction of SAH. In Type 1 changes (n = 21), ischemic depolarization was not observed during a 1-hour observation period. In Type 2 changes (n = 13), the DC potential demonstrated ischemic depolarization on initiation of SAH and recovered 80% from the maximal DC deflection during a 1-hour observation period (33.3 ± 15.8 minutes). In Type 3 changes (n = 14), the DC potential displayed ischemic depolarization and did not recover during a 1-hour observation period. Histological evaluations at DC potential recording sites showed intact tissue at all sites in the Type 1 group, whereas in the Type 2 and Type 3 groups neuronal damage of varying severity was observed depending on the duration of ischemic depolarization. The duration of depolarization that causes injury to 50% of neurons (P 50 ) was estimated to be 22.4 minutes (95% confidence intervals 17.0-30.3 minutes). CSD was observed in 3 rats at 6 sites in the Type 1 group 5.1 ± 2.2 minutes after

  13. Systemic thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Nitin; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Zand, Ramin; Sharma, Vijay K; Barlinn, Kristian; Male, Shailesh; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Bodechtel, Ulf; Iftikhar, Sulaiman; Arthur, Adam; Elijovich, Lucas; Alexandrov, Anne W; Alexandrov, Andrei V

    2015-10-27

    We sought to determine the safety of IV thrombolysis (IVT) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients harboring unruptured intracranial aneurysm (UIA) in a multicenter study and a comprehensive meta-analysis of available case series. We analyzed prospectively collected data from consecutive AIS patients treated with IVT during a 4-year period at 4 tertiary-care stroke centers. All patients routinely underwent CT or magnetic resonance angiography during hospitalization. The presence of UIA was documented on the basis of neuroradiology reports. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) was defined as imaging evidence of ICH combined with an increase in NIH Stroke Scale score of ≥4 points. A systematic meta-analysis of case series reporting safety of IVT in AIS with concomitant UIA was conducted according to PRISMA recommendations. Among 1,398 AIS patients treated with IVT, we identified 42 cases (3.0%) harboring a total of 48 UIAs. The rates of symptomatic and asymptomatic ICH were 2.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] by adjusted Wald method: 0%-12.6%) and 7.1% (95% CI: 1.8%-19.7%), respectively. A total of 5 case series met our inclusion criteria for meta-analysis, and the pooled rate of sICH among 120 IVT-treated AIS patients harboring UIA was 6.7% (95% CI: 3.1%-13.7%). In the overall analysis of 5 case-series studies, the risk ratio of sICH did not differ between AIS patients with and without UIA (risk ratio = 1.60; 95% CI: 0.54-4.77; p = 0.40) with no evidence of heterogeneity across included studies (I(2) = 22% and p = 0.27 for Cochran Q test). Our prospectively collected multicenter data, coupled with the findings of the meta-analysis, indicate the potential safety of IVT in AIS patients with UIA. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Prolonged Paroxysmal Sympathetic Storming Associated with Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Yan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal sympathetic storming (PSS is a rare disorder characterized by acute onset of nonstimulated tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, hyperthermia, external posturing, and diaphoresis. It is most frequently associated with severe traumatic brain injuries and has been reported in intracranial tumors, hydrocephalous, severe hypoxic brain injury, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Although excessive release of catecholamine and therefore increased sympathetic activities have been reported in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, there is no descriptive report of PSS primarily caused by spontaneous SAH up to date. Here, we report a case of prolonged PSS in a patient with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and consequent vasospasm. The sympathetic storming started shortly after patient was rewarmed from hypothermia protocol and symptoms responded to Labetalol, but intermittent recurrence did not resolve until 3 weeks later with treatment involving Midazolam, Fentanyl, Dexmedetomidine, Propofol, Bromocriptine, and minimizing frequency of neurological and vital checks. In conclusion, prolonged sympathetic storming can also be caused by spontaneous SAH. In this case, vasospasm might be a precipitating factor. Paralytics and hypothermia could mask the manifestations of PSS. The treatment of the refractory case will need both timely adjustment of medications and minimization of exogenous stressors or stimuli.

  15. Lactic Acidosis Induced by Linezolid Mimics Symptoms of an Acute Intracranial Bleed: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zuccarini, Nichole Suzzanne; Yousuf, Tariq; Wozniczka, Daniel; Rauf, Anis Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common and most often associated with disturbed acid-base balance. Rarely, it can be a life-threatening medication side effect. Hence, determining the etiology of lactic acidosis early in patients is paramount in choosing the correct therapeutic intervention. Although lactic acidosis as an adverse drug reaction of linezolid is a well-recognized and documented clinical entity, the occurrence of such mimicking an acute intracranial bleed has not been reported to our knowledge...

  16. Decompressive craniectomy in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage for hematoma or oedema versus secondary infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedemans, Taco; Verbaan, Dagmar; Coert, Bert A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van den Berg, René; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Munckhof, Pepijn

    2017-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been proposed as lifesaving treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). However, data is sparse and controversy exists whether the underlying cause of elevated ICP influences neurological outcome. The

  17. Brain hypoxanthine concentration correlates to lactate/pyruvate ratio but not intracranial pressure in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Hauerberg, John; Jørgensen, Linda

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral edema in acute liver failure is suggested, in in vitro and animal studies, to involve a compromised oxidative metabolism with a decrease in cerebral ATP levels and an increase in purine concentrations. In this study we hypothesize that the cerebral concentrations...... of hypoxanthine, inosine, and lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio are increased and correlated in patients with acute liver failure. Furthermore, we expect the purines and L/P ratio to correlate with intracranial pressure (ICP) (positively), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (negatively)....

  18. Contralateral extradural hematoma following decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma (the value of intracranial pressure monitoring): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguins, Lucas Crociati; Sampaio, Gustavo Botelho; Abib, Eduardo Cintra; Adry, Rodrigo Antônio Rocha da Cruz; Ellakkis, Richam Faissal El Hossain; Ribeiro, Filipe Webb Josephson; Maset, Ângelo Luiz; de Morais, Dionei Freitas

    2014-05-16

    Decompressive surgery for acute subdural hematoma leading to contralateral extradural hematoma is an uncommon event with only few cases previously reported in the English medical literature. The present study describes the case of a 39-year-old White Brazilian man who had a motorcycle accident; he underwent decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of acute subdural hematoma and evolved contralateral extradural hematoma following surgery. The present case highlights the importance of close monitoring of the intracranial pressure of severe traumatic brain injury, even after decompressive procedures, because of the possible development of contralateral extradural hematoma.

  19. Role of Lumbar Drainage as an Adjunct for controlling Intracranial pressure in Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gudmundsson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a 16-year-old girl with fulminant bacterial meningitis in whom external ventricular drainage and intense volume-targeted therapy (the Lund protocol was not sufficient to control intracranial pressure, but lumbar drainage on day 8 decreased the intracranial pressure immediately and led to a sustained low intracranial pressure level. The case is unusual and not fully understood, but the authors assume that due to inflammation and tissue reactions following aggressive infection, cerebrospinal fluid could not flow freely from the posterior fossa up to the ventricular drain. High pressure in the posterior compartment maintained the high intracranial pressure measured by the ventricular drain, and lumbar drain insertion caused an immediate fall in pressure. The lesson learned is that during an intracranial pressure crisis in a patient with open basal cisterns, a lumbar drain may be necessary because the cerebrospinal fluid space can be compartmentalized.

  20. Endovascular therapy for acute basilar artery occlusion: Comparison between patients with and without underlying intracranial atherosclerotics stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gun Soo; Kim, Seul Kee; Baek, Byeong Hyeon; Lee, Youn Young; Yoon, Woong [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    To compare the characteristics and outcomes of multimodal endovascular therapy (EVT) in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion (BAO) with and without underlying intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). We retrospectively analyzed the data from 50 patients with acute BAO who were treated with EVT. The baseline characteristics and outcomes of patients with and without ICAS were compared. Patients with ICAS underwent intracranial angioplasty or stenting after mechanical thrombectomy. Thirty percent of the patients (15/50) had underlying ICAS at the occlusion site. On pretreatment diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), bilateral thalamic infarction was less frequently found in patients with ICAS (0% vs. 25.7%, p = 0.03). Occlusion in the proximal segment of the basilar artery was more common in patients with ICAS (60% vs. 5.7%, p < 0.001), whereas occlusion in the distal segment of the basilar artery was more common in patients without ICAS (26.7% vs. 91.4%, p < 0.001). There were no significant differences in the rates of successful revascularization, 3-month modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–2, symptomatic hemorrhage, and mortality between the two groups. ICAS was common in patients with acute stroke due to BAO. The occlusion site and the presence or absence of bilateral thalamic infarction on pretreatment DWI might help predict the underlying ICAS in patients with acute BAO.

  1. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-meng Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference theory, decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference can relieve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Increased intracranial pressure can also reduce optic nerve damage in glaucoma patients, and a safe, effective and noninvasive way to achieve this is by increasing the intra-abdominal pressure. The purpose of this study was to observe the changes in orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure at elevated intra-abdominal pressure. An inflatable abdominal belt was tied to each of 15 healthy volunteers, aged 22–30 years (12 females and 3 males, at the navel level, without applying pressure to the abdomen, before they laid in the magnetic resonance imaging machine. The baseline orbital subarachnoid space width around the optic nerve was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe. The abdominal belt was inflated to increase the pressure to 40 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa, then the orbital subarachnoid space width was measured every 10 minutes for 2 hours. After removal of the pressure, the measurement was repeated 10 and 20 minutes later. In a separate trial, the intraocular pressure was measured for all the subjects at the same time points, before, during and after elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Results showed that the baseline mean orbital subarachnoid space width was 0.88 ± 0.1 mm (range: 0.77–1.05 mm, 0.77 ± 0.11 mm (range: 0.60–0.94 mm, 0.70 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.62–0.80 mm, and 0.68 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.57–0.77 mm at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe, respectively. During the elevated intra-abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width increased from the baseline and dilation of the optic nerve sheath was significant at 1, 3 and 9 mm behind the globe. After decompression of the abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width normalized and returned to the baseline value. There was no

  2. The effect of increased intra-abdominal pressure on orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su-Meng; Wang, Ning-Li; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Chen, Wei-Wei; Yang, Di-Ya; Li, Zhen; Cao, Yi-Wen

    2018-02-01

    In accordance with the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference theory, decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference can relieve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Increased intracranial pressure can also reduce optic nerve damage in glaucoma patients, and a safe, effective and noninvasive way to achieve this is by increasing the intra-abdominal pressure. The purpose of this study was to observe the changes in orbital subarachnoid space width and intraocular pressure at elevated intra-abdominal pressure. An inflatable abdominal belt was tied to each of 15 healthy volunteers, aged 22-30 years (12 females and 3 males), at the navel level, without applying pressure to the abdomen, before they laid in the magnetic resonance imaging machine. The baseline orbital subarachnoid space width around the optic nerve was measured by magnetic resonance imaging at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe. The abdominal belt was inflated to increase the pressure to 40 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa), then the orbital subarachnoid space width was measured every 10 minutes for 2 hours. After removal of the pressure, the measurement was repeated 10 and 20 minutes later. In a separate trial, the intraocular pressure was measured for all the subjects at the same time points, before, during and after elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Results showed that the baseline mean orbital subarachnoid space width was 0.88 ± 0.1 mm (range: 0.77-1.05 mm), 0.77 ± 0.11 mm (range: 0.60-0.94 mm), 0.70 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.62-0.80 mm), and 0.68 ± 0.08 mm (range: 0.57-0.77 mm) at 1, 3, 9, and 15 mm behind the globe, respectively. During the elevated intra-abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width increased from the baseline and dilation of the optic nerve sheath was significant at 1, 3 and 9 mm behind the globe. After decompression of the abdominal pressure, the orbital subarachnoid space width normalized and returned to the baseline value. There was no significant difference in the

  3. Non-stenotic intracranial arteries have atherosclerotic changes in acute ischemic stroke patients: a 3T MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jang, Jinhee; Sung, Jinkyeong; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Kim, Bum-soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Won; Koo, Jaseong [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yong Sam [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the degree of atherosclerotic changes in intracranial arteries by assessing arterial wall thickness using T1-weighted 3D-turbo spin echo (3D-TSE) and time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) in patients with acute ischemic stroke as compared with unaffected controls. Thirty-three patients with acute ischemic stroke and 36 control patients were analyzed. Acute ischemic stroke patients were divided according to TOAST classification. At both distal internal carotid arteries and basilar artery without stenosis, TOF-MRA was used to select non-stenotic portion of assessed arteries. 3D-TSE was used to measure the area including the lumen and wall (Area{sub Outer}) and luminal area (Area{sub Inner}). The area of the vessel wall (Area{sub VW}) of assessed intracranial arteries and the ratio index (RI) of each patient were determined. Area{sub Inner}, Area{sub Outer}, Area{sub VW}, and RI showed good inter-observer reliability and excellent intra-observer reliability. Area{sub Inner} did not significantly differ between stroke patients and controls (P = 0.619). However, Area{sub Outer}, Area{sub VW}, and RI were significantly larger in stroke patients (P < 0.001). The correlation coefficient between Area{sub Inner} and Area{sub Outer} was higher in the controls (r = 0.918) than in large vessel disease patients (r = 0.778). RI of large vessel disease patients was significantly higher than that of normal control, small vessel disease, and cardioembolic groups. In patients with acute ischemic stroke, wall thickening and positive remodeling are evident in non-stenotic intracranial arteries. This change is more definite in stroke subtype that is related to atherosclerosis than that in other subtypes which are not. (orig.)

  4. Computed tomographic findings of traumatic intracranial lesions

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    Jeong, Seong Wook; Kim, Il Young; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Ki Jeoung; Yoon, Il Gyu [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-10-15

    Traumatic intracranial lesion has been one of the most frequent and serious problem in neurosurgical pathology. Computed tomography made it possible to get prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention of intracranial lesions by its safety, fastness and accuracy. Computed tomographic scan was carried out on 1309 cases at Soonchunhyang Chunan Hospital for 15 months from October 1983 to December 1984. We have reviewed the computed tomographic scans of 264 patients which showed traumatic intracranial lesion. The result were as follows: 1. Head trauma was the most frequent diagnosed disease using computed tomographic scans (57.8%) and among 264 cases the most frequent mode of injury was traffic accident (73.9%). 2. Skull fracture was accompanied in frequency of 69.7% and it was detected in CT in 38.6%: depression fracture was more easily detected in 81%. 3. Conutercoup lesion (9.5%) was usually accompanied with temporal and occipital fracture, and it appeared in lower incidence among pediatric group. 4. Intracranial lesions of all 264 cases were generalized cerebral swelling (24.6%), subdural hematoma (22.3%), epidural hematoma (20.8%), intracerebral hematoma (6.1%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (3.0%). 5. The shape of hematoma was usually biconvex (92.7%) in acute epidural hematoma and cresentic (100%) in acute subdural hematoma, but the most chronic the case became, they showed planoconvex and bicconvex shapes. 6. Extra-axial hematoma was getting decreased in density as time gone by. 7. Hematoma density was not in direct proportion to serum hemoglobin level as single factor.

  5. Spectrum and Prevalence of Pathological Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Acute Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lummel, N; Koch, M; Klein, M; Pfister, H W; Brückmann, H; Linn, J

    2016-06-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the spectrum and prevalence of pathological intracranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. We retrospectively identified all consecutive patients with cerebral spinal fluid proven bacterial meningitis who presented at our neurology department between 2007 and 2012. Pathogenic agents and clinical symptoms were noted. MR-examinations were evaluated regarding presence and localization of pathological signal alterations in the different sequences by two neuroradiologists in consensus. A total of 136 patients with purulent bacterial meningitis were identified. In 114 cases the bacterial pathogen agent was proven and in 75 patients an MRI was available. In 62 of the 75 (82.7 %) patients meningitis-associated pathologic imaging findings were evident on MRI. Overall, intraventricular signal alterations, i.e., signs of pyogenic ventriculitis, were present in 41 cases (54.7 %), while sulcal signal changes were found in 22 cases (29.3 %). Intraparenchymatous signal alterations affected the cortex in 15 cases (20 %), and the white matter in 20 patients (26.7 %). The diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences were most sensitive in the detection of these changes and showed any pathologic findings in 67.6 and 79.6 %, respectively. Patients with streptococcal meningitis showed significantly more often (n = 29 of 34, 85.3 %) intraventricular and/or sulcal diffusion restrictions than patients with meningitis caused by other agents (n = 12 of 37, 32.4 %) (pbacterial meningitis. Intraventricular diffusion restrictions, i.e., signs of pyogenic ventriculitis, are more often found in patients with streptococcal, especially pneumococcal, infection.

  6. Highlighting intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with severe acute brain trauma Ressaltando a monitorização da pressão intracraniana em pacientes com traumatismo cerebral agudo grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L. E Falcão

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial pressure (ICP monitoring was carried out in 100 patients with severe acute brain trauma, primarily by means of a subarachnoid catheter. Statistical associations were evaluated between maximum ICP values and: 1 Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS scores; 2 findings on computed tomography (CT scans of the head; and 3 mortality. A significant association was found between low GCS scores (3 to 5 and high ICP levels, as well as between focal lesions on CT scans and elevated ICP. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with ICP > 40 mm Hg than in those with ICP Monitorização da pressão intracraniana (PIC foi adotada em 100 pacientes com traumatismo cerebral agudo grave, usando-se preferencialmente um catéter subaracnóide. Associações estatísticas foram avaliadas entre valores máximos de PIC e : 1 número de pontos na Escala de Coma de Glasgow (ECG; 2 achados na tomografia computadorizada (TC da cabeça; e 3 mortalidade. Encontrou-se associação significante entre baixo número de pontos (3 a 5 na ECG e PIC elevada, assim como entre lesões focais na TC e hipertensão intracraniana. A mortalidade foi significantemente maior em pacientes com PIC > 40 mm Hg do que naqueles com PIC < 20 mm Hg.

  7. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: risks of aneurysm rupture and delayed cerebral ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Three percent of the population harbors an intracranial aneurysm. A minority of these aneurysms will rupture and cause a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating disease with high case fatality and morbidity. A major contributor to the poor outcome after SAH is delayed cerebral ischemia

  8. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Agonist Attenuates Acute Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema by Preventing Neutrophil Migration after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhao, Diana; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether JWH133, a selective cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) agonist, prevented neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by attenuating inflammation. Adult male rats were assigned to six groups: sham-operated, SAH with vehicle, SAH with JWH133 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg) treatment 1 h after surgery, and SAH with JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) at 1 h with a selective CB2R antagonist, SR144528 (3.0 mg/kg). The perforation model of SAH was performed and pulmonary wet-to-dry weight ratio was evaluated 24 and 72 h after surgery. Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry were evaluated 24 h after surgery. JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) significantly and most strongly improved lung edema 24 h after SAH. SR144528 administration significantly reversed the effects of JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg). SAH-induced increasing levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreasing levels of a tight junction (TJ) protein, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, were ameliorated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) administration 24 h after SAH. Immunohistochemical assessment also confirmed substantial leukocyte infiltration in the outside of vessels in SAH, which were attenuated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) injection. CB2R agonist ameliorated lung permeability by inhibiting leukocyte trafficking and protecting tight junction proteins in the lung of NPE after SAH.

  9. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  10. Resveratrol Attenuates Acute Inflammatory Injury in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats via Inhibition of TLR4 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Sheng Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 has been proven to play a critical role in neuroinflammation and to represent an important therapeutic target following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Resveratrol (RSV, a natural occurring polyphenolic compound, has a powerful anti-inflammatory property. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of RSV in protecting against early brain injury (EBI after SAH remain obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of RSV on the TLR4-related inflammatory signaling pathway and EBI in rats after SAH. A prechiasmatic cistern SAH model was used in our experiment. The expressions of TLR4, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. The expressions of Iba-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in brain cortex were determined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological function were further evaluated to investigate the development of EBI. We found that post-SAH treatment with RSV could markedly inhibit the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1, MyD88, and NF-κB. Meanwhile, RSV significantly reduced microglia activation, as well as inflammatory cytokines leading to the amelioration of neural apoptosis, brain edema, and neurological behavior impairment at 24 h after SAH. However, RSV treatment failed to alleviate brain edema and neurological deficits at 72 h after SAH. These results indicated that RSV treatment could alleviate EBI after SAH, at least in part, via inhibition of TLR4-mediated inflammatory signaling pathway.

  11. Stent-assisted coiling of wide-necked aneurysms in the setting of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage: experience in 65 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Peter S; Dalyai, Richard T; Kung, David; Toporowski, Amy; Chandela, Sid; Hasan, David; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Dumont, Aaron S; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Jabbour, Pascal M

    2012-06-01

    Stent-assisted coiling in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage remains controversial. Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding the utility of this procedure and the risks of hemorrhagic and ischemic complications. To assess the utility of stent-assisted coil embolization and pretreatment with antiplatelet agents in the management of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms. A retrospective study of 65 patients with ruptured wide-necked aneurysms treated with stent-assisted coiling. Patients with hydrocephalus or a Hunt and Hess grade ≥ III received a ventriculostomy before endovascular intervention. Patients were treated intraoperatively with 600 mg of clopidogrel and maintained on daily doses of 75 mg of clopidogrel and 81 mg of aspirin. The Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score was recorded at the time of discharge. We identified major bleeding complications secondary to antiplatelet therapy and cases of in-stent thrombosis that required periprocedural thrombolysis. Of the aneurysms, 66.2% arose within the anterior circulation; 69.2% of patients presented with hydrocephalus or a Hunt and Hess grade ≥ III and required a ventriculostomy. A good outcome (GOS of 4 or 5) was achieved in 63.1% of patients, and the overall mortality rate was 16.9%. There were 10 (15.38%) major complications associated with bleeding secondary to antiplatelet therapy (5 patients, 7.7%) or intraoperative in-stent thrombosis (5 patients, 7.7%). Three (4.6%) patients had a fatal hemorrhage. Our findings suggest that stent-assisted coiling and routine treatment with antiplatelet agents is a viable option in the management of ruptured wide-necked aneurysms.

  12. Time Course of Changes in Extravascular Lung Water Index, Intracranial and Cerebral Perfusion Pressures in Acute Cerebral Circulatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the time course of changes in extravascular lung water index (ELWI and intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures (ICP and CPP and to determine their possible relationships in acute cerebral circulatory disorders (ACCD. Subject and methods. ELWI, pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI, ICP, CPP, and central hemodynamics were studied by transpulmonary thermodilution and current X-ray studies were conducted in 18 patients on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 of ACCD. Results. Examinations revealed a supratentorial dislocation of the brain in 6 persons; its subtento-rial dislocation was found in 1 case; supra- and subtentorial dislocations were seen in 6. In patients, ELWI and PVPI increased from days 1 and 5, respectively. The high baseline ICP increased over time. CPP remained unchanged. Preserved left ventricular contractility, enhanced myocardial one, a significant direct correlation between ELWI and PVPI, as well as their increase confirmed that the noncardiogenic genesis was responsible for increased ELWI. A direct significant correlation was found between ICP and ELWI, ICP and PVPI. Against this background, acute respiratory distress syndrome developed in 14 patients with pneumonia evolving in its presence in 7 patients. Conclusion. In ACCD, ELWI increases in the first 24 hours of the acute period. One of its causes is, along with others, primary and/or secondary damage to the brainstem structures with elevated ICP and progressive brain dislocation. The determination of ICP, unlike CPP, is crucial in the diagnosis and treatment of primary/secondary brain injuries and in prognosis. Key words: acute cerebral circulatory disorder, extravascular lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  13. Hippocampal Atrophy Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Correlates with Disruption of Astrocyte Morphology and Capillary Coverage by AQP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anzabi, Maryam; Ardalan, Maryam; Iversen, Nina Kerting

    2018-01-01

    Despite successful management of ruptured intracranial aneurysm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) remains the main cause of high mortality and morbidity in patients who survive the initial bleeding. Astrocytes play a key role in neurovascular coupling...

  14. Effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on the level of function in acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke patients on a neurointensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Maxine L; Darbinian, Jeanne A

    2015-07-01

    To explore the effect of an evidence-based mobility intervention on the level of function (LOF) achieved by patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) stroke and to identify clinical characteristics and measures associated with walking distances >15.24m. Retrospective pre- and postintervention study. Regional neurointensive care unit. Adult patients with ICH and SAH (N=361). Daily mobility intervention based on patient's current LOF. Walking >15.24m (LOF 5) by neurointensive care unit discharge. Electronic health records for 361 patients (52.6% women; mean age, 62.1y; ICH stroke, 63.2%; aphasia, 35%; hemiplegia, 33%) were included. There was a 2.3-fold increase in patients with hemorrhagic stroke achieving a LOF of 5 by neurointensive care unit discharge after introduction of a mobility intervention. In the multivariable logistic regression model including neurointensive care unit length of stay (LOS) as a covariate, the intervention, LOF of 5 at admission, SAH stroke type, third (vs lowest) quartile of neurointensive care unit LOS, and absence of aphasia and/or hemiplegia were associated with higher likelihood of achieving a LOF of 5 (odds ratio [OR]=5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.52-11.06; OR=6.02; 95% CI, 1.45-24.96; OR=3.78; 95% CI, 1.83-7.80; OR=2.94; 95% CI, 1.16-7.47; OR=17.77; 95% CI, 6.59-47.92, respectively). A mobility intervention was strongly associated with increased distance walked by neurointensive care unit patients with acute hemorrhage at discharge and can be applied in any intensive care unit setting to promote stroke recovery. Future studies directed at building predictive models for walking achievement in patients with acute hemorrhagic stroke may provide insight into individualized treatment goal setting and discharge planning. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aspectos técnicos da monitorização da pressão intracraniana pelo método subaracnóideo no traumatismo craniencefálico grave Technical aspects of intracranial pressure monitoring by subarachnoid method in severe head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venâncio Pereira Dantas Filho

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisados prospectivamente 206 pacientes com traumatismo craniencefálico (TCE grave (8 pontos ou menos na Escala de Coma de Glasgow, internados na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas. Após avaliação por tomografia computadorizada de crânio (TC, 72 pacientes necessitaram de tratamento neurocirúrgico. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos à monitorização contínua da pressão intracraniana (PIC pelo método subaracnóideo (11 com parafuso metálico e 195 com cateter plástico. Os níveis de PIC foram registrados continuamente na tela do monitor, sendo os seus valores de final de hora anotados em ficha padronizada. Todos os pacientes foram tratados segundo um protocolo orientado pelos níveis da PIC. Não foram observadas complicações hemorrágicas ou hematomas intracranianos relacionados ao método de monitorização em TC de controle. Para controle de infecções intracranianas, foram colhidas amostras de líquido cefalorraquidiano através de punção lateral C1-C2 em 66 pacientes com PIC abaixo de 20 mm Hg, sendo positivas as culturas para Acinetobacter sp em 2 pacientes. O resultado final na alta hospitalar mostrou 75 (36,40% óbitos e 131 (63,6% sobreviventes. Os níveis de PIC influenciaram significativamente o resultado final (pTwo hundred and six patients with severe head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 points or less after nonsurgical resuscitation on admission, managed at Intensive Care Unit-Hospital das Clínicas - Universidade Estadual de Campinas were prospectively analysed. All patients were assessed by CT scan and 72 required neurosurgical intervention. All patients were continuously monitored to evaluate intracranial pressure (ICP levels by a subarachnoid device (11 with subarachnoid metallic bolts and 195 with subarachnoid polyvinyl catheters. The ICP levels were continuously observed in the bedside pressure monitor display and their end-hour values were

  16. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stéphanie; Compter, A; Labeyrie, Marc Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Béjot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Specken-Welleweerd, Jantien; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touzé, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stéphane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie Germaine

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  17. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of intracranial artery dissection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debette, Stephanie; Compter, Annette; Labeyrie, Marc-Antoine; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Metso, Tina M.; Majersik, Jennifer J.; Goeggel-Simonetti, Barbara; Engelter, Stefan T.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bijlenga, Philippe; Southerland, Andrew M.; Naggara, Olivier; Bejot, Yannick; Cole, John W.; Ducros, Anne; Giacalone, Giacomo; Schilling, Sabrina; Reiner, Peggy; Sarikaya, Hakan; Welleweerd, Janna C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; de Borst, Gert Jan; Bonati, Leo H.; Jung, Simon; Thijs, Vincent; Martin, Juan J.; Brandt, Tobias; Grand-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kloss, Manja; Mizutani, Tohru; Minematsu, Kazuo; Meschia, James F.; Pereira, Vitor M.; Bersano, Anna; Touze, Emmanuel; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Leys, Didier; Chabriat, Hugues; Markus, Hugh S.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Chabrier, Stephane; Baumgartner, Ralph; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Arnold, Marcel; Bousser, Marie-Germaine

    Spontaneous intracranial artery dissection is an uncommon and probably underdiagnosed cause of stroke that is defined by the occurrence of a haematoma in the wall of an intracranial artery. Patients can present with headache, ischaemic stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or symptoms associated with

  18. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: initial and follow-up screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, A.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms may rupture, causing subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). SAH is a devastating subtype of stroke, resulting in death or severe disability in half the patients. This thesis has a focus on initial and follow-up screening for unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and consists

  19. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to intracranial aneurysm Sindrome da doença não tiroideana em pacientes com hemorragia subaracnoidea devida a aneurisma cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto Casulari

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm (SH is associated with changes in the hormonal profile in the first 24 hours after the event. We proposed that the hormonal changes observed are due to the intense stress to which the patients are exposed. However, the thyroidal hormonal profile is indicative of the presence of a nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS. In this paper, we examined whether the change in the thyroid hormone profile is compatible with a NTIS. Two groups of patients were included in the study: A 30 patients with SH (21 females and 9 males; 41.7±11.4 years and B a control group including 25 patients with benign diseases of the spine (BDS (lumbar disc hernia or stable spinal trauma (8 females and 17 males; 41.3±14.2 years. In a subgroup of eight patients of each group serum triiodothyronine (T3 and reverse T3 levels were measured. The blood samples were obtained between 8:00 and 9:00 AM. The following results were obtained: The SH group had smaller serum T3 and free T4 levels than the BDS group (pNós apresentamos previamente que a hemorragia subaracnoidea devido à ruptura de aneurisma intracraniano (SH está associada com alterações no perfil hormonal nas primeiras 24 horas após o evento. Nós propusemos que as alterações hormonais observadas são devidas ao intenso estresse ao qual os pacientes estão expostos. Contudo, o perfil hormonal tireoidiano é indicativo da presença da síndrome da doença não tireoidiana (NTIS. Neste trabalho, examinamos se as alterações no perfil dos hormônios tireoidianos são compatíveis com a NTIS. Dois grupos de pacientes foram incluídos no estudo: A 30 pacientes com SH (21 mulheres e 9 homens; 41,7±11,4 anos e B um grupo controle incluindo 25 pacientes com doenças benignas da coluna (BDS (hérnia de disco lombar ou estável trauma da coluna (8 mulheres e 17 homens; 41,3±14,2 anos. Em um subgrupo de oito pacientes de cada grupo

  20. Subarachnoid Haemorrhage and Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Nanji, Liliana; Melo, Teresa P; Canhão, Patrícia; Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Some cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) have been associated with vigorous physical activity, including sports. Our research aimed to describe the association between SAH and sports and to identify the types of sports that were more frequently found as precipitating factors in a tertiary single-centre SAH register. We retrieved information from a prospectively collected SAH registry and reviewed discharge notes of acute SAH patients admitted to the Stroke Unit of Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon, between 1995 and 2014. Out of 738 patients included in the analysis, 424 (57.5%) cases of SAH were preceded by physical activity. Nine cases (1.2%) were associated with sports, namely running (2 cases), aerobics (2 cases), cycling, body balance, dance, surf and windsurf. Patients with SAH while practicing sports were younger than controls (average age 43.1 vs. 57.0 years; p = 0.007). In 1 patient, there was a report of trauma to the neck. Patients in the sports group only had Hunt and Hess scale grades 1 (11.1%) or 2 (88.9%) at admission, while patients in the control group had a wider distribution in severity. Our findings indicate that SAH precipitated by sports is not very frequent and is uncommonly related to trauma. Patients who suffered SAH associated with sports were younger and apparently had a milder clinical presentation.

  1. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm applied to post-interventional flat detector CT in comparison to pre-treatment CT in patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennecke, Angelika; Svergun, Stanislav; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias; Scholz, Bernhard; Royalty, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Metal artefacts can impair accurate diagnosis of haemorrhage using flat detector CT (FD-CT), especially after aneurysm coiling. Within this work we evaluate a prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm by comparison of the artefact-reduced and the non-artefact-reduced FD-CT images to pre-treatment FD-CT and multi-slice CT images. Twenty-five patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were selected retrospectively. FD-CT and multi-slice CT before endovascular treatment as well as FD-CT data sets after treatment were available for all patients. The algorithm was applied to post-treatment FD-CT. The effect of the algorithm was evaluated utilizing the pre-post concordance of a modified Fisher score, a subjective image quality assessment, the range of the Hounsfield units within three ROIs, and the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation. The pre-post concordance of the modified Fisher score, the subjective image quality, and the pre-post correlation of the ranges of the Hounsfield units were significantly higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. Within the metal-affected slices, the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation coefficient was higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. The overall diagnostic quality of the artefact-reduced images was improved and reached the level of the pre-interventional FD-CT images. The metal-unaffected parts of the image were not modified. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm applied to post-interventional flat detector CT in comparison to pre-treatment CT in patients with acute subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennecke, Angelika; Svergun, Stanislav; Doerfler, Arnd; Struffert, Tobias [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Scholz, Bernhard [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim (Germany); Royalty, Kevin [Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Metal artefacts can impair accurate diagnosis of haemorrhage using flat detector CT (FD-CT), especially after aneurysm coiling. Within this work we evaluate a prototype metal artefact reduction algorithm by comparison of the artefact-reduced and the non-artefact-reduced FD-CT images to pre-treatment FD-CT and multi-slice CT images. Twenty-five patients with acute aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were selected retrospectively. FD-CT and multi-slice CT before endovascular treatment as well as FD-CT data sets after treatment were available for all patients. The algorithm was applied to post-treatment FD-CT. The effect of the algorithm was evaluated utilizing the pre-post concordance of a modified Fisher score, a subjective image quality assessment, the range of the Hounsfield units within three ROIs, and the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation. The pre-post concordance of the modified Fisher score, the subjective image quality, and the pre-post correlation of the ranges of the Hounsfield units were significantly higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. Within the metal-affected slices, the pre-post slice-wise Pearson correlation coefficient was higher for artefact-reduced than for non-artefact-reduced images. The overall diagnostic quality of the artefact-reduced images was improved and reached the level of the pre-interventional FD-CT images. The metal-unaffected parts of the image were not modified. (orig.)

  3. Management of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Deena M; Brown, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) occur in approximately 2-3 % of the population. Most of these lesions are incidentally found, asymptomatic and typically carry a benign course. Although the risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is low, this complication can result in significant morbidity and mortality, making assessment of this risk the cornerstone of UIA management. This article reviews important factors to consider when managing unruptured intracranial aneurysms including patient demographics, comorbidities, family history, symptom status, and aneurysm characteristics. It also addresses screening, monitoring, medical management and current surgical and endovascular therapies.

  4. Intracranial MR imaging of achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Shinichi; Ootsuka, Ryouichi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nishitani, Hiromu; Shirakawa, Norihisa; Hashimoto, Toshiaki (Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Intracranial MR imaging was performed in five patients with achondroplasia. All patients had narrowing of the subarachnoid space at the level of the formen magnum that was mainly due to protrusion of the posterior aspect. Three patients had compressive deformities of the brainstem and/or upper cervical spine. Among them, two patients had deformities of the pons. Relative upward displacement of the brainstem was seen in all patients. Hydrocephalus was seen in three patients. (author).

  5. Genetics of intracranial aneurysms and related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, F.N.G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are dilatations of the vessel walls of cerebral arteries. Some can rupture and result in a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a severe subtype of stroke. This thesis is set out to elucidate the pathophysiology of IA from a genetic perspective. The main conclusions are: 1.

  6. Computed tomography and intracranial hemorrhages in the neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Iekado; Kushida, Yoshimasa; Shishido, Masaru; Nagasawa, Sadatsugu; Seiki, Yoshikatsu

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-two of 290 neonates admitted to the Perinatal Intensive Care Unit, Toho University Medical School, were examined by CT scan because of tentative clinical diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. CT scanner employed in this study was TCT-60 A from the Toshiba The Electric Co., Ltd. Fourteen cases (44%) were confirmed by the CT scan to have intracranial hemorrhage. Four cases had hemorrhage in the ventricle, while the remaining ten cases had subarachnoid hemorrhage. Subdural hemorrhage was not revealed in our series. Three of the four cases with intraventricular hemorrhage showed a typical subependymal germinal matrix hemorrhage. The prognosis of intraventricular hemorrhage in neonates seemed to be poor; two of the four cases died within a week. Their body weight at birth was apparently under the standard, and their Apgar score was 3 points. The subarachnoid hemorrhage was the main type of intracranial neonatal hemorrhages. In our series, it was constituted approximately 70% of the intracranial hemorrhages. The CT images of the subarachnoid hemorrhage in neonate were greatly different from those in adults. An irregular, wide high-density area around the falxtentorial junction was characteristic of the CT in many neonatal subarachnoid hemorrhages. In severe subarachnoid hemorrhages, a characteristic Y-shaped, high-density figure was demonstrated. In cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage from the deep venous system, high-density spreading immediately ventral to the falx-tentrium junction was demonstrated. These high-density areas due to blood in the subarachnoid space rapidly disappeared with the lapse of time. On the other hand, high-density areas in cerebral cisterns and/or fissures were rarely demonstrated in neonatal subarachnoid hemorrhages. The prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage in neonates was fairly good in the sense of life and cerebral functions. (author)

  7. Superior cerebellar aneurysm causing subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old with alagille syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2012-04-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterised by mutation in Jagged1 gene. Intracranial aneurysms may be seen in this condition and may present as subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the first case of superior cerebellar aneurysm rupture causing WFNS grade 1 subarachnoid haemorrhage in a 17-year-old girl. The clinical condition and management of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  8. Familial aggregation of intracranial aneurysms in an Inuit patient population in Kalaallit Nunaat (Greenland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgaard, Lars; Eskesen, Vagn; Gjerris, Flemming

    2003-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracranial aneurysm (IA) has been reported to be higher in Greenlandic Inuits than in Caucasian Danes, but the rate of familial aggregation in Inuits is unknown....

  9. Optic nerve sheath diameter, intracranial pressure and acute mountain sickness on Mount Everest: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, A I; Morris, D S; Owen, C G; Bron, A J; Roach, R C

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the association of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), as a correlate of intracranial pressure (ICP), with acute mountain sickness (AMS). Longitudinal cohort study of mountaineers from sea level to 6400 m. Mount Everest (North side). 13 mountaineers (10 men, 3 women; aged 23-52 years) on a British expedition to climb Mount Everest. ONSD was measured ultrasonically, 3 mm behind the globe using B scans recorded with an OTI-Scan 3D scanner (Ophthalmic Technologies, Canada). Serial binocular scans were recorded at sea level, and 2000, 3700, 5200 and 6400 m. All ONSDs were measured by a blinded observer. ONSD, AMS score (using the Lake Louise scoring system), heart rate, and oxygen saturation levels. All results were analysed by regression analysis with adjustment. ONSD was positively associated with increasing altitude above sea level (0.10 mm increase in ONSD per 1000 m, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.14 mm) and AMS score (0.12 mm per score, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.18 mm); further associations were found with resting heart rate (0.29 mm per 20 beats/min, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.41 mm) and oxygen saturations (0.20 mm per 10% decrease, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.29 mm). ONSD increases at high altitude, and this increase is associated with more severe symptoms of AMS. Given the linkage between ONSD and ICP, these results strongly suggest that intracranial pressure plays an important role in the pathophysiology of AMS.

  10. Modifications of intracranial pressure after molecular adsorbent recirculating system treatment in patients with acute liver failure: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, F; Ruberto, F; Perrella, S M; Cappannoli, A; Bruno, K; Martelli, S; Celli, P; Summonti, D; D'Alio, A; Tosi, A; Novelli, G; Morabito, V; Poli, L; Rossi, M; Berloco, P B; Pietropaoli, P

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral dysfunction may be fatal in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring may be mandatory to direct measures to prevent further cerebral edema. Recently the introduction of dialysis with the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) has improved the outcomes among patients with ALF. The aim of this study was to evaluate ICP changes after MARS treatment among patients with ALF. Three patients -- 14, 18 and 16 years old -- were admitted to the ICU for acute liver failure induced by HBV in two cases and by acetaminophen in the other one. Because of Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) MARS treatments were performed in all patients. The patients received MARS treatments every day after their admission to liver transplantation. After MARS therapy the ICP decreased on average from 21 to 7 mm Hg. Significant hemodynamic modifications were not observed and their neurological conditions improved. MARS treatment improved the clinical pictures of these patients increasing the available time to obtain an urgent liver graft.

  11. Cerebral haemodynamic response to acute intracranial hypertension induced by head-down tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosone, Daniele; Ozturk, Vesile; Roatta, Silvestro; Cavallini, Anna; Tosi, Piera; Micieli, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a context of general inhibition of the sympathetic nervous system, the cerebral haemodynamic response to -30 degrees head-down tilt (HDT), a manoeuvre that produces an increase in intracranial arterial pressure. Nineteen healthy subjects were studied according to the following protocol: 10 min lying in supine position, 10 min HDT, 10 min recovery. Inhibition of the sympathetic system was confirmed by the decrease in heart rate (-3.6 bpm) and arterial blood pressure (-5.9 mmHg, p<0.05) in the late phase of the test. Blood velocity and blood pusatility index initially increased (+3.2 cm s(-1) and +9% respectively, p<0.01) then returned towards baseline before the end of HDT, while the cerebrovascular resistance index (=arterial blood pressure/blood velocity) dropped significantly and remained below control level (-7%, p<0.01) throughout the test. The changes in both these indices were opposite to those reported in several sympathetic activation tests, such as the handgrip and cold pressor tests. Conversely, arterial pressure at cranial level increased during HDT (as it also does during sympathetic activation tests), due to the development of a hydrostatic pressure gradient between heart and brain levels. Therefore, the effects observed on the pulsatility and resistance indices are not secondary to the increase in intracranial arterial pressure. It is suggested that the changes in these cerebrovascular indices are mediated by a reduction of sympathetic tone that presumably involves the cerebral as well as the peripheral vascular bed.

