WorldWideScience

Sample records for acute hospital setting

  1. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Responding to domestic violence in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, Julie; Westbury, Maggie; Kench, Selecia; Furse, Bella

    2014-04-29

    Domestic violence is recognised as a significant global health and societal concern. It is associated with physical and emotional effects, and individuals may present to a range of healthcare providers. There has been a paucity of evidence regarding effective strategies for the identification and support of patients who have experienced domestic violence, particularly in acute healthcare environments, until recently. This article describes the development and implementation of a domestic abuse nurse specialist role within one acute hospital trust. The wider implications for staff education and training are also considered.

  3. Constipation: cause and control in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H

    Constipation is not a glamorous subject, but its prevention and management can make a vast difference to patients' quality of life. This literature review identifies causative factors and describes the mode of action, side-effects and contraindications of many remedies currently available. Recommendations include a systematic approach to management in an acute ward setting, based on assessment of risk, maintenance of normal bowel routine and appropriate dietary advice and the use of appropriate pharmaceutical interventions where necessary. To be effective, this process should be underpinned by accurate documentation and the maintenance of a high level of knowledge and awareness among staff.

  4. Nursing sabbatical in the acute care hospital setting: a cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaar, Gina L; Swenty, Constance F; Phillips, Lori A; Embree, Jennifer L; McCool, Isabella A; Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    Practice-based acute care nurses experience a high incidence of burnout and dissatisfaction impacting retention and innovation and ultimately burdening the financial infrastructure of a hospital. Business, industry, and academia have successfully implemented professional sabbaticals to retain and revitalize valuable employees; however, the use is infrequent among acute care hospitals. This article expands upon the synthesis of evidence supporting nursing sabbaticals and suggests this option as a fiscally sound approach for nurses practicing in the acute care hospital setting. A cost-benefit analysis and human capital management strategies supporting nursing sabbaticals are identified.

  5. Hospital Costs Associated With Agitation in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cots, Francesc; Chiarello, Pietro; Pérez, Victor; Gracia, Alfredo; Becerra, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The study determined hospital costs associated with a diagnosis of agitation among patients at 14 general hospitals in Spain. Data from discharge records of adult patients (2008-2012) with a diagnosis of agitation (ICD-9-CM code 293.0) were analyzed. Incremental hospital costs for agitated patients and a control group of patients without agitation were quantified, and the adjusted cost and incremental cost for both groups were compared by use of a recycled-predictions approach. The analysis included 355,496 hospital discharges, 5,334 of which were of patients with a diagnosis of agitation. Among patients with a diagnosis of agitation, hospital stays were significantly longer (12 days versus nine days). A significant difference in mean costs of €472 (95% confidence interval [CI]=€351-€593) was noted between patients with agitation and those in the control group. A recycled-predictions approach showed a difference of €1,593(CI=€1,556-€1,631). Findings indicate that agitation increased the use of hospital resources by at least 8%.

  6. Factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting: a review of recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Bronwyn; Bonner, Ann; Pryor, Julie

    2010-10-01

    To explore and discuss from recent literature the common factors contributing to nurse job satisfaction in the acute hospital setting. Nursing dissatisfaction is linked to high rates of nurses leaving the profession, poor morale, poor patient outcomes and increased financial expenditure. Understanding factors that contribute to job satisfaction could increase nurse retention. A literature search from January 2004 to March 2009 was conducted using the keywords nursing, (dis)satisfaction, job (dis)satisfaction to identify factors contributing to satisfaction for nurses working in acute hospital settings. This review identified 44 factors in three clusters (intra-, inter- and extra-personal). Job satisfaction for nurses in acute hospitals can be influenced by a combination of any or all of these factors. Important factors included coping strategies, autonomy, co-worker interaction, direct patient care, organizational policies, resource adequacy and educational opportunities. Research suggests that job satisfaction is a complex and multifactorial phenomenon. Collaboration between individual nurses, their managers and others is crucial to increase nursing satisfaction with their job. Recognition and regular reviewing by nurse managers of factors that contribute to job satisfaction for nurses working in acute care areas is pivotal to the retention of valued staff. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Health professionals' experience of teamwork education in acute hospital settings: a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kylie; Jordan, Zoe; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is seen as an important element of patient care in acute hospital settings. The complexity of the journey of care for patients highlights the need for health professionals to collaborate and communicate clearly with each other. Health organizations in western countries are committed to improving patient safety through education of staff and teamwork education programs have been integral to this focus. There are no current systematic reviews of the experience of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The objective of this systematic review was to search for the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. This review considered studies reporting on experiences of registered health professionals who work in acute hospitals. This included medical, nursing and midwifery and allied health professionals. The focus of the meta-synthesis was the experiences and reflections of health professionals who were involved in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The geographical context for this review was acute hospitals in rural or metropolitan settings in Australia and overseas countries. The review focused on the experiences of health professionals who work in acute hospitals and participated in teamwork education programs. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research.In the absence of research studies, other text such as opinion papers, discussion papers and reports were considered. Studies published in English and from 1990 to 2013 were included in this review. The literature search for relevant papers occurred between 13 September and 26 October 2013. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched were PubMed, CINAHL, Embase and Scopus. The

  8. An evaluation of the implementation of Advanced Nurse Practitioner (ANP) roles in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Ann; Goodwin, Emma; Kennedy, Fiona; Hawley, Kay; Gerrish, Kate; Smith, Christine

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of implementing Advanced Nurse Practitioner roles on patients, staff members and organizational outcomes in an acute hospital. The worldwide development of advanced practice roles in nursing has been influenced by increasing demands and costs of health care. A key issue in the UK has been the reduction in hours junior doctors can work. While there is evidence these roles can have a positive impact in a variety of clinical specialties, little is known about the impact advanced nurses substituting for junior doctors can have on patients, staff members and organizational outcomes in general hospital care settings. Collective case study. A collective case study in a district general hospital in England was undertaken in 2011-2012. Interviews with strategic stakeholders (n = 13) were followed by three individual case studies. Each case study represented the clinical area in which the roles had been introduced: medicine, surgery and orthopaedics and included interviews (n = 32) and non-participant observation of practice. The ANPs had a positive impact on patient experience, outcomes and safety. They improved staff knowledge, skills and competence and enhanced quality of working life, distribution of workload and team-working. ANPs contributed to the achievement of organizational priorities and targets and development of policy. ANPs undertaking duties traditionally performed by junior doctors in acute hospital settings can have a positive impact on a range of indicators relating to patients, staff members and organizational outcomes which are highly relevant to nursing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rehabilitative management of oropharyngeal dysphagia in acute care settings: data from a large Italian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Vincon, Elena; Grosso, Elena; Miletto, Anna Maria; Di Rosa, Rosalba; Schindler, Oskar

    2008-09-01

    A high incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) in acute-care settings has been reported; however, no data on its management are found in the literature. Here we report the experience with rehabilitative management of OD in a large Italian hospital. The characteristics of inpatients with OD during 2004 have been studied prospectively. For each patient, demographic data, the department referring the patient, the disease causing OD, and the presence of a communication disorder were registered. The swallowing level at the beginning and at the end of rehabilitation were recorded. Of the 35,590 inpatients admitted to San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin during 2004, 222 of them were referred for the assessment and rehabilitation of OD. The inpatients with OD came from different departments and mainly had a neurologic disease. In 110 patients a communication disorder was present. The swallowing impairment was moderate to severe at the moment of referral, while on average patients were able to eat by mouth after swallowing therapy. Dysphagia rehabilitation in an acute care setting is requested from different departments because of its prevalence and severity; skilled specialists are needed for early assessment and the best management.

  10. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  11. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting: the Irish results of the ENDORSE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, O

    2012-05-01

    ENDORSE (Epidemiologic International Day for the Evaluation of Patients at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism in the Acute Hospital Care Setting), is a multinational, cross-sectional survey of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk prevalence and effective prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting. Three Irish hospitals enrolled in the study. The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines were employed to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis. Of 552 patients, 297 (53.8%) and 255 (46.2%) were categorised as surgical or medical, respectively, with 175 (59%) surgical and 109 (43%) medical patients deemed to be at risk for VTE. Of these, only 112 (64%) and 51 (47%) received recommended VTE prophylaxis, respectively. The results are consistent with those observed in other countries and demonstrate a high prevalence of risk for VTE and a low rate of prophylaxis use, particularly in medical patients. Awareness of VTE guidelines should be an integral component of health policy.

  12. Dignity and patient-centred care for people with palliative care needs in the acute hospital setting: A systematic review.

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    Pringle, Jan; Johnston, Bridget; Buchanan, Deans

    2015-09-01

    A core concept behind patient-centred approaches is the need to treat people with, and preserve, dignity in care settings. People receiving palliative care are one group who may have particularly sensitive needs in terms of their condition, symptoms and life expectancy. Dignity is more likely to be violated in hospital settings. Given the high percentage of people with palliative care needs who are admitted to hospital during their last year of life, the provision of dignity enhancing and preserving care in that setting is of vital importance. To examine international evidence relating to dignity and person-centred care for people with palliative care needs in the acute hospital setting. A systematic literature review was conducted, incorporating data extraction, analysis and quality appraisal of included papers. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, EMBASE, Cochrane Database and Web of Science. Inclusion dates: 1 January 2000-1 April 2014. Adult palliative care, acute care setting, dignity or person-centred care. In all, 33 papers met the inclusion criteria for the review. Papers highlighted the many and varied potential threats to dignity for people with palliative care needs in acute settings, including symptom control and existential distress, approaches and models in care provision and healthcare settings and design. Acute hospital staff require adequate training, including symptom control, and the correct environment in which to deliver dignified and person-centred end-of-life care. Specific models/approaches to care can be beneficial, if adequate training regarding implementation is given. The needs of family members also require consideration, particularly following bereavement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Environmental scan of infection prevention and control practices for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Wrechelle; Geransar, Rose; Clayden, Nancy; Jones, Jessica; de Grood, Jill; Joffe, Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Missaghi, Bayan; Pearce, Craig; Ghali, William; Conly, John

    2017-10-01

    Ward closure is a method of controlling hospital-acquired infectious diseases outbreaks and is often coupled with other practices. However, the value and efficacy of ward closures remains uncertain. To understand the current practices and perceptions with respect to ward closure for hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada. A Web-based environmental scan survey was developed by a team of infection prevention and control (IPC) experts and distributed to 235 IPC professionals at acute care sites across Canada. Data were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A total of 110 completed responses showed that 70% of sites reported at least 1 outbreak during 2013, 44% of these sites reported the use of ward closure. Ward closure was considered an "appropriate," "sometimes appropriate," or "not appropriate" strategy to control outbreaks by 50%, 45%, and 5% of participants, respectively. System capacity issues and overall risk assessment were main factors influencing the decision to close hospital wards following an outbreak. Results suggest the use of ward closure for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in Canadian acute care health settings is mixed, with outbreak control methods varying. The successful implementation of ward closure was dependent on overall support for the IPC team within hospital administration. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Does HIPE data capture the complexity of stroke patients in an acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, B

    2010-01-01

    The Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) system is currently used as a principle source of national data on discharges from acute hospitals. The Casemix Programme is used to calculate funding for patient care (HIPE activity and Specialty Costs Returns). Th coding is usually undertaken by clerical personnel. We were concerned that the medical complexity of our stroke patients was not captured by the process. The aims of this study were to compare activity coded by HIPE coding staff and medical staff in consecutive stroke patients discharged from the hospital. One hundred consecutive discharged patients with stroke as primary diagnosis were coded by clerical staff [usual practice] and by medical staff. We compared the coding and any differences. We calculated the financial comparison of subsequent differences in Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Relative Values (RVs). Clinician coded DRGs resulted in a higher assigned RV in 45 cases. The total RV value for HIPE using clerical coding was 595,268.94 euros and using medical coding was 725,252.16 euros. We conclude that medical input is useful in detailing the complications arising in stroke patients. We suggest that physicians should assist in the HIPE coding process in order to capture clinical complexity, so that funding can be appropriately assigned to manage these complex patients.

  15. Nursing Education Interventions for Managing Acute Pain in Hospital Settings: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes and Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Gareth; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the effects of nursing education interventions on clinical outcomes for acute pain management in hospital settings, relating interventions to health care behavior change theory. Three databases were searched for nursing education interventions from 2002 to 2015 in acute hospital settings with clinical outcomes reported. Methodological quality was rated as strong, moderate, or weak using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. The 12 eligible studies used varied didactic and interactive teaching methods. Several studies had weaknesses attributable to selection biases, uncontrolled confounders, and lack of blinding of outcome assessors. No studies made reference to behavior change theory in their design. Eight of the 12 studies investigated nursing documentation of pain assessment as the main outcome, with the majority reporting positive effects of education interventions on nursing pain assessment. Of the remaining studies, two reported mixed findings on patient self-report of pain scores as the key measure, one reported improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management after a nursing intervention, and one study found an increase in nurses' delivery of a relaxation treatment following an intervention. Improvements in design and evaluation of nursing education interventions are suggested, drawing on behavior change theory and emphasizing the relational, contextual, and emotionally demanding nature of nursing pain management in hospital settings. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 'Being a conduit' between hospital and home: stakeholders' views and perceptions of a nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasalu, Munikumar Ramasamy; Clarke, Amanda; Atkinson, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    To explore and critically examine stakeholders' views and perceptions concerning the nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Service in an acute hospital setting and to inform sustainability, service development and future service configuration. The drive in policy and practice is to enable individuals to achieve their preferred place of care during their last days of life. However, most people in UK die in acute hospital settings against their wishes. To facilitate individuals' preferred place of care, a large acute hospital in northeast England implemented a pilot project to establish a nurse-led Macmillan Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service. A pluralistic evaluation design using qualitative methods was used to seek stakeholders' views and perceptions of this service. In total, 12 participants (five bereaved carers and seven health professionals) participated in the evaluation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with bereaved carers who used this service for their relatives. A focus group and an individual interview were undertaken with health professionals who had used the service since its inception. Individual interviews were also conducted with the Discharge Facilitator and service manager. Analysis of all data was guided by Framework Analysis. Four key themes emerged relating to the role of the Discharge Facilitator Service: achieving preferred place of care; the Discharge Facilitator as the 'conduit' between hospital and community settings; delays in hospital discharge and stakeholders' perceptions of the way forward for the service. The Discharge Facilitator Service acted as a reliable resource and support for facilitating the fast-tracking of end-of-life patients to their preferred place of care. Future planning for hospital-based palliative care discharge facilitating services need to consider incorporating strategies that include: increased profile of the service, expansion of service provision and the Discharge Facilitator's earlier

  17. Comparison between ultrasound and noncontrast helical computed tomography for identification of acute ureterolithiasis in a teaching hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Ronan Marquez Ferreira de Souza

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown noncontrast computed tomography (NCT to be more effective than ultrasound (US for imaging acute ureterolithiasis. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies directly comparing these techniques in an emergency teaching hospital setting. The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of US and NCT performed by senior radiology residents for diagnosing acute ureterolithiasis; and to assess interobserver agreement on tomography interpretations by residents and experienced abdominal radiologists. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study of 52 consecutive patients, who underwent both US and NCT within an interval of eight hours, at Hospital São Paulo. METHODS: US scans were performed by senior residents and read by experienced radiologists. NCT scan images were read by senior residents, and subsequently by three abdominal radiologists. The interobserver variability was assessed using the kappa statistic. RESULTS: Ureteral calculi were found in 40 out of 52 patients (77%. US presented sensitivity of 22% and specificity of 100%. When collecting system dilatation was associated, US demonstrated 73% sensitivity, 82% specificity. The interobserver agreement in NCT analysis was very high with regard to identification of calculi, collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat. CONCLUSIONS: US has limited value for identifying ureteral calculi in comparison with NCT, even when collecting system dilatation is present. Residents and abdominal radiologists demonstrated excellent agreement rates for ureteral calculi, identification of collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat on NCT.

  18. A randomised controlled trial of extended brief intervention for alcohol dependent patients in an acute hospital setting (ADPAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Paula

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol dependence affects approximately 3% of the English population, and accounts for significant medical and psychiatric morbidity. Only 5.6% of alcohol-dependent individuals ever access specialist treatment and only a small percentage ever seek treatment. As people who are alcohol dependent are more likely to have experienced health problems leading to frequent attendance at acute hospitals it would seem both sensible and practical to ensure that this setting is utilised as a major access point for treatment, and to test the effectiveness of these treatments. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial with a primary hypothesis that extended brief interventions (EBI delivered to alcohol-dependent patients in a hospital setting by an Alcohol Specialist Nurse (ASN will be effective when compared to usual care in reducing overall alcohol consumption and improving on the standard measures of alcohol dependence. Consecutive patients will be screened for alcohol misuse in the Emergency Department (ED of a district general hospital. On identification of an alcohol-related problem, following informed written consent, we aim to randomize 130 patients per group. The ASN will discharge to usual clinical care all control group patients, and plan a programme of EBI for treatment group patients. Follow-up interview will be undertaken by a researcher blinded to the intervention at 12 and 24 weeks. The primary outcome measure is level of alcohol dependence as determined by the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Questionnaire (SADQ score. Secondary outcome measures include; Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT score, quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption, health-related quality of life measures, service utilisation, and patient experience. The trial will also allow an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of EBI in an acute hospital setting. In addition, patient experience will be assessed using qualitative methods

  19. An exploration of mental capacity assessment within acute hospital and intermediate care settings in England: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayes, Mark; Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pamela

    2017-10-01

    To explore approaches to the assessment of mental capacity within acute hospital and intermediate care settings in England. Two focus group interviews were conducted with multidisciplinary staff (n = 13) within a large hospital trust. Data were analysed using a Framework approach. Three main themes were identified: (i) the assessment process; (ii) staff experience of assessment; (iii) assessing capacity for patients with communication difficulties. Staff identified the main patient groups, patient decisions and professionals involved in capacity assessment. They described using both formal and informal approaches to assess capacity and specific methods to identify and support the needs of patients with communication difficulties during the assessment process. Most staff reported finding capacity assessment challenging, due to time pressures, a perceived lack of knowledge or skills and encountering practice that is not consistent with legal requirements. Staff stated a need for initiatives to facilitate and improve practice. These findings provide confirmatory evidence that mental capacity assessment is complex and challenging and that staff would benefit from additional support and resources to aid their practice. It provides new evidence about the methods used by staff to assess capacity, particularly for patients with communication difficulties. Implications for Rehabilitation This study contributes to our understanding of how staff assess capacity in hospital and intermediate care settings. Mental capacity assessment is a complex activity and many staff reported finding it challenging. Patients with communication difficulties need additional support during capacity assessments but may not always receive this. Current practice needs to be improved and staff need support and resources to achieve this.

  20. Attitudes and behaviors of hospital staff toward elders in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2002-11-01

    This study was a grounded-theory approach to the social processes engaged in by elderly people while in the hospital. Staff behaviors were identified along two continua, attitude, which affected the elders' dignity and autonomy, and managing care, which affected the elders' health. Elders described the physicians' role as the director of their health care. The elders characterized the nurses' role to provide their medications and direct needs, whereas the nurses identified their role as providing education and emotional support. Implications and recommendations for practice are offered. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  1. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  2. The reliability of in-hospital diagnoses of diabetes mellitus in the setting of an acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Suzanne V; Lipska, Kasia J; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Li, Yan; Jones, Philip G; McGuire, Darren K; Goyal, Abhinav; Stolker, Joshua M; Lind, Marcus; Spertus, John A; Kosiborod, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Incident diabetes mellitus (DM) is important to recognize in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To develop an efficient screening strategy, we explored the use of random plasma glucose (RPG) at admission and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to select patients with AMI for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing. Prospective registry of 1574 patients with AMI not taking glucose-lowering medication from 24 US hospitals. All patients had HbA1c measured at a core laboratory and admission RPG and ≥2 FPGs recorded during hospitalization. We examined potential combinations of RPG and FPG and compared these with HbA1c≥6.5%-considered the gold standard for DM diagnosis in these analyses. An RPG>140 mg/dL or FPG≥126 mg/dL had high sensitivity for DM diagnosis. Combining these into a screening protocol (if admission RPG>140, check HbA1c; or if FPG≥126 on a subsequent day, check HbA1c) led to HbA1c testing in 50% of patients and identified 86% with incident DM (number needed to screen (NNS)=3.3 to identify 1 case of DM; vs NNS=5.6 with universal HbA1c screening). Alternatively, using an RPG>180 led to HbA1c testing in 40% of patients with AMI and identified 82% of DM (NNS=2.7). We have established two potential selective screening methods for DM in the setting of AMI that could identify the vast majority of incident DM by targeted screening of 40-50% of patients with AMI with HbA1c testing. Using these methods may efficiently identify patients with AMI with DM so that appropriate education and treatment can be promptly initiated.

  3. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed.

  4. The effectiveness of interventions in the prevention and management of aggressive behaviours in patients admitted to an acute hospital setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynoch, Kate; Wu, Chiung-Jung Jo; Chang, Anne M

    2009-01-01

    Violence in healthcare has been widely reported and healthcare workers, particularly nurses in the acute care setting, are ill-equipped to manage patients who exhibit aggressive traits. An initial search of the Cochrane Library and the Joanna Briggs Institute did not reveal any published systematic reviews recommending strategies to manage aggressive and/or violent behaviours in patients admitted to an acute hospital setting. This systematic review aims to establish best practice in the prevention and management of aggressive behaviours in patients admitted to an acute hospital setting. A three-step search strategy was utilised during this review. Major databases searched included: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Health source, Web of science, EMBASE, the Cochrane library and Database of abstracts of reviews of effects (DARE) as well as PubMed. The search included published and unpublished studies and papers in English from 1990-2007. This review considered any randomised controlled trials (RCT) that evaluated the effectiveness of interventions in the prevention and management of patients who exhibit aggressive behaviours in an acute hospital setting. In the absence of RCT's, other research designs such as non-randomised controlled trials and before and after studies were considered for inclusion in the narrative summary to enable the identification of current approaches and possible future strategies for preventing and managing patient aggression in acute care areas. Each included study was assessed by two independent reviewers using the appropriate appraisal checklist developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from the papers included in this review using the standardised data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta Analysis of Statistics: Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) package. The studies included in this review were not suitable for meta-analysis and therefore the results are presented in narrative form. Twelve

  5. Experiences of the Implementation of a Learning Disability Nursing Liaison Service within an Acute Hospital Setting: A Service Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Amy; Bailey, Carol; Gates, Bob; Sooben, Roja

    2014-01-01

    It has been well documented that people with learning disabilities receive poor care in acute settings. Over the last few years, a number of learning disability liaison nurse services have developed in the United Kingdom as a response to this, but there has been a failure to systematically gather evidence as to their effectiveness. This article…

  6. Bacterial and viral pathogen spectra of acute respiratory infections in under-5 children in hospital settings in Dhaka city.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golam Sarower Bhuyan

    Full Text Available The study aimed to examine for the first time the spectra of viral and bacterial pathogens along with the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated bacteria in under-5 children with acute respiratory infections (ARIs in hospital settings of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Nasal swabs were collected from 200 under-five children hospitalized with clinical signs of ARIs. Nasal swabs from 30 asymptomatic children were also collected. Screening of viral pathogens targeted ten respiratory viruses using RT-qPCR. Bacterial pathogens were identified by bacteriological culture methods and antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was determined following CLSI guidelines. About 82.5% (n = 165 of specimens were positive for pathogens. Of 165 infected cases, 3% (n = 6 had only single bacterial pathogens, whereas 43.5% (n = 87 cases had only single viral pathogens. The remaining 36% (n = 72 cases had coinfections. In symptomatic cases, human rhinovirus was detected as the predominant virus (31.5%, followed by RSV (31%, HMPV (13%, HBoV (11%, HPIV-3 (10.5%, and adenovirus (7%. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most frequently isolated bacterial pathogen (9%, whereas Klebsiella pneumaniae, Streptococcus spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, and Haemophilus influenzae were 5.5%, 5%, 2%, and 1.5%, respectively. Of 15 multidrug-resistant bacteria, a Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate and an Enterobacter agglomerans isolate exhibited resistance against more than 10 different antibiotics. Both ARI incidence and predominant pathogen detection rates were higher during post-monsoon and winter, peaking in September. Pathogen detection rates and coinfection incidence in less than 1-year group were significantly higher (P = 0.0034 and 0.049, respectively than in 1-5 years age group. Pathogen detection rate (43% in asymptomatic cases was significantly lower compared to symptomatic group (P<0.0001. Human rhinovirus, HPIV-3, adenovirus, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Klebsiella pneumaniae had

  7. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  8. Exercise therapy for low back pain: a small-scale exploratory survey of current physiotherapy practice in the Republic of Ireland acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Karol; Doody, Catherine; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2006-11-01

    A small-scale exploratory cross-sectional survey investigated the current use of a range of exercise therapy approaches for low back pain (LBP) by outpatient physiotherapists in the acute hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland, where the majority of publicly funded treatment is delivered. Of the 120 postal questionnaires distributed to 24 physiotherapy departments, 87 were returned (72.5% response rate). The results showed specific spinal stabilization exercises were the most popular exercise therapy for acute (39%; n = 35) and chronic (51%; n = 48) LBP, followed by the McKenzie approach (acute LBP (ALBP) 35.6%; n = 32: chronic LBP (CLBP) 17%; n = 16), and abdominal exercise (ALBP 11.1%; n = 10: CLBP 9.6%; n = 9). The most popular forms of exercise therapy used by outpatient physiotherapists in acute hospital settings in Ireland lack support from evidence-based clinical guidelines, and further large-scale high quality randomized controlled trials of these approaches are warranted. Further research should also establish the use of exercise therapy and attitudes to clinical guidelines of physiotherapists in other countries and healthcare settings.

  9. Comparison of the prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory infections at different hospital settings in North China, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxing; Xie, Zhengde; Zhang, Tiegang; Lu, Yanqin; Fan, Hongwei; Yang, Donghong; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe; Shen, Kunling; Huang, Fang; Han, Jinxiang; Li, Taisheng; Gao, Zhancheng; Ren, Lili; Wang, Jianwei

    2018-02-08

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are a great public health challenge globally. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with ARIs attending at different hospital settings is fully undetermined. Laboratory-based surveillance for ARIs was conducted at inpatient and outpatient settings of 11 hospitals in North China. The first 2-5 patients with ARIs were recruited in each hospital weekly from 2012 through 2015. The presence of respiratory viruses was screened by PCR assays. The prevalence of respiratory viruses was determined and compared between patients at different hospital settings. A total of 3487 hospitalized cases and 6437 outpatients/Emergency Department (ED) patients were enrolled. The most commonly detected viruses in the hospitalized cases were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 33.3%) in children less than two years old, adenoviruses (13.0%) in patients 15-34 years old, and influenza viruses (IFVs, 9.6%) in patients ≥65 years. IFVs were the most common virus in outpatient/ED patients across all age groups (22.7%). After controlling for the confounders caused by other viruses and covariates, adenoviruses (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97, 99% confidence interval [99% CI]: 2.19-7.20) and RSV (aOR: 2.04, 99% CI: 1.34-3.11) were independently associated with increased hospitalization in children, as well as adenoviruses in adults (aOR: 2.14, 99% CI: 1.19-3.85). Additionally, co-infection of RSV with IFVs was associated with increased hospitalization in children (aOR: 12.20, 99% CI: 2.65-56.18). A substantial proportion of ARIs was associated with respiratory viruses in North China. RSV, adenoviruses, and co-infection of RSV and IFVs were more frequent in hospitalized children (or adenoviruses in adults), which might predict the severity of ARIs. Attending clinicians should be more vigilant of these infections.

  10. [Road traffic injuries in Catalonia (Spain): an approach using the minimum data set for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clèries, Montse; Bosch, Anna; Vela, Emili; Bustins, Montse

    2015-09-01

    To verify the usefulness of the minimum data set (MDS) for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources for the study of road traffic injuries and to describe the use of health resources in Catalonia (Spain). The study population consisted of patients treated in any kind of emergency service and patients admitted for acute hospitalization in Catalonia in 2013. A descriptive analysis was performed by age, gender, time and clinical variables. A total of 48,150 patients were treated in hospital emergency departments, 6,210 were attended in primary care, and 4,912 were admitted to hospital. There was a higher proportion of men (56.2%), mainly aged between 20 and 40 years. Men accounted for 54.9% of patients with minor injuries and 75.1% of those with severe injuries. Contusions are the most common injury (30.2%), followed by sprains (28.7%). Fractures mostly affected persons older than 64 years, internal injuries particularly affected men older than 64 years, and wounds mainly affected persons younger than 18 years and older than 64 years. In the adult population, the severity of the injuries increased with age, leading to longer length of stay and greater complexity. Hospital mortality was 0.2%. Fractures, internal injuries and wounds were more frequent in the group of very serious injuries, and sprains and contusions in the group of minor injuries. MDS records (acute hospitals and emergency resources) provide information that is complementary to other sources of information on traffic accidents, increasing the completeness of the data. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  13. The 'dis-ease' of dying: challenges in nursing care of the dying in the acute hospital setting. A qualitative observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomer, Melissa J; Endacott, Ruth; O'Connor, Margaret; Cross, Wendy

    2013-09-01

    Changes in health care and an ageing population have meant that more people are dying in the acute hospital setting. While palliative care principles have resulted in quality care for the dying, many patients die in an acute care, still receiving aggressive/resuscitative care. The aims were to explore nurses' 'recognition of' and 'responsiveness to' dying patients and to understand the nurses' influence on end-of-life care. A qualitative approach was taken utilising non-participant observation to elicit rich data, followed by focus groups and individual semi-structured interviews for clarification. This study was conducted in two acute medical wards in one health service, identified as having the highest rates of death, once palliative care and critical care areas were excluded. Twenty-five nurses consented to participate, and 20 episodes of observation were conducted. Nurses took a passive role in recognising dying, providing active care until a medical officer's declaration of dying. Ward design, nurse allocation and nurses' attitude to death impacts patient care. End-of-life care in a single room can have negative consequences for the dying. Nurses demonstrated varying degrees of discomfort, indicating that they were underprepared for this role. When patients are terminally ill, acknowledgement of dying is essential in providing appropriate care. It should not be assumed that all nurses are adequately prepared to provide dying care. Further work is necessary to investigate how the attitudes of nurses towards caring for dying patients in the acute hospital setting may impact care of the dying patient.

  14. Using sense-making theory to aid understanding of the recognition, assessment and management of pain in patients with dementia in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn; Lichtner, Valentina; Allcock, Nick; Briggs, Michelle; James, Kirstin; Keady, John; Lasrado, Reena; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Swarbrick, Caroline; José Closs, S

    2016-01-01

    The recognition, assessment and management of pain in hospital settings is suboptimal, and is a particular challenge in patients with dementia. The existing process guiding pain assessment and management in clinical settings is based on the assumption that nurses follow a sequential linear approach to decision making. In this paper we re-evaluate this theoretical assumption drawing on findings from a study of pain recognition, assessment and management in patients with dementia. To provide a revised conceptual model of pain recognition, assessment and management based on sense-making theories of decision making. The research we refer to is an exploratory ethnographic study using nested case sites. Patients with dementia (n=31) were the unit of data collection, nested in 11 wards (vascular, continuing care, stroke rehabilitation, orthopaedic, acute medicine, care of the elderly, elective and emergency surgery), located in four NHS hospital organizations in the UK. Data consisted of observations of patients at bedside (170h in total); observations of the context of care; audits of patient hospital records; documentary analysis of artefacts; semi-structured interviews (n=56) and informal open conversations with staff and carers (family members). Existing conceptualizations of pain recognition, assessment and management do not fully explain how the decision process occurs in clinical practice. Our research indicates that pain recognition, assessment and management is not an individual cognitive activity; rather it is carried out by groups of individuals over time and within a specific organizational culture or climate, which influences both health care professional and patient behaviour. We propose a revised theoretical model of decision making related to pain assessment and management for patients with dementia based on theories of sense-making, which is reflective of the reality of clinical decision making in acute hospital wards. The revised model recognizes the

  15. The 'weekend effect' in acute medicine: a protocol for a team-based ethnography of weekend care for medical patients in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Carolyn; Sutton, Elizabeth; Angell, Emma; Aldridge, Cassie P; Boyal, Amunpreet; Bion, Julian

    2017-04-05

    It is now well-recognised that patients admitted to hospital on weekends are at higher risk of death than those admitted during weekdays. However, the causes of this 'weekend effect' are poorly understood. Some contend that there is a deficit of medical staff on weekends resulting in poorer quality care, whereas others find that patients admitted to hospital on weekends are sicker and therefore at higher risk of adverse outcomes. Clarifying the causal pathway is clearly important in order to identify effective solutions. In this article we describe an ethnographic approach to evaluating the organisation and delivery of medical care on weekends compared with weekdays, with a specific focus on the role of medical staff as part of National Health Service England's plan to implement 7-day services. We will conduct an ethnographic study of 20 acute hospitals in England between April 2016 and March 2018 as part of the High-intensity Specialist-Led Acute Care project (www.hislac.org). Data will be collected through observations and shadowing, and interviews with staff, in 10 hospitals with higher intensity specialist (consultant) staffing on weekends and 10 with lower intensity specialist staffing. Interviews will be conducted with up to 20 patients sampled from two high-intensity and two low-intensity sites. We will coordinate, compare and contrast observations across our team of ethnographers. Analysis will be both in-depth and cross-cutting, exploring specific features within individual sites and making comparisons between them. We outline how data collection and analysis will be facilitated and organised. The project has received ethics approval from the South West Wales Research Ethics Committee: Reference 13/WA/0372. Informed consent will be obtained for all interview participants. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications in high-quality journals and at national and international conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  16. Assessing the economic value of avoiding hospital admissions by shifting the management of gram+ acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections to an outpatient care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektare, V; Khachatryan, A; Xue, M; Dunne, M; Johnson, K; Stephens, J

    2015-01-01

    To estimate, from a US payer perspective, the cost offsets of treating gram positive acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI) with varied hospital length of stay (LOS) followed by outpatient care, as well as the cost implications of avoiding hospital admission. Economic drivers of care were estimated using a literature-based economic model incorporating inpatient and outpatient components. The model incorporated equal efficacy, adverse events (AE), resource use, and costs from literature. Costs of once- and twice-daily outpatient infusions to achieve a 14-day treatment were analyzed. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Costs were adjusted to 2015 US$. Total non-drug medical cost for treatment of ABSSSI entirely in the outpatient setting to avoid hospital admission was the lowest among all scenarios and ranged from $4039-$4924. Total non-drug cost for ABSSSI treated in the inpatient setting ranged from $9813 (3 days LOS) to $18,014 (7 days LOS). Inpatient vs outpatient cost breakdown was: 3 days inpatient ($6657)/11 days outpatient ($3156-$3877); 7 days inpatient ($15,017)/7 days outpatient ($2495-$2997). Sensitivity analyses revealed a key outpatient cost driver to be peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) costs (average per patient cost of $873 for placement and $205 for complications). Drug and indirect costs were excluded and resource use was not differentiated by ABSSSI type. It was assumed that successful ABSSSI treatment takes up to 14 days per the product labels, and that once-daily and twice-daily antibiotics have equal efficacy. Shifting ABSSSI care to outpatient settings may result in medical cost savings greater than 53%. Typical outpatient scenarios represent 14-37% of total medical cost, with PICC accounting for 28-43% of the outpatient burden. The value of new ABSSSI therapies will be driven by eliminating the need for PICC line, reducing length of stay and the ability to completely avoid a hospital stay.

  17. Neuropsychological Counseling in Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Explores integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology in hospital setting. Sees example of such interchange occurring in rehabilitation unit or hospital where psychologist has responsibilities for helping patients, families, and staff to understand implications of central nervous system dysfunction and to adapt to changes. Discusses…

  18. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting

    OpenAIRE

    Devriendt, Els; Wellens, Nathalie I H; Flamaing, Johan; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip; Boonen, Steven; Milisen, Koen

    2013-01-01

    Background The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons? medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to com...

  19. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) and Potential Cost Savings and Shortened Bed Stays In an Acute Hospital Setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Brien, C

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral inserted central catheters (PICCs) have increasingly become the mainstay of patients requiring prolonged treatment with antibiotics, transfusions, oncologic IV therapy and total parental nutrition. They may also be used in delivering a number of other medications to patients. In recent years, bed occupancy rates have become hugely pressurized in many hospitals and any potential solutions to free up beds is welcome. Recent introductions of doctor or nurse led intravenous (IV) outpatient based treatment teams has been having a direct effect on early discharge of patients and in some cases avoiding admission completely. The ability to deliver outpatient intravenous treatment is facilitated by the placement of PICCs allowing safe and targeted treatment of patients over a prolonged period of time. We carried out a retrospective study of 2,404 patients referred for PICCs from 2009 to 2015 in a university teaching hospital. There was an exponential increase in the number of PICCs requested from 2011 to 2015 with a 64% increase from 2012 to 2013. The clear increase in demand for PICCs in our institution is directly linked to the advent of outpatient intravenous antibiotic services. In this paper, we assess the impact that the use of PICCs combined with intravenous outpatient treatment may have on cost and hospital bed demand. We advocate that a more widespread implementation of this service throughout Ireland may result in significant cost savings as well as decreasing the number of patients on hospital trollies.

  20. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons’ medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients’ data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. Methods In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. Results The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients’ condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of

  1. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Els; Wellens, Nathalie I H; Flamaing, Johan; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip; Boonen, Steven; Milisen, Koen

    2013-09-05

    The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons' medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients' data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients' condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of care. An actual shortage of

  2. Creating opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred care: how nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use communication strategies when managing medications in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    management in an acute hospital setting. Language discourses shaped and were shaped by complex power relations between patients and clinicians and among clinicians themselves. Clinicians need to be encouraged to have regular conversations to talk about and challenge each other's practices. More emphasis should be placed on ensuring that patients are given opportunities to voice their concerns about how their medications are managed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Multidimensional evaluation of a radio frequency identification wi-fi location tracking system in an acute-care hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoniewska, Barbara; Graham, Alecia; Gavrilova, Marina; Wah, Dannel; Gilgen, Jonathan; Coke, Jason; Burden, Jack; Nayyar, Shikha; Kaunda, Joseph; Yergens, Dean; Baylis, Barry; Ghali, William A

    2012-01-01

    Real-time locating systems (RTLS) have the potential to enhance healthcare systems through the live tracking of assets, patients and staff. This study evaluated a commercially available RTLS system deployed in a clinical setting, with three objectives: (1) assessment of the location accuracy of the technology in a clinical setting; (2) assessment of the value of asset tracking to staff; and (3) assessment of threshold monitoring applications developed for patient tracking and inventory control. Simulated daily activities were monitored by RTLS and compared with direct research team observations. Staff surveys and interviews concerning the system's effectiveness and accuracy were also conducted and analyzed. The study showed only modest location accuracy, and mixed reactions in staff interviews. These findings reveal that the technology needs to be refined further for better specific location accuracy before full-scale implementation can be recommended.

  4. Crisis leadership in an acute clinical setting: christchurch hospital, new zealand ICU experience following the february 2011 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravsky, Lev

    2015-04-01

    On Tuesday, February 22, 2011, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch, New Zealand. This qualitative study explored the intensive care units (ICUs) staff experiences and adopted leadership approaches to manage a large-scale crisis resulting from the city-wide disaster. To date, there have been a very small number of research publications to provide a comprehensive overview of crisis leadership from the perspective of multi-level interactions among staff members in the acute clinical environment during the process of the crisis management. The research was qualitative in nature. Participants were recruited into the study through purposive sampling. A semi-structured, audio-taped, personal interview method was chosen as a single data collection method for this study. This study employed thematic analysis. Formal team leadership refers to the actions undertaken by a team leader to ensure the needs and goals of the team are met. Three core, formal, crisis-leadership themes were identified: decision making, ability to remain calm, and effective communication. Informal leaders are those individuals who exert significant influence over other members in the group to which they belong, although no formal authority has been assigned to them. Four core, informal, crisis-leadership themes were identified: motivation to lead, autonomy, emotional leadership, and crisis as opportunity. Shared leadership is a dynamic process among individuals in groups for which the objective is to lead one another to the achievement of group or organizational goals. Two core, shared-leadership themes were identified: shared leadership within formal medical and nursing leadership groups, and shared leadership between formal and informal leaders in the ICU. The capabilities of formal leaders all contributed to the overall management of a crisis. Informal leaders are a very cohesive group of motivated people who can make a substantial contribution and improve overall team performance in a

  5. A simulation study of the interception of prescribing errors by clinical pharmacists in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruba, Thibaut; Boussadi, Abdelali; Lenain, Emilie; Korb-Savoldelli, Virginie; Gillaizeau, Florence; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the performance of several pharmacists in the same department who analysed the same prescriptions in a simulation study. One hundred prescriptions were retrospectively extracted from the prospective database of our hospital. Five clinical pharmacists working in the same department were asked to analyse individually the order lines of each prescription as if it were part of their routine daily practice. Afterward, an independent committee of five other clinical pharmacists reviewed the same 100 prescriptions. We calculated the sensitivity and the specificity of error detection in a line order by using the results of the committee as the gold standard. A total of 908 order lines were analysed (mean 9 ± 3 order lines per prescription). Fifty-one medication errors were identified by the committee (5.6%), including 23 related to laboratory test results: renal failure, or therapeutic concentrations being too low or too high. The sensitivity of the five pharmacists ranged between 19.6% and 56.9% and the specificity between 92.8% and 98.7%. The rates of agreement between each pharmacist and the committee, assessed using kappa coefficient, were between 0.20 and 0.39. The main factors affecting sensitivity and/or specificity in univariate analysis were the number of drugs per prescription, type of drug prescribed (ATC classification) and the glomerular filtration rate. Discrepancies between the performances of pharmacists exist, as there are between other health care professionals. Pharmacist training, standardization of the pharmaceutical analysis of drug prescription, and implementation of a clinical decision support system allowing biological values to be linked to drug prescriptions could improve individual performance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Improving the fundamentals of care for older people in the acute hospital setting: facilitating practice improvement using a Knowledge Translation Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechula, Rick; Kitson, Alison; Marcoionni, Danni; Page, Tammy; Zeitz, Kathryn; Silverston, Heidi

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports on a structured facilitation program where seven interdisciplinary teams conducted projects aimed at improving the care of the older person in the acute sector. Aims  To develop and implement a structured intervention known as the Knowledge Translation (KT) Toolkit to improve the fundamentals of care for the older person in the acute care sector. Three hypotheses were tested: (i) frontline staff can be facilitated to use existing quality improvement tools and techniques and other resources (the KT Toolkit) in order to improve care of older people in the acute hospital setting; (ii) fundamental aspects of care for older people in the acute hospital setting can be improved through the introduction and use of specific evidence-based guidelines by frontline staff; and (iii) innovations can be introduced and improvements made to care within a 12-month cycle/timeframe with appropriate facilitation. Methods  Using realistic evaluation methodology the impact of a structured facilitation program (the KT Toolkit) was assessed with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of how a range of tools, techniques and strategies may be used by clinicians to improve care. The intervention comprised three elements: the facilitation team recruited for specific knowledge, skills and expertise in KT, evidence-based practice and quality and safety; the facilitation, including a structured program of education, ongoing support and communication; and finally the components of the toolkit including elements already used within the study organisation. Results  Small improvements in care were shown. The results for the individual projects varied from clarifying issues of concern and planning ongoing activities, to changing existing practices, to improving actual patient outcomes such as reducing functional decline. More importantly the study described how teams of clinicians can be facilitated using a structured program to conduct practice improvement activities

  7. Does physical exercise improve ADL capacities in people over 65 years with moderate or severe dementia hospitalized in an acute psychiatric setting? A multisite randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürge, Elisabeth; Berchtold, André; Maupetit, Christine; Bourquin, Nathalie M-P; von Gunten, Armin; Ducraux, Daniel; Zumbach, Serge; Peeters, Anne; Kuhne, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Several studies on the effect of physical exercise on activities of daily living (ADL) for people with dementia exist; yet, data concerning the specific context of acute psychiatric hospitals remain scant. This study measured the effect of a physical exercise program on ADL scores in patients with moderate to severe dementia hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward. A multicenter clinical trial was conducted in five Swiss and Belgian psychiatric hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (EG) or a control group (CG). Members of the EG received 20 physical exercise sessions (strengthening, balance, and walking) over a four-week period while members of the CG participated in social interaction sessions of equivalent duration and frequency, but without physical exercise. The effect of exercise on ADL was measured by comparing scores of the Barthel Index and the Functional Independence Measure in the EG and CG before and after the intervention, and two weeks later. Hundred and sixty patients completed the program. Characteristics of participants of both groups were similar at the inception of the study. The mean ADL score of EG decreased slightly over time, whereas that of the CG significantly decreased compared to initial scores. Overall differences between groups were not significant; however, significant differences were found for mobility-related items. ADL scores in elderly with moderate to severe dementia deteriorate during acute psychiatric hospitalization. An exercise program delays the loss of mobility but does not have a significant impact on overall ADL scores.