  12. Delayed Rebleeding of Cerebral Aneurysm Misdiagnosed as Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Seung-Yoon; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Jong-Tae; Kang, Sung-Don

    2016-01-01

    An intracranial saccular aneurysm is uncommonly diagnosed in a patient with closed head trauma. We herein present a patient with delayed rebleeding of a cerebral aneurysm misdiagnosed as traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A 26-year-old female visited our emergency department because of headache after a motorcycle accident. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a right-side dominant SAH in Sylvian fissure. Although traumatic SAH was strongly suggested because of the history of head traum...

  13. Computed Tomographic Angiogram of an Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Causing Acute Retrobulbar Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Jee Ho; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Bum Tae; Ohn, Young-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D-CT) angiography is a widespread imaging modality for intracranial vascular lesions. However, 3D-CT angiograms of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy have not been previously described. We present 3D-CT angiograms of an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery that caused subarachnoid hemorrhage and vision loss in a 39-year old man. The 3D-CT angiograms were consistent with findings identif...

  14. Low-pressure balloon angioplasty with adjuvant pharmacological therapy in patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by intracranial arterial occlusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Raul G.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Buonanno, Ferdinando S.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Yoo, Albert J.; Rabinov, James D.; Pryor, Johnny C.; Hirsch, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of coronary balloons in the cerebral vasculature is limited due to their poor trackability and increased risk of vessel injury. We report our experience using more compliant elastomer balloons for thrombus resistant to intraarterial (IA) pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis in acute stroke. We retrospectively analyzed 12 consecutive patients with an occluded intracranial artery treated with angioplasty using a low-pressure elastomer balloon. Angiograms were graded according to the Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction (TICI) and Qureshi grading systems. Outcomes were categorized as independent (modified Rankin scale, mRS, score ≤2), dependent (mRS score 3-5), or dead (mRS score 6). Included in the study were 12 patients (mean age 66±17 years, range 31-88 years; mean baseline National Institutes of Health stroke scale score 17±3, range 12-23). The occlusion sites were: internal carotid artery (ICA) terminus (five patients, including two concomitant cervical ICA occlusions), M1 segment (two patients), and basilar artery (two patients). Pharmacological treatment included intravenous (IV) t-PA only (two patients), IA urokinase only (nine patients), both IV t-PA and IA urokinase (one patient), and IV and/or IA eptifibatide (eight patients). Mean time to treatment was 5.9±3.9 h (anterior circulation) and 11.0±7.2 h (posterior circulation). Overall recanalization rate (TICI grade 2/3) was 91.6%. Procedure-related morbidity occurred in one patient (distal posterior inferior cerebellar artery embolus). There were no symptomatic hemorrhages. Outcomes at 90 days were independent (five patients), dependent (three patients) and dead (four patients, all due to progression of stroke with withdrawal of care). Angioplasty of acutely occluded intracranial arteries with low-pressure elastomer balloons results in high recanalization rates with an acceptable degree of safety. Prior use of thrombolytics may increase the chances of recanalization, and glycoprotein IIb

  15. Magnesium in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergh, W.M. (Walter Marcel) van den

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to determine the role of serum magnesium in the pathophysiology after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to assess the effect of magnesium treatment in reducing cerebral ischemia in experimental SAH and in improving clinical outcome in patients with

  16. Cardiac arrhythmia as initial presentation of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, FGH; Henselmans, JML; van de Loosdrecht, AA

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death are most frequently caused by preexisting heart disease. Rarely, cardiac arrhythmia is a first symptom of an acute neurological event. We describe a patient with asystole and other cardiac arrhythmias, as initial symptoms of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid

  17. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms: Complications in Acutely Ruptured versus Unruptured Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechan, R. S.; Sprengers, M. E.; Majoie, C. B.; Peluso, J. P.; Sluzewski, M.; van Rooij, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The use of stents in the setting of SAH is controversial because of concerns about the efficacy and risk of dual antiplatelet therapy. We compare complications of stent-assisted coil embolization in patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms with complications in patients with unruptured aneurysms.

  18. Management of acute traumatic intracranial haematoma in rural and remote areas of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, John; Reilly, Peter; Pearce, Andrew; Taylor, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Outcomes are reviewed with traumatic brain injury (TBI) involving intracranial haematomata (ICH) with patients in rural and remote areas of South Australia and adjacent states. Patients were referred to the Royal Adelaide Hospital (RAH), a level 1 trauma centre with a major neurosurgical service. From 2000 to 2013, 1107 multiple trauma cases included 162 with severe TBI. Local medical officers (LMOs) phoned a specific number to access resuscitative and neurosurgical advice. Onsite neurosurgical support was provided when requested. Specialist teams later retrieved these patients to RAH. Locations were coded according to the Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA+). Injuries were coded using ICD 9 and 10. General surgeon LMOs drained nine clinically progressive ICHs. Neurosurgical attendance was provided in four instances. Eight patients survived. The remaining 153 patients had other injuries involving thoraco-abdominal organs, spine, pelvis and limbs. The overall mortality was 30%. Twenty-six had ICHs requiring surgical drainage later at the RAH, with 46% mortality. Average Injury Severity Score was 30 (range 9-66). Male/female ratio was 76/24. Motor vehicular accidents predominated (60%), followed by falls (26%) and assaults (10%). Those under 30 years were overrepresented. Patients were transported a mean distance of 283 km (maximum distance 2600 km). LMOs in remote locations may consider immediate drainage of deteriorating traumatic ICH. Adequate support from a distant major trauma centre can help achieve acceptable outcomes. Effective communications are vital. The Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and Neurosurgical Society of Australasia guidelines based on the Early Management of Severe Trauma protocols can assist LMOs in making the decision to undertake emergency craniotomy. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  19. Design and characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner for detection of acute intracranial hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Wang, X.; Foos, D. H.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V. E.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Prompt and reliable detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) has substantial clinical impact in diagnosis and treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury. This paper describes the design, development, and preliminary performance characterization of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) head scanner prototype for imaging of acute ICH. Methods: A task-based image quality model was used to analyze the detectability index as a function of system configuration, and hardware design was guided by the results of this model-based optimization. A robust artifact correction pipeline was developed using GPU-accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) scatter simulation, beam hardening corrections, detector veiling glare, and lag deconvolution. An iterative penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) reconstruction framework with weights adjusted for artifact-corrected projections was developed. Various bowtie filters were investigated for potential dose and image quality benefits, with a MC-based tool providing estimates of spatial dose distribution. Results: The initial prototype will feature a source-detector distance of 1000 mm and source-axis distance of 550 mm, a 43x43 cm2 flat panel detector, and a 15° rotating anode x-ray source with 15 kW power and 0.6 focal spot size. Artifact correction reduced image nonuniformity by ~250 HU, and PWLS reconstruction with modified weights improved the contrast to noise ratio by 20%. Inclusion of a bowtie filter can potentially reduce dose by 50% and improve CNR by 25%. Conclusions: A dedicated CBCT system capable of imaging millimeter-scale acute ICH was designed. Preliminary findings support feasibility of point-of-care applications in TBI and stroke imaging, with clinical studies beginning on a prototype.

  20. Delayed acute spinal cord injury following intracranial gunshot trauma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jason S; Richardson, R Mark; Gean, Alisa D; Stiver, Shirley I

    2012-04-01

    The authors report the case of a patient who presented with a hoarse voice and left hemiparesis following a gunshot injury with trajectory entering the left scapula, traversing the suboccipital bone, and coming to rest in the right lateral medullary cistern. Following recovery from the hemiparesis, abrupt quadriparesis occurred coincident with fall of the bullet into the anterior spinal canal. The bullet was retrieved following a C-2 and C-3 laminectomy, and postoperative MR imaging confirmed signal change in the cord at the level where the bullet had lodged. The patient then made a good neurological recovery. Bullets can fall from the posterior fossa with sufficient momentum to cause an acute spinal cord injury. Consideration for craniotomy and bullet retrieval should be given to large bullets lying in the CSF spaces of the posterior fossa as they pose risk for acute spinal cord injury.

  1. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  2. CT in acute stroke: improved detection of dense intracranial arteries by varying window parameters and performing a thin-slice helical scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadda, D.; Vannucchi, L.; Niccolai, F.; Neri, A.T.; Carmignani, L.; Pacini, P.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the possibility of improving detection of a dense intracranial artery on CT in acute stroke by narrowing window width, varying window level and performing a thin-slice helical scan for the circle of Willis, in some cases followed by postprocessing maximum-intensity projections. We carried out 32 examinations of 31 patients with a documented cerebral ischaemic attack, performing cranial CT within 6 h of the onset of symptoms. Patients with intracranial haemorrhage were excluded, as were patients who went on to thrombolytic therapy. Varying window width and centre level on standard 5 mm thick contiguous axial slices, we detected a dense proximal middle cerebral artery (MCA) in a higher proportion of patients. A 1.1 mm thick helical scan through the circle of Willis improved recognition of a dense distal horizontal segment and the temporoinsular branches of the MCA and of a dense posterior cerebral artery. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Toshihide; Shimosegawa, Eku; Inugami, Atsushi; Shishido, Fumio; Fujita, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Uemura, Kazuo; Yasui, Nobuyuki (Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to aneurysm rupture was evaluated in relation to CT findings in nine patients. Six patients were studied within 3 days and the other three patients were studied 4 to 6 days from the ictus of SAH using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. In all of the patients, hematoma in the subarachnoid space and ventricles was demonstrated by the proton density-weighted spin echo sequence, which showed that bloody cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had a higher signal intensity than brain tissue or normal CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging was more sensitive in detecting SAH and more informative as to the site of the ruptured aneurysm than CT. Despite some limitations in applying it to patients with acute SAH, magnetic resonace imaging has clear advantages in the diagnosis of SAH. (author).

  4. Treatment of intracranial stenoses using the Neuroform stent system: initial experience in five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan; Hartmann, Marius [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ringleb, Peter [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Division of Neurology, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    We assessed the technical feasibility of balloon-assisted angioplasty with consecutive stenting using a flexible, self-expanding neurovascular stent for the treatment of intracranial arteriosclerotic vascular stenoses. Five consecutive patients with symptomatic drug-resistant stenoses of the intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) or the main stem of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were treated by balloon-assisted angioplasty with consecutive stenting using the Neuroform stent system. Balloon dilatation of the stenoses and consecutive stent placement with complete coverage of the stenoses was feasible in all patients. One patient suffered acute thrombosis distally to the stented vessel segment which was successfully treated by fibrinolysis, and one patient suffered acute subarachnoid and parenchymal hemorrhage probably due to vessel perforation. In the other three patients, no complications occurred during or immediately after angioplasty. All patients were free of further ischemic events up to the 6-month follow-up. Our findings demonstrate that the Neuroform stent system can used successfully for the treatment of intracranial stenoses of the ICA and the main stem of the MCA. Although immediate angiographic results are promising, long-term angiographic and clinical follow-up is essential to demonstrate long-term outcome. (orig.)

  5. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of Intracranial Aneurysms: Complications in Acutely Ruptured versus Unruptured Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechan, R S; Sprengers, M E; Majoie, C B; Peluso, J P; Sluzewski, M; van Rooij, W J

    2016-03-01

    The use of stents in the setting of SAH is controversial because of concerns about the efficacy and risk of dual antiplatelet therapy. We compare complications of stent-assisted coil embolization in patients with acutely ruptured aneurysms with complications in patients with unruptured aneurysms. Between February 2007 and March 2015, 45 acutely ruptured aneurysms and 47 unruptured aneurysms were treated with stent-assisted coiling. Patients with ruptured aneurysms were not pretreated with antiplatelet medication but received intravenous aspirin during the procedure. Thromboembolic events and early rebleeds were recorded. In ruptured aneurysms, 9 of 45 patients had thromboembolic complications. Four patients remained asymptomatic, 4 developed infarctions, and 1 patient died. The permanent complication rate in ruptured aneurysms was 11% (95% CI, 4%-24%). Five of 45 patients (11%; 95% CI, 4%-24%) had an early rebleed from the treated aneurysm after 3-45 days, and in 4, this rebleed was fatal. In 46 patients with 47 unruptured aneurysms, thromboembolic complications occurred in 2. One patient remained asymptomatic; the other had a thalamus infarction. The complication rate in unruptured aneurysms was 2.2% (1 of 46; 95% CI, 0.01%-12%). No first-time hemorrhages occurred in 46 patients with 47 aneurysms during 6 months of follow-up. The complication rate of stent-assisted coiling with early adverse events in ruptured aneurysms was 10 times higher than that in unruptured aneurysms. Early rebleed accounted for most mortality. In ruptured aneurysms, stent-assisted coil embolization is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and should only be considered when less risky options have been excluded. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Prognostic significance of hematoma thickness to midline shift ratio in patients with acute intracranial subdural hematoma: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Wael Mohamed Mohamed; Khedr, Wael Mahmoud; Elwany, Amr Hamdy

    2018-04-01

    Acute intracranial subdural hematoma (ASDH) is commonly associated with a grave prognosis citing a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The parameters to decide on surgical evacuation of the hematoma are sometimes controversial. In this study, we theorized that the ratio between maximal hematoma thickness and midline shift would be varied by associated intrinsic brain pathology emanating from the trauma and would thus objectively evaluates the prognosis in ASDH. The records of patients diagnosed with ASDH who were submitted to surgical evacuation through a craniotomy were revised. Data collected included basic demographic data, preoperative general and neurological examinations, and radiological findings. The maximal thickness of the hematoma (H) on the preoperative CT brain was divided by the midline shift at the same level (MS) formulating the H/MS ratio. Postoperative data obtained included Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), and follow-up period. Sixty-seven eligible patients were included in the study, of which 53 (79.1%) patients were males. Mean age was 34 years. The H/MS ratio ranged from 0.69 to 1.8 with a mean of 0.93. Age above 50 years (P = 0.0218), admission GCS of less than 6 (0.0482), and H/MS ratio of 0.79 or less (P = 0.00435) were negative prognostic factors and correlated with a low postoperative GCS and GOS. H/MS ratio is a useful prognostic tool in patients diagnosed with ASDH and can be added to the armamentarium of data to improve the management decision in this cohort of patients.

  7. Traumatic rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Ramlakhan, BMedSc, MBBCh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial dermoid cysts are congenital tumors of ectodermal origin. Rupture of these cysts can occur spontaneously, but rupture in association with trauma is reported infrequently. The diagnosis of rupture is made by the presence of lipid (cholesterol droplets in the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles. Nonenhanced CT of the head demonstrates multiple foci of low attenuation that correspond with hyperintense signal on T1-weighted MRI. We present a case of an adult patient with rupture of an intracranial dermoid cyst, precipitated by minor trauma.

  8. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension presenting without orthostatic headache complicated by acute subdural hematoma after drainage for chronic subdural hematoma--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramae, Takumi; Inamasu, Joji; Nakagawa, Yu; Nakatsukasa, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a case of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) manifesting as a bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) without orthostatic headache. He developed life-threatening acute SDH as a complication of CSDH drainage. Neurosurgeons should be aware that SIH patients do not always present with orthostatic headache. Brain magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium may be recommended for young adults with non-traumatic CSDH before drainage to exclude SIH, even if they do not present with orthostatic headache.

  9. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  10. Intracranial aneurysms: risk factors for development and rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinloog, R.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms occur in approximately 3% of the population. The pathogenesis of aneurysms is largely unknown, and is thought to be a complex process in which both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Aneurysms can rupture and give rise to subarachnoid haemorrhage, a devastating

  11. Intracranial Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvedstrup, Jeppe; Radojicic, Aleksandra; Moudrous, Walid

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new method of noninvasive intracranial pressure (nICP) measurement with conventional lumbar puncture (LP) opening pressure. METHODS: In a prospective multicenter study, patients undergoing LP for diagnostic purposes underwent intracranial pressure measurements with HeadSen...

  12. INTRACRANIAL PRESSURE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Widiyanthi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Intracranial pressure is total of pressure that is produced by brain, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid/CSF in the tight cranial space. As a respon to intracranial pressure increasing, compensation begin by movement of CSF from ventricle to cerebral subarachnoidal space, and increase the absorption of CSF. Increasing of ICP usually caused by increasing of brain volume (cerebral oedem, blood (intracranial bleeding, space occupying lesion, or CSF (hidrocephalus. Indication in ICP monitoring can be seen from : neurological criteria, abnormal CT-scan result when admission, normal CT-scan result, but had more two risk factors. According to the procedure that must be done, there are two methods in ICP monitoring: invasive ICP monitoring methodes and non-invasive measuring method. Increasing of ICP will decrease the compliance of brain, pulsation of artery more clearly, and the component of vein is lost. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  13. Intracranial hemorrhage: ultrasound, CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-03-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is one of the most common causes of acute focal neurologic deficit in children and adults. Neuroimaging including ultrasonography (US), computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is essential in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage. Imaging findings should guide treatment. The highly variable appearance of an intracranial hemorrhage can be challenging. A thorough knowledge of hematoma evolution and US, CT and MR hematoma characteristics is mandatory for adequate interpretation of findings. The purpose of this review is (1) to summarize the imaging characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage on various imaging techniques and (2) to review the various types of intracranial hemorrhage, and their causes. (orig.)

  14. Pseudoaneurysm of the anterior spinal artery in a patient with Moyamoya: an unusual cause of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, D M; Woldenberg, R F; Setton, A

    2006-08-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a recognized presentation of Moyamoya disease in adults. Because there are extensive collateral networks and potential complications that develop, a thorough investigation of the intracranial and extracranial circulation is necessary to exclude a treatable cause when these patients present with SAH. We present a case of SAH due to a ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the anterior spinal artery arising from the supreme intercostal artery, which was the sole source of blood supply to the intracranial circulation.

  15. Lethal subarachnoid bleeding under immunosuppressive therapy due to mycotic arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigel, S.; Kloska, S.; Freund, M. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Kehl, H.G. [Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology, Univ. Hospital of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    A subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) occurred 67 days after cardiac transplantation in 10-year-old girl with consecutive immunocompromising therapy. Neither digital subtraction angiography (DSA) nor computed tomographic angiography showed signs of intracranial vascular malformations. One month before the lethal SAH occurred, she had developed arterial hypertension and attacks of severe headache with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis while CT scans showed an infarct of the left thalamus. Pathologic findings established the rare diagnosis of SAH due to aspergillosis-related mycotic arteritis. Imaging characteristics are presented. (orig.)

  16. Reversible Akinetic Mutism after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage in the Territory of the Anterior Cerebral Artery without Permanent Ischaemic Damage to Anterior Cingulate Gyri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Sibille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on two cases of transient akinetic mutism after massive subarachnoid haemorrhage due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA. In the two cases, vasospasm could not be demonstrated by imaging studies throughout the clinical course. Both patients shared common radiological features: a hydrocephalus due to haemorrhagic contamination of the ventricular system and a mass effect of a subpial hematoma on the borders of the corpus callosum. Patients were also investigated using auditory event-related evoked potentials at acute stage. In contrast to previous observations of akinetic mutism, P300 wave could not be recorded. Both patients had good recovery and we hypothesized that this unexpectedly favourable outcome was due to the absence of permanent structural damage to the ACA territory, with only transient dysfunction due to a reversible mass effect on cingulate gyri.

  17. Fahr′s disease Presenting with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Al-Jehani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fahr′s disease is a rare disorder of slowly progressive cognitive, psychiatric, and motor decline associated with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC and widespread calcification in the brain and cerebellum. Acute presentation of IBGC is most often as a seizure disorder; however, we present a case of an acute IBCG presentation in which the cause of the deterioration was an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  19. Hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, Ale; van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem Berkelbach; Tulleken, Cornelis A.F.; Rinkel, Gabriël J.E.

    OBJECTIVE: Hypomagnesemia frequently occurs in hospitalized patients, and it is associated with poor outcome. We assessed the frequency and time distribution of hypomagnesemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and its relationship to the severity of SAH, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI),

  20. Computed tomographic findings of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung Sook; Kim, Young Sook; Kim, Young Chul [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was a reliable technique to evaluate the exact size and location of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage and to predict it's prognosis. Fifty-nine cases of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated and reviewed by CT scan. The following results were obtained. 1. The sex ratio of male to female was 1 to 1.4, The highest incidence was in 6th and 7th decades. 2. The most common cause of spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage was hypertension (74.6%), followed by the aneurysm (13.5%), arteriovenous malformation (5.1%), occlusive vascular disease (3.4%), and blood dyscrasia (3.4%). 3. The most common location was basal ganglia and thalamic hemorrhage (37.3%), followed by lobar hemorrhage (27.1%), cerebellar hemorrhage (13.5%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11.9%). 4. Primary intraventricular hemorrhage carried the highest mortality. 5. The larger volume of hematoma, the higher the mortality rate.

  1. Technique of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters improve the prognosis of acute post-traumatic hemispheric brain swelling patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eShi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute post-traumatic cerebral hemispheric brain swelling (ACHS is a serious disorder that occurs after traumatic brain injury (TBI, and it often requires immediate treatment. The aim of our clinical study was to assess the effects of stepwise intracranial decompression combined with external ventricular drainage catheters on the prognosis of ACHS patients.Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 172 cases of severe craniocerebral trauma patients with acute cerebral hemispheric swelling. The patients were divided into two groups: unilateral stepwise standard large trauma craniectomy (S-SLTC combined with external ventricular drainage (EVD catheter implants (n = 86 and unilateral routine frontal temporal parietal SLTC (control group, n = 86.Result: No significant differences in age, sex, or preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale score were observed between groups (P < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the ipsilateral subdural effusion incidence rates between the S-SLTC+EVD treatment group and the routine SLTC group. However, the incidence rates of intraoperative acute encephalocele and contralateral epidural and subdural hematoma in the S-SLTC+EVD group were significantly lower than those in the SLTC group (17.4% and 3.5% vs. 37.2% and 23.3%, respectively. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP values of patients in the S-SLTC+EVD group were also lower than those in the SLTC group at days 1 through7 (P<0.05. A positive neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 50.0% and decreased mortality (15.1% was observed in the S-SLTC+EVD group compared to the neurological outcome (GOS score 4 to 5, 33.8%; 36.0% in the SLTC group (P<0.05.Conclusions: Our data suggest that S-SLTC+EVD is more effective for controlling ICP, improving neurological outcome, and decreasing mortality rate compared with routine SLTC.

  2. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis N. Mavridis; Maria Meliou; Efstratios-Stylianos Pyrgelis

    2015-01-01

    Troponin (tr) elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neur...

  3. Intracranial CNS Manifestations of Myeloid Sarcoma in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Review of the Literature and Three Case Reports from the Author’s Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo M. Cervantes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcoma (MS of the central nervous system (CNS is a rare presentation of leukemic mass infiltration outside of the bone marrow. It may involve the subperiosteum and dura mater and, on rare occasions, can also invade the brain parenchyma. The disease is most commonly seen in children or young adults; however, it has been described in multiple age groups. MS can be seen in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia and other myeloproliferative disorders. This entity has the potential to be underdiagnosed if the MS appearance precedes the first diagnosis of leukemia. The main reason is that their appearance on CT and MRI has a broad differential diagnosis, and proper diagnosis of MS can only be made if the imaging findings are correlated with the clinical history and laboratory findings. Herein, we describe the intracranial CNS manifestations of MS in patients with AML on CT and MRI involving the brain and/or meninges. This study is based on a systematic review of the literature. In addition, three case reports from the author’s institution with AML and intracranial involvement of MS are included. Our aim is to enhance the awareness of this entity among both clinicians and radiologists.

  4. Intrathecal gadodiamide for identifying subarachnoid and ventricular neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-Calleja, Jesús; Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Soto-Hernández, José Luis; Del-Brutto, Oscar H; Moreno-Andrade, Talía; Gutiérrez-Alvarado, Ramón; Rodríguez-Carbajal, Jesús

    2015-07-01

    Some neurocysticercosis cysts may remain hidden despite novel MRI sequences. This study evaluates the diagnostic value of gadodiamide (GDD)-contrasted MRI cisternography in selected cases of neurocysticercosis. We included patients aged 18-65 years with a probable diagnosis of subarachnoid cysticercosis in whom previous neuroimaging studies failed to demonstrate the presence of cysts. One millilitre of GDD was administered intrathecally as a contrast agent with subsequent performance of MRI. Fourteen patients were included. Optimal contrast diffusion was achieved in nine patients, and partial diffusion was achieved in 4. Intracranial vesicles were identified in 10 patients, with the presence of more than 60 basal subarachnoid vesicles being revealed in all, with five cysts in the fourth ventricle in four patients and a floating cyst in the lateral ventricle in one. In one case, intrathecal GDD demonstrated spinal cysticercosis. No adverse events were reported after intrathecal GDD administration. Intrathecal GDD administration is useful for the diagnosis of subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis and can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in selected cases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Aspirin and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Bradley A; Rosalind Lai, Pui Man; Frerichs, Kai U; Du, Rose

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested a potential beneficial effect of aspirin on the risk of aneurysm rupture. This benefit must be weighed against its potential adverse effects as an antiplatelet agent in the setting of acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A total of 747 consecutive patients with cerebral aneurysms were reviewed, comparing demographics, aneurysm features, presenting clinical and radiographic grades, vasospasm, and outcome at 1 year between patients with aneurysmal SAH taking aspirin on presentation and those who were not. The rate of hemorrhagic presentation was significantly greater in patients not taking aspirin (40% vs. 28%; P = 0.016). Among 274 patients presenting with aneurysmal SAH, there was no significant difference in presenting clinical (Hunt and Hess) and radiographic (Fisher) grade between patients taking aspirin and those who were not. There was also no significant difference in the rate of subsequent angiographic and delayed cerebral ischemia. Multivariate analysis of outcome at 1 year found only increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.12), Hunt and Hess grade (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.81-5.03), and associated hypertension (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.39-7.81) to be statistically significant risk factors for poor outcome (death or dependence), whereas aspirin use was not associated with poor outcome (OR 1.19, 95% CI 0.35-4.09; P = 0.78). In the present study, patients taking aspirin had a lower rate of hemorrhagic presentation. In addition, taking aspirin did not adversely impact presenting clinical grade or radiographic grade, vasospasm, and outcome in the setting of aneurysmal SAH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  7. Experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: subarachnoid blood volume, mortality rate, neuronal death, cerebral blood flow, and perfusion pressure in three different rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunell, Giselle Fabiana; Mathiesen, Tiit; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Svendgaard, Niels-Aage

    2003-01-01

    To investigate which of three subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) models is the most suitable for studies of pathological and pathophysiological processes after SAH. SAH was induced in rats via intracranial endovascular perforation (perforation model), blood injection into the cisterna magna (300 microl), or blood injection into the prechiasmatic cistern (200 microl). The subarachnoid blood volume was quantitatively measured. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) (as assessed with laser Doppler flowmetry), intracranial pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure were recorded for 90 minutes after SAH. Mortality was recorded, and neuronal death was assessed in animals that survived 7 days after SAH. The subarachnoid blood volume was close to the injected amount after prechiasmatic SAH. In the other models, the volume varied between 40 and 480 microl. The mortality rates were 44% in the perforation SAH group, 25% in the prechiasmatic SAH group, and 0% in the cisterna magna SAH group; the corresponding values for neuronal death were 11, 44, and 28%. Cerebral perfusion pressure approached baseline values within 5 minutes after SAH in all three models. CBF decreased to approximately 35% of baseline values immediately after SAH in all groups; it gradually increased to normal values 15 minutes after SAH in the cisterna magna SAH group and to 60 and 89% of baseline values 90 minutes post-SAH in the perforation and prechiasmatic SAH groups. CBF was significantly correlated with the subarachnoid blood volume. The prechiasmatic SAH model seems to be the most suitable for study of the sequelae after SAH; it produces a significant decrease in CBF, an acceptable mortality rate, and substantial pathological lesions, with high reproducibility. The CBF reduction is predominantly dependent on the amount of subarachnoid blood.

  8. Xanthochromia after subarachnoid haemorrhage needs no revisitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, M; Hasan, D; Blijenberg, B G; Hijdra, A; van Gijn, J

    1989-01-01

    Recently it was contended that it is bloodstained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that is important in the diagnosis of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and not xanthochromia, and also that a normal CT scan and the absence of xanthochromia in the CSF do not exclude a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The CSF findings were therefore reviewed of 111 patients with a proven SAH. All patients had xanthochromia of the CSF. Lumbar punctures were performed between 12 hours and one week after the ictus. Xanthochromia was still present in all (41) patients after 1 week, in all (32) patients after 2 weeks, in 20 of 22 patients after three weeks and in 10 of 14 patients after four weeks. In six years we identified only 12 patients with sudden headache, normal CT, bloodstained CSF, and no xanthochromia. Angiography was carried out in three and was negative. All 12 patients survived without disability and were not re-admitted with a SAH (mean follow up 4 years). It is concluded that it is still xanthochromia that is important in the diagnosis of SAH and not bloodstained CSF. Furthermore a normal CT scan and the absence of xanthochromia do exclude a ruptured aneurysm, provided xanthochromia is investigated by spectrophotometry and lumbar puncture is carried out between 12 hours and 2 weeks after the ictus. PMID:2769274

  9. Intracranial haemorrhage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consultant Neurosurgeon, Division of Neurosurgery, University of Cape Town and Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town. David Le Feuvre .... evacuation. This, together with criticism of various limitations of the STICH trial, has led to the initiation of STICH II.[19]. Intracranial haematomas may also be dealt with during another ...

  10. The diagnostic accuracy of TCD for intracranial arterial stenosis/occlusion in patients with acute ischemic stroke: the importance of time interval between detection of TCD and CTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jingxia; Zhou, Qin; Ouyang, Huangqing; Zhang, Shaofeng; Lu, Zuneng

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate prospectively the diagnostic accuracy of transcranial doppler (TCD) as an additional screening tool for intracranial arterial steno-occlusive disease against computed tomography angiography (CTA) in patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) if both are performed in a short time interval. Between July 2011 and May 2012, 128 patients who were hospitalized within 24 hours of symptom onset and fulfilled the criteria for the clinical diagnosis of AIS were enrolled. Bedside detection of TCD was accomplished immediately after admission. High-resolution brain CTA was performed within 3 hours after the completion of TCD and the images were interpreted by a neuroradiologist blinded to TCD findings. The accuracy parameters of TCD against CTA were calculated after computation of true-positive, false-positive, true negative, and false-negative values. Among the 128 patients, there were 68 males and 60 females, aged 61.4 ± 17.5 years. The mean time interval between the detection of TCD and CTA was 89.7 (77.8) minutes. In 65% of patients, both examinations were performed with less than a half-hour interval between them. The diagnostic accuracy of TCD for different arteries showed slight distinction. Transcranial doppler demonstrated the most accurate diagnosis for middle cerebral artery (MCA), where TCD showed 35 true-positive, 0 false-negative, 1 false-positive, and 92 true-negative studies compared with CTA. Furthermore, elevated MCA velocities on TCD correlated well with the severity of intracranial stenosis detected on CTA. Vertebral artery (VA) is one of the arteries with the lowest sensitivity for TCD diagnosis (sensitivity 63.4%, specificity 96.5%, positive predictive value (PPV) 89.6%, negative predictive value (NPV) 84.8%, and accuracy 85.9%). In 20 cases (15.6%), TCD showed findings complementary to CTA (real-time embolization, collateral flow patterns, and steal phenomenon). Transcranial doppler shows high diagnostic accuracy against CTA if both are

  11. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT

  12. Emergent intracranial balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation: Experience of a single institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Seo, Jung Hwa; Jeong, Hae Woong [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of angioplasty for recanalization after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). The study population was selected from 134 patients who underwent endovascular revascularization therapy (ERT) for AIS between October 2011 and May 2014. Of those 134 patients, 39 who underwent balloon angioplasty with or without stent insertion were included in this study. Balloon angioplasty was the primary treatment for nine patients and a rescue method for 30 patients. The revascularization rate at 7 days, procedure-related complications, and clinical outcomes at 3 months were analyzed. The occlusion sites were the middle cerebral artery (n = 26), intracranial internal carotid artery (n = 10), and middle cerebral artery branch (n = 3). Angioplasty achieved successful revascularization (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Ischemia grade 2b–3) in 76.9% of patients. Computed tomography angiography performed 7 days post-procedure revealed a maintained reperfusion in 82.8% of successful cases. Only two patients had symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. At the 3-month follow-up, 18 (48.6%) and 10 (27.0%) patients showed good and poor functional outcomes, respectively (modified Rankin Scale scores, 0–2 and 5–6). Emergent balloon angioplasty and bailout self-expandable stent placement may be safe and effective for achieving successful revascularization in acute large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation. It could be a feasible rescue method as well as a primary method for ERT.

  13. Blood Pressure Management in Intracranial Hemorrhage: Current Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcel, Cheryl; Sato, Shoichiro; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-04-01

    Non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (i.e. intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH] and subarachnoid hemorrhage [SAH]) are more life threatening and least treatable despite being less common than ischemic stroke. Elevated blood pressure (BP) is a strong predictor of poor outcome in both ICH and SAH. Data from a landmark clinical trial INTERACT 2, wherein 2839 participants enrolled with spontaneous ICH were randomly assigned to receive intensive (target systolic BP <140 mmHg) or guideline recommended BP lowering therapy (target systolic BP <180 mmHg), showed that intensive BP lowering was safe, and more favorable functional outcome and better overall health-related quality of life were seen in survivors in the intensive treatment group. These results contributed to the shift in European and American guidelines towards more aggressive early management of elevated BP in ICH. In contrast, the treatment of BP in SAH is less well defined and more complex. Although there is consensus that hypertension needs to be controlled to prevent rebleeding in the acute setting, induced hypertension in the later stages of SAH has questionable benefits.

  14. Intracranial aneurysms in twins: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, H K; Lam, Y; Cheng, K M; Chan, C M; Cheung, Y L

    2011-04-01

    Intracranial aneurysm in twins is a rare clinical disease entity. Only 15 cases have been described in the literature. We report on a pair of identical twins with intracranial aneurysms. One presented with subarachnoid haemorrhage; digital subtraction angiography showed a left posterior communicating artery aneurysm, which was treated by coiling. The patient's twin sister was called for screening, whereupon digital subtraction angiography revealed a right ophthalmic internal carotid artery aneurysm that was treated conservatively.

  15. Respiratory arrest in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1984-01-01

    Sudden loss of consciousness and cardiorespiratory disorders occurred in 43 of 254 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two patients had ventricular fibrillation, 37 had one or more episodes with a disturbance of respiratory rhythm that required assisted ventilation, and 4 died suddenly without

  16. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  17. A 'Benign' Sphenoid Ridge Meningioma Manifesting as a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Associated with Tumor Invasion into the Middle Cerebral Artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, Nae Jung; Kim, Ho Sung; Kim, Sun Yong [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    Meningioma rarely manifests as a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and invasion directly into a major intracranial artery is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, meningioma presenting with an SAH associated with major intracranial arterial invasion has never been reported. We present a case of sphenoid ridge meningotheliomatous meningioma manifesting as an SAH without pathologically atypical or malignant features, due to direct tumor invasion into the middle cerebral artery

  18. Intracranial lipomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takashi; Shojima, Kazuhito; Moritaka, Kazuhiko; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Konishi, Jun

    1984-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas are very rare and reports of infantile lipomas are scarce. Nine cases of intracranial lipomas, five in infants and four in adults are described and characteristic findings of the CT are presented. Two of the six cases involved lipomas at the corpus callosum that were associated with frontal dysraphism and cranium bifidum at the midline of frontal region. Five of the nine cases involved lipomas at the quadrigeminal cistern. In one case with an advanced enlargement in circumference of the head in the perinatal period, a V-P shunt was conducted for obstructive hydrocephalus. Another case had widely ranging agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with an interhemispheric cyst showing the right sided parietal and occipital lobes through the callosal agenesis. One of the nine cases had a lipoma in the left sylvian fissure and in the adult was in the interpeduncular cistern. Four of the nine cases were associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Based on these cases and published reports, the CT features of intracranial lipoma are discussed. (author)

  19. Computed tomographic angiogram of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm causing acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jee Ho; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Bum Tae; Ohn, Young-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    Three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D-CT) angiography is a widespread imaging modality for intracranial vascular lesions. However, 3D-CT angiograms of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm associated with acute retrobulbar optic neuropathy have not been previously described. We present 3D-CT angiograms of an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery that caused subarachnoid hemorrhage and vision loss in a 39-year old man. The 3D-CT angiograms were consistent with findings identified directly during surgery.

  20. Contralateral extradural hematoma following decompressive craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma (the value of intracranial pressure monitoring): a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Meguins, Lucas Crociati; Sampaio, Gustavo Botelho; Abib, Eduardo Cintra; Adry, Rodrigo Antônio Rocha da Cruz; Ellakkis, Richam Faissal El Hossain; Ribeiro, Filipe Webb Josephson; Maset, Ângelo Luiz; de Morais, Dionei Freitas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Decompressive surgery for acute subdural hematoma leading to contralateral extradural hematoma is an uncommon event with only few cases previously reported in the English medical literature. Case presentation The present study describes the case of a 39-year-old White Brazilian man who had a motorcycle accident; he underwent decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of acute subdural hematoma and evolved contralateral extradural hematoma following surgery. Conclusion The presen...

  1. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  2. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  3. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess...... and subcortical abscesses in combination with sinusitis. She was treated with endoscopic sinus surgery and intravenous antibiotics. Both patients had developed psoriasis and episodes of infection during treatment. They were non-septic and had low fever on presentation. None of the patients suffered any long...

  4. High risk population isolate reveals low frequency variants predisposing to intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurki, M.I.; Gaal, E.I.; Kettunen, J.; Lappalainen, T.; Menelaou, A.; Anttila, V.; Hof, F.N. van 't; Fraunberg, M. von Und Zu; Helisalmi, S.; Hiltunen, M.; Lehto, H.; Laakso, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Koivisto, T.; Ronkainen, A.; Rinne, J.; Kiemeney, B.; Vermeulen, S.; Kaunisto, M.A.; Eriksson, J.G.; Aromaa, A.; Perola, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Raitakari, O.T.; Salomaa, V.; Gunel, M.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Ruigrok, Y.M.; Rinkel, G.J.; Niemela, M.; Hernesniemi, J.; Ripatti, S.; Bakker, P.I. de; Palotie, A.; Jaaskelainen, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    3% of the population develops saccular intracranial aneurysms (sIAs), a complex trait, with a sporadic and a familial form. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from sIA (sIA-SAH) is a devastating form of stroke. Certain rare genetic variants are enriched in the Finns, a population isolate with a small founder

  5. The anti-(+-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody mAb7F9 attenuates acute (+-methamphetamine effects on intracranial self-stimulation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Harris

    Full Text Available Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against (+-methamphetamine (METH is being evaluated for the treatment of METH addiction. A human/mouse chimeric form of the murine anti-METH mAb7F9 has entered clinical trials. This study examined the effects of murine mAb7F9 on certain addiction-related behavioral effects of METH in rats as measured using intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS. Initial studies indicated that acute METH (0.1-0.56 mg/kg, s.c. lowered the minimal (threshold stimulation intensity that maintained ICSS. METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c. also blocked elevations in ICSS thresholds (anhedonia-like behavior during spontaneous withdrawal from a chronic METH infusion (10 mg/kg/day x 7 days. In studies examining effects of i.v. pretreatment with mAb7F9 (at 30, 100, or 200 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg blocked the ability of an initial injection of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c. to reduce baseline ICSS thresholds, but was less capable of attenuating the effect of subsequent daily injections of METH. MAb7F9 (200 mg/kg also produced a small but significant reduction in the ability of METH (0.3 mg/kg, s.c. to reverse METH withdrawal-induced elevations in ICSS thresholds. These studies demonstrate that mAb7F9 can partially attenuate some addiction-related effects of acute METH in an ICSS model, and provide some support for the therapeutic potential of mAb7F9 for the treatment of METH addiction.

  6. Natural course of subarachnoid hemorrhage is worse in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hendrik Pahl

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is a major risk factor for poor outcome in patients with ruptured or unruptured intracranial aneurysms (IA submitted to treatment. It impairs several physiologic patterns related to cerebrovascular hemodynamics and homeostasis. Objective Evaluate clinical, radiological patterns and prognostic factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients according to age. Method Three hundred and eighty nine patients with aneurismal SAH from a Brazilian tertiary institution (Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo were consecutively evaluated from 2002 to 2012 according to Fisher and Hunt Hess classifications and Glasgow Outcome Scale. Results There was statistically significant association of age with impaired clinical, radiological presentation and outcomes in cases of SAH. Conclusion Natural course of SAH is worse in elderly patients and thus, proper recognition of the profile of such patients and their outcome is necessary to propose standard treatment.