  8. Cognition, continence and transfer status at the time of discharge from an acute hospital setting and their associations with an unfavourable discharge outcome after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    Current demographic trends pose a major societal challenge due to the rising number of older people with chronic conditions such as stroke. The relative impact of various disabilities at the time of discharge from an acute unit on discharge outcome is poorly understood. To examine the association between cognition, continence and transfer status at the time of discharge from the acute stroke unit and discharge destination. A retrospective stroke register database study was conducted in an acute stroke unit in a UK hospital with a catchment population of 568,000. Consecutive acute stroke admissions between 1997 and 2003 who were discharged alive were identified and the likelihood of adverse discharge outcomes defined as institutionalization or a requirement for longer-term rehabilitation was estimated. A total of 2,521 discharges were analyzed (median length of hospital stay 8 days). The presence of confusion, urinary incontinence or the need for help with transfers at the time of discharge predicted a higher likelihood of an adverse outcome even after controlling for age, stroke subtype, premorbid Rankin score and length of hospital stay. The need for help with transfers appeared to be the most consistent and significant factor associated with an adverse outcome regardless of age, sex or stroke subtype across the sample distribution. The ability to transfer has a pivotal role in the clinical decision making of discharge destination after stroke. Understanding of the factors which may increase the potential for improving this ability after acute stroke could have an impact on clinical outcome. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. A comprehensive systematic review of healthcare workers' perceptions of risk from exposure to emerging acute respiratory infectious diseases and the perceived effectiveness of strategies used to facilitate healthy coping in acute hospital and community healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiwen, Koh; Hegney, Desley; Drury, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    Emerging acute respiratory infectious diseases, such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and the Avian Influenza A/H5N1 virus are contagious with high morbidity and mortality rates. Hence, health care workers, who are in close contact with affected patients, face many risks. There need to be a greater understanding of: individual HCWs' risk perceptions; adopted risk-mitigating strategies; and factors influencing both. This review aimed to establish the best evidence regarding health care worker's risk perceptions and workplace strategies towards emerging acute respiratory infectious diseases in acute hospital and community healthcare settings; and to make recommendations for practice and future research. Participants Studies that included male and female health care workers practising in acute and community health care settings were considered.Types of intervention (s)/Phenomena of interest This review considered studies that investigated: health care workers' risk perceptions; perceived meaning/effectiveness of the individual and workplace strategies implemented; and the factors influencing both.Types of outcomes This review focused on factors affecting: health care worker' risk perceptions; use of risk-mitigating strategies; and their perceived meaning and effectiveness.Types of studies Both qualitative and quantitative study designs published in the English language were including in the study. Using a three-step search strategy, the following databases from 1997-2009 were accessed: CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPUS, ScienceDirect, Sociological Abstracts, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardised critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Disagreements were resolved through discussion, or with a third reviewer. Information was extracted by two independent reviewers from each paper using the standardised data extraction tools from

  10. The King's College Hospital Acute Stroke Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, P; Butterworth, R J; Soo, J; Kerr, J E

    1996-01-01

    The King's College Hospital (KCH) Acute Stroke Unit (ASU) was set up in January 1994 in order to provide acute management for patients admitted with stroke and to undertake biomedical research. Of 206 patients admitted to KCH with a stroke or suffering an in-hospital stroke, 141 (68%) patients were admitted to the ASU over its first 6 months of operation: 120 (85%) were from the Accident and Emergency Department and 21 (15%) from other wards. Management included resuscitation and medical stabilisation, investigation, prevention of stroke complications (including aspiration, venous thrombosis, and pressure sores), rehabilitation (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy), nutrition (dietetics) and initiation of secondary prevention measures (aspirin or anticoagulation, blood pressure and lipid lowering, and carotid endarterectomy). All aspects of management are driven by agreed guidelines. Patients remain under the care of the admitting physician but specific stroke management and guidance is provided by two research doctors and the unit's nurses, therapists and dietician. The unit also facilitates research into stroke pathophysiology and acute therapeutic interventions. Our experience suggests that an ASU is relatively easy to set up and may contribute to improved care. Whether ASUs improve patient survival and functional outcome, and are cost-effective, requires further study.

  11. The effect of aggression management training programmes for nursing staff and students working in an acute hospital setting. A narrative review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, B; Zeller, A; Hahn, S; Dassen, T; Schols, J M G A; Halfens, R J G

    2015-01-01

    Patient aggression is a longstanding problem in general hospital nursing. Staff training is recommended to tackle workplace aggression originating from patients or visitors, yet evidence on training effects is scarce. To review and collate current research evidence on the effect of aggression management training for nurses and nursing students working in general hospitals, and to derive recommendations for further research. Systematic, narrative review. Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, pubmed, psycArticles, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection were searched for articles evaluating training programs for staff and students in acute hospital adult nursing in a 'before/after' design. Studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 in English, French or German were eligible of inclusion. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the 'Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies'. Main outcomes i.e. attitudes, confidence, skills and knowledge were collated. Nine studies were included. Two had a weak, six a moderate, and one a strong study design. All studies reported increased confidence, improved attitude, skills, and knowledge about risk factors post training. There was no significant change in incidence of patient aggression. Our findings corroborate findings of reviews on training in mental health care, which point to a lack of high quality research. Training does not reduce the incidence of aggressive acts. Aggression needs to be tackled at an organizational level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute Hospitalization of the Older Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Acute hospitalization of older patients may be associated with loss of muscle strength and functional performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hospitalization as a result of medical disease on muscle strength and functional performance in older medical ...

  13. Can we predict which hospitalised patients are in their last year of life? A prospective cross-sectional study of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance as a screening tool in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Anne; Laking, George; Frey, Rosemary; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2014-09-01

    Screening to identify hospital inpatients with a short life expectancy may be a way to improve care towards the end of life. The Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance is a screening tool that has recently been advocated for use in the hospital setting. To assess the clinical utility of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance as a screening tool in an acute hospital setting. Mortality at 6 and 12 months and sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance at 1 year. Prospective cross-sectional study of 501 adult inpatients in a tertiary New Zealand teaching hospital screened utilising the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance. A total of 99 patients were identified as meeting at least one of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance triggers. In this group, 6-month mortality was 56.6% and 12-month mortality was 67.7% compared with 5.2% and 10%, respectively, for those not identified as meeting the criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance at 1 year were 62.6% and 91.9%, respectively, with a positive predictive value of 67.7% and a negative predictive value of 90.0%. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance in this study are comparable to, or better than, results of studies identifying patients with a limited life expectancy in particular disease states (e.g. heart failure and renal failure). Screening utilising the Gold Standards Framework Prognostic Indicator Guidance in the acute setting could be the first step towards implementing a more systematic way of addressing patient need--both current unrecognised and future anticipated--thereby improving outcomes for this population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Childhood acute pancreatitis in a children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, S K; Chui, C H; Jacobsen, A S

    2003-09-01

    To analyse the cases of acute pancreatitis presented to a children's hospital in Singapore. Clinical charts of all children, aged under 18 years, who presented to our hospital for the first time with pancreatitis (ICD search criteria = 577.x) between the period of 1998 and mid-2002 were reviewed. Parameters analysed included presenting features, aetiology of the acute pancreatitis, length of hospital stay, complications, treatment and outcome. There were 12 cases in the review period, and the attributable causes in these cases were, in descending order, trauma, drug-induced, anatomical anomalies, poisoning and idiopathic. Of interest were two patients whose pancreatitis were results of child abuse. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (n=11) and vomiting (n=7), though only five patients localised the pain to the epigastrium. Abdominal tenderness could be elicited in all the patients. Eleven had evidence of acute pancreatitis from computerised tomography (CT) whilst the twelfth was diagnosed with ultrasonography. The peak amylase levels amongst these patients were not high, with a median of 512.5 U/L. In the acute stage, only one patient required operative intervention whilst the remainder were managed conservatively. The mean length of hospital stay was 12.41 +/- 4.54 days. The complications encountered included pseudocyst formation, ascites, hypocalcaemia, pleural effusion and coagulopathy. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in children can be difficult. This is often due to ambiguous symptoms, signs and laboratory results. CT and ultrasound are essential investigations in the diagnosis and subsequent follow-up.

  15. Mechanical ventilators in US acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinson, Lewis; Vaughn, Frances; Nelson, Steve; Giordano, Sam; Kallstrom, Tom; Buckley, Tim; Burney, Tabinda; Hupert, Nathaniel; Mutter, Ryan; Handrigan, Michael; Yeskey, Kevin; Lurie, Nicole; Branson, Richard

    2010-10-01

    The supply and distribution of mechanical ventilation capacity is of profound importance for planning for severe public health emergencies. However, the capability of US health systems to provide mechanical ventilation for children and adults remains poorly quantified. The objective of this study was to determine the quantity of adult and pediatric mechanical ventilators at US acute care hospitals. A total of 5,752 US acute care hospitals included in the 2007 American Hospital Association database were surveyed. We measured the quantities of mechanical ventilators and their features. Responding to the survey were 4305 (74.8%) hospitals, which accounted for 83.8% of US intensive care unit beds. Of the 52,118 full-feature mechanical ventilators owned by respondent hospitals, 24,204 (46.4%) are pediatric/neonatal capable. Accounting for nonrespondents, we estimate that there are 62,188 full-feature mechanical ventilators owned by US acute care hospitals. The median number of full-feature mechanical ventilators per 100,000 population for individual states is 19.7 (interquartile ratio 17.2-23.1), ranging from 11.9 to 77.6. The median number of pediatric-capable device full-feature mechanical ventilators per 100,000 population younger than 14 years old is 52.3 (interquartile ratio 43.1-63.9) and the range across states is 22.1 to 206.2. In addition, respondent hospitals reported owning 82,755 ventilators other than full-feature mechanical ventilators; we estimate that there are 98,738 devices other than full-feature ventilators at all of the US acute care hospitals. The number of mechanical ventilators per US population exceeds those reported by other developed countries, but there is wide variation across states in the population-adjusted supply. There are considerably more pediatric-capable ventilators than there are for adults only on a population-adjusted basis.

  16. Occupational therapy in Australian acute hospitals: A modified practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Ongoing changes to health-care funding Australia wide continue to influence how occupational therapists practise in acute hospitals. This study describes the practice challenges experienced by Western Australian acute care occupational therapists. Then, it explores if and how acute care occupational therapists are modifying their practice in response to these practice changes. This study used a qualitative grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 13 purposively selected acute care occupational therapists from four Western Australian metropolitan hospitals. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method to provide detailed descriptions of acute care occupational therapy practice and to generate theory. Five conceptual categories were developed. The first two addressed practice challenges: pragmatic organisational influences on client care and establishing a professional identity within the multidisciplinary team. Three categories related to therapist responses are as follows: becoming the client advocate, being the facilitator and applying clinical reasoning. Finally, modified practice was identified as the core category which explains the process whereby acute care occupational therapists are ensuring they remain relevant and authentic in the acute care context. Western Australian acute care occupational therapists are practising in a highly complex health context that presents many challenges. They are responding by using a modified form of practice that ensures occupational therapy skills remain relevant within the narrow confines of this health setting. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. Hospital medicine (Part 2): what would improve acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    There are so many obvious delays and inefficiencies in our traditional system of acute hospital care; it is clear that if outcomes are to be improved prompt accurate assessment immediately followed by competent and efficient treatment is essential. Early warning scores (EWS) help detect acutely ill patients who are seriously ill and likely to deteriorate. However, it is not known if any EWS has universal applicability to all patient populations. The benefit of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) such as Medical Emergency Teams has yet to be proven, possibly because doctors and nurses are reluctant to call the RRS for help. Reconfiguration of care delivery in an Acute Medical Assessment Unit has been suggested as a "proactive" alternative to the "reactive" approach of RRS. This method ensures every patient is in an appropriate and safe environment from the moment of first contact with the hospital. Further research is needed into what interventions are most effective in preventing the deterioration and\\/or resuscitating seriously ill patients. Although physicians expert in hospital care decrease the cost and length of hospitalization without compromising outcomes hospital care will continue to be both expensive and potentially dangerous.

  18. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  19. PRIORITY SETTING IN AN ACUTE CARE HOSPITAL IN ARGENTINA: A QUALITATIVE CASE STUDY DISTRIBUCIÓN PRIORITARIA EN UN HOSPITAL DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS EN ARGENTINA: ESTUDIO CUALITATIVO DE UN CASO DISTRIBUIÇÃO PRIORITÁRIA EM UM HOSPITAL DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS NA ARGENTINA: ESTUDO QUALITATIVO DE UM CASO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Gordon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe and evaluate priority setting in an Acute Care hospital in Argentina, using Accountability for Reasonableness, an ethical framework for fair priority setting. Methods: Case Study involving key informant interviews and document review. Thirty respondents were identified using a snowball sampling strategy. A modified thematic approach was used in analyzing the data. Results: Priorities are primarily determined at the Department of Health. The committee which is supposed to set priorities within the hospital was thought not to have much influence. Decisions were based on government policies and objectives, personal relationships, economic, political, historical and arbitrary reasons. Decisions at the DOH were publicized through internet; however, apart from the tenders and a general budget, details of hospital decisions were not publicized. CATA provided an accessible but ineffective forum for appeals. There were no clear mechanisms for appeals and leadership to ensure adherence to a fair process. Conclusions: In spite of their efforts to ensure fairness, Priority setting in the study hospital did not meet all the four conditions of a fair process. Policy discussions on improving legitimacy and fairness provided an opportunity for improving fairness in the hospital and Accountability for Reasonableness might be a useful framework for analysis and for identifying and improving strategies.Propósito: Describir y evaluar el establecimiento de prioridades en un hospital de cuidados intensivos en Argentina, empleando la Administración Razonable como marco ético para una justa asignación. Métodos: Estudio de un Caso que incluía entrevistas a un informante y revisión de documentos. Se identificó a treinta participantes empleando la estrategia de muestras tipo "bola de nieve". Al analizar los datos, se empleó un enfoque temático modificado. Resultados: Las prioridades se determinan principalmente en el Departamento de Salud

  20. Predicting hospitalization in children with acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktiryaki, A Betul; Civelek, Ersoy; Can, Demet; Orhan, Fazıl; Aydogan, Metin; Reisli, Ismail; Keskin, Ozlem; Akcay, Ahmet; Yazicioglu, Mehtap; Cokugras, Haluk; Yuksel, Hasan; Zeyrek, Dost; Kocak, A Kadir; Sekerel, Bulent E

    2013-05-01

    Acute asthma is one of the most common medical emergencies in children. Appropriate assessment/treatment and early identification of factors that predict hospitalization are critical for the effective utilization of emergency services. To identify risk factors that predict hospitalization and to compare the concordance of the Modified Pulmonary Index Score (MPIS) with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline criteria in terms of attack severity. The study population was composed of children aged 5-18 years who presented to the Emergency Departments (ED) of the tertiary reference centers of the country within a period of 3 months. Patients were evaluated at the initial presentation and the 1(st) and 4(th) hours. Of the 304 patients (median age: 8.0 years [interquartile range: 6.5-9.7]), 51.3% and 19.4% required oral corticosteroids (OCS) and hospitalization, respectively. Attack severity and MPIS were found as predicting factors for hospitalization, but none of the demographic characteristics collected predicted OCS use or hospitalization. Hospitalization status at the 1(st) hour with moderate/severe attack severity showed a sensitivity of 44.1%, specificity of 82.9%, positive predictive value of 38.2%, and negative predictive value of 86.0%; for MPIS ≥ 5, these values were 42.4%, 85.3%, 41.0%, and 86.0%, respectively. Concordance in prediction of hospitalization between the MPIS and the GINA guideline was found to be moderate at the 1(st) hour (κ = 0.577). Attack severity is a predictive factor for hospitalization in children with acute asthma. Determining attack severity with MPIS and a cut-off value ≥ 5 at the 1(st) hour may help physicians in EDs. Having fewer variables and the ability to calculate a numeric value with MPIS makes it an easy and useful tool in clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  2. Dialysis Requiring Acute Kidney Injury in Acute Cerebrovascular Accident Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint A; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Kamat, Sunil; Annapureddy, Narender; Benjo, Alexandre; Thakar, Charuhas V

    2015-11-01

    The epidemiology of dialysis requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admissions is poorly understood with previous studies being from a single center or year. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the yearly incidence trends of AKI-D in hospitalizations with AIS and ICH from 2002 to 2011. We also evaluated the trend of impact of AKI-D on in-hospital mortality and adverse discharge using adjusted odds ratios (aOR) after adjusting for demographics and comorbidity indices. We extracted a total of 3,937,928 and 696,754 hospitalizations with AIS and ICH, respectively. AKI-D occurred in 1.5 and 3.5 per 1000 in AIS and ICH admissions, respectively. Incidence of admissions complicated by AKI-D doubled from 0.9/1000 to 1.7/1000 in AIS and from 2.1/1000 to 4.3/1000 in ICH admissions. In AIS admissions, AKI-D was associated with 30% higher odds of mortality (aOR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.48; Paccident continues to grow and is associated with increased mortality and adverse discharge. This highlights the need for early diagnosis, better risk stratification, and preparedness for need for complex long-term care in this vulnerable population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. A comparison of quality of care indicators in urban acute care hospitals and rural critical access hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawal Lutfiyya, M; Bhat, Deepa K; Gandhi, Seema R; Nguyen, Catherine; Weidenbacher-Hoper, Vicki L; Lipsky, Martin S

    2007-06-01

    Two recent Institute of Medicine reports highlight that the quality of healthcare in the US is less than what should be expected from the world's most extensive and expensive healthcare system. This may be especially true for critical access hospitals since these smaller rural-based hospitals often have fewer resources and less funding than larger urban hospitals. The purpose of this paper was to compare quality of hospital care provided in urban acute care hospitals to that provided in rural critical access hospitals. Cross-sectional study analyzing secondary Hospital Compare data. T-test statistics were computed on weighted data to ascertain if differences were statistically significant (P=0.01). Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hospitals. US Acute Care and Critical Access hospitals. Differences between urban acute care hospitals and rural critical access hospitals on quality care indicators related to acute myocardial infarction, heart failure and pneumonia. For 8 of the 12 hospital quality indicators the differences between urban acute care and rural critical access hospitals were statistically significant (P=0.01). In seven instances these differences favored urban hospitals. One indicator related to pneumonia favored rural hospitals Although this study focused on only three disease states, these are among the most common clinical conditions encountered in inpatient settings. The findings suggested that there may be differences in quality in rural critical access hospitals and urban acute care hospitals and support the need for future studies addressing disparities between urban acute care and rural critical access hospitals.

  4. Blood lactate as a predictor for in-hospital mortality in patients admitted acutely to hospital: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Ole; Grunnet, Niels; Barfod, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    setting, i.e. patients assessed pre-hospitally, in the trauma centre, emergency department, or intensive care unit. 2) To examine the agreement between arterial, peripheral venous, and capillary blood lactate levels in patients in the acute setting. METHODS: We performed a systematic search using Pub...... to the hospital, or serial lactate measurements. Furthermore there is no consensus whether the sample should be drawn from arterial, peripheral venous, or capillary blood. The aim of this review was: 1) To examine whether blood lactate levels are predictive for in-hospital mortality in patients in the acute...... lactate monitoring as being useful for risk assessment in patients admitted acutely to hospital, and especially the trend, achieved by serial lactate sampling, is valuable in predicting in-hospital mortality. All patients with a lactate at admission above 2.5 mM should be closely monitored for signs...

  5. Performance of in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization: Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motomura Noboru

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective In-hospital mortality is an important performance measure for quality improvement, although it requires proper risk adjustment. We set out to develop in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization using a nation-wide electronic administrative record system in Japan. Methods Administrative records of 224,207 patients (patients discharged from 82 hospitals in Japan between July 1, 2002 and October 31, 2002 were randomly split into preliminary (179,156 records and test (45,051 records groups. Study variables included Major Diagnostic Category, age, gender, ambulance use, admission status, length of hospital stay, comorbidity, and in-hospital mortality. ICD-10 codes were converted to calculate comorbidity scores based on Quan's methodology. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was then performed using in-hospital mortality as a dependent variable. C-indexes were calculated across risk groups in order to evaluate model performances. Results In-hospital mortality rates were 2.68% and 2.76% for the preliminary and test datasets, respectively. C-index values were 0.869 for the model that excluded length of stay and 0.841 for the model that included length of stay. Conclusion Risk models developed in this study included a set of variables easily accessible from administrative data, and still successfully exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. These models can be used to estimate in-hospital mortality rates of various diagnoses and procedures.

  6. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nore Anne K

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40% were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84% were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%, were frequently comatose (35%, had respiratory depression (37%, and many received naloxone (49%. The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%, fewer were comatose (10%, and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%. Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%, 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often

  7. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Hovda, Knut E; Bjornaas, Mari A; Nore, Anne K; Figueiredo, Jose CP; Ekeberg, Oivind; Jacobsen, Dag

    2008-01-01

    Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40%) were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84%) were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%), were frequently comatose (35%), had respiratory depression (37%), and many received naloxone (49%). The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%), fewer were comatose (10%), and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%). Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%), 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often caused by drug and

  8. Information technology and hospital patient safety: a cross-sectional study of US acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appari, Ajit; Johnson, Eric M; Anthony, Denise L

    2014-11-01

    To determine whether health information technology (IT) systems are associated with better patient safety in acute care settings. In a cross-sectional retrospective study, data on hospital patient safety performance for October 2008 to June 2010 were combined with 2007 information technology systems data. The sample included 3002 US non-federal acute care hospitals. Electronic health record (EHR) system was coded as a composite dichotomous variable based on the presence of 10 major clinical and administrative applications that (if in use) could potentially meet stage 1 "meaningful use" objectives. The surgical IT system was measured as a dichotomous variable if a hospital used at least 1 of the perioperative, preoperative, or postoperative information systems. Hospital patient safety performance was measured by risk-standardized estimated rates per 1000 admissions. Statistical analyses were conducted using an estimated dependent variable methodology with gamma-log link-based weighted generalized linear models, adjusting for hospital characteristics, historical composite process quality, and propensity for EHR adoption. We found that the use of surgical IT systems was associated with 7% to 26% lower rates for 7 of 8 patient safety indicators (incidence rate ratio [IRR] range from 0.74 to 0.93; all P values hospitals. However, the cross-sectional design limits our ability to make causal conclusions.

  9. Mentoring Nurse Practitioners in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Rodica S

    2017-08-01

    Nursing philosophy is the foundation of nurse practitioner (NP) training. However, NP practice is based on the medical care model. Thus, the necessity of mediating between these two approaches is often problematic for new NPs who are transitioning into their new roles. Mentoring has been used successfully to facilitate role transition and role understanding for nurses, NPs, and physicians. However, mentoring has been rarely studied in NPs. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory of mentoring for new NPs in a hospital setting. Grounded theory methodology was used. The sampling approach was initially purposive and was then shifted to theoretical to ensure the collection of meaningful data. Semistructuredinterviews were recorded and transcribed into Word documents for analysis. The three-phase analysis developed by Corbin and Strauss was initiated after the second interview. Sixteen participants (eight mentors and eight mentees) were interviewed between February and June 2011. The core category that emerged from the data was "defining self," and the main categories were forming the relationship, developing the relationship, and mentoring outcomes. A well-designed formal mentoring program may greatly improve the transition of NPs into a new role. The theory generated by the data from these study participants provides clearly defined categories that may be operationally defined and utilized to develop evaluation tools for mentoring programs.

  10. Abuse in Hospital-Based Birth Settings?

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Are laboring and birthing women treated abusively in the hospital? Although seldom recognized as abuse or violence against women, bullying and medical treatments under false pretenses, even in a hospital, constitute abuse and a basic human rights issue that needs attention. Naming the problem is a first step. The power of medical authority, the lack of accountability in the hospital hierarchical system, policies and protocols, and expectations of compliancy all make an environment ripe for ab...

  11. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in an outpatient setting | Awori | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) typically affects hospitalized patients with critical illness. Outpatient AAC is reported to occur in elderly males with cardiovascular comorbidities. We report the presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis in two young African men admitted for the first time within days of each other.

  12. 48 Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis in an Outpatient Setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) typically affects hospitalized patients with critical illness. Outpatient AAC is reported to occur in elderly males with cardiovascular comorbidities. We report the presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis in two young African men admitted for the first time within days of ...

  13. Analysis of Surfing Injuries Presenting in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubbal, Kevin T; Chen, Charlie; Costantini, Todd; Herrera, Fernando; Dobke, Marek; Suliman, Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Surfing is a rapidly growing major worldwide sport; however, little is understood regarding severe injuries and resulting hospital admissions. This study explores surfing-related injuries in the major surfing hub of San Diego presenting in the acute trauma setting. The purpose of this study is to address the void of information regarding severe surfing injuries in the trauma setting, including injury patterns, associated hospitalization course, and risk factors. Understanding the injury patterns in surfing accidents is crucial for proper management of surfing injuries. A retrospective analysis was performed of all surfing-related injuries in a Level 1 trauma center between 2000 and 2016. A total of 93 patients were identified. Body parts most commonly affected include the head (42, 46%), face (21, 22%), and spine (47, 51%). Twenty-eight (30%) patients required surgical intervention, including 19 for spinal injuries, 3 for facial injuries, 4 for upper extremity injuries, and 2 for lower extremity injuries. The distribution for most presentations (55, 59%) occurred in the summer months between July and September. The Injury Severity Score demonstrated strong positive correlation with the length of hospital stay, with a Pearson coefficient of 0.52 (P sport, is not without major risks. In contrast with other studies, we found a high proportion of head, face, and spine injuries in patients presenting with surfing injuries in the trauma setting, consistent with its presentation as a high velocity and high impact injury. With plastic surgeons often treating severe head and facial injuries, understanding the injury patterns in severe surfing accidents is crucial for proper management. High rates of positive alcohol and drug screening signal the importance to bring awareness to the dangers of surfing under the influence.

  14. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ..., Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing--Program Administration... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...

  15. Acute intoxications: differences in management between six Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duineveld, C.; Vroegop, M.; Schouren, L.; Hoedemaekers, A.; Schouten, J.A.; Moret-Hartman, M.; Kramers, C.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acute intoxications are frequently seen in Dutch hospitals. Based on single-centre studies and the fact that there are no clear guidelines, we hypothesised that hospital admission of acute intoxications may vary. Furthermore, decontamination treatment of poisonings may differ between

  16. MEDPAR Limited Data Set (LDS) - Hospital (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MedPAR consolidates Inpatient Hospital or Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) claims data from the National Claims History (NCH) files into stay level records.

  17. Children hospitalized due to acute otitis media: how does this condition differ from acute mastoiditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Saat, Riste; Lempinen, Laura; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical picture and microbiological findings of children hospitalized due to acute otitis media and to analyze how it differs from acute mastoiditis. A retrospective review of the medical records of all children (0-16 years) hospitalized due to acute otitis media in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Helsinki University Hospital, between 2003 and 2012. Comparison with previously published data of children with acute mastoiditis (n=56) from the same institute and period of time. The most common pathogens in the children hospitalized due to acute otitis media (n=44) were Streptococcus pneumoniae (18%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16%), Streptococcus pyogenes (14%), and Staphylococcus aureus (14%). One of the most common pathogens of out-patient acute otitis media, Haemophilus influenzae, was absent. Otorrhea was common in infections caused by S. pyogenes and otorrhea via tympanostomy tube in infections caused by P. aeruginosa. In children under 2 years-of-age, the most common pathogens were S. pneumoniae (43%), Moraxella catarrhalis (14%), and S. aureus (7%). S. pyogenes and P. aeruginosa were only found in children over 2 years-of-age. Previous health problems, bilateral infections, and facial nerve paresis were more common in children hospitalized due to acute otitis media, compared with acute mastoiditis, but they also demonstrated lower CRP values and shorter duration of hospital stay. The number of performed tympanostomies and mastoidectomies was also comparatively smaller in the children hospitalized due to acute otitis media. S. aureus was more common and S. pneumoniae, especially its resistant strains, was less common in the children hospitalized due to acute otitis media than acute mastoiditis. Acute otitis media requiring hospitalization and acute mastoiditis compose a continuum of complicated acute otitis media that differs from common out-patient acute otitis media. The bacteriology of children hospitalized due to acute otitis media

  18. Abuse in hospital-based birth settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Are laboring and birthing women treated abusively in the hospital? Although seldom recognized as abuse or violence against women, bullying and medical treatments under false pretenses, even in a hospital, constitute abuse and a basic human rights issue that needs attention. Naming the problem is a first step. The power of medical authority, the lack of accountability in the hospital hierarchical system, policies and protocols, and expectations of compliancy all make an environment ripe for abuse and present obstacles for both women and staff to recognize or stop abuse. Learning to recognize abuse and take effective action, and understanding the legal requirements for "informed consent" can help, but ending abuse will require systemic change.

  19. Incidence of pediatric acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Ashraf; Naveed Shahzad; Altaf Hussain; Shafat Ahmed Tak; Syed Tariq Ahmed Bukhari; Aliya Kachru

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric acute kidney injury (pAKI) is a common complication associated with high mortality in children. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in hospitalized (critically ill and non-critically ill) patients. This was a retrospective study conducted during the period of June 1, 2013, to May 31, 2014, at the Postgraduate Department of Pediatrics, G. B. Pant Hospital, an Associated Hospital of Government Medical College, Srinagar,...

  20. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennerby, Cathy

    2012-02-01

    AIM: This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. BACKGROUND: The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children\\'s hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about \\'near misses\\

  1. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology BBA Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Public Law 105-33 BBRA Medicare... Ultrasound (IVUS) III. Changes to the Hospital Wage Index for Acute Care Hospitals A. Background B. Wage...

  2. Validation of the PHEEM instrument in a Danish hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Knut; Bastholt, Lars; Bested, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) has been translated into Danish and then validated with good internal consistency by 342 Danish junior and senior hospital doctors. Four of the 40 items are culturally dependent in the Danish hospital setting. Factor analysis...

  3. Acute appendicitis in Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hospital is a tertiary care facility in competition with a large number of private hospitals with different levels of competence. Objective: The objective of the study is to review the outcome of the surgical management of acute appendicitis in our hospital. Method: A retrospective study of subjects who had appendectomy for ...

  4. A pressure ulcer audit and feedback project across multi-hospital settings in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, G.J.J.W.; Halfens, J.; Candel, M.J.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Abu-Saad, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether participating in a pressure ulcer prevalence survey and receiving feedback results in an improvement in quality of care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional studies from 1998 to 2002 were compared over time. SETTING: Sixty-two acute care hospitals in the Netherlands. STUDY

  5. Safety of Intranasal Fentanyl in the Out-of-Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders P H; Pedersen, Danny M B; Trautner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    : In this prospective observational study, we administered intranasal fentanyl in the out-of-hospital setting to adults and children older than 8 years with severe pain resulting from orthopedic conditions, abdominal pain, or acute coronary syndrome refractory to nitroglycerin spray. Patients received 1 to 3 doses...

  6. Consultant input in acute medical admissions and patient outcomes in hospitals in England: a multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Derek; Lambourne, Adrian; Percival, Frances; Laverty, Anthony A; Ward, David K

    2013-01-01

    Recent recommendations for physicians in the UK outline key aspects of care that should improve patient outcomes and experience in acute hospital care. Included in these recommendations are Consultant patterns of work to improve timeliness of clinical review and improve continuity of care. This study used a contemporaneous validated survey compared with clinical outcomes derived from Hospital Episode Statistics, between April 2009 and March 2010 from 91 acute hospital sites in England to evaluate systems of consultant cover for acute medical admissions. Clinical outcomes studied included adjusted case fatality rates (aCFR), including the ratio of weekend to weekday mortality, length of stay and readmission rates. Hospitals that had an admitting Consultant presence within the Acute Medicine Unit (AMU, or equivalent) for a minimum of 4 hours per day (65% of study group) had a lower aCFR compared with hospitals that had Consultant presence for less than 4 hours per day (pConsultant working, incorporating all the guideline recommendations and which included the minimum Consultant presence of 4 hours per day (29%) was associated with reduced excess weekend mortality (p40 acute medical admissions per day had a lower aCFR compared to hospitals with fewer than 40 admissions per day (passociation between well-designed systems of Consultant working practices, which promote increased patient contact, and improved patient outcomes in the acute hospital setting.

  7. Acute and chronic diseases as part of multimorbidity in acutely hospitalized older patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Frenkel, Wijnanda J.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Parlevliet, Juliette L.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    Background: To describe the prevalence of multimorbidity and to study the association between acute and chronic diseases in acutely hospitalized older patients Methods: Prospective cohort study conducted between 2006 and 2008 in three teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. 639 patients aged 65 years

  8. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Reshetko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  9. Health professional perspectives on lifestyle behaviour change in the paediatric hospital setting: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Laura; Powell, Jane; Wordsworth, Sharon; Cummins, Carole

    2014-03-13

    Research exists examining the challenges of delivering lifestyle behaviour change initiatives in practice. However, at present much of this research has been conducted with primary care health professionals, or in acute adult hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators associated with implementing routine lifestyle behaviour change brief advice into practice in an acute children's hospital. Thirty-three health professionals (nurses, junior doctors, allied health professionals and clinical support staff) from inpatient and outpatient departments at a UK children's hospital were interviewed about their attitudes and beliefs towards supporting lifestyle behaviour change in hospital patients and their families. Responses were analysed using thematic framework analysis. Health professionals identified a range of barriers and facilitators to supporting lifestyle behaviour change in a children's hospital. These included (1) personal experience of effectiveness, (2) constraints associated with the hospital environment, (3) appropriateness of advice delivery given the patient's condition and care pathway and (4) job role priorities, and (5) perceived benefits of the advice given. Delivery of lifestyle behaviour change advice was often seen as an educational activity, rather than a behaviour change activity. Factors underpinning the successful delivery of routine lifestyle behaviour change support must be understood if this is to be implemented effectively in paediatric acute settings. This study reveals key areas where paediatric health professionals may need further support and training to achieve successful implementation.

  10. Acute IPPS - Disproportionate Share Hospital - DSH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — There are two methods for a hospital to qualify for the Medicare DSH adjustment. The primary method is for a hospital to qualify based on a statutory formula that...

  11. Basic clinical characteristics and hospital outcomes of acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Basic clinical characteristics and hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome patients - Sudan. A.M. Taha, H.O. Mirghani. Abstract. Background: There are Variation in the presentation of the acute coronary syndrome between countries. The present study aimed to investigate the basic clinical characteristics and ...

  12. Acute Perforated Peptic Ulcer at El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The pattern of peptic ulcer disease and its complications has changed during the last two to three decades. Objectives: To state the frequency of acute peptic ulcer perforations and outcomes of their management at El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan. Materials and Methods: This is an audit of patients with acute ...

  13. Dyspnea is a dangerous symptom in the pre-hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Kirkegaard, Hans; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht

    , resuscitation from cardiac arrest, acute dyspnea of unknown origin and other suspicion of STEMI. We hypothesize that unresolved dyspnea is an independent predictor of mortality in this prehospital setting and that the mortality is higher in patients with acute dyspnea of unknown origin than in patients......,204 (70%) of the patients, acute dyspnea of unknown origin in 1,461 (8 %), resuscitated from cardiac arrest in 163 (1%) and other suspicion of STEMI in 3,533 (20%). When adjusting for age, sex, systolic blood pressure and Charlson Comorbidity Index (p... with unresolved dyspnea than in patients with chest pain with a RR 2.55 (CI 2.09-3.10). This difference remained significant at 4 years with a RR of 1.34 (CI 1.24-1.45). Conclusion Acute dyspnea of unknown origin in the pre-hospital setting is an independent predictor of mortality and the mortality is higher than...

  14. acute leukemias immunophenotypes at agakhan university hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... specimens from patients suspected to have acute leukemia were analysed for cytomorphological characteristics ... Conclusion: Immunophenotyping of acute leukemia is beneficial in accurate diagnosis of patients with these ..... AML-M2 in both pediatric and adult population in. India(15). The proportion of ...

  15. Nurse odor perception in various Japanese hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Horiguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because unpleasant hospital odors affect the nursing environment, we investigated nurses' perceptions of the odors of various hospital settings: hospital rooms, nurse stations, and human waste disposal rooms to discard the urine, stools and diapers. A questionnaire based on the Japanese Ministry of the Environment's guidelines on odor index regulation was used to assess nurses' perceptions of odor intensity, comfort, tolerability, and description in the aforementioned settings. Questionnaires were distributed to nursing department directors at three Japanese hospitals, who then disseminated the questionnaires to nursing staff. Of the 1,151 questionnaires distributed, 496 nurses participated. Human waste disposal rooms had greater odor intensity and were perceived as more uncomfortable than the other settings. Unpleasant odors in disposal rooms, hospital rooms, and nurse stations were rated as slightly intolerable in comparison. Hospital and disposal rooms were mainly described as having a “pungent odor such as of urine and stool.” In contrast, nurse stations were described as having other unpleasant odors, such as chemical, human-body-related, or sewage-like odors. Given that nurses spend much of their time in hospital rooms and nurse stations, odor management in these two settings would likely improve nurses' working conditions at hospitals. Improving odors at nurse stations is feasible. Such improvements could have indirect effects on nurse turnover and burnout.

  16. Increase in hospital admissions for acute childhood asthma in Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine whether hospital admissions for acute childhood asthma were rising in Cape Town in line with the experience of other countries, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital's records for the period 1978 - 1990 were analysed. These were compared with total admissions for non-surgical causes and lower ...

  17. Acute inflammatory and anabolic systemic responses to peak and constant-work-rate exercise bout in hospitalized patients with COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Spruit, Martijn A; Troosters, Thierry; Gosselink, Rik; Kasran, Ahmad; Decramer, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Study objectives: To explore the acute systemic inflammatory and anabolic effects of cycling in hospital admitted patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in patients with clinically stable disease. Design: Cross-sectional comparative study. Setting: University Hospital Gasthuisberg, a tertiary care setting. Patients: 16 patients with clinically stable COPD (no acute exacerbation in the past 12 weeks; median age: 73 years (IQR: 60 to 75); median forced expiratory volume ...

  18. Acute stress impairs set-shifting but not reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, K A; Floresco, S B; Phillips, A G

    2013-09-01

    The ability to update and modify previously learned behavioral responses in a changing environment is essential for successful utilization of promising opportunities and for coping with adverse events. Valid models of cognitive flexibility that contribute to behavioral flexibility include set-shifting and reversal learning. One immediate effect of acute stress is the selective impairment of performance on higher-order cognitive control tasks mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not the hippocampus. Previous studies show that the mPFC is required for set-shifting but not for reversal learning, therefore the aim of the present experiment is to assess whether exposure to acute stress (15 min of mild tail-pinch stress) given immediately before testing on either a set-shifting or reversal learning tasks would impair performance selectively on the set-shifting task. An automated operant chamber-based task, confirmed that exposure to acute stress significantly disrupts set-shifting but has no effect on reversal learning. Rats exposed to an acute stressor require significantly more trials to reach criterion and make significantly more perseverative errors. Thus, these data reveal that an immediate effect of acute stress is to impair mPFC-dependent cognition selectively by disrupting the ability to inhibit the use of a previously relevant cognitive strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Comfort Measures Order Set at a Tertiary Care Academic Hospital: Is There a Comparable Difference in End-of-Life Care Between Patients Dying in Acute Care When CMOS Is Utilized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine; Stilos, Kalli; Nowell, Allyson; Lau, Fanchea; Moore, Jennifer; Wynnychuk, Lesia

    2018-04-01

    Standardized protocols have been previously shown to be helpful in managing end-of-life (EOL) care in hospital. The comfort measures order set (CMOS), a standardized framework for assessing imminently dying patients' symptoms and needs, was implemented at a tertiary academic hospital. We assessed whether there were comparable differences in the care of a dying patient when the CMOS was utilized and when it was not. A retrospective chart review was completed on patients admitted under oncology and general internal medicine, who were referred to the inpatient palliative care team for "EOL care" between February 2015 and March 2016. Of 83 patients, 56 (67%) received intiation of the CMOS and 27 (33%) did not for EOL care. There was significant involvement of spiritual care with the CMOS (66%), as compared to the group without CMOS (19%), P care, which was significantly less than the number of symptom management adjustments per patient when CMOS was not used (3.3), P care and assessment across the organization is still required.

  20. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Annmarie T; Jørgensen, Henrik; Jørsboe, Hanne Blæhr

    2016-01-01

    AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute...... and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013. MAIN VARIABLES: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators - of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used...... to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery) as well as time...

  1. Patient safety climate and worker safety behaviours in acute hospitals in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Cakil; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn

    2013-06-01

    To obtain a measure of hospital safety climate from a sample of National Health Service (NHS) acute hospitals in Scotland and to test whether these scores were associated with worker safety behaviors, and patient and worker injuries. Data were from 1,866 NHS clinical staff in six Scottish acute hospitals. A Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire measured hospital safety climate (Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture), worker safety behaviors, and worker and patient injuries. The associations between the hospital safety climate scores and the outcome measures (safety behaviors, worker and patient injury rates) were examined. Hospital safety climate scores were significantly correlated with clinical workers' safety behavior and patient and worker injury measures, although the effect sizes were smaller for the latter. Regression analyses revealed that perceptions of staffing levels and managerial commitment were significant predictors for all the safety outcome measures. Both patient-specific and more generic safety climate items were found to have significant impacts on safety outcome measures. This study demonstrated the influences of different aspects of hospital safety climate on both patient and worker safety outcomes. Moreover, it has been shown that in a hospital setting, a safety climate supporting safer patient care would also help to ensure worker safety. The Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire has proved to be a usable method of measuring both hospital safety climate as well as patient and worker safety outcomes. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Implementing managed alcohol programs in hospital settings: A review of academic and grey literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Hannah L; Kassam, Shehzad; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Hyshka, Elaine

    2018-01-18

    People with severe alcohol use disorders are at increased risk of poor acute-care outcomes, in part due to difficulties maintaining abstinence from alcohol while hospitalised. Managed alcohol programs (MAP), which administer controlled doses of beverage alcohol to prevent withdrawal and stabilise drinking patterns, are one strategy for increasing adherence to treatment, and improving health outcomes for hospital inpatients with severe alcohol use disorders. Minimal research has examined the implementation of MAPs in hospital settings. We conducted a scoping review to describe extant literature on MAPs in community settings, as well as the therapeutic provision of alcohol to hospital inpatients, to assess the feasibility of implementing formal MAPs in hospital settings and identify knowledge gaps requiring further study. Four academic and 10 grey literature databases were searched. Evidence was synthesised using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Forty-two studies met review inclusion criteria. Twenty-eight examined the administration of alcohol to hospital inpatients, with most reporting positive outcomes related to prevention or treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Fourteen studies examined MAPs in the community and reported that they help stabilise drinking patterns, reduce alcohol-related harms and facilitate non-judgemental health and social care. MAPs in the community have been well described and research has documented effective provision of alcohol in hospital settings for addressing withdrawal. Implementing MAPs as a harm reduction approach in hospital settings is potentially feasible. However, there remains a need to build off extant literature and develop and evaluate standardised MAP protocols tailored to acute-care settings. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  3. [The Torino Network Project. Global management of acute myocardial infarction from the field to the hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaccia, Michele; Sicuro, Marco; Scacciatella, Paolo

    2002-02-01

    A unidirectional clinical pathway for acute myocardial infarction from out-of-hospital setting to the coronary care unit and catheterization laboratory could lead to mortality reduction. The ongoing "Progetto Torino Network. Gestione globale dell'infarto miocardico acuto prime ore dal territorio all'ospedale" is based on this statement and described in the three-structural, diagnostic-therapeutical, multimedial issues. This project represents the historical evolution of our involvement in out-of-hospital cardiac emergency management.

  4. Acute poisoning in a children's hospital: a 2-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazen, L E; Lovejoy, F H; Crone, R K

    1986-02-01

    In a 2-year retrospective review, 90 patients were treated in a children's hospital for acute overdoses. In 90%, the history was the most important indicator of poisoning. On physical examination, 64% of patients were found to have altered sensorium, and 69% of cases were confirmed with a routine qualitative toxicology screening test. Accidental overdoses were most frequently due to ingestion of petroleum distillates, digoxin, carbamazepine, and theophylline. Suicidal patients ingested alcohol, barbiturates, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and aspirin. The majority of children with accidental overdoses received medical attention within 2 hours, but suicidal patients presented significantly later. Appropriate treatment with gastric lavage or emesis was used for 85% of patients on an emergency basis prior to admission. The inpatient therapy is based on continued gastrointestinal decontamination, basic organ system support, and monitoring for toxic effects and complications of therapy. Specific antidotes were available for only 10% of patients. In this study, 50% of patients were able to be discharged to their homes after one day of hospitalization. Pediatric patients treated in the intensive care unit incur less morbidity than adults in a similar setting. Adolescents who attempt suicide and are treated in the intensive care unit are likely to take prescription drugs in a similar manner as their adult counterparts.

  5. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassen AT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Annmarie T Lassen,1 Henrik Jørgensen,2 Hanne Blæhr Jørsboe,3,4 Annette Odby,5 Mikkel Brabrand,6 Jacob Steinmetz,7 Julie Mackenhauer,8 Hans Kirkegaard,8 Christian Fynbo Christiansen9 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 2Department of Surgery, Hospital of Northern Sjaelland, Hilleroed, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Nykobing F Hospital, 4Department of Hospital Administration, Nykobing F Hospital, Nykøbing Falster, 5The Danish Clinical Registers, Registry Support Centre for Health Quality and Informatics, Aarhus, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Hospital of South West Jutland, Esbjerg, 7Department of Anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 8Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University, 9Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim for database: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts.Study population: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013.Main variables: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators – of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery as well as time for triage and physician judgment. Data are currently gathered from The Danish National Patient Registry, two existing databases (Danish Stroke Register and Danish Database for Emergency Surgery, and will

  6. Variability of patient safety culture in Belgian acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Schrooten, Ward; Wami, Welcome; Aerts, Marc; Barrado, Leandro Garcia; Claes, Neree; Hellings, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to measure differences in safety culture perceptions within Belgian acute hospitals and to examine variability based on language, work area, staff position, and work experience. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed to hospitals participating in the national quality and safety program (2007-2009). Hospitals were invited to participate in a comparative study. Data of 47,136 respondents from 89 acute hospitals were used for quantitative analysis. Percentages of positive response were calculated on 12 dimensions. Generalized estimating equations models were fitted to explore differences in safety culture. Handoffs and transitions, staffing, and management support for patient safety were considered as major problem areas. Dutch-speaking hospitals had higher odds of positive perceptions for most dimensions in comparison with French-speaking hospitals. Safety culture scores were more positive for respondents working in pediatrics, psychiatry, and rehabilitation compared with the emergency department, operating theater, and multiple hospital units. We found an important gap in safety culture perceptions between leaders and assistants within disciplines. Administration and middle management had lower perceptions toward patient safety. Respondents working less than 1 year in the current hospital had more positive safety culture perceptions in comparison with all other respondents. Large comparative databases provide the opportunity to identify distinct high and low scoring groups. In our study, language, work area, and profession were identified as important safety culture predictors. Years of experience in the hospital had only a small effect on safety culture perceptions.

  7. Dilemma in the emergency setting: hypomagnesemia mimicking acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, María; Martinez-Rodriguez, Laura; Larrosa-Campo, Davinia; Calleja, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Stroke mimics may account for up to 30% of all acute stroke consultations. However, in the emergency setting, accurate diagnosis is not always possible. Case report and review of the literature. A 73-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with acute aphasia and right hemiparesis. The National Institute of Health Stroke Score was 21, compatible with severe stroke, so she received thrombolysis. Laboratory testing demonstrated severe hypomagnesemia. She had been taking proton pump inhibitors for years and neuroimaging did not demonstrate signs of acute ischemic disease. After correcting the metabolic alterations with intravenous and oral supplemental magnesium, the patient was discharged asymptomatic. No further episodes have been registered to date. Hypomagnesemia might cause acute neurological symptoms that could be confused with stroke. A careful history is essential for diagnosis but suspicion of stroke mimic should not prevent tPA administration.

  8. Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute respiratory infections are the commonest cause of acute morbidity in children especially those under five in the developing countries. Clinical diagnosis is of utmost importance considering the unavailability of radiological and microbiological services in most primary care settings in most developing ...

  9. [Management of avoidable acute transfers from an intermediate care geriatric facility to acute hospitals: critical aspects of an intervention protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colprim, Daniel; Casco, Mónica; Malumbres, Jennifer; Rodríguez, Ginés; Inzitari, Marco

    The unplanned transfers (UT) from post-acute intermediate care facilities, are associated with adverse outcomes for patients, and a significant cost to the system. We present a practical protocol and the design of an intervention study aimed at reducing avoidable UT from a geriatric post-acute rehabilitation setting to acute care hospitals. A quasi-experimental non randomized study. The intervention consists in: 1) protocol for early detection of symptoms in order to conduct a pro-active management of decompensation; 2) an advanced care planning structured protocol for the acute decompensations. We will compare the intervention group with a parallel and a historical cohort for demographic, functional, cognitive, comorbidity and social variables. number of UT to acute care hospitals. This is a quasi-experimental study, focused on everyday care practice that intends to assess the impact of multi-disciplinary and multi-factorial intervention to reduce UT from a post-acute rehabilitation unit. We expect that the project results will be useful for future randomized and controlled studies. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional Measures for Fall Risk in the Acute Care Setting: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Alaina M; Siu, Ka-Chun; Honaker, Julie A

    2017-04-01

    This review explores the evidence pertaining to the use of functional ability measures for fall risk in the acute care setting. We included studies from six bibliographic databases that investigated fall risk functional ability measures in hospitalized older adults (≥55 years). We utilized the following search terms: acute care, subacute care, critical care, inpatient, fall, and fall prevention. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Timed "Up and Go" (TUG) was identified as a feasible fall risk functional ability measure for clinicians; it demonstrated clinical performance of fair sensitivity (56%-68%) and good specificity (74%-80%). Clinical performance of other measures (Berg Balance Scale and Functional Reach test) was not as favorable as the TUG. Functional ability measures are underutilized in the acute care setting, potentially due to limited knowledge and training on administration. Combining functional measures with subjective screening tools may optimize performance and accuracy of identifying fall risk identification.

  11. Method for Assigning Priority Levels in Acute Care (MAPLe-AC predicts outcomes of acute hospital care of older persons - a cross-national validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljunggren Gunnar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous risk factors for adverse outcomes for older persons after an acute hospital stay have been identified, a decision making tool combining all available information in a clinically meaningful way would be helpful for daily hospital practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Method for Assigning Priority Levels for Acute Care (MAPLe-AC to predict adverse outcomes in acute care for older people and to assess its usability as a decision making tool for discharge planning. Methods Data from a prospective multicenter study in five Nordic acute care hospitals with information from admission to a one year follow-up of older acute care patients were compared with a prospective study of acute care patients from admission to discharge in eight hospitals in Canada. The interRAI Acute Care assessment instrument (v1.1 was used for data collection. Data were collected during the first 24 hours in hospital, including pre-morbid and admission information, and at day 7 or at discharge, whichever came first. Based on this information a crosswalk was developed from the original MAPLe algorithm for home care settings to acute care (MAPLe-AC. The sample included persons 75 years or older who were admitted to acute internal medical services in one hospital in each of the five Nordic countries (n = 763 or to acute hospital care either internal medical or combined medical-surgical services in eight hospitals in Ontario, Canada (n = 393. The outcome measures considered were discharge to home, discharge to institution or death. Outcomes in a 1-year follow-up in the Nordic hospitals were: living at home, living in an institution or death, and survival. Logistic regression with ROC curves and Cox regression analyses were used in the analyses. Results Low and mild priority levels of MAPLe-AC predicted discharge home and high and very high priority levels predicted adverse outcome at discharge both in the Nordic

  12. Therapy of Acute Hypertension in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tennille N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment target, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and propose treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios. PMID:24522943

  13. The costs of acute readmissions to a different hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Kongstad, Line Planck

    2017-01-01

    in costs between different-hospital readmissions and same-hospital readmissions within the same DRG. Secondly, to investigate whether the effect of different-hospital readmission on costs vary depending of provider type (general versus teaching hospital). We use a rich Danish patient-level administrative...... to a different hospital. The change in hospital indicates that a progression of the illness has occurred since the initial hospitalisation. As a result, different-hospital readmissions might be more costly compared to same-hospital admissions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to analyse differences...... data set covering inpatient stays in the period 2008–2010. We exploit the fact that some patients are readmitted within the same DRG and that some of these readmissions occur at different hospitals in a propensity score difference-in-difference design. The estimates are based on a restricted sample...

  14. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  15. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both unadjusted and adjusted time to event analyses, patients with pneumonia + acute kidney injury

  16. Epidemiology of acute organophosphate poisoning in hospital emergency room patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Chandrabhan; Jaga, Kushik

    2005-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning is a major health issue in developing countries. Organophosphate insecticides inhibit cholinesterase (ChE) enzymatic activity, thereby eliciting cholinergic signs and symptoms. Victims of OP poisoning require immediate hospital emergency room (ER) treatment to prevent a fatal outcome. We present an epidemiologic review of acute OP poisoning in hospital ER patients. Areas of interest include countries with acute OP poisoning, nature of exposure, gender and age of patients, clinical cholinergic features, ChE activity, and health outcome, including recovery rate, case fatality rate, and post-ER complications. The review comprises case reports, hospital surveys, and clinical studies on acute OP poisoning. More studies were conducted in developed than in developing countries. Suicidal and occupational OP poisoning in agricultural workers was prevalent in developing countries, whereas accidental OP poisoning was prevalent in developed countries. Healthcare workers in the ER were also affected by OP poisoning. Both males and females were affected. Children accounted for 35% of the OP-poisoned victims. Patients presented with a classic cholinergic syndrome and serum ChE depresssion, with a recovery rate above 90%. Neurologic impairment was the most frequent complication. Preventing environmental OP exposure and increasing the awareness of pesticide toxicity would reduce acute OP poisoning and protect human health.

  17. Computerized Testing in a Hospital Setting: Psychometric and Psychological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Leif; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This Swedish study sought to evaluate a touch-screen computer-based (CB) test administration system in a hospital setting in comparison with paper-and-pencil administrative routine. Patients were given psychometric tests (involving depression, mood, and intelligence measurement) in both formats. Patient pleasantness, activation, and calmness were…

  18. Recent temporal trends in the presentation, management, and outcome of women hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbag, Avi; Matetzky, Shlomi; Gottlieb, Shmuel; Fefer, Paul; Kohanov, Orly; Atar, Shaul; Zahger, Doron; Porter, Avital; Koifman, Bella; Goldenberg, Ilan; Segev, Amit

    2015-04-01

    Few data exist on the recent trends in the outcome of women hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome. We examined temporal trends in the hospital management and outcomes of women hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome in a real-world setting. We evaluated time-dependent changes in the clinical characteristics, management strategies, and outcomes of women enrolled in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Surveys (ACSIS) between 2000 and 2010. Periods were categorized as early (2000-2004) and late (2006-2010). Among 11,536 patients enrolled in ACSIS, 2710 (24%) were women. Frequency of women presenting with acute coronary syndrome had declined from 25% in 2000 to 22% in 2010 (P for trend = .002). Women presented less frequently with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and more frequently with associated comorbidities (P change in time to admission among women hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome, temporal change in management strategies over the last decade may have contributed to improved outcomes in this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Failure to Regain Function at 3 months After Acute Hospital Admission Predicts Institutionalization Within 12 Months in Older Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegijs, Erja; Buurman, Bianca M.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To study the effects of functional decline on admission to long-term institutionalized care within 12 months from acute hospital admission. Design: Pooled analyses of 3 longitudinal cohorts. Setting: Tertiary and secondary hospital. Participants: A total of 1085 community-dwelling

  20. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A PERIPHERAL TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Karunahara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES Acute pancreatitis (AP is one of the most common diseases in gastroenterology. Two percent of all patients admitted to hospital are diagnosed with AP. During the last decade, an increasing incidence was observed, mostly because of a higher sensitivity of diagnostic tests. Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis is still symptomatic and no specific medication is available today. As a result of popular belief that the pancreas should be put to rest during acute pancreatitis, the parenteral route for nutrition is still predominantly used in Acute Pancreatitis. There has been increasing evidence; however, about gut being main source of microorganisms causing infectious pancreatic complications and multiorgan failure. In patients with severe pancreatitis, oral intake is inhibited by nausea and subileus. Although some reports show that enteral feeding is possible in acute pancreatitis and associated with fewer septic complications. Although the evidence is inconclusive to support enteral nutrition in all patients with severe acute pancreatitis, the enteral route may be used if tolerated. Supportive treatment is the most important line of management in acute pancreatitis. The aim is to study the management of acute pancreatitis in a peripheral tertiary hospital and to assess the outcome of the management. METHODS & MATERIALS Data Collection: Patients with acute abdominal pain are admitted in hospital and diagnosed as acute pancreatitis based on blood investigations and radiological findings. Patients categorised- Revised Atlanta Classification. Different medical management modes followed and outcomes recorded, tabulated and analysed. Research Design: Retrospective study. Research Settings: Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Government Hospital, Trichy, Tamilnadu. Duration: 5 yrs. (2010-2015 Sample Size: 186. Inclusion Criteria: Patients between 12 and 75 yrs. of age, patients admitted to the hospital as a case of acute pancreatitis, both sexes

  1. Quality indicators for integrated care of dysphagia in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Danielle Pedroni; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a panel of quality indicators for the management of swallowing rehabilitation (SR) therapy in a hospital setting. There were four stages in developing these indicators: identifying procedures to be managed; generating indicators and standardizing data collection; identifying the correlation among indicators; and formulating the panel of indicators. The following 12 quality indicators were developed: swallowing evaluation index; individual care index; speech-language pathologist (SLP) care index; number of assisted patients index; severity rate; swallowing diagnosis rate per hospital unit; swallowing rehabilitation demand index; time until first swallowing evaluation; SLP index per hospital bed; time until removal of feeding tube; time until reintroduction of oral feeding; and time until decannulation. The proposed indicators were designed to improve the management of dysphagia in a hospital setting. Measuring these indicators is essential to understanding the patient's needs and providing quality care. Managing care using these indicators will make it easier to track the patient's rehabilitation process, measure the effectiveness of new therapeutic processes and technologies, and evaluate the performance of hospital units relative to other providers in the area. The management of SR using quality indicators allows the effectiveness and efficiency of rehabilitation programs to be clearly evaluated.

  2. Nurses' workarounds in acute healthcare settings: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Deborah S; Greenfield, David; Travaglia, Joanne F; Long, Janet C; Black, Deborah; Johnson, Julie; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-05-11

    Workarounds circumvent or temporarily 'fix' perceived workflow hindrances to meet a goal or to achieve it more readily. Behaviours fitting the definition of workarounds often include violations, deviations, problem solving, improvisations, procedural failures and shortcuts. Clinicians implement workarounds in response to the complexity of delivering patient care. One imperative to understand workarounds lies in their influence on patient safety. This paper assesses the peer reviewed empirical evidence available on the use, proliferation, conceptualisation, rationalisation and perceived impact of nurses' use of workarounds in acute care settings. A literature assessment was undertaken in 2011-2012. Snowballing technique, reference tracking, and a systematic search of twelve academic databases were conducted to identify peer reviewed published studies in acute care settings examining nurses' workarounds. Selection criteria were applied across three phases. 58 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Using an analytic frame, these studies were interrogated for: workarounds implemented in acute care settings by nurses; factors contributing to the development and proliferation of workarounds; the perceived impact of workarounds; and empirical evidence of nurses' conceptualisation and rationalisation of workarounds. The majority of studies examining nurses' workarounds have been published since 2008, predominantly in the United States. Studies conducted across a variety of acute care settings use diverse data collection methods. Nurses' workarounds, primarily perceived negatively, are both individually and collectively enacted. Organisational, work process, patient-related, individual, social and professional factors contribute to the proliferation of workarounds. Group norms, local and organisational culture, 'being competent', and collegiality influence the implementation of workarounds. Workarounds enable, yet potentially compromise, the execution of

  3. A Survey of Acute Pain Service Structure and Function in United States Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawood Nasir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the number of U.S. hospitals offering an acute pain service (APS is increasing, the typical structure remains unknown. This survey was undertaken to describe the structure and function of the APS in U.S. hospitals only. We contacted 200 non-teaching and 101 teaching U.S. hospitals. The person in charge of postoperative pain management completed and returned the survey. Seventy-four percent of responding hospitals had an organized APS. An APS was significantly more formally organized in academic/teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching hospitals. Pain assessments included “pain at rest” (97%, “pain on activity” (63%, and reassessment after pain therapy intervention (88.8%. Responding hospitals utilized postoperative pain protocols significantly more commonly in teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching and VA hospitals. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IV-PCA was managed most commonly by surgeons (75%, while epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve block infusions were exclusively managed by anesthesiologists. For improved analgesia, 62% allowed RNs to adjust the IV-PCA settings within set parameters, 43% allowed RN adjustment of epidural infusion rates, and 21% allowed RN adjustment of peripheral nerve catheter local anesthetic infusion rates.

  4. The importance of clinical leadership in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available John Daly,1 Debra Jackson,1 Judy Mannix,2 Patricia M Davidson,1,3 Marie Hutchinson4 1Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS, Sydney, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3School of Nursing, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia Abstract: In many areas of the developed world, contemporary hospital care is confronted by workforce challenges, changing consumer expectations and demands, fiscal constraints, increasing demands for access to care, a mandate to improve patient centered care, and issues concerned with levels of quality and safety of health care. Effective governance is crucial to efforts to maximize effective management of care in the hospital setting. Emerging from this complex literature is the role of leadership in the clinical setting. The importance of effective clinical leadership in ensuring a high quality health care system that consistently provides safe and efficient care has been reiterated in the scholarly literature and in various government reports. Recent inquiries, commissions, and reports have promoted clinician engagement and clinical leadership as critical to achieving and sustaining improvements to care quality and patient safety. In this discursive paper, we discuss clinical leadership in health care, consider published definitions of clinical leadership, synthesize the literature to describe the characteristics, qualities, or attributes required to be an effective clinical leader, consider clinical leadership in relation to hospital care, and discuss the facilitators and barriers to effective clinical leadership in the hospital sector. Despite the widespread recognition of the importance of effective clinical leadership to patient outcomes, there are some quite considerable barriers to participation in clinical leadership. Future strategies should aim to address these barriers so as to

  5. Internet usage and potential impact for acute care hospitals: survey in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    1998-12-01

    These survey results are from a national survey of acute care hospitals. A random sample of 813 hospitals was selected with 115 responding and 33 incorrect addresses resulting in a 15% response rate. The purpose of the study was to measure the extent of information systems integration in the financial, medical, and administrative systems of the hospitals. Internet usage including homepages and advertising was measured. Other selected telecommunication applications are analyzed. As demonstration projects from the literature are compared to the survey results, the potential for hospitals is tremendous. Resulting cost savings could be equally impressive. This information will provide a benchmark for hospitals to determine their position relative to Internet technology and to set goals.

  6. Dialysis-Requiring Acute Kidney Injury among Hospitalized Adults with Documented Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Nationwide Inpatient Sample Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint; Simoes, Priya K; Yacoub, Rabi; Annapureddy, Narender; Kamat, Sunil; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Perumalswami, Ponni; Branch, Andrea; Coca, Steven G; Wyatt, Christina M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may cause kidney injury, particularly in the setting of cryoglobulinemia or cirrhosis; however, few studies have evaluated the epidemiology of acute kidney injury in patients with HCV. We aimed to describe national temporal trends of incidence and impact of severe AKI requiring renal replacement (“dialysis-requiring AKI”) in hospitalized adults with HCV. We extracted our study cohort from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project using data from 2004–2012. We defined HCV and dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury based on previously validated ICD-9-CM codes. We analyzed temporal changes in the proportion of hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring AKI and utilized survey multivariable logistic regression models to estimate its impact on in-hospital mortality. We identified a total of 4,603,718 adult hospitalizations with an associated diagnosis of HCV from 2004–2012, of which 51,434 (1.12%) were complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury. The proportion of hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury increased significantly from 0.86% in 2004 to 1.28% in 2012. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury vs. those without (27.38% vs. 2.95%; adjusted odds ratio 2.09, 95% Confidence Interval 1.74–2.51). The proportion of HCV hospitalizations complicated by dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury increased significantly between 2004–2012. Similar to observations in the general population, dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury was associated with a two-fold increase in odds of in-hospital mortality in adults with HCV. These results highlight the burden of acute kidney injury in hospitalized adults with HCV infection. PMID:26189719

  7. Predicting In-Hospital Mortality in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yong; Du, Xin; Rogers, Kris D; Wu, Yangfeng; Gao, Runlin; Patel, Anushka

    2017-10-01

    Currently available risk scores (RSs) were derived from populations with very few participants from China. We aimed to develop an RS based on data from patients with acute coronary syndrome in China and to compare its performance with the commonly promoted Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) RS. Clinical Pathways for Acute Coronary Syndromes-Phase 2 was a trial of a quality improvement intervention in China. Patients recruited from 75 hospitals from October 2007 to August 2010 were divided into training and validation sets based on immediate or delayed implementation. A Clinical Pathways for Acute Coronary Syndromes (CPACS) RS for in-hospital mortality was developed separately by gender, using the training set (6,790 patients). Discrimination and calibration of the CPACS RS and GRACE RS were compared on the validation set (3,801 patients). Although discrimination of the GRACE RS was acceptable, this was improved with the CPACS RS (c-statistic 0.82 vs 0.87, p = 0.012 for men; c-statistic 0.78 vs 0.85, p = 0.006 for women). The absolute bias was significantly lower with CPACS RS for both genders (7.6% vs 97.5% in men and 21.5% vs 77.2% in women), compared with the GRACE RS, which systematically overestimated risk. The CPACS RS underestimated risk in women, but only in those already above threshold levels currently used to define a clinical high-risk population. In conclusion, the GRACE RS substantially overestimates the risk of in-hospital death in patients presenting to the hospital with a suspected acute coronary syndrome in China. We have developed and independently validated a new RS utilizing data from Chinese patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Care of children with medical complexity in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher J; Simon, Tamara D

    2014-07-01

    Children with medical complexity are a subset of patients with special health care needs whose "health and quality of life depend on integrating health care between a primary care medical home, tertiary care services, and other important loci of care such as transitional care facilities, rehabilitation units, the home, the school, and other community based settings," according to Cohen et al. These children are characterized by (1) substantial health care service needs, (2) one or more severe chronic clinical condition(s), (3) severe functional limitations, and (4) high projected use of health resources that may include frequent or prolonged hospitalization, multiple surgeries, or the ongoing involvement of multiple subspecialty services and providers. Children with medical complexity are an important population for pediatric hospitalists, particularly those practicing in tertiary care settings. Recent studies describe the increasing prevalence of complex chronic conditions among all pediatric hospitalizations in the United States. This article reviews the definitions of children with medical complexity and recent studies describing the changes in hospital utilization for this group. We discuss issues in their inpatient care, including (1) intensive care coordination needs, (2) critical decision-making that occurs in the inpatient setting, (3) common clinical issues that occur with technology dependence (tracheostomies, feeding tubes, and cerebrospinal fluid shunts), and (4) common reasons for admission (eg, perioperative care, aspiration pneumonia, seizures, and feeding intolerance). Finally, we present a few important clinical questions regarding inpatient care for children with medical complexity that will require research in the coming years. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Smoking restrictions and hospitalization for acute coronary events in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D.; Demidenko, Eugene; Malenka, David J.; Li, Zhongze; Gohlke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of smoking restrictions in Germany on coronary syndromes and their associated costs. Methods and results All German states implemented laws partially restricting smoking in the public and hospitality sectors between August 2007 and July 2008. We conducted a before-and-after study to examine trends for the hospitalization rate for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) for an insurance cohort of 3,700,384 individuals 30 years and older. Outcome measures were hospitalization rates for coronary syndromes, and hospitalization costs. Mean age of the cohort was 56 years, and two-thirds were female. Some 2.2 and 1.1% persons were hospitalized for angina pectoris and AMI, respectively, during the study period from January 2004 through December 2008. Law implementation was associated with a 13.3% (95% confidence interval 8.2, 18.4) decline in angina pectoris and an 8.6% (5.0, 12.2) decline in AMI after 1 year. Hospitalization costs also decreased significantly for the two conditions—9.6% (2.5, 16.6) for angina pectoris and 20.1% (16.0, 24.2) for AMI at 1 year following law implementation. Assuming the law caused the observed declines, it prevented 1,880 hospitalizations and saved 7.7 million Euros in costs for this cohort during the year following law implementation. Conclusions Partial smoking restrictions in Germany were followed by reductions in hospitalization for angina pectoris and AMI, declines that continued through 1 year following these laws and resulted in substantial cost savings. Strengthening the laws could further reduce morbidity and costs from acute coronary syndromes in Germany. PMID:22350716

  10. CQI in the acute care setting: an opportunity to influence acute care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Helen F; Fallone, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is a tool and a methodology that allows nephrology nurses to monitor, evaluate, and creatively improve their working environment. Using an established, consistent, and easily understood format enables information sharing and facilitates progress toward establishing best practice guidelines and standards. Strengthening the nursing knowledge base improves the care provided to patients, which improves outcomes. Use of CQI methods can facilitate better processes, which in turn influence acute care practice. The cycle and the process never end since new knowledge is critical to provide the best care to patients. The Acute Care SIG will continue the PDCA cycle to Act in response to the changing needs of patients in the acute care setting and to our membership in the acute care arena.

  11. Amplified hearing device use in acute care settings for patients with hearing loss: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Amber R; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Jenerette, Coretta M; Hughart, Kimberly M; Jenkins, Wendy W; Hsu, Wesley

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using amplified hearing devices (AHD) in acute care settings for patients with hearing loss. Secondary objectives include patient and nurse satisfaction, and nursing perceived productivity. Twenty-five adult hard of hearing patients and 15 nurses were evaluated. Patients with a perceived hearing handicap were identified through the Hearing Handicap for the Elderly Screening Version. Patient and staff nurse surveys were used to assess for satisfaction with using the AHD. Nurses were surveyed to evaluate whether they felt the AHD made patient communication more efficient and effective. Twenty-four patients expressed satisfaction with the AHD and would use it in future hospitalizations. Nurses also reported satisfaction, perceived improvement of patient communication and decreased time spent communicating with patients. Results demonstrate the feasibility of using an AHD in acute care inpatient settings where elderly hard of hearing patients are common. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Hospital Medicine (Part 1): what is wrong with acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    Modern hospitals are facing several challenges and, over the last decade in particular, many of these institutions have become dysfunctional. Paradoxically as medicine has become more successful the demand for acute hospital care has increased, yet there is no consensus on what conditions or complaints require hospital admission and there is wide variation in the mortality rates, length of stay and possibly standards of care between different units. Most acutely ill patients are elderly and instead of one straightforward diagnosis are more likely to have a complex combination of multiple co-morbid conditions. Any elderly patient admitted to hospital is at considerable risk which must be balanced against the possible benefits. Although most of the patients in hospital die from only approximately ten diagnoses, obvious life saving treatment is often delayed by a junior doctor in-training first performing an exhaustive complete history and physical, and then ordering a number of investigations before consulting a senior colleague. Following this traditional hierarchy delays care with several "futile cycles" of clinical activity thoughtlessly directed at the patient without any benefit being delivered. If acute hospital medicine is to be improved changes in traditional assumptions, attitudes, beliefs and practices are needed.

  13. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy: a geriatric experience in the acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, F; Zuccalà, G; Bernabei, R; Cocchi, A; Manigrasso, L; Tafani, A; De Angelis, G; Carbonin, P U

    1997-01-01

    The continuously growing segment of the geriatric population with the high incidence and prevalence of comorbidity and disability suggests that enhanced preventive and rehabilitative programs will be mandatory. The early arrangement of comprehensive assessment and rehabilitation services is extremely important not only in preventing the decline of patients in the acute care settings and successive prolonged care before discharge, but also in improving functional status at discharge. We have considered the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program in acute medical care of the elderly. This article discusses a pilot project being carried out at Catholic University Hospital "A. Gemelli" of Rome.

  14. Antimicrobial Stewardship in Acute Care Centres: A Survey of 68 Hospitals in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Nault

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and quantitative monitoring of antimicrobial use are required to ensure that antimicrobials are used appropriately in the acute care setting, and have the potential to reduce costs and limit the spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms and Clostridium difficile. Currently, it is not known what proportion of Quebec hospitals have an ASP and/or monitor antimicrobial use.

  15. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah R. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding or improvements to the management of AKI.

  16. Environmental cleaning resources and activities in Canadian acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutman, Dick E; Ford, B Douglas; Sopha, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Environmental cleaning interventions have increased cleaning effectiveness and reduced antibiotic-resistant organisms in hospitals. This study examined cleaning in Canadian acute care hospitals with the goal of developing strategies to improve cleaning and reduce antibiotic-resistant organism rates. Managers most responsible for environmental services (EVS) completed an extensive online survey that assessed EVS resources and cleaning practices. The response rate was 50.5%; 96 surveys were completed, representing 103 of 204 hospitals. Whereas 86.3% (82/95) of managers responsible for EVS reported their staff was adequately trained and 76.0% (73/96) that supplies and equipment budgets were sufficient, only 46.9% (45/96) reported that EVS had enough personnel to satisfactorily clean their hospital. A substantial minority (36.8%, 35/95) of EVS departments did not audit the cleaning of medical surgical patient rooms on at least a monthly basis. Cleaning audits of medical surgical patient rooms frequently included environmental marking methods in only one third (33.3%, 31/93) of hospitals and frequently included the measurement of residual bioburden in only 13.8% (13/94). There was a general need for increased and improved auditing of environmental cleaning in Canadian hospitals, and there were perceived EVS staffing deficits in the majority of hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Factors associated with hospitalization of children with acute odontogenic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klačar Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the sociodemographic and clinical features of odontogenic infections between hospitalized and nonhospitalized children and to show what were the risk factors in children that could predict the course of odontogenic infection and indicate the need for hospital treatment. The design of our study was of the case-control type. The two study groups consisted of 70 inpatients and 35 outpatients with odontogenic infections who were treated at Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Clinical Center in Kragujevac, Serbia. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected retrospectively from patients' hospital records. The following characteristics were significantly associated with hospital treatment of children with acute odontogenic infection: living in a village (OR =7.26,[1.43-36.96], multi-spatial infection (OR =0.04, [0.00-0.91], and affection of upper face (OR = 0.01, [0.00-0.86]. Tooth extraction was important intervention in the treatment regimen and reduced frequency of hospitalization (OR=0.07, [0.01-0.70]. The differences between hospitalized and non-hospitalized children were not significant in regard to: ethnicity, employment of parents, anatomical region of infection, side of the facial infection, source of infection (posterior or anterior deciduous or permanent teeth, and treatment (drainage and incision, oral or parenteral antibiotics. In children with acute odontogenic infection it is necessary to do tooth extraction in timely manner, especially if the source of infection is tooth from upper jaw and if it is multi-spatial infection.

  19. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennerby, Cathy; Joyce, Pauline

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children's hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about 'near misses', parental dissatisfaction, perceived competency weaknesses and rising cost associated with their use. [Young's (2009) Journal of Organisational Change, 22, 524-548] nine-stage change framework was used to guide the implementation of the competency assessment tool within a paediatric acute care setting. The ongoing success of the initiative, from a nurse manager's perspective, relies on structured communication with the agency provider before employing competent agency nurses. Sustainability of the change will depend on nurse managers' persistence in attending the concerns of those resisting the change while simultaneously supporting those championing the change. These key communication and supporting roles highlight the pivotal role held by nurse managers, as gate keepers, in safe-guarding children while in hospital. Leadership qualities of nurse managers will also be challenged in continuing to manage and drive the change where resistance might prevail. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Nurses’ workarounds in acute healthcare settings: a scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Workarounds circumvent or temporarily ‘fix’ perceived workflow hindrances to meet a goal or to achieve it more readily. Behaviours fitting the definition of workarounds often include violations, deviations, problem solving, improvisations, procedural failures and shortcuts. Clinicians implement workarounds in response to the complexity of delivering patient care. One imperative to understand workarounds lies in their influence on patient safety. This paper assesses the peer reviewed empirical evidence available on the use, proliferation, conceptualisation, rationalisation and perceived impact of nurses’ use of workarounds in acute care settings. Methods A literature assessment was undertaken in 2011–2012. Snowballing technique, reference tracking, and a systematic search of twelve academic databases were conducted to identify peer reviewed published studies in acute care settings examining nurses’ workarounds. Selection criteria were applied across three phases. 58 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Using an analytic frame, these studies were interrogated for: workarounds implemented in acute care settings by nurses; factors contributing to the development and proliferation of workarounds; the perceived impact of workarounds; and empirical evidence of nurses’ conceptualisation and rationalisation of workarounds. Results The majority of studies examining nurses’ workarounds have been published since 2008, predominantly in the United States. Studies conducted across a variety of acute care settings use diverse data collection methods. Nurses’ workarounds, primarily perceived negatively, are both individually and collectively enacted. Organisational, work process, patient-related, individual, social and professional factors contribute to the proliferation of workarounds. Group norms, local and organisational culture, ‘being competent’, and collegiality influence the implementation of workarounds. Conclusion

  1. Handheld echocardiography during hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Michael W; Geske, Jeffrey B; Anavekar, Nandan S; Askew, J Wells; Lewis, Bradley R; Oh, Jae K

    2017-11-01

    Handheld echocardiography (HHE) is concordant with standard transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a variety of settings but has not been thoroughly compared to traditional TTE in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Completed by experienced operators, HHE provides accurate diagnostic capabilities compared with standard TTE in AMI patients. This study prospectively enrolled patients admitted to the coronary care unit with AMI. Experienced sonographers performed HHE with a V-scan. All patients underwent clinical TTE. Each HHE was interpreted by 2 experts blinded to standard TTE. Agreement was assessed with κ statistics and concordance correlation coefficients. Analysis included 82 patients (mean age, 66 years; 74% male). On standard TTE, mean left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction was 46%. Correlation coefficients between HHE and TTE were 0.75 (95% confidence interval: 0.66 to 0.82) for LV ejection fraction and 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.58 to 0.77) for wall motion score index. The κ statistics ranged from 0.47 to 0.56 for LV enlargement, 0.55 to 0.79 for mitral regurgitation, and 0.44 to 0.57 for inferior vena cava dilatation. The κ statistics were highest for the anterior (0.81) and septal (0.71) apex and lowest for the mid inferolateral (0.36) and basal inferoseptal (0.36) walls. In patients with AMI, HHE and standard TTE demonstrate good correlation for LV function and wall motion. Agreement was less robust for structural abnormalities and specific wall segments. In experienced hands, HHE can provide a focused assessment of LV function in patients hospitalized with AMI; however, HHE should not substitute for comprehensive TTE. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, A

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +\\/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +\\/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +\\/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +\\/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.

  3. Ingestive Skill Difficulties are Frequent Among Acutely-Hospitalized Frail Elderly Patients, and Predict Hospital Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Faber, Jens Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Purpose : To examine the relationship between ingestive skill performance while eating and drinking and frailty status in acutely-hospitalized elderly patients and to examine whether there is a relationship between the proportion of ingestive skill difficulties and Length of Hospital Stay (LOS.......0%). When adjusting for frailty status, difficulties in self-feeding and texture management were related to prolonged LOS, and difficulties in positioning and liquid ingestion were related to discharge to institutional care. Conclusion : Ingestive skill difficulties among acutely-hospitalized frail elderly...... patients were frequent and characterized by great complexity. This necessitates a broad range of management strategies related to the patients’ ability in positioning, self-feeding skills, as well as oropharyngeal sensorimotor skills. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.3109/02703181.2012.736019...

  4. Falls in hospital and new placement in a nursing home among older people hospitalized with acute illness

    OpenAIRE

    Basic D; Hartwell TJ

    2015-01-01

    David Basic,1 Tabitha J Hartwell2 1Department of Geriatric Medicine, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shoalhaven District Memorial Hospital, Nowra, NSW, Australia Purpose: To examine the association between falls in hospital and new placement in a nursing home among older people hospitalized with acute illness.Materials and methods: This prospective cohort study of 2,945 consecutive patients discharged alive from an acute geri...

  5. Asian patients with Hinchey Ia acute diverticulitis: a condition for the ambulatory setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Dedrick Kok Hong; Tan, Ker-Kan

    2018-01-01

    Diverticulitis in Asians is a different disease entity from Western counterparts. Few Asian studies have evaluated the management of acute Hinchey Ia diverticulitis with consideration for outpatient management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of Asian patients with Hinchey Ia acute diverticulitis. A retrospective review of all patients who were treated for Hinchey Ia acute colonic diverticulitis between 2012 and 2014 was performed. All patients were diagnosed on computed tomography (CT). There were 129 patients with Hinchey Ia acute diverticulitis. Fifty-five (42.6%) patients were male, and the median age was 54 years (range, 30-86). Eighty-seven (67.4%) patients had right-sided diverticulitis. Most patients were treated empirically with intravenous ceftriaxone and metronidazole (89.1%). They were then discharged with oral antibiotics. Only 6.1% of patients had a positive blood culture. The median length of stay in the hospital was 4 (range, 3-4) days. Only three (2.3%) patients were readmitted for acute diverticulitis within 30 days. They were managed with antibiotics and discharged well. The repeated CT scans reconfirmed Hinchey Ia diverticulitis. No patients required emergency surgery, and there were no 30-day mortalities. Asian patients with Hinchey Ia diverticulitis recovered well with conservative management and could be amenable to outpatient therapy. Future prospective studies should be performed amongst Asians to evaluate managing this condition in an ambulatory setting.

  6. Acute hospital dementia care: results from a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Suzanne; O'Shea, Emma; O'Neill, Desmond; Gallagher, Paul; de Siún, Anna; McArdle, Denise; Gibbons, Patricia; Kennelly, Sean

    2016-05-31

    Admission to an acute hospital can be distressing and disorientating for a person with dementia, and is associated with decline in cognitive and functional ability. The objective of this audit was to assess the quality of dementia care in acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. Across all 35 acute public hospitals, data was collected on care from admission through discharge using a retrospective chart review (n = 660), hospital organisation interview with senior management (n = 35), and ward level organisation interview with ward managers (n = 76). Inclusion criteria included a diagnosis of dementia, and a length of stay greater than 5 days. Most patients received physical assessments, including mobility (89 %), continence (84 %) and pressure sore risk (87 %); however assessment of pain (75 %), and particularly functioning (36 %) was poor. Assessment for cognition (43 %) and delirium (30 %) was inadequate. Most wards have access at least 5 days per week to Liaison Psychiatry (93 %), Geriatric Medicine (84 %), Occupational Therapy (79 %), Speech & Language (81 %), Physiotherapy (99 %), and Palliative Care (89 %) Access to Psychology (9 %), Social Work (53 %), and Continence services (34 %) is limited. Dementia awareness training is provided on induction in only 2 hospitals, and almost half of hospitals did not offer dementia training to doctors (45 %) or nurses (48 %) in the previous 12 months. Staff cover could not be provided on 62 % of wards for attending dementia training. Most wards (84 %) had no dementia champion to guide best practice in care. Discharge planning was not initiated within 24 h of admission in 72 % of cases, less than 40 % had a single plan for discharge recorded, and 33 % of carers received no needs assessment prior to discharge. Length of stay was significantly greater for new discharges to residential care (p < .001). Dementia care relating to assessment, access to certain specialist services

  7. Introduction of the conducted electrical weapon into a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Clinton, Joseph E; Lappe, Mark A; Heegaard, William G; Williams, Martin F; Miner, James R

    2011-09-01

    The TASER(®) X26 Conducted Electrical Weapon (CEW) provides painful stimuli and neuromuscular incapacitation to potentially violent persons. Use by law enforcement in society is common. Presenting a CEW is known to de-escalate some situations. Health care personnel sometimes encounter violent persons within the confines of the hospital. CEW use by health care security personnel has not been described. The objective is to describe results from the introduction of the CEW into a hospital environment. Upon introducing the CEW into an urban hospital campus, standardized reports were made describing all CEW use by hospital security. Reports were retrospectively reviewed for the first 12 months of CEW use. Collected data included force options used, potential injuries avoided, witness comments, outcomes, and whether the CEW required full activation or if inactive presentation was sufficient to control the situation. Rates of security personnel injuries were also gathered. Descriptive analysis was applied. Twenty-seven CEW deployments occurred: four were inactive presentation, 20 were presentation with LASER sight activation, and three were probe deployments with a 5-s delivery of electrical current. Two persons required evaluation for minor injuries not related to CEW use. Witnesses reported that in all incidents, injuries were likely avoided due to CEW presentation or use. CEW use aborted one suicide attempt. Personnel injury rates decreased during the study period. CEW introduction into a health care setting demonstrated the ability to avert and control situations that could result in further injury to subjects, patients, and personnel. This correlates with a decrease in injury for hospital personnel. Further study is recommended for validation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pre-hospital acute coronary syndrome care in Kerala, India: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amisha; Mohanan, P P; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Huffman, Mark D

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death in India. Many of these deaths are due to acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which require prompt symptom recognition, care-seeking behavior, and transport to a treatment facility in the critical pre-hospital period. In India, little is known about pre-hospital management of individuals with ACS. We aim to understand the facilitators, barriers, and context of optimal pre-hospital ACS care to provide opportunities to reduce pre-hospital delays and improve acute cardiovascular care. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 27 ACS providers in Kerala, India to understand facilitators, barriers, and context to pre-hospital ACS care. Six themes emerged from these interviews and discussions: (1) individuals with ACS misperceive their symptoms as non-cardiac in origin; (2) emergency medical services are infrequently used; (3) insufficient pre-hospital healthcare infrastructure contributes to pre-hospital delay; (4) multiple stops are made before arriving at a facility that can provide definitive diagnosis and treatment; (5) relatively high costs of treatment and lack of widespread health insurance coverage limits care delivery; and (6) novel mobile technologies may allow for faster diagnosis and initiation of treatment in the pre-hospital setting. Individualized patient-based factors (general knowledge of ACS symptoms, socioeconomic position) and broader systems-based factors (ambulance networks, coordination of transport) affect pre-hospital ACS care in Kerala. Improving public awareness of ACS symptoms, increasing appropriate use of emergency medical services, and building a infrastructure for rapid and coordinated transport may improve pre-hospital ACS care. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Risk of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis associated with conventional and atypical antipsychotics: a population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasse, Christiane; Jacobsen, Jacob; Pedersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of atypical and conventional antipsychotics with the risk of hospitalization for acute pancreatitis. DESIGN: Population-based, case-control study. DATA SOURCE: Health care databases of Northern Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 3083 adults hospitalized...... with acute pancreatitis (case patients) and 30,830 control subjects. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Controls were selected from the general population by using risk-set sampling and were matched to case patients by age and sex. The date of the case patients' admission for acute pancreatitis was used...... as the index date for the matched control subjects. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to estimate rate ratios (RRs) for hospitalization due to acute pancreatitis in current users (0-90 days before admission or index date) and former users (> 90 days before admission or index date) of atypical...

  10. Acute effects of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jing; Zhao, Ang; Zhao, Jinzhuo; Chen, Renjie; Wang, Weibing; Ha, Sandie; Xu, Xiaohui; Kan, Haidong

    2014-01-01

    Air pollution has been accepted as an important contributor to asthma development and exacerbation. However, the evidence is limited in China. In this study, we investigated the acute effect of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China. We applied over-dispersed generalized additive model adjusted for weather conditions, day of the week, long-term and seasonal trends. An interquartile range increase in the moving average concentrations of PM 10 , SO 2 , NO 2 and BC on the concurrent day and previous day corresponded to 1.82%, 6.41%, 8.26% and 6.62% increase of asthmatic hospitalization, respectively. The effects of SO 2 and NO 2 were robust after adjustment for PM 10 . The associations appeared to be more evident in the cool season than in the warm season. Our results contribute to the limited data in the scientific literature on acute effects of air pollution on asthma in high exposure settings, which are typical in developing countries. - Highlights: • Few prior studies in China examine the effect of air pollution on asthma. • We found acute effect of air pollution on asthma hospitalization in Shanghai. • Our results contribute to limited data on air pollution and asthma in China. - Ambient air pollution increases the risk of asthma hospitalization in Shanghai, China

  11. Factors contributing to nursing team work in an acute care tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Suzanne; Higgs, Megan; Manning, Vicki; Netto, Gayle; Fernandez, Ritin

    Effective nursing teamwork is an essential component of quality health care and patient safety. Understanding which factors foster team work ensures teamwork qualities are cultivated and sustained. This study aims to investigate which factors are associated with team work in an Australian acute care tertiary hospital across all inpatient and outpatient settings. All nurses and midwives rostered to inpatient and outpatient wards in an acute care 600 bed hospital in Sydney Australia were invited to participate in a cross sectional survey between September to October 2013. Data were collected, collated, checked and analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 21. Factors reporting a significant correlation with where p team leadership were 3.6 (S.D. 0.57) and 3.8 (SD 0.6) respectively. Leadership and communication between nurses were significant predictors of team work p team work.

  12. Feasibility of using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for evaluation of fall-related risk factors in acute rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih W; Lin, Li F; Chou, Lin C; Wu, Mei J; Liao, Chun D; Liou, Tsan H

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we reported the use of an International Classification of Functioning (ICF) core set that can provide a holistic framework for evaluating the risk factors of falls; however, data on the feasibility of applying this core set are lacking. To investigate the feasibility of applying the fall-related ICF risk-factor core set in the case of patients in an acute-rehabilitation setting. A cross-sectional and descriptive correlational design. Acute-rehabilitation ward. A total of 273 patients who experienced fall at acute-rehabilitation ward. The data on falls were collected from the hospital's Nursing Information System (NIS) and the fall-reporting system (Adverse Event Reporting System, AERS) between 2010 and 2013. The relationship of both systems to the fall-related ICF core set was analyzed to assess the feasibility of their clinical application. We evaluated the feasibility of using the fall-related ICF risk-factor core set by using the frequency and the percentage of the fall patients in of the listed categories. The fall-related ICF risk-factor core set category b735 (muscle tone functions) exhibited a high feasibility (85.95%) for clinical application, and the category b730 (muscle power functions) covered 77.11% of the patients. The feasibility of application of the category d410 (change basic body position) was also high in the case of all fall patients (81.69%). In the acute-rehabilitation setting, the feasibility of application of the fall-related ICF risk-factor core set is high. The fall-related ICF risk-factor core set can help multidisciplinary teams develop fall-prevention strategies in acute rehabilitation wards.

  13. Discontinuing the Use of PRN Intramuscular Medication for Agitation in an Acute Psychiatric Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ariel; Russ, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the impact of eliminating intramuscular PRN medication for agitation on patient and staff safety in an acute psychiatric inpatient setting. The current retrospective chart review investigated the use of PRN medications (oral and intramuscular) to treat acute agitation, including aggression, and related outcomes before and after a mandated change in PRN practice that required real time physician input before administration of intramuscular medications. The use of both oral and intramuscular PRN medications dramatically decreased following implementation of the mandated change in practice. In particular, the use of intramuscular PRNs for agitation decreased by about half. Despite this decrease, the assault rate in the hospital was unchanged, and the utilization of restraint and seclusion continued to decrease. It is possible to reduce the utilization of PRN medications for agitation without broadly compromising safety on acute care psychiatric inpatient units.