  7. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  8. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caranci, F., E-mail: ferdinandocaranci@libero.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Briganti, F., E-mail: frabriga@unina.it [Unit of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M. [Neuroradiology service, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Service Cardarelli Hospital Naples (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  9. Epidemiology and genetics of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caranci, F.; Briganti, F.; Cirillo, L.; Leonardi, M.; Muto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are acquired lesions (5–10% of the population), a fraction of which rupture leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage with devastating consequences. Until now, the exact etiology of intracranial aneurysms formation remains unclear. The low incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage in comparison with the prevalence of unruptured IAs suggests that the vast majority of intracranial aneurysms do not rupture and that identifying those at highest risk is important in defining the optimal management. The most important factors predicting rupture are aneurysm size and site. In addition to ambiental factors (smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and hypertension), epidemiological studies have demonstrated a familiar influence contributing to the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms, with increased frequency in first- and second-degree relatives of people with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In comparison to sporadic aneurysms, familial aneurysms tend to be larger, more often located at the middle cerebral artery, and more likely to be multiple. Other than familiar occurrence, there are several heritable conditions associated with intracranial aneurysm formation, including autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, neurofibromatosis type I, Marfan syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia type I, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II and IV. The familial occurrence and the association with heritable conditions indicate that genetic factors may play a role in the development of intracranial aneurysms. Genome-wide linkage studies in families and sib pairs with intracranial aneurysms have identified several loci on chromosomes showing suggestive evidence of linkage, particularly on chromosomes 1p34.3–p36.13, 7q11, 19q13.3, and Xp22. For the loci on 1p34.3–p36.13 and 7q11, a moderate positive association with positional candidate genes has been demonstrated (perlecan gene, elastin gene, collagen type 1 A2

  10. Clinical Trials in Cardiac Arrest and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Lessons from the Past and Ideas for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Frontera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Elevated intracranial pressure that occurs at the time of cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to inadequate cerebral blood flow, which may mimic the brain injury cascade that occurs after cardiac arrest. Insights from clinical trials in cardiac arrest may provide direction for future early brain injury research after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Methods. A search of PubMed from 1980 to 2012 and clinicaltrials.gov was conducted to identify published and ongoing randomized clinical trials in aneurysmal SAH and cardiac arrest patients. Only English, adult, human studies with primary or secondary mortality or neurological outcomes were included. Results. A total of 142 trials (82 SAH, 60 cardiac arrest met the review criteria (103 published, 39 ongoing. The majority of both published and ongoing SAH trials focus on delayed secondary insults after SAH (70%, while 100% of cardiac arrest trials tested interventions within the first few hours of ictus. No SAH trials addressing treatment of early brain injury were identified. Twenty-nine percent of SAH and 13% of cardiac arrest trials showed outcome benefit, though there is no overlap mechanistically. Conclusions. Clinical trials in SAH assessing acute brain injury are warranted and successful interventions identified by the cardiac arrest literature may be reasonable targets of the study.

  11. Lifetime Effects of Small Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishima, Kaoru; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Aihara, Masanori; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2016-11-01

    Recent prospective multicenter studies have shown that the probability of rupture of unruptured aneurysms with maximal diameter <7 mm is rather low. However, the overall risks and long-term impact of unruptured aneurysms on lifetime quality of life are still unknown. A mathematical model of the natural history of intracranial aneurysms was constructed, in which the hypothetical individuals with or without unruptured aneurysm transit between discrete health states. The annual rupture rate of small aneurysms was assumed to be 0.5% in the baseline analysis, followed by the subsequent sensitivity analysis. The analyses were continued until cumulative death rate from subarachnoid hemorrhage or other causes reached 1.0. Age-specific ratios of death of subarachnoid hemorrhage in the individuals harboring unruptured aneurysm, if dying at 60 years old, were 25% in men and 43% in women. These ratios decreased rapidly with higher age. Most (more than 90%) patients with small aneurysms were expected to die of diseases other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. In the baseline analysis (60-year-old individuals), lifetime lost to small aneurysms could be estimated as 3.8% for men and 4.2% for women, but a somewhat larger impact could be identified in the young and/or female individuals compared with in the elderly and/or male individuals. Lifetime effects of small unruptured aneurysms without risk factors increasing the probability of rupture are relatively small, and most patients were expected to die of diseases other than subarachnoid hemorrhage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage in infants due to vitamin K deficiency with special reference to the prognostic evaluation by CT and follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yoshifumi; Matsukado, Yasuhiko; Kaku, Motoyuki

    1982-01-01

    The authors reported sixteen cases with intracranial hemorrhage due to Vitamin K deficiency and their follow-up studies. Intracranial hemorrhages were classified into four groups according to the CT findings. Eight cases were with hemorrhage of single location, whereas combined multiple hemorrhages were seen in also eight cases; four acute subdural hematomas (Group A), and four subarachnoid or intraventricular hemorrhages (Group B), four acute subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages (Group C), and four combined intracerebral hemorrhages (Group D). Clinical symptoms were almost identical in any group. Beside CT classification of hemorrhage it was characteristic to see extensive edema in the ipsilateral hemisphere. Follow-up studies were performed in fifteen children whose age ranged from nine months to five years old. In follow-up CT, ventricular dilatation was most frequently encountered in 53%, and cortical atrophy in 33%, leukomalacia in 27%. Chronic subdural hematomas and porencephaly were also seen. In the examination of mental development (Tsumori-Inage's). normal DQ were seen in 40%, and slight or severe mental disturbance were of 40%. In conclusion, the patients of Group A and B showed good recovery and normal development, although marked cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were noted on follow-up CT, in which follow-up study in longer period should be indicated. In Group C and D, three cases showed severe mental disturbance and had leukomalacia on CT due to respiratory disturbance. Combined multiple hemorrhage in Vitamin K deficiency should be particularly emphasized as one of the poorest prognostic factors in mental development. (author)

  13. Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoff, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disorder with an often poor prognosis. The occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important factors determining outcome in

  14. Cardiovascular manifestations of subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Manikandan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH is one of the devastating conditions, especially the aneurysmal bleed which has high mortality as well as morbidity. The mortality and morbidity caused by SAH have been recognised to be caused by both neurological and systemic causes. The alterations in systemic and other organ damage could cause death in up to 40% of SAH patients. Among the systemic manifestations, cardiovascular and respiratory complications increase hospitalisation and worsen the outcome. The main pathophysiological mechanism is the increased sympathetic activation causing myocardial necrosis. Various cardiovascular manifestations range from electrocardiogram changes to myocardial ischaemia, cardiac failure and arrhythmias. This review deals with the cardiac manifestations in SAH patients.

  15. The initial time-course of headache in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Čomić, Hata; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; Vergouwen, Mervyn D.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/320630544

    2017-01-01

    Background If acute severe headache disappears early after its onset, the question arises whether subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should still be ruled out. We studied the initial time-course and minimal duration of headache in a consecutive series of neurologically intact patients with spontaneous

  16. [Reangiography after perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein, A; Mueller, O; Timochenko, O; Moenninghoff, C; Sure, U; Forsting, M; Schlamann, M

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the detection of causative vascular lesions in patients with perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after initially negative noninvasive and invasive neurovascular imaging, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA), DSA and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We analyzed the value of repeated DSA for the detection of causative vascular lesions in 750 patients presenting to our institution with SAH and including 30 with a purely perimesencephalic pattern of subarachnoidal hemorrhage and initially negative noninvasive and invasive neurovascular imaging over a 10-year period. Repeated DSA demonstrated a causative vascular lesion in 1 patient (3.3%) but no causative vascular lesions were detected in the other patients. Repeated DSA can be used to detect a source of hemorrhage after initially negative imaging diagnostics in some rare cases. Such a finding has a therapeutic and prognostic impact especially for aneurysms in the posterior circulation which bear a higher risk of renewed hemorrhaging. Therefore, we believe that repeated DSA should be recommended in patients with perimesencephalic SAH even under consideration of the risk of complications caused by a second invasive DSA.

  17. Intracranial Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Schweiger, Vittorio; Zanconato, Giovanni; Lonati, Gisella; Baggio, Silvia; Gottin, Leonardo; Polati, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia is an infrequent occurrence in the obstetric population. Nevertheless, it is a potentially life-threatening complication. In the majority of the cases, the first clinical symptom associated with intracranial subdural bleeding is severe headache, but the clinical course may have different presentations. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old woman with an acute intracranial subdural hematoma shortly after spinal anesthe...

  18. Endovascular treatment for pediatric intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Jiang, Chuhan; Li, Youxiang; Yang, Xinjian; Wu, Zhongxue [Capital Medical University, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute and Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Hebei (China)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics and outcomes of pediatric patients with intracranial aneurysms. From 1998 to 2005, 25 pediatric patients (aged {<=}17 years) with intracranial aneurysm were treated at our institute. Eleven of 25 patients had subarachnoid hemorrhage. In ten patients, the aneurysm was an incidental finding. One patient presented with cranial nerves dysfunction and three with neurological deficits. The locations of the aneurysms were as follows: vertebral artery (VA; n = 9), middle cerebral artery (MCA; n = 5), posterior cerebral artery (PCA; n = 4), basilar artery (BA; n = 2), anterior communicating artery (n = 2), anterior cerebral artery (n = 2), and internal carotid artery (n = 1). Five patients were treated with selective embolization with coils. Sixteen patients were treated with parent vessel occlusion (PVO). Eight PVOs were performed with balloons and eight were performed with coils. One patient with a VA aneurysm was spontaneously thrombosed 4 days after the initial diagnostic angiogram. In three patients treated with stent alone or stent-assisted coiling, one with BA trunk aneurysm died. One aneurismal recurrence occurred and was retreated. At a mean follow-up duration of 23.5 months, 96% of patients had a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 4 or 5. Pediatric intracranial aneurysms occur more commonly in male patients and have a predilection for the VA, PCA, and MCA. PVO is an effective and safe treatment for fusiform aneurysms. Basilar trunk fusiform aneurysms were difficult to treat and were associated with a high mortality rate. (orig.)

  19. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...

  20. Intracranial pressure monitoring (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intracranial pressure monitoring is performed by inserting a catheter into the head with a sensing device to monitor the pressure around the brain. An increase in intracranial pressure can cause a decrease in blood flow to ...

  1. Intraparenchymal intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with acute liver failure Monitoreo intraparenquimatoso de presión intracraneana en pacientes con falla hepática aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra T. Rabadán

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP is a common cause of death in acute liver failure (ALF and is determinant for decision-making regarding the timing of liver transplantation. The recommended type ICP monitoring device is controversial in ALF patients. Epidural devices had less risk of hemorrhagic complications, but they are less reliable than intraparenchymal ones. METHOD: Twenty-three patients with ALF were treated, and 19 of them received a liver transplant. Seventeen patients had ICP monitoring because of grade III-IV encephalopathy. All patients received fresh plasma (2-3 units before and during placing the intraparenchymal device. RESULTS: Eleven cases (64.7% had elevated ICP, and 6 patients (35.2% had normal values. One patient (5.9% had an asymptomatic small intraparenchymal haemorrhage ANTECEDENTES: La presión intracraneana elevada (PIC es una causa frecuente de muerte en la falla hepática aguda (FHA y es determinante para la toma de decisiones respecto del momento del transplante hepático. El tipo de dispositivo para el monitoreo de OIC es controversial em los pacientes em FHA. Los dispositivos epidurales tienen menos riesgo de complicaciones hemorrágicas, pero son menos confiables que los intraparenquimatosos. MÉTODO: Veintitrés pacientes con FHA fueron tratados, y 19 de ellos recibieron un transplante hepático. diecisiete pacientes tuvieron monitoreo de PIC debido a encefalopatía grado III-IV. Todos los pacientes recibieron plasma fresco (2-3 unidades antes y durante la colocación de la fibra intraparenquimatosa. RESULTADOS: Once casos (64.7% tuvieron PIC elevada, y 6 pacientes (35.2% tuvieron valores normales. Un paciente (5.9% tuvo una pequeña hemorragia intraparenquimatosa asintomática <1cm³ en TAC, la cual no impidió el transplante hepático. CONCLUSIÓN: En nuestra experiencia, el monitoreo intraparenquimatoso de presión intracraneana en pacientes con FHA parece ser un método preciso y con bajo riesgo

  2. The commonly missed diagnosis of intracranial hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee N. Ruggeri-McKinley, BSN, RN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 28 year old female who presented with a subacute onset of a severe throbbing and stabbing headache after a morning spin class 9 months ago. We confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension cause by a cerebrospinal fluid leak. The headache finally resolved after a 55 ml blood patch. Affecting an estimated 5/100,000 patients, spontaneous intracranial hypotension is considered rare in medical literature. Many patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension are incapacitated for years and even decades. The misdiagnosis of intracranial hypotension can have serious consequences and lead to unnecessary testing and treatment. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of this diagnosis when evaluating a patient with acute head pain. Considering that physical exams are usually normal, clinicians must focus on the patient history and physical. Clues in the patient interviewing process can lead to an immediate and accurate diagnosis.

  3. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.

  4. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  5. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  6. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure During Intracranial Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intracranial endoscopy is a minimum invasive procedure, which reduces trauma to the brain, is cost-effective, and carries a shortened hospital stay with an improved postoperative outcome. Objective: To monitor intracranial pressure changes during intracranial endoscopy among children and adults under general anesthesia/sedation, and to compare the intracranial pressure changes between children and adults receiving general anesthesia and among adults receiving general anesthesia and sedation. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted in one of the tertiary care hospitals of Lucknow. This was carried out in the department of neurosurgery from January 2008 to December 2008. Patients who were not fit for general anesthesia received local anesthesia under sedation. Patients participating in the study were divided into three groups. Intracranial pressure was recorded at specific intervals. Parametric data were subjected to statistical analysis using a student\\s t test. Result: A total of 70 patients were undergoing intracranial endoscopy under general anesthesia during the study period. In both groups A and B, intracranial pressure increases the maximum during inflation of the balloon. In group C, all the variations in ICP were found to be statistically significant. In the comparison of intracranial pressure changes between groups A and B, no significant difference was found. All correlations in the comparison of groups B and C were found to be statistically significant (p< 0.001. Conclusion: There is a need for continuous intraoperative monitoring of ICP intracranial endoscopy, because ICP increases in various stages of the procedure, which can be detrimental to the perfusion of the brain. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(4.000: 240-245

  7. Neurosarcoidosis-related intracranial haemorrhage: three new cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, J P

    2012-06-09

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial haemorrhage in neurosarcoidosis (NS-ICH) is rare, poorly understood and the diagnosis of NS may not be immediately apparent. METHODS: The clinical features of three new NS-ICH cases are described including new neuropathological findings and collated with cases from a systematic literature review. RESULTS: Cases: (i) A 41-year-old man with headaches, hypoandrogenism and encephalopathy developed a cerebellar haemorrhage. He had neuropathological confirmation of NS with biopsy-proven angiocentric granulomata and venous disruption. He responded to immunosuppressive therapy. (ii) A 41-year-old man with no history of hypertension was found unconscious. A subsequently fatal pontine haemorrhage was diagnosed. Liver biopsy revealed sarcoid granulomas. (iii) A 36-year-old man with raised intracranial pressure headaches presented with a seizure and a frontal haemorrhage. Hilar lymph node biopsy confirmed sarcoidosis, and he was treated successfully. Systematic Review: Twelve other published cases were identified and collated with our cases. Average age was 36 years and M:F = 2.3:1; 46% presented with neurological symptoms and 31% had CNS-isolated disease. Immediate symptoms of ICH were acute\\/worsening headache or seizures (60%). ICH was supratentorial (62%), infratentorial (31%) or subarachnoid (7%). 40% had definite NS, 53% probable NS and 7% possible NS (Zajicek criteria). Antigranulomatous\\/immunosuppressive therapy regimens varied and 31% died. CONCLUSIONS: This series expands our knowledge of the pathology of NS-ICH, which may be of arterial or venous origin. One-third have isolated NS. Clinicians should consider NS in young-onset ICH because early aggressive antigranulomatous therapy may improve outcome.

  8. Método para registro continuo da pressão intracraniana A method for continuous monitoring of the intracranial pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique S. Ivamoto

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Pacientes com hipertensão intracraniana aguda podem ser melhor manipulados se a pressão intracraniana for constantemente medida. Uma série de 91 pacientes com traumatismos cranio-encefálicos agudos, hemorragia subaracnóidea, encefalite, hemorragia intracerebral, ou intoxicação por monóxido de carbono foi acompanhada usando o interruptor a pressão de Numoto por um método aqui descrito. O principal benefício tem sido o conhecimento do valor da pressão intracraniana a todo momento e a detecção rápida de elevações da pressão. Complicações se limitaram a 3 casos de infecção. Dois deles foram pequenas coleções purulentas no ponto de saída do tubo no couro cabeludo. Um paciente com uma fratura craniana exposta, laceração cerebral e hematoma intracerebral desenvolveu uma infecção da ferida operatoria e abscesso cerebral que requereu drenagem.Patients suffering acute intracranial pressure increases can be more advantageously handled if the intracranial pressure is constantly monitored. 91 patients with acute head injuries, hydrocephalus, cerebral infarction, subarachnoid hemorrhage, encephalitis, intracerebral hemorrhage, or carbon monoxide intoxication have been so monitored by using the Numoto pressure switch by a method herein described. The main advantage has been the knowledge of the level of intracranial pressure at any given time and the early detection of a rising pressure when this phenomenon occurred. There were no complications except for 3 cases of infection. Two of these cases were minor purulent collections only at the site of exit of the tube in the scalp. One patient with a compound wound, cerebral laceration, and intracerebral hematoma developed a wound infection and brain abscess which required drainage.

  9. MRI of the optic nerve in benign intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, A.; Barker, G.J.; Riordan-Eva, P.; MacManus, D.; Sanders, M.; Tofts, P.S.; McDonald, W.I.; Moseley, I.F.; Miller, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the MRI appearance of the optic nerve and its cerebrospinal-fluid-containing sheath in 17 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) and 15 normal controls. Using phased-array local coils, 3-mm coronal T2-weighted fat-suppressed fast spin-echo images were obtained with an in-plane resolution of < 0.39 mm. The optic nerve and its sheath were clearly differentiated. An enlarged, elongated subarachnoid space around the optic nerve was demonstrated in patients with BIH. High-resolution MRI of the optic nerve offers additional information which may be of value for diagnosis and in planning and monitoring treatment. (orig.). With 5 figs

  10. Advances in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Its Significance in Managing Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawoos, Usmah; McCarron, Richard M.; Auker, Charles R.; Chavko, Mikulas

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) measurements are essential in evaluation and treatment of neurological disorders such as subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, hydrocephalus, meningitis/encephalitis, and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The techniques of ICP monitoring have evolved from invasive to non-invasive—with both limitations and advantages. Some limitations of the invasive methods include short-term monitoring, risk of infection, restricted mobility of the subject, etc. The invasiveness of a method limits the frequency of ICP evaluation in neurological conditions like hydrocephalus, thus hampering the long-term care of patients with compromised ICP. Thus, there has been substantial interest in developing noninvasive techniques for assessment of ICP. Several approaches were reported, although none seem to provide a complete solution due to inaccuracy. ICP measurements are fundamental for immediate care of TBI patients in the acute stages of severe TBI injury. In severe TBI, elevated ICP is associated with mortality or poor clinical outcome. ICP monitoring in conjunction with other neurological monitoring can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of brain damage. This review article presents: (a) the significance of ICP monitoring; (b) ICP monitoring methods (invasive and non-invasive); and (c) the role of ICP monitoring in the management of brain damage, especially TBI. PMID:26690122

  11. Cerebral hemodynamics in elderly patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Using serial SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Hideo; Fukushima, Takeo; Hirakawa, Katsuyuki; Sakamoto, Seizaburou; Tsuchimochi, Hirohito; Tomonaga, Masamichi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-05-01

    To define characteristics of cerebral vasospasm in elderly patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, changes in cerebral hemodynamics were serially determined by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 99m}Tc-hexamethylpropylene-amino-oxime (HMPAO). The subjects were 8 elderly patients with an average age of 65 years (one men and 7 women). The findings were compared with those from 28 younger patients with an average age of 49 years (9 men and 19 women). The common site of aneurysms was the internal carotid artery (37.5%) in the elderly group. The frequency of delayed ischemic neurologic dysfunction after cerebral vasospasm was 50.0% in the elderly group and 39.3% in the younger group. There was no significant difference in the frequency of cerebral infarction between the two groups (25.0% vs 28.6%); however, the rate of persistent delayed ischemic neurologic dysfunction was higher in the elderly group (50.0%) than the younger group (36.4%). The frequency of hydrocephalus was higher in the elderly group (50.0%) than the younger group (21.4%). In the elderly group, the recovery from decreased cerebral blood flow was poor even in patients with mild subarachnoid hemorrhage. All patients with severe subarachnoid hemorrhage developed delayed ischemic neurologic dysfunction. Even if the degree of subarachnoid hemorrhage was the same in both groups, the recovery from decreased blood flow was poorer in the elderly group than the younger group. There was no decrease in cerebral blood flow in the stage of vasospasm, which may be attributed to the relief of intracranial pressure due to cerebral atrophy. Even in subacute stage, blood flow was more diffusely decreased in the elderly group than the younger group. (N.K.).

  12. Gender influences the initial impact of subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Friedrich

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH carries high early patient mortality. More women than men suffer from SAH and the average age of female SAH survivors is greater than that of male survivors; however, the overall mortality and neurological outcomes are not better in males despite their younger age. This pattern suggests the possibility of gender differences in the severity of initial impact and/or in subsequent pathophysiology. We explored gender differences in survival and pathophysiology following subarachnoid hemorrhage induced in age-matched male and female rats by endovascular puncture. Intracranial pressure (ICP, cerebral blood flow (CBF, blood pressure (BP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP were recorded at and after induction of SAH. Animals were sacrificed 3 hours after lesion and studied for subarachnoid hematoma size, vascular pathology (collagen and endothelium immunostaining, inflammation (platelet and neutrophil immunostaining, and cell death (TUNEL assay. In a second cohort, 24-hour survival was determined. Subarachnoid hematoma, post-hemorrhage ICP peak, BP elevation, reduction in CPP, intraluminal platelet aggregation and neutrophil accumulation, loss of vascular collagen, and neuronal and non-neuronal cell death were greater in male than in female rats. Hematoma size did not correlate with the number of apoptotic cells, platelet aggregates or neutrophil. The ICP peak correlated with hematoma size and with number of apoptotic cells but not with platelet aggregates and neutrophil number. This suggests that the intensity of ICP rise at SAH influences the severity of apoptosis but not of inflammation. Mortality was markedly greater in males than females. Our data demonstrate that in rats gender influences the initial impact of SAH causing greater bleed and early injury in males as compared to females.

  13. CT and angiography evaluation in ruptured intracranial aneurysm clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Sik; Kim, Byung Young; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Zeon, Seok Kil; Park, Sam Kyoon [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-09-15

    CT has been become one of the most important diagnostic method in the evaluation of ruptured intracranial aneurysm with direct detection of subarachnoid, intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and identification of complications such as recurrent bleeding, hydrocephalus and infarction secondary to arterial spam. Angiography gives precise information on the location, size of aneurysm and presence of arterial spasm. Authors attempted to predict the location of ruptured aneurysm in the CT by distribution of blood in subarachnoid spaces and brain parenchyme in comparison with angiographic findings, and also predict the prognosis of the patients by relationship between the extent of blood and clinical grade. Authors analysed 40 cases of ruptured intracranial aneurysm confirmed by CT and angiography at Keimyung University Hospital for last 2 year. The results were as follows: 1. The age and sex distribution; the most prevalent age group was 5th to 6th decades (70%), and female patient was slightly more than male patient (57.5% : 42.5%). 2. The location of aneurysms were; posterior communicating artery group 17 cases (42.2%), middle cerebral artery group 10 cases (25.0%), anterior communicating artery group 7 cases (17.5%), basilar artery bifurcation 1 case (2.5%), posterior inferior cerebellar artery 1 cases (2.5%), and multiple aneurysms 4 cases (10%) in order to frequency. 3. Characteristic distribution of intracranial hemorrhage in CT were as follows; 1) In 6 cases (85.7%) of anterior communicating artery aneurysm, interhemispheric fissure hemorrhage was noted. 2) The ipsilateral sylvian fissure hemorrhage was noted in all cases of middle cerebral artery aneurysm (10 cases) and 12 cases (70.6%) of posterior communicating artery aneurysm. 3) Localized hematoma in frontal lobe near interhemispheric fissure (2 cases; 28.6%), septum pellucidum (1 case; 14.3%) and corpus callosm (1 case; 14.3%) were characteristic in anterior communicating artery aneurysm. 4) Comma

  14. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces imaging using a pulse-triggered three-dimensional turbo spin echo MR sequence with variable flip-angle distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Silvera, Jonathan [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Bekaert, Olivier; Decq, Philippe [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Public Health, Creteil (France); Vignaud, Alexandre [Siemens Healthcare, Saint Denis (France); Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno [Laboratoire Images Signaux et Systemes Intelligents, UPEC, Creteil (France)

    2011-02-15

    To assess the three-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip-angle distribution magnetic resonance sequence (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimised Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution) for the imaging of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces. We prospectively investigated 18 healthy volunteers and 25 patients, 20 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH), five with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), using the SPACE sequence at 1.5T. Volume rendering views of both intracranial and ventricular CSF were obtained for all patients and volunteers. The subarachnoid CSF distribution was qualitatively evaluated on volume rendering views using a four-point scale. The CSF volumes within total, ventricular and subarachnoid spaces were calculated as well as the ratio between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes. Three different patterns of subarachnoid CSF distribution were observed. In healthy volunteers we found narrowed CSF spaces within the occipital aera. A diffuse narrowing of the subarachnoid CSF spaces was observed in patients with NCH whereas patients with CH exhibited narrowed CSF spaces within the high midline convexity. The ratios between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes were significantly different among the volunteers, patients with CH and patients with NCH. The assessment of CSF spaces volume and distribution may help to characterise hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  15. A study about histopathological change of NBCA injected into subarachnoid space of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Suk Hong; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Suk Hong

    2002-01-01

    To determine the histopathological changes occurring after the injection of NBCA (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) into the subarachnoid space of the cat. A 1:4 NBCA-Lipiodol mixture was injected into the subarachnoid space of ten cats by cervical spinal tap. Two weeks later all cats were sacrificed, and histopathological examination of the cerebrospinal leptomeninges, blood vessels and parenchyma was undertaken. 1. Changes in leptomeninges: Foreign body giant cells were noted in five cases, fibrosis in six and acute inflammation in all ten. Chronic inflammatory change accompanied 7 of 10 acute inflammations. 2. Changes in blood vessels: One case was excluded because blood vessels were not included in pathologic tissue. Acute vasculitis was noted in six cases, thrombosis in one, and one showed fibrotic change without necrosis in the media of the vessel wall. Among the six with acute vasculitis, severe change was noted in one and mild change in five. 3. Changes in parenchyma: Mild parenchymal inflammation was discovered in two cases and mild infarction in one. Parenchymal changes were limited to the outer cortex. The injection of NBCA into the subarachnoid space of the cat caused toxic histopathological changes in the cerebrospinal meninges, blood vessels, and parenchyma

  16. A study about histopathological change of NBCA injected into subarachnoid space of the cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Kyung Un; Lee, Suk Hong; Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Suk Hong [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    To determine the histopathological changes occurring after the injection of NBCA (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) into the subarachnoid space of the cat. A 1:4 NBCA-Lipiodol mixture was injected into the subarachnoid space of ten cats by cervical spinal tap. Two weeks later all cats were sacrificed, and histopathological examination of the cerebrospinal leptomeninges, blood vessels and parenchyma was undertaken. 1. Changes in leptomeninges: Foreign body giant cells were noted in five cases, fibrosis in six and acute inflammation in all ten. Chronic inflammatory change accompanied 7 of 10 acute inflammations. 2. Changes in blood vessels: One case was excluded because blood vessels were not included in pathologic tissue. Acute vasculitis was noted in six cases, thrombosis in one, and one showed fibrotic change without necrosis in the media of the vessel wall. Among the six with acute vasculitis, severe change was noted in one and mild change in five. 3. Changes in parenchyma: Mild parenchymal inflammation was discovered in two cases and mild infarction in one. Parenchymal changes were limited to the outer cortex. The injection of NBCA into the subarachnoid space of the cat caused toxic histopathological changes in the cerebrospinal meninges, blood vessels, and parenchyma.

  17. Isolated Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Evaluation of Critical Care Unit Admission Practices and Outcomes From a North American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witiw, Christopher D; Byrne, James P; Nassiri, Farshad; Badhiwala, Jetan H; Nathens, Avery B; da Costa, Leodante B

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage is a common radiographic finding associated with traumatic brain injury. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the association between hospital-level ICU admission practices and clinically important outcomes for patients with isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and mild clinical traumatic brain injury. Multicenter observational cohort. Trauma centers participating in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program spanning January 2012 to March 2014. A total of 14,146 subjects, 16 years old and older, admitted to 215 trauma centers with isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage and Glasgow Coma Scale score 13 or greater. Patients with concurrent intracranial injuries, severe injury to other body regions, or tests positive for alcohol or illicit substances were excluded. ICU admission. The primary outcome was need for neurosurgical intervention, defined as insertion of an intracranial monitor/drain or craniectomy/craniotomy. Secondary outcomes describing the clinical course included hospital discharge disposition, in-hospital mortality, and length of stay. Admission to ICU was common within the cohort (44.6%), yet the need for neurosurgical intervention was rare (0.24%). Variability was high between centers and remained so after adjusting for differences in case-mix and hospital-level characteristics (median odds ratio, 4.1). No significant differences in neurosurgical interventions, mortality, or discharge disposition to home under self-care were observed between groups of the highest and lowest ICU admitting hospitals. However, those in highest admitting group "stayed" in hospital 1.13 (95% CI, 1.07-1.20; p practices may represent an opportunity for resource optimization when managing patients with mild clinical traumatic brain injury and associated isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  18. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  19. Ruptured intracranial aneurysm in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta: 2 familial cases and a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaberel, T; Rochey, A; di Palma, C; Lucas, F; Touze, E; Emery, E

    2016-12-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is an inherited connective tissue disorder that causes bone fragility. Vascular complications have been described, but only few cases of ruptured intracranial aneurysm have been reported. We first described 2 familial cases of ruptured intracranial aneurysm and then conducted a systematic review of the literature. A mother and her daughter with a typical history of osteogenesis imperfecta presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage, which was related to a posterior communicating artery aneurysm in both cases. The mother had early rebleeding and died. The aneurysm was excluded by coiling in the daughter. Despite occurrence of hydrocephalus and delayed cerebral ischemia, she had an excellent functional outcome. A systematic review of the literature identified seven additional cases. None of the cases were in fact familial. All patients had a previous medical history of multiple fractures. Seven aneurysms were resolved, three by surgical clipping and four by endovascular procedure. No periprocedural complication was reported. One patient died prematurely and 6 experienced good functional outcome. We report the first familial cases of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in osteogenesis imperfecta patients. Intracranial aneurysms are probably linked to a collagen pathology, which is at the origin of osteogenesis imperfecta. In cases of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in an osteogenesis imperfecta family, intracranial aneurysm screenings in the relatives showing osteogenesis imperfecta should be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Bedside transcranial sonography monitoring in a patient with hydrocephalus post subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Najjar, Ahmed; Denault, André Y.; Bojanowski, Michel W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Development of hydrocephalus can occur after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Typically, it is diagnosed with computed tomography, CT, scan. However, transcranial sonography (TCS) can be used particularly in patients with craniotomy which removes the acoustic interference of the skull and allows a closer up visualization of brain structures through the skin. Case presentation We report a 73-year-old woman who was hospitalized for SAH and developed acute hydrocephalus requiring an ext...

  1. Risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, D; Vaeth, M; Tsiropoulos, I

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of occurrence of subarachnoid haemorrhage in first degree relatives (parents, siblings, children) of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. DESIGN: Population based cohort study using data from the Danish National Discharge Registry and the Central Person Registry......, standardised for age, sex, and calendar period. This process was repeated for patients discharged from neurosurgery units, as diagnoses from these wards had high validity (93%). RESULTS: 18 patients had a total of 19 first degree relatives with subarachnoid haemorrhage during the study period, corresponding...... to a standardised incidence ratio of 2.9 (95% confidence interval 1.9 to 4.6). Patients discharged from neurosurgery wards had a higher standardised incidence ratio (4.5, 2.7 to 7.3). CONCLUSIONS: First degree relatives of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage have a threefold to fivefold increased risk...

  2. Hypothesis on the Role of Cryptochromes in Inflammation and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Barreto Nogueira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have recently found that the temperature variability (TV in the day–night cycle may predict the mean intracranial pressure in the following 24 h (ICP24 in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients under multimodality monitoring, sedation, and hypothermia (<35°C. Specifically, we found that ICP24 = 6 (4 − TV mmHg. TV is the ratio between the coefficient of variation of temperature during the nocturnal and the preceding diurnal periods. This result suggests that the circadian clock reflects brain plasticity mechanisms and its malfunctioning leads to deterioration of the neurologic status. The sleep–wake cycle is absent in these patients and their circadian clock can function properly only by environment light-independent mechanisms. One mechanism involves the circadian clock proteins named cryptochromes (CRYs. CRYs are highly preserved and widespread in the evolutionary tree, are expressed in different cell types in humans [type II CRYs, in two forms: human cryptochrome 1 and 2 (hCRY1 and hCRY2], and in certain species, respond to blue light and play role in magnetoreception. Interestingly, SAH outcome seems to correlate with inflammation, and CRYs decrease inflammatory activity. Our hypothesis derived from these observations is that CRYs modulate the circadian oscillation of temperature even during therapeutic hypothermia and improve outcome in SAH through decrease in inflammation. A strategy to test this hypothesis is to measure periodically during the acute phase of high-grade SAH the level of CRYs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and circulating white blood cells, and to correlate these levels with outcome, TV, ICP24, and pro- and anti-inflammatory markers in CSF and blood. If this hypothesis is true, the development of therapies targeting inflammation in SAH could take advantage of cryptochrome properties. It has been shown that blue light phototherapy increases the expression of CRYs in blood mononuclear cells in jaundiced

  3. The autopsy-correlation of computed tomography in acute severe head injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Shin; Kim, Hong; Mikabe, Toshio; Karasawa, Hideharu; Watanabe, Saburo

    1981-01-01

    We discuss the importance of Contrast-Enhanced CT (C.E.CT) in establishing the variety of the intracranial pathological process in acute severe head injuries. During a two-and-a-half-year period (June, 1977 - December, 1979) thirty-three patients with acute severe head injuries were autopsied, all of whom had been scanned on admission. Among them, 14 patients had undergone both plain CT and C.E.CT on admission. Brain slices were examined macroscopically in three categories; brain contusion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Each category was then compared retrospectively with the plain CT and C.E.CT findings. C.E.CT was found to correspond much better to the autopsy finding than plain CT in the following three points: (1) C.E.CT clearly enhances the contusion areas and reveals occult contusion areas. (2) C.E.CT enhances the areas corresponding to the subarachnoid space due to the breakdown of brain-surface blood vessels. (3) C.E.CT reveals the enlargement and formation of the intracerebral hematoma by the extravasation of the intravenous contrast material from injured arterial vessels. (author)

  4. MicroRNA Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pathophysiologically involved in acute cerebral ischemia. This study compared miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid...... from neurologically healthy patients, as well as SAH patients with and without subsequent development of DCI. METHODS: In a prospective case-control study of SAH patients treated with external ventricular drainage and neurologically healthy patients, miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid were screened...... passed quality control. In the validation, 66 miRNAs showed a relative increase in cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients compared with neurologically healthy patients (P

  5. Evaluation of pituitary and thyroid hormones in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm Avaliação dos hormônios hipofisários e tireoidianos em pacientes com hemorragia subaracnoidea devido a ruptura de aneurisma intracraniano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mangieri

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the central nervous system (CNS influences the pituitary hormone secretions and that diseases of CNS are frequently associated with an altered endocrine function. The aim of this study has been the evaluation of the serum concentrations of the pituitary and thyroid hormones in a series of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Thirty-five patients (23 females and 12 males, aged 51.9±13.3 years on the mean were admitted. They were evaluated to assess the clinical severity of the subarachnoid hemorrhage by Hunt & Hess scale: nine patients were in the grade I, 14 in the grade II, and 12 in the grade III. Blood samples were obtained between 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. and serum hormones were measured by commercial kits (IRMA or MEIA methods. Cortisol serum levels (normal range (NR = 5 to 18 µg/dL were increased in all the patients (mean ± standard deviation = 31.4±12.4 µg/dL. Mean prolactin levels (NR É bem conhecido que o sistema nervoso central (SNC influencia as secreções dos hormônios hipofisários e que doenças do SNC são frequentemene associadas com função endócrina alterada. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar as concentrações séricas dos hormônios hipofisários e tireoidianos em uma série de pacientes acometidos de hemorragia subaracnóidea devida a ruptura de aneurisma cerebral. Foram avaliados 35 pacientes (23 mulheres e 12 homens, com média de idade de 51,9±13,3 anos. Foram avaliados para a severidade da doença pela escala de Hunt & Hess: nove deles estavam no grau I, 14 no grau II e 12 no grau III. As amostras de sangue foram obtidas entre 8:00 e 9:00 horas e os hormônios foram medidos pelos métodos de IRMA ou de MEIA. Os níveis séricos de cortisol (valor normal (VN 5 a 18 µg/dl estavam aumentados em todos os pacientes (média±desvio padrão = 31,4±12,4 µg/dl. Os níveis de prolactina (VN <20 ng/ml foram de 18,6±17,1 ng/ml e cinco (14,2% tiveram n

  6. Pre-hospital ct diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hov, Maren Ranhoff; Ryen, Annette; Finsnes, Katrine; Storflor, Janne; Lindner, Thomas; Gleditsch, Jostein; Lund, Christian Georg

    2017-02-28

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with higher mortality in the acute phase than other stroke types. There is a particular risk of early and devastating re-bleeding. Patients therefore need urgent assessment in a neurosurgical department, and the shorter the time from symptom onset to diagnosis the better. The Norwegian Acute Stroke Pre-hospital Project (NASPP) has developed a Mobile Stroke Unit (MSU) model, which is staffed with anesthesiologists also trained in pre-hospital clinical assessment of acute stroke patients and interpretation of computerized tomography (CT). The MSU was operated on-call from the local dispatch center in a rural area 45-160 km away from a neurosurgical department. Two patients presented with clinical symptoms and signs compatible with SAH. In both cases, the CT examination confirmed the diagnosis of SAH. Both were transported directly from patient location to the regional neurosurgical department, saving at least 2-2.5 h of pre-neurosurgical time. The Norwegian MSU model staffed with anesthesiologists can rapidly establish an exact diagnosis of SAH, which in a rural area significantly reduces time to neurosurgical care. Study data are retrospectively registered in ClinicalTrail.gov. NCT03036020 Unique Protocol ID: NASPP-2 Brief Title: The Norwegian Acute Stroke Prehospital Project Overall Status: Completed Primary Completion Date: January 2016 [Actual] Verification Date: January 2017.

  7. Antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, A; García Rodríguez, L A; Poulsen, F R

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate the relationship between use of antithrombotic drugs and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We identified patients discharged from Danish neurosurgery units with a first-ever SAH diagnosis in 2000 to 2012 (n=5,834). For each case, we selected 40 age-, sex...

  8. Continuous EEG Monitoring in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Friberg, Christian Kærsmose; Wellwood, Ian

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous EEG (cEEG) may allow monitoring of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and seizures, including non-convulsive seizures (NCSz), and non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE). We aimed to evaluate: (a) the diagnostic...

  9. Genetic Epidemiology of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korja, Miikka; Silventoinen, Karri; McCarron, Peter

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: It would be essential to clinicians, familial aneurysm study groups, and aneurysm families to understand the genetic basis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but there are no large population-based heritability estimates assessing the relative contribution of genetic...

  10. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, but may be related to vasospasm. Experimental studies have indicated that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse vasospasm and have

  11. Prediction of intracranial hypertension through noninvasive intracranial pressure waveform analysis in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestero, Matheus Fernando Manzolli; Frigieri, Gustavo; Cabella, Brenno Caetano Troca; de Oliveira, Sergio Mascarenhas; de Oliveira, Ricardo Santos

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a noninvasive device to assess intracranial pressure wave form in children with hydrocephalus. A prospective and non-experimental descriptive-analytic study was performed. Fifty-six patients were enrolled in this study. They were divided in four groups: group A, children with clinically compensated hydrocephalus; B, surgically treated hydrocephalus; C, patients with acute intracranial hypertension due to hydrocephalus; and D, children without neurological disease (control). Data were collected through the installation of an extracranial deformation sensor, coupled to the children's scalp, which allowed registration of noninvasive intracranial pressure curves. Parameters obtained were analyzed: P2/P1 ratio, "classification P1 and P2 and P1 slope. P2/P1 index and "classification of P1 and P2" had a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100% for predicting intracranial hypertension. "P1 slope" presented no statistical difference. This study showed a useful and noninvasive method for monitoring intracranial pressure, which was able to indicate the intracranial hypertension in children with hydrocephalus and, thus, should be further investigated for clinical applications.

  12. Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Detection of Hemispheric Bioimpedance Asymmetry in Acute Brain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Stroke; Stroke, Acute; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhage; Clot (Blood); Brain; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Stroke; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Injury

  13. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  14. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  15. Clinical and CT analysis of GCS 15 patients with intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; He Jianyuan; Jiang Shanyue; Zhang Yanling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical symptoms and CT manifestations of GCS 15 patients with intracranial hemorrhage. Methods: Clinical data and manifestations of the CT images of 35 patients with GCS 15 and intracranial hemorrhage were retrospectively analyzed and followed up. in short term. Results: Clinical symptoms: Deficits in short-term memory appeared in 17% of patients, vomiting in 26%, headache in 97%, physical evidence of trauma above the clavicles in 100%. CT scanning: intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 18 patients, epidural hemorrhage in 9 patients, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 8 patients, subdural hemorrhage in 7 patients. During follow up, clinical severe degree was in consistent of craniocerebral CT scanning. Conclusion: For patients with GCS 15 brain injuries early head CT scanning is very important. Intracranial hemorrhage may occur in these patients. If possible, re-assessment of clinical examination and CT scanning is remarkably necessary. (authors)

  16. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Kanamaru

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video.

  17. Simultaneous Spinal and Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Cured by Craniotomy and Laminectomy: A Video Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamaru, Hideki; Kanamaru, Kenji; Araki, Tomohiro; Hamada, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous spinal and intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a rare entity. A 67-year-old man visited our hospital due to headache after diving into a river 2 weeks before. Non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed bilateral intracranial CSDH. The bilateral CSDH was evacuated and his symptoms improved. Three days after craniotomy, he complained of sensory disturbance on his buttocks. Lumbar MRI showed a space-occupying lesion behind the thecal sac at L5. CT with myelography showed a subdural mass lesion; there was no communication with the subarachnoid space. Fourteen days after craniotomy, L5 laminectomy was performed and the dura mater was incised carefully. The video shows that a liquid hematoma similar to the intracranial CSDH flowed out, followed by cerebrospinal fluid. His symptoms improved after the operation and the hematoma did not recur. This is a rare condition of spinal CSDH demonstrated by neuroimaging and intraoperative video.

  18. A clinical study on neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroo; Inoue, Takao; Shimura, Kohji

    1980-01-01

    Clinical pigns, laboratory data, CT findings, CSF spectrophotometric findings and CSF/blood glucose ratio were reviewed on thirty six newborns with intracranial hemorrhage confirmed by CT and/or autopsy and the following findings were obtained. The sites of hemorrhage were: intraventricular 14, intracerebral 4, subdural 2, subarachnoidal 16. 1) Convulsion (39%), hypotonia (58%), apnea (47%), and bradycardia (58%) were seen, but those were not regarded as specific for the intracranial hemorrhage. 2) Severe anemia of hemoglobin value less than 14 g/dl (17%), more than 10% fall of hematocrit (10%), and hyperglycemia of blood glucose more than 200 mg/gl (42%) were seen almost equally in every type of hemorrhage. 3) On CSF spectrophotometry, ajj twelve cases of intraventricular and four cases of intracerebral hemorrhage had the oxyhemoglobin peak absorbance. However, of fourteen cases of subarachnoidal hemorrhage, three had the oxyhemoglobin peak absorbance but the other eleven cases had the bilirubin peak absorbance. 4) Hypoglycorrachia, defined as CSF/blood glucose ratio less than 0.4, was recognized only in the intraventricular hemorrhage group (5/9, 56%). It was concluded that lumbar puncture should be done first of all when intracranial hemorrhage is suspected. If hypoglycorrachia or oxyhemoglobin peak absorbance is recognized, computed tomography should be performed immediately to know the accurate site and extent of hemorrhage. Although hypoglycorrachia is more specific for the intraventricular hemorrhage, it is usually found several days after the hemorrhage. On the other hand, oxyhemoglobin can be identified in CSF within a day after the episode of hemorrhage and this method is more benifical for the early diagnosis. (author)

  19. Dolichoectasia and dissection of the intracranial vertebrobasilar artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanov, D.; Boshnjakovich, P.; Zivkovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the clinical neuro-radiological features of dolichoectatic intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection. The clinical features native and post-contrast CT scans of five patients (4 men and 1 woman; age ranged from 25 to 68 years) with dolichoectatic intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection were analysed retrospectively for a period of 3 years. Diagnosis was confirmed by vertebral angiography. Clinical symptoms due to ischemic cerebellar and/or brain stem lesion were present in 4 patient, 2 of them had Wallenberg syndrome. Occipital and/or posterior neck pains were found in 4 patients. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was shown in 1 patient. The incidence of previously documented hypertension was 60% (3 of 5 patients). The prognosis was relatively good. Dolichoectasia was detected by native, post-contrast CT scans and reconstructions in all patients. Intimal flap was visualized with post contrast CT scans in 1 patients. Extension of the basilar artery tip into the third ventricle was detected in 3 patients. Ischemic low-density lesions were detected in 3 patients and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 1 patient. Vertebral angiography disclosed elongation and dilatation of the vertebral and basilar arteries, double lumen sign - the presence of a true and false lumen and an intimal flap, double density and retention of contrast medium. Ischemic symptoms and head and/or neck pain were the most common clinical findings. The double lumen sign considered as the only pathognomonic angiographic finding of arterial dissection, was found in all patients. Angiography is still considered the 'gold standard' for diagnosis of intracranial vertebrobasilar artery dissection. (author)

  20. Pediatric Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Patient With Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Takotsubo Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Thomas E; Frizzola, Meg A; Priest, Marc A; Rochman, Monica F; Froehlich, Curtis D

    Takotsubo syndrome is rare in pediatric patients but must be considered in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage with pulmonary edema and cardiomyopathy. A systematic, collaborative approach is needed to facilitate emergent transfer of patients where extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (e-CPR) is used as a lifesaving measure. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) use in transport requires preplanning, role delineation, resources, and research efforts to be successful. We present an unusual transport case of successful e-CPR/ECMO treatment of Takotsubo syndrome in a 12-year-old boy with an isolated traumatic intracranial injury, cardiomyopathy with pulmonary edema, and multiple cardiac arrests. Copyright © 2018 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe head injuries and intracranial pressure monitoring outcome in Southern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Reza Farrokhi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Head injury is still a major cause of death and disability. Despite advances in intensive monitoring and clinical practice, little data is available to show the predictive value of intracranial pressure monitoring in assessment of the outcome of head injuries. This study was undertaken to evaluate this predictive value and is the first Iranian study in which ICP monitoring has been included. METHODS: In a prospective study from September 1999 to September 2003, all head- injured patients (53 patients with GCS of 4-8 who were admitted to Nemazee Hospital of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were included in this study. Subarachnoid screw method or ventricular catheter via ventriculostomy was used to determine intracranial pressure. Patients were monitored for 3 days and were followed for two years at 6-month intervals. RESULTS: Car accidents were the most common cause of head injury (43.3% and 43.3% of patients had GCS of 8. Sixty percent of patients had abnormal intracranial pressure. The patients were most commonly in their first decade of life (18.8% and 81% of patients were male. Controlling increased intracranial pressure was successful in 60% of patients and resulted in a decrease of mortality rate from 60% to 15%. CONCLUSIONS: Early treatment of increased intracranial pressure in head injury patients would be beneficial in reducing mortality and morbidity rates. KEY WORDS: Southern Iran, head injury, outcome, intracranial pressure.

  2. Neonatal Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture Treated by Endovascular Management: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pei Tai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric intracranial aneurysm rupture is rare, and is traditionally managed by surgical clipping. To the best of our knowledge, endovascular embolization of aneurysms in neonates has not previously been reported in Taiwan. We report a 9-day-old boy with intracranial aneurysms who underwent endovascular embolization, representing the youngest reported case in Taiwan. The 9-day-old boy presented with non-specific symptoms of irritable crying, seizure and respiratory distress. Computed tomography disclosed intraventricular hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage and focal intracranial hemorrhage around the right cerebellum. Subsequent computed tomographic angiography showed two sequential fusiform aneurysms, measuring 3 mm, located in the right side posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA. The patient underwent endovascular embolization because of the high risk of aneurysm re-rupture and the impossibility of surgical clipping due to the fusiform nature of the aneurysms. A postembolization angiogram revealed complete obliteration of the right distal PICA and proximal aneurysm. The distal PICA aneurysm was revascularized from the collateral circulation, but demonstrated a slow and delayed filling pattern. The patient's condition remained stable over the following week, and he was discharged without anticonvulsant therapy. No significant developmental delay was noted at follow-up at when he was 3 months old. This case emphasizes the need for clinical practitioners to consider a diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in neonates with seizure and increased intracranial pressure. Neonatal intracranial aneurysms can be treated safely by endovascular treatment.

  3. [Wegener granulomatosis and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an insignificant association?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnet, D; Ginguené, C; Marcos, A; Cahen, R; Mac Gregor, B; Turjman, F; Vallée, B

    2010-08-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is an uncommon systemic necrotizing vasculitis that demonstrates renal and respiratory tropism. While the pathogenesis of WG remains controversial, autoimmune and inflammatory mechanisms are likely to be involved. The nervous system could be affected in up to 54% of cases. Although central nervous system involvement has been reported in 7-11% of cases, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurrence is exceptional. We describe the third reported case of WG-related aneurysmal SAH and then discuss the diagnosis and pathogenesis of WG along with the physiopathology of intracranial aneurysm in light of recent data reported in the literature. A 63-year-old woman with WG was referred to our neurosurgical department for aneurysmal SAH. The vasculitis diagnosis had been established 4 years earlier when she presented with chronic sinusitis, recurrent cystitis, and renal failure. The cerebral angiography revealed an anterior communicating artery dysplastic aneurysm. The neurosurgical management of the aneurysm was scheduled but delayed because the patient was experiencing a vasculitis flare-up. Immunosuppressive therapy and intravenous corticotherapy were given, with the patient's improvement, allowing neurosurgical clipping of the aneurysm. Wegener granulomatosis-related aneurysmal SAH is an exceptional condition in neurovascular pathology. As inflammatory mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of aneurysm, the vasculitis flare-up could account for this SAH. The management of WG could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapy, as could the vasculitis-related SAH. SAH occurrence in patients with systemic vasculitis could indicate a vasculitis flare-up. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis.

  5. Imaging findings in primary intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant; Shroff, Manohar [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hawkins, Cynthia [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuropathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bouffet, Eric [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Rutka, James [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neurosurgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-02-01

    Intracranial atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are rare and extremely aggressive neoplasms seen primarily in childhood. Imaging features are often considered non-specific. However, correct diagnosis of AT/RT is important because these tumors have a markedly different clinical prognosis and require more aggressive therapy. To determine the imaging features of AT/RT. We retrospectively analyzed imaging findings in 11 patients with primary intracranial AT/RT presenting over a period of 5 years. CT (n=11), MR (n=7), clinical (n=11) and pathological (n=11) features were evaluated. FISH analysis showing monosomy of chromosome 22 (absence of bcr 22q11 locus) was available for three patients. Immunohistochemical staining for INI-1 (BAF47) was performed on all tumors. There were 11 patients, 6 boys and 5 girls. The age of presentation varied from 1 month to 15 years (average age 3 years 8 months). Six tumors were located in the posterior fossa and five in the supratentorial compartment. The tumors showed a hyperdense solid component (64%) that showed moderate to marked enhancement with contrast medium. On MR imaging, the predominant signal pattern was isointensity on T1-weighted images (57%) and T2 shortening with heterogeneity on T2-weighted images (86%). All tumors were large in size (average 4.2 x 3.7 cm), and there was a tendency for calcification (36%), hemorrhage (46%), necrosis (46%) and perifocal edema (100%). There was also a high tendency for subarachnoid dissemination, with five patients (46%) demonstrating brain and/or spinal metastasis. At follow-up (n=7), six patients showed local recurrence. At the time of recurrence, all these patients showed extensive leptomeningeal spread of the disease in both intracranial and intraspinal compartments. There are no specific imaging features for intracranial AT/RT. But a high tendency toward large size, a hyperdense solid component on CT scan with calcification, hemorrhage, necrosis and subarachnoid spread suggest

  6. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ... study in which 26 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were treated with octreotide, a synthetic hormone ...

  7. Postinterventional subarachnoid haemorrhage after endovascular stroke treatment with stent retrievers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoubashman, Omid; Reich, Arno; Jungbluth, Michael; Pjontek, Rastislav; Wiesmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical significance of postinterventional subarachnoid hyperdensities (PSH) after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke. We analysed clinical and radiological data of 113 consecutive patients who received postinterventional CT scans within 4.5 h after mechanical thrombectomy. PSH was present in 27 of 113 patients (24 %). Extravasation of contrast agent was observed during intervention in only 6 of 27 cases (22 %). There was consecutive haemorrhagic transformation in four patients with PSH (p = 0.209, Fisher's exact test). Preinterventional predictors for the occurrence of PSH in our series were a long interval between clinical onset and recanalization (p = 0.028), a long procedure time (p = 0.010), and a high number of recanalization attempts (p = 0.001). PSH had no significant impact on clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale) at discharge (p = 0.419) or at 3 months (p = 0.396). There were no significant correlations between PSH and thrombectomy devices (Solitaire: p = 0.433, Trevo Pro: p = 0.124). PSH after endovascular mechanical thrombectomy in acute ischemic stroke are likely to occur in complicated cases in which more than one revascularisation attempt is performed. PSH per se do not appear to be associated with an impaired clinical outcome or an elevated risk for consecutive haemorrhage. (orig.)

  8. Paradoxical Increase in Mortality and Rupture of Intracranial Aneurysms in Microsomal Prostaglandin E2 Synthase Type 1-Deficient Mice: Attenuation by Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Silva, Ricardo A; Mitchell, Ian J; Kung, David K; Pewe, Lecia L; Granja, Manuel F; Harty, John T; Faraci, Frank M; Heistad, Donald D; Hasan, David M

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Expression of microsomal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthase type 1 (mPGES-1) is increased in the wall of intracranial aneurysms in humans. PGE2, a by-product of mPGES-1, is associated with inflammation and cerebrovascular dysfunction. To test the hypothesis that deletion of mPGES-1 decreases the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms in a murine model. Intracranial aneurysms were induced in wild-type and mPGES-1 knockout (mPGES-1 KO) mice by using a combination of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced hypertension and intracranial injection of elastase in the basal cistern. Prevalence of aneurysms, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and mortality were assessed. We also tested the effects of administration of aspirin (6 mg/kg/d) by gavage and PGE2 (1 mg/kg/d) by subcutaneous infusion. Systolic blood pressure and prevalence of aneurysm were similar in wild-type and mPGES-1 KO mice. However, mortality and the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage were markedly increased in mPGES-1 KO mice (P increase rupture of intracranial aneurysms. Aspirin, but not PGE2, attenuated the increased mortality in mPGES-1 KO mice (P increase in rupture of cerebral aneurysms and mortality, which are attenuated by low-dose aspirin.

  9. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected but u...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  10. Lumbar catheter for monitoring of intracranial pressure in patients with post-hemorrhagic communicating hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Verena; Staykov, Dimitre; Huttner, Hagen B; Sauer, Roland; Schwab, Stefan; Bardutzky, Juergen

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-measurement by lumbar drainage (LD) catheter in patients with post-hemorrhagic communicating hydrocephalus (PHCH). Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, n = 21) or spontaneous ganglionic hemorrhage (ICH, n = 22) with ventricular involvement and the need for external ventricular drainage (EVD) due to acute hydrocephalus were included. When EVD weaning was not feasible due to persistent hydrocephalus, an additional LD was placed, after which EVD was clamped off. During this overlap period, patients underwent simultaneous pressure recording via EVD ("EVD-ICP") and LD ("LD-ICP"). Testing included manual compression of the jugular veins and body-posture changes from supine to 30° position. After EVD removal, we evaluated sensitivity and specificity of ICP-rise >20 mmHg during continuous monitoring via LD for the detection of persistent PHCH using additional evaluation with computed tomography (CT). A total of 1,806 measurements were performed in 43 patients. "LD-ICP" was strongly correlated to "EVD-ICP", with determination coefficients R(2) for the baseline measurements and each of the maneuvers ranging from 0.95-0.99, and slopes ranging 0.96-1.01. Sensitivity of "LD-ICP" >20 mmHg for detection of persistent PHCH as compared to CT was 81% and specificity was 100%. Two patients with severe SAH developed reversible signs of herniation after gradually increasing differences between "LD-ICP" and "EVD-ICP" indicated a cranio-spinal pressure gradient, likely due to cerebrospinal fluid overdrainage via LD. ICP measured via LD highly and reliably correlated to ICP measured via EVD in patients with PHCH.

  11. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: Early evaluation and optimization of management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a life-threatening disease that was first described in the 18th century, but it took until the early 20th century until the term "spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage" was introduced by the English neurologist Sir Charles P. Symonds. Nowadays, the term spontaneous

  12. Frequency and appearance of hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by endovascular therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falter, Bernhard; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica; Nikoubashman, Omid; Mull, Michael [University Hospital Aachen RWTH, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    It is still unclear how often subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to chronic hemosiderin depositions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of chronic hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal SAH in patients who did not undergo surgery. Furthermore, we analyzed typical MRI patterns of chronic SAH and sought to obtain information on the temporal course of MRI signal changes. We retrospectively analyzed 90 patients who had undergone endovascular treatment for acute aneurysmal SAH. In all patients, initial CT studies and at least one T2*-weighted MRI obtained 6 months or later after SAH were analyzed for the presence and anatomical distribution of SAH or chronic hemosiderin depositions. In total, 185 T2*-weighted MRI studies obtained between 2 days and 148 months after SAH were evaluated (mean follow-up 30.2 months). On MRI studies obtained later than 6 months after SAH, subpial hemosiderin depositions were found in 50 patients (55.5 %). Most frequent localizations were the parenchyma adjacent to the frontal and parietal sulci and the insular cisterns. While the appearance of hemosiderin depositions was dynamic within the first 3 months, no changes were found during subsequent follow-up. MR signal changes were not only conclusive with subarachnoid hemosiderin depositions but in many cases also resembled those that have been associated with cortical hemosiderosis. T2*-weighted MRI is an effective means of diagnosing prior SAH. Our study suggests that chronic hemosiderin depositions can be found in a considerable number of patients after a single event of subarachnoid hemorrhage. (orig.)

  13. Frequency and appearance of hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage treated by endovascular therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falter, Bernhard; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica; Nikoubashman, Omid; Mull, Michael

    2015-10-01

    It is still unclear how often subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) leads to chronic hemosiderin depositions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of chronic hemosiderin depositions after aneurysmal SAH in patients who did not undergo surgery. Furthermore, we analyzed typical MRI patterns of chronic SAH and sought to obtain information on the temporal course of MRI signal changes. We retrospectively analyzed 90 patients who had undergone endovascular treatment for acute aneurysmal SAH. In all patients, initial CT studies and at least one T2*-weighted MRI obtained 6 months or later after SAH were analyzed for the presence and anatomical distribution of SAH or chronic hemosiderin depositions. In total, 185 T2*-weighted MRI studies obtained between 2 days and 148 months after SAH were evaluated (mean follow-up 30.2 months). On MRI studies obtained later than 6 months after SAH, subpial hemosiderin depositions were found in 50 patients (55.5%). Most frequent localizations were the parenchyma adjacent to the frontal and parietal sulci and the insular cisterns. While the appearance of hemosiderin depositions was dynamic within the first 3 months, no changes were found during subsequent follow-up. MR signal changes were not only conclusive with subarachnoid hemosiderin depositions but in many cases also resembled those that have been associated with cortical hemosiderosis. T2*-weighted MRI is an effective means of diagnosing prior SAH. Our study suggests that chronic hemosiderin depositions can be found in a considerable number of patients after a single event of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  14. Raised intracranial pressure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is article presents an approach to raised intracranial pressure (ICP) constructed in a question-answer fashion. ..... Given that raised ICP is a serious and potentially life-threatening emergency, fast and reliable referral and transfer mechanisms should be established to ensure patients with this condition are effectively treated.

  15. Intracranial atherosclerosis following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.H.; Burger, P.C.; Heinz, E.R.; Friedman, A.H.; Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a case of severe intracranial atherosclerosis in a young man who had received therapeutic radiation for a presumed brain neoplasm. Since there was no evidence of vascular disease outside the radiation ports, we speculate that accelerated atherosclerosis was induced by radiation and that hyperlipidemia may have predisposed him to this effect

  16. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  17. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  18. Procedural complications of endovascular treatment in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage treated at a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Mikko; Pyysalo, Liisa; Jalava, Iiro; Snicker, Oona; Pienimäki, Juha-Pekka; Öhman, Juha; Ronkainen, Antti

    2018-03-01

    We present a single-centre experience of procedural complications suffered by patients undergoing endovascular treatment for a ruptured saccular intracranial aneurysm at Tampere University Hospital, Finland, between 2000 and 2014. From 2000 to 2014, we treated 1,253 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, 491 of whom received endovascular treatment. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from the hospital's aneurysm database. A procedural complication was defined as having occurred whenever there was a documented new event in the patient's medical records or a note of a technical complication written by an interventionist after endovascular treatment. Procedural complications could be with or without clinical symptoms. Nearly 40% (491/1253) of the patients were treated with the endovascular method. Procedural complications occurred in 11.4% (56/491) of cases. The morbidity rate was 4.5% (22/491) and the mortality rate was 0.2% (1/491). Of the 56 complications, ischaemic complications occurred in 52% (29/56), haemorrhagic complications occurred in 27% (15/56) and technical complications occurred in 21% (12/56) of cases. In 61% (34/56) of the cases, the procedural complication did not cause any clinical symptoms. The total risk for procedural complications leading to postoperative disability or death at our institute was 4.7%. The complication frequency is in accordance with previous reports. Endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms is a safe treatment method when patient selection is carefully performed.

  19. Does treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms within 24 hours improve clinical outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Timothy J; Dowling, Richard J; Yan, Bernard; Laidlaw, John D; Mitchell, Peter J

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze whether treating ruptured intracranial aneurysms within 24 hours of subarachnoid hemorrhage improves clinical outcome. An 11-year database of consecutive ruptured intracranial aneurysms treated with endovascular coiling or craniotomy and clipping was analyzed. Outcome was measured by the modified Rankin Scale at 6 months. Our policy is to treat all cases within 24 hours of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment delays are due to nonclinical logistical factors. Two hundred thirty cases were coiled or clipped within 24 hours of subarachnoid hemorrhage and 229 at >24 hours. No difference in age, gender, smoking, family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage, aneurysm size, or aneurysm location was found between the groups. Poor World Federation of Neurological Surgeons clinical grade patients were overrepresented in the ultra-early group. Increasing age and higher World Federation of Neurological Surgeons clinical grade were predictors of poor outcome. Eight point zero percent (16 of 199) of cases treated within 24 hours of SAH (ultra-early) were dependent or dead at 6 months compared with 14.4% (30 of 209) of those treated at >24 hours post-SAH (delayed; (χ2, P0.044) [corrected]. A total of 3.5% of cases coiled within 24 hours were dependent or dead at 6 months compared with 12.5% of cases coiled at 1 to 3 days, an 82% relative risk reduction and a 10.2% absolute risk reduction (χ2, P=0.040). These groups did not differ in age, World Federation of Neurological Surgeons clinical grade, aneurysm size, or aneurysm location. Treatment of ruptured aneurysms within 24 hours is associated with improved clinical outcomes compared with treatment at >24 hours. The benefit is more pronounced for coiling than clipping.

  20. Arachnoid granulation affected by subarachnoid hemorrhage

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    R.P. Chopard

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate using light microscopy the fibro-cellular components of arachnoid granulations affected by mild and severe subarachnoid hemorrage. The erythrocytes were in the channels delimitated by collagenous and elastic bundles and arachnoid cells, showing their tortuous and intercommunicating row from the pedicle to the fibrous capsule. The core portion of the pedicle and the center represented a principal route to the bulk outflow of cerebrospinal fluid and erythrocytes. In the severe hemorrhage, the fibrocellular components are desorganized, increasing the extracellular channels. We could see arachnoid granulations without erythrocytes, which cells showed big round nucleous suggesting their transformation into phagocytic cells.

  1. The value of MRI in angiogram-negative intracranial haemorrhage

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    Renowden, S.A. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Molyneux, A.J. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Anslow, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Byrne, J.V. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01

    In one year, cerebral angiograms were performed for intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) on 334 patients. No cause for haemorrhage could be identified in 41 (12 %), 30 of whom had predominantly subarachnoid (SAH) and 11 predominantly parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). These patients were prospectively examined by cranial MRI 1-6 weeks after the ictus. The MRI studies were positive in 7 patients (17 %). In the 30 patients examined after SAH, 2 studies were positive, showing an aneurysm in one case and a brain stem lesion of uncertain aetiology in the other. In those examined after PH, cavernous angiomas were shown in 2, a tumour in 1 and a vascular malformation in another; useful diagnostic information was thus obtained in 36 % of this group. (orig.)

  2. A rare complication of spinal anesthesia: Intracranial subdural hemorrhage

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    Cengiz Kaplan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal (subarachnoid anesthesia (SA is a widely used general-purpose anesthesia. Postdural Puncture Headaches (PDPHs represent one of the principal complications of spinal anesthesia. A 21-year-old man underwent inguinal herniorrhaphy and orchiectomy using spinal anesthesia. Postoperatively, our patient started to have a headache with nausea. The patient received symptomatic therapy, but the severe headache persisted even in the supine position, with his vital signs and neurological examination being normal. Cranial MRI showed a bilateral subdural hematoma from his frontal to temporal region. A postdural puncture headache is a frequent complication after spinal anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as an intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(1.000: 54-56

  3. Trends in Intracranial Stenting Among Medicare Beneficiaries in the United States, 2006–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aakriti; Desai, Mayur M.; Kim, Nancy; Bulsara, Ketan R.; Wang, Yun; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background It is uncertain how intracranial stenting (ICS) has been adopted nationally during a period characterized by a restrictive payment policy by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, humanitarian device exemption approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and insufficient evidence of effectiveness. We sought to determine the trends in rates of ICS use and associated outcomes in the United States. Methods and Results From 65 211 328 Medicare Fee‐for‐Service beneficiaries hospitalized between 2006 and 2010 in acute care hospitals in the United States, we included patients with ICD‐9‐CM procedure codes for intracranial angioplasty and stenting, excluding those with a principal discharge diagnosis code of cerebral aneurysm or subarachnoid hemorrhage. We report operative rates per 1 000 000 person‐years and outcomes including 30‐day and 1‐year mortality rates. There were 838 ICS procedures performed among Fee‐for‐Service beneficiaries. The overall hospitalization rate for ICS increased significantly from ≈1 per 1 000 000 person‐years (n=35 procedures) in 2006 to 9 per 1 000 000 person‐years (n=258 procedures) in 2010 (P=0.0090 for trend). Procedure rates were higher in men than in women, and were highest among patients aged 75 to 84 years and lowest among those ≥85 years. The 30‐day mortality rate increased from 2.9% (95% CI, 0.1 to 15.3) to 12.9% (95% CI, 9.0 to 17.6), P=0.1294 for trend, and the 1‐year mortality rate increased from 14.7% (95% CI, 5.0 to 31.1) to 19.5% (95% CI, 14.9 to 24.9), P=0.0101; however, the annual changes were not significant after adjustment. Conclusions ICS utilization in the United States has modestly increased during a period of inadequate supportive evidence. Humanitarian device exemption and a restrictive payment policy appear to have caused slow adoption of the technology. PMID:23588099

  4. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garge, Shaileshkumar S; Vyas, Pooja D; Modi, Pranav D; Ghatge, Sharad

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn's disease (CD) seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging,) showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA) showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA). Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH.

  5. Crohns disease with central nervous system vasculitis causing subarachnoid hemorrhage due to aneurysm and cerebral ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaileshkumar S Garge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasculitis secondary to Crohn′s disease (CD seems to be a very rare phenomenon. We report a 39-year-old male who presented with headache, vomiting, and left-sided weakness in the known case of CD. Cross-sectional imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, showed right gangliocapsular acute infarct with supraclinoid cistern subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Cerebral digital substraction angiography (DSA showed dilatation and narrowing of right distal internal carotid artery (ICA. Left ICA was chronically occluded. His inflammatory markers were significantly raised. Imaging features are suggestive of cerebral vasculitis. Arterial and venous infarcts due to thrombosis are known in CD. Our case presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in supraclinoid cistern due to rupture of tiny aneurysm of perforator arteries causing SAH and infarction in right basal ganglia. Patient was treated conservatively with immunosuppression along with medical management of SAH.

  6. Headache following intracranial neuroendovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Eric P; Moskowitz, Shaye I; Tepper, Stewart J; Gupta, Rishi; Novak, Eric; Hussain, Muhammad Shazam; Stillman, Mark J

    2012-05-01

    Predicting who will develop post-procedure headache (PPH) following intracranial endovascular procedures (IEPs) would be clinically useful and potentially could assist in reducing the excessive diagnostic testing so often obtained in these patients. Although limited safety data exist, the use of triptans or dihydroergotamine (DHE) often raise concern when used with pre/post-coiled aneurysms. We sought to determine risk factors for PPH following IEP, to evaluate the utility of diagnostic testing in patients with post-coil acute headache (HA), and to record whether triptans and DHE have been used safely in this clinical setting. We conducted a retrospective chart review of adult patients undergoing IEPs. Bivariate analyses were conducted to compare patients who did and did not develop PPH. We reviewed records pertaining to 372 patients, of whom 263 underwent intracranial coil embolizations, 21 acrylic glue embolizations, and 88 stent placements. PPH occurred in 72% of coil patients, 33% of glue patients, and 14% of stent patients. Significant risk factors for post-coil HA were female gender, any pre-coil HA history, smoking, and anxiety/depression. A pre-stent history of HA exceeding 1 year's duration, and smoking were risk factors for post-stent HA. A pre-glue history of HA exceeding 1 year was the only risk factor for post-glue HA. In the small subgroup available for study, treatment with triptans or DHE was not associated with adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Diagnostic testing was low yield. Occurrence of PPH was common after IEPs and especially so with coiling and in women, smokers, and those with anxiety/depression, and was often of longer duration than allowed by current International Classification of Headache Disorders-II criteria. The yield of diagnostic testing was low, and in a small subgroup treatment with triptans or DHE did not cause adverse events in pre/post-coiled aneurysms. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. Neonatal intracranial aneurysms: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohotti, Jeewaka E; Carter, Nicole S; Zhang, Victor Jia Wei; Lai, Leon T; Xenos, Christopher; Asadi, Hamed; Chandra, Ronil V

    2018-03-02

    Intracranial aneurysms in the neonate, presenting in the first 4 weeks of life, are exceedingly rare. They appear to have characteristics, including presentation and location, that vary from those found in adults. The authors present a case of a 28-day-old neonate with a ruptured distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm. Initial noninvasive imaging with transfontanelle ultrasound and CT confirmed intraparenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed a 14-mm ruptured fusiform MCA aneurysm that was not identified on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Microsurgical treatment was performed with partial neurological recovery. A comprehensive review of the literature from 1949 to 2017 revealed a total of 40 aneurysms in 37 neonates, including the present case. The most common presenting symptom was seizure. Although subarachnoid hemorrhage was the most common form of hemorrhage, 40% had intraparenchymal hemorrhage. The median aneurysm size was 10 mm (range 2-30 mm) and the most common location was the MCA, with two-thirds of cases involving the distal intracranial vasculature. Over the last 10 years, there has been a trend of increasing noninvasive diagnosis of ruptured cerebral aneurysms in neonates, with CT angiography and contrast-enhanced MRI being the most useful diagnostic modalities. The use of contrast-enhanced MRI may improve sensitivity over time-of-flight MRA. Microsurgical treatment was the most common treatment modality overall, with increased use of endovascular treatment in the last decade. Most patients underwent microsurgical vessel ligation or endovascular parent vessel occlusion. There were high rates of neurological recovery after microsurgical or endovascular treatment, particularly for patients with distal aneurysms.

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage in patient treated with rivaroxaban

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    Michelle Molina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rivaroxaban is an oral factor Xa inhibitor used for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. There are currently no evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of hemorrhagic side effects of factor Xa inhibitors. We report a case of a thalamic hemorrhage in an 84 year-old right-handed female on rivaroxaban for treatment of atrial fibrillation. The patient had fallen down steps and became unresponsive. She was found to have diffuse scattered acute subarachnoid hemorrhage as well as intraventricular hemorrhage. Neurosurgical intervention was not required in this case, but controversy over decision making to pursue pro-coagulant therapy in the setting of worsening hemorrhage requiring emergent surgery is discussed.

  9. Isolated Subarachnoidal Hemorrhage following Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenant, Marie; Leys, Didier; Lucas, Christian

    2010-06-08

    Cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome is a rare but well-described complication following carotid endarterectomy or stenting. Clinical signs are ipsilateral, throbbing, unilateral headache with nausea or vomiting, seizures, and neurological deficits, with or without intracerebral abnormalities on CT scan, such as brain edema or intracerebral hemorrhage. Subarachnoidal hemorrhage is rarely described especially if it occurs isolated. We describe a 74-year-old man with a history of high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, atrioventricular block with pacemaker, and ischemic cardiopathy with coronary bypass. He underwent right carotid endarterectomy for a 90% NASCET asymptomatic stenosis. Four days after surgery, he complained of unusual headaches with right, throbbing hemicrania. Nine days after surgery, he presented with left hemiplegia and a partial motor seizure. He had fluctuant altered consciousness, left hemiplegia, and left visual and sensory neglect. Brain CT showed right frontal subarachnoidal hemorrhage without parenchymal bleeding. Cerebral angiography found no cerebral aneurysm, no vascular malformation, but a vasospasm of the left middle cerebral artery. Transcranial Doppler confirmed this vasospasm. Evolution was favorable with no recurrence of seizures but with an improvement of the neurological deficits and vasospasm. Physicians should bear in mind this very rare complication of endarterectomy and immediately perform neuroimaging in case of unusual headache following endarterectomy or angioplasty.

  10. Does Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Embolic Stroke Have Long-term Side Effects on Intracranial Vessels? An Angiographic Follow-up Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurre, Wiebke; Pérez, Marta Aguilar; Horvath, Diana; Schmid, Elisabeth; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Henkes, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Mechanical thrombectomy (mTE) proved to be effective treating acute vessel occlusions with an acceptable rate of procedural complications. Potential long-term side effects of the vessel wall trauma caused by mechanical irritation of the endothelium are unknown up to now. Methods. From a retrospectively established database of 640 acute stroke treatments, we selected 261 patients with 265 embolic vessel occlusions treated successfully by mTE without permanent implantation of a stent. Analysis comprised the type of devices used and the number of passes performed. Digital subtraction angiography immediately after treatment was evaluated for vasospasm, dissection, and extravasation. Control angiographic images were evaluated for any morphological change compared to the immediate posttreatment angiographic run. Results. Recanalization was achieved with a median of one (range 1–10) mTE maneuvers. Vasospasm occurred in 69 territories (26.0 %) and was treated with glyceroltrinitrate in three. Dissection was observed in one vessel (0.4 %). Intraprocedural hemorrhage in two patients (0.8 %) was either wire or device induced. Follow-up digital subtraction angiography was available for 117 territories after a median of 107 days, revealing target vessel occlusion in one segment (0.9 %) and a de novo stenosis of four segments (3.4 %). All findings were clinically asymptomatic. Posttreatment vasospasm was more frequent in patients with de novo stenosis and occlusion (p = 0.038). Conclusion. De novo stenoses and occlusions occur in a small proportion of patients after mTE. Because all lesions were clinically asymptomatic, this finding does not affect the overall benefit of the treatment. Vasospasm may predict late vessel wall changes.

  11. Analysis of unknown cause subarachnoid hemorrhage with repeated negative angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Yoshihisa; Hayakawa, Takanori; Honma, Masato

    2006-01-01

    Seven hundred and fifty five cases of acute non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were admitted to the department of neurosurgery of our hospital from July, 1995 to March, 2004. In 555 patients cerebral angiography was conducted but initial angiography was negative in 30 patients. Except 10 general condition poor patients, in 20 initial angiogram-negative patients were undergone repeated angiography. The cause of SAH could not be demonstrated in 13 cases. The SAH in perimesencephalic and non-perimesencephalic cisturns was seen in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Occipital and/or neck pain on admission was statistically more common among patients with perimesencephalic SAH than those with non-perimesencephalic SAH (p=0.029), and the prognosis of perimesencephalic SAH was good. We conclude that repeat angiography should not be recommended in patients with perimesencephalic SAH. Patients with non-perimesencephalic SAH had a higher rate of complication. In the non-perimesencephalic group, 3 patients developed hydrocephalus and 3 patients had vasospasm, which were found by repeated angiography. Therefore, repeated angiography is recommended for better clinical outcome by early detection and management of serious complications in this group of patients. (author)

  12. Burr Hole Drainage for Complicated Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Syndrome

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    Yu-Fang Liu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a potentially severe condition that is caused by continuous cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Clinically, most patients have a benign course and the condition remits after conservative management. We report two consecutive patients who presented with acute expansion of subdural collection and disturbed consciousness. Both patients recovered completely after undergoing burr hole drainage.

  13. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  14. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm and International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms cohorts: differences in multiplicity and location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jason; Brown, Robert D.; Moomaw, Charles J.; Sauerbeck, Laura; Hornung, Richard; Gandhi, Dheeraj; Woo, Daniel; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Flaherty, Matthew L.; Meissner, Irene; Anderson, Craig; Connolly, E. Sander; Rouleau, Guy; Kallmes, David F.; Torner, James; Huston, John; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    Object Familial predisposition is a recognized nonmodifiable risk factor for the formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). However, data regarding the characteristics of familial IAs are limited. The authors sought to describe familial IAs more fully, and to compare their characteristics with a large cohort of nonfamilial IAs. Methods The Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study is a multicenter international study with the goal of identifying genetic and other risk factors for formation and rupture of IAs in a highly enriched population. The authors compared the FIA study cohort with the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) cohort with regard to patient demographic data, IA location, and IA multiplicity. To improve comparability, all patients in the ISUIA who had a family history of IAs or subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded, as well as all patients in both cohorts who had a ruptured IA prior to study entry. Results Of 983 patients enrolled in the FIA study with definite or probable IAs, 511 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Of the 4059 patients in the ISUIA study, 983 had a previous IA rupture and 657 of the remainder had a positive family history, leaving 2419 individuals in the analysis. Multiplicity was more common in the FIA patients (35.6% vs 27.9%, p < 0.001). The FIA patients had a higher proportion of IAs located in the middle cerebral artery (28.6% vs 24.9%), whereas ISUIA patients had a higher proportion of posterior communicating artery IAs (13.7% vs 8.2%, p = 0.016). Conclusions Heritable structural vulnerability may account for differences in IA multiplicity and location. Important investigations into the underlying genetic mechanisms of IA formation are ongoing. PMID:22540404

  15. Clinical significance of diminution of high-density areas in basal cisterns following acute aneurysmal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Takeda, Rihei; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Sato, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the sequential changes in the high density in basal cisterns in the acute stage of aneurysmal bleeding. We could recognize Group 3 (clot or thick layer), according to Fisher's classification, in 66.3% of the intracranial aneurysms at admission (83 cases). In the early stage of an intracranial aneurysm, a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was detected in all the patients on CT. We evaluated 40 cases of Group 3 sequentially on CT. This investigation showed that 55% of the Grade I--Ii group, 27.3% of the Grade III group, and 11.1% of the Grade IV--V group changed to Group 2(thin or diffuse pattern) in approximately 20 hours on the average. As for the correlation between the high density in basal cisterns and the neurological condition (Hunt and Hess), we found a neurological improvement in the decreased-high-density group. The unchanged- high-density group showed deterioration. Compared with the decreased-high-density group, the unchanged group showed a greater increase in the CVI (Cerebro Ventricular Index). RI ( 111 In) cisternography also showed a disturbance of the CSF circulation. To lower the vasospasm it is important to decrease the high density in an early stage by carrying out CSF. It was considered to be prognostic when a CT scan was performed within 24 hours after SAH. (author)

  16. Intracranial chondroma: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Veena; Mehdi, Ghazala; Varshney, Manoranjan; Jain, Anshu; Vashishtha, Sonal; Gaur, Kavita; Srivastava, Vinod Kumar

    2011-05-12

    Intracranial chondroma is a rare benign cartilaginous tumour with an incidence of less than 1% of all primary intracranial tumours. The authors are reporting here a case of intracranial chondroma in a 40-year-old man who presented with 5-month history of headache and gradual diminution of vision. A tentative diagnosis of chondroma was made on imprint cytology which was confirmed on histopathological examination.

  17. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  18. Imaging of Intracranial Pressure Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, John; Saindane, Amit M

    2017-03-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure inside the bony calvarium and can be affected by a variety of processes, such as intracranial masses and edema, obstruction or leakage of cerebrospinal fluid, and obstruction of venous outflow. This review focuses on the imaging of 2 important but less well understood ICP disorders: idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Both of these ICP disorders have salient imaging findings that are important to recognize to help prevent their misdiagnosis from other common neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  19. Secondary Intracranial Hypotension: A Case Report

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    Pinar Gundogan Bozdag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypotension is a clinical condition that characterized by postural (orthostatic headache and low pressure. It apperas with cerebrospinal fluid leak which occurs spontaneous or depending on the secondary attempts. 31 years old female patient which has diagnosis of acute appendicitis and underwent appendectomy under spinal anesthesia. postoperative 5.day she admitted with a postural headache, diplopia. Patient was treated with conservative methods after diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. We aim to asses an encountered complication after spinal anesthesia which widely applied for surgical procedures with imaging findings and literature.

  20. Anaplastic Medullary Ependymoma Presenting as Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Nicolas Nicastro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A-41-year old man presented with violent thunderclap headache and a bilateral proprioceptive sensibility deficit of the upper limbs. Cerebral CT scan and MRI were negative. Lumbar puncture confirmed subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, but cerebral angiography was negative. Three months later, the patient presented with paraparesis, and a thorough work-up revealed a diffuse, anaplastic extramedullary C7-D10 ependymoma with meningeal carcinomatosis considered the source of hemorrhage. The patient went through a D5-D8 laminectomy, temozolomide chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. The situation remained stable for a few months. In this paper, we would like to emphasize that spinal masses should be considered in cases of SAH with negative diagnostic findings for aneurysms or arteriovenous malformation.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of the intracranial pressure in non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Sigal, Tal; Kimiagar, Itzhak; Bekerman, Inessa

    2016-12-01

    The article describes the modified technique of measuring the diameters of the optic nerve sheath (ONSD) for assessment of the intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients with intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The CT scans of 443 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The ONSDs were measured at 3mm behind the globe and at the point where the ophthalmic artery crosses the optic nerve. The ONSD/eyeball transverse diameter (ETD) ratio was calculated. The correlation analysis was performed with the Glasgow Coma Scale score, Hemispheric Stroke Scale score, Glasgow Outcome Score, and invasive ICP readings. ONSD was enlarged in 95% of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage or SAH. Pathological ONSDs were 6.6±0.8mm (cut-off value >5.5mm; pintracranial hemorrhage and SAH, the presence of ONSD greater than a threshold of 5.5mm is significantly predictive of invasively measured elevated ICP. The prediction of raised ICP can be further refined by measuring ONSD at the point where the optic nerve and the ophthalmic artery cross, and by determining the ratio between the ONSD and ETD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L.; Zentner, J.

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.)