  14. A New Model of Delirium Care in the Acute Geriatric Setting: Geriatric Monitoring Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Mei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium is a common and serious condition, which affects many of our older hospitalised patients. It is an indicator of severe underlying illness and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment, associated with poor survival, functional outcomes with increased risk of institutionalisation following the delirium episode in the acute care setting. We describe a new model of delirium care in the acute care setting, titled Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU where the important concepts of delirium prevention and management are integrated. We hypothesize that patients with delirium admitted to the GMU would have better clinical outcomes with less need for physical and psychotropic restraints compared to usual care. Methods/Design GMU models after the Delirium Room with adoption of core interventions from Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening bright light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythm and improve sleep in the elderly patients. The novelty of this approach lies in the amalgamation of these interventions in a multi-faceted approach in acute delirium management. GMU development thus consists of key considerations for room design and resource planning, program specific interventions and daily core interventions. Assessments undertaken include baseline demographics, comorbidity scoring, duration and severity of delirium, cognitive, functional measures at baseline, 6 months and 12 months later. Additionally we also analysed the pre and post-GMU implementation knowledge and attitude on delirium care among staff members in the geriatric wards (nurses, doctors and undertook satisfaction surveys for caregivers of patients treated in GMU. Discussion This study protocol describes the conceptualization and implementation of a specialized unit for delirium management. We hypothesize that such a model of care will not only result in better clinical outcomes for the elderly patient with delirium compared to usual geriatric care

  15. Examining financial performance indicators for acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Wheeler, John R C

    2013-01-01

    Measuring financial performance in acute care hospitals is a challenge for those who work daily with financial information. Because of the many ways to measure financial performance, financial managers and researchers must decide which measures are most appropriate. The difficulty is compounded for the non-finance person. The purpose of this article is to clarify key financial concepts and describe the most common measures of financial performance so that researchers and managers alike may understand what is being measured by various financial ratios.

  16. The Balanced Scorecard of acute settings: development process, definition of 20 strategic objectives and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groene, Oliver; Brandt, Elimer; Schmidt, Werner; Moeller, Johannes

    2009-08-01

    Strategy development and implementation in acute care settings is often restricted by competing challenges, the pace of policy reform and the existence of parallel hierarchies. To describe a generic approach to strategy development, illustrate the use of the Balanced Scorecard as a tool to facilitate strategy implementation and demonstrate how to break down strategic goals into measurable elements. Multi-method approach using three different conceptual models: Health Promoting Hospitals Standards and Strategies, the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Model and the Balanced Scorecard. A bundle of qualitative and quantitative methods were used including in-depth interviews, standardized organization-wide surveys on organizational values, staff satisfaction and patient experience. Three acute care hospitals in four different locations belonging to a German holding group. Chief executive officer, senior medical officers, working group leaders and hospital staff. Development and implementation of the Balanced Scorecard. Twenty strategic objectives with corresponding Balanced Scorecard measures. A stepped approach from strategy development to implementation is presented to identify key themes for strategy development, drafting a strategy map and developing strategic objectives and measures. The Balanced Scorecard, in combination with the EFQM model, is a useful tool to guide strategy development and implementation in health care organizations. As for other quality improvement and management tools not specifically developed for health care organizations, some adaptations are required to improve acceptability among professionals. The step-wise approach of strategy development and implementation presented here may support similar processes in comparable organizations.

  17. Depression After First Hospital Admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Mårtensson, Solvej; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim

    2016-01-01

    for depression and mortality via linkage to patient, prescription, and cause-of-death registries until the end of 2012. Incidence of depression (as defined by hospital discharge or antidepressant medication use) and the relationship between depression and mortality were examined using time-to-event models......We examined incidence of depression after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and whether the timing of depression onset influenced survival. All first-time hospitalizations for ACS (n = 97,793) identified in the Danish Patient Registry during 2001-2009 and a reference population were followed....... In total, 19,520 (20.0%) ACS patients experienced depression within 2 years after the event. The adjusted rate ratio for depression in ACS patients compared with the reference population was 1.28 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 1.30). During 12 years of follow-up, 39,523 (40.4%) ACS patients and 27...

  18. Malnutrition in Acutely Unwell Hospitalized Elderly - "The Skeletons Are Still Rattling in the Hospital Closet".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y; Thompson, C; Shari, R; Hakendorf, P; Miller, M

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in hospitalized patients with prevalence rates of up to 30% in Australian hospitals with adverse consequences for both the patients and health care services. Despite formulation of nutritional screening protocols, not all hospitalized patients get nutritional screening. Real life screening rates of hospitalized elderly patients are unknown. The present study explored nutrition screening rate in acutely unwell elderly patients admitted in a large tertiary hospital and how these patients fared depending upon their nutrition status. A prospective cross-sectional study involving 205 general medical patients ≥60years recruited between November 2014 and November 2015. The number of patients who missed nutrition screening were noted and all patients underwent nutritional assessment by a qualified dietitian using PG-SGA and quality of life was measured using EQ-5D 5L. A survival curve was plotted and multivariate cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for confounders. Only 99 (49.7%) patients underwent nutritional screening. One hundred and six (53.5%) patients were confirmed as malnourished by PG-SGA. Malnourished patients had significantly longer length of hospital stay and had worse quality of life. Mortality was significantly higher in malnourished patients at one year (23 (21.7%) vs 4 (4.3%); pmalnutrition significantly affects survival even after adjustment for confounders like age, sex, Charlson index and polypharmacy. This study confirms that nutrition screening is still suboptimal in elderly hospitalized patients with adverse consequences and suggests need for review of policies to improve screening practices.

  19. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Methods for extracellular vesicles isolation in a hospital setting

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    Matías eSáenz-Cuesta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research in extracellular vesicles (EVs has been rising during the last decade. However, there is no clear consensus on the most accurate protocol to isolate and analyze them. Besides, most of the current protocols are difficult to implement in a hospital setting due to being very time consuming or to requirements of specific infrastructure. Thus, our aim is to compare five different protocols (comprising two different medium-speed differential centrifugation protocols; commercially polymeric precipitation -exoquick-; acid precipitation; and ultracentrifugation for blood and urine samples to determine the most suitable one for the isolation of EVs. Nanoparticle tracking analysis, flow cytometry, western blot, electronic microscopy and spectrophotometry were used to characterize basic aspects of EVs such us concentration, size distribution, cell-origin and transmembrane markers and RNA concentration. The highest EV concentrations were obtained using the exoquick protocol, followed by both differential centrifugation protocols, while the ultracentrifugation and acid-precipitation protocols yielded considerably lower EV concentrations. The five protocols isolated EVs of similar characteristics regarding markers and RNA concentration however standard protocol recovered only small EVs. EV isolated with exoquick presented difficult to be analyzed with western blot. The RNA concentrations obtained from urine-derived EVs were similar to those obtained from blood-derived ones, despite the urine EV concentration being 10 to 20 times lower. We consider that a medium-speed differential centrifugation could be suitable to be applied in a hospital setting due to require the simplest infrastructure and recover higher concentration of EV than standard protocol. A workflow from sampling to characterization of EVs is proposed.

  1. In-hospital mortality and long-term survival of patients with acute intoxication admitted to the ICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, Raya; Brinkman, Sylvia; De Keizer, Nicolette F.; Meulenbelt, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079479227; De Lange, Dylan W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess in-hospital and long-term mortality of Dutch ICU patients admitted with an acute intoxication. DESIGN: Cohort of ICU admissions from a national ICU registry linked to records from an insurance claims database. SETTING: Eighty-one ICUs (85% of all Dutch ICUs). PATIENTS: Seven

  2. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with lower long-term hospital bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z

    2016-01-01

    Background  Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator improves functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke. Few studies have investigated the effects of thrombolysis in a real-world setting. We evaluated the impact of thrombolysis on long-term hospital bed day use...... patients admitted to stroke centers not yet offering thrombolysis in 2004-2006. The outcomes were length of the stroke admission, total all-cause hospital bed day use during the first year after the stroke, and the long-term risk of readmissions. Thrombolysed and non-thrombolysed patients were compared...... in the overall risk of readmission (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI: 0.79-1.04); however, thrombolysis was associated with reduced risk of pneumonia (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI: 0.35-0.97).  Conclusions  Thrombolysis in ischemic stroke was associated with lower long-term hospital bed day use...

  3. Prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Khodadadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aim: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of dehydrating and gastroenteritis among children worldwide. . The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj. Methods: This cross sectional – descriptive study was done on 184 stool samples of children younger than 7 years of age hospitalized at Imam Sajjad hospital of Yasuj in 2011 due to acute gastroenteritis. All samples were routinely analyzed for detection of rotavirus by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA test. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 184 samples analyzed, 52(28.26% were positive.The Results showed significant relationship between the seasonal distribution and virus detection (p=0/001. The highest incidence of rotavirus was seen in autumn with frequency of (48.08% and the lowest in spring (5.77%. Conclusions: According to high prevalence of rotavirus infection, continual surveillance is necessary to provide useful data for formulating effective vaccines and perform diarrhea prevention programs. Key words: Rotavirus, Gastroenteritis, Prevalence, Elisa

  4. Research Article. Characteristics of Sleep Apnea Assessed Before Discharge in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Heart Failure

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    Kocsis Ildikó

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Evaluation of the characteristics of sleep apnea (SA in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure, considering that undiagnosed SA could contribute to early rehospitalization. Methods. 56 consecutive patients (13 women, 43 men, mean age 63.12 years with acute heart failure, in stable condition, underwent nocturnal polygraphy before hospital discharge. The type and severity of SA was determined. Besides descriptive statistics, correlations between the severity of SA and clinical and paraclinical characteristics were also analyzed (t-test, chi-square test, significancy at alpha 30/h. The apnea was predominantly obstructive (32 cases vs. 12 with central SA. Comparing the patients with mild or no SA with those with severe SA, we did not find statistically significant correlations (p>0.05 between the severity of SA and the majority of main clinical and paraclinical characteristics - age, sex, BMI, cardiac substrates of heart failure, comorbidities. Paradoxically, arterial hypertension (p=0.028 and atrial fibrillation (p=0.041 were significantly more prevalent in the group with mild or no SA. Conclusions. Before discharge, in the majority of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure moderate and severe SA is present, and is not related to the majority of patient related factors. Finding of significant SA in this setting is important, because its therapy could play an important role in preventing readmissions and improving prognosis.

  5. Factors contributing to fecal incontinence in older people and outcome of routine management in home, hospital and nursing home settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asangaedem Akpan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asangaedem Akpan1,2,3, Margot A Gosney2, James Barrett3,4, 1Directorate of Medicine and Elderly Care, Warrington Hospital, Warrington, Cheshire, UK; 2School of Food Biosciences, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, UK; 3Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; 4Directorate of Elderly Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clatterbridge Hospital, Merseyside, UKObjective: Fecal loading, cognitive impairment, loose stools, functional disability, comorbidity and anorectal incontinence are recognized as factors contributing to loss of fecal continence in older adults. The objective of this project was to assess the relative distribution of these factors in a variety of settings along with the outcome of usual management. Methods: One hundred and twenty adults aged 65 years and over with fecal incontinence recruited by convenience sampling from four different settings were studied. They were either living at home or in a nursing home or receiving care on an acute or rehabilitation elderly care ward. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit which factors associated with fecal incontinence were present from subjects who had given written informed consent or for whom assent for inclusion in the study had been obtained.Results: Fecal loading (Homes 6 [20%]; Acute care wards 17 [57%]; Rehabilitation wards 19 [63%]; Nursing homes 21 [70%] and functional disability (Homes 5 [17%]; Acute care wards 25 [83%]; Rehabilitation wards 25 [83%]; Nursing homes 20 [67%] were significantly more prevalent in the hospital and nursing home settings than in those living at home (P < 0.01. Loose stools were more prevalent in the hospital setting than in the other settings (Homes 11 [37%]; Acute care wards 20 [67%]; Rehabilitation wards 17 [57%]; Nursing homes 6 [20%] (P < 0.01. Cognitive impairment was significantly more common in the nursing home than in the other settings (Nursing homes 26 [87%], Homes 5 [17%], Acute care wards 13 [43%], Rehabilitation

  6. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

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    Evan S. Cole

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory conditions, we descriptively compare costs and outcomes to those of patients who received care for the same services in acute care hospitals. Methods: We describe Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to a long-term acute care hospital between 2011 and 2012. We compare them to a population of Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to an acute care hospital for one of five respiratory diagnosis-related groups. Measurements used include patient descriptive information, admissions, diagnosis-related groups, length of stay, place of discharge, 90-day episode costs, readmissions, and patient risk scores. Results: We found that long-term acute care hospital admissions for Medicaid patients were fairly low (470 90-day episodes and restricted to complex cases. We also found that the majority of long-term acute care hospital patients were blind or disabled (71.2%. Compared to patients who stayed at an acute care hospital, long-term acute care hospital patients had higher average risk scores (13.1 versus 9.0, lengths of stay (61 versus 38 days, costs (US$143,898 versus US$115,056, but fewer discharges to the community (28.4% versus 51.8%. Conclusion: We found that the Medicaid population seeking care at long-term acute care hospitals is markedly different than the Medicare populations described in other long-term acute care hospital studies. In addition, our study revealed that Medicaid patients receiving select respiratory care at a long-term acute care hospital were distinct from Medicaid patients receiving similar care at an acute care hospital. Our findings suggest that

  7. Incidence and Outcome of Acute Cardiorenal Syndrome in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwani, Vivek; Bhargava, Maneesha; Chanchlani, Rahul; Mehta, Amar Jeet

    2017-06-01

    To determine the incidence, etiology and outcome of Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) in hospitalized children. A prospective cohort study was carried out in 242 children between 6 mo to 18 y of age hospitalized with primary cardiac, renal or any systemic disorder at a tertiary care center in India. The primary outcome was the development of CRS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the risk of mortality secondary to CRS. Among 242 children, 67 (27.7%) children developed CRS and the rest 175 (72.3%) did not. Among those with CRS, 40.3%, 20.9%, and 38.8% had CRS-1, 3 and 5, respectively. Cardiac diseases leading to CRS were myocarditis (40.7%) followed by congenital heart disease (25.9%), rheumatic heart disease (18.5%), and dilated cardiomyopathy (7.4%); renal disease associated with CRS was acute glomerulonephritis (100%) and major systemic disorders leading to CRS were septicemia (53.8%), malaria (23.1%), scrub typhus (7.7%), and acute gastroenteritis (3.8%). The occurrence of CRS was associated with an increased risk of mortality (OR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.8, 14.1; p 0.000). A subgroup analysis revealed that children with CRS having acute kidney injury stage 2 and 3 also had a higher risk of mortality (p 0.001). The incidence of CRS is quite high in children with cardiac, renal or systemic diseases and is associated with a significant risk of mortality. Children presenting with these illnesses should be monitored for the occurrence of CRS so that early intervention may reduce mortality.

  8. Acute Pericarditis-Associated Hospitalization in the USA: A Nationwide Analysis, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nilay; Pandey, Ambarish; Jain, Priyank; Garg, Neetika

    Epidemiologic data on hospitalizations for acute pericarditis are scarce. We sought to study the trends in these hospitalizations and outcomes in the USA over a 10-year period. We used the 2003-2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to identify admissions with a primary diagnosis of acute pericarditis. Outcomes included hospitalization rate, case fatality rate (CFR), length of stay (LOS), hospital charges, complications and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We observed an estimated 135,710 hospitalizations for acute pericarditis among patients ≥16 years during the study period (mean age 53.5 ± 18.5 years; 40.5% women). The incidence of acute pericarditis hospitalizations was significantly higher for men than for women [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.54-1.58; p pericarditis have declined significantly in the US population. Average charges for acute pericarditis hospitalization have increased. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Quantum Physics Principles and Communication in the Acute Healthcare Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Heidi L; Peyerl, Colleen Kraft; Solheim-Witt, Marit

    This pilot study explores whether clinician awareness of quantum physics principles could facilitate open communication between patients and providers. In the spirit of action research, this study was conceptualized with a holistic view of human health, using a mixed method design of grounded theory as an emergent method. Instrumentation includes surveys and a focus group discussion with twelve registered nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. Findings document that the preliminary core phenomenon, energy as information, influences communication in the healthcare environment. Key emergent themes include awareness, language, validation, open communication, strategies, coherence, incoherence and power. Research participants indicate that quantum physics principles provide a language and conceptual framework for improving their awareness of communication and interactions in the healthcare environment. Implications of this pilot study support the feasibility of future research and education on awareness of quantum physics principles in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Local adaptation and evaluation of a falls risk prevention approach in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Willeke; Hill, Keith D; Bennell, Kim; Vu, Michelle; Haines, Terry P

    2011-04-01

    To determine whether locally adapting a falls risk factor assessment tool results in an instrument with clinimetric properties sufficient to support an acute hospital's falls prevention program. Prospective cohort study of predictive validity and observational investigation of intra- and inter-rater reliability. Acute wards in two large hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. One hundred and thirty acute hospital inpatients participated in the predictive accuracy evaluation, with 25 and 35 inpatients used for the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability analyses, respectively. To develop a falls risk screen and assessment instrument through local adaptation of an existing tool. Clinimetric property analysis of new instrument (Western Health Falls Risk Assessment, WHeFRA) and comparison with 'gold standard tool' (STRATIFY). Fallers, falls and falls per 1000 bed days. Sensitivity (Sens), specificity (Spec), Youden Index (YI) and these three statistics based on event rate of falls (Sens(ER), Spec(ER) and YI(ER)), were calculated to determine predictive accuracy. Reliability was determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), weighted kappa and signed rank test. Seven participants (5.4%) fell, with 14 falls (fall rate: 10.7 falls per 1000 patient bed days). The WHeFRA instrument was significantly more accurate at predicting fallers and the rate of falls than the STRATIFY. Intra-rater reliability ICC (95% confidence intervals) for WHeFRA screen was 0.94 (0.86-0.97) and inter-rater reliability was 0.78 (0.61-0.88). Local adaptation of an existing tool resulted in an instrument with favorable clinimetric properties and may be a viable procedure for facilitating falls prevention program development and implementation in acute hospital settings.

  11. Incidence of pediatric acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric acute kidney injury (pAKI is a common complication associated with high mortality in children. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI and mortality in hospitalized (critically ill and non-critically ill patients. This was a retrospective study conducted during the period of June 1, 2013, to May 31, 2014, at the Postgraduate Department of Pediatrics, G. B. Pant Hospital, an Associated Hospital of Government Medical College, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. All patients between the ages of one month and 18 years were included in the study, who had AKI. In general, out of 23,794 patients, 197 developed AKI (0.8%. On subgroup analysis, 2460 were critically ill and had Intensive Care Unit (ICU admission among whom 99 developed AKI (4%, whereas 21,334 had general pediatric ward admissions and 98 developed AKI (0.5%. Infantile age group was the most commonly 91 (46.2% affected. The common causes of AKI were renal in 73 (37%, neurologic in 38 (19%, septicemia in 35 (18%, and inborn errors of metabolism in 30 (15.2%. Out of 197 pAKI patients, 42 (21.3% died and all of them were critically sick (ICU admissions. The incidence of pAKI in general was 0.8%, whereas it was 4% in critically ill children and 0.5% in general ward admissions implying an eight-fold increased risk of pAKI in critically ill patients.

  12. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Fukuda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods: This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs. The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results: In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions: The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted.

  13. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Yee Cheong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods: Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4 were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music and days 2 and 3 (with CMT. Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS. Results: Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01 in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01 in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014. Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01 and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045 were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion: These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation.

  14. Prediction of falls using a risk assessment tool in the acute care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferko Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The British STRATIFY tool was previously developed to predict falls in hospital. Although the tool has several strengths, certain limitations exist which may not allow generalizability to a Canadian setting. Thus, we tested the STRATIFY tool with some modification and re-weighting of items in Canadian hospitals. Methods This was a prospective validation cohort study in four acute care medical units of two teaching hospitals in Hamilton, Ontario. In total, 620 patients over the age of 65 years admitted during a 6-month period. Five patient characteristics found to be risk factors for falls in the British STRATIFY study were tested for predictive validity. The characteristics included history of falls, mental impairment, visual impairment, toileting, and dependency in transfers and mobility. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain optimal weights for the construction of a risk score. A receiver-operating characteristic curve was generated to show sensitivities and specificities for predicting falls based on different threshold scores for considering patients at high risk. Results Inter-rater reliability for the weighted risk score indicated very good agreement (inter-class correlation coefficient = 0.78. History of falls, mental impairment, toileting difficulties, and dependency in transfer / mobility significantly predicted fallers. In the multivariate model, mental status was a significant predictor (P Conclusion Good predictive validity for identifying fallers was achieved in a Canadian setting using a simple-to-obtain risk score that can easily be incorporated into practice.

  15. Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in medical, surgical, and intensive care unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T B Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in hospitalized patients. There are few comparative studies on hospital-acquired AKI (HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU patients. This study was conducted to compare the epidemiological characteristics, clinical profiles, and outcomes of HAAKI among these three units. All adult patients (>18 years of either gender who developed AKI based on RIFLE criteria (using serum creatinine, 48 h after hospitalization were included in the study. Patients of acute on chronic renal failure and AKI in pregnancy were excluded. Incidence of HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU wards were 0.54%, 0.72%, and 2.2% respectively ( P < 0.0001. There was no difference in age distribution among the groups, but onset of HAAKI was earliest in the medical ward ( P = 0.001. RIFLE-R was the most common AKI in medical (39.2% and ICU (50% wards but in the surgical ward, it was RIFLE-F that was most common (52.6%. Acute tubular necrosis was more common in ICU ( P = 0.043. Most common etiology of HAAKI in medical unit was drug induced (39.2%, whereas in surgical and ICU, it was sepsis (34% and 35.2% respectively. Mortality in ICU, surgical and medical units were 73.5%, 43.42%, and 37.2%, respectively ( P = 0.003. Length of hospital stay in surgical, ICU and medical units were different ( P = 0.007. This study highlights that the characters of HAAKI are different in some aspects among different hospital settings.

  16. Risks predicting prolonged hospital discharge boarding in a regional acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Sajid A; Robinson, Richard D; Cheeti, Radhika; Rath, Shyamanand; Cowden, Chad D; Rosinia, Frank; Zenarosa, Nestor R; Wang, Hao

    2018-01-30

    management timely consultation, and disposition to discharge dwell time affect boarding and patient flow in a tertiary acute care hospital. Efficiency of the discharge process did not affect patient satisfaction relative to the perceived quality of discharge instruction and follow-up plan explanations. Prolonged disposition to discharge intervals result in unnecessary hospital bed occupancy thereby negatively impacting hospital finances while delivering no direct benefit to patients.

  17. The prevalence of Capgras syndrome in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamam, Lut; Karatas, Gonca; Zeren, Tayfun; Ozpoyraz, Nurgul

    2003-10-01

    Capgras syndrome (CS), the most common type of delusional misidentification syndrome, is the delusional belief that significant people in the patient's life have been replaced by identical doubles. Capgras syndrome is thought to be a rare syndrome which commonly occurs in a psychotic context. The objective of this study was to estimate the 5-year prevalence rate of CS in a university hospital in-patient setting and determine associated etiological and sociodemographic factors. All patient files and medical records were reviewed in detail for the presence of Capgras syndrome. The sociodemographic variables, clinical manifestations, and psychiatric and medical diagnoses of patients who fulfilled clinical criteria for Capgras syndrome were recorded for statistical evaluation. The retrospective evaluation of patient files in 920 cases admitted to our psychiatric in-patient unit over 5 years revealed that 12 patients fulfilled the criteria for Capgras syndrome. The crude prevalence of Capgras syndrome in this population during 5-year period was 1.3% (1.8% for females, 0.9% for males). Schizophrenia (50%) was the most common psychiatric diagnosis in these patients. Only two patients presented with an organic etiology underlying Capgras syndrome. The results of this study indicate that Capgras syndrome is not a rare syndrome, and commonly occurs during the course of either functional or organic psychotic illness. Age seems to be an important predicting factor for the etiology of psychosis underlying Capgras syndrome.

  18. The Burden of Child Maltreatment Leading to Hospitalization in a Provincial Setting in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rero, Allanie; Aipit, Jimmy; Yarong-Kote, Tina; Watch, Villa; Bolnga, John W; Vei, Robert; Morris, Marilyn; Lufele, Elvin; Laman, Moses

    2016-08-01

    Child maltreatment is prevalent globally. In Papua New Guinea (PNG), child maltreatment remains an under-reported problem. As part of a 10 month prospective observational study conducted at Modilon Hospital in PNG, we investigated the burden of child maltreatment in the form of sexual abuse, physical abuse and neglect, leading to hospitalization in children ≤14 years. Of 1061 screened admissions, 107 (10%) fulfilled the definition of child maltreatment. The in-hospital admission prevalence of sexual abuse was 5.7% [60 of 1061; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.4-7.3]. Neglect accounted for 3.4% (36 of 1061; 95% CI: 2.4-4.7) of admissions, while physical abuse accounted for 1.0% (11 of 1061; 95% CI: 0.6-1.9). Mortality was highest in the neglected group, with severe acute malnutrition accounting for 89% of deaths. Improved awareness, establishment of appropriate channels for addressing child maltreatment and enforcement of child protection laws in PNG and other epidemiologically similar settings are urgently needed. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Air Pollution and Hospitalization for Acute Myocardial Infarction in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Tian, Yaohua; Xiang, Xiao; Sun, Kexin; Juan, Juan; Song, Jing; Cao, Yaying; Xu, Beibei; Hu, Yonghua

    2017-09-01

    There is growing interest in the association between ambient air pollution and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The objective of this study was to explore the association in 14 Chinese cities using a time-stratified case-crossover design. We identified 80,787 hospital admissions for AMI between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015 from electronic hospitalization summary reports. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the percent changes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in AMI admissions in relation to an interquartile range increase in ambient air pollutant concentrations. All analyzed air pollutants, with the exception of ozone, were positively associated with daily AMI admissions on lag2 and lag3 days. An interquartile range increase in particulate matter China, or even in other developing countries, to report the short-term effects of air pollution on AMI morbidity. Our findings contribute to the limited scientific data on the effects of ambient air pollution on AMI in developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Causes of Acute Poisoning Hospital admission in Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammad Hosseini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: About 7% of patient referred to hospital are various forms of poisoning. This study was performed to determine the major causes of acute poisoning leading to Hospitalization at Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj, Iran. Methods: This descriptive study was performed from August 2007 to July 2008 on 470 cases of poisonings referred to Shahid Beheshti hospital of Yasuj. Demographic characteristics, time of poisoning, poisoning factor, history of previous poisoning, history of psychiatric disease, medication and other therapeutic intervention based on questionnaires and interviews with patients or companions of patients were recorded. Data were analyzed by Chi-Square Test. Results: Majority of poisoned patients were single females, in the age range of 21-30 years, unemployed, lived in urban areas, and had at least a diploma. The majority of cases were intentional poisoning with a history of depression, previous poisoning and attempted suicide. Significant relationship were seen between poisoning, age, sex, and job, (p0.05. Conclusion: With respect to the results of this study, the majority of these poisonings occurred among young, single and unemployed females due to suicide and drug intoxication. Necessary actions should be done in drug usage and maintenance, taking action against non-prescription drugs and giving proper public education to families.

  1. Applying lean Six Sigma to reduce linen loss in an acute care hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying lean Six Sigma to reduce linen loss in an acute care hospital. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... This paper describes a case study in an acute care hospital that formed a cross-functional team to apply the Lean Six Sigma problem solving methodology and tools to improve the linen ...

  2. Antipsychotics for delirium in the general hospital setting in consecutive 2453 inpatients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Kotaro; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Wada, Ken; Odawara, Toshinari; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shiganami, Takafumi; Tsuchida, Kazuo; Oshima, Yoshio; Uchimura, Naohisa; Akaho, Rie; Watanabe, Akira; Taira, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Katsuji; Hashimoto, Naoko; Usui, Chie; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-03-01

    Attention to risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium has been paid. A clinical question was whether risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium would exceed efficacy of those even in the general hospital setting. A prospective observational study proceeded over a 1-year period at 33 general hospitals, where at least one psychiatrist worked full time. Subjects were patients who developed delirium during their admission due to acute somatic diseases or surgery, and who received antipsychotics for delirium. The primary outcome was rates and kinds of serious adverse events. Among 2834 patients who developed delirium, 2453 patients received antipsychotics, such as risperidone (34%), quetiapine (32%), and parenteral haloperidol (20%), for delirium. Out of 2453 patients, 22 serious adverse events (0.9%) were reported. Aspiration pneumonia was the most frequent (17 patients, 0.7%), followed by cardiovascular events (4 patients, 0.2%) and venous thromboembolism (1 patient, 0.0%). There was no patient with a fracture or intracranial injury due to a fall. No one died because of antipsychotic side effects. The mean Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale score was 2.02 (SD 1.09). Delirium was resolved within 1 week in more than half of the patients (54%). In the general hospital setting under management including fine dosage adjustment and early detection of side effects, risk of antipsychotics for older patients with delirium might be low, in contrast to antipsychotics for dementia in the nursing home or outpatient settings. A point may be not how to avoid using antipsychotics but how to monitor their risk. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Management of levofloxacin induced anaphylaxis and acute delirium in a palliative care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunangshu Ghoshal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Levofloxacin is a commonly prescribed antibiotic for managing chest and urinary tract infections in a palliative care setting. Incidence of Levofloxacin-associated anaphylaxis is rare and delirium secondary to Levofloxacin is a seldom occurrence with only few published case reports. It is an extremely rare occurrence to see this phenomenon in combination. Early identification and prompt intervention reduces both mortality and morbidity. A 17-year-old male with synovial sarcoma of right thigh with chest wall and lung metastasis and with no prior psychiatric morbidity presented to palliative medicine outpatient department with community-acquired pneumonia. He was initiated on intravenous (IV Ceftriaxone and IV Levofloxacin. Post IV Levofloxacin patient developed anaphylaxis and acute delirium necessitating IV Hydrocortisone, IV Chlorpheneramine, Oxygen and IV Haloperidol. Early detection and prompt intervention helped in complete recovery. Patient was discharged to hospice for respite after 2 days of hospitalization and then discharged home. Acute palliative care approach facilitated management of two life-threatening medical complications in a palliative care setting improving both quality and length of life.

  4. Generalization of the Right Acute Stroke Prevention Strategies in Reducing in-Hospital Delays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Huang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reduce the door-to-needle (DTN time of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT in acute ischemic stroke (AIS through a comprehensive, hospital-based implementation strategy. The intervention involved a systemic literature review, identifying barriers to rapid IVT treatment at our hospital, setting target DTN time intervals, and building an evolving model for IVT candidate selection. The rate of non-in-hospital delay (DTN time ≤ 60 min was set as the primary endpoint. A total of 348 IVT cases were enrolled in the study (202 and 146 in the pre- and post-intervention group, respectively. The median age was 61 years in both groups; 25.2% and 26.7% of patients in the pre- and post-intervention groups, respectively, were female. The post-intervention group had higher rates of dyslipidemia and minor stroke [defined as National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS ≤ 3]; less frequent atrial fibrillation; higher numbers of current smokers, heavy drinkers, referrals, and multi-model head imaging cases; and lower NIHSS scores and blood sugar level (all P 0.05. These findings indicate that it is possible to achieve a DTN time ≤ 60 min for up to 60% of hospitals in the current Chinese system, and that this logistical change can yield a notable improvement in the outcome of IVT patients.

  5. Unnecessary Antibiotics for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections: Association With Care Setting and Patient Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlam, Tamar F; Soria-Saucedo, Rene; Cabral, Howard J; Kazis, Lewis E

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Up to 40% of antibiotics are prescribed unnecessarily for acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs). We sought to define factors associated with antibiotic overprescribing of ARTIs to inform efforts to improve practice. Methods.  We conducted a retrospective analysis of ARTI visits between 2006 and 2010 from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Those surveys provide a representative sample of US visits to community-based physicians and to hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) and outpatient practices. Patient factors (age, sex, race, underlying lung disease, tobacco use, insurance), physician specialty, practice demographics (percentage poverty, median household income, percentage with a Bachelor's Degree, urban-rural status, geographic region), and care setting (ED, hospital, or community-based practice) were evaluated as predictors of antibiotic overprescribing for ARTIs. Results.  Hospital and community-practice visits had more antibiotic overprescribing than ED visits (odds ratio [OR] = 1.64 and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27-2.12 and OR = 1.59 and 95% CI, 1.26-2.01, respectively). Care setting had significant interactions with geographic region and urban and rural location. The quartile with the lowest percentage of college-educated residents had significantly greater overprescribing (adjusted OR = 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07-1.86) than the highest quartile. Current tobacco users were overprescribed more often than nonsmokers (OR = 1.71; 95% CI, 1.38-2.12). Patient age, insurance, and provider specialty were other significant predictors. Conclusions.  Tobacco use and a lower grouped rate of college education were associated with overprescribing and may reflect poor health literacy. A focus on educating the patient may be an effective approach to stewardship.

  6. Introducing the concept of a corporate culture to the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, S; Trostler, R J

    1987-05-01

    The hospital industry is undergoing radical changes. To keep pace with the ever increasing demands for improved productivity and performance, hospitals are attempting to operate like businesses. This article examines one hospital's attempts at establishing a culture focused on excellence in its occupational therapy department. Guidelines are offered for creating positive cultures in other hospital settings.

  7. Nurses' perceptions of professional dignity in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Laura; Kangasniemi, Mari Katariina; Rocco, Gennaro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Stievano, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The concept of dignity can be divided into two main attributes: absolute dignity that calls for recognition of an inner worth of persons and social dignity that can be changeable and can be lost as a result of different social factors and moral behaviours. In this light, the nursing profession has a professional dignity that is to be continually constructed and re-constructed and involves both main attributes of dignity. The purpose of this study was to determine how nurses described nursing's professional dignity in internal medicine and surgery departments in hospital settings. The research design was qualitative. This study was approved by the ethics committees of the healthcare organizations involved. All the participants were provided with information about the purpose and the nature of the study. A total of 124 nurses participated in this study. The data were collected using 20 focus group sessions in different parts of Italy. The data were analysed by means of a conventional inductive content analysis starting from the information retrieved in order to extract meaning units and sorting the arising phenomena into conceptually meaningful categories and themes. Nursing's professional dignity was deeply embedded in the innermost part of individuals. Regarding the social part of dignity, a great importance was put on the values that compose nursing's professional identity, the socio-historical background and the evolution of nursing in the area considered. The social part of dignity was also linked to collaboration with physicians and with healthcare assistants who were thought to have a central role in easing work strain. Equally important, though, was the relationship with peers and senior nurses. The organizational environments under scrutiny with their low staffing levels, overload of work and hierarchical interactions did not promote respect for the dignity of nurses. To understand these professional values, it is pivotal to comprehend the role of different

  8. The interface between palliative medicine and specialists in acute-care hospitals: boundaries, bridges and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glare, Paul A; Auret, Kirsten A; Aggarwal, Ghauri; Clark, Katherine J; Pickstock, Sarah E; Lickiss, J Norelle

    2003-09-15

    Palliative care teams have made an important contribution to improving the care of patients with incurable illnesses in Australian hospitals over the past 20 years. Co-location of hospital-based palliative medicine specialists with other specialties allows communication and exchange of ideas on issues relevant to the medical care of such patients. Shared management of complex cases maximises comprehension of patient distress and optimises the support provided during hospitalisation. Tensions arising across the interface provide opportunities for both groups to improve the relief of suffering in the acute-care setting. Palliative medicine in the private sector has some advantages, but specialists also face specific challenges, including the cost of certain drugs, access to the multidisciplinary team and reimbursement issues.

  9. Misdiagnosing absent pedicle of cervical spine in the acute trauma setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad H. Abduljabbar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms.

  10. The scale of hospital production in different settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hollingsworth, Bruce; Birch, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    cities. The relative efficiencies of the hospitals, the changes in productivity during this time period, and the relationship between efficiency and the size or scale of the hospitals are investigated using data envelopment analysis. The models for the production of health care use case mix adjusted......This paper analyses the productive efficiency of 141 public hospitals from 1998-2004 in two Canadian provinces; one a small province with a few small cities and a generally more rural population and the other a large province that is more urban in nature, with a population who mainly live in large...

  11. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueen, A.S.; Worthy, S.; Keir, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  12. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Hospital Settings

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  13. The views of domestic staff and porters when supporting patients with dementia in the acute hospital: An exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Caroline; Manthorpe, Jill

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that very many hospital patients have dementia but there are many concerns about the quality of care and support they receive. Consequently there have been numerous calls for hospital staff to have dementia training. While cleaning or domestic staff and porters form considerable parts of the hospital workforce they are infrequently considered in discussions of dementia care training and practice. This exploratory study aimed to investigate the experiences of domestic staff and porters working in an acute hospital setting who are in contact regularly with patients with dementia. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken in 2016 with seven domestic staff and five porters in one English acute hospital to investigate their views and experiences. Data were analysed thematically by constant comparison technique and theoretical sampling. Themes were identified and realistic concepts developed. Participants observed that caring attitudes and behaviour in their encounters with patients with dementia are important but challenging to put into practice. Several would have valued more information about dementia. Some noted situations in the hospital stay that seemed particularly difficult for patients with dementia such as travelling to different parts of the hospital for treatments. The study suggests the need for improving the dementia-related knowledge and skills of all non-clinical staff especially those new to the NHS. The impact of witnessing dementia symptoms and distress on emotional well-being requires further research so that ancillary staff can improve the hospital stay of patients with dementia.

  14. Pre-hospital and hospital delay in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes in tertiary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, G S; Kassem, H H; Ameen, O A; Al Taaban, H S; Rizk, H H

    2017-09-01

    Early presentation is desirable in all cases of acute prolonged chest pain. Causes of delayed presentation vary widely across geographic regions because of different patients' profile and different healthcare capabilities. To detect causes of delay of Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) patients in our country. Patients admitted with NSTE-ACS were included. We recorded the time delay between the onsets of acute severe symptoms till their arrival to the hospital (Pre-hospital delay). We also recorded the time delay between the arrival to hospital and the institution of definitive therapy (hospital delay). Causes of pre-hospital delay are either patient- or transportation-related, while hospital delay causes are either staff- or system-related. We recruited 315 patients, 200 (63.5%) were males, 194 (61.6%) hypertensives, 180 (57.1%) diabetics, 106 (33.7%) current smokers and 196 (62.2%) patients had prior history of cardiac diseases. The mean pre-hospital delay time was 8.7 ± 9.7 h. Sixty-six percent of this time was due to patient-related causes and 34% of pre-hospital delay time was spent in transportation. The mean hospital delay time was 2.3 ± 0.95 h. In 89.8% of cases, the hospital delay was system-related while in 10.2% the reason was staff-related. The mean total delay time to definitive therapy was 11.0 ± 9.8 h. Pre-hospital delay was mainly patient-related. Hospital delay was mainly related to healthcare resources. Governmental measures to promote ambulance emergency services may reduce the pre-hospital delay, while improving the utilization of healthcare resources may reduce hospital delay.

  15. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR=1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p=0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p=0.63). In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: Case of smoking cessation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece Robin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Methods Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Results Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Conclusions Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during

  17. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: case of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sharon; Pieters, Karen; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Reece, Robin; Reid, Robert D

    2011-09-14

    The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC) is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up) were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during implementation may provide insight into issues affecting program

  18. Physical and Occupational Therapy From the Acute to Community Setting After Stroke: Predictors of Use, Continuity of Care, and Timeliness of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K; Li, Dongmei; Johnson, Anna M; Fraher, Erin P

    2017-04-04

    To identify predictors of therapist use (any use, continuity of care, timing of care) in the acute care hospital and community (home or outpatient) for patients discharged home after stroke. Retrospective cohort analysis of Medicare claims (2010-2013) linked to hospital-level and county-level data. Acute care hospital and community. Patients (N=23,413) who survived the first 30 days at home after being discharged from an acute care hospital after stroke. Not applicable. Physical and occupational therapist use in acute care and community settings; continuity of care across the inpatient and home or the inpatient and outpatient settings; and early therapist use in the home or outpatient setting. Multivariate logistic and multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify hospital-level, county-level, and sociodemographic characteristics associated with therapist use, continuity, and timing, controlling for clinical characteristics. Seventy-eight percent of patients received therapy in the acute care hospital, but only 40.8% received care in the first 30 days after discharge. Hospital nurse staffing was positively associated with inpatient and outpatient therapist use and continuity of care across settings. Primary care provider supply was associated with inpatient and outpatient therapist use, continuity of care, and early therapist care in the home and outpatient setting. Therapist supply was associated with continuity of care and early therapist use in the community. There was consistent evidence of sociodemographic disparities in therapist use. Therapist use after stroke varies in the community and for specific sociodemographic subgroups and may be underused. Inpatient nurse staffing levels and primary care provider supply were the most consistent predictors of therapist use, continuity of care, and early therapist use. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of relevant ICF categories by patients in the acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Huber, Erika Omega; Stucki, Gerold; Herceg, Malvina; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Quittan, Michael

    To describe functioning and health of patients in the acute hospital and to identify the most common problems using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Cross-sectional survey in a convenience sample of neurological, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary patients requiring rehabilitation in the acute hospital. The second level categories of the ICF were used to collect information on patients' problems. For the ICF components Body Functions, Body Structures and Activities and Participation absolute and relative frequencies of impairments/limitations in the study population were reported. For the component Environmental Factors absolute and relative frequencies of perceived barriers or facilitators were reported. The mean age in the sample was 57.6 years with a median age of 60.5, 49% of the patients were female. In 101 patients with neurological conditions, 115 ICF categories had a prevalence of 30% and more: 32 categories of Body Functions, 13 categories of Body Structures, 32 categories of Activities and Participation and 38 categories of Environmental Factors. In 105 patients with cardiopulmonary conditions, 80 categories had a prevalence of 30% and more: 36 categories of Body Functions, eight categories of Body Structures, 10 categories of Activities and Participation and 26 categories of Environmental Factors. In 90 patients with musculoskeletal conditions, 61 categories had a prevalence of 30% and more: 14 categories of Body Functions, five categories of Body Structures, 16 categories of Activities and Participation and 26 categories of Environmental Factors. This study is a first step towards the development of ICF Core Sets for patients in the acute hospital.

  20. Acute myocardial infarction incidence and hospital mortality : routinely collected national data versus linkage of national registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek, Huberdina L.; Kardaun, Jan W. P. F.; Gevers, Evelien; de Bruin, Agnes; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Bots, Michiel L.; Reitsma, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objective To compare levels of and trends in incidence and hospital mortality of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) based on routinely collected hospital morbidity data and on linked registers. Cases taken from routine hospital data are a mix of patients with recurrent and first

  1. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  2. [Continuity of care from the acute care hospital: Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Casals, Montserrat; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Alsina-Ribas, Anna; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Oriol-Ruscalleda, Margarita; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    To describe the profile of patients treated by a Continuity of Care Manager in an acute-care center during the first six months of its activity, as well as the profile of patients treated and the resource allocation. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with complex care needs requiring continuity of care liaison, and who were attended by the Continuity of Care Nurse during the period from October 2013 to March 2014. Patient characteristics, their social environment and healthcare resource allocation were registered and analyzed. A total of 1,034 cases of demand that corresponded to 907 patients (women 55.0%; age 80.57±10.1; chronic 47.8%) were analyzed, of whom 12.2% were readmitted. In the multivariate model, it was observed that the variables associated with readmission were polypharmacy (OR: 1.86; CI: 1.2-2.9) and fall history prior to admission (OR: 0.586; CI: 0.36-2-88). Patients treated by a Continuity of Care Nurse are over 80 years, with comorbidities, geriatric syndromes, complex care, and of life needs, to whom an alternative solution to hospitalization is provided, thus preventing readmissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. Nurses' attitudes towards the use of PRN psychotropic medications in acute and forensic mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Lesley; Wynaden, Dianne; Heslop, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Many countries now have national mental health policies and guidelines to decrease or eliminate the use of seclusion and restraint yet the use of Pro Re Nata (PRN) medications has received less practice evaluation. This research aimed to identify mental health nurses' attitudes towards the use of PRN medications with mental health consumers. Participants were working in forensic mental health and non-forensic acute mental health settings. The "Attitudes towards PRN medication use survey" was used and data were collected online. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package Social Sciences, Version 22.0. Practice differences between forensic and other acute mental health settings were identified related to the use of PRN medications to manage symptoms from nicotine, alcohol and other drug withdrawal. Differences related to the useage of comfort rooms and conducting comprehensive assessments of consumers' psychiatric symptoms were also detected. Qualitative findings highlighted the need for increased accountability for the prescribing and administration of PRN medications along with more nursing education/training to use alternative first line interventions. Nurses administering PRN medications should be vigilant regarding the indications for this practice to ensure they are facilitating the consumer's recovery by reducing the use of all forms of potentially restrictive practices in the hospital setting. The reasons for using PRN medications and PRN administration rates must be continually monitored to avoid practices such as high dose antipsychotics use and antipsychotic polypharmacy to ensure the efficacy of the consumers' management plans on their health care outcomes. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Use of sterile pre-fabricated antibiotic beads in the combat hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Wade T; Petrides, Michael G; Gunn, Philip A; Howard, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Time and manpower constraints associated with acute combat casualty care can make antibiotic bead production at the point of care prohibitively difficult, if not impossible. The purpose of this study is to evaluate our technique for the sterile prefabrication of antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads in the combat hospital environment by assessing their sterility at the time of use. This investigation is a prospective study of a consecutive series of specimens. Imipenem-impregnated antibiotic beads were sterilely prepared, threaded on a suture strand, and packaged. Over a 6-week period, 50 consecutive packages were evaluated for sterility with aerobic and anaerobic culture swabs performed at the time of opening. Culture results, as well as number of shelf days for each specimen, were then reviewed. Of the 50 packages of antibiotic-impregnated PMMA beads, the average number of days on the shelf before use was 9.3 (range: 2-17). None of the packages showed growth of organisms from the cultures, indicating that antibiotic-impregnated PMMA beads can be sterilely produced and maintained in their sterile state for future use in the combat hospital environment. This practice should be considered a safe adjunct in the management of contaminated, open traumatic injuries in this setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  6. Hydroxyurea and acute painful crises in sickle cell anemia: effects on hospital length of stay and opioid utilization during hospitalization, outpatient acute care contacts, and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Samir K; Bauserman, Robert L; McCarthy, William F; Castro, Oswaldo L; Smith, Wally R; Waclawiw, Myron A

    2010-12-01

    Exploratory findings from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of hydroxyurea (MSH) in sickle cell anemia (SS). Recurrent acute painful crises may be mild, moderate, or severe in nature and often require treatment at home, in acute care facilities as outpatients, and in the hospital with oral and/or parenteral opioids. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of hydroxyurea (HU) on length of stay (LOS) in hospital and opioid utilization during hospitalization, outpatient acute care contacts, and at home. Data from patient diaries, follow-up visit forms, and medical contact forms for the 299 patients enrolled in the MSH were analyzed. Types and dosages of at home, acute care, and in-hospital analgesic usage were explored descriptively. At-home analgesics were used on 40% of diary days and 80% of two-week follow-up periods, with oxycodone and codeine the most frequently used. Responders to HU used analgesics on fewer days. During hospitalization, 96% were treated with parenteral opioids, with meperidine the most frequently used; oxycodone was the most commonly used oral medication. The average LOS for responders to HU was about two days less than for other groups, and their cumulative time hospitalized during the trial was significantly less than for nonresponders or placebo groups (P<0.022). They also had the lowest doses of parenteral opioids during acute care crises (P=0.015). Beneficial effects of HU include shortening the duration of hospitalization because of acute painful episodes and reducing the net amount of opioid utilization. Copyright © 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. All rights reserved.