  3. Cerebral Artery Remodeling in Rodent Models of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guvenc Tuna, Bilge; Lachkar, Nadia; de Vos, Judith; Bakker, Erik N. T. P.; VanBavel, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm is known to contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We hypothesized that vasospasm initiates structural changes within the vessel wall, possibly aggravating ischemia and leading to resistance to vasodilator treatment. We therefore investigated the

  4. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage following ischemia in vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokolov, Arseny A.; Husain, Shakir; Sztajzel, Roman; Croquelois, Alexandre; Lobrinus, Johannes A.; Thaler, David; Städler, Claudio; Hungerbühler, Hansjörg; Caso, Valeria; Rinkel, Gabriel J.; Michel, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia (VBD) is a chronic disorder with various cerebrovascular and compressive manifestations, involving subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Occurrence of SAH shortly after worsening of clinical VBD symptoms has occasionally been reported. The goal of the study was to examine

  5. The need for repeat angiography in subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, H.; Solymosi, L. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Zentner, J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the necessity for a second angiogram study in patients in whom initial angiography after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) was negative. During a 12-year period, 122 of 694 patients (17.5 %) had negative initial angiograms. CT, available for 98 patients, showed a preponderance of subarachnoid blood in the perimesencephalic cisterns in 50 of 73 patients (68.5 %) in whom blood was visible on CT. Angiography, repeated in 67 patients, revealed an aneurysm in 4 (6 %): 2 had an aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery, 1 of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and 1 of the P2 segment of the posterior cerebral artery. CT showed subarachnoid blood in the interpeduncular and ambient cisterns in this last case, and a preponderance of subarachnoid blood outside the perimesencephalic cisterns in the remaining 3 patients. (orig.) With 2 figs., 1 tab., 32 refs.

  6. Magnesium sulfate in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M.; Algra, A.; van Kooten, F.; Dirven, C. M. F.; van Gijn, J.; Vermeulen, M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnesium reverses cerebral vasospasm and reduces infarct volume after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rats. We aimed to assess whether magnesium reduces the frequency of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in patients with aneurysmal SAH. METHODS: Patients were

  7. Cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum and sixth nerve palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Negoro, Makoto; Awaya, Shinobu

    1987-05-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography in a young woman with a chronic sixth nerve palsy demonstrated a cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum originating from the cerebellopontine cistern. The possible etiologic role of this diverticulum in her palsy is discussed.

  8. Cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum and sixth nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Negoro, Makoto; Awaya, Shinobu

    1987-01-01

    Metrizamide CT cisternography in a young woman with a chronic sixth nerve palsy demonstrated a cavernous sinus subarachnoid diverticulum originating from the cerebellopontine cistern. The possible etiologic role of this diverticulum in her palsy is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Bedside diagnosis of mitochondrial dysfunction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, A.; Nielsen, T. H.; Nilsson, O.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives - Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is frequently associated with delayed neurological deterioration (DND). Several studies have shown that DND is not always related to vasospasm and ischemia. Experimental and clinical studies have recently documented that it is possible...

  10. Myocarditis in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : A histopathologic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bilt, Ivo A C; Vendeville, Jean Paul; van de Hoef, Tim P.; Begieneman, Mark P V; Lagrand, Wim K.; Kros, Johan M.; Wilde, Arthur A M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Niessen, Hans W M

    Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) such as electrocardiographic changes, echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities, and elevated troponin levels are independently associated with a poor prognosis. They are caused by catecholaminergic stress coinciding with influx of

  11. Life Satisfaction and Return to Work After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passier, Patricia E. C. A.; Visser-Meily, Johanna M. A. Anne; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Lindeman, Eline; Post, Marcel W. M.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate life satisfaction and employment status after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and to explain the associations between life satisfaction and demographic, disease-related, psychological, and personality characteristics. Subjects with SAH (n = 141)

  12. Subarachnoid pneumocephalus: a rare complication of epidural catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Robert; Jan, Rehana

    2002-11-01

    Several potential complications may occur during identification of the epidural space. We present a case of subarachnoid pneumocephalus as a rare complication of epidural catheter placement. Copyright 2002 by Elsevier Science Inc.

  13. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  14. Intracranial aneurysms: evaluation in 200 patients with spiral CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.; Kingston, R.J.; Markson, G.; Dorsch, N.W.C.; McMahon, J.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the usefulness of spiral CT angiography (CTA) with three- dimensional reconstructions in defining intracranial aneurysms, particularly around the Circle of Willis. Two hundred consecutive patients with angiographic and/or surgical correlation were studied between 1993 and 1998, with CTA performed on a GE HiSpeed unit and Windows workstation. The following clinical situations were evaluated: conventional CT suspicion of an aneurysm; follow-up of treated aneurysm remnants or of untreated aneurysms; subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and negative angiography; family or past aneurysm history; and for improved definition of aneurysm anatomy. Spiral CTA detected 140 of 144 aneurysms, and an overall sensitivity of 97%, including 30 of 32 aneurysms 3 mm or less in size. In 38 patients with SAH and negative angiography, CTA found six of the seven aneurysms finally diagnosed. There was no significant artefact in 17 of 23 patients (74%) with clips. The specificity of CTA was 86% with 8 false-positive cases. Spiral CTA is very useful in demonstrating intracranial aneurysms. (orig.)

  15. Natural history of untreated unruptured intracranial aneurysms in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Daniel L; Murphy, Meghan E; Vine, Roanna L; Brown, Robert D; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-11-16

    The effect of age on risk of intracranial aneurysm rupture is not well understood. We investigated the clinical course of patients 65 years and older with conservatively managed unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA) and determined risk factors for rupture in this population. We reviewed prospectively collected data on baseline characteristics and long- term follow-up for patients aged 65 years and older with an UIA that were initially managed with observation. The association between patient and aneurysmal characteristics and risk of rupture was performed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression model. There were 214 patients (mean age: 74.7 years, SD: 6.0) included in our study. The median follow-up time was 3.7 years, with a cumulative follow-up time of 883.7 person-years. During the study period, seven patients (3.3%) received interventional treatment of their UIA and eight patients (3.7%) experienced aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, yielding an annual risk of rupture of 0.9%. All aneurysms that ruptured were at least 10 mm in size. Increasing patient age [unit relative risk (RR) 1.19, 95% CI 1.07-1.36, p = 0.002], larger aneurysmal size (unit RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.17, p = 0.021), and increasing PHASES score (unit RR 1.62, 95% CI 1.32-2.06, p 10 mm in diameter) and low risk of interventional procedure.

  16. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bischof, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology

  17. A follow-up study by CT scan of intracranial hemorrhages in newborn children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Iekado; Kushida, Yoshimasa; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Tsutsumi, Shunichiro; Kuramitsu, Toru

    1983-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhages in perinatal babies and their sequelae are two of the targets of recent investigations. This study was designed to make clear the correlation between intracranial hemorrhage in perinates and the sequential widening of the cerebrospinal fluid space, including ventricles. 600 cases with moderate or severe clinical symptoms were treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Toho University Hospital from February, 1981, to October, 1982. Of these, 137 cases were suspected clinically to have had an intracranial hemorrhage at birth. In the CT study of these cases, intracranial hemorrhages of various types were confirmed in 55 cases. These included subarachnoid hemorrhages (29 cases), intraventricular hemorrhages (3 cases), intracerebral hemorrhages (3 cases), and combined hemorrhages (20 cases). A follow-up check of these cases by means of CT scan and neurological examinations was done for a period of from 40 days to 20 months. In 35 cases (63.5%) out of the 55, a temporary or persistent enlagement of the ventricle and/or widenings of the CSF space of various types were demonstrated. The latter included subdural effusion, the widening of the Sylvian fissure and/or interhemispheric fissure, and the widening of the basal cisterns. An enlargement of the ventricle occurred often following an intraventricular or intracerebral hemorrhage. On the other hand, subdural effusion was a common sequela after a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These changes in the ventricle or CSF space seem to be benign in nature and were improved in most cases during the period of the follow-up study. The ventricular enlargement disappeared substantially in 5 cases, and in the remaining 30 cases the abnormalities on the CT scans were much improved. Clinically, retarded physical development was evident in 3 cases, but the others showed no developmental retardation

  18. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Bischof, Felix, E-mail: felix.bischof@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology.

  19. Brain Lactate Metabolism in Humans With Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Oddo M; Levine JM; Frangos S; Maloney-Wilensky E; Carrera E; Daniel RT; Levivier M; Magistretti PJ; LeRoux PD

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. METHODS: Thirty one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxi...

  20. Computerized tomography in the study of intracranial complications in hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaut, J.L.; Gastaut, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    CT was used to examine 100 patients with various hematologic disorders. It was generally in patients with clinical signs of encephalic alteration (68% of the cases) that we demonstrated lesions. In several cases, the lesions were detected by CT, whereas common neurological investigational methods remained negative. The most interesting findings were in acute leukemias (leucoblastic infiltrations, cerebral hemorrhages and infarctions, and iatrogenic morphologic modifications) and in Hodgkin diseases (intracranial localizations). CT permits a more complete neurologic work-up for patients with hematologic disorders and provides a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of intracranial complications. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 MB [de

  1. A Preliminary Observational Study of Anovulatory Uterine Bleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Suzanne M; Fifield, Susan W; Pizzi, Michael A; Alejos, David; Richie, Alexa N; Dinh, Tri A; Cheshire, William P; Meek, Shon E; Freeman, William D

    2017-12-01

    It was observed that women with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) tended to have earlier menses than a typical 21- to 28-day cycle. The goal was to determine whether there is an association between aSAH and early onset of menses. All cases of aSAH in women aged 18 to 55 years who were admitted to our facility's neuroscience intensive care unit from June 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, were reviewed. The electronic healthcare record for each of these patients was examined for documentation of menses onset, computed tomography of the head, brain aneurysm characteristics, modified Fisher score and Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, presence/absence of vasospasm, medical/surgical history, and use of medications that affect the menstrual cycle. The mean onset of menses in this study population was compared with the mean of 21 to 28 days with the 1-sample t test. During the study period, 103 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage were admitted. Sixty-one were women, and 15 were aged 18 to 55 years. Nine of the 15 (60%) had documentation of menses occurring during their initial week of hospitalization; 1 patient had documentation of menses on hospital day 12. There is a significant difference when the mean onset of menses in our patient population is compared with the approximate normal menstrual cycle of 21 to 28 days (P abnormal uterine bleeding after SAH may occur in women with aSAH and typically within the first 7 to 10 days after intracranial aneurysm rupture. The physiologic cause of early onset of menses after aSAH, whether primary or secondary, remains unknown.

  2. Intracranial Hemorrhage Following a 3-week Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 35-year-old female presented to the ED with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS of 11. Per her boyfriend, the patient was having headaches for the past 3 weeks. She was initially taken to an outside hospital where her GCS was reported as 13. A non-contrast head computed tomography (CT revealed a large lobar intraparenchymal hemorrhage within the left frontal parietal lobe with midline shift. Upon examination, vitals were notable for blood pressure of 209/88mmHg, and her left pupil was fixed and dilated. The patient had extension of her right arm to noxious stimuli, paralysis of her right leg, and purposeful movement of the left arm and left leg. The patient was started on a nicardipine drip in the ED and subsequently taken to the operating room for a decompressive craniectomy. Significant findings: The patient’s head CT showed a significant area of hyperdensity consistent with an intracranial hemorrhage located within the left frontal parietal lobe (red arrow. Additionally, there is rightward midline shift up to 1.1cm (green arrow and entrapment of the right lateral ventricle (blue arrow. Discussion: Intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the mortality for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH has declined steadily over the past several decades, the mortality for IPH mortality has not significantly.1 One of the most serious considerations when treating a patient with IPH is the management of intracranial pressure (ICP.2 Once an IPH is identified, immediate steps should be taken to bring ICP within acceptable levels including elevating the head of the bed to 30 degrees, sedation, and controlling hypertension with medications.2-3 Even with early and aggressive care, the prognosis for IPH remains poor; the 30-day mortality rate for IPH is estimated to be less than 50%, and a 2010 systematic review estimated only 12-39% of IPH patients achieve independent function.4-5 Predictors of

  3. The risk of intravenous thrombolysis-induced intracranial hemorrhage in Taiwanese patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ting Chiu

    Full Text Available The presence of an intracranial aneurysm is contraindicated to recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA treatment for acute ischemic stroke. However, it is difficult to exclude asymptomatic intracranial aneurysms by using conventional, noncontrast head computed tomography (CT, which is the only neuroimaging suggested before r-tPA. Recent case reports and series have shown that administering r-tPA to patients with a pre-existing aneurysm does not increase the bleeding risk. However, Asians are known to have a relatively higher bleeding risk, and little evidence is available regarding the risk of using r-tPA on Asian patients with intracranial aneurysms.Medical records from the Shuang Ho hospital stroke registration between July 2010 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed, and 144 patients received r-tPA. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms were detected using CT, or magnetic resonance or conventional angiography after r-tPA. The primary and secondary outcomes were the difference in overall intracranial hemorrhage (ICH and symptomatic ICH after r-tPA. The differences were analyzed using Fisher's exact or Mann-Whitney U tests, and p < 0.05 was defined as the statistical significance.A total of 144 patients were reviewed, and incidental unruptured intracranial aneurysms were found in 11 of them (7.6%. No significant difference was observed in baseline demographic data between the aneurysm and nonaneurysm groups. Among patients with an unruptured aneurysm, two had giant aneurysms (7.7 and 7.4 mm, respectively. The bleeding risk was not significant different between aneurysm group (2 out of 11, 18% with nonaneurysm group (7 out of 133, 5.3% (p = 0.14. None of the patients with an unruptured aneurysm had symptomatic ICH, whereas one patient without an aneurysm exhibited symptomatic ICH.The presence of an unruptured intracranial aneurysm did not significantly increase the risk of overall and symptomatic ICH in Taiwanese patients after they

  4. Intracranial Pressure Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raboel, P H; Bartek, J; Andresen, M

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods...... standard in terms of accurate measurement of pressure, although microtransducers generally are just as accurate. Both invasive techniques are associated with a minor risk of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. Furthermore, zero drift is a problem with selected microtransducers. The non...

  5. Intracranial Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshan B. Hameed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A pregnant woman with a mechanical prosthetic mitral valve was anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight heparin in the first trimester followed by warfarin until 36 weeks' gestation. She was then switched to intravenous unfractionated heparin infusion to allow for regional anesthesia in anticipation of vaginal delivery. She developed severe headache on hospital day 2 that was refractory to pain medications. Cranial imaging demonstrated a large subdural hematoma with midline shift. She delivered a healthy baby girl by cesarean section. Eventually, symptoms and intracranial abnormalities resolved over time. In conclusion, subdural hematoma is a relatively rare complication that requires multidisciplinary management plan.

  6. MR imaging of experimentally induced intracranial hemorrhage in rabbits during the first 6 hours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, O.; Rossitti, S.; Ericsson, A.; Raininko, R. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1999-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the MR appearance of intracranial, especially intraparenchymal, hemorrhage during the first 6 hours after bleeding with various pulse sequences in an animal model. Material and methods: Intracerebral hematomas and subarachnoid hemorrhage were created by injecting autologous blood in 9 rabbits. MR studies were performed using a 1.5 T scanner with pixel size and slice thickness comparable to those used in clinical practice before blood injection, immediately after injection, and at regular intervals during 6 hours. The images were compared with the hematoma sizes on formalin-fixed brain slices. Results: In every animal, susceptibility-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) pulse sequences depicted the intraparenchymal hematomas and blood escape in the ventricles or subarachnoid space best as areas of sharply defined, strong hypointensity. The findings remained essentially unchanged during follow-up. The sizes corresponded well to the post-mortem findings. Gradient- and spin-echo (GRASE) imaging revealed some hypointensities, but these were smaller and less well defined. Spin-echo (SE) sequences (proton density-, T1- and T2-weighted) as well as a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery turbo spin-echo sequence (fast FLAIR) depicted the hemorrhage sites as mostly isointense to brain. Conclusion: Susceptibility-weighted GRE imaging at 1.5 T is highly sensitive to both hyperacute hemorrhage in the brain parenchyma and to subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. (orig.)

  7. Migration of an Intracranial Subdural Hematoma to the Spinal Subdural Space: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Ik; Son, Dong Wuk; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Young Soo; Sung, Soon Ki; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2015-09-01

    A 57-year-old man complained of severe lower back pain and radicular pain in both legs for 1 week after falling from a ladder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine showed a subdural hematoma (SDH), which was surgically removed. The patient had no back pain or the radicular leg pain at 2 weeks post-surgery. However, he complained of diffuse headaches upon follow-up. Brain computed tomography (CT) and MRI revealed an intracranial SDH, which was immediately removed by surgery. During his 1-year follow-up, he reported that the pain had resolved without recurrence. Simultaneous spinal and intracranial SDH are rare and no standard treatment exists for this condition. This case suggests that it is possible that an intracranial SDH can migrate into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space through an arachnoid tear. CSF circulation allows the intracranial SDH to enter subarachnoid spaces encasing the spinal cord. In order to prevent irreversible damage, surgical intervention should be considered for case of spinal SDH with progressive neurological deficits.

  8. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset). Comparison of pre- and post-CT era and their prognostic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, S.; Ogata, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakao, S.; Mizue, H. (Kobe Central Municipal Hospital (Japan)); Kobayashi, Y.

    1982-04-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages.

  9. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide there are varying reports on the prevalence of meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms. Different reports state intracranial meningiomas, gliomas or metastatic tumours as the most common tumour among intracranial neoplasms. We present our institutions' experience of patients with intracranial ...

  10. Screening for intracranial aneurysms? Prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms in Hong Kong Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, David Y C; Abrigo, Jill M; Cheung, Tom C Y; Siu, Deyond Y W; Poon, Wai S; Ahuja, Anil T; Wong, George K C

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to generate data on the local prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in asymptomatic Hong Kong Chinese individuals. First-degree relatives of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) were recruited as surrogates of the general population and to explore the potential role of screening in this locality. METHODS The authors identified first-degree relatives of consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured aneurysm who were admitted to a university hospital in Hong Kong from June 2008 to December 2010. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was the imaging modality used to screen the cerebral vasculature of these asymptomatic individuals. If MRA showed abnormal findings, CT angiography was performed to confirm the MRA findings. RESULTS In total, 7 UIAs were identified from the 305 MR angiograms obtained. The prevalence of UIAs in first-degree relatives of patients with aSAH in the Hong Kong Chinese population was 2.30% (95% CI1.02%-4.76%). This percentage was lower than the prevalence rate of 3.2% from a meta-analysis of the literature. The sizes of the UIAs detected ranged from 1.4 mm to 7.5 mm; 85.7% of the UIAs detected in this study were < 5 mm, in contrast to 66% noted in the literature. One of the UIAs identified underwent endovascular stent placement with a flow diverter. None of the UIAs identified ruptured or became symptomatic during a median follow-up period of 3.5 years. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of UIAs in first-degree relatives of patients with aSAH in the Hong Kong Chinese population was lower than that in Caucasians. At the same time, most of the UIAs detected in this study were small (85.7% were < 5 mm, vs 66% in a meta-analysis). With a similar incidence of aSAH in Hong Kong (7.5 per 100,000 person-years) as compared with data cited in the literature, the hypothesis that UIA rupture risk size threshold is different in Chinese patients should be further

  11. Coping strategies in patients following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberg, T; Orasson, A; Linnamägi, U; Toomela, A; Pulver, A; Asser, T

    2001-09-01

    To assess psychological coping strategies and their relationship with outcome in patients after primary subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). In 51 unselected patients (24 males, 27 females; mean age 46 years) in an average 15.7+/-12.0 months after SAH usage of coping strategies were assessed by means of Estonian COPE-D test with 15 four-items scales and compared to those obtained from 51 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy persons. The data were analysed according to age, sex and education of the patients, initial severity of disease, localization of aneurysm and outcome characteristics. Patients after SAH reported using social support strategy less than control persons (Pcoping styles were less used (Pdisability and dependence in daily living. Healthy women used social support more than men; patients and control persons 50 years or older used task-oriented strategies less than younger persons (Pcoping strategies used by patients after SAH differs compared to healthy persons. The differences in using coping strategies are related to age of the patients, functional state and degree of adaptation after SAH.

  12. Spreading depolarizations increase delayed brain injury in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamming, Arend M.; Wermer, Marieke J. H.; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Lanier, Christian; van Os, Hine J. A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van der Toorn, Annette; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Stowe, Ann M.; Dijkhuizen, Rick M.

    Spreading depolarizations may contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, but the effect of spreading depolarizations on brain lesion progression after subarachnoid hemorrhage has not yet been assessed directly. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that

  13. Fever after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: relation with extent of hydrocephalus and amount of extravasated blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Luitse, Merel J. A.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Fever after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is associated with poor outcome. Because hydrocephalus and extravasated blood may influence thermoregulation, we determined whether these factors increase the risk for fever after subarachnoid hemorrhage. METHODS: Fever within 14

  14. Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J.; Guillemin, F.; Proust, F.; Molyneux, A.J.; Fox, A.J.; Claiborne, J.S.; Meder, J.-F.; Rouleau, I.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The preventive treatment of unruptured aneur­ysms has been performed for decades despite the lack of evidence of a clinical benefit. Reports of observational studies such as the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (ISUIA) suggest that preventive treatments are rarely justified. Are these reports compelling enough to guide clinical practice? The ISUIA methods and data are reviewed and analysed in a more conventional manner. The design of the appropriate clinical research program is approached by steps, reviewing potential problems, from the formulation of the precise research question to the interpretation of subgroup analyses, including sample size, representativity, duration of observation period, blin­ding, definition of outcome events, analysis of cross-overs, losses to follow-up, and data reporting. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms observed in ISUIA ruptured at a minimal annual rate of 0.8% (0.5-1%), despite multiple methodological difficulties biased in favour of a benign natural history. Available registries do not have the power or the design capable of providing normative guidelines for clinical decisions. The appropriate method to solve the clinical dilemma is a multicentric trial comparing the incidence of a hard clinical outcome events in approximately 2000 patients randomly allocated to a treatment group and a deferred treatment group, all followed for ten years or more. Observational studies have failed to provide reliable evidence in favour or against the preventive treatment of unruptured aneurysms. A randomized trial is in order to clarify what is the role of prevention in this common clinical problem. PMID:20557790

  15. Blood free Radicals Concentration Determined by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Delayed Cerebral Ischemia Occurrence in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewelina, Grzywna; Krzysztof, Stachura; Marek, Moskala; Krzysztof, Kruczala

    2017-12-01

    Pathophysiology of delayed cerebral ischemia and cerebral vasospasm following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is still poorly recognized, however free radicals are postulated as one of the crucial players. This study was designed to scrutinize whether the concentration of free radicals in the peripheral venous blood is related to the occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia associated with cerebral vasospasm. Twenty-four aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients and seven patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysm (control group) have been studied. Free radicals in patients' blood have been detected by the electron paramagnetic resonance (CMH.HCl spin probe, 150 K, ELEXSYS E500 spectrometer) on admission and at least 72 h from disease onset. Delayed cerebral ischemia monitoring was performed by daily neurological follow-up and transcranial color coded Doppler. Delayed cerebral ischemia observed in six aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was accompanied by cerebral vasospasm in all six cases. No statistically significant difference in average free radicals concentration between controls and study subgroups was noticed on admission (p = .3; Kruskal-Wallis test). After 72 h free radicals concentration in delayed cerebral ischemia patients (3.19 ± 1.52 mmol/l) differed significantly from the concentration in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients without delayed cerebral ischemia (0.65 ± 0.37 mmol/l) (p = .012; Mann-Whitney test). These findings are consistent with our assumptions and seem to confirm the role of free radicals in delayed cerebral ischemia development. Preliminary results presented above are promising and we need perform further investigation to establish whether blood free radicals concentration may serve as the biomarker of delayed cerebral ischemia associated with cerebral vasospasm.

  16. Experience of 3D-TOF MR angiography for subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-ruptured aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Toshihiro; Uchida, Keita; Goto, Hideo; Sano, Mitsuhiko

    1995-01-01

    Three-dimensional time-of-flight MR angiography (3D-TOF MRA) with 1.0 T MRI was performed on ten patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage or with non-ruptured cerebral aneurysms. 3D-TOF MRA was evaluated with respect to its efficiency in detecting aneurysms, circumferential vessels, vasospasms and combined vascular lesions. All seven cerebral aneurysms that were detected by cerebral angiography, were demonstrable by 3D-TOF MRA. The diameter of the smallest aneurysm was approximately 2.5 mm. A very small aneurysm that appeared suspicious by MRA, but could not be demonstrated by cerebral angiography was confirmed at surgery. The detection of circumferential arteries was satisfactory in one middle cerebral artery aneurysm, but small vessels could not be identified in other aneurysms. Vasospasms were detected in two cases. MRA was sensitive for detecting vasospasms, but the precise examination was difficult because of high intensity signal in subacute hematomas. MRA was excellent in detecting other combined vascular lesions. This study demonstrates that 3D-TOF MRA represents a valuable examination modality of detecting aneurysms, spasms and combined vascular lesions. We do believe that 3D TOF MRA should be considered as an efficient tool before cerebral angiography, even in the acute phase of subarachnoid hemorrhages. (author)

  17. Brown-Séquard syndrome and cervical post-traumatic subarachnoid hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascón-Ramírez, Fernando; Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Trondin, Albert; Arredondo, M Javier

    2017-10-20

    Cervical Traumatic SSH are very rare in literature. They are usually caused by cardiopulmonary diseases that increase vascular pressure causing spinal vessels rupture. In thoracolumbar spine, the spinal puncture is the most common cause. The ventrolateral position is even more unusual. In traumatic brain injury (TBI), an abrupt extension-flexion movement could have caused the rupture of subarachnoid vessels. This, accompanied by the slowed blood "wash out" (probably due to the previous osteoarthrosis and spinal canal stenosis), led to the formation of an organized clot, which caused an acute spinal cord compression syndrome. Cervical subarachnoid spinal hematoma can present as Brown-Séquard syndrome. The treatment is prompt surgical removal and decompression. The posterior approach (partial hemilaminectomy with or without laminoplasty) with microsurgical technique is feasible, fast and simple to evacuate the hematoma with good results. Surgical nuances in posterior approach are: small spinal canal, difficulty in mobilizing the cervical cord, these haematomas are wrapped and attached to the spinal cord or nerve roots by multiple arachnoid bands, requiring techniques of Microdissection for its evacuation unlike the epidural and subdural haematomas that are easily aspirated. Here, we report a unique case of a ventrolateral SSH due to TBI. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma

    OpenAIRE

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. Case Description: We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resoluti...

  19. The Role of Nitric Oxide in Resolution of Vasospasam Corresponding with Cerebral Vasospasms after Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Dizdarević

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial aneurysmal rupture is the common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. This haemorrhage is typically diffuse and located in extracerebral subarachnoid space in which main cerebral arterial branches are situated. The intimate and long-term contact of arterial wall and blood products in the closed space causes the cerebral vasospasm as a serious and frequent complication of SAH. It is connected with significant morbidity and mortality due to developing of focal cerebral ischaemia and subsequently cerebral infarction. The aim of our experimental research was to create the animal model of vasospasm using the femoral artery due to examination of reduced basic dilator activity cause in arterial wall after SAH. The important characteristic of major cerebral arteries is their localization in the closed subarachnoid space which enables their to have long-term contact with blood products after haemorrhage. Thirty six femoral arteries (FA of eighteen female rats weighing about 300 g were used. In vivo, femoral arteries are microsurgically prepared in both inguinal regions in all rats. Eighteen arteries were encompassed by polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE material forming closed tube and autologous blood was injected in the tube around the arterial wall. Additional eighteen arteries, as a control group, were also put in PTFE tube but without exposing to the blood. All rats are left to live for eight days. Afterwards, rats were sacrificed and their arteries were in vitro examined including an isometric tension measurement and histological changes analysis. The tension was measured during application of vasoconstrictors and vasodilatators (nitric oxide, NO. FA exposed to periadventitial blood exhibit hyper reactivity to constrictors (KCl, phenylephrine, acetylcholine compared to control group. It was also found that NO donor (sodium nitroprusside diminished arterial spasm induced by blood and vasoconstrictors. In conclusion, FA can be

  20. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... post pubescent teenagers, tends to fit the adult stereotype. How is pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosed? If ... Subscribe to AOJ Allied Health Resources for School Nurses About AAPOS Our Association Staff Contacts Medical Disclaimer ...

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: role of subtraction CT angiography in etiological diagnosis and pretreatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Wei, X; Lv, F; Li, Q; Xie, P

    2014-12-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a deleterious cerebrovascular disorder that requires prompt etiological diagnosis. We wished to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the latest generation 3D subtraction CT angiography (CTA) in etiological diagnosis and pretreatment planning of patients with suspected SAH. A total of 88 patients were included in our study and underwent both 3D subtraction CTA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) examinations. The 3D subtraction CTA images were reviewed by two independent readers who were blinded to the results of DSA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 3D subtraction CTA were calculated on a per-patient basis. The possibility for surgical treatment was also evaluated based on information provided by CTA alone. According to DSA results, 72 patients were diagnosed with ruptured intracranial aneurysms, 5 patients with arteriovenous malformations, and no lesion was detected in 11 patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values of CTA for etiological evaluation of SAH were all 100%. Correct pretreatment decision was made in 67 of 70 patients based on the CTA measurements alone. THE results of our study indicate that 3D subtraction CTA is an accurate, fast and non-invasive imaging modality that is equal to DSA in etiological evaluation and pretreatment planning of patients with suspected SAH. It may replace DSA as the first step imaging method in patients with suspected SAH, while DSA should still be reserved for case of uncertainty.

  2. Convexity Subarachnoid Hemorrhage with PiB Positive Pet Scans: Clinical Features and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, John V; Singhal, Shaloo; Rowe, Christopher C; Kempster, Peter; Bower, Simon; Phan, Thanh G

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) has been reported to present as convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH). Lesser known is that cSAH can herald intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and ischemic lesions. We present seven new cases with (11) C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positive positron emission tomography (PET) scans including two with biopsy, review the literature and comment on clinical and radiological findings. Patients with cSAH identified on CT, underwent MR imaging and MR angiography to exclude intracranial aneurysm. Nonaneurysmal cSAH were further prospectively evaluated for amyloid angiopathy using PiB. Clinical and radiological features of cSAH, subsequent ICH and ischemic lesions were characterized. Seven patients with nonaneurysmal cSAH fulfilled the Boston criteria for probable CAA. All had PiB PET scans consistent with CAA. Of the 4 patients who had contrast MR Imaging all had enhancement overlying the cSAH, followed by ICH in three cases. All patients presented with transient sensory symptoms. All patients had small punctate subcortical and cortical infarcts on diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Literature review revealed subsequent ICH in approximately 11/79 patients. The finding of cSAH and PiB binding in our patients suggest underlying CAA. cSAH may be associated with ischemic lesion as well as future ICH occurrence. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. Intracranial Aneurysms in Sickle-Cell Disease Are Associated With the Hemoglobin SS Genotype But Not With Moyamoya Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Gardner, Kate; Kesse-Adu, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intracranial aneurysms and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may occur more frequently in sickle-cell disease (SCD), and this could be related to the sickle genotype and moyamoya syndrome seen in SCD. METHODS: Records from a total of 1002 patients with SCD attending 2...... had imaging data; the prevalence was significantly higher in patients with HbSS genotype compared with other sickle genotypes with the highest prevalence (15%) observed in women in the age group 30 to 39 years. Fifty-one HbSS patients had a moyamoya vasculopathy, but only 3 of these had concomitant...

  4. Hydroxyethyl starch for volume expansion after subarachnoid haemorrhage and renal function: Results of a retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Bercker

    Full Text Available Hydroxyethyl starch (HES was part of "triple-H" therapy for prophylaxis and therapy of vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH. The European Medicines Agency restricted the use of HES in 2013 due to an increase of renal failure in critically ill patients receiving HES compared to crystalloid fluids. The occurrence of renal insufficiency in patients with SAH due to HES is still uncertain. The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether there was an association with renal impairment in patients receiving HES after subarachnoid haemorrhage.Medical records of all non-traumatic SAH patients treated at the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Leipzig, Germany, between January 2009 and December 2014 were analysed. Patients received either HES 6% and/or 10% (HES group, n = 183 or exclusively crystalloids for fluid therapy (Crystalloid group, n = 93. Primary outcome was the incidence of acute kidney injury.The study groups had similar characteristics except for initial SAPS scores, incidence of vasospasm and ICU length of stay. Patients receiving HES fulfilled significantly more often SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria. 24.6% (45/183 of the patients in the HES group had acute kidney injury (KDIGO 1-3 at any time during their ICU stay compared to 26.9% (25/93 in the crystalloid group (p = 0.679. Only few patients needed renal replacement therapy with no significant difference between groups (Crystalloid group: 4.3%; HES group: 2.2%; p = 0.322. The incidence of vasospasm was increased in the HES group when compared to the crystalloid group (33.9% vs. 17.2%; p = 0.004.In the presented series of patients with non-traumatic SAH we found no significant association between HES therapy and the incidence of acute kidney injury. Treatment without HES did not worsen patient outcome.

  5. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  6. Cerebral vasospasm following traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Aminmansour

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    • Background: Cerebral vasospasm is a preventable cause of death and disability in patients who experience aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of cerebral vasospasm following traumatic SAH and its relationship with different brain injuries and severity of trauma.
    • Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2006 to March 2007 in department of Neurosurgery in Al-Zahra Hospital. Consecutive head-injured patients who had SAH on the basis of an admission CT scan were prospectively evaluated. The severity of the trauma was evaluated by determining Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score on admission. Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography evaluations were performed at least 48 hours after admission and one week thereafter. Vasospasm in the MCA and ACA was defined by mean flow velocity (FV of more than 120 cm/sec with a Lindegaard index (MVA/ICA FV ratio higher than 3. Basilar artery vasospasm was defined by FV higher than 85 cm/sec.
    • Results: Seventy seven patients with tSAH were enrolled from whom 13 were excluded. The remaining were 52 (81.2% men and 12 (18.7% women, with a mean age of 37.89 years. Trauma was severe in 11 (17.2%, moderate in 13 (20.3%, and mild in 40 (62.5% patients. From all, 27 patients (42.1% experienced at least one vasospasm during the study period and MCA vasospasm was the most common in the first and second weeks (55.5%.
    • Conclusions: Traumatic SAH is associated with a high incidence of cerebral vasospasm with a higher probability in patients with severe TBI.
    • Keywords: Cerebral Vasospasm, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Trauma, Traumatic Brain Injury.
  1. Intracranial calcification on paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, B.; Cavanagh, N.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the computed tomograms of 18000 children examined consecutively form the basis of an assessment of the diagnostic significance of intracranial calcification. The low incidence of physiological calcification in the pineal and choroid of about 2% up to the age of 8 years, but increasing 5-fold by the age of 15 years, is confirmed. Pathological calcification occurred in 1.6%, the commonest causes being neoplasms (43%), neuroectodermal syndromes (20%) and infections (12%). Diffuse basal ganglia calcification (15%) bore little relation to the diverse clinical symptomatology, and routine bio-chemical studies showed a disorder of metabolism to be present in only 6 cases. Calcification has not been previously noted in acute haemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, Pertussis or Cocksackie encephalitis, infantile neuraxonal dystrophy, Marinesco-Sjoegren syndrome or in the basal ganglia in neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  2. Prospective study of sentinel headache in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn, F.H.H.; Wijdicks, E.F.M.; Graaf, Y. van der; Weerdesteyn-van Vliet, F.A.C.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Gijn, J. van

    1994-01-01

    Retrospective surveys of patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage suggest that minor episodes with sudden headache (warning leaks) may precede rupture of an aneurysm, and that early recognition and surgery might lead to improved outcome. We studied 148 patients with sudden and severe headache

  3. Intra-arterial nimodipine for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bashir, Asma; Andresen, Morten; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Intra-arterial nimodipine (IAN) has shown a promising effect on cerebral vasospasm (CV) after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. At our institution, Rigshospitalet, IAN treatment has been used since 2009, but the short- and long-term clinical efficacy of IAN has not yet been assessed. The purpo...

  4. Subarachnoid hemorrhage: long-term consequences & stem cell treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, E.

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) represents a considerable health problem that strikes patients at a relatively young age. At present, limited options are available to treat the devastating consequences of SAH. The endovascular puncture model is a suitable animal model to study the pathophysiological

  5. MRI demonstration of subarachnoid neurocysticercosis simulating metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, K.Y.; Roebuck, D.J.; Metreweli, C. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin NT (Hong Kong); Mok, V.; Kay, R. [Dept. of Neurology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Ng, H.K.; Teo, J.G.C. [Dept. of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong); Lam, J.; Poon, W. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT (Hong Kong)

    1998-11-01

    We present a patient with neurocysticercosis with spinal subarachnoid spread who presented with lower back pain and progressive numbness and weakness of the left leg. MRI of the spine simulated metastasis. MRI of the brain demonstrated a ``bunch of grapes`` appearance in the basal cisterns, characteristic of cysticercosis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  6. Spinal vascular malformations in non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germans, M. R.; Pennings, F. A.; Sprengers, M. E. S.; Vandertop, W. P.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and no evidence for a cerebral aneurysm on angiography, a frequent cause of the hemorrhage is perimesencephalic hemorrhage or other cerebral vascular pathology. In some patients no cause is found. The exact incidence of a spinal

  7. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Days 1 through 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Alejandro E.; Brice, Roanne G.; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAHs) are a serious medical emergency, as 30% to 50% of all SAHs can result in death. Personal accounts and case studies are an important aspect of evidence-based practice. This first article of two presents a review of AB's (patient) condition immediately following an SAH in the intensive care and immediately post…

  8. Recovery from a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Patient and Spouse Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Roanne G.; Brice, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    This second article of a two-part case study focuses on the experiences of a patient and his spouse (caregiver) when a neurological trauma occurs. It is the personal account when A.B. survived a vertebral artery aneurysm and hemorrhage resulting in a subarachnoid hemorrhage. It is also an in-depth post-trauma account from two speech-language…

  9. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  10. Plasticity of cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Maddahi, Aida

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is most often followed by a delayed phase of cerebral ischemia which is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. The causes underlying this delayed phase are still unsettled, but are believed to include cerebral vasospasm, cortical spreading depression...

  11. Delayed Optochiasmal Arachnoiditis following Intervention for a Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Neoh, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Visual morbidity following a subarachnoid haemorrhage is common among survivors and it is usually the result of vascular ischaemia at the time of the initial insult. In this report, we present an unusual case of delayed, progressive visual loss following intervention for a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. We discuss the possible etiological factors and highlight potential diagnostic pitfalls.

  12. The Worst Headache of Life: Evaluation of Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-06

    include autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, hypertension, aortic coarctation , alpha-1 -antitrypsin deficiency, connective tissue diseases...which is highest immediately after the initial subarachnoid hemorrhage, is through early surgical or endovascular treatment of the ruptured aneurysm...Endovascular treatment is particularly useful in posterior circulation aneurysms, such as a basilar tip aneurysm, in which the surgical approach is

  13. Syndrome of inappropriately low-pressure acute hydrocephalus (SILPAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark G; Price, Angel V

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with acute hydrocephalus have ventriculomegaly and high intracranial pressure (ICP). However, there is a subset of patients who are symptomatic with acute ventriculomegaly and inappropriately low ICP. Two patient groups were defined. Each patient presented with clinical deterioration that included a significant decrease in level of consciousness with new and significant ventriculomegaly. Patients in group 1 (n = 10) were managed without endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). Group 2 was a series of patients (n = 10) managed with ETV. Treatment for both groups involved insertion of an external ventricular drain (EVD) with ICP <5 cmH(2)O. Further treatment consisted of either neck wrapping with a tensor bandage and/or lowering the EVD to negative levels to facilitate drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which resulted in clinical improvement and resolution of ventriculomegaly. All 20 patients had anatomical obstruction to CSF flow into the subarachnoid space (SAS) confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with cine MRI studies. Group 1 patients were treated until shunt revision/insertion was possible (n = 7), ICP normalized, and the EVD could be removed (n = 2), or death (n = 1) occurred. Patients in group 2 all underwent ETV, and ICP patterns normalized in all. Group 2 patients were managed with an EVD until shunt revision/insertion was required (n = 2), ICP normalized and the EVD could be removed (n = 7), or death (n = 1) occurred. The syndrome of inappropriately low-pressure acute hydrocephalus (SILPAH) is an important entity in both children and adults. A possible hypothesis invokes loss of an effective SAS. ETV reestablishes communication between the SAS and ventricles, producing a rapid return of normal ICP dynamics and a significant decrease in the number of shunt-dependent patients.

  14. Elevated intracranial pressure causes optic nerve and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Derek M; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel experimental system for the modulation and measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP), and to use this system to assess the impact of elevated ICP on the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in CD1 mice. This system involved surgical implantation of an infusion cannula and a radiowave based pressure monitoring probe through the skull and into the subarachnoid space. The infusion cannula was used to increase ICP, which was measured by the probe and transmitted to a nearby receiver. The system provided robust and consistent ICP waveforms, was well tolerated, and was stable over time. ICP was elevated to approximately 30 mmHg for one week, after which we assessed changes in optic nerve structure with transmission electron microscopy in cross section and RGC numbers with antibody staining in retinal flat mounts. ICP elevation resulted in optic nerve axonal loss and disorganization, as well as RGC soma loss. We conclude that the controlled manipulation of ICP in active, awake mice is possible, despite their small size. Furthermore, ICP elevation results in visual system phenotypes of optic nerve and RGC degeneration, suggesting that this model can be used to study the impact of ICP on the visual system. Potentially, this model can also be used to study the relationship between ICP and IOP, as well diseases impacted by ICP variation such as glaucoma, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and the spaceflight-related visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Massive neonatal intracranial hemorrhage caused by bromadiolone: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mingsheng; Zhang, Mengqi; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Zhenghong

    2017-11-01

    Bromadiolone, often called a super-warfarin, is a potent rodenticide with long half-life. Skin and mucosal bleeding is the most common clinical manifestations of its intoxication. Bromadiolone intoxications in adults and children have been reported, but this phenomenon is rarely seen in fetuses. This paper presents a case of neonate with massive intracranial hemorrhage mediated by bromadiolone intoxication, highlighting that the bromadiolone is potentially lethal to the fetus. The male neonate presented with poor respiratory effort, decreased muscle tone, and pallor at birth. He developed generalized seizures on day 1 of life. His mother suffered from bleeding of oral mucosa and the subsequent lab screening for toxicants showed a bromadiolone level of 126 ng/mL. Laboratory tests revealed that prolonged prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). A computed tomography (CT) of his head revealed a severe subdural hematoma, which lead to midline shift, bilateral intraventricular hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Serum from cord blood was collected and screened for toxicants. The result returned with a bromadiolone level of 94 ng/mL. The neonate was treated with vitamin K, fresh-frozen plasma, and red blood cells. His parents required termination of all treatments, and the neonate unfortunately died shortly after. Through clinical experience from this case, we believe that bromadiolone can be passed down to the fetus via placenta. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhage caused by bromadiolone is rare but potentially lethal. Pregnant women should be informed of the serious side effects of bromadiolone and this poisonous reagent should be avoided in any period during pregnancy.

  16. Intracranial dermoid cysts: variations of radiological and clinical features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orakcioglu, B.; Halatsch, M.-E.; Unterberg, A.; Fortunati, M.; Yonekawa, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts are uncommon, and their clinical features as well as surgical management differ from patient to patient. Dermoids are generally benign lesions, but may cause spontaneous complications such as meningitis and/or hydrocephalus due to rupture and epileptic seizures depending on their location. Little has been reported about characteristic imaging findings with resulting therapeutic considerations, and only a few reports exist about associated hydrocephalus. Imaging modalities have changed and can facilitate differential diagnosis and follow-up if applied correctly. In this paper, we attempt to contribute our clinical experience with the management of dermoid cysts. The charts of five men and two women with intracranial dermoid cysts were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were treated between September 1993 and September 2006. Selected patients are presented in detail. Tumour location, size and radiographic characteristics varied in each patient. Clinical presentations comprised focal neurological deficits as well as epileptic seizures, persistent headache, mental changes and psycho-organic syndromes. One patient underwent delayed ventriculo-peritoneal shunting after ruptured fatty particles caused obstructive hydrocephalus. Despite dermoid rupture into the subarachnoid space, three patients never developed hydrocephalus. Diffuse vascular supra-tentorial lesions were seen in one patient as a result of aseptic meningitis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity in dermoids is related to decrease of water proton diffusion and should be used for both the diagnosis and follow-up of this lesion. Although dermoid cysts are known to be benign entities per se, their rupture can cause a wide range of symptoms including aseptic meningitis and/or hydrocephalus. This may be due to intraventricular obstruction and/or paraventricular compression. While rupture does not necessarily bring about hydrocephalus, radical removal of the tumor and

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todoroki, Koji; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Kadota, Koki; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kanemaru, Reizou; Fujimoto, Toshirou; Yamamoto, Kunimitsu

    1987-12-01

    A sequential MR scan was performed on 21 patients with intracranial hematoma, and simultaneously the T/sub 1/ values of the hematomas were calculated. The T/sub 1/ value of a hematoma was found to be longer than that of the white matter in the acute phase, but it soon becomes as short as that of the white matter (7 - 10 day after). After several days, the T/sub 1/ value again gradually becomes longer. In the experiment, 30 ml of fresh blood (15 samples) were stored at room temperature, and a sequential MR scan and the calculation of the T/sub 1/ were performed over a period of 20 days. In vitro, most of the T/sub 1/ values were long, but there was much variation on the first day. A shortening of the T/sub 1/ was observed as well in vivo, and after this shortening, no prolongation of the T/sub 1/ was observed. Perhaps the shortening of T/sub 1/ was caused by the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin and by the coagulation of the blood. The lysis and absorption of the hematoma may, on the other hand, cause the prolongation of the T/sub 1/ in vitro. For the diagnosis of intracranial hematoma, CT was found to be a method superior to MRI, especially in the acute phase. However, MRI gives us more information about hematoma (concerning the denaturation of the hemoglobin to methemoglobin, the lysis and absorption of the hematoma, the range of hemorrhagic tissue and edema, etc.) than does CT. An IR (T/sub 1/-weighted) image shows a good contrast between the hematoma and the surrounding tissue (hemorrhagic tissue, edema) in the early phase. On the other hand, the SE (T/sub 2/-weighted) image informs us of the lesion when the hematoma is low approx. isodense on the CT in the chronic phase.

  18. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    . The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  19. Intracranial dural metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Lakshmi; Abrey, Lauren E; Iwamoto, Fabio M

    2009-05-01

    : Intracranial dural metastases (IDM) are found at autopsy in 9% of patients with advanced systemic cancer. However, to the authors' knowledge, IDM have not been studied systematically in the modern neuroimaging era. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical presentation, imaging, treatment, and prognosis of patients with IDM. : The current study was a retrospective review of 122 patients with IDM diagnosed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2006. Patients with concurrent brain or leptomeningeal metastases were excluded. : Sixty-one percent of the patients were women; the median age at diagnosis was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) at diagnosis was 80, and the median time to IDM diagnosis from initial cancer diagnosis was 37 months. Breast (34%) and prostate (17%) cancers were the most frequent primary tumors associated with IDM. Fifty-six percent of patients had a single dural metastasis. On imaging, 70% had metastases of the overlying skull, 44% had dural tail metastases, 53% had vasogenic edema, and 34% had brain invasion. Direct extension from skull metastases was the most common mode of spread. Eighty-three percent of patients had active systemic disease at the time of IDM diagnosis. A lower KPS and lung cancer were associated with worse overall survival. Surgical resection and chemotherapy improved progression-free survival, but only resection was found to be associated with improved overall survival. : IDM affect a significant proportion of cancer patients. KPS and status of systemic cancer should guide treatment decisions. Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  20. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  1. Equal contribution of increased intracranial pressure and subarachnoid blood to cerebral blood flow reduction and receptor upregulation after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Laboratory investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    chain reaction was used to determine the mRNA levels for ET(A), ET(B), and 5-HT(1) receptors. Regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) were quantified by means of an autoradiographic technique. RESULTS: Compared with the sham condition, both SAH and saline injection resulted in significantly...

  2. Intracranial calcification in central diabetes insipidus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, Salwa R. [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); Pandey, Tarun [Al Razi Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuwait (Kuwait); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Radiology Department, Little Rock, AR (United States); Badawi, Mona H. [Al-Adan Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Kuwait (Kuwait)

    2008-01-15

    Intracranial calcification is a known but extremely rare complication of diabetes insipidus. To date, only 16 patients have been reported and all had the peripheral (nephrogenic) type of diabetes insipidus. We report a child with intracranial calcification complicating central diabetes insipidus. We also report a child with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, and compare the patterns of intracranial calcification. (orig.)

  3. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  4. Delayed chronic intracranial subdural hematoma complicating resection of a tanycytic thoracic ependymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, Rosario; Giugno, Antonella; Graziano, Francesca; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Giller, Cole; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate that the diagnosis of an intracranial subdural hematoma should be considered for patients presenting with acute or delayed symptoms of intracranial pathology following resection of a spinal tumor. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman found to have a chronic subdural hematoma 1 month following resection of a thoracic extramedullary ependymoma. Evacuation of the hematoma through a burr hole relieved the presenting symptoms and signs. Resolution of the hematoma was confirmed with a computed tomography (CT) scan. Headache and other symptoms not referable to spinal pathology should be regarded as a warning sign of an intracranial subdural hematoma, and a CT scan of the head should be obtained. The mechanism of the development of the hematoma may be related to the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid with subsequent intracranial hypotension leading to an expanding subdural space and hemorrhage.

  5. Treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms yesterday and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Alexander; Steiner, Anahi; Kerry, Ghassan; Ranaie, Gholamreza; Baer, Ingrid; Hammer, Christian M.; Kunze, Stefan; Steiner, Hans-Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Objective This prospective study is designed to detect changes in the treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms over a period of 17 years. Methods We compared 361 treated cases of aneurysm occlusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage from 1997 to 2003 with 281 cases from 2006 to 2014. Specialists of neuroradiology and vascular neurosurgery decided over the modality assignment. We established a prospective data acquisition in both groups to detect significant differences within a follow-up time of one year. With this setting we evaluated the treatment methods over time and compared endovascular with microsurgical treatment. Results When compared to the earlier group, microsurgical treatment was less frequently chosen in the more recent collective because of neck-configuration. Endovascular treatment was chosen more frequently over time (31.9% versus 48.8%). Occurrence of initial symptomatic ischemic stroke was significantly lower in the clipping group compared to the endovascular group and remained stable over time. The number of reinterventions due to refilled treated aneurysms significantly decreased in the endovascular group at one-year follow-up, but the significantly better occlusion- and reintervention-rate of the microsurgical group persisted. The rebleeding rate in the endovascular group at one year follow-up decreased from 6.1% to 2.2% and showed no statistically significant difference to the microsurgical group, anymore (endovascular 2.2% versus microsurgical 0.0%, p = 0.11). Conclusion Microsurgical clipping still has some advantages, however endovascular treatment is improving rapidly. PMID:28257502

  6. Treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms using internally expanding coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, M. Fareed K.; Memon, Muhammad Zeeshan; Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) showed that patients with intracranial aneurysms treated with coil embolization have better clinical outcomes than those undergoing neurosurgical clipping. However some patients treated endovascularly have recurrence of aneurysms. Low packing density is often cited as a reason for recurrence. Coiling with hydrogel covered coils significantly improves the packing density. We report our initial experience in using a newly introduced design of hydrogel coils. Methods: Three consecutive patients with unruptured aneurysms were treated with hydrogel coated coils. During embolization, a stable framework was first established with bare metal coils, and gel coated coils were used subsequently to increase the packing density. After the procedure, packing density was estimated by calculating the compaction ratio using an online calculator. Results: Successful coil embolization was achieved in all 3 patients. Hydrogel coated coils comprised 11, 63 and 72% of the total coils deployed. One patient had coil herniation that required stent deployment. All patients remained neurologically intact during and after the procedure. Follow-up angiography in 2 patients at 6 months revealed aneurysm stability without any residual neck remnant. Conclusions: The softness of the hydrogel allowed us to deploy coated coils with good packing density. A slight expansion of these coils at the neck can be expected to reduce any neck remnant and potentially inhibit recurrence. PMID:22518218

  7. Lesões cerebrais agudas e sua influência sobre a motilidade gastrintestinal Influence of acute brain injuries on gut motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adson Freitas de Lucena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A hemorragia subaracnóide é um exemplo de agravo capaz de elevar a pressão intracraniana a patamares de expressiva morbidade. A dilatação gástrica aguda e o retardo do esvaziamento gástrico são alterações de relevância fisiopatológica em pacientes com hipertensão intracraniana, sendo a normalização desses parâmetros útil para otimizar a recuperação dos pacientes vítimas de lesões do sistema nervoso central. Conduziu-se uma revisão bibliográfica em revistas de pesquisa médico-acadêmica e bibliotecas eletrônicas na área das ciências da saúde nacionais e internacionais nos últimos vinte e oito anos a respeito do eixo funcional cérebro-trato gastrintestinal e seu comportamento em animais experimentais ou pacientes com lesão cerebral aguda. A diminuição do tônus parassimpático é uma potencial causa da intolerância alimentar associado a hipertensão intracraniana. O comportamento do esvaziamento gástrico e do trânsito do trato gastrintestinal seguem padrão bifásico: uma fase inicial de esvaziamento gástrico acelerado e uma fase tardia de letargia intestinal. Observações experimentais são importantes para compreender o difícil manejo nutricional e volêmico de pacientes em terapia intensiva que evoluem com HIC secundária a um trauma crânio encefálico ou após hemorragia subaracnóide pós-rotura aneurismática cerebral. A elevação da pressão intracraniana causa incremento na atividade simpática, que é responsável por muitos dos sintomas periféricos sistêmicos e gastrintestinais. Conclui-se que as lesões cerebrais agudas que cursam com elevação importante da pressão intracraniana retardam o esvaziamento gastrintestinal tendo como via fisiopatológica as alterações no sistema nervoso autônomo.Subarachnoid hemorrhage can increase intracranial pressure, causing significant morbidity. Acute gastric dilation and delayed gastric emptying are commonly seen in patients with intracranial

  8. The Intracranial-B2LEED3S Score and the Risk of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Ischemic Stroke Patients Under Antiplatelet Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Sissani, Leila; Labreuche, Julien; Vicaut, Eric; Bousser, Marie Germaine; Chamorro, Angel; Fisher, Marc; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M; Hennerici, Michael G; Mattle, Heinrich; Rothwell, Peter M; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Greving, Jacoba P; Algra, Ale

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic antiplatelet therapy in the post-acute phase of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke is limited by the risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) complications. METHODS: We developed an ICH risk score based on the PERFORM trial cohort (n = 19,100), which included patients with a

  9. Treatment of ruptured complex and large/giant ruptured cerebral aneurysms by acute coiling followed by staged flow diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Piano, Mariangela; Fang, Shanna; Pero, Guglielmo; Kallmes, David F; Quilici, Luca; Valvassori, Luca; Lozupone, Emilio; Cloft, Harry J; Boccardi, Edoardo; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Flow-diversion treatment has been shown to be associated with high rates of angiographic obliteration; however, the treatment is relatively contraindicated in the acute phase following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) as these patients require periprocedural dual antiplatelet therapy. Acute coiling followed by flow diversion has emerged as an intriguing and feasible treatment option for ruptured complex and giant aneurysms. In this study the authors report outcomes and complications of patients with ruptured aneurysms undergoing coiling in the acute phase followed by planned delayed flow diversion. METHODS This case series includes patients from 2 institutions. All patients underwent standard endovascular coiling in the acute phase after SAH with the intention and plan to proceed with flow diversion at a later date. Outcomes studied included angiographic occlusion, procedure-related complications, and long-term clinical outcome as measured using the modified Rankin Scale. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent coiling in the acute phase with the intention to undergo flow diversion at a later date. The mean aneurysm size was 15.8 ± 7.9 mm. Of the 31 patients undergoing coiling, 4 patients could not undergo further flow-diverter therapy: 3 patients (9.7%) died of complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage and 1 patient had permanent morbidity as a result of perioperative ischemic stroke (3.1%). Twenty-seven patients underwent staged placement of flow diverters after adequate recovery. The median time to treatment was 16 weeks. There was one case of aneurysm rebleeding following coil treatment. There were no cases of permanent morbidity or mortality resulting from flow-diverter treatment. Twenty-four patients underwent imaging follow-up; 18 of these patients had aneurysms that were completely or nearly completely occluded (58.1% on an intent-to-treat basis). At last follow-up (mean 18.3 months), 25 patients had mRS scores ≤ 2 (80.6% on an intent-to-treat basis

  10. New angiographic measurement tool for analysis of small cerebral vessels: application to a subarachnoid haemorrhage model in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turowski, B.; Moedder, U. [Heinrich-Heine University, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Neuroradiology, Duesselorf (Germany); Haenggi, D.; Steiger, H.J. [Heinrich-Heine University, Department of Neurosurgery, Duesseldorf (Germany); Beck, A.; Aurich, V. [Heinrich-Heine University, Institute of Informatics, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Exact quantification of vasospasm by angiography is known to be difficult especially in small vessels. The purpose of the study was to develop a new method for computerized analysis of small arteries and to demonstrate feasibility on cerebral angiographies of rats acquired on a clinical angiography unit. A new software tool analysing grey values and subtracting background noise was validated on a vessel model. It was tested in practice in animals with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). A total of 28 rats were divided into four groups: SAH untreated, SAH treated with local calcium antagonist, SAH treated with placebo, and sham-operated. The diameters of segments of the internal carotid, caudal cerebral, middle cerebral, rostral cerebral and the stapedial arteries were measured and compared to direct measurements of the diameters on magnified images. There was a direct correlation between the cross-sectional area of vessels measured in a phantom and the measurements acquired using the new image analysis method. The spread of repeated measurements with the new software was small compared to the spread of direct measurements of vessel diameters on magnified images. Application of the measurement tool to experimental SAH in rats showed a statistically significant reduction of vasospasm in the SAH groups treated with nimodipine-releasing pellets in comparison to all the other groups combined. The presented computerized method for analysis of small intracranial vessels is a new method allowing precise relative measurements. Nimodipine-releasing subarachnoidal pellets reduce vasospasm, but further testing with larger numbers is necessary. The tool can be applied to human angiography without modification and offers the promise of substantial progress in the diagnosis of vasospasm after SAH. (orig.)

  11. Haemorrhage in intracranial tuber- culosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Intracranial tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries where tuberculosis is endemic.1 In the central nervous system tuberculosis manifests as cerebritis, cerebral abscess, tuberculoma, and tubercu- lous meningitis (TBM).1-5 TBM is thought to arise from cerebrospinal.

  12. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  13. What Is IH (Intracranial Hypertension)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store What is IH? What is IH? Intracranial hypertension literally means that the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid ( ... is too high. “Intracranial” means “within the skull.” “Hypertension” means “high fluid pressure.” To understand how this ...

  14. Spaceflight-Induced Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Alex P; Marshall-Bowman, Karina

    2015-06-01

    Although once a widely speculated about and largely theoretical topic, spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension has gained acceptance as a distinct clinical phenomenon, yet the underlying physiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the past, many terms were used to describe the symptoms of malaise, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo, though longer duration spaceflights have increased the prevalence of overlapping symptoms of headache and visual disturbance. Spaceflight-induced visual pathology is thought to be a manifestation of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) because of its similar presentation to cases of known intracranial hypertension on Earth as well as the documentation of increased ICP by lumbar puncture in symptomatic astronauts upon return to gravity. The most likely mechanisms of spaceflight-induced increased ICP include a cephalad shift of body fluids, venous outflow obstruction, blood-brain barrier breakdown, and disruption to CSF flow. The relative contribution of increased ICP to the symptoms experienced during spaceflight is currently unknown, though other factors recently posited to contribute include local effects on ocular structures, individual differences in metabolism, and the vasodilator effects of carbon dioxide. This review article attempts to consolidate the literature regarding spaceflight-induced intracranial hypertension and distinguish it from other pathologies with similar symptomatology. It discusses the proposed physiological causes and the pathological manifestations of increased ICP in the spaceflight environment and provides considerations for future long-term space travel. In the future, it will be critical to develop countermeasures so that astronauts can participate at their peak potential and return safely to Earth.

  15. Imaging intracranial tuberculosis in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children`s Hospital, Rondebosch (South Africa)

    1995-05-01

    A morphologically based imaging review of intracranial tuberculosis in childhood is presented. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance features of parenchymal tuberculoma, tuberculous meningitis and meningeal/meniningocerebral tuberculoma are illustrated. Recent insight into the nature of tuberculoma necrosis and its magnetic resonance correlation is reviewed. Pathogenesis, relevant clinical background and the role of modern imaging is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Resistive NMR of intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Grossman, R.I.; Levine, R.S.; Lynch, R.; Goldberg, H.I.; Samuel, L.; Edelstein, W.; Bottomley, P.; Redington, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison between computed tomography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in 17 patients with intracranial hematomas indicate a distinct role for NMR in evaluating the stable patient with hematoma. NMR is useful for delineating the extent of the hematoma, the relationship of the hematoma to brain anatomy, and the presence of hematoma at a time when the hematoma is isodense on CT.

  17. A case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura presenting with intracranial hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Akbayram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenic purpura is an acute, generally considered a self-limiting benign disorder with a 60%-80% change of spontaneous recovery occurring usually within a few months after onset. Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but life-threatening complication of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We report a 4-year-old girl who admitted with headache, vomiting, bleeding from noise and bruises on the extremities. Her neurological examination was normal. Based on laboratory finding she was diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura and intracranial hemorrhage. We suggest that cranial imaging should be perform in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura admitted with bleeding symptoms, vomiting and headache even if they had no abnormal neurological signs.

  18. Management of intracranial hemorrhage in adult patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher-Sandersjöö, Alexander; Thelin, Eric Peter; Bartek, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a common complication in adults treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of outcome and investigate intervention strategies following ICH development in ECMO-treated adult patients. METHODS.......036), presence of intraparenchymal hematoma (IPH) (p = 0.049), IPH volume (p = 0.002), presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p = 0.001), subarachnoid hemorrhage Fisher grade (p...), 63% (n = 10) had favorable neurological outcome (GOS 4-5) after six months. Five patients were surgically treated for their ICH, some with dire hemorrhagic consequences, however one patient made a complete recovery. CONCLUSIONS: ICH in adult ECMO patients is associated with a high mortality rate...

  19. Does Ondansetron Modify Sympathectomy Due to Subarachnoid Anesthesia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkawi, Abdullah S; Mavridis, Dimitris; Flood, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disagreement among many underpowered studies has led to an equivocal understanding of the efficacy of the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron in preventing the consequences of sympathectomy after subarachnoid anesthesia. The authors assessed the efficacy of ondansetron with respect to the ov......BACKGROUND: Disagreement among many underpowered studies has led to an equivocal understanding of the efficacy of the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron in preventing the consequences of sympathectomy after subarachnoid anesthesia. The authors assessed the efficacy of ondansetron with respect.......12; I = 60%, P = 0.002) and bradycardia (relative risk = 0.44 [95% CI, 0.26 to 0.73], P = 0.001; TSA-adjusted CI, 0.05 to 3.85; I = 0%, P = 0.84). However, the authors found indications of bias among these trials. TSAs demonstrated that the meta-analysis lacked adequate information size and did...

  20. Spinal myelopathy induced by subarachnoid batrachotoxin: ultrastructure and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J H; Deshpande, S S; Pence, R S; Albuquerque, E X

    1978-01-20

    A combined structural and electrophysiologic analysis on the effects of subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin was conducted in rats. Swelling of neuronal perikarya, accompanied by areas of clearing, satellitosis, fatty metamorphosis and central chromatolysis were demonstrated in the spinal anterior horns. Studies on isolated extensor digitorum longus (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles showed membrane depolarization in the extensor 24 h after injection, with progressive augmentation of this phenomenon in animals given multiple injections of the toxin. Differential sensitivity of fast and slow muscles was evident: soleus was only slightly affected. Subarachnoid injections of batrachotoxin, which induced swelling of neuronal perikarya and axonal processes, also caused signs of denervation in the extensor muscle 7 days after injection, while spontaneous transmitter release was still present. Some structural and and most electrophysiologic alterations after batrachotoxin injections were reversible.

  1. Clipping and Coiling of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 2000 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Jessica J; Isaacs, Abby J; Kamel, Hooman; Sedrakyan, Art

    2015-09-01

    Endovascular coiling therapy is increasingly popular for obliteration of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, but older patients face higher procedural risks and shorter periods during which an untreated aneurysm may rupture causing subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We assessed trends in clipping and coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, outcomes after clipping and coiling of unruptured intracranial aneurysms, and in SAH among Medicare beneficiaries. Using 2000 to 2010 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review data, we identified 2 cohorts of patients admitted electively for clipping or coiling of an unruptured aneurysm: (1) utilization cohort (2000-2010): patients ≥65 years enrolled ≥1 month in a given year and (2) outcomes cohort (2001-2010): patients ≥66 years of age enrolled in Medicare for ≥1 year. We calculated rates of clipping, coiling, and SAH per 100 000 Medicare beneficiaries. We tested for trends in the risk of in-hospital mortality and complications, discharge destination, 30-day mortality, 30-day readmissions, and length of hospitalization. Characteristics of patients undergoing clipping (n=4357) or coiling (n=7942) did not change appreciably. Overall, 30-day mortality, in-hospital complications, and 30-day readmissions decreased, generally reaching their lowest levels in 2008 to 2010 (1.6%, 25.0%, and 14.5% for clipping and 1.5%, 13.8%, and 11.0% for coiling, respectively). Procedural treatment rates per 100 000 beneficiaries increased from 1.4 in 2000 to 6.0 in 2010, driven mainly by increased use of coiling but SAH rates did not decrease. Although outcomes tended to improve over time, increased preventative treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms among Medicare beneficiaries did not result in a population-level decrease in SAH rates. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. A study of the intracranial hemorrhagic lesions by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Kazuyoshi

    1983-01-01

    Changes in X-ray density corresponding to intracranial hemorrhagic lesions were follwed in fourteen patients. In addition, X-ray density of solutions with oxyhemoglobin, CO-hemoglobin and methehemoglobin as well as suspension of blood corpuscles, hemolysate, calcium, sodium, iron, copper, magnesium and phosphate was measured. The following results were obtained: 1) The average X-ray density of hemorrhagic lesions within 48 hours after intracranial hemorrhage was 73.80 H.N.: 55.81 H.N. between 48 hours and three weeks : 49.5 H.N. between three and four weeks: 26.81 H.N. over four weeks. In all cases, the intracranial hemorrhage in its acute stage revealed a high X-ray density as compared to the surrounding cerebral tissue. This was helpful for the detection of hemorrhagic lesions. 2) X-ray density of the lesion decreased 1.68 H.N./day after the hemorrhage. 3) Among various constituents of blood, the solution of sodium showed the highest X-ray density, followed by hemoglobin, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, copper and iron. 4) However, when the concentration of each blood constituent was taken into consideration, hemoglobin showed the highest X-ray density, followed by calcium, copper, sodium, magnesium, phosphate and iron. 5) There was no significant difference in X-ray density between the suspension of blood corpuscles and hemolysate. The findings were the same whether hemoglobin was oxyhemoglobin, CO-hemoglobin or methehemoglobin. 6) Oxyhemoglobin showed the highest X-ray density, followed by CO-hemoglobin and methehemoglobin. These findings suggested that hemoglobin in the intracranial hemorrhagic lesion seems to be a major factor producing a high X-ray density particularly in its acute stage. (author)

  3. Cerebral Hemodynamic Changes Induced by a Lumbar Puncture in Good-Grade Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Eric A. Schmidt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with good-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH are those without initial neurological deficit. However, they can die or present severe deficit due to secondary insult leading to brain ischemia. After SAH, in a known context of energy crisis, vasospasm, hydrocephalus and intracranial hypertension contribute to unfavorable outcome. Lumbar puncture (LP is sometimes performed in an attempt to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP and release headaches. We hypothesize that in good-grade SAH patients, a 20-ml LP releases headaches, reduces ICP and improves cerebral blood flow (CBF as measured with O15 PET scan. Methods: Six good-grade (WFNS grade 1or 2 SAH patients (mean age 48 years, 2 women, 4 men were prospectively included. All aneurysms (4 anterior communicating artery and 2 right middle cerebral artery were coiled at day 1. Patients were managed according to our local protocol. LP was performed for severe headache (VAS >7 despite maximal painkiller treatment. Patients were included when the LP was clinically needed. The 20-ml LP was done in the PET scan (mean delay between SAH and LP: 3.5 days. LP allows hydrostatic measurement of ICP. Arterial blood pressure (ABP was noninvasively gauged with photoplethysmography. Every signal was monitored and analyzed off-line. Regional CBF (rCBF was measured semiquantitatively with O15 PET before and after LP. Then we calculated the difference between baseline and post-LP condition for each area: positive value means augmentation of rCBF after the LP, negative value means reduction of rCBF. Individual descriptive analysis of CBF was first performed for each patient; then a statistical group analysis was done with SPM for all voxels using t statistics converted to Z scores (p 3.2. Results: A 20-ml LP yielded a reduction in pain (–4, a drop in ICP (24.3 ± 12.5 to 6.9 ± 4.7 mm Hg, but no change in ABP. Descriptive and statistical image analysis showed a heterogeneous and biphasic change in

  4. Management of Agitation Following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is There a Role for Beta-Blockers?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fayaz; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Stroke is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. About 20% of the stroke is hemorrhagic and about 50% of these is due to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A troublesome neuropsychiatric complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage is agitation/aggression. Case Presentation. A 45-year-old man with no prior psychiatric history, sustained subarachnoid hemorrhage. After initial stabilization for 2 days, he underwent craniotomy and clipping of anterior cerebral...

  5. Risk factors for all-cause death after diagnosis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvela, Seppo; Lehto, Hanna

    2015-02-03

    We investigated all-cause mortality and risk factors of death of patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) in a long-term follow-up study. A total of 142 patients with 181 UIAs diagnosed between 1956 and 1978 when UIAs were not treated were included in this study. Patients were followed until death or until 2011 to 2012. Mortality rates and risk factors were studied with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Cox proportional hazards regression models. During 3,530 person-years, 113 (80%) had died, giving an average annual mortality of 3.2%. Of them, 19 (17%) died of aneurysm rupture from the index UIA, 6 (5%) of other aneurysm-related causes, and 2 (2%) of unspecified subarachnoid hemorrhage. The remaining 86 died of causes unrelated to intracranial aneurysms. The cumulative death rate was 20% (95% confidence interval 14%-27%) at 10 years and 60% (52%-68%) at 30 years. Independent risk factors for subsequent death were patient age (adjusted hazard ratio 1.09 per year, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.12, p < 0.001), male sex (2.81, 1.59-4.96, p < 0.001), heavy alcohol use (4.22, 2.22-8.02, p < 0.001), and cigarette smoking (1.72, 0.97-3.07, p = 0.064). History of hypertension, family history of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and diameter of UIA predicted death only in univariable analysis. In patients of working age with a UIA, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking are modifiable risk factors for untimely death through several causes and should be taken into account when treatment is considered. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Leukocyte count and incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderholm, Martin; Zia, Elisabet; Hedblad, Bo; Engström, Gunnar

    2014-04-03

    Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease, in the majority of cases caused by a rupture of an arterial intracranial aneurysm. The effect of systemic low-grade inflammation on incidence of SAH is not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between leukocyte count, a marker of systemic inflammation, and incidence of SAH in a large cohort study. Leukocyte count and other cardiovascular risk factors were measured in 19,794 individuals (17,083 men and 2,711 women, mean age 44 years) participating in a health screening program between 1974 and 1981. Incidence of SAH in relation to baseline leukocyte concentration was studied during a mean follow-up of 27 years in participants free from previous stroke. Ninety-five participants had a SAH, corresponding to an incidence of 22 per 100,000 in women and 17 per 100,000 in men. The hazard ratio for SAH per one standard deviation (2.01 × 10⁹ cells/L) increase of leukocyte concentration was 1.26 (95% CI 1.05-1.53, p = 0.014) after adjustment for several potential confounding factors including smoking. In sensitivity analysis, there was a significant association in smokers but not in non-smokers. High leukocyte count at baseline was associated with increased incidence of SAH, although this relationship might be restricted to smokers. The results support the view that low-grade systemic inflammation could be involved in the pathogenesis of SAH, or constitute an early risk marker for the disease.

  7. Middle cerebral arterial flow changes on transcranial color and spectral Doppler sonography in patients with increased intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Duan, Yun-You; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Yuan, Li-Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wei; Li, Li-Hong; Li, Liang

    2014-12-01

    Intracranial pressure usually increases after severe brain injury. However, a method for noninvasive evaluation of intracranial pressure is still lacking. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential role of transcranial color Doppler sonography in assessing intracranial pressure by observing the middle cerebral artery blood flow parameters in patients with increased intracranial pressure of varying etiology. The hemodynamic changes in the middle cerebral artery in patients with varying degrees of increased intracranial pressure were investigated by transcranial color Doppler sonography in 93 patients who had emergency surgery for brain injury. Middle cerebral artery Doppler flow spectra changed regularly as intracranial pressure increased. The pulsatility index (PI) and resistive index (RI) had a significantly positive correlation with intracranial pressure (r = 0.90 and 0.89, respectively; Pintracranial pressure (r = -0.52; Pintracranial pressure, with sensitivity of 0.885 and specificity of 0.970. In addition to the PI and RI, middle cerebral artery diastolic flow velocity measurement by transcranial color Doppler sonography may also be a useful variable for evaluating intracranial pressure in patients with acute brain injury. © 2013 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  8. Post eclamptic aneurysmal rupture subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosed in the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid and/or intracerebral haemorrhage in women during pregnancy is rare. The risk depends on the stage of pregnancy, but seems to be highest during the late third trimester, during delivery and in the puerperium. Headache can be a symptom of both preeclampsia, subarachnoid haemorrhage and other pathologies or conditions. It is essential for pregnant women with a suspected ruptured aneurysm to be investigated and treated without delay, irrespective of fear of harm to the foetus, to avoid complications from aneurysm rupture. This case study presents a 39-year-old woman who was 35 weeks and 3 days pregnant with known preeclampsia. She endured a headache for the three days leading up to the delivery with associated diplopia on the third day, but these symptoms were thought to be related to her preeclampsia. Over the three hours following childbirth, her headache became more severe and she suffered from vomiting, loss of vision, torticollis and seizures. Computed tomography (CT) of her head revealed a subarachnoid haemorrhage while CT angiography of the Circle of Willis failed to reveal an aneurysm and 4-vessel angiography only demonstrated an area slightly suspicious for the presence of an aneurysm. 3D rotational angiography clearly demonstrated a 1-2 mm aneurysm superior to the left terminal internal carotid artery. In this case, 3D rotational angiography proved to be a valuable additional technique. This patient underwent surgery for her ruptured aneurysm and has made an excellent recovery

  9. Different drugs for prevention of post subarachnoid block shivering. Randomized, controlled, double blind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Zein Elabdein Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative administration of granisetron, dexmedetomidine, and tramadol was effective in decreasing the incidence and intensity of post subarachnoid shivering without increasing the incidence of the side effects.

  10. Effect of magnesium treatment and glucose levels on delayed cerebral ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage : A substudy of the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage trial (MASH-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijenaar, Jolien F.; Dorhout Mees, Sanne M.; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Magnesium treatment did not improve outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage in the Magnesium in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Haemorrhage II trial. We hypothesized that high glucose levels may have offset a potential beneficial effect to prevent delayed cerebral ischemia.

  11. Temperature variability in the day-night cycle is associated with further intracranial pressure during therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Adriano Barreto; Annen, Eva; Boss, Oliver; Farokhzad, Faraneh; Sikorski, Christopher; Keller, Emanuela

    2017-08-03

    To assess whether circadian patterns of temperature correlate with further values of intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe brain injury treated with hypothermia. We retrospectively analyzed temperature values in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients treated with hypothermia by endovascular cooling. The circadian patterns of temperature were correlated with the mean ICP across the following day (ICP 24 ). We analyzed data from 17 days of monitoring of three subarachnoid hemorrhage patients that underwent aneurysm coiling, sedation and hypothermia due to refractory intracranial hypertension and/or cerebral vasospasm. ICP 24 ranged from 11.5 ± 3.1 to 24.2 ± 6.2 mmHg. The ratio between the coefficient of variation of temperature during the nocturnal period (18:00-6:00) and the preceding diurnal period (6:00-18:00) [temperature variability (TV)] ranged from 0.274 to 1.97. Regression analysis showed that TV correlated with ICP 24 (Pearson correlation = -0.861, adjusted R square = 0.725, p TV) mmHg or, for 80% prediction interval, [Formula: see text] mmHg. The results indicate that the occurrence of ICP 24 higher than 20 mmHg is unlikely after a day with TV ≥1.0. TV correlates with further ICP during hypothermia regardless the strict range that temperature is maintained. Further studies with larger series could clarify whether intracranial hypertension in severe brain injury can be predicted by analysis of oscillation patterns of autonomic parameters across a period of 24 h or its harmonics.

  12. Intracranial subdural hematoma and pneumocephalus after spinal instrumentation of myelodysplastic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Roman; Maliszewski, Mariusz; Krawczyk, Lech

    2011-01-01

    To report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma, pneumocephalus, and pneumorachis, which occurred because of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak caused by a malpositioned transpedicular screw during spinal surgery for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis accompanied with hydrocephalus. Intracranial hemorrhage may occur as a consequence of dural sac penetration and CSF leakage after various medical procedures at the spinal level. The awareness of this severe complication is especially important during spinal instrumentation procedures in which inadvertent dural sac violation and CSF loss may be overlooked. A case report and literature review are presented here. A 12-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus underwent instrumentation for severe myelodysplastic scoliosis. Postoperatively, she became aphasic and increasingly somnolent. An urgent computed tomographic scan of the head and spine showed massive intracranial hematoma, pneumocephalus, pneumorachis, and a malpositioned pedicular screw that caused CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and bleeding remote from the surgical site. The patient needed neurosurgical cranial decompression and subsequent spinal reoperation with dural tear repair. The final outcome was an uneventful complete recovery. The increasing use of pedicular screws in spinal surgery carries a potential risk of occult dural sac violation with subsequent CSF leakage, intracranial hypotension, and the possibility of intracranial bleeding and pneumocephalus remote from the surgical site. This potentially fatal complication should always be considered after spinal surgery in the presence of early signs of neurological deterioration and necessitates an urgent cranial and spinal imaging to confirm the diagnosis and to make adequate treatment decisions.

  13. Raised intracranial pressure: What it is and how to recognise it

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raised ICP can be defined in many ways, but in the acute setting it commonly refers to pressure greater than .... Hypertensive encephalopathy (malignant hypertension, eclampsia). Metabolic encephalopathy. Hypoxic-ischaemic ... Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. ICP varies over the course of the day and is influenced.

  14. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G

    2017-01-01

    (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent...

  15. Modulação da pressão intracraniana em um modelo experimental de hipertensão abdominal e lesão pulmonar aguda Factors associated with variation in intracranial pressure in a model of intra-abdominal hypertension with acute lung injury

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    Fernando Godinho Zampieri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito de alterações hemodinâmicas, respiratórias e metabólicas sobre a pressão intracraniana em um modelo de lesão pulmonar aguda e síndrome compartimental abdominal. MÉTODOS: Oito porcos Agroceres foram submetidos, após a instrumentação, a cinco cenários clínicos: 1 estado basal com baixa pressão intra-abdominal e pulmão sadio; 2 pneumoperitôneo, com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg; 3 lesão pulmonar aguda induzida por lavagem pulmonar e desativação de surfactante; 4 pneumoperitôneo com pressão intra-abdominal de 20 mm Hg na vigência de lesão pulmonar aguda e com PEEP baixo; e 5 PEEP ajustado a 27 cm H2O na vigência de pneumoperitôneo e lesão pulmonar aguda. Variáveis respiratórias e hemodinâmicas foram coletadas. Análise multivariada foi realizada buscando as variáveis associadas com elevação da pressão intracraniana nos cinco cenários estudados. RESULTADOS: Após a análise multivariada, nas situações não associadas com lesão pulmonar aguda apenas a pressão de platô das vias aéreas se correlacionou positivamente com a pressão intracraniana. Nos modelos associados com lesão pulmonar aguda, a pressão de platô de vias aéreas, a pressão arterial de CO2, o CO2 no final da expiração e a pressão venosa central se correlacionaram positivamente com incrementos da pressão intracraniana. CONCLUSÃO: Em um modelo de disfunção orgânica múltipla com situações clínicas associadas com aumento da pressão torácica e abdominal, o incremento da pressão intracraniana desencadeado pela elevação da pressão abdominal parece ser decorrente da piora da complacência do sistema respiratório e da redução do gradiente para drenagem venosa cerebral ocasionado pela elevação da pressão venosa central.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic changes on intracranial pressure in a model of acute lung injury and abdominal compartment syndrome

  16. Time-related changes in cerebral blood flow in subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Tadaharu; Hasue, Masamichi; Ko, Meishyu; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tatsuya (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan). Hachiouji Medical Center); Miwa, Tetsurou

    1992-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was determined by the {sup 123}I-IMP SPECT reference sample method in 39 patients with subarachnoid hemorrahge (SAH) due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm, who were referred to a medical center within 36 hours after the onset. SAH and ruptured aneurysm were diagnosed by CT scan and angiography, respectively. By regarding the day of onset as day 0, SAH was divided into three stages: the acute stage during day 0-4, the subacute stage during day 5-20, and the chronic stage during day 21 or more. The prognosis was evaluated with the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Average CBFs were 33.39, 29.44, and 33.15 in the acute, subacute, and chronic stages, respectively. The values were all lower than the reference sample value, 43.39. Only a small number of cases, however, had vasospasm on angiography conducted in the acute stage. There was correlation between CT severity in the acute stage and decreased CBF. When low denisty area was seen on CT in the subacute stage, average CBFs were 28.28 and 23.95 in the acute and subacute stages, respectively, in contrast to 35.97 and 32.45 without evidence of low density in the subacute stage. CBF decreased by 0.79 in a group of cisternal drainage from the acute stage to the subacute stage, being smaller than the value (7.15) in a group without drainage. When ventricular-peritoneal shunt was conducted for hydrocepharus in the chronic stage, CBF was increased after surgery. CBF associated with an improvement of the GOS was higher in both the acute and the subacute stages than in severely disabled or death cases. Prognosis was better in a group with acute CBF of 30 or more than a group of less than 30. Serial determination of CBF in SAH was useful for evaluating the condition of SAH, selecting therapeutic methods, and estimating the prognosis. (N.K.).