  7. Art viewing directives in hospital settings effect on mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Potash, Jordan S; Fang, Fan; Rollins, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect viewing directives can have when encountering art in hospitals. A secondary objective of the study was to understand the responses of viewers to an art exhibit on the theme of medical student empathy toward patient pain and suffering. Displaying art in hospitals has been credited with increasing well-being of patients, visitors, and staff. Generally, hospital curators have focused on the type of art to display (natural, symbolic, and abstract). This focus has neglected the possibility that in addition to the type of art, the way that viewers engage art may also be responsible for the healing effect. Participants (n = 97) were randomly allocated into one of the viewing directives: (1) reflecting on one artwork, (2) creating a drawing or poem in response to one artwork, or (3) no direction. Prior to looking at the art and immediately after, participants were administered the Brief Mood Introspection Scale (BMIS) and offered an opportunity to participate in an interview. Pre-post results of the BMIS demonstrated that viewers who received directions achieved some therapeutic effect. Qualitative themes from the post-exhibit interviews identified that the empathy themed exhibit was well received, although there were differences among responses from patients, visitors, and staff. The results imply that hospitals may consider offering prompts to help viewers engage with art to enhance mood and exhibiting art that demonstrates empathy for patient suffering. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Posttraumatic stress following childbirth in homelike- and hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramrood, C.A.; Paarlberg, K.M.; Huis In 't Veld, E.M.; Berger, L.W.; Vingerhoets, A.J.; Weijmar Schultz, W.C.; van Pampus, M.G.

    Methods. aEuro integral Multi-center cross-sectional study at midwifery practices, general hospitals and a tertiary (university) referral center. An unselected population of 907 women was invited to complete questionnaires on PTSD, demographic, psychosocial, and obstetric characteristics 2 to 6

  9. Environmental Contaminants in Hospital Settings and Progress in Disinfecting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Messina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical devices, such as stethoscopes, and other objects found in hospital, such as computer keyboards and telephone handsets, may be reservoirs of bacteria for healthcare-associated infections. In this cross-over study involving an Italian teaching hospital we evaluated microbial contamination (total bacterial count (TBC at 36°C/22°C, Staphylococcus spp., moulds, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., E. coli, total coliform bacteria, Acinetobacter spp., and Clostridium difficile of these devices before and after cleaning and differences in contamination between hospital units and between stethoscopes and keyboards plus handsets. We analysed 37 telephone handsets, 27 computer keyboards, and 35 stethoscopes, comparing their contamination in four hospital units. Wilcoxon signed-rank and Mann-Whitney tests were used. Before cleaning, many samples were positive for Staphylococcus spp. and coliforms. After cleaning, CFUs decreased to zero in most comparisons. The first aid unit had the highest and intensive care the lowest contamination (P<0.01. Keyboards and handsets had higher TBC at 22°C (P=0.046 and mould contamination (P=0.002 than stethoscopes. Healthcare professionals should disinfect stethoscopes and other possible sources of bacterial healthcare-associated infections. The cleaning technique used was effective in reducing bacterial contamination. Units with high patient turnover, such as first aid, should practise stricter hygiene.

  10. Development of an Arabic inpatient satisfaction survey: application in acute medical rehabilitation setting in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboabat, Ahmed; Qannam, Hazem

    2017-09-18

    In the management of chronic disease, evidence suggests that satisfied patients exhibit more loyalty to treatment providers and greater adherence to treatment regimens. This is particularly so in the rehabilitation setting. We aimed to develop a reliable and valid Arabic-language survey to objectively measure inpatient satisfaction in medical rehabilitation settings in Saudi Arabia. The King Fahad Medical City Rehabilitation Hospital Patient Satisfaction Survey (RH PSS) is a self-administered survey that addresses four domains of rehabilitation care: access, structure, process, and outcomes. The RH PSS was developed through four steps. Step 1: An item-generation process utilizing input from patients, rehabilitation professionals, and the relevant literature. Step 2: Individual interviews and focus groups, conducted for cognitive testing of the survey and to examine content validity. Step 3: Assessment of internal consistency and construct validity. Step 4: Survey implementation wherein factor analysis and reliability and validity testing were conducted. The survey was conducted at an acute inpatient medical rehabilitation hospital in Saudi Arabia. A total of 709 rehabilitation inpatients participated. The RH PSS demonstrated reasonable reliability and validity. Cronbach's alpha for all the RH PSS subscales ranged from 0.81 to 0.89, and 0.96 for the entire survey. Factor analysis showed good correlation of the 33 survey items and the subscales. The RH PSS demonstrated a good level of predictive validity through the high correlation between the global item "intent to recommend" and overall satisfaction (R2 = 0.786, adjusted R2 = 0.783, p = 0.01). The RH PSS is the first satisfaction survey with reported validity and reliability testing to address inpatient rehabilitation settings in Saudi Arabia. Further research involving multiple sites is recommended for nationwide validation.

  11. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  12. Management of hypertension in the setting of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitsch, Laura; Jauch, Edward C

    2007-12-01

    The optimal management of blood pressure in the first 24 hours of ischemic stroke remains a controversial topic. Most patients are hypertensive at presentation and subsequently experience a spontaneous decline in blood pressure. Decreasing penumbral blood flow and exacerbating vasogenic edema are significant concerns in whether to treat blood pressure elevations. Although an initially elevated blood pressure has been associated with poor outcome, attempts to acutely lower blood pressure are also associated with worsened outcomes. Thus, the current approach in acute ischemic stroke is permissive hypertension, in which antihypertensive treatment is warranted in patients with systolic blood pressure greater than 220 mm Hg, receiving thrombolytic therapy, or with concomitant medical issues. The use of predictable and titratable medications that judiciously reduce (approximately 10% to 15%) the initial presenting mean arterial pressure is recommended in these situations. Future study must define optimal blood pressure goals, likely on an individual basis.

  13. Spiritual Care in a Hospital Setting: Nurses’ and Patients’ Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasblom, J.P.; Steen, van der J.T.; Jochemsen, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Trent Universities Interprofessional Learning in Practice (TUILIP) project aimed to establish interprofessional learning (IPL) for healthcare students in clinical practice settings. Ten IPL facilitators were employed in eight varied practice setting pilot sites for up to a year to research,

  14. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  15. Study of radiation safety education practices in acute care Texas hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemley, A.A.; Hedl, J.J. Jr.; Griffin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    A survey study was performed to assess the extent of radiation safety education and training in acute care Texas hospitals for radiologic technologists and other hospital personnel. The findings revealed a self-perceived need by hospital administrative personnel and were interpreted to suggest a quantitative need for increased radiation safety education for several classes of hospital personnel. The findings are discussed relative to potential certification requirements for technologists and implications for the training of other personnel

  16. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Bj?rk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with d...

  17. Characterizing and predicting rates of delirium across general hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Thomas H; Hart, Kamber L; Perlis, Roy H

    2017-05-01

    To better understand variation in reported rates of delirium, this study characterized delirium occurrence rate by department of service and primary admitting diagnosis. Nine consecutive years (2005-2013) of general hospital admissions (N=831,348) were identified across two academic medical centers using electronic health records. The primary admitting diagnosis and the treating clinical department were used to calculate occurrence rates of a previously published delirium definition composed of billing codes and natural language processing of discharge summaries. Delirium rates varied significantly across both admitting diagnosis group (X 2 10 =12786, pdelirium (86/109764; 0.08%) and neurological admissions the greatest (2851/25450; 11.2%). Although the rate of delirium varied across the two hospitals the relative rates within departments (r=0.96, pdelirium varies significantly across admitting diagnosis and hospital department. Both admitting diagnosis and department of care are even stronger predictors of risk than age; as such, simple risk stratification may offer avenues for targeted prevention and treatment efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pre-hospital detection of acute ischemic stroke secondary to emergent large vessel occlusion: lessons learned from electrocardiogram and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrain, Alexander G; Kellner, Christopher Paul; Mocco, J

    2018-01-03

    Currently, there is no device capable of detecting acute ischemic stroke (AIS) secondary to emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) in the pre-hospital setting. The inability to reliably identify patients that would benefit from primary treatment with endovascular thrombectomy remains an important limitation to optimizing emergency medical services (EMS) triage models and time-to-treatment. Several clinical grading scales that rely solely on clinical examination have been proposed and have demonstrated only moderate predictive ability for ELVO. Consequently, a technology capable of detecting ELVO in the pre-hospital setting would be of great benefit. An analogous scenario existed decades ago, in which pre-hospital detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was unreliable until the emergence of the 12-lead ECG and its adoption by EMS providers. This review details the implementation of pre-hospital ECG (PHECG) for the detection of AMI and explores how early experience with PHECG may be applied to ELVO detection devices, once they become available. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Potentially avoidable hospital admissions in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia in the USA: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Keenan, Tanya; Abel, Gregory A; Steensma, David P; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Chen, Yi-Bin; Hobbs, Gabriela; Traeger, Lara; Fathi, Amir T; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Ballen, Karen K; Amrein, Philip C; Stone, Richard M; Temel, Jennifer S

    2016-06-01

    Older adults (≥60 years of age) with acute myeloid leukaemia spend a substantial proportion of their life in hospital after diagnosis. We examined reasons for their hospital admissions and identified potentially avoidable hospital admissions (PAH) in this age group in the USA. In this retrospective analysis, we examined the reasons for hospital admissions in older patients diagnosed with and treated for acute myeloid leukaemia at two tertiary care hospitals in the USA. We included patients receiving intensive induction chemotherapy or non-intensive treatment. We excluded those with acute promyelocytic leukaemia, those seen only for a one-time consultation who received primary treatment elsewhere, and those who received supportive care alone. We identified the eligible cohort using the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital Leukemia Clinical Research Information Systems database. Practising oncologists used a consensus-driven medical record review process to identify the primary reason for each hospital admission and categorise it as potentially avoidable or not avoidable on the basis of an adaptation of Graham's criteria for PAH. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify predictors of PAH. Between May 1, 2005, and Dec 23, 2011, we assessed 1040 hospital admissions (excluding initial admission for diagnosis) in 329 consecutively admitted patients. The most common primary reasons for hospital admissions were: fever or infection (396 [38%]), planned admission for chemotherapy or transplantation (391 [38%]), and uncontrolled symptoms (102 [10%]). We identified 172 (27%) of 649 unplanned hospital admissions as potentially avoidable; among these admissions, 82 (48%) were readmissions because of previous premature hospital discharge, 32 (19%) because of problems that could have been managed in the outpatient setting, and 26 (15%) because of failure of timely outpatient follow-up. In a mixed logistic regression model, higher

  20. Acute stroke: automatic perfusion lesion outlining using level sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouridsen, Kim; Nagenthiraja, Kartheeban; Jónsdóttir, Kristjana Ýr; Ribe, Lars R; Neumann, Anders B; Hjort, Niels; Østergaard, Leif

    2013-11-01

    To develop a user-independent algorithm for the delineation of hypoperfused tissue on perfusion-weighted images and evaluate its performance relative to a standard threshold method in simulated data, as well as in acute stroke patients. The study was approved by the local ethics committee, and patients gave written informed consent prior to their inclusion in the study. The algorithm identifies hypoperfused tissue in mean transit time maps by simultaneously minimizing the mean square error between individual and mean perfusion values inside and outside a smooth boundary. In 14 acute stroke patients, volumetric agreement between automated outlines and manual outlines determined in consensus among four neuroradiologists was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis, while spatial agreement was quantified by using lesion overlap relative to mean lesion volume (Dice coefficient). Performance improvement relative to a standard threshold approach was tested with the Wilcoxon signed rank test. The mean difference in lesion volume between automated outlines and manual outlines was -9.0 mL ± 44.5 (standard deviation). The lowest mean volume difference for the threshold approach was -25.8 mL ± 88.2. A significantly higher Dice coefficient was observed with the algorithm (0.71; interquartile range [IQR], 0.42-0.75) compared with the threshold approach (0.50; IQR, 0.27- 0.57; P , .001). The corresponding agreement among experts was 0.79 (IQR, 0.69-0.83). The perfusion lesions outlined by the automated algorithm agreed well with those defined manually in consensus by four experts and were superior to those obtained by using the standard threshold approach. This user-independent algorithm may improve the assessment of perfusion images as part of acute stroke treatment. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13121622/-/DC1. RSNA, 2013

  1. National Veterans Health Administration inpatient risk stratification models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Cronin, Robert M; VanHouten, Jacob P; Siew, Edward D; Eden, Svetlana K; Fihn, Stephan D; Nielson, Christopher D; Peterson, Josh F; Baker, Clifton R; Ikizler, T Alp; Speroff, Theodore; Matheny, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) is a potentially preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Identifying high-risk patients prior to the onset of kidney injury is a key step towards AKI prevention.

  2. Features of Acute Neuroinfections in Clinical Hospital of Pediatric Infectious of Kyiv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Yevtushenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the structure, course and clinical picture of 65 cases of acute neuroinfections in children, who were treated in the clinical hospital of pediatric infections of Kyiv in 2014.

  3. Delivery of physical therapy in the acute care setting: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K; Heatwole Shank, Kendra; Knauer, Stefanie R; Montmeny, Richard M

    2012-02-01

    Population-based studies on physical therapy use in acute care are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine population-based, hospital discharge data from North Carolina to describe the demographic and diagnostic characteristics of individuals who receive physical therapy and, for common diagnostic subgroups, to identify factors associated with the receipt of and intensity of physical therapy use. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Hospital discharge data for 2006-2007 from the 128 acute care hospitals in the state were examined to identify the most common diagnoses that receive physical therapy and to describe the characteristics of physical therapy users. For 2 of the most common diagnoses, logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the receipt and intensity of physical therapy. Of the more than 2 million people treated in acute care hospitals, 22.5% received physical therapy (mean age=66 years; 58% female). Individuals with osteoarthritis (admitted for joint replacement) and stroke were 2 of the most common patient types to receive physical therapy. Almost all individuals admitted for a joint replacement received physical therapy, with little between-hospital variation. Between-hospital variation in physical therapy use for stroke was greater. Demographic and hospital-related factors were associated with physical therapy use and physical therapy intensity for both diagnoses, after controlling for illness severity and comorbidities. Data from only one state were examined, and the studied variables were limited. The use and intensity of physical therapy for stroke and joint replacement in acute care hospitals in North Carolina vary by clinical and nonclinical factors. Reasons behind the association of hospital characteristics and physical therapy use need further investigation.

  4. The effectiveness of nurse-delivered aromatherapy in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill R; Rivard, Rachael L; Griffin, Kristen H; Kolste, Alison K; Joswiak, Denise; Kinney, Mary Ellen; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-04-01

    To examine the use and effectiveness of essential oil therapeutic interventions on pain, nausea, and anxiety, when provided by nurses to patients in acute hospital settings across a large health system. This study expands upon the limited body of literature on aromatherapy use among inpatients. Retrospective, effectiveness study using data obtained from electronic health records. Ten Allina Health hospitals located in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Nurse-delivered aromatherapy. Change in patient-reported pain, anxiety, and nausea, rated before and after receiving aromatherapy using a numeric rating scale (0-10). There were 10,262 hospital admissions during the study time frame in which nurse-delivered aromatherapy was part of patient care. The majority of admissions receiving aromatherapy were females (81.71%) and white (87.32%). Over 75% of all aromatherapy sessions were administered via inhalation. Lavender had the highest absolute frequency (49.5%) of use regardless of mode of administration, followed by ginger (21.2%), sweet marjoram (12.3%), mandarin (9.4%), and combination oils (7.6%). Sweet marjoram resulted in the largest single oil average pain change at -3.31 units (95% CI: -4.28, -2.33), while lavender and sweet marjoram had equivalent average anxiety changes at -2.73 units, and ginger had the largest single oil average change in nausea at -2.02 units (95% CI: -2.55, -1.49). Essential oils generally resulted in significant clinical improvements based on their intended use, although each oil also showed ancillary benefits for other symptoms. Future research should explore use of additional essential oils, modes of administration, and different patient populations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The effect of integration of hospitals and post-acute care providers on Medicare payment and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Werner, Rachel M

    2018-02-07

    In this paper we examine empirically the effect of integration on Medicare payment and rehospitalization. We use 2005-2013 data on Medicare beneficiaries receiving post-acute care (PAC) in the U.S. to examine integration between hospitals and the two most common post-acute care settings: skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and home health agencies (HHA), using two measures of integration-formal vertical integration and informal integration representing preferential relationships between providers without formal relationships. Our identification strategy is twofold. First, we use longitudinal models with a fixed effect for each hospital-PAC pair in a market to test how changes in integration impact patient outcomes. Second, we use an instrumental variable approach to account for patient selection into integrated providers. We find that vertical integration between hospitals and SNFs increases Medicare payments and reduces rehospitalization rates. However, vertical integration between hospitals and HHAs has little effect, nor does informal integration between hospitals and either PAC setting. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing pressure ulcer prevalence rates in the long-term acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Catherine T; Trigilia, Donna; Houle, Tracy L; Delong, Sandra; Rosenblum, David

    2009-04-01

    Information about pressure ulcer prevalence, prevention, and optimal management strategies in the long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) setting is sparse. Although care processes in other patient care settings have been reported to affect pressure ulcer prevalence rates, the effect of such programs in the LTACH is unknown. To reduce perceived above-average pressure ulcer prevalence rates and improve care processes, a 108-bed LTACH used a failure mode and effects analysis to identify and address high-priority areas for improvement. Areas in need of improvement included a lack of 1) wound care professionals, 2) methods to consistently document prevention and wound data, and 3) an interdisciplinary wound care team approach, as well as a faulty electronic medical record. While prevalence data were collected, policies and procedures based on several published guidelines were developed and incorporated into the pressure ulcer plan of care by the newly established wound care team. Improved assessment and documentation methods, enhanced staff education, revised electronic records, wound care product reviews, and a facility-wide commitment to improved care resulted in a reduction of facility-acquired pressure ulcer prevalence from 41% at baseline to an average of 4.2% during the following 12 months as well as fewer missing electronic record data (improves care practices and reduces pressure ulcer prevalence in the LTACH. Studies to increase knowledge about the LTACH patient population and their unique needs and risk profiles are needed.

  7. Pattern and presentation of acute abdomen in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboola, John Owoade; Olatoke, Samuel Adegboyega; Rahman, Ganiyu Abebisi

    2014-05-01

    Abdominal pain of sudden onset is the hallmark of most non-traumatic emergency surgical presentations. This presents a scenario of urgency to the young surgeon who has to determine which of a myriad of disease conditions the patient is presenting with. Such a physician has to rely on experience and a sound knowledge of the local aetiological spectrum in making a clinical diagnosis. To determine the epidemiology and aetiological spectrum of diseases presenting as acute abdomen in the adult population at the hospital surgical emergency unit. Two hundred and seventy-six patients presenting at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital emergency unit and managed by the general surgeons between 1(st) of May 2009 and 30(th) of April 2010 were recruited and followed-up throughout the period of admission. The biodata and clinical information inclusive of diagnosis, investigations, treatment modality and outcome were entered in a structured questioner. Standardised treatment was given to all patients and difficulties encountered in their management were also noted. The data collected was evaluated using SPSS16. Acute abdomen constituted 9.6% of total surgical emergency admissions with patients aged 16-45 years constituting 78.3%. The commonest cause of acute abdomen was appendicitis (30.3%) followed by intestinal obstruction (27.9%), perforated typhoid ileitis 14.9% and peptic ulcer disease (7.6%), respectively. The result from the study is similar to what has been reported in other tropical settings with inflammatory lesions being the major problem. There is also a rising incidence of post-operative adhesions and gradual decline in incidence of obstructed hernia.

  8. Fall risk as a function of time after admission to sub-acute geriatric hospital units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Kilian; Ravindren, Johannes; Becker, Clemens; Lindemann, Ulrich; Jaensch, Andrea; Klenk, Jochen

    2016-10-07

    There is evidence about time-dependent fracture rates in different settings and situations. Lacking are data about underlying time-dependent fall risk patterns. The objective of the study was to analyse fall rates as a function of time after admission to sub-acute hospital units and to evaluate the time-dependent impact of clinical factors at baseline on fall risk. This retrospective cohort study used data of 5,255 patients admitted to sub-acute units in a geriatric rehabilitation clinic in Germany between 2010 and 2014. Falls, personal characteristics and functional status at admission were extracted from the hospital information system. The rehabilitation stay was divided in 3-day time-intervals. The fall rate was calculated for each time-interval in all patients combined and in subgroups of patients. To analyse the influence of covariates on fall risk over time multivariate negative binomial regression models were applied for each of 5 time-intervals. The overall fall rate was 10.2 falls/1,000 person-days with highest fall risks during the first week and decreasing risks within the following weeks. A particularly pronounced risk pattern with high fall risks during the first days and decreasing risks thereafter was observed in men, disoriented people, and people with a low functional status or impaired cognition. In disoriented patients, for example, the fall rate decreased from 24.6 falls/1,000 person-days in day 2-4 to about 13 falls/1,000 person-days 2 weeks later. The incidence rate ratio of baseline characteristics changed also over time. Fall risk differs considerably over time during sub-acute hospitalisation. The strongest association between time and fall risk was observed in functionally limited patients with high risks during the first days after admission and declining risks thereafter. This should be considered in the planning and application of fall prevention measures.

  9. Perceived quality of an alternative to acute hospitalization: an analytical study at a community hospital in Hallingdal, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegard, Øystein; Hjortdahl, Per

    2014-10-01

    There is growing international interest in the geography of health care provision, with health care providers searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Norway, the government has recently legislated for municipal authorities to develop local health services for a selected group of patients, with a quality equal to or better than that provided by hospitals for emergency admissions. General practitioners in Hallingdal, a rural district in southern Norway, have for several years referred acutely somatically ill patients to a community hospital, Hallingdal sjukestugu (HSS). This article analyzes patients' perceived quality of HSS to demonstrate factors applicable nationally and internationally to aid in the development of local alternatives to general hospitals. We used a mixed-methods approach with questionnaires, individual interviews and a focus group interview. Sixty patients who were taking part in a randomized, controlled study of acute admissions at HSS answered the questionnaire. Selected patients were interviewed about their experiences and a focus group interview was conducted with representatives of local authorities, administrative personnel and health professionals. Patients admitted to HSS reported statistically significant greater satisfaction with several care aspects than those admitted to the general hospital. Factors highlighted by the patients were the quiet and homelike atmosphere; a small facility which allowed them a good overall view of the unit; close ties to the local community and continuity in the patient-staff relationship. The focus group members identified some overarching factors: an interdisciplinary and holistic approach, local ownership, proximity to local general practices and close cooperation with the specialist health services at the hospital. Most of these factors can be viewed as general elements relevant to the development of local alternatives to acute hospitalization both nationally and internationally. This

  10. Secular trends and seasonality in first-time hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thomas; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of acute myocardial infarction has declined in several Western countries during the last decades. The incidence and mortality of acute myocardial infarction follow a seasonal pattern. We examined if changes in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction were associated with any...... was estimated using a Poisson regression model. Results: The incidence rate decreased by 3.2 % (95% confidence interval: 2.7-3.3%) annually. Hospitalizations followed different seasonal patterns depending on age, but not on gender. In the

  11. Environmental qualities and patient wellbeing in hospital settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2013-01-01

    undertaken by Architecture and Design and the Danish Building Research Institute (Aalborg University) set out in 2008 to review research on the impact of the environmental qualities of health-care facilities on patients and staff. The objective of the review team was to develop a tool that would allow...

  12. Senile anorexia in acute-ward and rehabilitations settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Savina, C; Piredda, M; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Domiguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Cannella, C

    2008-10-01

    The most common pathological change in eating behaviour among older persons is anorexia, which accounts for a large percent of undernutrition in older adults. The main research aims are to determine, in a sample of acute and rehabilitation elderly subjects, the prevalence of anorexia of aging and the causes most impacting on senile anorexia. four different Units cooperated to this research study. Patients were recruited from geriatric acute and rehabilitation wards in Italy. Each Research Unit, for the estimation of the prevalence of anorexia in elderly subjects evaluated all the patients aged over 65 recruited from April 2006 to June 2007. Nutritional status, depression, social, functional and cognitive status, quality of life, health status, chewing, swallowing, sensorial functions were evaluated in anorexic patients and in a sample of "normal eating" elderly subjects. 96 anorexic subjects were selected in acute and rehabilitation wards (66 women; 81.5 +/- 7 years; 30 men: 81.8 +/- 8 years. The prevalence of anorexia in the sample was 33.3% in women and 26.7% in men. Anorexic subjects were older and more frequently needed help for shopping and cooking. A higher (although not statistically significant) level of comorbidity was present in anorexic subjects. These subjects reported constipation and epigastrium pain more frequently. Nutritional status parameters (MNA, anthropometry, blood parameters) were significantly worst in anorexic subjects whereas CRP was higher. Chewing and swallowing efficiencies were significantly impaired and eating patterns were different for anorexic subjects with a significant reduction of protein rich foods. consequences of anorexia can be extremely serious and deeply affect both patient's mobility, mortality and quality of life. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to perform a special evaluation of the nutritional risk, to constantly evaluate the nutritional status and feeding intake of older patients, to identify and treat the

  13. Management of acute pain in the postoperative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Winfried; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2018-01-01

    Despite the introduction of evidence-based recommendations for postoperative pain management (POPM), the consensus is that pain control remains suboptimal. Barriers to achieving patient-satisfactory analgesia include deficient knowledge regarding POPM among staff, lack of instructions, insufficient....../unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly-trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level where major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving...

  14. Management of acute pain in the postoperative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Winfried; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2017-01-01

    Despite the introduction of evidence-based recommendations for postoperative pain management (POPM), the consensus is that pain control remains suboptimal. Barriers to achieving patient-satisfactory analgesia include deficient knowledge regarding POPM among staff, lack of instructions, insufficient....../unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly-trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level where major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving...

  15. Clinical decision making of nurses working in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  16. [Selection criteria of mobile lifters in the hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriero, G; Ottonello, M; Franchignoni, F

    2002-01-01

    The manual handling of patients with limited mobility represents the major cause of musculoskeletal injury to the spine in paramedical health care workers. Within the hospital, the more complex procedures of patient transfer often require the use of mobile hoists. The aim of this paper is to describe the basic criteria for the selection of such hoists. The main characteristics of a hoist are its stability, the sling attachment, the speed of operation, range of movement of the spreader bar, safety of the operation being performed, patient comfort, the physical effort required on the part of the health care worker, manoeuvrability and simplicity of use. Important organizational-structural features to evaluate include: the type of patient normally present in the unit concerned, the specific movement to be performed, the structural characteristics of the environment, and the work organization of the personnel.

  17. Measuring unexplained variation in acute hospital use by patients enrolled with northern New Zealand general practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandiford P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: There is increasing concern worldwide at the steady growth in acute inpatient admissions and emergency department (ED attendances. AIM: To develop measures of variation in acute hospital use between populations enrolled at different general practices that are independent of the sociodemographic characteristics of those populations. METHODS: Two consecutive years of hospital discharge and ED attendance data were combined with primary health organisation (PHO registers from 385 practices of over 1.5 million people to develop and test two measures of unplanned hospital use: the standardised acute hospital admission ratio (SAAR and the standardised ED attendance ratio (SEAR. Disease-specific measures were also produced for inpatient events. RESULTS: The enrolled populations of a high proportion of practices had significantly higher or lower than expected acute use of hospitals and this was consistent over both years studied. Practices whose population made unexpectedly high use of acute hospital care for one condition tended to do so for others. Differences in health needs between practice populations as measured by clinical complexity, comorbidities and length of stay did not explain a significant portion of the overall variation in hospital admissions. The enrolled population’s average travelling time to a 24-hour ED accounted for some of the practice variation in unplanned utilisation of hospital services. DISCUSSION: This study confirms that there is considerable unexplained practice variation in acute hospital use. Further development of the SAAR and SEAR measures may be possible to use these to identify modifiable practice-level factors associated with high unplanned hospital use.

  18. Unusual causes of acute abdomen in a Nigerian hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute abdomen is the most common abdominal emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality in General surgical practice. Over a 7-year period, a study of unusual causes of acute abdomen was undertaken, with the aim of identifying these causes and outcome of operative management. Eleven cases were ...

  19. HIV Infection in hospitalized under-5 children with acute watery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-31

    Dec 31, 2011 ... Five of them presented within 48 hours of diarrhoea . Associated illness. Three had malaria while two had acute respiratory infec- tion in addition to acute diarrhea. Past Medical History. Two had been admitted earlier for febrile illness but no previous history of blood transfusion. None had a chronic illness.

  20. DYNAMICS OF HOSPITALIZATION OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE SURGICAL PATHOLOGY OF ABDOMINAL AND ABDOMINAL ORGANS IN KUZBASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Валерий Иванович Подолужный

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Publications of recent years do not reflect the regional dynamics of hospitalization of patients with acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and anterior abdominal wall. Goal – to determine the volume of hospitalizations and treatment of patients with acute surgical pathology of the abdominal and anterior abdominal wall in the Kuzbass in the dynamics from 1993 to 2016. Materials and methods. A comparative analysis of the volume of treatment of patients with acute appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, acute pancreatitis, intestinal obstruction, perforated ulcer of the stomach and duodenum and strangulated hernia in surgical departments of Kuzbass from 1993 to 2016 to understand the changes occurring in abdominal surgery. Estimated in the comparative aspect for two decades (1993-2002 and 2007-2016 the average annual number of treated. The estimation of indicators in calculation on 100000 population is executed. The statistical processing was carried out using IBM SPSS Statistica computer version 24 and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Result. Statistically significantly decreased the number of patients with acute appendicitis and perforated ulcers of the stomach and duodenum. The average annual hospitalization of patients with acute pancreatitis and strangulated abdominal hernias has significantly increased in the last decade. There are no significant differences in the increase in the total number of patients with acute cholecystitis and acute intestinal obstruction. Conclusions: 1. Over the past decade compared with 1993-2002, the incidence of acute appendicitis per 100000 thousand of the population decreased in the region by 39.9 %, the incidence of perforated gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer by 30.2 %. 2. At this time, the number of people treated with 100000 people with acute pancreatitis increased by 94.7 %; with acute cholecystitis by 12.4 %; with an acute intestinal obstruction by 9.8 % and with a strangulated

  1. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES IN ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN CELJE GENERAL HOSPITAL IN 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Veninšek

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. DIGAMI study showed that intrahospital mortality and mortality at one year after myocardial infarction can be significantly reduced in diabetics treated in acute phase of myocardial infarction by GI infusion and afterwards for at least three months with intensive insulin treatment. Mortality can be reduced for more than 50% in a subgroup of patients younger than 70 years, without congestive heart failure, with first myocardial infarction, not treated with insulin or digitalis. In this perspective we reviewed treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in 1999 in Celje General Hospital.Methods. We reviewed documentation of treatment of all diabetics with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. We collected data on number of newly discovered diabetes, on previous treatment of diabetes, on treatment of diabetes during hospitalization and at discharge, on drugs used for treatment of diabetes and on mortality during hospitalization.Results. Diabetics presented 20% of all patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. None of patients received GI infusion, none had intensively managed blood sugar. 24% of patients were treated with sulfonylureas in acute phase of myocardial infarction. 33% of patients were discharged from hospital with insulin therapy. Intrahospital mortality was 9%, comparable with patients without diabetes.Conclusions. In 1999 was intrahospital treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in Celje General Hospital successful as their intrahospital mortality equaled non-diabetics. Treatment of diabetes itself, during hospitalization and after discharge, on the other hand, in 1999 had not been up to date according to results of recent studies. In our opinion, it is mandatory for diabetologist to make part of the team that treats diabetic with acute myocardial infarction

  2. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Tommi Bo; Hallberg, I.R.; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    and societal values, and micro level factors, such as organisation of care, nurse's competence and communication skills, seemingly governed nurses' collaboration with relatives. CONCLUSION: Although the nurses could be seen as mere victims of conflicting values, there appeared to be potential for improving....... OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated....... PARTICIPANTS: Six registered nurses and two auxiliary nurses in charge of discharge planning for the patients were included. METHOD: Open interviews using an interview guide. Manifest and latent content analysis was applied. RESULT: The main theme Encountering relatives-to be caught between ideals and practice...

  3. Variations in levels of care within a hospital provided to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations in levels of care within a hospital provided to acute trauma patients. WWD Stewart, Z Farina, DL Clarke. Abstract. Introduction. Caring for trauma patients is a dynamic process, and it is often necessary to move the trauma patient around the hospital to different locations. This study attempted to document the quality ...

  4. Use of Acute Care Hospitals by Long-Stay Patients: Who, How Much, and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coster, Carolyn; Bruce, Sharon; Kozyrskyj, Anita

    2005-01-01

    The effects of long-term hospitalizations can be severe, especially among older adults. In Manitoba, between fiscal years 1991/1992 and 1999/2000, 40 per cent of acute care hospital days were used by the 5 per cent of patients who had long stays, defined as stays of more than 30 days. These proportions were remarkably stable, despite major changes…

  5. In-Hospital Death Prediction in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Monhart, Z.; Reissigová, Jindra; Zvárová, Jana; Grünfeldová, H.; Janský, P.; Vojáček, J.; Widimský, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 52-52 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : acute coronary syndrome * in-hospital death * prediction * multilevel logistic regression * non-PCI hospital Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  6. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  7. Reiki and its journey into a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryak, Elizabeth; Vitale, Anne

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest among health care providers, especially professional nurses to promote caring-healing approaches in patient care and self-care. Health care environments are places of human caring and holistic nurses are helping to lead the way that contemporary health care institutions must become holistic places of healing. The practice of Reiki as well as other practices can assist in the creation of this transformative process. Abington Memorial Hospital (AMH) in Abington, Pennsylvania is a Magnet-designated health care facility with an Integrative Medicine Services Department. AMH's Integrative Medicine staff focuses on the integration of holistic practices, such as Reiki into traditional patient care. Reiki services at AMH were initiated about 10 years ago through the efforts of a Reiki practitioner/nurse and the vision that healing is facilitated through the nurturing of the mind, body, and spirit for healing and self-healing. AMHs-sustained Reiki program includes Reiki treatments and classes for patients, health care providers, and community members. This program has evolved to include a policy and annual competency for any Reiki-trained nurse and other employees to administer Reiki treatments at the bedside.

  8. Hospital quality measures: are process indicators associated with hospital standardized mortality ratios in French acute care hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantcha, Marcus; Le-Pogam, Marie-Annick; Calmus, Sophie; Grenier, Catherine; Evrard, Isabelle; Lamarche-Vadel, Agathe; Rey, Grégoire

    2017-08-22

    Results of associations between process and mortality indicators, both used for the external assessment of hospital care quality or public reporting, differ strongly across studies. However, most of those studies were conducted in North America or United Kingdom. Providing new evidence based on French data could fuel the international debate on quality of care indicators and help inform French policy-makers. The objective of our study was to explore whether optimal care delivery in French hospitals as assessed by their Hospital Process Indicators (HPIs) is associated with low Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios (HSMRs). The French National Authority for Health (HAS) routinely collects for each hospital located in France, a set of mandatory HPIs. Five HPIs were selected among the process indicators collected by the HAS in 2009. They were measured using random samples of 60 to 80 medical records from inpatients admitted between January 1st, 2009 and December 31, 2009 in respect with some selection criteria. HSMRs were estimated at 30, 60 and 90 days post-admission (dpa) using administrative health data extracted from the national health insurance information system (SNIIR-AM) which covers 77% of the French population. Associations between HPIs and HSMRs were assessed by Poisson regression models corrected for measurement errors with a simulation-extrapolation (SIMEX) method. Most associations studied were not statistically significant. Only two process indicators were found associated with HSMRs. Completeness and quality of anesthetic records was negatively associated with 30 dpa HSMR (0.72 [0.52-0.99]). Early detection of nutritional disorders was negatively associated with all HSMRs: 30 dpa HSMR (0.71 [0.54-0.95]), 60 dpa HSMR (0.51 [0.39-0.67]) and 90 dpa HSMR (0.52 [0.40-0.68]). In absence of gold standard of quality of care measurement, the limited number of associations suggested to drive in-depth improvements in order to better determine associations

  9. No Racial Difference in Rehabilitation Therapy Across All Post-Acute Care Settings in the Year Following a Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Feng, Chunyang; Burke, James F

    2017-12-01

    Black stroke survivors experience greater poststroke disability than whites. Differences in post-acute rehabilitation may contribute to this disparity. Therefore, we estimated racial differences in rehabilitation therapy utilization, intensity, and the number of post-acute care settings in the first year after a stroke. We used national Medicare data to study 186 168 elderly black and white patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of stroke in 2011. We tabulated the proportion of stroke survivors receiving physical, occupational, and speech and language therapy in each post-acute care setting (inpatient rehabilitation facility, skilled nursing facility, and home health agency), minutes of therapy, and number of transitions between settings. We then used generalized linear models to determine whether racial differences in minutes of physical therapy were influenced by demographics, comorbidities, thrombolysis, and markers of stroke severity. Black stroke patients were more likely to receive each type of therapy than white stroke patients. Compared with white stroke patients, black stroke patients received more minutes of physical therapy (897.8 versus 743.4; P rehabilitation therapy utilization or intensity after accounting for patient characteristics. It is unlikely that differences in rehabilitation utilization or intensity are important contributors to racial disparities in poststroke disability. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Twenty-Four-Hour Mobility During Acute Hospitalization in Older Medical Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inactivity during hospitalization in older medical patients may lead to functional decline. This study quantified 24-hour mobility, validated the accelerometers used, and assessed the daily level of basic mobility in acutely admitted older medical patients during their hospitalization....... METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study in older medical patients able to walk independently (ambulatory patients) and those not able to walk independently (nonambulatory patients) on admission. The 24-hour mobility level during hospitalization was assessed by measuring the time in lying, sitting......%-100% with positions performed by older medical patients. CONCLUSIONS: Older acutely hospitalized medical patients with walking ability spent 17h/d of their in-hospital time in bed, and the level of in-hospital mobility seemed to depend on the patients' level of basic mobility. The accelerometers were valid...

  11. Transient and persistent worsening renal function during hospitalization for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greiner, Melissa A; Sharma, Puza P; DeVore, Adam D; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2014-12-01

    Transient and persistent worsening renal function (WRF) may be associated with different risks during hospitalization for acute heart failure. We compared outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure with transient, persistent, or no WRF. We identified patients 65 years or older hospitalized with acute heart failure from a clinical registry linked to Medicare claims data. We defined WRF as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥ 0.3 mg/dL after admission. We further classified patients with WRF by the difference between admission and last recorded serum creatinine levels into transient WRF (acute heart failure were associated with higher adjusted risks for 90-day all-cause postadmission mortality. Patients with persistent WRF had worse outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Concordance and robustness of quality indicator sets for hospitals: an analysis of routine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Halim, Axel; Färber, Robert

    2011-05-18

    Hospitals are increasingly being evaluated with respect to the quality of provided care. In this setting, several indicator sets compete with one another for the assessment of effectiveness and safety. However, there have been few comparative investigations covering different sets. The objective of this study was to answer three questions: How concordant are different indicator sets on a hospital level? What is the effect of applying different reference values? How stable are the positions of a hospital ranking? Routine data were made available to three companies offering the Patient Safety Indicators, an indicator set from the HELIOS Hospital Group, and measurements based on Disease Staging™. Ten hospitals from North Rhine-Westphalia, comprising a total of 151,960 inpatients in 2006, volunteered to participate in this study. The companies provided standard quality reports for the ten hospitals. Composite measures were defined for strengths and weaknesses. In addition to the different indicator sets, different reference values for one set allowed the construction of several comparison groups. Concordance and robustness were analyzed using the non-parametric correlation coefficient and Kendall's W. Indicator sets differing only in the reference values of the indicators showed significant correlations in most of the pairs with respect to weaknesses (maximum r = 0.927, CI 0.714-0.983, p definition of quality, independent of their focus on patient safety, mortality, or length of stay. However, for most of the hospitals, changing the indicator set or the reference value resulted in a shift from the superior to the inferior half of the group or vice versa. Thus, while taken together the indicator sets offer the hospitals complementary pictures of their quality, on an individual basis they do not establish a reliable ranking.

  13. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers

  14. Absent cervical spine pedicle and associated congenital spinal abnormalities - a diagnostic trap in a setting of acute trauma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildermuth Simon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital spinal abnormalities can easily be misdiagnosed on plain radiographs. Additional imaging is warranted in doubtful cases, especially in a setting of acute trauma. Case Presentation This patient presented at the emergency unit of our university hospital after a motor vehicle accident and was sent to our radiology department for imaging of the cervical spine. Initial clinical examination and plain radiographs of the cervical spine were performed but not conclusive. Additional CT of the neck helped establish the right diagnosis. Conclusion CT as a three-dimensional imaging modality with the possibility of multiplanar reconstructions allows for the exact diagnosis and exclusion of acute traumatic lesions of the cervical spine, especially in cases of doubtful plain radiographs and when congenital spinal abnormalities like absent cervical spine pedicle with associated spina bifida may insinuate severe trauma.

  15. Absent cervical spine pedicle and associated congenital spinal abnormalities - a diagnostic trap in a setting of acute trauma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Andreisek, Gustav; Scheffel, Hans; Wildermuth, Simon; Leschka, Sebastian; Stolzmann, Paul

    2010-11-09

    Congenital spinal abnormalities can easily be misdiagnosed on plain radiographs. Additional imaging is warranted in doubtful cases, especially in a setting of acute trauma. This patient presented at the emergency unit of our university hospital after a motor vehicle accident and was sent to our radiology department for imaging of the cervical spine. Initial clinical examination and plain radiographs of the cervical spine were performed but not conclusive. Additional CT of the neck helped establish the right diagnosis. CT as a three-dimensional imaging modality with the possibility of multiplanar reconstructions allows for the exact diagnosis and exclusion of acute traumatic lesions of the cervical spine, especially in cases of doubtful plain radiographs and when congenital spinal abnormalities like absent cervical spine pedicle with associated spina bifida may insinuate severe trauma.

  16. Older Patients in the Acute Setting - Is There a Better Solution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressel, Eckart; Reichstein Wejse, Miriam; Demény, Ann Kathrin

    Background A substantial amount of older (>65 years) patients admitted to the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) at Bispebjerg Hospital are often characterized by complex health related and medication problems, functional loss and atypical presentation of symptoms. We established a Geriatric Acute Team (GATE....... The control group received treatment after usual standard at the AMU, whereas, the case group received an acute geriatric assessment and follow-up in GATE conducted by a senior consultant in geriatric medicine. Data were retrieved from the patient’s medical journals and included demographic and medical...... and 58 % had more than 3 simultaneous present diseases. Implementing GATE resulted in shorter hospitalization times at AMU (p=0.03), fewer doctors attending the single patient (p=0.02), fewer 30-day readmission (p=0.05) and more patients being transferred to the geriatric ward (p=0.002). Conclusion...

  17. [Total cholesterol levels predict in-hospital mortality in patients with acute heart failure aged 70 years or older].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Palomas, Juan L; Gámez-López, Antonio L; Moreno-Conde, Mirian; López-Ibáñez, Cristina; Ramiro-Ortega, Esmeralda; Castellano-García, Patricia; Villar-Ráez, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Lower total cholesterol (TC) levels have been associated with increased mortality In both acute and chronic heart failure (HF) patients. The present study sought to evaluate the impact of TC levels on in-hospital mortality in patients with acute HF aged 70 years or older. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on TC (mg/dL) quartiles (Q) as follow: Q1 (CT≤125), Q2-Q3 (CT 126-174), Q4 (CT≥175). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the association of each variable with hypocholesterolaemia and in-hospital mortality. The analysis included 301 patients with acute HF. The mean age was 79.3±5.5 years, and 51.2% of patients had HF with depressed systolic function, and the most frequent aetiology was ischaemic heart disease (40.9%). Higher C-reactive protein levels, lower levels of serum albumin and haemoglobin, and lower left ventricle ejection fraction were independently associated with hypocholesterolaemia. There 26 deaths (8.6% of the series) during hospitalization. In-hospital mortality decreased in a stepwise fashion with increasing quartile of TC: Q1 14.3%, Q2-Q3 8.7% and Q4 2.7% (P=.04), and was independently associated with higher serum creatinine levels and lower serum albumin and TC levels. Lower TC levels independently predict increased in-hospital mortality risk in older patients with acute HF. A higher inflammatory activity, associated with a lower total cholesterol in this clinical setting may explain the inverse relationship between cholesterol and mortality. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of 8000 hospital admissions for acute poisoning in a rural area of Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Hoek, Wim; Konradsen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    : To estimate trends in incidence and causes of acute poisoning over time in rural Sri Lanka, and to assess the possible impact of policies that aimed to restrict availability of highly toxic pesticides. METHODS: Time series of incidence of acute poisoning based on retrospective in-patient records of six...... government hospitals in southern Sri Lanka from 1990 to 2002. RESULTS: Data of 8,110 admissions for acute poisoning were available for analysis. Most cases were young adults, who deliberately self-poisoned themselves with pesticides, males outnumbering females. Average incidence rate of acute poisoning over...

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN HOSPITALIZED IN THE CLINIC IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Kovalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study of the etiological structure and clinical features of acute intestinal infections of viral, bacterial and mixed etiology in children hospitalized in a specialized department of Children's Clinical Hospital №9 named G. N. Speransky, city of Moscow in 2008—2016. It was found that during 9 years of follow-up, the number of hospitalized patients with acute intestinal infections does not have an obvious tendency to decrease. More than half of hos-pitalized patients are children 1—7 years old. Among the reasons for acute intestinal infections of established etiology, viral agents (rotaviruses and noroviruses prevail. Among bacterial intestinal infections, the most urgent are salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis and staphylococcal infection.  

  20. Health professionals' perspectives of providing care to people with dementia in the acute setting: Toward better practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbasi, Sally; Jones, Jacqueline; Lockwood, Craig; Emden, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    This article reports an interpretative research project about the care of patients with dementia admitted to the acute setting with a non-dementia-related illness. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 25 medical, nursing, and other health care professionals drawn from 3 metropolitan teaching hospitals in Australia. Qualitative data analysis generated 5 major themes relating to the built environment and organizational "system" as determinants of practice, the influence of key players, current dementia care management, and ideal dementia care management. Results showed acute care hospitals are not the best place for people with dementia and can negatively influence health outcomes such as functional independence and quality of life. Participants reported attempts to provide best practice but experienced major constraints stemming largely from environmental, sociocultural, and economic issues. Recommendations include the delivery of acute services in tandem with dementia services and a whole organization shift in thinking away from what conveniently suits the institution to thinking that is person-centered and dementia-friendly. With support from executive-level management, nurses can play a leading role in the implementation of practice change.

  1. A systematic review of team-building interventions in non-acute healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher J; Kim, Bo; Silverman, Allie; Bauer, Mark S

    2018-03-01

    Healthcare is increasingly delivered in a team-based format emphasizing interdisciplinary coordination. While recent reviews have investigated team-building interventions primarily in acute healthcare settings (e.g. emergency or surgery departments), we aimed to systematically review the evidence base for team-building interventions in non-acute settings (e.g. primary care or rehabilitation clinics). We conducted a systematic review in PubMed and Embase to identify team-building interventions, and conducted follow-up literature searches to identify articles describing empirical studies of those interventions. This process identified 14 team-building interventions for non-acute healthcare settings, and 25 manuscripts describing empirical studies of these interventions. We evaluated outcomes in four domains: trainee evaluations, teamwork attitudes/knowledge, team functioning, and patient impact. Trainee evaluations for team-building interventions were generally positive, but only one study associated team-building with statistically significant improvement in teamwork attitudes/knowledge. Similarly mixed results emerged for team functioning and patient impact. The evidence base for healthcare team-building interventions in non-acute healthcare settings is much less developed than the parallel literature for short-term team function in acute care settings. Only one intervention we identified has been tested in multiple non-acute settings by distinct research teams. Positive findings regarding the utility of team-building interventions are tempered by a lack of control conditions, inconsistency in outcome measures, and high probability of bias. Considering these results alongside the well-recognized costs of poor healthcare teamwork suggests that additional research is sorely needed to develop the evidence base for team-building in non-acute settings.

  2. Unplanned Hospital Visits - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the...

  3. Unplanned Hospital Visits - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  4. Nationwide trends of hospital admissions for acute cholecystitis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Jobanputra, Yash; Garg, Sushil K; Patwardhan, Soumil; Mehta, Dhruv; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R

    2017-02-01

    Acute cholecystitis is a fairly common inpatient diagnosis among the gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to use a national database of US hospitals to evaluate the incidence and costs of hospital admissions associated with acute cholecystitis. We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample Database (NIS) for all patients in which acute cholecystitis (ICD-9 codes: 574.00, 574.01, 574.30, 574.31, 574.60, 574.61 or 575.0) was the principal discharge diagnosis from 1997 to 2012. The NIS is the largest all-payer inpatient database in the United States and contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each year. The statistical significance of the difference in the number of hospital discharges, lengths of stay and associated hospital costs over the study period was determined by using the Chi-square test for trends. In 1997, there were 149 661 hospital admissions with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, which increased to 215 995 in 2012 ( P cholecystitis decreased by 17% between 1997 and 2012 (i.e. from 4.7 days to 3.9 days; (P cholecystitis has increased significantly in the United States over the last 16 years, along with a great increase in the associated hospital charges. However, there has been a gradual decline in the mean length of stay. Inpatient costs associated with acute cholecystitis contribute significantly to the total healthcare bill. Further research on cost-effective evaluation and management of acute cholecystitis is required. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  5. Setting up a child eye care centre: the Mercy Eye Hospital, Abak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To document and share our experience in setting up a Child Eye Care Centre within a rural mission eye hospital and document subsequent development of services. Method: The location of the project was Mercy Eye Hospital (MEH) Abak, Akwa Ibom State in the South South zone of Nigeria). Consent to commence ...

  6. Nurse perceptions of safety climate in Australian acute hospitals: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Sze-Ee; Morello, Renata; Rifat, Sheral; Brand, Caroline; Barker, Anna

    2017-03-16

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to explore nurse perceptions of safety climate in acute Australian hospitals. Methods Participants included 420 nurses who have worked on 24 acute wards from six Australian hospitals. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) Short Form was used to quantify nurse perceptions of safety climate and benchmarked against international data. Generalised linear mixed models were used to explore factors that may influence safety climate. Results On average, 53.5% of nurses held positive attitudes towards job satisfaction followed by teamwork climate (50.5%). There was variability in SAQ domain scores across hospitals. The safety climate and perceptions of hospital management domains also varied across wards within a hospital. Nurses who had worked longer at a hospital were more likely to have poorer perceptions of hospital management (β=-5.2; P=0.014). Overall, nurse perceptions of safety climate appeared higher than international data. Conclusions The perceptions of nurses working in acute Victorian and New South Wales hospitals varied between hospitals as well as across wards within each hospital. This highlights the importance of surveying all hospital wards and examining the results at the ward level when implementing strategies to improve patient safety and the culture of safety in organisations. What is known about the topic? Prior studies in American nursing samples have shown that hospitals with higher levels of safety climate have a lower relative incidence of preventable patient complications and adverse events. Developing a culture of safety in hospitals may be useful in targeting efforts to improve patient safety. What does this paper add? This paper has shown that the perceptions of safety climate among nurses working in acute Australian hospitals varied between hospitals and across wards within a hospital. Only half the nurses also reported positive attitudes towards job satisfaction and teamwork climate. What are

  7. What can we learn about patient safety from information sources within an acute hospital: a step on the ladder of integrated risk management?

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, H; Olsen, S; Scobie, S; Chapman, E; Sachs, R; McKee, M; Vincent, C; Thomson, R

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the utility of data already existing within hospitals for monitoring patient safety. SETTING: An acute hospital in southern England. DESIGN: Mapping of data sources proposed by staff as potentially able to identify patient safety issues followed by an in-depth analysis of the content of seven key sources. Data source analysis: For each data source: scope and depth of content in relation to patient safety, number and type of patient safety incidents identified, degree of o...

  8. Concordance and robustness of quality indicator sets for hospitals: an analysis of routine data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Färber Robert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals are increasingly being evaluated with respect to the quality of provided care. In this setting, several indicator sets compete with one another for the assessment of effectiveness and safety. However, there have been few comparative investigations covering different sets. The objective of this study was to answer three questions: How concordant are different indicator sets on a hospital level? What is the effect of applying different reference values? How stable are the positions of a hospital ranking? Methods Routine data were made available to three companies offering the Patient Safety Indicators, an indicator set from the HELIOS Hospital Group, and measurements based on Disease Staging™. Ten hospitals from North Rhine-Westphalia, comprising a total of 151,960 inpatients in 2006, volunteered to participate in this study. The companies provided standard quality reports for the ten hospitals. Composite measures were defined for strengths and weaknesses. In addition to the different indicator sets, different reference values for one set allowed the construction of several comparison groups. Concordance and robustness were analyzed using the non-parametric correlation coefficient and Kendall's W. Results Indicator sets differing only in the reference values of the indicators showed significant correlations in most of the pairs with respect to weaknesses (maximum r = 0.927, CI 0.714-0.983, p Conclusions Our results reveal an unsettling lack of concordance in estimates of hospital performance when different quality indicator sets are used. These findings underline the lack of consensus regarding optimal validated measures for judging hospital quality. The indicator sets shared a common definition of quality, independent of their focus on patient safety, mortality, or length of stay. However, for most of the hospitals, changing the indicator set or the reference value resulted in a shift from the superior to the

  9. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis......: Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between...

  10. Nursing students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in placements outside traditional hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida T; Berntsen, Karin; Brynildsen, Grethe; Hestetun, Margrete

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explore students' opinions of the learning environment during clinical placement in settings outside traditional hospital settings. Background Clinical placement experiences may influence positively on nursing students attitudes towards the clinical setting in question. Most studies exploring the quality of clinical placements have targeted students' experience in hospital settings. The number of studies exploring students' experiences of the learning environment in healthcare settings outside of the hospital venue does not match the growing importance of such settings in the delivery of health care, nor the growing number of nurses needed in these venues. Design A survey design was used. Method The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory was administered to two cohorts of undergraduate nursing students (n = 184) after clinical placement in mental health care, home care and nursing home care. Results Nursing students' overall contentment with the learning environment was quite similar across all three placement areas. Students in mental health care had significantly higher scores on the subscale individualisation, and older students had significantly higher scores on the total scale. Compared with other studies where the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory has been used, the students' total scores in this study are similar or higher than scores in studies including students from hospital settings. Conclusion Results from this study negate the negative views on clinical placements outside the hospital setting, especially those related to placements in nursing homes and mental healthcare settings. Relevance to clinical practice Students' experience of the learning environment during placements in mental health care, home care and nursing homes indicates the relevance of clinical education in settings outside the hospital setting. PMID:24460862

  11. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghani, Hyder O; Elnour, Mohammed A; Taha, Akasha M; Elbadawi, Abdulateef S

    2016-01-01

    Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05). Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  12. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyder O Mirghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05. Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  13. Effects of Structured Exercise Interventions for Older Adults Hospitalized with Acute Medical Illness: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanach, Frances A; Pastva, Amy M; Hall, Katherine S; Pavon, Juliessa M; Morey, Miriam C

    2017-06-12

    This review examined effects of structured exercise (aerobic walking, with or without complementary modes of exercise) on cardiorespiratory measures, mobility, functional status, healthcare utilization, and Quality of Life in older adults (≥60 years) hospitalized for acute medical illness. Inclusion required exercise protocol, at least one patient-level or utilization outcome, and at least one physical assessment point during hospitalization or within 1 month of intervention. MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL databases were searched for studies published from 2000 to March 2015. Qualitative synthesis of 12 articles, reporting on 11 randomized controlled (RCT) and quasi-experimental studies described a heterogeneous set of exercise programs and reported mixed results across outcome categories. Methodological quality was independently assessed by 2 reviewers using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias tool. Larger, well-designed RCTs are needed, incorporating measurement of pre-morbid function, randomization with intention-to-treat analysis, examination of a targeted intervention with pre-defined intensity, and reported adherence and attrition.

  14. The oral health status of older patients in acute care on admission and Day 7 in two Australian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibney, Jennifer Mary; Wright, Clive; Sharma, Anita; D'Souza, Mario; Naganathan, Vasi

    2017-09-01

    to determine the oral health status of older patients in acute care wards at admission and after 7 days. a prospective descriptive study was conducted in two acute tertiary referral hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Oral health was assessed on admission (within 24 h) and Day 7 using the Oral Health Assessment Tool. a total of 575 patients were admitted under the Geriatric teams at the two hospitals. Four hundred and thirty-five (76%) patients had oral cleanliness (debris) scores in the 'not healthy' range with food particles, tartar or plaque evident in at least one area in most areas of the mouth, teeth or dentures. At Day 7 206 were reassessed. One hundred and forty-nine patients (73%) were in the 'not healthy' range and of these 127 (62%) had the same score as on admission. poor oral health is common in older people admitted to hospital acute care wards and does not improve over a 7-day period. Given the link between oral health and general health the next steps are to determine how oral health can be improved in this setting and see whether this leads to better patient outcomes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Nationwide trends of hospital admissions for acute cholecystitis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Jobanputra, Yash; Garg, Sushil K; Patwardhan, Soumil; Mehta, Dhruv

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Acute cholecystitis is a fairly common inpatient diagnosis among the gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to use a national database of US hospitals to evaluate the incidence and costs of hospital admissions associated with acute cholecystitis. Method: We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample Database (NIS) for all patients in which acute cholecystitis (ICD-9 codes: 574.00, 574.01, 574.30, 574.31, 574.60, 574.61 or 575.0) was the principal discharge diagnosis from 1997 to 2012. The NIS is the largest all-payer inpatient database in the United States and contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each year. The statistical significance of the difference in the number of hospital discharges, lengths of stay and associated hospital costs over the study period was determined by using the Chi-square test for trends. Results: In 1997, there were 149 661 hospital admissions with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, which increased to 215 995 in 2012 ( P cholecystitis decreased by 17% between 1997 and 2012 (i.e. from 4.7 days to 3.9 days; (P cholecystitis has increased significantly in the United States over the last 16 years, along with a great increase in the associated hospital charges. However, there has been a gradual decline in the mean length of stay. Inpatient costs associated with acute cholecystitis contribute significantly to the total healthcare bill. Further research on cost-effective evaluation and management of acute cholecystitis is required. PMID:27174434

  16. Prediction of behavioural and cognitive deficits in patients with traumatic brain injury at an acute rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guise, E; LeBlanc, J; Feyz, M; Lamoureux, J; Greffou, S

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors that would predict short-term neuropsychological outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) hospitalized in an acute rehabilitation setting. Data was collected in the context of an acute early rehabilitation setting of a trauma centre. A brief neuropsychological assessment was carried out for 348 patients within a month following their trauma. Length of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) was the best predictor of behavioural, memory and executive function variables within a month post TBI. The odds of being agitated, labile, irritable and disinhibited at one month post trauma were almost six times higher for those with PTA that lasted more than 7 days compared to those with a PTA of less than 24 hours. Also, the odds of having a higher mental manipulation score (less significant executive function impairment) were almost two times lower for those with frontal lesions, and three to six times lower for those with PTA of more than 24 hours. In addition, TBI severity, education and age were considered good predictors of some aspects of neuropsychological outcome. This model may help clinicians and administrators recognize the probable post-traumatic deficits as quickly as possible and to plan interventions as well as post-acute discharge orientation accordingly and early on.

  17. The effect of hospital volume on patient outcomes in severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hsiu-Nien

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relation between hospital volume and outcome in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. The determination is important because patient outcome may be improved through volume-based selective referral. Methods In this cohort study, we analyzed 22,551 SAP patients in 2,208 hospital-years (between 2000 and 2009 from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Primary outcome was hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay and charges. Hospital SAP volume was measured both as categorical and as continuous variables (per one case increase each hospital-year. The effect was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations accounting for hospital clustering effect. Adjusted covariates included patient and hospital characteristics (model 1, and additional treatment variables (model 2. Results Irrespective of the measurements, increasing hospital volume was associated with reduced risk of hospital mortality after adjusting the patient and hospital characteristics (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.995, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.993-0.998 for per one case increase. The patients treated in the highest volume quartile (≥14 cases per hospital-year had 42% lower risk of hospital mortality than those in the lowest volume quartile (1 case per hospital-year after adjusting the patient and hospital characteristics (adjusted OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.83. However, an inverse relation between volume and hospital stay or hospital charges was observed only when the volume was analyzed as a categorical variable. After adjusting the treatment covariates, the volume effect on hospital mortality disappeared regardless of the volume measures. Conclusions These findings support the use of volume-based selective referral for patients with SAP and suggest that differences in levels or processes of care among hospitals may have contributed to the volume

  18. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-10-31

    The oral health of older people in acute hospitals has rarely been studied. Hospital admission provides a prime opportunity for identification and rectification of problems, and oral health promotion. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presents the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. Searches of electronic databases and the websites of relevant professional health service bodies in the UK were undertaken to identify articles and guidelines. The literature shows a high prevalence of oro-dental disease in this population, with many known detrimental effects, combined with suboptimal oral hygiene and mouth care provision in acute hospitals. Several guidelines exist, although the emphasis on oral health is weaker than other aspects of hospital care. Older adults admitted to acute hospitals have a high burden of oro-dental disease and oral and mouth care needs, but care provision tends to be suboptimal. The literature is growing, but this area is still relatively neglected. Great potential exists to develop oral and mouth care in this context. The second part of this article explores clinical recommendations. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  19. Serum zinc levels in hospitalized children with acute lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Macronutrient deficiency has continued to attract significant research interest, whereas the import of micronutrients like zinc has only recently become the focus of interest. Thus against the background of a dearth of data on zinc levels in Nigerian children with Acute Lower Respiratory Infection (ALRI), this study ...

  20. Acute intoxications in two university hospitals in Burkina Faso ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    70.8%) were more common than intentional (28.9) and suicidal attempts (0.3%). Among poisoned-patients, female patients represented a great majority. Pharmaceuticals were the most common cause of acute intoxication, followed by chemicals, ...

  1. Surgically treated acute abdomen at Gondar University Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: This study has shown what the commonest symptoms of acute abdomen are and that the outcome of emergency laparotomy may be affected by different factors. Some of these factors were duration of illness, age, presence of peritonitis, Haematocrit level and complication detection time. Since the management ...

  2. Acute pancreatitis at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONCLUSIONS: The current management of acute pancreatitis at AKUH is physician dependant and not in conformity with the established and recommended guidelines. The CT scans were over-prescribed, their timing inappropriate and efforts to exclude the cause of pancreatitis moderate. The mortality rate is acceptable ...

  3. Multidisciplinary team interventions to optimise health outcomes for older people in acute care settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Louise D; Phillips, Jane L; Newton, Phillip J; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Al Abed, Naser; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge facing our health care systems internationally is managing the needs of increasing numbers of older people in hospital with chronic and complex conditions. A multidisciplinary approach is considered central to tailoring and targeting approaches to gerontological care, although this is often not realised in reality. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is seen as gold standard, though they are not readily available in many acute settings, compounded by the requirement for time, coordination of multidisciplinary specialties, and reimbursement issues. This systematic review aimed to identify multidisciplinary team interventions to optimise health outcomes for older people in acute care settings. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials reporting acute care multidisciplinary team based interventions, to improve care outcomes for hospitalised older people. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL (EBSCO), Cochrane and PsycINFO) were searched from 1 January 2000 to 1 July 2014 in the English language. Data was extracted by two reviewers and checked by a third reviewer to resolve any conflicts. Seven articles reporting RCTs met the systematic review inclusion criteria. The heterogeneity of study populations, multidisciplinary team interventions and outcome measures necessitated the use of narrative analysis. Three common elements of these studies included: (i) tailored treatment by clinicians with geriatric expertise (ii) a focus on transitional care interventions that enhance discharge planning; and (iii) communication an essential ingredient to improving care. The tailoring of treatment, underpinned with clear communication strategies can reduce emergency department re-admission rates, mortality and functional decline of older people. Refining health professionals roles and responsibilities within transition models is an essential component that can improve health outcomes for older people in acute care settings. Crown Copyright © 2015

  4. Esophagus and contralateral lung-sparing IMRT for locally advanced lung cancer in the community hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny eKao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal technique for performing lung IMRT remains poorly defined. We hypothesize that improved dose distributions associated with normal tissue sparing IMRT can allow for safe dose escalation resulting in decreased acute and late toxicity. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 consecutive lung cancer patients treated with curative intent from 1/10 to 9/14. From 1/10 to 4/12, 44 patients were treated with the community standard of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or IMRT without specific esophagus or contralateral lung constraints (standard RT. From 5/12 to 9/14, 38 patients were treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT with selective sparing of contralateral lung and esophagus. The study endpoints were dosimetry, toxicity and overall survival.Results: Despite higher mean prescribed radiation doses in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT cohort (64.5 Gy vs. 60.8 Gy, p=0.04, patients treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT had significantly lower lung V20, V10, V5, mean lung, maximum esophagus and mean esophagus doses compared to patients treated with standard RT (p≤0.001. Patients in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT group had reduced acute grade ≥3 esophagitis (0% vs. 11%, p<0.001, acute grade ≥2 weight loss (2% vs. 16%, p=0.04, late grade ≥2 pneumonitis (7% vs. 21%, p=0.02. The 2-year overall survival was 52% with normal tissue-sparing IMRT arm compared to 28% for standard RT (p=0.015.Conclusion: These data provide proof of principle that suboptimal radiation dose distributions are associated with significant acute and late lung and esophageal toxicity that may result in hospitalization or even premature mortality. Strict attention to contralateral lung and esophageal dose volume constraints are feasible in the community hospital setting without sacrificing disease control.

  5. The Influence of Hyperglycemia at Admission on In-hospital Arrhythmia Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fariz M.Z Zein

    2015-12-01

    were no association between type of ACS, diabetes mellitus (DM, obesity, and hypertension, with the in-hospital arrhythmias. In multivariate analysis, the adjusted OR of HA was 2.85 (95% CI 1.35-6.02, and DM was the confounding variable. Conclusion: the incidence of in-hospital arrhythmias in patients with ACS was 21.55% (95% CI 16.26-26.84. Hyperglycemia at admission may increase the risk of in-hospital arrhythmia in patients with ACS. Key words: hyperglycemia at admission; in-hospital arrhythmia; acute coronary syndrome

  6. Epidemiology of acute hepatitis B in a university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil: retrospective study of two five-year periods

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraz, Maria Lúcia Gomes; Yoradjian, Alessandra; Barbieri, Andrea; Figueiredo, Virginia; Lopes Neto, Edmundo; Cruz, Cibele Nascimento; Silva, Antonio Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    CONTEXT: HBV infection is endemic in Brazil and acute HBV infection is still a common disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze incidence, risk factors and evolution of acute HBV infection. SETTING: University Hospital. PATIENTS: 357 patients with acute HBV infection, comparing two periods: 1985-1989 vs. 1990-1994. RESULTS: The overall incidence declined from 50 new cases/year in 1985-89 (30% of all cases) to 25 new cases/year in 1990-94 (8% of all cases). Transmission among male homosexuals (3.9% of ca...

  7. Trends of hospitalizations, fatality rate and costs for acute myocardial infarction among Spanish diabetic adults, 2001-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez-García Rodrigo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is one of the more frequent reasons diabetic patients are admitted to hospital, and there are reports that the long-term prognosis after an AMI is much worse in these patients than in non-diabetic patients. This study aims to compare hospital admissions and costs in Spanish diabetic and non-diabetic subjects due to AMI during the period 2001-2006. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 6 years of national hospitalization data associated with diabetes using the Minimum Basic Data Set. National hospitalization rates were calculated for AMI among diabetic and non-diabetic adults. Fatality rates, mean hospital stay and direct medical costs related to hospitalization were analyzed. Costs were calculated using Diagnosis-Related Groups for AMI in diabetics and non-diabetics patients. Results During the study period, a total of 307,099 patients with AMI were admitted to Spanish hospitals. Diabetic patients made up 29.6% of the total. The estimated incidence due to AMI in diabetics increased from 54.7 cases per 100,000 in 2001 to 64.1 in 2006. Diabetic patients had significantly higher mortality than nondiabetic patients after adjusting for age, gender, and year (OR 1.11 [95% CI, 1.08-1.14]. The cost among diabetic patients increased by 21.3% from 2001 to 2006. Conclusions Diabetic patients have higher rates of hospital admission and fatality rates during the hospitalization after an AMI than nondiabetic patients. Diabetic adults who have suffered an AMI have a greater than expected increase in direct hospital costs over the period 2001-2006.

  8. Acute pulmonary oedema: clinical characteristics, prognostic factors, and in-hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parissis, John T; Nikolaou, Maria; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Delgado, Juan; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Mc Lean, Antony; Kremastinos, Dimitrios; Follath, Ferenc

    2010-11-01

    Acute pulmonary oedema (APE) is the second, after acutely decompensated chronic heart failure (ADHF), most frequent form of acute heart failure (AHF). This subanalysis examines the clinical profile, prognostic factors, and management of APE patients (n = 1820, 36.7%) included in the Acute Heart Failure Global Survey of Standard Treatment (ALARM-HF). ALARM-HF included a total of 4953 patients hospitalized for AHF in Europe, Latin America, and Australia. The final diagnosis was made at discharge, and patients were classified according to European Society of Cardiology guidelines. Patients with APE had higher in-hospital mortality (7.4 vs. 6.0%, P = 0.057) compared with ADHF patients (n = 1911, 38.5%), and APE patients exhibited higher systolic blood pressures (P chronic renal disease (P renal function, and history may identify high-risk APE patients.

  9. Acute traumatic and depressive symptoms in family members of hospitalized individuals with delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Robert B; Rosenthal, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    This study characterized symptoms of acute stress and depression in caregivers present during the hospitalization of a loved one with delirium. This is an observational, cross-sectional analysis of caregivers of patients hospitalized with delirium. Standardized questionnaires were used in caregiver interviews to assess psychological reactions to traumatic situations and understanding of medical care. Of the 40 caregivers recruited, half had significant symptoms of acute stress and 12.5% of caregivers were highly symptomatic across all domains related to trauma. Elevated acute stress was positively correlated with both past or current depression and prior mental health treatment (p delirium as having a negative impact on their lives were also at elevated risk (p delirium are at elevated risk for experiencing severe acute traumatic and depressive symptoms, and this response might place them at risk for developing traumatic disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. [Application of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-min; Wang, Peng; Chen, Jie; Luo, Dan-hong; Shen, Wang-ming

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of stroke rehabilitation unit in municipal hospitals during the acute phase of cerebral infarction. 77 acute cerebral infarction patients were randomly assigned to stroke rehabilitation unit group and 73 to ordinary group. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), activities of daily living (ADL) Barthel index and average hospitalized time were compared in two groups before and after the treatment. The average NIHSS in two groups before treatment were 9.26 and 9.12 respectively (P > 0.05) but became 2.62 and 7.64 after treatment (P 0.05) but 87.26 and 64.20 after the treatment (P rehabilitation unit being applied in the acute phase of cerebral infarction, it showed positive results in the following aspects as: improving the neurological function, capabilities of managing daily life, and also shortening the days of hospitalization.

  11. Analysis of Hospital Charges of Inpatients with Acute Ischemic Stroke in Beijing, China, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Dehui; Liu, Xiaole; Lian, Hui; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Yakun; Xu, Qun; Peng, Bin; Wang, Haitao; Fang, Quan; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Kangan; Jin, Xiaofeng; Fan, Zhongjie

    2018-02-08

    The study aimed to analyze the hospital charges of the inpatients with acute ischemic stroke in Beijing and determine the factors associated with hospital costs. Medical records of hospitalized patients with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke according to International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes were collected from 121 hospitals in Beijing from March 1, 2012, to February 28, 2015. Distribution characteristics of hospital charges for different hospital levels (level 2 hospitals and level 3 hospitals) and types (Western medicine hospitals and Chinese medicine hospitals) were studied. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association among hospital costs and factors that influenced total hospital charges. There were 158,781 admissions for ischemic stroke, 63.1% of the patients were male and their mean age was 67.7 ± 12.4 years, the median length of hospital stay (LOHS) was 13.5 days (interquartile range 9.9-18.1 days). The median hospital charge was 2,112 (1,436-3,147) US dollars. Of these, 46.7% were for medicine, 21.1% for laboratory and examination, and 16.3% for therapy. LOHS, hospital level, and pulmonary infection were key determinants of the hospital charges. The proportion of medicine fees for the ischemic stroke inpatients showed a downward trend during the period from 2012 to 2015, but medicine fees still accounted for the largest percentage of hospital charges in China. LOHS emerged to be the main determinant of the cost. Decreasing medicine fees and LOHS might be strategies to decrease hospital charges and reduce economic burden of stroke in China. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... basket index for IPPS hospitals in all areas less 2.0 percentage for hospitals that fail to submit...: Final Fiscal Year 2010 Wage Indices and Payment Rates Implementing the Affordable Care Act AGENCY... final wage indices, hospital reclassifications, payment rates, impacts, and other related tables...

  13. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the administration of vaccines by...--Program Administration, Validation, and Reconsideration Issues. Shaheen Halim, (410) 786-0641, Hospital... Federation of American Hospitals FDA Food and Drug Administration FFY Federal fiscal year FPL Federal poverty...

  14. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... are revising the conditions of participation (CoPs) for hospitals relating to the administration of... and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing--Program Administration, Validation, and Reconsideration Issues... Financing Administration HCO High-cost outlier HCRIS Hospital Cost Report Information System HHA Home health...

  15. Manual cleaning of hospital mattresses: an observational study comparing high- and low-resource settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, J.; Hakizimana, B.; Meintjes, W.A.; Nillessen, M.; Both, E. de; Voss, A.; Mehtar, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are more frequently encountered in low- than in high-resource settings. There is a need to identify and implement feasible and sustainable approaches to strengthen HAI prevention in low-resource settings. AIM: To evaluate the biological contamination

  16. Predictors of oedema among children hospitalized with severe acute malnutrition in Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girma, Tsinuel; Kæstel, Pernille; Mølgaard, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition has two main clinical manifestations, i.e., oedematous and non-oedematous. However, factors of oedema are not well established.......Severe acute malnutrition has two main clinical manifestations, i.e., oedematous and non-oedematous. However, factors of oedema are not well established....

  17. Falls in hospital and new placement in a nursing home among older people hospitalized with acute illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, David; Hartwell, Tabitha J

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association between falls in hospital and new placement in a nursing home among older people hospitalized with acute illness. This prospective cohort study of 2,945 consecutive patients discharged alive from an acute geriatric medicine service used multivariate logistic regression to model the association between one or more falls and nursing home placement (primary analysis). Secondary analyses stratified falls by injury and occurrence of multiple falls. Demographic, medical, and frailty measures were considered in adjusted models. The mean age of all patients was 82.8±7.6 years and 94% were admitted through the emergency department. During a median length of stay (LOS) of 11 days, 257 (8.7%) patients had a fall. Of these, 66 (25.7%) sustained an injury and 53 (20.6%) had two or more falls. Compared with nonfallers, fallers were more likely to be placed in a nursing home (odds ratio [OR]: 2.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.37-3.00), after adjustment for age, sex, frailty, and selected medical variables (including dementia and delirium). Patients without injury (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.17-2.85) and those with injury (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.15-4.77) were also more likely to be placed. Patients who fell had a longer LOS (median 19 days vs 10 days; Polder people in acute care shows that falls in the hospital are significantly associated with new placement in a nursing home. Given the predominantly negative experiences and the financial costs associated with placement in a nursing home, fall prevention should be a high priority in older people hospitalized with acute illness.

  18. Pre-hospital delay in Vietnamese patients hospitalized with a first acute myocardial infarction: A short report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L.; Phan, Dat T.; Ha, Duc A.; Nguyen, Quang N.; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Administration of coronary reperfusion therapy to patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) within the proper timeframe is essential in avoiding clinical complications and death. However, the extent of pre-hospital delay is unexplored in Vietnam. This report aims to describe the duration of pre-hospital delay of Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the Vietnam National Heart Institute .   Methods: A total of 103 Hanoi residents hospitalized at the largest tertiary care medical center in the city for first AMI, who have information on  prehospital delay was included in this report. Results: One third of the study sample was women and mean age was 66 years. The mean and median pre-hospital delay duration were 14.9 hours and 4.8 hours, respectively. The proportion of patients who delayed pre-hospital delay is often observed in patients with a first AMI in Vietnam. In order to confirm these preliminary descriptive findings, a full-scale investigation of all Hanoi residents hospitalized with first AMI is needed. Increasing public awareness about AMI treatment is vital in encouraging patients to seek medical care timely after experiencing AMI symptoms such that received treatment is most effective. PMID:29445447

  19. Nursing practice in nutritional care: a comparison between a residential aged care setting and a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sandra; McCutcheon, Helen; Parker, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    To explore the similarities and differences in the nursing practice in nutritional care between a residential aged care setting and a hospital setting. Despite being preventable and treatable, undernutrition remains a problem for many older people in residential aged care and hospital settings. Nurses have a crucial role in assisting people who are unable to eat independently and are uniquely positioned to implement solutions that will lead to better nutritional care. During 2007-2010, an action research study was conducted, underpinned by the principles of the participatory world view to address undernutrition in a residential aged care setting and a hospital setting. The multimethod approach of data and between-method triangulation were used to collect and analyse qualitative non-participant observations and action research group data. Non-participant observations and action research group data were qualitatively analysed using the Analytic Hierarchy. How nurses chose to participate in the provision of nutritional care and assert their autonomy when changing practice to nutritional care affected the quality of the resident/patient mealtime experience. Operational efficiency influenced the choices that nurses made about the type of intervention to implement to improve nursing practice in nutritional care. Nurses required management approval to change practice in nutritional care. The reasons for undernutrition are multifactorial and more research is needed to investigate the organizational structures and processes that affect the delivery of nutritional care across role functions, how these affect the continuity of care and the nurses' role in defining the culture around resident/patient mealtimes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Predictors of pre-hospital delay in Hong Kong Chinese patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Polly Wc; Yu, Doris Sf

    2018-01-01

    The pre-hospital delay to seek care remains the most significant barrier for effective management of acute myocardial infarction. Many of the previous studies mainly took place in Western countries. Few data are available about the care-seeking behavior of Hong Kong Chinese. The purpose of this study was to identify the predictors of pre-hospital delay in care seeking among Hong Kong Chinese patients with acute myocardial infarction. Adult Chinese patients ( n=301) with a confirmed diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction were recruited from the cardiac units of three regional hospitals in Hong Kong. Various socio-demographic, clinical, symptom presentation characteristics and patient perceptual factors were considered as potential predictors. Multivariate analysis was conducted to identify the independent predictors with pre-hospital delay in care-seeking among acute myocardial infarction patients. Perceived barriers to care seeking constituted the most significant predictor for longer pre-hospital delay in acute myocardial infarction patients. Female gender was also significant in predicting longer delay, whereas a greater extent of symptom congruence and a greater extent of typical symptom presentation were significantly associated with a shorter delay. The final model accounted for 49.6% of the variance in pre-hospital delay as a whole. The most prominent predictors of pre-hospital delay are modifiable in nature, including the perceived barriers to care seeking and symptom congruence. Other sociodemographic and clinical factors also influence patients' decision. Although these are non-modifiable, our findings provide important insight for educating high-risk individuals.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of hospital treatment and outcomes of acute methanol poisoning during the Czech Republic mass poisoning outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulisek, Jan; Balik, Martin; Polak, Ferdinand; Waldauf, Petr; Pelclova, Daniela; Belohlavek, Jan; Zakharov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    During an outbreak of mass methanol poisoning in the Czech Republic in 2012-2014, we compared the total hospital costs and one-year medical costs in the patients treated with different antidotes (fomepizole versus ethanol) and modalities of hemodialysis (intermittent hemodialysis, IHD, versus continuous renal replacement therapy, CRRT). Cross-sectional study in 106 patients with confirmed diagnosis treated in 30 ICU settings. For each patient, the following data were analyzed: admission laboratory data, GCS, PSS, ICU length of stay, organ failures, treatment, outcome, and total hospital costs. Of 83 survivors, in 54 (65%) patients the follow-up examination, quality of life measurement with SF36 questionnaire two years after discharge, and one-year medical costs analysis were performed. The median total hospital costs were 7200 (IQR 1500-10,900) euros and the median one-year medical costs were 1447 (IQR 133-1163) euros in the study population. The total hospital costs were higher in the patients treated with fomepizole comparing to ethanol: 12,890 (IQR 6910-16,210) versus 5590 (IQR 1430-6940) euros (p0.05). The total hospital costs in the patients with acute methanol poisoning were more than three times higher in the patients treated with fomepizole than in the patients treated with ethanol after adjustment for the severity of poisoning. The dialysis modality did not affect the total hospital costs, but the trend to lower costs was present in IHD-group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Variations and determinants of hospital costs for acute stroke in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade W Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The burden of stroke is high and increasing in China. We modelled variations in, and predictors of, the costs of hospital care for patients with acute stroke in China. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Baseline characteristics and hospital costs for 5,255 patients were collected using the prospective register-based ChinaQUEST study, conducted in 48 Level 3 and 14 Level 2 hospitals in China during 2006-2007. Ordinary least squares estimation was used to determine factors associated with hospital costs. Overall mean cost of hospitalisation was 11,216 Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY (≈US$1,602 per patient, which equates to more than half the average annual wage in China. Variations in cost were largely attributable to stroke severity and length of hospital stay (LOS. Model forecasts showed that reducing LOS from the mean of 20 days for Level 3 and 18 days for Level 2 hospitals to a duration of 1 week, which is common among Western countries, afforded cost reductions of 49% and 19%, respectively. Other lesser determinants varied by hospital level: in Level 3 hospitals, health insurance and the occurrence of in-hospital complications were each associated with 10% and 18% increases in cost, respectively, whilst treatment in a teaching hospital was associated with approximately 39% decrease in cost on average. For Level 2 hospitals, stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage was associated with a 19% greater cost than for ischaemic stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Changes to hospital policies to standardise resource use and reduce the variation in LOS could attenuate costs and improve efficiencies for acute stroke management in China. The success of these strategies will be enhanced by broader policy initiatives currently underway to reform hospital reimbursement systems.

  3. Variations and determinants of hospital costs for acute stroke in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jade W; Heeley, Emma L; Jan, Stephen; Huang, Yining; Huang, Qifang; Wang, Ji-Guang; Cheng, Yan; Xu, En; Yang, Qidong; Anderson, Craig S

    2010-09-28

    The burden of stroke is high and increasing in China. We modelled variations in, and predictors of, the costs of hospital care for patients with acute stroke in China. Baseline characteristics and hospital costs for 5,255 patients were collected using the prospective register-based ChinaQUEST study, conducted in 48 Level 3 and 14 Level 2 hospitals in China during 2006-2007. Ordinary least squares estimation was used to determine factors associated with hospital costs. Overall mean cost of hospitalisation was 11,216 Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY) (≈US$1,602) per patient, which equates to more than half the average annual wage in China. Variations in cost were largely attributable to stroke severity and length of hospital stay (LOS). Model forecasts showed that reducing LOS from the mean of 20 days for Level 3 and 18 days for Level 2 hospitals to a duration of 1 week, which is common among Western countries, afforded cost reductions of 49% and 19%, respectively. Other lesser determinants varied by hospital level: in Level 3 hospitals, health insurance and the occurrence of in-hospital complications were each associated with 10% and 18% increases in cost, respectively, whilst treatment in a teaching hospital was associated with approximately 39% decrease in cost on average. For Level 2 hospitals, stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage was associated with a 19% greater cost than for ischaemic stroke. Changes to hospital policies to standardise resource use and reduce the variation in LOS could attenuate costs and improve efficiencies for acute stroke management in China. The success of these strategies will be enhanced by broader policy initiatives currently underway to reform hospital reimbursement systems.

  4. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to  patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient de...

  5. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  6. A Conceptual Framework: The Musical Self as a Unique Pathway to Outcomes in the Acute Pediatric Health Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemark, Helen; Rimmer, Jo; Bower, Janeen; Tucquet, Belinda; Miller, Lauren; Fisher, Michelle; Ogburn, Nicholas; Dun, Beth

    2018-03-09

    This article reports on a project at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne in which the music therapy team synthesized their practice and related theories to propose a new conceptual framework for music therapy in their acute pediatric setting. The impetus for the project was the realization that in the process of producing key statements about the non-musical benefits of music therapy, the cost was often the suppression of information about the patient's unique musical potential as the major (mediating) pathway from referral reason, to music therapy, and to effective outcomes. The purpose of the project was to articulate how this team of clinicians conceive of the patient's musical self as the major theoretical pathway for music therapy in an evidence-based acute medical setting. The clinicians' shared reflexive process across six months involved robust directed discussion, annotation of shared reading, and documentation of all engagement in words and diagrams. The outcome was a consensus framework including three constructs: the place of music in the life of the infant, child, and young people, Culture and Context, and Musical Manifestations. The constructs were tested in a clinical audit, and found to be robustly inclusive. In addition to the conceptual framework, this project serves to demonstrate a process by which clinical teams may reflect on their individual practice and theory together to create a consensus stance for the overall service they provide in the one setting.

  7. Ways to Reduce In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Artamonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze a medical care system for acute coronary syndrome (ACS in a large city in terms of in-hospital cardiogenic shock mortality risk management. Materials and methods. The health care facility management system for a risk for cardiogenic shock (CS and its poor outcome (death was a methodological basis of this study. The information from case histories of ACS patients consecutively admitted to the Kemerovo Cardiology Dispensary (Kemerovo, Russia in the period 2006 to 2011 was used to develop an electronic database. Sampling included 19281 patients with ACS, 6537 with myocardial infarction (MI, 493 with CS. Results and discussion. The medical care system for patients with ACS encompasses an emergency team (a prehospital level, a specialized cardiac hospital (an in-hospital level with a multistage therapeutic and diagnostic process in relation the severity of a patient’s status. The management is based on the principle of continuity of care, by applying the well-defined activity algorithms through valid information exchange and risk stratification for poor outcomes of ACS. An antishock team working just in the admission unit of a hospital was set up to treat high CS risk patients. A systems approach allowed the strategy of early specialized medical care to be developed with a priority of primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI as reperfusion therapy in patients with ST-elevation MI. In 2006-2011, every three patients with suspected ACS had verified MI that was com_ plicated by CS in 7.5%. In the CS group, the in-hospital mortality rates totaled 88.0% of cases; that after primary Адрес для корреспонденции (Correspondence to: PCI was 62.2%. In the examined period, the introduction of innovation clinical and organizational approaches provided a reduction in this indicator by 17.6 and 37.5%, respectively. Conclusion. The efficiency of risk management for CS and its poor outcomes in patients with ACS is

  8. Discrimination in waiting times by insurance type and financial soundness of German acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwierz, Christoph; Wübker, Achim; Wübker, Ansgar; Kuchinke, Björn A

    2011-10-01

    This paper shows that patients with private health insurance (PHI) are being offered significantly shorter waiting times than patients with statutory health insurance (SHI) in German acute hospital care. This behavior may be driven by the higher expected profitability of PHI relative to SHI holders. Further, we find that hospitals offering private insurees shorter waiting times when compared with SHI holders have a significantly better financial performance than those abstaining from or with less discrimination.

  9. The Feasibility of performing resistance exercise with acutely ill hospitalized older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockwood Kenneth

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For older adults, hospitalization frequently results in deterioration of mobility and function. Nevertheless, there are little data about how older adults exercise in the hospital and definitive studies are not yet available to determine what type of physical activity will prevent hospital related decline. Strengthening exercise may prevent deconditioning and Pilates exercise, which focuses on proper body mechanics and posture, may promote safety. Methods A hospital-based resistance exercise program, which incorporates principles of resistance training and Pilates exercise, was developed and administered to intervention subjects to determine whether acutely-ill older patients can perform resistance exercise while in the hospital. Exercises were designed to be reproducible and easily performed in bed. The primary outcome measures were adherence and participation. Results Thirty-nine ill patients, recently admitted to an acute care hospital, who were over age 70 [mean age of 82.0 (SD= 7.3] and ambulatory prior to admission, were randomized to the resistance exercise group (19 or passive range of motion (ROM group (20. For the resistance exercise group, participation was 71% (p = 0.004 and adherence was 63% (p = 0.020. Participation and adherence for ROM exercises was 96% and 95%, respectively. Conclusion Using a standardized and simple exercise regimen, selected, ill, older adults in the hospital are able to comply with resistance exercise. Further studies are needed to determine if resistance exercise can prevent or treat hospital-related deterioration in mobility and function.