  17. Flair MR imaging in the Detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage : comparison with CT and T1-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Youn; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Oh, Tae Kyung; Kim, Ho Kyun [College of Medicine, Jnje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To compare the findings of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging in the detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), with those of precontrast CT and T1-weighted MR imaging. In 13 patients (14 cases) with SAH, FLAIR MR images were retrospectively analyzed and compared with CT (10 patients, 11 cases) and T1-weighted MR images (9 cases). SAH was confirmed on the basis of high density along the subarachnoid space, as seen on precontrast CT, or lumbar puncture. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0T unit. FLAIR MR and CT images were obtained during the acute stage(less than 3 days after ictus) in 10 and 9 cases, respectively, during the subacute stage (4-14 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively, and during the chronic stage (more than 15 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively. CT was performed before FLAIR MR imaging, and the interval between CT and FLAIR ranged from 24 hours (6 cases) to 2-3 (2 cases) or 4-7 days (3 cases). In each study, the conspicuity of visualization of SAH was graded as excellent, good, fair, or negative at five locations (sylvian fissure, cortical sulci, anterior basal cistern, posterior basal cistern, and perimesencephalic cistern). In all cases, subarachnoid hemorrhages were demonstrated as high signal intensity areas on FLAIR images. The detection rates for SAH on CT and T1-weighted MR images were 100% (11/11) and 89% (8/9), respectively. FLAIR was superior to T1-weighted imaging in the detection of SAH at all sites except the anterior basal cistern (p less than 0.05) and superior to CT in the detection of SAH at the cortical sulci (p less than 0.05). On FLAIR MR images, subarachnoid hemorrhages at all stages are demonstrated as high signal intensity areas; the FLAIR MR sequence is thus considered useful in the detection of SAH. In particular FLAIR is more sensitive than CT for the detection of SAH in the cortical sulci. (author)

  18. Pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure was first described in 1853. Ever since, there has been a plethora of controversial hypotheses to explain its pathogenesis. I have explored the subject comprehensively by doing basic, experimental and clinical studies. My objective was to investigate the fundamentals of the subject, to test the validity of the previous theories, and finally, based on all these studies, to find a logical explanation for the pathogenesis. My studies included the following issues pertinent to the pathogenesis of optic disc edema in raised intracranial pressure: the anatomy and blood supply of the optic nerve, the roles of the sheath of the optic nerve, of the centripetal flow of fluids along the optic nerve, of compression of the central retinal vein, and of acute intracranial hypertension and its associated effects. I found that, contrary to some previous claims, an acute rise of intracranial pressure was not quickly followed by production of optic disc edema. Then, in rhesus monkeys, I produced experimentally chronic intracranial hypertension by slowly increasing in size space-occupying lesions, in different parts of the brain. Those produced raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) and optic disc edema, identical to those seen in patients with elevated CSFP. Having achieved that, I investigated various aspects of optic disc edema by ophthalmoscopy, stereoscopic color fundus photography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and light microscopic, electron microscopic, horseradish peroxidase and axoplasmic transport studies, and evaluated the effect of opening the sheath of the optic nerve on the optic disc edema. This latter study showed that opening the sheath resulted in resolution of optic disc edema on the side of the sheath fenestration, in spite of high intracranial CSFP, proving that a rise of CSFP in the sheath was the essential pre-requisite for the development of optic disc edema. I also investigated optic disc edema with

  19. Surgical evacuation of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ashraf Shaker; Abdel-Hady, Hesham

    2011-03-01

    Although the incidence of vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) in neonates has dramatically decreased in the developed world since the adoption of routine vitamin K prophylaxis, in developing countries the incidence is still high. Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is the most dangerous complication. Early recognition and management are important to decrease the mortality rate and neurological sequelae. The authors conducted a prospective study between January 2008 and June 2010. They included all full-term neonates referred to the Department of Neurosurgery at Mansoura University Children's Hospital with ICH complicating VKDB and necessitating surgical evacuation. The objective was to evaluate the clinical presentation, diagnosis, hospital course, and outcome of ICH in full-term neonates with VKDB after surgical evacuation. Thirty-two neonates with ICH due to VKDB were included. Diagnosis and classification of ICH were based on detailed history, physical examination, and the interpretation of CT or MR imaging studies. The diagnosis of VKDB was based on pretreatment coagulation studies (prothrombin time [PT] and partial thromboplastin time [PTT]), which are grossly abnormal, together with a normal platelet count and correction of coagulation results to normal after vitamin K administration. The mean age (± SD) at onset of symptoms was 20.4 ± 4.9 days. Two neonates (6.25%) had early VKDB, 7 (21.9%) had classic VKDB, and 23 (71.9%) had late VKDB. The most common neurological manifestations included focal seizures, disturbed consciousness level, and tense anterior fontanel. The most common general manifestations included pallor, respiratory distress, and bleeding from other sites. Radiological findings varied from acute subdural hemorrhage (SDH) in 18 cases (56.3%), intracerebral hemorrhage in 10 (31.3%), and acute SDH with underlying intracerebral hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage, and/or subarachnoid hemorrhage in 4 (12.5%). Before administration of vitamin K

  20. Direct costs of modern treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Y. B. W. E. M.; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Albrecht, K. W.; Beenen, L. F. M.; Groen, R. J. M.; de Haan, R. J.; Vermeulen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose-The purpose of this study was to investigate the current direct costs of modern management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis. Methods-During a 1-year period, we studied all admitted patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from

  1. Direct costs of modern treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Y B W E M; Dijkgraaf, M G W; Albrecht, K W; Beenen, L F M; Groen, R J M; de Haan, R. J.; Vermeulen, M

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the current direct costs of modern management of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the first year after diagnosis. METHODS: During a 1-year period, we studied all admitted patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

  2. Technique of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression effectively reduces postoperative complications of severe bifrontal contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Bifrontal contusion is a common clinical brain injury. In the early stage, it is often mild, but it progresses rapidly and frequently worsens suddenly. This condition can become life threatening and therefore requires surgery. Conventional decompression craniectomy is the commonly used treatment method. In this study, the effect of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression surgery on the prognosis of patients with acute severe bifrontal contusion was investigated. Method A total of 136 patients with severe bifrontal contusion combined with deteriorated intracranial hypertension admitted from March 2001 to March 2014 in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups, i.e., a conventional decompression group and an intracranial pressure (ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression group (68 patients each, to conduct a retrospective study. The incidence rates of acute intraoperative encephalocele, delayed hematomas, and postoperative cerebral infarctions and the Glasgow outcome scores (GOSs 6 months after the surgery were compared between the two groups.Results (1 The incidence rates of acute encephalocele and contralateral delayed epidural hematoma in the stepwise decompression surgery group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05; (2 6 months after the surgery, the incidence of vegetative state and mortality in the stepwise decompression group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05; the rate of favorable prognosis in the stepwise decompression group was also significantly higher than that in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05.Conclusions The ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression technique reduced the perioperative complications of traumatic brain injury through the gradual release of intracranial pressure and was beneficial to the prognosis of

  3. Intrasylvian hematoma caused by ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysms predicts recovery from poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Kosuke; Moriya, Takafumi; Nakashita, Satoru; Lo, Benjamin W Y; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-09-01

    Intrasylvian hematoma (ISH) is a subtype of intracranial hematoma caused by aneurysmal rupture and often presents with a poor initial neurological grade; it is not well studied. The aim of this study was to elucidate outcomes of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with ISH. Data for 97 patients with poor-grade SAH (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies Grade IV or V) were retrospectively analyzed from a single-center, prospective, observational cohort database. Ultra-early surgical clipping, removal of hematoma, external decompression for brain swelling, and prevention of vasospasm by cisternal irrigation with milrinone were combined as an aggressive treatment. Characteristics and clinical courses of SAH with ISH were identified. The authors also evaluated any correlations between poor admission-grade SAH and ISH with good functional outcome. Patients with poor admission-grade SAH and with ISH were more likely to have initial cerebral edema (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test), which significantly resolved overtime (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U-test). These patients had a better chance of functional survival (modified Rankin Scale scores of 1-3; OR 5.75; 95% CI 1.36-24.3; p = 0.017) at 6 months after hospital discharge, after adjustment for potential confounders such as younger age and better initial neurological grade by multivariable analysis. ISH predicted good functional recovery from poor-grade aneurysmal SAH.

  4. Two cases of intracranial gliomatosis in different types: clinical manifestations and radiological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun JIANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report one case of gliomatosis cerebri (GC and one case of leptomeningeal gliomatosis (LG, both of them were clearly diagnosed by brain biopsy. Methods and Results 1 The GC patient was a 48-year-old male who presented with epilepsy and focal neurological deficits. Cranial MRI revealed diffuse white matter lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres without obvious mass effect and enhancement. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that tumor cells and proliferative glial cells were positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. Ki-67 labeling index was about 10% . 2 The LG patient was a 30-year-old female who mainly presented with high intracranial pressure and epilepsy. Repeated cranial MRI revealed aggressive enlargement of subarachnoid space and ventricles, multiple encapsulated cysts in sulci and fissures, and parenchymal infiltration. Strong enhancement in meninges and the encapsulated cysts could be seen in contrast-enhanced images. Histologically, dense and uneven distribution of tumor cells was the main feature. Obvious atypia of nuclei and proliferation of small vessels could be seen. Tumor cells were positive for GFAP. Ki-67 labeling index was about 5% . By brain biopsy, both cases were diagnosed as anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO Ⅲ. The principle of treatment was temozolomide chemotherapy. Conclusions For intracranial gliomatosis, relatively distinct characteristics in brain MRI could indicate the diagnosis. Brain biopsy should be done early as possible for a clear diagnosis.  DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.12.013 

  5. Trends in Resident Operative Teaching Opportunities for Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Matthew; Nayak, Nikhil; Ali, Zarina; Heuer, Gregory; Sanborn, Matthew; Stein, Sherman; Schuster, James; Grady, M Sean; Malhotra, Neil R

    2017-07-01

    The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial heralded a paradigm shift in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. During this same time frame, neurosurgical training programs increased in size and scope. The present study examines the impact of trends in surgical clipping and the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, over one decade, and the neurosurgical resident complement on the resident teaching environment using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). The NIS was used to estimate the number of aneurysms treated with either surgical clipping and endovascular methods from 2002 through 2011 at teaching institutions. Teaching opportunities per year per resident or chief resident were calculated as the ratio of the number of specified cases to the average number of neurosurgical trainees by year. Annualized trends were assessed. Over the study period, the percent change in odds of occurrence of a clipped ruptured aneurysm was -15.6% per year (P institutions. This corresponded to a decline in teaching opportunities for clipped ruptured aneurysms for both residents and chief residents (P < 0.001). In contrast, teaching opportunities for endovascular treatment of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms increased dramatically over the study period. There has been a significant decrease in opportunity for operative exposure to craniotomy for ruptured aneurysm clipping over the past decade, whereas the volume of endovascular procedures for aneurysms has dramatically increased, highlighting the need for a shift in training strategy for those neurosurgeons graduating from residency desiring to subspecialize in neurovascular neurosurgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Circumferential and fusiform intracranial aneurysms: reconstructive endovascular treatment with self-expandable stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubicz, Boris [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Brussels (Belgium); Hopital Erasme, Service de Radiologie (EA 2691), Brussels (Belgium); Collignon, Laurent; Baleriaux, Danielle [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Brussels (Belgium); Lefranc, Florence; Bruneau, Michael; Brotchi, Jacques; Witte, Olivier de [Erasme University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-06-15

    We report our experience with endovascular treatment (EVT) of circumferential and fusiform intracranial aneurysms by a reconstructive approach with self-expandable stents. A retrospective review of our prospectively maintained database identified all circumferential and fusiform aneurysms treated by a reconstructive endovascular approach over a 3-year period. Clinical charts, procedural data, and angiographic results were reviewed. From April 2004 to May 2007, 13 patients were identified, of whom 12 were asymptomatic and 1 presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Two patients with an aneurysm {<=}2 mm were treated by stent-within-stent placement without coiling (group 1). In 11 patients with a larger aneurysm, stenting with subsequent coiling was performed (group 2). In this latter approach, a balloon was temporarily inflated within the stent to ensure safe coil delivery. All patients showed an excellent clinical outcome. Asymptomatic procedural complications occurred in three patients, two with cervical internal carotid artery dissection and one with retroperitoneal hematoma. In patients of group 1, the aneurysm had completely disappeared at 6 months. In patients of group 2, aneurysm occlusion was complete in three and incomplete in eight. Follow-up angiography in 12 patients showed four with further thrombosis, six with stable results, and two with minor recanalization. Circumferential and fusiform intracranial aneurysms may be treated by a reconstructive endovascular approach with self-expandable stents. In small aneurysms, a stent-within-stent technique is effective, whereas stenting and subsequent coiling is indicated in larger aneurysms. This therapeutic protocol is associated with good clinical and anatomical results. (orig.)

  7. A Theoretical Consideration of the Surgical Treatment of Small Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Han Soo

    2016-12-01

    Surgical treatment of small, unruptured intracranial aneurysms remains a controversial topic. Recently, some authors have doubted the validity of the low rupture rates of small aneurysms reported in the literature and advocate aggressive surgical treatment of small unruptured aneurysms; however, some theoretical elucidation is necessary to determine whether such aggressive treatment is appropriate. On certain theoretical assumptions, a simulation was performed to examine whether the low rupture rates for small aneurysms could produce a reasonable size distribution of ruptured aneurysms. Second, considering a hypothetical population in which all the unruptured aneurysms over a certain cut-off size are treated, the effect of this policy on reducing the incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was mathematically analyzed. Then, the contribution of each individual operation to this reduction of SAH incidence was calculated. The low rupture rates reported in the literature produced a reasonable size distribution of ruptured aneurysms (median diameter of 10 mm) in the simulated population. The analysis of the treatment cut-off size showed that, as the cut-off size was progressively lowered to the range of 3-5 mm, further reduction of the incidence of SAH became almost negligible. The contribution of each individual surgery on unruptured aneurysms decreased rapidly as the aneurysm size decreased, and this reduction was proportional to the reduction of the rupture rate of the aneurysm. These results suggest that we should be prudent in providing surgical treatment to small unruptured intracranial aneurysms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms in children with sickle cell disease: analysis of 18 aneurysms in 5 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Surbhi; Speller-Brown, Barbara; Wyse, Emily; Meier, Emily R; Carpenter, Jessica; Fasano, Ross M; Pearl, Monica S

    2015-05-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are rare in the general pediatric population and account for <2% of all cerebral aneurysms. Only 7 children with sickle hemoglobinopathy and IAs have been reported, the majority of which were discovered after rupture. To report the prevalence of unruptured IAs in a selected population of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and to describe the aneurysm morphology, hematologic characteristics, and management in this patient population. A retrospective review of the electronic database for all children with SCD who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging or angiography from January 2002 to August 2013 at a single institution was performed. Records were reviewed for IA, age, sex, sickle cell genotype, neurological symptoms, hematologic indexes, transcranial Doppler findings, and management. Five of 179 children (2.8%) with SCD imaged by brain magnetic resonance imaging or angiography were diagnosed with IAs. None presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Four patients (80%) had HbSS disease, and 1 patient had hemoglobin sickle cell HbSC disease. A total of 18 aneurysms were detected; the majority of patients had multiple aneurysms (80%) and bilateral involvement (60%). Children with SCD are at risk for developing multiple intracranial aneurysms, and a high index of suspicion must be maintained during the interpretation of routine magnetic resonance imaging or angiography of the brain.

  9. Brain lactate metabolism in humans with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Carrera, Emmanuel; Daniel, Roy T; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2012-05-01

    Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. Thirty-one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxic (PbtO(2) 119 μmol/L) versus nonhyperglycolytic. Median per patient samples with elevated CMD lactate was 54% (interquartile range, 11%-80%). Lactate elevations were more often attributable to cerebral hyperglycolysis (78%; interquartile range, 5%-98%) than brain hypoxia (11%; interquartile range, 4%-75%). Mortality was associated with increased percentage of samples with elevated lactate and brain hypoxia (28% [interquartile range 9%-95%] in nonsurvivors versus 9% [interquartile range 3%-17%] in survivors; P=0.02) and lower percentage of elevated lactate and cerebral hyperglycolysis (13% [interquartile range, 1%-87%] versus 88% [interquartile range, 27%-99%]; P=0.07). Cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate production predicted good 6-month outcome (odds ratio for modified Rankin Scale score, 0-3 1.49; CI, 1.08-2.05; P=0.016), whereas increased lactate with brain hypoxia was associated with a reduced likelihood of good outcome (OR, 0.78; CI, 0.59-1.03; P=0.08). Brain lactate is frequently elevated in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, predominantly because of hyperglycolysis rather than hypoxia. A pattern of increased cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate was associated with good long-term recovery. Our data suggest that lactate may be used as an aerobic substrate by the injured human brain.

  10. Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and natural history of intracranial aneurysms: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Eric Homero Albuquerque; Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Paschoal Junior, Fernando Mendes; Jong-A-Liem, Glaucia Suzanna; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2018-01-01

    The aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a major public health problem described as a sudden drastic event with no warning symptoms and high morbidity and mortality rates. The role of the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphism in intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is still a matter of controversy with divergent findings among European, American, and Asian populations. Our study purposed to test the association between intracranial aneurysms formation and nitric oxide gene polymorphisms through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Systematic search on Medline, Lilacs, and EMBASE was performed. The primary search resulted in 139 papers, out of which 9 met our inclusion criteria after a full text analysis. The dominant T786C model found a significant association with IA (OR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.04-1.44, p = 0.01), so did studies of the recessive T786C model (OR 0.37, 95 % CI 0.30-0.45, p < 0.0001) but with opposite effect. Our findings support the presence of the T786C polymorphism as a predictor for the development of intracranial aneurysm in the cerebral vascular system. More studies are necessary in order to elucidate the pathways of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cerebrovascular diseases and in defining how different allelic combinations of the eNOS gene single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) could favor this pathological process.

  11. Unruptured intracranial aneurysm presenting with epiletic seizure Epilepsia secundária a aneurisma cerebral não roto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Sena

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial aneurysms are frequently present with subarachnoid hemorrhage.Less often they produce suggestive symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction or intracranial tumor when very large. Their association with epilepsy has rarely been reported; such concurrence may not be a coincidence. When the patient presents with epileptiforme attacks the presence of an intracranial aneurysm is rarely considered. In this paper we report the case of a 45-years-old patient with an unruptured aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery with a 10 years history of epileptic seizure.Aneurismas intracranianos freqüentemente se apresentam com hemorragia subaracnóidea quando rotos, porém quando gigantes sangram com menor freqüência e se comportam como verdadeiros tumores, comprimindo estruturas cerebrais adjacentes, apresentando sintomatologia peculiar. Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 45 anos que apresentava crises convulsivas generalizadas com evolução de 10 anos. A investigação radiológica revelou presença de aneurisma gigante da artéria cerebral média, não roto. É realizada revisão da literatura correlacionando a presença de aneurismas não rotos e epilepsia, pois esta associação é pouco freqüente na literatura.

  12. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cerebral vasospasm is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. While the cellular mechanisms underlying vasospasm remain unclear, it is believed that inflammation may play a critical role in vasospasm. Matrix metalloproteinasees (MMPs are a family of extracellular and membrane-bound proteases capable of degrading the blood-rain barrier (BBB. As such, MMP upregulation following SAH may result in a proinflammatory extravascular environment capable of inciting delayed cerebral vasospasm. This paper presents an overview of MMPs and describes existing data pertinent to delayed cerebral vasospasm.

  13. Epidural anesthesia as a cause of acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklar, E.M.L.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Post, M.J.D.; Montalvo, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Six patients with acquired spinal subarachnoid cysts secondary to epidural anesthesia were evaluated with MR imaging (seven patients) and intraoperative US (three patients). The cysts were located in the lower cervical and thoracic spine. Adhesions and irregularity of the cord surface were frequently noted. Associated intramedullary lesions, including intramedullary cysts and myelomalacia, were seen in two of the patients. Arachnoiditis was unsuspected clinically in three patients, and MR imaging proved to be the diagnostic examination that first suggested the cause of the patients symptoms. The underlying mechanism for the formation of these cysts is a chemically induced arachnoiditis

  14. Presentation of Significant Subarachnoid Hemorrhage without Loss of Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Taylor

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 68-year-old female with history of hypertension presented to the emergency department one hour after the sudden onset of 10/10 headache. The patient had a history of headaches, but described this episode as the “worst of her life” with associated vomiting, mild neck pain with movement, increased light sensitivity, and generalized weakness. The patient denied focal weakness or changes in vision. On exam, the patient was awake and alert with no slurred speech. Gait was intact and strength was 5/5 bilaterally in the upper and lower extremities. She had no facial asymmetry. Significant findings: A non-contrast head CT demonstrated extensive subarachnoid hemorrhage occupying both cerebral convexities, the anterior interhemispheric fissure, the sylvian fissures, and the basal cisterns. Later CTA would show an 8 mm by 7 mm by 8mm MCA aneurysm near the M1/M2 junction and two pericallosal artery aneurysms, 7 by 6 mm and 8 by 5 mm respectively. The patient underwent external ventricular drain (EVD placement by neurosurgery, followed by coiling of the three aneurysms by interventional radiology. Discussion: Subarachnoid hemorrhages account for 10 percent of cerebrovascular accidents, with mortality rates approaching 50 percent. Most subarachnoid hemorrhages are due to ruptured saccular aneurysms located at bifurcations of arteries within the circle of Willis. Other causes include trauma or AV malformations. Common complications of SAH include vasospasms, cerebral tissue infarction, seizure, and cardiac complications.1 In addition to the sudden severe headache seen in 97 percent of cases, 50 percent of patients experience transient loss of consciousness, and many experience vomiting, meningeal irritation, nuchal rigidity, and photosensitivity.2 One retrospective series evaluating proven non-traumatic, spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhages found nausea or vomiting in 77 percent of patients, loss of consciousness in 53 percent

  15. A case report on subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis is the most common central nervous system helminthic infection in humans. We hereby present a case combining two rare manifestations of neurocysticercosis: the subarachnoid and intraventricular forms. The patient presented with hydrocephalus and neurologic deficits and although endoscopic removal of the cysts and two cycles of postoperative cysticidal drugs resulted in resolution of symptoms, they later recurred. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement and a further cycle of albendazole plus dexamethasone led to substantial clinical improvement. Extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis may be challenging to diagnose and treat and is usually associated with a poorer prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of this condition.

  16. Rare anomalies of craniocerebral vessels with subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhl, L.; Thron, A.

    1986-01-01

    Seven patients presenting rare vascular anomalies of the craniocerebral vessels are reported, six of whom suffered from subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Angiography demonstrated typically located saccular aneurysms as the cause of bleeding in three of these cases. An increased coincidence of rare vascular anomalies and aneurysms is known from the literature. Our findings suggest that in cases of SAH and rare cerebrovascular anomalies additional aneurysms can be demonstrated almost as often as in unselected cases of SAH (70%). Despite controversial aspects regarding the pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms, abnormalities of the vessel walls of genetic or embryologic origin seem to be the most likely reason for this high coincidence. (orig.) [de

  17. Evaluation of patients with headache due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension by RN cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Zy; Park, Chan Hee; Soo, Joo In; Pai, Moon Sun; Yoon, Suk Nam; Kim, Jang Sung

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) typically occurs without an obvious cause. However, it can be seen following the lumbar puncture, craniotomy, or spinal surgery. Also listed are contributing factors such as sneezing, coughing, intercourse or minor fall. Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are not common, but are now increasingly recognized as a cause of postural headache associated with intracranial hypotension. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of RN cisternography in the diagnosis of SIH cuased by spinal CSF leakage. Four patients with clinical suspicion of SIH (Group I) and six patients as normal control (Group II) underwent RN cisternography. RN cisternography in Group II was done for various reasons, such as hydrocephalus, syringomyelia and memory loss. Group I consisted of the patients who presented with postural headache, as well as additional symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, tinnitus and eyeball pain. The age range of these patients was 27 - 67 years. Lumbar puncture and CSF examinations were performed in Group I more than once and showed typical findings of low CSF pressure and slightly elevated protein level. Brain MRI (4/4), Cervico-thoracic spine MRI (3/4) were also performed. On gadolinium-enhanced brain MRI, enhancement of the meninges which is the most characteristic radiographic finding in intracranial hypotension was found in all patients of Group I. But, cervico-thoracic spin MRI was nonspecific. None of Group I had contrast myelography because of the patient's refusal. Group I and Group II underwent radionuclide cisternography following lumbar subarachnoid injection of 99mTc-DTPA (1-2mCi). The scans were taken in 2, 5, 24 hours later using single head gamma camera equipped with LEAP. Entire spinal region in posterior view and head in frontal and lateral views were obtained. The cisternography of Group I showed the CSF leakage or diverticulum at the level of cervico-thoracic junction(3/4) and mid-thoracic level (1

  18. Evaluation of patients with headache due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension by RN cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Zy; Park, Chan Hee; Soo, Joo In; Pai, Moon Sun; Yoon, Suk Nam; Kim, Jang Sung [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) typically occurs without an obvious cause. However, it can be seen following the lumbar puncture, craniotomy, or spinal surgery. Also listed are contributing factors such as sneezing, coughing, intercourse or minor fall. Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are not common, but are now increasingly recognized as a cause of postural headache associated with intracranial hypotension. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of RN cisternography in the diagnosis of SIH cuased by spinal CSF leakage. Four patients with clinical suspicion of SIH (Group I) and six patients as normal control (Group II) underwent RN cisternography. RN cisternography in Group II was done for various reasons, such as hydrocephalus, syringomyelia and memory loss. Group I consisted of the patients who presented with postural headache, as well as additional symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, tinnitus and eyeball pain. The age range of these patients was 27 - 67 years. Lumbar puncture and CSF examinations were performed in Group I more than once and showed typical findings of low CSF pressure and slightly elevated protein level. Brain MRI (4/4), Cervico-thoracic spine MRI (3/4) were also performed. On gadolinium-enhanced brain MRI, enhancement of the meninges which is the most characteristic radiographic finding in intracranial hypotension was found in all patients of Group I. But, cervico-thoracic spin MRI was nonspecific. None of Group I had contrast myelography because of the patient's refusal. Group I and Group II underwent radionuclide cisternography following lumbar subarachnoid injection of 99mTc-DTPA (1-2mCi). The scans were taken in 2, 5, 24 hours later using single head gamma camera equipped with LEAP. Entire spinal region in posterior view and head in frontal and lateral views were obtained. The cisternography of Group I showed the CSF leakage or diverticulum at the level of cervico-thoracic junction(3/4) and mid

  19. Stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy: Dose prescription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlienger, M.; Lartigau, E.; Nataf, F.; Mornex, F.; Latorzeff, I.; Lisbona, A.; Mahe, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was the study of the successive steps permitting the prescription of dose in stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy, which includes radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The successive steps studied are: the choice of stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy among the therapeutic options, based on curative or palliative treatment intent, then the selection of lesions according to size/volume, pathological type and their number permitting the choice between radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, which have the same methodological basis. Clinical experience has determined the level of dose to treat the lesions and limit the irradiation of healthy adjacent tissues and organs at risk structures. The last step is the optimization of the different parameters to obtain a safe compromise between the lesion dose and healthy adjacent structures. Study of dose-volume histograms, coverage indices and 3D imaging permit the optimization of irradiation. For lesions close to or included in a critical area, the prescribed dose is planned using the inverse planing method. Implementation of the successively described steps is mandatory to insure the prescription of an optimized dose. The whole procedure is based on the delineation of the lesion and adjacent healthy tissues. There are sometimes difficulties to assess the delineation and the volume of the target, however improvement of local control rates and reduction of secondary effects are the proof that the totality of the successive procedures are progressively improved. In practice, stereotactic intracranial radiotherapy is a continually improved treatment method, which constantly benefits from improvements in the choice of indications, imaging, techniques of irradiation, planing/optimization methodology and irradiation technique and from data collected from prolonged follow-up. (authors)

  20. Intracranial haemorrhage among a population of haemophilic patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, S V; Vicari, P; Cavalheiro, S; Bordin, J O

    2003-09-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in haemophilic patients. The overall incidence of ICH has been reported to range from 2.2% to 7.5% in patients with haemophilia. From 1987 to 2001, 401 haemophilic patients from the Serviço de Hemofilia, Disciplina de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo were evaluated. The episodes of ICH were documented by CT scan and the anatomic location, clinical presentation, relationship to trauma and clinical factors, including the presence of HIV infection and the presence of inhibitor, were reviewed. Among 401 haemophilic patients, 45 ICH episodes in 35 (8.7%) patients with age ranging from 4 days to 49 years (mean 10.6 years) were observed. A history of recent trauma was documented in 24 (53.3%) cases. Seventeen (37.8%) episodes occurred in more than one site of bleeding, 12 (26.7%) were subdural, seven (15.5%) subarachnoid, four (8.9%) epidural, two (4.4%) intracerebral and one (2.2%) intraventricular. The most frequent symptoms were headache and drowsiness. All patients were submitted to replacement therapy and neurosurgical intervention was performed in eight (17.8%) patients. Despite the treatment, three (8.6%) haemophilia A patients died due to the ICH event and three presented late sequelae. The most important aspect of ICH management is the early replacement therapy in haemophilic patients. This prompt treatment will increase the chances of a better prognosis. Another impact measure consists in the administration of the deficient coagulation factor after every head trauma, even when considered minor.

  1. Migraine before rupture of intracranial aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebedeva, Elena R; Gurary, Natalia M; Sakovich, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA.......Rupture of a saccular intracranial aneurysm (SIA) causes thunderclap headache but it remains unclear whether headache in general and migraine in particular are more prevalent in patients with unruptured SIA....

  2. Phase contrast MRI in intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooij, P.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are outpouchings of intracranial arteries that cause brain hemorrhage after rupture. Unruptured aneurysms can be treated but the risk of treatment may outweigh the risk of rupture. Local intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics can contribute substantially to the rupture risk estimation

  3. Computerised tomographic detection of intracranial complications of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include cerebral, subdural and epidural abscesses, frontal bone osteomyelitis. The maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses were mostly involved and can be implicated as the sinogenic causes of intracranial infections. Sphenoidal sinus was not involved in any of the patients. Key Words: Intracranial Complications, Sinusitis, ...

  4. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-01-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma. (orig.)

  5. MRI of intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, A.; Ochi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, T.; Yasunaga, A.; Shibata, S.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings in a patient with primary intracranial meningeal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). CT delineated the anatomical relations and MRI aided in tissue characterisation. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI findings in primary intracranial meningeal MFH. (orig.). With 1 fig

  6. Traumatic and alternating delayed intracranial hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoin, F.; Redford, H.; Jomin, M.; Viaud, C.; Pruvo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Repeat computed tomography has enabled us to confirm the concept of delayed hematomas. With this in mind we report two cases of alternating, post-traumatic intracranial hematomas; confirming also the role of tamponade after surgical removal of an intracranial hematoma.

  7. Whole brain CT perfusion combined with CT angiography in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Bo; Li, Shu; Liang, Chuansheng; Xu, Ke; Li, Songbai

    2013-12-01

    To assess cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and monitor cerebral microcirculatory changes in patients with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) via CT angiography (CTA) combined with whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP) techniques. Sixty patients with SAH (SAH group) and 10 patients without SAH (control group) were selected for a prospective study. CTP combined with CTA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) studies were performed on patients with initial onset of SAH less than three days. CTA and DSA as well as the CTP parameters such as cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time (MTT), and time-to-peak (TTP) were acquired and analyzed. The relationship of CTA and CTP measurements was assessed in these acute SAH patients. CTP techniques were used to achieve the perfusion maps of the whole brain in patients with acute SAH. Compared to the control group, mean CBF value was significantly lower while both MTT and TTP values were significantly higher in SAH group (all p<0.05). Further analysis revealed that mean CBF in patients with CVS, sCVS, Fisher III-IV and Hunt-Hess III-V significantly decreased when compared to patients with nCVS, asCVS, Fisher I-II and Hunt-Hess I-II (p<0.05). Furthermore both MTT and TTP values were also significantly reduced in patient with CVS, sCVS, Fisher III-IV and Hunt-Hess III-V (p<0.05). The study demonstrated that changes of microcirculation in patients with SAH could be assessed by whole-brain CTP. CTP combined with CTA could detect both macroscopic evident vasospasm on CTA and alterations of microcirculation on CTP. Mean CBF was significantly lower in patients with SAH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in adults infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Blignaut

    2014-04-01

    Objectives: To describe the radiological appearance of intracranial aneurysms in HIV-positive adults. Method: In this retrospective analysis of data, 23 HIV-positive patients, of which 15 (65.2%were female, with a total of 41 aneurysms were included. The mean age was 38 years, and their median CD4 count was 305 x 106/L. Inclusion criteria comprised subarachnoid haemorrhage and confirmed intracranial aneurysms on four-vessel angiography. Results: Fifteen (65.2% patients had a single aneurysm, of which 12 (80.0% had a saccular appearance. Seven (46.7% of the single aneurysms had a neck width larger than 50% of the transverse aneurysm sac size. The mean longitudinal diameter of the aneurysm sac was 4.9 mm and the transverse diameter 4.4 mm. More than half of these aneurysms occurred at the anterior communicating artery. The median CD4 count of single-aneurysm patients was 319 x 106 /L. Eight patients (34.8% had multiple aneurysms, with a total of 26 aneurysms (range 2–6 aneurysms per patient, of which 13 (50.0% had a complex appearance. Twenty-four (92.3% of the multiple aneurysms had a neck width larger than 50% of the transverse aneurysm sac size. The mean longitudinal diameter of the aneurysm sac was 4.0 mm and the transverse diameter 3.9 mm. The multiple aneurysms occurred more commonly in the internal carotid artery. These patients had a median CD4 count of 294 x 106/L. Conclusion: HIV-associated intracranial aneurysms occur at a younger age, appear to be saccular and complex in shape, with a wide neck, and might rupture at small sizes.

  9. Management of stent for an emergency situation during coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Binxian; Li Minghua; Wang Wu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of stent for endovascular treatment of an emergency situation such as coil migration, coil herniation, prolapsed coil and stretched coil during coil embolization of intracranial aneurysms, and to summarize the possible mechanisms of these emergency situations. Methods: The records of 12 patients, who received coil embolization for intracranial aneurysms and developed emergent complications during the embolization procedures, were retrospectively reviewed. Wide-neck aneurysms were found in 9 and subarachnoid hemorrhages in 10 patients. The maximum diameter of the aneurysms was 3 mm or less in 1, 3-5 mm in 7 and 5-12 mm in 2 patients. All patients were evaluated by angiographic and clinical follow-up for 18 months or more. Results: Coil migration was found in 3, coil herniation in 7 and stretched coil in 2 patients. Eight patients were treated with stenting, and no ischemic stroke occurred. Of the four patients, who were treated without stent, stretched coil was seen in one, which was successfully retrieved, coil herniation was seen in 3, and ischemic stroke occurred in two. No re-bleeding or in-stent stenosis occurred during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Stents can be used as a feasible and effective tool to treat these emergency situations, which occasionally occur during endovascular embolization for intracranial aneurysms. The occurrence of these emergent events is related to the undersized coil and incompatible diameter to that of the aneurysms, which causes the moving of the coil and subsequent coil embolization, and is also related to the excessive embolization and microcatheter-related problems. (authors)

  10. Endovascular Treatment of Intracranial Artery Dissection: Clinical and Angiographic Follow-Up

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    Reza Mohammadian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intracranial artery dissections are rare and many controversies exist about treatment options. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the endovascular approach in patients with an intracranial dissection presenting with different symptoms. Methods. We prospectively evaluated the clinical features and treatment outcomes of 30 patients who had angiographically confirmed nontraumatic intracranial dissections over 4 years. Patients were followed up for 17 months, and their final outcomes were assessed by the modified Rankin Score (mRS and angiography. Results. Sixteen (53.3% patients had a dissection of the anterior circulation, whereas 14 (46.7% had a posterior circulation dissection. Overall, 83.3% of the patients suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Grade IV Hunt and Hess score was seen in 32% of the SAH presenting cases. Parent artery occlusion (PAO with coil embolization was used in 70% of the cases. The prevalence of overall procedural complications was 23.3%, and all were completely resolved at the end of follow-up. No evidence of in-stent occlusion/stenosis or rebleeding was observed in our cases during follow-up. Angiography results improved more frequently in the PAO with coil embolization group (100% than in the stent-only-treated group (88.9% (P=0.310 and the unruptured dissection group (5/5, 100% in comparison with the group that presented with SAH (95.8% (P=0.833. Conclusion. Favorable outcomes were achieved following an endovascular approach for symptomatic ruptured or unruptured dissecting aneurysms. However, the long-term efficacy and durability of these procedures remain to be determined in a larger series.

  11. Cerebrovascular reactivity after treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms--A transcranial Doppler sonography and acetazolamide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøthun, Marianne Lundervik; Haaland, Øystein Ariansen; Logallo, Nicola; Svendsen, Frode; Thomassen, Lars; Helland, Christian A

    2016-04-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) is defined as the change in cerebral blood flow, or blood velocity, in response to a vasoactive stimulus. There is a possible association between impaired CVR and vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Most studies on CVR and vasospasm have used healthy subjects as reference. However, due to potential different vascular features, CVR in persons with intracranial aneurysms may differ from CVR in healthy subjects. Therefore, our aim was to examine CVR in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). CVR was examined in 37 patients in the first postoperative week after treatment for UIA, using acetazolamide (AZ) test with transcranial Doppler monitoring of blood flow velocities. Mean blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries was 58.5 (SD 12.8) cm/s at baseline, and 94.3 (SD 19.5) cm/s after stimulation with AZ. Mean CVR was 62.6 (SD 16.8) %. There was no significant difference when comparing right and left sides, and treated and untreated sides. A simple regression analysis suggested that CVR increased with 0.7% points for each year a patient aged (p=0.004). However, the significance disappeared in a multiple analysis (increase of 0.6% points per year, p=0.055). Other possible influencing factors (gender, smoking, hypertension, body mass index, aneurysm location and treatment modality) were not significantly associated with CVR. CVR in patients with UIA is not different from normal values reported in healthy subjects, and does not indicate a systemically impaired vascular system in patients with UIA. We suggest that CVR in age and gender matched healthy controls can be used as reference for persons with intracranial aneurysms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Hemorrhagic Colloid Cyst Presenting with Acute Hydrocephaly

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    Reza Akhavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloid cysts are benign slow-growing cystic lesions located on the roof of the third ventricle that usually present with symptoms related to gradual rise of intracranial pressure. They mostly remain asymptomatic and sometimes grow progressively and cause diverse symptoms associated with increased intracranial pressure such as headache, diplopia, and sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a 47-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute severe headache and nausea/vomiting. On MRI examination acute hydrocephaly due to hemorrhagic colloid cyst was detected. Acute hemorrhage in colloid cysts is extremely rare and may present with symptoms of acute increase in the intracranial pressure. Intracystic hemorrhage is very rarely reported as a complication of colloid cyst presenting with paroxysmal symptoms of acute hydrocephaly.

  13. Proximity to the treating centre and outcomes following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Cian J; Spears, Julian; Urbach, David; Wallace, M Christopher

    2011-01-01

    In the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the potential for early complications and the centralization of limited resources often challenge the delivery of timely neurosurgical care. We sought to determine the impact of proximity to the accepting neurosurgical centre on outcomes following aneurysmal SAH. Using administrative data, we analyzed patients undergoing treatment for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage at neurosurgical centres in Ontario between 1995 and 2004. We compared mortality for patients receiving treatment at a centre in their county (in-county) versus those treated from outside counties (out-of-county). We also examined the impact of distance from the patient's residence to the treating centre. The mortality rates were significantly lower for in-county versus out-of-county patients (23.5% vs. 27.6%, p=0.009). This advantage remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders (HR=0.84, p=0.01). The relationship between distance from the treating centre and mortality was biphasic. Under 300 km, mortality increased with increasing distance. Over 300 km, a survival benefit was observed. Proximity to the treating neurosurgical centre impacts survival after aneurysmal SAH. These results have significant implications for the triage of these critically ill patients.

  14. Global cerebral edema and brain metabolism after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbok, Raimund; Ko, Sang-Bae; Schmidt, J Michael; Kurtz, Pedro; Fernandez, Luis; Choi, H Alex; Connolly, E Sander; Lee, Kiwon; Badjatia, Neeraj; Mayer, Stephan A; Claassen, Jan

    2011-06-01

    Global cerebral edema is common among patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with poor outcome. Currently no targeted therapy exists largely due to an incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This is a prospective observational study including 39 consecutive patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage with multimodal neuromonitoring. Levels of microdialysate lactate-pyruvate ratio, episodes of cerebral metabolic crisis (lactate-pyruvate ratio >40 and brain glucose cerebral perfusion pressure, and transcranial Doppler sonography flow velocities were analyzed. Median age was 54 years (range, 45 to 61 years) and 62% were female. Patients with global cerebral edema on admission (n=24 [62%]) had a higher incidence of metabolic crisis in the first 12 hours of monitoring (n=15 [15% versus 2%], Pcerebral edema. There was no difference in brain tissue oxygen tension or cerebral perfusion pressure between the groups; however, in patients with global cerebral edema, a higher cerebral perfusion pressure was associated with lower lactate-pyruvate ratio (Pcerebral edema is associated with early brain metabolic distress.

  15. Cerebral Vasospasm with Ischemia following a Spontaneous Spinal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Sophia F. Shakur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vasospasm is a well-known consequence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH triggered by blood breakdown products. Here, we present the first case of cerebral vasospasm with ischemia following a spontaneous spinal SAH. A 67-year-old woman, who was on Coumadin for atrial fibrillation, presented with chest pain radiating to the back accompanied by headache and leg paresthesias. The international normalized ratio (INR was 4.5. Ten hours after presentation, she developed loss of movement in both legs and lack of sensation below the umbilicus. Spine MRI showed intradural hemorrhage. Her coagulopathy was reversed, and she underwent T2 to T12 laminectomies. A large subarachnoid hematoma was evacuated. Given her complaint of headache preoperatively and the intraoperative finding of spinal SAH, a head CT was done postoperatively that displayed SAH in peripheral sulci. On postoperative day 5, she became obtunded. Brain MRI demonstrated focal restricted diffusion in the left frontoparietal area. Formal angiography revealed vasospasm in anterior cerebral arteries bilaterally and right middle cerebral artery. Vasospasm was treated, and she returned to baseline within 48 hours. Spontaneous spinal SAH can result in the same sequelae typically associated with aneurysmal SAH, and the clinician must have a degree of suspicion in such patients. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cerebral vasospasm may explain this unique case.