  10. Staff perceptions of end-of-life care in the acute care setting: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Karen; Clark, Jean; Marshall, Bridget; Allan, Simon

    2011-05-01

    Understanding current end of life (EOL) care delivery in acute care is an important prerequisite to positively influencing practice, and published New Zealand (NZ) and international data are limited. Therefore, staff perceptions of EOL care in the hospital setting were investigated via survey. This article presents key findings. A total of 610 staff members in a 194-bed regional hospital were surveyed regarding their perceptions of EOL care, which yielded a response rate of 29% with 179 surveys returned. Respondents were from medical, nursing, and allied health staff working in medical, surgical, elder health, and a regional cancer treatment service. Responses to Likert scale statements regarding the Care of the dying, Communication, Teamwork, Documentation, Attitudes to death and dying in the workplace, and Barriers to the care of patients, their whānau (a NZ Māori word that refers to extended family or family group), and families frequently contrasted with additional and explanatory comments. The thematic analysis of written text identified five themes: The reality of care, The team dynamic, The direction of care, Knowledge and education, and Environmental and organizational factors. The quality and timeliness of EOL care was significantly influenced by the elements informing the themes and the pervasive nature and importance of communication. Meeting the needs of dying patients in acute care was complex but a significant priority for staff.

  11. [Hospital care expenses caused by acute fascioliasis, cystic echinococcosis, and neurocysticercosis in Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fica, Alberto; Weitzel, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acute fascioliasis (FA), cystic echinococcosis (CE) and neurocysticercosis (NCC) are three endemic parasitic diseases in Chile for whom there is scarce information about the economic impact they represent during management at the hospital. To quantify and compare hospital care expenses caused by these three endemic helminth infections in a Chilean hospital. Retrospective analysis of hospital costs at a referral hospital in Santiago between 2006 and 2010. Hospital databases were used to identify patients with the corresponding infections, and those with sufficient data on hospital costs were included. A total of 16 patients representing 21 cases were identified and analyzed: four with AF, eleven with CE, and six with NCC. Median hospital expenses for cases with AF were US$ 1799 and mainly caused by bed-day costs. Median hospital costs for cases of CE were US$ 4707 and the most important costs components were medications, bed-day costs and consumables. NCC patients had median costs of US$ 1293, which were mainly due to bed-day costs. Non-parenchymatous or mixed forms of NCC showed a trend toward higher hospital costs compared with parenchymatous forms. Although helminth infections in Chile, an upper middle income country, are declining and considered rare in routine clinical practice, hospital care expenses caused by patients with AF, CE, and NCC are high and might still present an important economic burden to the Chilean healthcare system.

  12. Clinical profile and influences on outcomes in patients hospitalized for acute pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kytö, Ville; Sipilä, Jussi; Rautava, Päivi

    2014-10-28

    The clinical profile with regard to sex and the influences on outcomes in patients who have been hospitalized for acute pericarditis is largely uncharacterized. We studied all patients aged ≥16 years admitted to the hospital because of acute pericarditis (postpericardiotomy and myocardial infarction associated pericarditis were excluded). Data were collected from a Finnish national registry that included data on all cardiovascular admissions (670 409) during 9.5 years in 29 hospitals nationwide. During the study period, there were 1361 admissions for acute pericarditis. Pericarditis patients were more likely to be male (64.9% of patients) than female (35.1%), with an age-adjusted likelihood ratio of 1.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65-2.06; Ppericarditis was 3.32 per 100 000 person-years. Men 16 to 65 years of age were at higher risk for pericarditis (relative risk, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.81-2.26; Ppericarditis caused 0.20% (95% CI, 0.19%-0.22%) of all cardiovascular admissions. The proportion of pericarditis-caused admissions declined by an estimated 51% per 10-year increase in age. The in-hospital mortality rate for acute pericarditis was 1.1% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.8%). Mortality increased with age (hazard ratio, 3.26; 95% CI, 1.78-5.95 per 10-year increase in age; P=0.0001) and severe coinfection (pneumonia or septicemia; hazard ratio, 13.46; 95% CI, 2.26-80.01; Ppericarditis are more commonly male. Increasing age and severe coinfection are associated with greater in-hospital mortality in hospitalized acute pericarditis patients. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Design Parameters for Evaluating Light Settings and Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    of staff and guests in the future hospital. This paper is based on Böhmes G. concept of atmosphere dealing with the effect of light in experiencing atmosphere, and the importance having a holistic approach when designing a pleasurable light atmosphere. It shows important design parameters for pleasurable......When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can...... light atmosphere in hospital wards and specific present a proposal for evaluating light atmosphere in the dynamic light settings for hospital wards....

  14. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  15. SPECTRUM OF ACUTE RENAL FAILURE IN A SERVICE HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, P K; Varma, P P; Saini, J S; Chauhan, S S

    1997-10-01

    A prospective study of 82 patients with acute renal failure was carried out over the last 2 years. Mean age of the patients was 35.6 years (8-82 years). Male to female ratio was 3.5:1. The etiological factors were septicaemia in 18 patients (21.95%), aminoglycoside toxicity in 16 patients (19.51%), open heart surgery in 8 patients (9.76%), volume depletion and blood loss in 12 patients (14.63%), glomerulonephritis in 4 patients (4.88%), renal allograft dysfunction in 4 patients (4.88%), and miscellaneous causes in 20 patients (24.39%). Non-oliguric renal failure was observed in 39.02 per cent cases. Dialysis support was required in 65.8 per cent of the cases; with average 5.6 (4 to 11) dialysis sessions. Four patients of acute renal failure following open heart surgery were given continuous arterio-venous haemofiltration. Overall mortality was 32.5 per cent, septicaemia accounting for 60 per cent of the deaths.

  16. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: dispensing and administration--2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2012-05-01

    Results of the 2011 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to dispensing and administration are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1401 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 40.1%. Decentralization of the medication-use system continues, with 40% of hospitals using a decentralized system and 58% of hospitals planning to use a decentralized model in the future. Automated dispensing cabinets were used by 89% of hospitals, robots were used by 11%, carousels were used in 18%, and machine-readable coding was used in 34% of hospitals to verify doses before dispensing. Overall, 65% of hospitals had a United States Pharmacopeia chapter 797 compliant cleanroom for compounding sterile preparations. Medication administration records (MARs) have become increasingly computerized, with 67% of hospitals using electronic MARs. Bar-code-assisted medication administration was used in 50% of hospitals, and 68% of hospitals had smart infusion pumps. Health information is becoming more electronic, with 67% of hospitals having partially or completely implemented an electronic health record and 34% of hospitals having computerized prescriber order entry. The use of these technologies has substantially increased over the past year. The average number of full-time equivalent staff per 100 occupied beds averaged 17.5 for pharmacists and 15.0 for technicians. Directors of pharmacy reported declining vacancy rates for pharmacists. Pharmacists continue to improve medication use at the dispensing and administration steps of the medication-use system. The adoption of new technology is changing the philosophy of medication distribution, and health information is rapidly becoming electronic.

  17. Falls in hospital and new placement in a nursing home among older people hospitalized with acute illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basic D

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available David Basic,1 Tabitha J Hartwell2 1Department of Geriatric Medicine, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Geriatric Medicine and Rehabilitation, Shoalhaven District Memorial Hospital, Nowra, NSW, Australia Purpose: To examine the association between falls in hospital and new placement in a nursing home among older people hospitalized with acute illness.Materials and methods: This prospective cohort study of 2,945 consecutive patients discharged alive from an acute geriatric medicine service used multivariate logistic regression to model the association between one or more falls and nursing home placement (primary analysis. Secondary analyses stratified falls by injury and occurrence of multiple falls. Demographic, medical, and frailty measures were considered in adjusted models.Results: The mean age of all patients was 82.8±7.6 years and 94% were admitted through the emergency department. During a median length of stay (LOS of 11 days, 257 (8.7% patients had a fall. Of these, 66 (25.7% sustained an injury and 53 (20.6% had two or more falls. Compared with nonfallers, fallers were more likely to be placed in a nursing home (odds ratio [OR]: 2.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.37–3.00, after adjustment for age, sex, frailty, and selected medical variables (including dementia and delirium. Patients without injury (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.17–2.85 and those with injury (OR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.15–4.77 were also more likely to be placed. Patients who fell had a longer LOS (median 19 days vs 10 days; P<0.001.Conclusion: This study of older people in acute care shows that falls in the hospital are significantly associated with new placement in a nursing home. Given the predominantly negative experiences and the financial costs associated with placement in a nursing home, fall prevention should be a high priority in older people hospitalized with acute illness. Keywords: aged, inpatients, falls, nursing homes

  18. Fall prevention in acute care hospitals: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Patricia C; Carroll, Diane L; Hurley, Ann; Lipsitz, Stuart; Benoit, Angela; Chang, Frank; Meltzer, Seth; Tsurikova, Ruslana; Zuyov, Lyubov; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-11-03

    Falls cause injury and death for persons of all ages, but risk of falls increases markedly with age. Hospitalization further increases risk, yet no evidence exists to support short-stay hospital-based fall prevention strategies to reduce patient falls. To investigate whether a fall prevention tool kit (FPTK) using health information technology (HIT) decreases patient falls in hospitals. Cluster randomized study conducted January 1, 2009, through June 30, 2009, comparing patient fall rates in 4 urban US hospitals in units that received usual care (4 units and 5104 patients) or the intervention (4 units and 5160 patients). The FPTK integrated existing communication and workflow patterns into the HIT application. Based on a valid fall risk assessment scale completed by a nurse, the FPTK software tailored fall prevention interventions to address patients' specific determinants of fall risk. The FPTK produced bed posters composed of brief text with an accompanying icon, patient education handouts, and plans of care, all communicating patient-specific alerts to key stakeholders. The primary outcome was patient falls per 1000 patient-days adjusted for site and patient care unit. A secondary outcome was fall-related injuries. During the 6-month intervention period, the number of patients with falls differed between control (n = 87) and intervention (n = 67) units (P=.02). Site-adjusted fall rates were significantly higher in control units (4.18 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.45-5.06] per 1000 patient-days) than in intervention units (3.15 [95% CI, 2.54-3.90] per 1000 patient-days; P = .04). The FPTK was found to be particularly effective with patients aged 65 years or older (adjusted rate difference, 2.08 [95% CI, 0.61-3.56] per 1000 patient-days; P = .003). No significant effect was noted in fall-related injuries. The use of a fall prevention tool kit in hospital units compared with usual care significantly reduced rate of falls. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT

  19. [Nursing care management in hospital settings: the building of a construct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christovam, Barbara Pompeu; Porto, Isaura Setenta; de Oliveira, Denise Cristina

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to build and present a theoretical definition of the concept of nursing care management in hospital settings, based on specific literature. We chose to use Concept Analysis strategies for building concepts, the rules of Archeological Analysis for forming concepts, and Lexical Analysis as the theoretical-methodological framework. The operationalization of the strategies and rules for forming the concept permitted the construction of the concept of nursing care in hospital settings. The constructed concept presented, by its nature, the capacity to form a dialectic integration of the aspects relative to the knowing-doing of care and management. The theoretical definition of the concept of Nursing Care Management in Hospital Settings assigned meaning to the term, in the initial context of the construction of a theory of Nursing Care Management in Health Services.

  20. Priority-setting and hospital strategic planning: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Douglas; Shulman, Ken; Santiago-Sorrell, Patricia; Singer, Peter

    2003-10-01

    To describe and evaluate the priority-setting element of a hospital's strategic planning process. Qualitative case study and evaluation against the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness' of a strategic planning process at a large urban university-affiliated hospital. The hospital's strategic planning process met the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness' in large part. Specifically: the hospital based its decisions on reasons (both information and criteria) that the participants felt were relevant to the hospital; the number and type of participants were very extensive; the process, decisions and reasons were well communicated throughout the organization, using multiple communication vehicles; and the process included an ethical framework linked to an effort to evaluate and improve the process. However, there were opportunities to improve the process, particularly by giving participants more time to absorb the information relevant to priority-setting decisions, more time to take difficult decisions and some means to appeal or revise decisions. A case study linked to an evaluation using 'accountability for reasonableness' can serve to improve priority-setting in the context of hospital strategic planning.

  1. An acute hospital admission greatly increases one year mortality – Getting sick and ending up in hospital is bad for you

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløjstrup, Marianne; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Background: For most of the population a serious acute illness that require an emergency admission to hospital is a rare "once in a life time" event. This paper reports the one year mortality of patients admitted to hospital as acute emergencies compared to the general population. Method....... Results: We included 18,375 patients and 4037 (22.0%) died within one year. For all age groups the one year mortality of those admitted to hospital for acute illness was markedly greater than for the general population. Although the odds ratio of death was highest in younger patients (e.g. odds ratio...... >. 20 for 40. year olds), the absolute risk of death was greatest in the elderly (e.g. 20% mortality rate for men admitted to hospital over 65. years of age, compared to 1.7% for the general population). Discussion: Admission to hospital for an acute illness is associated with a greatly increased risk...

  2. Prediction of functional recovery six months following traumatic spinal cord injury during acute care hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Denis, Andréane; Feldman, Debbie; Thompson, Cynthia; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-15

    To determine factors associated with functional status six months following a traumatic cervical and thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI), with a particular interest in factors related to the acute care hospitalization stay. This is a prospective cohort study. Sixteen potential predictive variables were studied. Univariate regression analyses were first performed to determine the strength of association of each variable independently with the total Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) score. Significant ones were then included in a General linear model in order to determine the most relevant predictive factors among them. Analyses were carried out separately for tetraplegia and paraplegia. A single specialized Level I trauma center. One hundred fifty-nine patients hospitalized for an acute traumatic SCI between January 2010 and February 2015. Not applicable. The SCIM (version 3) functional score. Motor-complete SCI (AIS-A,B) was the main predictive factor associated with decreased total SCIM score in tetraplegia and paraplegia. Longer acute care length of stay and the occurrence of acute medical complications (either pneumonia, urinary tract infections or pressure ulcers) were predictors of decreased functional outcome following tetraplegia, while increased body mass index and higher trauma severity were predictive of decreased functional outcome following paraplegia. This study supports previous work while adding information regarding the importance of optimizing acute care hospitalization as it may influence chronic functional status following traumatic SCI.

  3. Hospital-Level Care at Home for Acutely Ill Adults: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David M; Ouchi, Kei; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Diamond, Keren; Licurse, Adam; Pu, Charles T; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-05-01

    Hospitals are standard of care for acute illness, but hospitals can be unsafe, uncomfortable, and expensive. Providing substitutive hospital-level care in a patient's home potentially reduces cost while maintaining or improving quality, safety, and patient experience, although evidence from randomized controlled trials in the US is lacking. Determine if home hospital care reduces cost while maintaining quality, safety, and patient experience. Randomized controlled trial. Adults admitted via the emergency department with any infection or exacerbation of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or asthma. Home hospital care, including nurse and physician home visits, intravenous medications, continuous monitoring, video communication, and point-of-care testing. Primary outcome was direct cost of the acute care episode. Secondary outcomes included utilization, 30-day cost, physical activity, and patient experience. Nine patients were randomized to home, 11 to usual care. Median direct cost of the acute care episode for home patients was 52% (IQR, 28%; p = 0.05) lower than for control patients. During the care episode, home patients had fewer laboratory orders (median per admission: 6 vs. 19; p Home patients were more physically active (median minutes, 209 vs. 78; p home patients, one occurred in control patients. Median direct cost for the acute care plus 30-day post-discharge period for home patients was 67% (IQR, 77%; p home-care services (22% vs. 55%; p = 0.08) and fewer readmissions (11% vs. 36%; p = 0.32). Patient experience was similar in both groups. The use of substitutive home-hospitalization compared to in-hospital usual care reduced cost and utilization and improved physical activity. No significant differences in quality, safety, and patient experience were noted, with more definitive results awaiting a larger trial. Trial Registration NCT02864420.

  4. The impact of the Danish smoking ban on hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tabita Maria; Møller, Lisbeth; Jørgensen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke is associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The positive impact of a smoking ban on AMI hospitalization rates has been demonstrated both inside and outside Europe. A national smoking ban (SB) was implemented in Denmark on 15...

  5. Accuracy of various iron parameters in the prediction of iron deficiency in an acute care hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, K. H.; Tan, H. L.; Lai, H. C.; Kuperan, P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Iron parameters like serum ferritin and iron saturation are routinely used in diagnosing iron deficiency. However, these tests are influenced by many factors. We aimed to review the accuracy of iron parameters among inpatients in an acute care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From

  6. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2014-10-30

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents.

  7. Occurrence of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria at an Acute Care Hospital Using Secondary Drinking Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of infection control strategies at acute-care hospitals has contributed to an overall decline in the number of healthcare-associated infections (HAI’s) in the United States, especially those caused by contaminated equipment used in surgical procedures and co...

  8. In-hospital Death Prediction by Multilevel Logistic Regressin in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Monhart, Z.; Zvárová, Jana; Hanzlíček, Petr; Grünfeldová, H.; Janský, P.; Vojáček, J.; Widimský, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2013), s. 11-17 ISSN 1801-5603 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : multilevel logistic regression * acute coronary syndromes * risk factors * in-hospital death Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/img/ejbi/2013/1/Reissigova_en.pdf

  9. An analysis of acute admissions to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid turnover of patients in a general hospital psychiatric unit demands stabilization and discharge as soon as possible. It is likely that patients are being prematurely discharged because of this pressure. Aim: The study sought to analyse admissions to an acute psychiatric unit with a view to determining the demographic ...

  10. Acute hospital costs after minimally invasive versus open lumbar interbody fusion: data from a US national database with 6106 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Lerner, Jason; Lesko, James; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective multi-institutional database review. To determine if minimally invasive interbody fusion is associated with cost savings when compared with open surgery. Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgeries are increasingly recognized as equivalent to open procedures. Although these techniques have been advocated for reducing pain, disability, and length of hospitalization, to date there has been little data demonstrating these benefits. This study analyzed inpatient hospital records from the Premier Perspective database (2002 to 2009), including patients who underwent a posterior lumbar fusion with interbody cage placement by ICD-9 code, and had implant charge codes that allowed determination if MIS pedicle screws were utilized. Exclusion criteria included a refusion surgery, deformity, >2 levels, and anterior fusion. Total costs were adjusted for covariates (age, sex, race, hospital geography and setting, payor, and comorbidities) using an analysis of covariance model. A total of 6106 patients were identified (1667 MIS and 4439 open). Length of stay (LOS) for 1-level MIS surgery averaged of 3.35 days versus 3.6 days for open surgery (P≤0.006). For 2-level MIS surgery LOS averaged of 3.4 days versus 4.03 days for open surgery (P≤0.001). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $29,187 for 1-level MIS procedures versus $29,947 for open surgery, a nonsignificant difference (P=0.55). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $2106 lower for 2-level MIS surgery (total costs of $33,879 for MIS vs. $35,984 for open surgery, P=0.0023). Cost savings were attributable primarily to lower room and board ($857), operating room ($359), pharmacy ($304), and laboratory ($166) costs in the MIS group. High variances in the 2-level open surgery with prolonged hospital stay also accounted for overall cost differences. This data from a large nationwide sample of hospitalizations demonstrates that MIS lumbar interbody fusion results in a

  11. Pain management of opioid-treated cancer patients in hospital settings in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, L.; Peuckmann, V.; Sjøgren, Per

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the performance and quality of cancer pain management in hospital settings. METHODS: Anaesthesiologists specialised in pain and palliative medicine studied pain management in departments of oncology and surgery. Study days were randomly chosen and patients treated with oral opioids......-treated patients in hospital settings: however, focussing on average pain intensity, the outcome seems favourable compared with other countries. Pain mechanisms were seldom examined and adjuvant drugs were not specifically used for neuropathic pain. Opioid dosing intervals and supplemental opioid doses were most...

  12. [Acute care of critically ill children in general hospitals: organisation and training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sambeeck, S J L; Janssen, E J M; Hundscheid, T; Martens, S J L; Vos, G D

    2013-01-01

    To gain insight into how the acute care of critically ill children at general hospitals is organised, whether staff is sufficiently trained and whether the necessary materials and medications are present. Questionnaire combined with a site visit. Questionnaires were sent to all primarily involved specialists (emergency room specialists and paediatricians), and to the auxiliary anaesthetists and intensivists involved, at the nine general hospitals in Southeast Netherlands. Two researchers performed standardised interviews with the lead paediatricians on site and checked for materials and medication present in the emergency and paediatric departments. Of the 195 questionnaires sent, 97 (49.7%) were deemed suitable for analysis. The response from the primary specialists involved (77.6%) was more than twice that of the auxiliary specialists (31.9%). At 7 hospitals, verbal agreements on the organisation of acute care were maintained, 1 hospital had a written protocol, and 2 hospitals had a task force addressing this topic. One out of 5 respondents was unaware of the verbal agreements and 1 out of 3 mistakenly assumed that a protocol existed. Two out of 3 primary specialists involved were certified for Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS); 1 out of 13 of the auxiliary specialists had such a certificate. Scenario training was being conducted at 8 hospitals. A paediatric resuscitation cart was available at both the emergency and paediatric departments of 8 hospitals, 3 of which were fully stocked at both departments. Laryngeal mask airways and PEEP-valves (Positive End Expiratory Pressure) were lacking at 6 of the 9 hospitals. The medication stock was complete at all the hospitals. The organisation of and training for the acute care of critically ill children and presence of materials - the aspects we investigated - need attention at all general hospitals evaluated. It appeared that many specialists are not APLS certified and written protocols concerning organisation

  13. Zotepine in the treatment of acute hospitalized schizophrenic episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, S; Quiner, S; Barnas, C; Fabisch, H; Haushofer, M; Sackel, C; König, P; Lingg, A; Platz, T; Rittmannsberger, H; Stuppäck, C; Willeit, M; Zapotoczky, H G

    2001-05-01

    The atypical antipsychotic zotepine was studied in an open, multicentre uncontrolled, post-marketing surveillance study in 108 schizophrenic patients hospitalized in 12 trial centres in Austria. Within the dosage range of 50-450 mg (mean at the end of the study, 207 +/- 125 mg/day), a significant reduction of positive as well as negative symptoms was noted. There was no increase in extrapyramidal side-effects during the study and a significant decrease in akathisia scores. The medication was well tolerated during the 42-day observation period. Zotepine improved both positive and negative symptoms and was not accompanied by extrapyramidal side-effects, justifying its classification as an atypical antipsychotic.

  14. Sustainability of Evidence-Based Acute Pain Management Practices for Hospitalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Clayton J; Xie, Xian-Jin; Herr, Keela A; Titler, Marita G

    2017-11-01

    Little is known regarding sustainability of evidence-based practices (EBPs) following implementation. This article reports sustainability of evidence-based acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults following testing of a multifaceted Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) implementation intervention. A cluster randomized trial with follow-up period was conducted in 12 Midwest U.S. hospitals (six experimental, six comparison). Use of evidence-based acute pain management practices and mean pain intensity were analyzed using generalized estimating equations across two time points (following implementation and 18 months later) to determine sustainability of TRIP intervention effects. Summative Index scores and six of seven practices were sustained. Experimental and comparison group differences for mean pain intensity over 72 hours following admission were sustained. Results revealed most evidence-based acute pain management practices were sustained for 18 months following implementation. Further work is needed to identify factors affecting sustainability of EBPs to guide development and testing of sustainability strategies.

  15. Review article: Paediatric status epilepticus in the pre-hospital setting: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furyk, Jeremy; Watt, Kerriane; Emeto, Theophilus I; Dalziel, Stuart; Bodnar, Daniel; Riney, Kate; Babl, Franz E

    2017-08-01

    Paediatric status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency and a common critical condition confronting pre-hospital providers. Management in the pre-hospital environment is challenging but considered extremely important as a potentially modifiable factor on outcome. Recent data from multicentre clinical trials, quality observational studies and consensus documents have influenced management in this area, and is important to both pre-hospital providers and emergency physicians. The objective of this review was to: (i) present an overview of the available evidence relevant to pre-hospital care of paediatric SE; and (ii) assess the current pre-hospital practice guidelines in Australia and New Zealand. The review outlines current definitions and guidelines of SE management, regional variability in pre-hospital protocols within Australasia and aspects of pre-hospital care that could potentially be improved. Contemporary data is required to determine current practice in our setting. It is important that paediatric neurologists, emergency physicians and pre-hospital care providers are all engaged in future endeavours to improve clinical care and knowledge translation efforts for this patient group. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  16. Winter excess in hospital admissions, in-patient mortality and length of acute hospital stay in stroke: a hospital database study over six seasonal years in Norfolk, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Phyo K; Vowler, Sarah L; Woodhouse, Peter R; Redmayne, Oliver; Fulcher, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have examined the incidence and mortality of stroke in relation to season. However, the evidence is conflicting partly due to variation in the populations (community vs. hospital-based), and in climatic conditions between studies. Moreover, they may not have been able to take into account the age, sex and stroke type of the study population. We hypothesized that the age, sex and type of stroke are major determinants of the presence or absence of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. We analyzed a hospital-based stroke register from Norfolk, UK to examine our prior hypothesis. Using Curwen's method, we performed stratified sex-specific analyses by (1) seasonal year and (2) quartiles of patients' age and stroke subtype and calculated the winter excess for the number of admissions, in-patient deaths and length of acute hospital stay. There were 5,481 patients (men=45%). Their ages ranged from 17 to 105 years (median=78 years). There appeared to be winter excess in hospital admissions, deaths and length of acute hospital stay overall accounting for 3/100,000 extra admissions (winter excess index of 3.4% in men and 7.6% in women) and 1/100,000 deaths (winter excess index of 4.7 and 8.6% in women) due to stroke in winter compared to non-winter periods. Older patients with non-haemorrhagic stroke mainly contribute to this excess. If our findings are replicated throughout England and Wales, it is estimated that there are 1,700 excess admissions, 600 excess in-patient deaths and 24,500 extra acute hospital bed days each winter, related to stroke within the current population of approximately 60 million. Further research should be focused on the determinants of winter excess in morbidity and mortality associated with stroke. This may subsequently reduce the morbidity and mortality by providing effective preventive strategies in future. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Data linkage of inpatient hospitalization and workers' claims data sets to characterize occupational falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Terry L; Slavova, Svetla; Bathke, Arne

    2007-07-01

    The identification of industry, occupation, and associated injury costs for worker falls in Kentucky have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between industry and occupation and 1) hospitalization length of stay; 2) hospitalization charges; and 3) workers' claims costs in workers suffering falls, using linked inpatient hospitalization discharge and workers' claims data sets. Hospitalization cases were selected with ICD-9-CM external cause of injury codes for falls and payer code of workers' claims for years 2000-2004. Selection criteria for workers'claims cases were International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions Electronic Data Interchange Nature (IAIABCEDIN) injuries coded as falls and/or slips. Common data variables between the two data sets such as date of birth, gender, date of injury, and hospital admission date were used to perform probabilistic data linkage using LinkSolv software. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests. Construction falls were the most prevalent for male workers and incurred the highest hospitalization and workers' compensation costs, whereas most female worker falls occurred in the services industry. The largest percentage of male worker falls was from one level to another, while the largest percentage of females experienced a fall, slip, or trip (not otherwise classified). When male construction worker falls were further analyzed, laborers and helpers had longer hospital stays as well as higher total charges when the worker fell from one level to another. Data linkage of hospitalization and workers' claims falls data provides additional information on industry, occupation, and costs that are not available when examining either data set alone.

  18. Structure and processes of interdisciplinary geriatric consultation teams in acute care hospitals: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschodt, Mieke; Claes, Veerle; Van Grootven, Bastiaan; Van den Heede, Koen; Flamaing, Johan; Boland, Benoit; Milisen, Koen

    2016-03-01

    Interdisciplinary geriatric consultation teams are implemented in the acute hospital setting in several high-income countries to provide comprehensive geriatric assessment for the increasing numbers of older patients with a geriatric profile hospitalized on non-geriatric units. Given the inconclusive evidence on this care model's effectiveness to improve patient outcomes, health care policy and practice oriented recommendations to redesign the structure and process of care provided by interdisciplinary geriatric consultation teams are needed. A scoping review was conducted to explore the structure and processes of interdisciplinary geriatric consultation teams in an international context. As nurses are considered key members of these teams, their roles and responsibilities were specifically explored. The revised scoping methodology framework of Arksey and O'Malley was applied. An electronic database search in Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE and a hand search were performed for the identification of descriptive and experimental studies published in English, French or Dutch until April 2014. Thematic reporting with descriptive statistics was performed and study findings were validated through interdisciplinary expert meetings. Forty-six papers reporting on 25 distinct interdisciplinary geriatric consultation teams in eight countries across three continents were included. Eight of the 12 teams (67%) reporting on their composition, stated that nurses and physicians were the main core members with head counts varying from 1 to 4 members per profession. In 80% of these teams nurses were required to have completed training in geriatrics. Advanced practice nurses were integrated in eleven out of fourteen interdisciplinary geriatric consultation teams from the USA. Only 32% of teams used formal screening to identify patients most likely to benefit from their intervention, using heterogeneous screening methods, and scarcely providing information on the responsibilities of

  19. Frequency of Cardiorenal Syndrome Type-I in Hospitalized Children with Acute Heart Failure in a Tertiary-Care Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, M.; Rahman, A. J.; Haque, A.; Sadqani, S.; Maheshwari, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of cardiorenal syndrome in hospitalized children with acute heart failure. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from December 2010 to December 2011. Methodology: Sixty eight (68) children with acute heart failure fulfilling the selection criteria were evaluated for worsening of renal function (WRF). Serum creatinine was done at baseline and repeated at 72 hours to see the worsening of renal function. Estimated serum creatinine clearance was calculated by Schwartz formula. Results: Mean age of patients was 43.6 +- 55.2 months. There were 43 (63%) males, 70% were under 57 months of age. Mean weight on admission was 14.7 +- 19.13 kg and mean height was 83 cm (+- 31.08 SD). Mean serum creatinine on admission was 0.77 mg/dl (+- 1.18 SD). Worsening renal function was noted in 55 (81%) of children, out of those, majority 36 (70.5%) were under 5 years of age. Conclusion: Worsening renal function was found in 81% of children admitted with the diagnosis of acute heart failure. Majority (70.5%) were under 5 years of age indicating a closer observation of renal status in younger age group to reduce, morbidity and mortality. (author)

  20. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  1. Low frequency of asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in an acute care geriatric hospital: prospective cohort study in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pires

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of asymptomatic carriers of toxigenic Clostridium difficile (TCD in nosocomial cross-transmission remains debatable. Moreover, its relevance in the elderly has been sparsely studied. Objectives To assess asymptomatic TCD carriage in an acute care geriatric population. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study at the 296-bed geriatric hospital of the Geneva University Hospitals. We consecutively recruited all patients admitted to two 15-bed acute-care wards. Patients with C. difficile infection (CDI or diarrhoea at admission were excluded. First bowel movement after admission and every two weeks thereafter were sampled. C. difficile toxin B gene was identified using real-time polymerase chain-reaction (BD MAXTMCdiff. Asymptomatic TCD carriage was defined by the presence of the C. difficile toxin B gene without diarrhoea. Results A total of 102 patients were admitted between March and June 2015. Two patients were excluded. Among the 100 patients included in the study, 63 were hospitalized and 1 had CDI in the previous year, and 36 were exposed to systemic antibiotics within 90 days prior to admission. Overall, 199 stool samples were collected (median 2 per patient, IQR 1-3. Asymptomatic TCD carriage was identified in two patients (2 %. Conclusions We found a low prevalence of asymptomatic TCD carriage in a geriatric population frequently exposed to antibiotics and healthcare. Our findings suggest that asymptomatic TCD carriage might contribute only marginally to nosocomial TCD cross-transmission in our and similar healthcare settings.

  2. Economic analysis of an epilepsy outreach model of care in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Eimer; McGinty, Ronan N; Costello, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in people with intellectual disability is higher than in the general population and prevalence rates increase with increasing levels of disability. Prevalence rates of epilepsy are highest among those living in residential care. The healthcare needs of people with intellectual disability and epilepsy are complex and deserve special consideration in terms of healthcare provision and access to specialist epilepsy clinics, which are usually held in acute hospital campuses. This patient population is at risk of suboptimal care because of significant difficulties accessing specialist epilepsy care which is typically delivered in the environs of acute hospitals. In 2014, the epilepsy service at Cork University Hospital established an Epilepsy Outreach Service providing regular, ambulatory outpatient follow up at residential care facilities in Cork city and county in an effort to improve access to care, reduce the burden and expense of patient and carer travel to hospital outpatient appointments, and to provide a dedicated specialist phone service for epilepsy related queries in order to reduce emergency room visits when possible. We present the findings of an economic analysis of the outreach service model of care compared to the traditional hospital outpatient service and demonstrate significant cost savings and improved access to care with this model. Ideally these cost savings should be used to develop novel ways to enhance epilepsy care for persons with disability. We propose that this model of care can be more suitable for persons with disability living in residential care who are at risk of losing access to specialist epilepsy care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Promoting the health, safety and welfare of adults with learning disabilities in acute care settings: a structured literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Rattray, Janice; Jones, Martyn; Macgillivray, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    To present the findings of a structured literature review that aimed to identify the influences on the health, safety and welfare of adults with learning disabilities in acute hospitals. There is increasing evidence regarding the inadequacy of care for people with learning disabilities in acute care settings. However, few studies have specifically addressed their health, safety and welfare in such contexts. Four key electronic databases (Medline; PsycINFO; British Nursing Index and archive; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) were searched for relevant literature published between 2000 and 2011. Publications assessed as meeting the inclusion criteria were retrieved in full. Data were extracted regarding methods used; primary aims of the study being reported; and key findings. Of the 3505 papers identified in the initial search, eight met the inclusion criteria. Analysis revealed six areas of influence on the health, safety and welfare of adults with learning disabilities in acute hospitals: care provision (meeting health and personal needs); communication; staff attitudes; staff knowledge; supporters; and carers (valuing their role); physical environment. We represent these six areas diagrammatically, as concentric rings. These influence on health, safety and welfare form an inner (direct) layer and an outer (indirect) layer consisting of liaison services and education/training. This new conceptualisation of influences as being multi-layered assists in the identification of similarly multi-layered improvement strategies. Adults with learning disabilities can exert their own influence on health, safety and welfare and should be supported to make decisions about their own care. More broadly they should be involved with policy development, nurse education and research. This can be achieved through inclusive approaches, for example, inviting people with learning disabilities to input into nursing curricula or to engage in research as

  4. Health literacy and 30-day hospital readmission after acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Fang, Gang; Annis, Izabela E; O'Conor, Rachel; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of a predictive model of health literacy, and to examine the relationship between derived health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants A National Institute of Aging (NIA) study cohort of 696 adult, English-speaking primary care patients, aged 55–74 years, was used to assess the validity of derived health literacy estimates. Claims from 7733 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalised for AMI in 2008 in North Carolina and Illinois were used to investigate the association between health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions. Measures The NIA cohort was administered 3 common health literacy assessments (Newest Vital Sign, Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, and Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine). Health literacy estimates at the census block group level were derived via a predictive model. 30-day readmissions were measured from Medicare claims data using a validated algorithm. Results Fair agreement was found between derived estimates and in-person literacy assessments (Pearson Correlation coefficients: 0.38–0.51; κ scores: 0.38–0.40). Medicare enrollees with above basic literacy according to derived health literacy estimates had an 18% lower risk of a 30-day readmission (RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.92) and 21% lower incidence rate of 30-day readmission (IRR=0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) than patients with basic or below basic literacy. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of 30-day readmission was 12% lower (p=0.03), and the incidence rate 16% lower (pliteracy. Conclusions Health literacy, as measured by a predictive model, was found to be a significant, independent predictor of 30-day readmissions. As a modifiable risk factor with evidence-based solutions, health literacy should be considered in readmission reduction efforts. PMID:26068508

  5. The trend of acute burns pre-hospital management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Hamdiya

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Burn injuries are common in our settings, a more reason for all to know the immediate intervention to give to victims of such accidents. The kind of first aid administered to burns victims possibly affects the burns management outcome. Thus, the earlier the right intervention implemented, the lesser the complications.

  6. Drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for hospitalized elderly with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Aparecido Maschio de Lima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to determine the rate of potential drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for elderly diagnosed with Acute Coronary Syndrome in a teaching hospital. This is an exploratory, descriptive study that analyzed 607 prescriptions through databases to identify and classify the interactions based on intensity (major, moderate or minor, the mechanism (pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics and documentation relevance. We detected 10,162 drug-drug interactions, distributed in 554 types of different combinations within the prescribed drugs, and 99% of prescriptions presented at least one and a maximum of 53 interactions; highlighting the prevalence of major and moderates ones. There was a correlation between the number of drug-drug interactions and the number of prescribed drugs and the hospitalization time. This study contributes for the delimitation of a prevalence pattern in drug-drug interactions in prescriptions for Acute Coronary Syndrome, besides subsidizing the importance of the effective implementation of the Clinical Pharmacy in teaching hospitals.

  7. Application of smart phone and supporting set for fundus imaging in primary hospital of rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Feng Jing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe the application of smart phone and supporting set for acquiring fundus images with slitlamp examination and non-contact lens in primary hospital of the rural area. METHODS: The supporting set for smart phone was purchased from taobao and securely connected to the ocular lens of slitlamp microscopy. The fundus photos were imaged with assistance of non-contact slitlamp lens from Volk. RESULTS: High quality images of various retinal diseases could be successfully taken with smart phone and supporting set by slitlamp examination. The fundus images were send to patients with Wechat as medical records or used for telconsultant. CONCLUSION: High resolution smart phones are wildly used nowadays and supporting sets are very accessible; thus high quality of images could be obtained with minimal cost in rural hospitals. The digital fundus images will be beneficial for medical record and rapid diagnosis with telconsultant.

  8. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  9. Mapping standard ophthalmic outcome sets to metrics currently reported in eight eye hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Monica; de Korne, Dirk F; Weizer, Jennifer S; Lee, Paul P; Flanagan, Declan; Kelly, Simon P; Odergren, Anne; Sandhu, Sukhpal S; Wai, Charity; Klazinga, Niek; Haripriya, Aravind; Stein, Joshua D; Hingorani, Melanie

    2017-12-29

    To determine alignment of proposed international standard outcomes sets for ophthalmic conditions to metrics currently reported by eye hospitals. Mixed methods comparative benchmark study, including eight eye hospitals in Australia, India, Singapore, Sweden, U.K., and U.S. All are major international tertiary care and training centers in ophthalmology. Main outcome measure is consistency of ophthalmic outcomes measures reported. International agreed standard outcomes (ICHOM) sets are available for cataract surgery (10 metrics) and macular degeneration (7 metrics). The eight hospitals reported 22 different metrics for cataract surgery and 2 for macular degeneration, which showed only limited overlap with the proposed ICHOM metrics. None of the hospitals reported patient reported visual functioning or vision-related quality of life outcomes measures (PROMs). Three hospitals (38%) reported rates for uncomplicated cataract surgeries only. There was marked variation in how and at what point postoperatively visual outcomes following cataract, cornea, glaucoma, strabismus and oculoplastics procedures were reported. Seven (87.5%) measured post-operative infections and four (50%) measured 30 day unplanned reoperation rates. Outcomes reporting for ophthalmic conditions currently widely varies across hospitals internationally and does not include patient-reported outcomes. Reaching consensus on measures and consistency in data collection will allow meaningful comparisons and provide an evidence base enabling improved sharing of "best practices" to improve eye care globally. Implementation of international standards is still a major challenge and practice-based knowledge on measures should be one of the inputs of the international standardization process.

  10. Determinants and Prognostic Impact of Heart Failure and Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in Acute Coronary Syndrome Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Bermejo, Rosa; Cordero, Alberto; García-Acuña, José M; Gómez Otero, Inés; Varela Román, Alfonso; Martínez, Álvaro; Álvarez Rodríguez, Leyre; Abou-Jokh, Charigan; Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Cid Álvarez, Belén; López-Palop, Ramón; Carrillo, Pilar; González-Juanatey, José R

    2017-12-15

    Contemporary data on the incidence and prognosis of heart failure (HF) and the influence of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the setting of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are scant. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between LVEF and HF with long-term prognosis in a cohort of patients with ACS. This is a retrospective observational study of 6208 patients consecutively admitted for ACS to 2 different Spanish hospitals. Baseline characteristics were examined and a follow-up period was established for registration of death and HF rehospitalization as the primary endpoint. Among the study participants, 5064 had ACS without HF during hospitalization: 290 (5.8%) had LVEF<40%, 540 (10.6%) LVEF 40% to 49%, and 4234 (83.6%) LVEF ≥ 50%. The remaining 1144 patients developed HF in the acute phase: 395 (34.6%) had LVEF<40%, 251 (21.9%) LVEF 40% to 49%, and 498 (43.5%) LVEF ≥ 50%. Patients with LVEF 40% to 49% had a demographic and clinical profile with intermediate features between the LVEF <40% and LVEF ≥ 50% groups. Kaplan-Meier curves showed that mortality and HF readmissions were statistically different depending on LVEF in the non-HF group but not in the HF group. Left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 50% was an independent prognostic factor in the non-HF group only. In ACS, long-term prognosis is considerably worse in patients who develop HF during hospitalization than in patients without HF, irrespective of LVEF. This parameter is a strong prognostic predictor only in patients without HF. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-hospital Delay after Acute Ischemic Stroke in Central Urban China: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanfeng; Yang, Tingting; Gong, Yanhong; Li, Wenzhen; Chen, Yawen; Li, Jing; Wang, Mengdie; Yin, Xiaoxv; Hu, Bo; Lu, Zuxun

    2017-05-01

    Timely thrombolytic treatment is paramount after acute ischemic stroke (AIS); however, a large proportion of patients experience substantial delays in presentation to hospital. This study evaluates the prevalence and risk factors in pre-hospital delays after AIS in central urban China. AIS patients from 66 hospitals in 13 major cities across Hubei Province, between October 1, 2014 and January 31, 2015 were interviewed and their medical records were reviewed to identify those who suffered pre-hospital delays. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were undertaken to determine the prevalence rates and the risk factors associated with pre-hospital delays. A total of 1835 patients were included in the analysis, with 69.3 % patients reportedly arrived at hospital 3 or more hours after onset and 55.3 % patients arrived 6 or more hours after onset. Factors associated with increased pre-hospital delays for 3 or more hours were as follows: patient had a history of stroke (odds ratio (OR), 1.319, P = 0.028), onset location was at home (OR, 1.573, P = 0.002), and patients rather than someone else noticed the symptom onset first (OR, 1.711; P pre-hospital delays. These findings indicate that pre-hospital delays after AIS are common in urban central China, and future intervention programs should be focused on public awareness of stroke and appropriate response.

  12. NACSELD Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure (NACSELD-ACLF) Score Predicts 30-Day Survival in Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Biggins, Scott W; Wong, Florence; Fallon, Michael B; Subramanian, Ram M; Kamath, Patrick S; Thuluvath, Paul; Vargas, Hugo E; Maliakkal, Benedict; Tandon, Puneeta; Lai, Jennifer; Thacker, Leroy R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2018-01-08

    NACSELD (North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease) definition of acute-on-chronic liver failure (NACSELD-ACLF) as ≥2 extra-hepatic organ failures has been proposed as a simple bedside tool to assess risk of mortality in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. We validated NACSELD-ACLF's ability to predict 30-day survival (defined as in-hospital death or hospice discharge) in a separate multicenter prospectively enrolled cohort of both infected and uninfected hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. We utilized the NACSELD database of 14 tertiary care hepatology centers that prospectively enrolled non-elective hospitalized patients with cirrhosis (N=2675). The cohort was randomly split 60%/40% into training (N=1605) and testing (N=1070) groups. Organ failures assessed were: 1) shock, 2) hepatic encephalopathy (grade III/IV), 3) renal (need for dialysis), and 4) respiratory (mechanical ventilation). Patients were most commonly Caucasian (79%) men (62%) with a mean age of 57 years with a diagnosis of alcohol-induced cirrhosis (45%). 1079 patients had an infection during hospitalization. Mean Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) was 19 and median Child score was 10. No demographic differences were present between the 2 split groups. Multivariable modeling revealed NACSELD-ACLF score, as determined by number of organ failures, was the strongest predictor of decreased survival after controlling for admission age, white blood cell count, serum albumin, MELD score, and presence of infection. The c-statistic for the training set was 0.8073 and was 0.8532 for the validation set. Although infection status remains an important predictor of death, NACSELD-ACLF was independently validated in a separate large multinational prospective cohort as a simple reliable bed-side tool to predict 30-day survival in both infected and uninfected patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of cirrhosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018

  13. Treatment for Multiple Acute Cardiopulmonary Conditions in Older Adults Hospitalized with Pneumonia, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmarajan, Kumar; Strait, Kelly M; Tinetti, Mary E; Lagu, Tara; Lindenauer, Peter K; Lynn, Joanne; Krukas, Michelle R; Ernst, Frank R; Li, Shu-Xia; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-08-01

    To determine how often hospitalized older adults principally diagnosed with pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or heart failure (HF) are concurrently treated for two or more of these acute cardiopulmonary conditions. Retrospective cohort study. 368 U.S. hospitals in the Premier research database. Individuals aged 65 and older principally hospitalized with pneumonia, COPD, or HF in 2009 or 2010. Proportion of diagnosed episodes of pneumonia, COPD, or HF concurrently treated for two or more of these acute cardiopulmonary conditions during the first 2 hospital days. Of 91,709 diagnosed pneumonia hospitalizations, 32% received treatment for two or more acute cardiopulmonary conditions (18% for HF, 18% for COPD, 4% for both). Of 41,052 diagnosed COPD hospitalizations, 19% received treatment for two or more acute cardiopulmonary conditions (all of which involved additional HF treatment). Of 118,061 diagnosed HF hospitalizations, 38% received treatment for two or more acute cardiopulmonary conditions (34% for pneumonia, 9% for COPD, 5% for both). Hospitalized older adults diagnosed with pneumonia, COPD, or HF are frequently treated for two or more acute cardiopulmonary conditions, suggesting that clinical syndromes often fall between traditional diagnostic categories. Research is needed to evaluate the risks and benefits of real-world treatment for the many older adults whose presentations elicit diagnostic uncertainty or concern about coexisting acute conditions. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  15. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace : A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P. P.; Francke, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  16. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: a multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  17. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: A multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Mistiaen, P.; van Dijk, L.; Groenewegen, P.P.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and

  18. Pediatric Medication Safety in Adult Community Hospital Settings: A Glimpse Into Nationwide Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Francisco; Ismail, Lana; Markowsky, Allison

    2016-12-01

    Most children in the United States are treated in adult settings. Studies show that the pediatric population is vulnerable to medication errors. It can be extrapolated that children cared for in adult settings are at equal or higher risk for errors. The goal of this study was to assess the existing pediatric medication safety infrastructure within adult hospitals. Questionnaire developed through Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) and distributed to pediatric hospitalist programs listed on the American Academy of Pediatrics, Section on Hospital Medicine web site and members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Quality Improvement Innovation Networks listserv. There were >20 questions regarding the use of various safety measures and characteristics of the hospital. Thirty-eight program staff and 26 Quality Improvement Innovation Networks listserv members completed the survey (total = 64). Of these, 90.6% use order sets or computerized provider order entry with pediatric weight-based dosing, 79.7% review pediatric medication safety events or concerns, 58.7% were aware that their hospital had defined or documented maximum doses on orders, and 50.0% had milligram-per-kilogram dosing required to be in the order. A majority of respondents document weights only in the metric system (kilograms or grams) in both the emergency department and the pediatric unit (84.4% and 92.1%, respectively). A total of 57.8% of hospitals had pharmacists trained in pediatrics, with hospitals with >300 beds more likely to have a pediatric pharmacist than those with Pediatric medication safety infrastructure shows variations within the sites surveyed. Our results indicate that certain deficiencies are more widespread than others, providing opportunities for targeted, but hospital-specific interventions. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. The costs of acute readmissions to a different hospital - Does the effect vary across provider types?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller Dahl, Christian; Planck Kongstad, Line

    2017-06-01

    Treatment costs are found to vary substantially and systematically within DRGs. Several factors have been shown to contribute to the variation in costs within DRGs. We argue that readmissions might also explain part of the observed variation in costs. A substantial number of all readmissions occur to a different hospital. The change in hospital indicates that a progression of the illness has occurred since the initial hospitalisation. As a result, different-hospital readmissions might be more costly compared to same-hospital admissions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to analyse differences in costs between different-hospital readmissions and same-hospital readmissions within the same DRG. Secondly, to investigate whether the effect of different-hospital readmission on costs vary depending of provider type (general versus teaching hospital). We use a rich Danish patient-level administrative data set covering inpatient stays in the period 2008-2010. We exploit the fact that some patients are readmitted within the same DRG and that some of these readmissions occur at different hospitals in a propensity score difference-in-difference design. The estimates are based on a restricted sample of n = 328 patients. Our results show that the costs of different-hospital readmissions are significantly higher relative to the costs of same-hospital readmission (approx. €777). Furthermore, the cost difference is found to be almost twice the size for patients readmitted to a teaching hospital (approx. €1016) (P different general hospital (approx. €511) (P different-hospital readmissions, and that the financial consequences are highest among teaching hospitals. If teaching hospitals are not compensated for the additional costs of treating different-hospital readmission patients, they might be unfairly funded under a DRG-based payment scheme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of conservative management of uncomplicated acute appendicitis: A single hospital based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz KH. Alnaser

    Full Text Available Background: Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest causes of acute abdomen. There is a wide discussion and controversy on the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of the conservative management of selected cases of acute appendicitis with an antibiotic first plan. Patients and methods: This was a single hospital-based prospective study with a duration of 25 months. Patients with clinical and radiological features of acute appendicitis presenting within 72 h of the beginning of abdominal pain with Alvarado score ≥5 were included. The patients received a therapeutic dose of broad-spectrum antibiotics and symptomatic treatment. The follow-up period was 6 months. Results: 90 patients were evaluated, 54 (60% patients were female and 36 (40% patients were male with mean age 34.4 years. Conservative treatment was successful in 68 (75.6% patients and failed in 22 (24.4% patients. No mortality recorded in this study. The main complications which occurred in those patients who failed to respond to conservative treatment were perforated appendicitis (3 patients, appendicular abscess (3 patients and appendicular mass (4 patients. Conclusion: Majority of cases of the first attack of uncomplicated acute appendicitis can be treated successfully by conservative treatment. However, conservative treatment demands precise communication, close monitoring and follow-up to recognize failure which needs to be treated immediately by surgery. Keywords: Acute appendicitis, Conservative treatment, Surgery, Antibiotics

  1. Pre-hospital and In-hospital Delays After Onset of Acute Ischemic Stroke—A Hospital-based Study in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Chen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The biggest hurdle for early hospital presentation is the narrow therapeutic window after stroke. The aims of our study were to investigate the time lags and the factors causing pre-hospital and emergency department (ED delay during acute ischemic stroke attack. Between June 2004 and October 2005, we prospectively studied 129 acute ischemic stroke patients who presented to the ED of the study hospital within 4 hours after symptom onset. Chi-square testing for trend, uni-variate and multiple logistic regression analyses was performed to evaluate the factors influencing delays in the ED presentation of acute ischemic stroke patients. The median time from symptom onset to ED arrival was 71 (mean ± SD, 82.7 ± 57.7 minutes. The median times from ED arrival to neurologic consultation, computed tomography scan, electrocardiogram, and laboratory data completion were 10 (11.3±9.9 minutes, 17 (9.6±11.3 minutes, 14 (23.3±55 minutes, and 39 (44.4±24.5 minutes, respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression models revealed that age < 65 years, illiteracy and awakening with symptoms were the most significant factors related to a delay in ED presentation. This study indicates that 2 hours of pre-hospital delay is the cutoff point for thrombolytic therapy. Organization of a stroke team and standardized stroke pathways may help to shorten in-hospital time consumption. Educational efforts should not only focus on the public, but also on the training of ED physicians and other medical personnel.

  2. Hospital Mortality of Septic Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Renal Replacement Therapy in the Postoperative Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Liu

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: The hospital mortality of postoperative elderly patients with septic AKI was more than 60% and was not affected by age. Mechanical ventilator use was the major risk factor and prognostic factor for elderly patients in this clinical setting.

  3. Delay in presentation after acute ischemic stroke: the Careggi Hospital Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleonora, Innocenti; Patrizia, Nencini; Ilaria, Romani; Alessandra, Del Bene; Francesco, Arba; Benedetta, Piccardi; Giovanni, Pracucci

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator is the approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke within 4.5 h from symptoms onset. Evidence suggests the earlier treatment was given, the greater the chance of a favorable outcome. We investigated if the delay in hospital presentation has been modified in the past 8 years. Acute ischemic strokes admitted to the Emergency Department of the Careggi Hospital, Florence from March 2004 to December 2012 were prospectively collected in the Careggi Hospital Stroke Registry. Proportion of patients presenting ≤ 2 h, 2-3.5, 3.5-6, and >6 h from symptom onset or with awakening stroke were compared. From March 2004 to December 2012, 3,856 patients with acute ischemic stroke arrived to the Careggi Emergency Department. During the period, 28.3 % of patients arrived ≤ 2 h from symptoms onset and 9.8 % between 2 and 3.5 h. The proportion of time-eligible patients is steady in the first years with a slight increase in 2011 and 2012. Early presentation is significantly associated with younger age, intracerebral hemorrhage, and stroke severity. In this study, about one-third of acute ischemic strokes arrived at the Emergency Department within the therapeutic time-window for intravenous thrombolysis. There is only a slight increase in early presentation through the period, mainly in the last 2 years. Additional efforts are required to impact deeply on the rates of time-eligible patients.

  4. Acute Poisoning in Adults Admitted in Ardabil Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Farzaneh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective s: Poisoning is one of the most common causes that referred to the Emergence and one of the most important Medicine immediacy. Correct and immediate diagnosis and accommodative treatment can be life saving. Knowing the overall pattern of poisoning in any geographical area would help to better manage and treat the victims.   Methods : In a cross sectional descriptive study, the required information was collected from the records of patients showing drugs and chemical poisoning who referred to Imam Khomeini hospital Collected data was statistically analyzed using SPSS software.   Results : Out of 2852 case of poisoning, 106 people passed away due to severe complication. Of these 56.8% were men and 43.2% were women. The majority of cases (76.8% were from urban areas. Suicide was the main cause of poisoning (66.53%. Accidental poisoning was recorded for 5.01% of cases. In 28.45% of cases, the cause of poisoning was not identified. The age group 21-30 years made the highest number of cases (52.3%. Tramadol, Benzodiazepines and Aceteminophen were the most poisons used respectively. Benzodiazeine was the most taken drug is in suicide (19.97%.   Conclusion : Results showed that poisoning with Tramadol and Benzodiazepines is high in Ardabil Province. Opioids, Aluminum Phosphide and Organophosphores are the main causative of death in poisoned victims in the province of Ardabil.

  5. Misuse of antibiotics reserved for hospital settings in outpatients: a prospective clinical audit in a university hospital in Southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Manon; Bornet, Charléric; Monges, Philippe; Stein, Andreas; Gensollen, Sophie; Seng, Piseth

    2016-07-01

    Some antibiotics are reserved essentially for hospital settings owing to cost effectiveness and in order to fight the emerging antibiotic resistance crisis. In some cases, antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals may be prescribed in outpatients for serious infections or in the absence of a therapeutic alternative. A 30-day prospective audit of outpatient prescriptions of antibiotics reserved exclusively for use in hospitals was performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions by measuring appropriateness according to guidelines. During the study period, 53 prescriptions were included, only 40% of which were appropriate. Among the 32 inappropriate prescriptions, 4 cases lacked microbial arguments, 1 case was not adequate for the infection type, 1 case involved an incorrect antibiotic dosage, 1 case involved an incorrect interval of dose administration, 3 cases had a therapeutic alternative and 22 cases were not recommended. Of the 53 prescriptions, 66% were started in hospital and 34% in outpatients. Only 25% of cases were prescribed with infectious diseases specialist (IDS) advice, 64% were based on microbiological documentation and 13% had a negative bacterial culture. Inappropriate prescriptions were usually observed in antibiotic lock therapy, skin infections, Clostridium difficile colitis, intra-abdominal infections and intravascular catheter-related infections. Outpatient prescriptions of antimicrobial drugs reserved exclusively for use in hospitals are frequently inappropriate. We recommend a real-time analysis algorithm with the involvement of an IDS for monitoring prescriptions to improve the quality of these prescriptions and possibly to prevent antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute rheumatic fever: a public health concern in resource-poor settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Busari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute rheumatic fever remains a public health concern in developing countries as well as in poorer communities and among indigenous populations in some developed nations. It poses serious economic problem at individual, communal and national levels through direct and indirect health care costs. The objective of this article is to review acute rheumatic fever in the global context with some emphasis on the continuing burden of this disease in the developing settings. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, PubMed, EMBASE and AJOL were searched with focus on epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment, and control of acute rheumatic fever. The review shows that acute rheumatic fever still occurs under conditions of impoverished overcrowding and poor sanitation and where access to healthcare services is limited. Since acute rheumatic fever is a preventable disease, improved housing and sanitation, access to effective healthcare services, early diagnosis, registration of cases and follow up remain the bedrock of the control of this disease [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 153-169

  7. Temporal trends of dialysis requiring acute kidney injury after orthotopic cardiac and liver transplant hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Chauhan, Kinsuk; Patel, Achint; Saha, Aparna; Poojary, Priti; Kamat, Sunil; Patel, Shanti; Ferrandino, Rocco; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Garimella, Pranav S; Menon, Madhav C; Thakar, Charuhas V

    2017-07-19

    The epidemiology and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in prevalent non-renal solid organ transplant recipients is unknown. We assessed the epidemiology of trends in acute kidney injury (AKI) in orthotopic cardiac and liver transplant recipients in the United States. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the yearly incidence trends (2002 to 2013) of the primary outcome, defined as AKI requiring dialysis (AKI-D) in hospitalizations after cardiac and liver transplantation. We also evaluated the trend and impact of AKI-D on hospital mortality and adverse discharge using adjusted odds ratios (aOR). The proportion of hospitalizations with AKI (9.7 to 32.7% in cardiac and 8.5 to 28.1% in liver transplant hospitalizations; p trend <0.01) and AKI-D (1.63 to 2.33% in cardiac and 1.32 to 2.65% in liver transplant hospitalizations; p trend <0.01) increased from 2002-2013. This increase in AKI-D was explained by changes in race and increase in age and comorbidity burden of transplant hospitalizations. AKI-D was associated with increased odds of in hospital mortality (aOR 2.85; 95% CI 2.11-3.80 in cardiac and aOR 2.00; 95% CI 1.55-2.59 in liver transplant hospitalizations) and adverse discharge [discharge other than home] (aOR 1.97; 95% CI 1.53-2.55 in cardiac and 1.91; 95% CI 1.57-2.30 in liver transplant hospitalizations). This study highlights the growing burden of AKI-D in non-renal solid organ transplant recipients and its devastating impact, and emphasizes the need to develop strategies to reduce the risk of AKI to improve health outcomes.

  8. Market and organizational factors associated with hospital vertical integration into sub-acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Tory H; Lemak, Christy Harris; Hearld, Larry R; Sen, Bisakha P; Wheeler, Jack R C; Menachemi, Nir

    2018-04-11

    Changes in payment models incentivize hospitals to vertically integrate into sub-acute care (SAC) services. Through vertical integration into SAC, hospitals have the potential to reduce the transaction costs associated with moving patients throughout the care continuum and reduce the likelihood that patients will be readmitted. The purpose of this study is to examine the correlates of hospital vertical integration into SAC. Using panel data of U.S. acute care hospitals (2008-2012), we conducted logit regression models to examine environmental and organizational factors associated with hospital vertical integration. Results are reported as average marginal effects. Among 3,775 unique hospitals (16,269 hospital-year observations), 25.7% vertically integrated into skilled nursing facilities during at least 1 year of the study period. One measure of complexity, the availability of skilled nursing facilities in a county (ME = -1.780, p integration into SAC. Measures of munificence, percentage of the county population eligible for Medicare (ME = 0.018, p integration into SAC. Dynamism, when measured as the change county population between 2008 and 2011 (ME = 1.19e-06, p integration into SAC. Organizational resources, when measured as swing beds (ME = 0.069, p integration into SAC. Organizational resources, when measured as investor owned (ME = -0.052, p integration into SAC. Hospital adaption to the changing health care landscape through vertical integration varies across market and organizational conditions. Current Centers for Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement programs do not take these factors into consideration. Vertical integration strategy into SAC may be more appropriate under certain market conditions. Hospital leaders may consider how to best align their organization's SAC strategy with their operating environment.

  9. Manual cleaning of hospital mattresses: an observational study comparing high- and low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopman, J; Hakizimana, B; Meintjes, W A J; Nillessen, M; de Both, E; Voss, A; Mehtar, S

    2016-01-01

    Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are more frequently encountered in low- than in high-resource settings. There is a need to identify and implement feasible and sustainable approaches to strengthen HAI prevention in low-resource settings. To evaluate the biological contamination of routinely cleaned mattresses in both high- and low-resource settings. In this two-stage observational study, routine manual bed cleaning was evaluated at two university hospitals using adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Standardized training of cleaning personnel was achieved in both high- and low-resource settings. Qualitative analysis of the cleaning process was performed to identify predictors of cleaning outcome in low-resource settings. Mattresses in low-resource settings were highly contaminated prior to cleaning. Cleaning significantly reduced biological contamination of mattresses in low-resource settings (P cleaning in both the high- and low-resource settings seemed comparable. Cleaning with appropriate type of cleaning materials reduced the contamination of mattresses adequately. Predictors for mattresses that remained contaminated in a low-resource setting included: type of product used, type of ward, training, and the level of contamination prior to cleaning. In low-resource settings mattresses were highly contaminated as noted by ATP levels. Routine manual cleaning by trained staff can be as effective in a low-resource setting as in a high-resource setting. We recommend a multi-modal cleaning strategy that consists of training of domestic services staff, availability of adequate time to clean beds between patients, and application of the correct type of cleaning products. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute Appendicitis After Kidney Transplantation: Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Brizuela, Edgar; Quiroz-Compeán, Alejandro; Vilatobá-Chapa, Mario; Alberú-Gómez, Josefina

    2018-04-01

    Here, we describe the presentation, treatment, and outcomes of acute appendicitis in kidney transplant recipients at a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. We conducted a retrospective case series study at a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City from January 2000 to January 2015. During our study period, 1186 patients received a kidney transplant; among these patients, we identified 10 cases of acute appendicitis (0.008%). Four patients (40%) were diagnosed on day 5 of symptom onset. Nine patients (90%) showed abdominal pain, 2 patients (20%) presented with a typical migratory pattern, and 2 patients (20%) showed symptoms of small bowel intestinal obstruction. Thirty percent of patients (3/10) presented a rule-out Alvarado score (≤ 3 points). A computed tomography scan was performed in all but one patient; among these 9 patients, 1 (11.1%) had a false-negative result. Among all patients with acute appendicitis, 50% (5/10) presented with a periappendiceal abscess and 40% (4/10) showed localized peritonitis. An open and laparoscopic appendectomy was performed in 7 of 10 patients (70%) and 3 of 10 patients (30%), respectively. All patients received ceftriaxone plus metronidazole or ertapenem for 5 to 7 days. There were no reported treatment failures or recurrence of symptoms. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis in kidney transplant recipients requires a high index of suspicion. Kidney transplant recipients with acute appendicitis had good outcomes with a therapeutic approach similar to that used in the general population.

  11. [Update on the management of acute viral bronchiolitis: proposed guidelines of Grand Ouest University Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, M; Cros, P; Gouin, M; Oillic, H; Bihouée, T; Denoual, H; Barzic, A; Duigou, A-L; Vrignaud, B; Levieux, K; Vabres, N; Fleurence, E; Darviot, E; Cardona, J; Guitteny, M-A; Marot, Y; Picherot, G; Gras-Le Guen, C

    2014-01-01

    While our European and North American colleagues have recently updated their recommendations, the 2000 Consensus Conference remains the main guideline on management of acute viral bronchiolitis in France. We aimed to establish an updated inter-regional protocol on management of acute viral bronchiolitis in infants. Pediatricians, pediatric pulmonologists, and emergency physicians of the Grand Ouest University Hospitals (France) gathered to analyze the recent data from the literature. Criteria to distinguish childhood asthma from acute viral bronchiolitis were established, then prescriptions of diagnostic tests, antibiotics, and chest physiotherapy were defined and reserved for very limited situations. Similarly, the modalities of oxygen therapy prescription and nutritional support were proposed. Finally, other therapeutics such as nebulized hypertonic saline seem promising, but their place in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in infants remains unclear. This work has provided new proposals for management of acute viral bronchiolitis and helped standardize practices within the Grand Ouest University Hospitals. This local organization could lay the keystone for working toward guidelines initiated by learned societies at the national level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of contemporary patients discharged from the hospital after an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert J; Saczynski, Jane S; McManus, David D; Waring, Molly E; McManus, Richard; Allison, Jeroan; Parish, David C; Lessard, Darleen; Person, Sharina; Gore, Joel M; Kiefe, Catarina I

    2015-10-01

    Limited contemporary data compare the clinical and psychosocial characteristics and acute management of patients hospitalized with an initial vs a recurrent episode of acute coronary disease. We describe these factors in a cohort of patients recruited from 6 hospitals in Massachusetts and Georgia after an acute coronary syndrome. We performed structured baseline in-person interviews and medical record abstractions for 2174 eligible and consenting patients surviving hospitalization for an acute coronary syndrome between April 2011 and May 2013. The average patient age was 61 years, 64% were men, and 47% had a high school education or less; 29% had a low general quality of life, and 1 in 5 were cognitively impaired. Patients with a recurrent coronary episode had a greater burden of previously diagnosed comorbidities. Overall, psychosocial burden was high, and more so in those with a recurrent vs those with an initial episode. Patients with an initial coronary episode were as likely to have been treated with all 4 effective cardiac medications (51.6%) as patients with a recurrent episode (52.3%), but were significantly more likely to have undergone cardiac catheterization (97.9% vs 92.9%) and a percutaneous coronary intervention (73.7% vs 60.9%) (P < .001) during their index hospitalization. Patients with a first episode of acute coronary artery disease have a more favorable psychosocial profile, less comorbidity, and receive more invasive procedures but similar medical management, than patients with previously diagnosed coronary disease. Implications of the high psychosocial burden on various patient-related outcomes require investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute Rheumatic Fever: Findings of a Hospital-Based Study and an Overview of Reported Outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upton D Allen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available To review the characteristics of reported outbreaks of acute rheumatic fever in the United States, and to determine if there is an increase in the incidence of acute rheumatic fever in the population served by the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, the authors conducted a literature search and a retrospective review of inpatients and outpatients, satisfying the revised Jones criteria for the diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever, from 1972 to 1988. Patients satisfying the revised Jones criteria for the time period 1972–88 were included in the study. There have been eight articles reporting an increase in acute rheumatic fever in the United States. In three, the majority of children were white and from middle class suburban/rural communities in different geographic locations. Mucoid strains of group A streptococci were implicated but not confirmed as being associated with the outbreaks in three. The results of the chart review at the Hospital for Sick Children revealed that 83 cases satisfied the revised Jones criteria. The number of cases per 100,000 children (aged 18 years or less per year, decreased progressively over the study period. Polyarthritis was the most frequently seen major criterion occurring in 73% of patients (61 of 83. The most frequently affected ethnic groups were Italians 23%, Afro-Canadians 19% and Orientals 8%. The reported outbreaks in the United States are multifocal and predominantly confined to white middle class children residing in suburban/rural communities. There was no evidence of an increase in the number of cases of acute rheumatic fever seen in the population served by the Hospital for Sick Children; there was a progressive decline in number of cases over the study period. The results facilitate the characterization of acute rheumatic fever within North America into three different patterns of occurrence.

  14. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Trent Herdman

    Full Text Available Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI. 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33. Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009. There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394. Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010 and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083. Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11, malaria (3, urinary tract infection (2, gastrointestinal infection (1 and undifferentiated sepsis (1. Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  15. Acute or chronic respiratory failure. Assessment and management of patients with COPD in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G A; Hall, J B

    1989-06-16

    Patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure exhibit severe pulmonary impairment as a baseline characteristic. Additional minor insults can precipitate cardiopulmonary failure that requires hospital admission and possibly mechanical ventilation. Our approach to these patients emphasizes evaluation of the imbalance between neuromuscular competence and mechanical load on the respiratory system. In this way, reversible factors can be identified and corrected before they progress to inspiratory muscle fatigue and respiratory failure. For cases in which deterioration is inexorable, guidelines for mechanical ventilation are given and approaches to eventual liberation from the ventilator are reviewed.

  16. Can a chronic disease management pulmonary rehabilitation program for COPD reduce acute rural hospital utilization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekaba, T M; Williams, E; Hsu-Hage, B

    2009-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) imposes a costly burden on healthcare. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is the best practice to better manage COPD to improve patient outcomes and reduce acute hospital care utilization. To evaluate the impact of a once-weekly, eight-week multidisciplinary PR program as an integral part of the COPD chronic disease management (CDM) Program at Kyabram District Health Services. The study compared two cohorts of COPD patients: CDM-PR Cohort (4-8 weeks) and Opt-out Cohort (0-3 weeks) between February 2006 and March 2007. The CDM-PR Program involved multidisciplinary patient education and group exercise training. Nonparametric statistical tests were used to compare acute hospital care utilization 12 months before and after the introduction of CDM-PR. The number of patients involved in the CDM-PR Cohort was 29 (n = 29), and that in the Opt-out Cohort was 24 (n = 24). The CDM-PR Cohort showed significant reductions in cumulative acute hospital care utilization indicators (95% emergency department presentations, 95% inpatient admissions, 99% length of stay; effect sizes = 0.62-0.66, P 0.05). Total costs associated with the hospital care utilization decreased from $130,000 to $7,500 for the CDM-PR Cohort and increased from $77,700 to $101,200 for the Opt-out Cohort. Participation in the CDM-PR for COPD patients can significantly reduce acute hospital care utilization and associated costs in a small rural health service.

  17. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  18. [A set of quality and safety indicators for hospitals of the "Agencia Valenciana de Salud"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot-Marzal, C M; Mira-Solves, J J; Guilabert-Mora, M; Pérez-Jover, V; Pablo-Comeche, D; Quirós-Morató, T; Cuesta Peredo, D

    2014-01-01

    To prepare a set of quality and safety indicators for Hospitals of the «Agencia Valenciana de Salud». The qualitative technique Metaplan® was applied in order to gather proposals on sustainability and nursing. The catalogue of the «Spanish Society of Quality in Healthcare» was adopted as a starting point for clinical indicators. Using the Delphi technique, 207 professionals were invited to participate in the selecting the most reliable and feasible indicators. Lastly, the resulting proposal was validated with the managers of 12 hospitals, taking into account the variability, objectivity, feasibility, reliability and sensitivity, of the indicators. Participation rates varied between 66.67% and 80.71%. Of the 159 initial indicators, 68 were prioritized and selected (21 economic or management indicators, 22 nursing indicators, and 25 clinical or hospital indicators). Three of them were common to all three categories and two did not match the specified criteria during the validation phase, thus obtaining a final catalogue of 63 indicators. A set of quality and safety indicators for Hospitals was prepared. They are currently being monitored using the hospital information systems. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Priority setting for technology adoption at a hospital level: relevant issues from the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Emanuele; Masella, Cristina

    2009-04-01

    The increasing pace of development of healthcare technologies obliges hospitals to increase both the rationality and the accountability of priority setting for technology adoption. This paper aims at identifying which are the relevant issues for technology assessment and selection at a hospital level and at grouping them in a reference framework. An electronic search from January 1990 onwards, covering PubMed, Medline and CILEA, has been carried out in order to collect the relevant contributions. A total of 20 studies were selected from the fields of health policy, management of technology and biomedical engineering. Two main assessment perspectives have been identified and detailed: value generation at a hospital level and level of sustainability in the implementation stage. Four types of investment in technology at a hospital level have been identified combining the perspectives. Moreover, the two perspectives have been deployed in a list of 19 relevant issues that should be reviewed during the budget process. The proposed framework can aid priority setting for technology adoption at a hospital level and contribute to increase both the rationality and the accountability of technology assessment and selection in the budget process.

  20. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montse Ballbè

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain. To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals —the early adopters— based on Rogers’ theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units. Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals’ awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings.

  1. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  2. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... grammatical error in our discussion of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) indicators. On... Hospital Quality Reporting Program (PCHQR), we made a grammatical error. On page 53601, in the table... requirements for the LTCH Quality Reporting Program, we made a grammatical error in our response to a comment...

  3. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Classifications 1. Pre-Major Diagnostic Categories (Pre-MDCs) a. Ventricular Assist Device b. Allogeneic Bone... Teaching Hospitals: Proposed Change in New Growth Period From 3 Years to 5 Years 3. Clarification Related... Days) of Diagnosis for Women Under 70 With AJCC T1c or Stage II or III Hormone Receptor Negative Breast...

  4. Pharmacotherapy prior to and in acute ischaemic stroke. The use of pharmacotherapy and drug-associated outcomes in real world practice - findings from the Polish Hospital Stroke Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewada, Maciej; Sarzyńska-Długosz, Iwona Marta; Skowrońska, Marta; Kamiński, Bogumił; Kobayashi, Adam; Członkowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a preventable disease and acute ischaemic stroke can be effectively treated. Specific pharmacotherapy is recommended in either prevention or acute ischemic stroke treatment. We aimed to evaluate the use and the early and late outcomes impact of drugs administered before and in acute ischaemic stroke in a real world practice. Ischaemic stroke patients hospitalized between 1st March 2007 and 29th February 2008 and reported in Polish Hospital Stroke Registry were analysed. Fully anonymous data were collected with standardized, web-based questionnaire with authorized access. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for case-mix and evaluate the impact of drugs used prior to or in acute ischaemic stroke on outcomes. The early outcomes were defined as in-hospital mortality or poor outcome (death or dependency - modified Rankin Scale  3) at hospital discharge, while late outcomes covered one-year survival. A total number of 26 153 ischaemic stroke patients (mean age: 71.8 years; females: 51.6%) was reported. The ana-lysis of pharmacotherapy showed that preventive use of hypo-tensive agents, anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation, antiplatelets and statins is inadequate. Regression models confirmed some expected drug benefits and additionally revealed that antihypertensive drugs or aspirin used prior to stroke and oral anticoagulants or statins used in hospital were associated with better stroke outcome. The prevention of ischaemic stroke needs to be monitored and improved. Evidence-based treatment of acute ischaemic stroke requires further promotion. The benefits of acute ischaemic stroke treatment with statins require to be confirmed in randomized controlled settings.

  5. Terapia ocupacional en un hospital general de pacientes agudos = Occupational therapy in a general hospital for acute pacients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocello, M. G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Desde su creación, el Hospital Provincial “Dr. José María Cullen” posee la característica de ser un hospital de emergencias, sostenido por la Sociedad de Beneficencia y la Hermanas de la Caridad.Su funcionamiento responde a un Modelo Clínico-Asistencial, lo cual influye en la inserción de Terapia Ocupacional debiendo adaptar sus funciones a las características de la Institución.Los marcos de referencia teóricos y programas que se implementandeber ser acordes con las necesidades surgidas de un Hospital General de Agudos y de emergencias.En el Sector de Terapia Ocupacional se desarrolla la actividad docente cumpliendo con los requisitos reglamentados por el Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Santa Fe.ABSTRACT Ever since its start the Provincial Hospital “Dr. José María Cullen” is characterised for being an emergency hospital under the guidance of the Benfit Society of Hermanas de la Caridad.Its function responds to a Clinical Assistential Model, which influences the insertion of Occupational Therapy, adapting its functiones to the characteristics of the Institution as and when called for.The theoretical points of reference and programmes that are used must be in accordance with tehe necessities that appear in an Acute and Emergency General Hospital.In the Occupational Therapy Sector the teaching activity is developed as required by rules and regulations of the Ministry of Health for the Province of Santa Fe.

  6. Emergence of resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in critically ill patients within an acute care teaching hospital and a long-term acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Claudester; Francis, Stephen J; Abell, Virginia; DiPersio, Joseph R; Wells, Patricia

    2007-05-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative, coccobacillus found in water and is a significant nosocomial pathogen in hospitals. This report chronicles the appearance in June 2003 of a multidrug-resistant A baumannii (MDR-AB) strain, its dissemination, and interventions used to control it in an acute care hospital (ACH) and long-term acute care facility (LTAC). Molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) showed that 88 of 99 strains (89%) gave an identical banding designated as clone A. Eight additional isolates were variants of clone A, and 3 isolates were unrelated. A baumannii was isolated from 229 patients between January 2003 and December 2004. Of these patients, 151 (66%) were colonized/infected with MDR-AB. Most isolates were resistant to antibiotics except for imipenem and ampicillin/sulbactam. Isolates included 108 (72%) in the respiratory tract, 32 (21%) in wounds, 6 (4%) in blood, and 5 (3%) in urine. Most isolates were found in the LTAC (70 isolates), ICU step-down (27 isolates), and ICU (26 isolates). This epidemiologic history illustrates (1) epidemic clonal spread, (2) target populations, (3) variable monthly prevalence, and (4) intervention outcomes. With intervention, the number of new isolates in the ACH decreased by dedicating an infection control professional to critical care, daily surveillance, isolation of positive MDR-AB patients, universal gloving, and routinely reporting results.

  7. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  8. Regular vs ad-lib albuterol for patients hospitalized with acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Alpana; Shim, Chang; Cohen, Hillel W; Chung, Virginia; Maggiore, Diane; Mani, Kartik; Dhuper, Sunil

    2005-09-01

    Inhaled, short-acting beta-agonists and systemic corticosteroids form the mainstay of therapy in acute asthma exacerbation. Asthma, however, is an inflammatory disease of the airways, and its underlying pathology is not impacted by short-acting beta-agonists. While the efficacy of ad-lib beta-agonist administration in outpatient management of asthma symptoms is well established, little data exist to support this strategy in patients with acute, severe asthma. We postulate that as long as patients hospitalized with severe asthma exacerbation receive systemic corticosteroids, regular, scheduled administration of short-acting beta-agonists is unnecessary. Similar therapeutic outcomes can be achieved with the ad-lib administration of the short-acting beta-agonists. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Pulmonary floor of a 600-bed municipal hospital. Sixty-two patients hospitalized for acute asthma. Patients were randomized to receive either albuterol nebulizations (regular albuterol group) or saline solution nebulizations (ad-lib group) every 4 h with management of breakthrough symptoms with albuterol metered-dose inhaler or nebulizations for both groups. All patients received systemic corticosteroids. Peak expiratory flows, asthma symptoms, and need for rescue bronchodilator were followed up on each patient until discharge. There was no significant difference in the length of hospitalization (median length, 48 h for ad-lib group vs 57.5 h for regular albuterol group, p = 0.82), rate of improvement in peak flow, or symptoms between the two groups. Ad-lib beta-agonist use compared to regular albuterol scheduled use resulted in a significant reduction in the total number of albuterol treatments administered (median, 7 treatments vs 19 treatments, p = 0.001) during hospitalization. In the management of asthma exacerbation, ad-lib administration of albuterol is therapeutically as effective as regular, scheduled administration. This method of

  9. Quality of in-hospital care for adults with acute bacterial meningitis: a national retrospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjini, A B; Stuart, J M; Cartwright, K; Cohen, J; Jacobs, M; Nichols, T; Ninis, N; Prempeh, H; Whitehouse, A; Heyderman, R S

    2006-11-01

    Most adults with bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia present to junior doctors who have limited experience of these conditions. In contrast to paediatric practice, data from industrialized countries with regard to current hospital management practice are lacking. To examine whether current practice meets recommended standards in hospital management of community-acquired bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia among adults. National audit of medical records. We conducted a survey of all patients with acute bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia admitted to 18 randomly selected acute hospitals in England and Wales between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2001. All stages of care, including pre-hospital management, initial hospital assessment, record keeping, and ongoing hospital and public health management, were assessed. We identified 212 cases of bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia; 190 cases remained in the final analysis. Clinical record keeping did not meet acceptable standards in 33% of cases. Parenteral antibiotics were given within 1 h of hospital arrival in 56% of cases, increasing to 79% among those with an initial differential diagnosis that included bacterial meningitis or meningococcal septicaemia. A full severity of illness assessment was made in 27%. The quality of clinical practice varied widely between hospitals. This was most pronounced in the timeliness of consultant review (p < 0.0005). The quality of adult clinical practice for bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia needs improvement. This study provides a tool for developing targeted interventions to improve quality of care and outcome among adults with life-threatening infections, both in the UK and in other countries.

  10. Risk factors leading to increased rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute care child and adolescent psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Logan; Pullen, Lisa M; Savage, Jennifer; Cayce, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents in the United States, with suicidal behavior peaking in adolescence. Suicidal and self-harming behavior is often chronic, with an estimated 15-30% of adolescents who attempt suicide having a second suicide attempt within a year. The focus of acute psychiatric hospitalization is on stabilization of these psychiatric symptoms resulting at times in premature discharge. Finding from studies based on high rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital indicates that adolescents continue to experience crisis upon discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital, leading to the question of whether or not these adolescents are being discharged prematurely. A chart review was performed on 98 adolescent clients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital to identify risk factors that may increase rehospitalization among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Clients admitted to the hospital within a 12-month time frame were compared to clients who were not readmitted during that 12-month period. History of self-harming behavior and length of stay greater than 5 days were found to be risk factors for rehospitalization. Adolescent clients who are admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital with a history of self-harming behavior and extended length of stay need to be identified and individualized treatment plans implemented for preventing repeat hospitalizations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Development of smartphone application that aids stroke screening and identifying nearby acute stroke care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Heo, JoonNyung; Kim, Jinkwon; Kim, Young Dae; Song, Tae Jin; Park, Eunjeong; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent. We developed a smartphone application that aids stroke patient self-screening and hospital selection, and may also decrease hospital arrival time. The application was developed for iPhone and Android smartphones. Map data for the application were adopted from the open map. For hospital registration, a web page (http://stroke119.org) was developed using PHP and MySQL. The Stroke 119 application includes a stroke screening tool and real-time information on nearby hospitals that provide thrombolytic treatment. It also provides information on stroke symptoms, thrombolytic treatment, and prescribed actions when stroke is suspected. The stroke screening tool was adopted from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale and is displayed in a cartoon format. If the user taps a cartoon image that represents abnormal findings, a pop-up window shows that the user may be having a stroke, informs the user what to do, and directs the user to call emergency services. Information on nearby hospitals is provided in map and list views, incorporating proximity to the user's location using a Global Positioning System (a built-in function of smartphones). Users can search for a hospital according to specialty and treatment levels. We also developed a web page for hospitals to register in the system. Neurology training hospitals and hospitals that provide acute stroke care in Korea were invited to register. Seventy-seven hospitals had completed registration. This application may be useful for reducing hospital arrival times for thrombolytic candidates.

  12. [The burden and outcomes of acute bronchiolitis among young children hospitalized in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Imad; Srugo, Isaac; Srur, Suzan; Horowitz, Yosef; Almagor, Tal; Wolf, Dana; Kra-Oz, Zipi; Kennes, Yoram; Rishpon, Shmuel; Miron, Dan

    2009-11-01

    Acute bronchiolitis (AB) is a significant indication for hospitalization during the winter period. Underlying conditions increase risk for severe manifestations. To estimate the burden and outcomes of AB in northern Israel. A prospective study was performed between 1.12.2005 - 31.3.2006. Previously healthy children younger than 2 years of age, hospitalized with the diagnosis of AB, in three hospitals in northern Israel, were included in this study. Overall, 465 children (93%) out of 500 children who were hospitalized due to AB and comprised 18% of all hospitalizations during the study period, were included. A pathogen was identified in 91% of cases. A single pathogen was identified in 243 (52%) cases; 2-4 pathogens were found in 176 (39%) children. Common pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Rhinovirus in 346 (75%) and 129 (28%), of which 192 (41%) and 37 (8%) were sole pathogens respectively. Complete data were available for 390 (82%) children, of whom 78% were younger than 6 months. Patients were hospitalized for 4 +/- 4.4 days; 15 children were treated in intensive care. There was one mortality. An X-ray was performed in 94% of cases. Most children were treated with multiple regimens including intravenous fluids, O2 supplement, physiotherapy, bronchodilators, steroids and antibiotics. Bronchiolitis was attributed to 18% of hospitalizations. On a national scale, assuming that the policy of hospitalization is similar, 4100 children were hospitalized due to AB. This reflects 4% of all hospitalized children a year in Israel and attributing to 16,400 hospitalizations. AB is associated with a huge burden, during a short period of the year, on pediatric departments, mainly attributed by infants younger than 6 months of age. The development of effective vaccine against RSV may significantly reduce the burden of morbidity.

  13. A Survey on 100 Children with Acute Ataxia in Mofid Children Hospital Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Karim-Zadeh

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The term “Ataxia” is used to denote disturbances of the body posture and its movement that are normally controlled by the cerebellum. frontal lobes and the posterior columns of the spinal cord. The initial symptom and the most prominent feature of ataxia is abnormal gait which is characterized by lurching and wide base walking. Knowing that, the acute ataxia is among those problems that brings very soon the child to pediatrics neurology department and in view of lack of any survey in this neid in our country, we decided to investigate the etiology of acute ataxia in Islamic Republic of Iran. Materials & Methods: Our patients were recruited from 100 children who were brought to neurology service of Mofid children hospital with the chief complaint of acute ataxia over 2 years period. (sep 2001 to sep 2003. All of those 100 patients were admitted and required investigations were performed. Results: Results of our workup revealed that the most common cause of acute ataxia is acute cerebellar one, which all of them preceded by viral febrile illness. The second frequent cause of acute. Ataxia is due to drug intoxication, which commonly was observed between 2 – 4 years period. Conclusion: The remaining etiologies in descending frequency were as follow, Infectious polyneuropathy, Migraine, Opsoclonus – Myoclonus, Brain tumor, ADEM,MS and Epilepsy.

  14. [Prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury requiring continuous renal replacement therapy undergoing surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, R; Liu, N

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) undergoing surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. Methods: Retrospective analysis were conducted for 60 patients diagnosed with AKI requiring CRRT undergoing surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection at Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University from March 2015 to September 2016. There were 43 male and 17 female patients with an mean age of (50±14) years. Demographic characteristics, diagnosis, perioperative periodrelated data, clinical parameters during CRRT were collected to set up a database. The patients were divided into survival group and non-survival group according to in-hospital mortality. The prognostic factors of mortality in-hospital after AKI requiring CRRT were analyzed by multivariate Logistic regression analysis regression. Results: In the 60 adult patients who had received CRRT, 21 patients (35.0%) died. There were significant differences between died and survival patients on proportion of age>60 years (χ(2)=6.851, P =0.003), lactic acid levels at 12-hour after CRRT ( t =-3.631, P =0.004), lactic acid levels at 24 hours after CRRT ( t =-2.986, P =0.032), proportion of body mass index >25 kg/m(2) (χ(2)=5.660, P =0.041), cardiopulmonary bypass time ( t =-2.720, P =0.001). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis revealed that age≥60 years ( OR =16.450, 95% CI: 2.172 to 84.589); high lactic acid levels at 12-hour after CRRT ( OR =1.719, 95% CI: 1.998 to 2.960) and long cardiopulmonary bypass time ( OR =1.028, 95% CI: 1.004 to 1.052) (all P acid levels at 12-hour after CRRT and long cardiopulmonary bypass time were independent prognostic factors of patients with AKI requiring CRRT after aortic surgery. Proper identification and management shall improve the prognosis of patients.

  15. A qualitative study of new graduates' readiness to use nursing informatics in acute care settings: clinical nurse educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun Hee; Cummings, Elizabeth; Ford, Karen

    2017-10-25

    There is an increase in demand for newly graduated nurses who are ready to use nursing informatics (NI) efficiently in technology-rich healthcare environments. However, the progress of embedding NI into curricula has been slow worldwide, and literature reports graduates are not ready to use NI tools effectively in the workplace, posing potential threats to patient safety. In the absence of National Standards for NI competencies, graduates' NI needs on entering the workplace need to be explored. To identify graduates' NI needs on entering the workplace in acute care settings from the perspectives of clinical nurse educators. A qualitative study using interpretive description with one focus group of six clinical nurse educators was conducted. Clinical nurse educators who are significantly involved in supporting graduates from their first day in the workplace were purposively recruited. The focus group was audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Graduates were found to be inadequately prepared to use NI tools on entering the workplace. Inefficient hospital systems and a ward culture that was discouraging graduates' NI practice were identified as major barriers to the implementation of NI practice. Lack of exposure to specific hospital systems as undergraduates was also identified as a significant barrier to NI practice among graduates. As well as supporting the pre-existing studies on NI skills in graduates and barriers to graduates' NI practice, this current study identified the need for nursing schools to further integrate NI into formal curricula and increased opportunity for exposure to hospital systems as undergraduates. Further studies in multiple settings across Australia are recommended to ensure the transferability of the findings of this study.

  16. Prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients with organ failure at arrival to hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Peter Bank; Hrobjartsson, Asbjorn; Nielsen, Daniel Lykke

    2017-01-01

    undifferentiated patients, at arrival to hospital. The result of the review will assist physicians working in an ED, when assessing patients' risk of organ failure and their associated prognosis. METHODS: The information sources used are electronic databases, PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL...... and analyze studies of prevalence and prognosis of acutely ill patients, with organ failure at arrival to hospital, assist ED physicians assessing the risk of organ failure in unselected patients, and guide recommendations for further research. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42017060871....

  17. Sentinel surveillance for influenza among severe acute respiratory infection and acute febrile illness inpatients at three hospitals in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alexander H; Ampofo, William; Akuffo, Richard; Doman, Brooke; Duplessis, Christopher; Amankwa, Joseph A; Sarpong, Charity; Sagoe, Ken; Agbenohevi, Prince; Puplampu, Naiki; Armah, George; Koram, Kwadwo A; Nyarko, Edward O; Bel-Nono, Samuel; Dueger, Erica L

    2016-09-01

    Influenza epidemiology in Africa is generally not well understood. Using syndrome definitions to screen patients for laboratory confirmation of infection is an established means to