  16. Clinical management guidelines for subarachnoid haemorrhage. Diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, J; Gilo, F; Frutos, R; Maestre, J; García-Pastor, A; Quintana, F; Roda, J M; Ximénez-Carrillo, A; Díez Tejedor, E; Fuentes, B; Alonso de Leciñana, M; Alvarez-Sabin, J; Arenillas, J; Calleja, S; Casado, I; Castellanos, M; Castillo, J; Dávalos, A; Díaz-Otero, F; Egido, J A; Fernández, J C; Freijo, M; Gállego, J; Gil-Núñez, A; Irimia, P; Lago, A; Masjuan, J; Martí-Fábregas, J; Martínez-Sánchez, P; Martínez-Vila, E; Molina, C; Morales, A; Nombela, F; Purroy, F; Ribó, M; Rodríguez-Yañez, M; Roquer, J; Rubio, F; Segura, T; Serena, J; Simal, P; Tejada, J

    2014-01-01

    To update the Spanish Society of Neurology's guidelines for subarachnoid haemorrhage diagnosis and treatment. A review and analysis of the existing literature. Recommendations are given based on the level of evidence for each study reviewed. The most common cause of spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is cerebral aneurysm rupture. Its estimated incidence in Spain is 9/100 000 inhabitants/year with a relative frequency of approximately 5% of all strokes. Hypertension and smoking are the main risk factors. Stroke patients require treatment in a specialised centre. Admission to a stroke unit should be considered for SAH patients whose initial clinical condition is good (Grades I or II on the Hunt and Hess scale). We recommend early exclusion of aneurysms from the circulation. The diagnostic study of choice for SAH is brain CT (computed tomography) without contrast. If the test is negative and SAH is still suspected, a lumbar puncture should then be performed. The diagnostic tests recommended in order to determine the source of the haemorrhage are MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and angiography. Doppler ultrasonography studies are very useful for diagnosing and monitoring vasospasm. Nimodipine is recommended for preventing delayed cerebral ischaemia. Blood pressure treatment and neurovascular intervention may be considered in treating refractory vasospasm. SAH is a severe and complex disease which must be managed in specialised centres by professionals with ample experience in relevant diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Rerupture of intracranial aneurysms: a clinicoanatomic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijdra, A.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.; van Crevel, H.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of 176 prospectively studied patients who survived for at least 24 hours after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, 39 had at least one computerized tomography (CT)-proven rebleed within 4 weeks after the first rupture. There were peaks in the incidence of rebleeding at the end of the 2nd

  18. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH: Five consecutive years' experience of Fars province, Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Rahmanian

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH, caused by the rupture of intracranial aneurysms, is a devastating event with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH plays a critical role in the potential loss of life as its sufferers are usually of a young age. We aimed to investigate the incidence of aSAH along with the patients' characteristics over five consecutive years in Fars, a large province located in Southern Iran.In this prospective study, anonymous data of all patients diagnosed with aSAH in Fars province were collected after patient admission and surgery. Data from the last national census in 2011 were used to calculate the incidence. The data were analysed using SPSS software version 18 using independent sample t test, chi square test and ANOVA. The significance level was set at 0.05.The number of aSAH cases identified in Fars, Iran, each year varied between 78 (2011 and 98 (2015 for a total of 421 aSAH cases within the 5-year study period. The annual aSAH incidence estimates showed no differences and were 1.65 [95% confidence interval (CI: 1.58-1.72], 1.70 (95%CI: 1.68-1.72, 1.71 (95%CI: 1.63-1.78, 1.82 (95%CI: 1.74-1.9, and 2.05 (95%CI: 1.97-2.13 per 100,000 persons, respectively, for the five consecutive years from 21 March 2011 to 20 March 2016. Hypertension was the most common risk factor, and was found in 198 (48% aSAH patients. Ninety-four (22.5% patients had moderate hydrocephalus on admission. Middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery were the most common sites of aneurysms. On admission, 351 (83% patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale score >7, 197 (47% presented with Hunt and Hess score of 1, and 365 (87% had a Fisher score of ≤3. Multiple aneurysms were found in 59 (14% of the 421 cases and the most common risk factors in multiple aneurysms were hypertension in 30 (51% and smoking in 26 (44% cases. Survival data were available only on patients diagnosed in year 2015, and the six

  19. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhigang; Li Guoxin; Qu Yuanming; Tang Jun; Liu Zuoqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To setup an endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysm with detachable balloon and micro-coil. Methods: Trans-femoral artery Seldinger's catheterization was used. Balloons and free MDS, GDC micro-coils were pushed into the aneurysm or carrying arteries. Results: No mortality occurred in authors' group. Internal carotid arteries (ICA) were occluded with detachable balloons in 5 aneurysms at sinus segment of ICA and 4 traumatic pseudo-aneurysms. No complications occurred. 9 aneurysms were completely occluded with micro-coils and 2 were partly (95%) occluded. 2 patients got mild paralysis due to vasospasm or mal detaching of MDS coils. Conclusions: Balloon occlusion of ICA for treatment of aneurysm at sinus segment is safe and effective in case of having abundant collateral circulation. Coil occlusion of intracranial aneurysm is a promising method of endovascular treatment. Compared with MDS, GDC coil is safer but expensive. Free coil is not very safe theoretically, but can be used with careful consideration as it is much cheaper

  20. Management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Susumu; Takahashi, Jun C.

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are congenital lesions that can cause serious neurological deficits or even death. They can manifest as intracranial hemorrhage, epileptic seizure, or other symptoms such as headache or tinnitus. They are detected by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Recently there have been significant developments in the management of AVMs. In this paper, the authors represent an overview of the epidemiology of AVMs and the existing treatment strategies. AVMs are ideally excised by standard microsurgical techniques. The grading scale which was proposed by Spetzler and Martin is widely used to estimate the risk of direct surgery. Stereotactic radiosurgery such as that using a gamma knife is very useful for small lesions located in eloquent areas. Technological advances in endovascular surgery have provided new alternatives in the treatment of AVMs. Currently indications for embolization can be divided into presurgical embolization in large AVMs to occlude deep arterial feeding vessels and embolization before stereotactic radiosurgery to reduce the size of the nidus. Palliative embolization can be also applied for patients with large, inoperable AVMs who are suffering from progressive neurological deficits secondary to venous hypertension and/or arterial steal phenomenon. (author)

  1. Desmopressin Acetate in Intracranial Haemorrhage

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    Thomas Kapapa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The secondary increase in the size of intracranial haematomas as a result of spontaneous haemorrhage or trauma is of particular relevance in the event of prior intake of platelet aggregation inhibitors. We describe the effect of desmopressin acetate as a means of temporarily stabilising the platelet function. Patients and Methods. The platelet function was analysed in 10 patients who had received single (N=4 or multiple (N=6 doses of acetylsalicylic acid and 3 patients (control group who had not taken acetylsalicylic acid. All subjects had suffered intracranial haemorrhage. Analysis was performed before, half an hour and three hours after administration of desmopressin acetate. Statistical analysis was performed by applying a level of significance of P≤0.05. Results. (1 Platelet function returned to normal 30 minutes after administration of desmopressin acetate. (2 The platelet function worsened again after three hours. (3 There were no complications related to electrolytes or fluid balance. Conclusion. Desmopressin acetate can stabilise the platelet function in neurosurgical patients who have received acetylsalicylic acid prior to surgery without causing transfusion-related side effects or a loss of time. The effect is, however, limited and influenced by the frequency of drug intake. Further controls are needed in neurosurgical patients.

  2. A case of intracranial teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiota, Madoka; Ando, Yukinori; Takashima, Sachio; Hori, Tomokatsu; Hiramoto, Shinsuke.

    1985-01-01

    A case of neonatal intracranial teratoma was examined on ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and tumor markers in serum, CSF and tumor tissue. This 27-day-old male infant was pointed out a head enlargement by prenatal sonography at 39 weeks' gestation. He admitted to our hospital at the age of one day after cesarean section. His birth weight was 4430 g and head circumstance 47.5 cm. On admission, physical and neurological examinations reveled big head, weak crying, twiching and sun set phenomenon. The optic fundi were normal. The CT scan at 1 day demonstrated the marked enlargement of lateral ventricles and the supratentorial large polycystic mass with calcifications at midline area. Transfontanelle sonography also delineated the polycystic mass and enlarged ventricle. Ventricular tap showed bloody CSF. Alpha-Fetoprotein and carcinoembryonic antigen level in CSF was higher than those in serum. Postmortam tumor necropsy revealed a teratoma including mature squamous epithelium, muscle, cartilage, bone, lymphoid and nervous tissue. There were immature mesenchymal cells in some parts. The immune histochemical method showed positive staining to AFP in intestinal and respiratory epithelium, and to CEA in intestinal epithelium and immature mesenchymal cells. In summary, these characteristic findings of US, CT and tumor marker in CSF have a diagnostic value of intracranial teratoma. (author)

  3. Possible Role of Inflammation and Galectin-3 in Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2018-02-07

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is known as one of the most devastating diseases in the central nervous system. In the past few decades, research on SAH has focused on cerebral vasospasm to prevent post-SAH delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) and to improve outcomes. However, increasing evidence has suggested that early brain injury (EBI) is an important mechanism contributing to DCI, cerebral vasospasm as well as poor outcomes. Though the mechanism of EBI is very complex, inflammation is thought to play a pivotal role in EBI. Galectin-3 is a unique chimera type in the galectin family characterized by its β-galactoside-binding lectin, which mediates various pathologies, such as fibrosis, cell adhesion, and inflammation. Recently, two clinical studies revealed galectin-3 to be a possible prognostic biomarker in SAH patients. In addition, our recent report suggested that higher acute-stage plasma galectin-3 levels correlated with subsequent development of delayed cerebral infarction that was not associated with vasospasm in SAH patients. We review the possible role and molecular mechanisms of inflammation as well as galectin-3 in brain injuries, especially focusing on EBI after SAH, and discuss galectin-3 as a potential new therapeutic or research target in post-SAH brain injuries.

  4. Accuracy of Daily Lung Ultrasound for the Detection of Pulmonary Edema Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Craig A; Co, Ivan; Pandey, Aditya S; Gregory Thompson, B; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna

    2016-04-01

    Early detection of pulmonary edema is vital to appropriate fluid management following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Lung ultrasound (LUS) has been shown to accurately identify pulmonary edema in patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF). Our objective was to determine the accuracy of daily screening LUS for the detection of pulmonary edema following SAH. Screening LUS was performed in conjunction with daily transcranial doppler for SAH patients within the delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) risk period in our neuroICU. We reviewed records of SAH patients admitted 7/2012-5/2014 who underwent bilateral LUS on at least 5 consecutive days. Ultrasound videos were reviewed by an investigator blinded to the final diagnosis. "B+ lines" were defined as ≥3 B-lines on LUS. Two other investigators blinded to ultrasound results determined whether pulmonary edema with ARF (PE-ARF) was present during the period of evaluation on the basis of independent chart review, with a fourth investigator performing adjudication in the event of disagreement. The diagnostic accuracy of B+ lines for the detection of PE-ARF and RPE was determined. Of 59 patients meeting criteria for inclusion, 21 (36%) had PE-ARF and 26 (44%) had B+ lines. Kappa for inter-rater agreement was 0.821 (p pulmonary edema following SAH and may assist with fluid titration during the risk period for DCI.

  5. The initial time-course of headache in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čomić, Hata; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-08-15

    If acute severe headache disappears early after its onset, the question arises whether subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) should still be ruled out. We studied the initial time-course and minimal duration of headache in a consecutive series of neurologically intact patients with spontaneous SAH. We included patients admitted between 2012 and 2015 within 48h after spontaneous SAH with a normal level of consciousness and no focal deficits. We retrieved data on headache severity, measured with a Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), ictus. We analyzed the proportion of patients with a first NRS 0 and NRS ictus and minimal headache duration. Patients were censored in case of a decrease in level of consciousness, aneurysm treatment, or early discharge. We included 106 patients (62 aneurysmal SAH, 33 perimesencephalic hemorrhage, 11 other spontaneous SAH). All patients were treated with analgesics. Within 48h after ictus, a first NRS 0 was reported by 9 patients (8%;95%CI:3%-14%) and a first NRS ictus. In a cohort of SAH patients with a normal level of consciousness and no focal deficits who all used analgetics, headache disappeared in around 10% within 48h after ictus. Our data indicate that a diagnostic work-up for SAH is also needed in patients using analgesics in whom headache has disappeared after 10h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inversion of neurovascular coupling after subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, Matilde; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2017-11-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) induces acute changes in the cerebral microcirculation. Recent findings ex vivo suggest neurovascular coupling (NVC), the process that increases cerebral blood flow upon neuronal activity, is also impaired after SAH. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether this occurs also in vivo. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to either sham surgery or SAH by filament perforation. Twenty-four hours later NVC was tested by forepaw stimulation and CO 2 reactivity by inhalation of 10% CO 2 . Vessel diameter was assessed in vivo by two-photon microscopy. NVC was also investigated ex vivo using brain slices. Cerebral arterioles of sham-operated mice dilated to 130% of baseline upon CO 2 inhalation or forepaw stimulation and cerebral blood flow (CBF) increased. Following SAH, however, CO 2 reactivity was completely lost and the majority of cerebral arterioles showed paradoxical constriction in vivo and ex vivo resulting in a reduced CBF response. As previous results showed intact NVC 3 h after SAH, the current findings indicate that impairment of NVC after cerebral hemorrhage occurs secondarily and is progressive. Since neuronal activity-induced vasoconstriction (inverse NVC) is likely to further aggravate SAH-induced cerebral ischemia and subsequent brain damage, inverse NVC may represent a novel therapeutic target after SAH.

  7. Role of P2X purinoceptor 7 in neurogenic pulmonary edema after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

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    Sheng Chen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE is an acute and serious complication after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH with high mortality. The present study aimed to test the therapeutic potential of brilliant blue G (BBG, a selective P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R antagonist, on NPE in a rat SAH model. METHODS: SAH was induced by endovascular perforation. 86 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle-, or BBG-treatment groups. Mortality, body weight, SAH grading, neurological deficits, NPE clinical symptoms, and pulmonary index were measured at 24 hours following SAH. Western blot, gelatin zymography, lung histopathology, and immunofluorescence staining were performed in the left lung lobe to explore the underlying mechanisms at 24 hours post-surgery. RESULTS: The incidence of clinical symptoms was correlated with pulmonary index. P2X7R and the marker of alveolar type I epithelial cells (the mucin-type glycoprotein T1-α immunoreactivities were generally co-localized. BBG administration decreased mature interleukin-1β, myeloperoxidase, and matrix metallopeptidase-9 activation, but increased tight junction proteins, such as ZO-1 and occludin, which ameliorated pulmonary edema via anti-inflammation and improved neurological deficits. CONCLUSION: P2X7R inhibition prevented NPE after SAH by attenuating inflammation. Thus, BBG is a potential therapeutic application for NPE after SAH and warrants further research.

  8. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

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    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Clinical Science and Community Health, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Neuroradiology, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan (Italy); Lista, Gianluca [V. Buzzi Children' s Hospital, ICP, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2014-03-15

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  9. Intracranial haemorrhage: an incidental finding at magnetic resonance imaging in a cohort of late preterm and term infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirgiovanni, Ida; Groppo, Michela; Bassi, Laura; Passera, Sofia; Schiavolin, Paola; Fumagalli, Monica; Mosca, Fabio; Avignone, Sabrina; Cinnante, Claudia; Triulzi, Fabio; Lista, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in term newborns has been increasingly recognised but the occurrence in late preterm infants and the clinical presentation are still unclear. To investigate the appearance of intracranial haemorrhage at MRI in a cohort of infants born at 34 weeks' gestation or more and to correlate MRI findings with neonatal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed neonatal brain MRI scans performed during a 3-year period. We included neonates ≥34 weeks' gestation with intracranial haemorrhage and compared findings with those in babies without intracranial haemorrhage. Babies were classified into three groups according to haemorrhage location: (1) infratentorial, (2) infra- and supratentorial, (3) infra- and supratentorial + parenchymal involvement. Intracranial haemorrhage was observed in 36/240 babies (15%). All of these 36 had subdural haemorrhage. Sixteen babies were included in group 1; 16 in group 2; 4 in group 3. All infants in groups 1 and 2 were asymptomatic except one who was affected by intraventricular haemorrhage grade 3. Among the infants in group 3, who had intracranial haemorrhage with parenchymal involvement, three of the four (75%) presented with acute neurological symptoms. Uncomplicated spontaneous vaginal delivery was reported in 20/36 neonates (56%), vacuum extraction in 4 (11%) and caesarean section in 12 (33%). Babies with intracranial haemorrhage had significantly higher gestational age (38 ± 2 weeks vs. 37 ± 2 weeks) and birth weight (3,097 ± 485 g vs. 2,803 ± 741 g) compared to babies without intracranial haemorrhage and were more likely to be delivered vaginally than by caesarian section. Mild intracranial haemorrhage (groups 1 and 2) is relatively common in late preterm and term infants, although it mostly represents an incidental finding in clinically asymptomatic babies; early neurological symptoms appear to be related to parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  10. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  11. Treatment strategy, management and clinical outcome of patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hiroki; Sato, Eishi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    The medical charts of 801 consecutive patients transferred to our critical care center over a 14-year interval (1994-2007) in poor neurological condition (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons; WFNS grade IV or V) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were treated following a strict protocol. After initial neurological evaluation, patients were sedated, paralyzed, and underwent strict blood pressure control. For patients with WFNS grade IV and selected patients with grade V, aggressive ultra-early repair (mainly clipping for anterior circulation aneurysm, coiling for posterior circulation aneurysm) was initiated. In grade V patients with poor brainstem function or destruction of vital brain areas on CT, only comfort measures were offered. Compared to the former period (1994-2000), coiling was more frequently indicated in elderly patients and bypass surgery was more often applied in complex aneurysm cases in the latter period (2001-2007). Compared to the former period, the number of aggressively treated patients significantly increased (37.6% versus 28.8%) in the latter period. Outcome assessments performed at 3 months revealed a significant increase of favorable outcomes (Glasgow Outcome Scale; good recovery (GR) or moderately disabled (MD)) and a decreased mortality rate in those patients (34% versus 28%, and 43% versus 47%; respectively). The ratio of favorable outcome and morbidity in all admitted patients were also improved (12% versus 8%, and 79% versus 85%; respectively). Outcome was largely determined by the initial hemorrhage and subsequent development of intractable intracranial hypertension or cerebral infraction. Age was also found to be significantly correlated with outcome. There was no significant difference in outcomes by treatment modality (clip or coil). In the latter period, aneurismal location was not the predictor, but delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) remained an important factor. In

  12. Cine-MR imaging in determining the flow characteristics of CSF and blood in spinal and intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, M.J.D.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Hinks, R.S.; Sklar, E.M.L.; Patchen, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the value of cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in assessing the flow patterns of patients with vascular cord neoplasms, spinal cord and subarachnoid cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and intracranial aneurysms. The authors' results in 26 patients showed that cine MR imaging can be used to (1) identify spinal neoplasms with prominent vascular supply; (2) help distinguish spinal cord cysts occurring above a spinal cord tumor from tumoral cysts; (3) determine which spinal cord or subarachnois cysts need shunting and, postoperatively, which cysts are adequately decompressed; (4) establish which tonsillar herniations in Chiari malformations may require resection; (5) determine the site of the block in obstructive hydrocephalus; and (6) determine the flow characteristics of an aneurysm

  13. Subduralt haematom fra aneurisme uden samtidig subaraknoidalblødning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Preben; Jørgensen, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    A case of acute subdural haematoma from an intracranial aneurysm is presented. Although the patient presented with isolated subdural haematoma, the clinical signs were consistent with the classical signs of subarachnoid haemorrhage including thunderclap headache. An aneurysm of the anterior...

  14. Intracranial hemorrhage due to intracranial hypertension caused by the superior vena cava syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Abedi-Valugerdi, Golbarg; Liska, Jan

    2013-01-01

    We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have an intracr......We report a patient with intracranial hemorrhage secondary to venous hypertension as a result of a giant aortic pseudoaneurysm that compressed the superior vena cava and caused obstruction of the venous return from the brain. To our knowledge, this is the first patient reported to have...... an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to a superior vena cava syndrome. The condition appears to be caused by a reversible transient rise in intracranial pressure, as a result of compression of the venous return from the brain. Treatment consisted of surgery for the aortic pseudoaneurysm, which led...... to normalization of the intracranial pressure and resorption of the intracranial hemorrhage....

  15. Effect of gravity and microgravity on intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Petersen, Lonnie G; Howden, Erin J; Sarma, Satyam; Cornwell, William K; Zhang, Rong; Whitworth, Louis A; Williams, Michael A; Levine, Benjamin D

    2017-03-15

    Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure on Earth. Gravity has a profound effect on fluid distribution and pressure within the human circulation. In contrast to prevailing theory, we observed that microgravity reduces central venous and intracranial pressure. This being said, intracranial pressure is not reduced to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Thus, over 24 h in zero gravity, pressure in the brain is slightly above that observed on Earth, which may explain remodelling of the eye in astronauts. Astronauts have recently been discovered to have impaired vision, with a presentation that resembles syndromes of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This syndrome is considered the most mission-critical medical problem identified in the past decade of manned spaceflight. We recruited five men and three women who had an Ommaya reservoir inserted for the delivery of prophylactic CNS chemotherapy, but were free of their malignant disease for at least 1 year. ICP was assessed by placing a fluid-filled 25 gauge butterfly needle into the Ommaya reservoir. Subjects were studied in the upright and supine position, during acute zero gravity (parabolic flight) and prolonged simulated microgravity (6 deg head-down tilt bedrest). ICP was lower when seated in the 90 deg upright posture compared to lying supine (seated, 4 ± 1 vs. supine, 15 ± 2 mmHg). Whilst lying in the supine posture, central venous pressure (supine, 7 ± 3 vs. microgravity, 4 ± 2 mmHg) and ICP (supine, 17 ± 2 vs. microgravity, 13 ± 2 mmHg) were reduced in acute zero gravity, although not to the levels observed in the 90 deg seated upright posture on Earth. Prolonged periods of simulated microgravity did not cause progressive elevations in ICP (supine, 15 ± 2 vs. 24 h head-down tilt, 15 ± 4 mmHg). Complete removal of gravity does not

  16. Novel method for dynamic control of intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Mark G; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Qvarlander, Sara; El-Khoury, Serge; Yang, Jun; Thyagaraj, Suraj; Loth, Francis

    2017-05-01

    OBJECT Intracranial pressure (ICP) pulsations are generally considered a passive result of the pulsatility of blood flow. Active experimental modification of ICP pulsations would allow investigation of potential active effects on blood and CSF flow and potentially create a new platform for the treatment of acute and chronic low blood flow states as well as a method of CSF substance clearance and delivery. This study presents a novel method and device for altering the ICP waveform via cardiac-gated volume changes. METHODS The novel device used in this experiment (named Cadence) consists of a small air-filled inelastic balloon (approximately 1.0 ml) implanted into the intracranial space and connected to an external programmable pump, triggered by an R-wave detector. Balloons were implanted into the epidural space above 1 of the hemispheres of 19 canines for up to 10 hours. When activated, the balloons were programed to cyclically inflate with the cardiac cycle with variable delay, phase, and volume. The ICP response was measured in both hemispheres. Additionally, cerebral blood flow (heat diffusion and laser Doppler) was studied in 16 canines. RESULTS This system, depending on the inflation pattern of the balloon, allowed a flattening of the ICP waveform, increase in the ICP waveform amplitude, or phase shift of the wave. This occurred with small mean ICP changes, typically around ± 2 mm Hg (15%). Bilateral ICP effects were observed with activation of the device: balloon inflation at each systole increased the systolic ICP pulse (up to 16 mm Hg, 1200%) and deflation at systole decreased or even inverted the systolic ICP pulse (-0.5 to -19 mm Hg, -5% to -1600%) in a dose-(balloon volume) dependent fashion. No aphysiological or deleterious effects on systemic pressure (≤ ±10 mm Hg; 13% change in mean pressure) or cardiac rate (≤ ± 17 beats per minute; 16% change) were observed during up to 4 hours of balloon activity. CONCLUSIONS The results of these initial

  17. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Hamasaki, Osamu; Sakoda, Katsuaki

    2002-01-01

    We report on two patients with intracranial atherosclerosis of the carotid artery or vertebral artery treated with stent-assisted angioplasty. Both patients have severe intracranial atherosclerosis (>70%) with refractory symptoms despite optimal medical treatment. In both patients, a coronary balloon-expandable stent was successfully placed using a protective balloon technique without procedural complications. The patients were asymptomatic and neurologically intact at a mean clinical follow-up of 13 months. Follow-up angiograms did not show restenosis 3 or 4 months after procedure, respectively. Stent-assisted angioplasty for intracranial atherosclerosis in the elective patient has proven effective, with an acceptable low rate of morbidity and mortality. (orig.)

  18. Surgical Results of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms in the Elderly : Single Center Experience in the Past Ten Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Eun Suk; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kwun, Byung Duk; Kim, Chang Jin

    2011-01-01

    Objective As medical advances have increased life expectancy, it has become imperative to develop specific treatment strategies for intracranial aneurysms in the elderly. We therefore analyzed the clinical characteristics and outcomes of the treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms in patients older than 70 years. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and results of neuroimaging modalities on 54 aneurysms of 48 consecutive patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms. (mean±SD age, 72.11±1.96 years; range, 70-78 years) who underwent surgical clipping over 10 years (May 1999 to June 2010). Results Of the 54 aneurysms, 22 were located in the internal carotid artery, 19 in the middle cerebral artery, 12 in the anterior cerebral artery, and 1 in the superior cerebellar artery. Six patients had multiple aneurysms. Aneurysm size ranged from 3 mm to 17 mm (mean±SD, 6.82±3.07 mm). Fifty of the 54 aneurysms (92.6%) were completely clipped. Three-month outcomes were excellent in 50 (92.6%) aneurysms and good and poor in 2 each (3.7%), with 1 death (2.0%). Procedure-related complications occurred in 7 aneurysms (13.0%), with 2 (3.7%) resulting in permanent neurological deficits, including death. No postoperative subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during follow-up. The cumulative rates of stroke- or death-free survival at 5 and 10 years were 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion Surgical clipping of unruptured intracranial aneurysms in elderly group could get it as a favorable outcome in well selected cases. PMID:21887389

  19. Safety of low-dose aspirin in endovascular treatment for intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Ma

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety of low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel versus high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel in prevention of vascular risk within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2013, this prospective and observational study enrolled 370 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis of ≥70% with poor collateral undergoing intracranial endovascular treatment. Antiplatelet therapy consists of aspirin, at a low-dose of 100 mg or high-dose of 300 mg daily; clopidogrel, at a dose of 75 mg daily for 5 days before endovascular treatment. The dual antiplatelet therapy continued for 90 days after intervention. The study endpoints include acute thrombosis, subacute thrombosis, stroke or death within 90 days after intervention. RESULTS: Two hundred and seventy three patients received low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel and 97 patients received high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel before intracranial endovascular treatment. Within 90 days after intervention, there were 4 patients (1.5% with acute thrombosis, 5 patients (1.8% with subacute thrombosis, 17 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (0.7% in low-dose aspirin group, compared with no patient (0% with acute thrombosis, 2 patient (2.1% with subacute thrombosis, 6 patients (6.2% with stroke, and 2 death (2.1% in high-dose aspirin group, and there were no significant difference in all study endpoints between two groups. CONCLUSION: Low-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel is comparative in safety with high-dose aspirin plus clopidogrel within 90 days of duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients treated with intracranial endovascular treatment.

  20. Hypertensive response to raised intracranial pressure in infancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, A M; Whitelaw, A G

    1988-01-01

    Mean arterial pressure and intracranial pressure were measured serially in six infants with intracranial hypertension (intracranial pressure greater than 20 mm Hg), and cerebral perfusion pressure was calculated from their difference. Overall, mean arterial pressure increased with rising intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.20 mm Hg/mm Hg. This caused a fall in cerebral perfusion pressure with increasing intracranial pressure at a mean rate of 0.80 mm Hg/mm Hg overall, although cerebral ...

  1. Time-dependent test characteristics of head computed tomography in patients suspected of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Daan; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Kemperman, Hans; Linn, Francisca H H; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2012-08-01

    A recent study suggested that in patients with acute headache suspicious of nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is not needed to rule out SAH if head CT performed ≤6 hours after ictus is negative. Before implementation in daily practice, these results need replication. Therefore, we investigated test characteristics of head CT in patients with a clinical suspicion of SAH. Patients suspicious of SAH and a normal level of consciousness presenting to our tertiary care hospital between 2005 and 2012 were included. All patients had a head CT interpreted by experienced neuroradiologists and CSF spectrophotometry if head CT was negative or inconclusive. We determined test characteristics with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for nontraumatic SAH of head CT performed ≤6 or >6 hours after onset of headache. Sensitivity of head CT ≤6 hours after ictus (n=137) was 98.5% (95% CI, 92.1%-100%), diagnosing all patients with aneurysmal and perimesencephalic SAH, but not with a cervical arteriovenous malformation. Sensitivity of head CT performed >6 hours after ictus (n=113) was 90.0% (95% CI, 76.3-97.2). After exclusion of patients with an atypical presentation without headache, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of head CT ≤6 hours were all 100%. In patients presenting with acute headache and a normal head CT ≤6 hours after ictus, as interpreted by experienced neuroradiologists, there is no added value of CSF analysis. In patients with an atypical presentation without headache and in patients presenting >6 hours after ictus, CSF analysis is still indicated.

  2. Importance of accessory outflow pathways in hydrocephalus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebel, R.W.; Black, P.M.; Pile-Spellman, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    This study evaluated the changes in pathways of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow that accompanied acute and compensated hydrocephalus in the rabbit. Intraventricularly injected 99mTc antimony sulfide was used as a tracer of outflow pathways, and specified structures were counted 12 to 24 hours after injection. Fifteen rabbits were divided into three groups: 1) an acutely hydrocephalic group in which 3 cisternal injections of blood were followed by a study of CSF pressure, ventricular size, and CSF outflow pathways 1 week after the last injection; 2) a control group treated according to the same protocol, except that sterile saline was injected instead of blood; and 3) a chronic group also treated according to the same protocol but in which the animals were maintained an average of 4 weeks after the last blood injection. Ventricular size was measured by computed digitation and expressed as an area ratio of ventricle to brain (VBR). In control animals, 11.8% of the injected colloid dosage was found in cranial perineural lymphatic channels, and 4.8% appeared in the spinal cord. The mean CSF pressure was 149 +/- 20.2 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and the mean VBR was 0.040 +/- 0.003. In animals evaluated 1 week after subarachnoid injection, accessory cranial perineural lymphatic outflow decreased significantly to 3.4%, and spinal cord activity increased to 9.8% (P less than 0.05, two-tailed t-test). These animals were hydrocephalic and had CSF pressure of 247 +/- 25.1 mm H20 (mean +/- SE) and VBR of 0.083 +/- 0.009

  3. [Giant racemose subarachnoid and intraventricular neurocysticercosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Larsen, Alvaro; Monteagudo, Maria; Lozano-Setien, Elena; Garcia-Garcia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic disease of the central nervous system. It is caused by the larvae of Taenia solium, which can affect different anatomical sites. In Spain there is an increasing prevalence mainly due to immigration from endemic areas. The extraparenchymal forms are less common, but more serious because they usually develop complications. Neuroimaging plays a major role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease, supported by serology and a compatible clinical and epidemiological context. First-line treatments are cysticidal drugs such as albendazole and praziquantel, usually coadministered with corticosteroids, and in some cases surgery is indicated. We here report a case of neurocysticercosis with simultaneous intraventricular and giant racemose subarachnoid involvement. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Recurrent craniospinal subarachnoid hemorrhage in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA usually manifests as cerebral hemorrhage, especially as nontraumatic hemorrhages in normotensive elderly patients. Other manifestations are subarachnoid (SAH, subdural, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH and superficial hemosiderosis. A 52-year-old hypertensive woman presented with recurrent neurological deficits over a period of 2 years. Her serial brain magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans showed recurrent SAH hemorrhage, and also intracerebral, IVH and spinal hemorrhage, with superficial siderosis. Cerebral angiograms were normal. Right frontal lobe biopsy showed features of CAA. CAA can present with unexplained recurrent SAH hemorrhage, and may be the initial and prominent finding in the course of disease in addition to superficial cortical siderosis and intracerebal and spinal hemorrhages.

  5. Hydrocephalus after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus (HCP is a common complication in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this review, we summarize the advanced research on HCP and discuss the understanding of the molecular originators of HCP and the development of diagnoses and remedies of HCP after SAH. It has been reported that inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and oxidative stress are the important causes of HCP, and well-known molecules including transforming growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, and iron terminally lead to fibrosis and blockage of HCP. Potential medicines for HCP are still in preclinical status, and surgery is the most prevalent and efficient therapy, despite respective risks of different surgical methods, including lamina terminalis fenestration, ventricle-peritoneal shunting, and lumbar-peritoneal shunting. HCP remains an ailment that cannot be ignored and even with various solutions the medical community is still trying to understand and settle why and how it develops and accordingly improve the prognosis of these patients with HCP.

  6. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of small intracranial malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Minoru; Shibui, Soichiro; Nomura, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with small intracranial malignancies. Methods and Materials: From July 1991 to March 1997, 80 patients with a total of 121 brain or skull-base tumors were treated with FSRT alone, and were followed for periods ranging from 3 to 62 months (median 9.8). The majority of patients received 42 Gy in 7 fractions over 2.3 weeks, but in July 1993, protocols using smaller fraction doses were introduced for patients whose radiation-field diameters were larger than 3 cm or whose tumors were close to critical normal tissues. Results: For 64 patients with metastatic brain tumors the overall median survival was 8.3 months and 1-year actuarial survival rate was 33%. Significant prognostic factors were: the presence of extracranial tumors, pre-treatment performance status, and the lung as a primary site. Patients without extracranial tumors prior to FSRT had a median survival of 21.2 months. For seven patients with high-grade glioma, 1-year actuarial local control rate was 75%, with a median survival of 10.3 months. For patients with skull-base tumors the local control was achieved in 6 of 6 patients (100%), with a median survival of 30.7 months. No one suffered from acute complications, but three patients, two of whom had undergone FSRT as the third course of radiotherapy, developed late radiation injuries. Conclusion: Overall high local control and low morbidity rates suggest that FSRT is an effective and safe modality, even for those with a history of prior irradiation. However, patients with risk factors should be treated with smaller fraction doses

  7. Nimodipine in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a randomized study of intravenous or peroral administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronvall, Erik; Undrén, Per; Rommer, Bertil Roland

    2009-01-01

    OBJECT: The calcium antagonist nimodipine has been shown to reduce the incidence of ischemic complications following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although most randomized studies have been focused on the effect of the peroral administration of nimodipine, intravenous infusion...

  8. Role of unphosphorylated transcription factor STAT3 in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samraj, Ajoy K; Müller, Anne H; Grell, Anne-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms behind increased cerebral vasospasm and local inflammation in late cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are poorly elucidated. Using system biology tools and experimental SAH models, we have identified signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3...

  9. Effects of prostacyclin on cerebral blood flow and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Wetterslev, Jørn; Stavngaard, Trine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs) are a major contributing factor for poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. In this trial, we investigated the therapeutic potential of prostacyclin, an endogen substance with known effect on vascular tone...... was initiated day 5 after subarachnoid hemorrhage and discontinued day 10. Primary outcome was the difference in change from baseline in global cerebral blood flow. Secondary outcome measures were occurrence of DIND, angiographic vasospasm, and clinical outcome at 3 months. RESULTS: No statistically significant...... parameters or clinical outcome were found between the 3 groups. CONCLUSIONS: Administration of prostacyclin to patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage may be safe and feasible. Global cerebral blood flow after subarachnoid hemorrhage is not markedly affected by administration of prostacyclin in the tested dose...

  10. Impaired endothelial function after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage correlates with arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, A; Staalsø, J M; Romner, B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction might be involved in the development of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: This prospective observational study of 48 SAH subjects and 23 control subjects examined associations between reactive hyperaemia index (RHI...

  11. Glycemia in conditions of hypothermia in patients with intracranial aneurysmal hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Олександрівна Дудукіна

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the proven effectiveness of hypothermia as a method of neuroprotection, the presence of significant side effects requires further development of detailed protocols of usage, especially glucose.Aim: Improving treatment outcomes of patients with subarachnoid aneurysmal hemorrhage by preventing the development of hyperglycemia during systemic hypothermia.Materials and Methods: The study involved 48 patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage of aneurysmal origin. All patients were conducted intracranial surgery - clipping aneurysms of cerebral vessels during regression of arterial vascular spasm (AVS in the systemic hypothermia prevention. Therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 29 patients with complicated disease course for 48 hours. It is evaluated the effectiveness of its own method of prevention and correction of hyperglycemia - permanent short-acting insulin before the warm saline at a dose of 2 units/hour during hypothermiaResults: During the prevention of hypothermia using methods of hyperglycemia episodes of above 10 mmol / L did not observe the rejection of a group of patients using the conventional method of correction of glycemia. Episodes of hypoglycemia do not observed in both groups of the study. Up to 48 hours of therapeutic hypothermia glucose levels remained stable, after 48 hours of hypothermia it is observed a significant increase in blood glucose that was cool termination criterion.Conclusions: Holding insulin infusion at short-acting dose of 2 units/hour during prophylactic hypothermia prevents episodes of hyperglycemia and consequently helps to maintain homeostasis. Carrying insulin infusion at short-acting dose of 2 units/hour during therapeutic hypothermia promotes stable blood glucose levels to 48 hours. After 48 hours of hypothermia in 51.72% of patients experienced a significant increase in blood glucose, which is one of the criteria for termination of cooling

  12. Epidemiology of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage: Focusing Predictive Models for Neurosurgical Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Alessandro; Levy, A Stewart; Carrick, Matthew M; Tanner, Allen; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2017-11-01

    To outline differences in neurosurgical intervention (NI) rates between intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) types in mild traumatic brain injuries and help identify which ICH types are most likely to benefit from creation of predictive models for NI. A multicenter retrospective study of adult patients spanning 3 years at 4 U.S. trauma centers was performed. Patients were included if they presented with mild traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score 13-15) with head CT scan positive for ICH. Patients were excluded for skull fractures, "unspecified hemorrhage," or coagulopathy. Primary outcome was NI. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression models were built to analyze the independent association between ICH variables and outcome measures. The study comprised 1876 patients. NI rate was 6.7%. There was a significant difference in rate of NI by ICH type. Subdural hematomas had the highest rate of NI (15.5%) and accounted for 78% of all NIs. Isolated subarachnoid hemorrhages had the lowest, nonzero, NI rate (0.19%). Logistic regression models identified ICH type as the most influential independent variable when examining NI. A model predicting NI for isolated subarachnoid hemorrhages would require 26,928 patients, but a model predicting NI for isolated subdural hematomas would require only 328 patients. This study highlighted disparate NI rates among ICH types in patients with mild traumatic brain injury and identified mild, isolated subdural hematomas as most appropriate for construction of predictive NI models. Increased health care efficiency will be driven by accurate understanding of risk, which can come only from accurate predictive models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Postoperative intracranial hemorrhage due to vitamin K deficiency: report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, T; Nakase, H; Morimoto, T; Tada, T; Sakaki, T; Hisanaga, M

    1992-01-01

    Vitamin K deficient hemorrhagic diathesis is well known as a cause of infantile intracranial hemorrhage. Its occurrence, however, as a post-surgical complication is rare and has never been reported previously. Two cases are presented here which illustrate the existence of such a hazard. Case 1. A 73-year-old woman admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage (WFNS IV) underwent microsurgical exploration of a left internal carotid aneurysm, and neck clipping of the aneurysm was performed. She had an uneventful postoperative course, but her neurological condition deteriorated suddenly on the fifth postoperative day. CT scan revealed a large epidural hematoma. Case 2. A 6-year-old boy was admitted due to the dysfunction of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt system that had previously been placed for hydrocephalus. This dysfunction was thought to be caused by meningitis. Twelve days after ventricular drainage and antibiotic therapy, sudden intraventricular hemorrhage occurred. In both cases, PT and APTT were markedly prolonged, FDP slightly increased and fibrinogen slightly decreased. SFMC was positive in case 2. After the administration of vitamin K, PT and APTT were immediately normalized. Recent reports emphasize the adverse effect of antibiotics that leads to vitamin K deficient hemorrhagic diathesis, especially, in patients in a cachectic state. In these two cases, such a cachectic condition was not observed. We presume that the cause of vitamin K deficiency would be, along with the administration of antibiotics, a preliminary condition of disseminated intravascular coagulation which is encountered in some neurological disorders including subarachnoid hemorrhage. We conclude that attention should be paid for these pitfalls in perioperative neurosurgical care.

  14. Intracranial EEG Connectivity Analysis and Result Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimeš, Petr; Janeček, Jiří; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Chládek, Jan; Brázdil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2012), s. 275-279 ISSN 2010-3638 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Connectivity * Correlation * Intracranial EEG * Signal Processing Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  16. Clinical Outcome Prediction in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Bayesian Neural Networks with Fuzzy Logic Inferences

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Benjamin W. Y.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Baker, Andrew; Levine, Mitchell A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The novel clinical prediction approach of Bayesian neural networks with fuzzy logic inferences is created and applied to derive prognostic decision rules in cerebral aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Methods. The approach of Bayesian neural networks with fuzzy logic inferences was applied to data from five trials of Tirilazad for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (3551 patients). Results. Bayesian meta-analyses of observational studies on aSAH prognostic factors gave gene...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute intractional tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venz, S.; Sander, B.; Benndorf, G.; Terstegge, K.; Podrabsky, P.; Cordes, M.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    We reported three cases of acute intracranial tuberculosis including miliary tuberculosis, basal meningitis, tuberculomas and neuritis of cranial nerves. All patients had native and contrast enhanced CT and MRI scans. MRI revealed more granulomas and a better imaging contrast in the detection of basal meningitis. Neuritis was diagnosed only with the MRI. MRI scans should be prefered as the imaging procedure in clinically presumed intracranial tuberculosis. (orig.) [de

  18. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma during rivaroxaban treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschel, Leonardo Gilmone; Rego, Felipe Marques Monteiro do; Milano, Jeronimo Buzetti; Jung, Gustavo Simiano; Silva Junior, Luis Fernando; Ramina, Ricardo, E-mail: leonardoruschel@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Neurologia de Curitiba (INC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    According to our research, this is the first case described in the literature of spontaneous intracranial epidural hematoma secondary to the use of Xarelto®. Spontaneous intracranial epidural hematomas are rarely described in the literature. They are associated with infectious diseases of the skull, coagulation disorders, vascular malformations of the dura mater and metastasis to the skull. Long-term post-marketing monitoring and independent reports will probably detect the full spectrum of hemorrhagic complications of the use of rivaroxaban. (author)

  19. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma

  20. Mucocele and pyocele with marked intracranial extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Machida, Tohru; Iio, Masahiro

    1984-08-01

    Two cases are presented with frontal sinus pyocele and fronto-ethmoid sinus mucocele in which marked intracranial extension is shown. Their intracranial part appeared as a large biconvex mass, which showed iso or slightly low density homogeneously and had gross calcification in the posterior rim. The findings of the paranasal sinuses and the orbit in tomograms and CT scans are thought to be useful in the differential diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma.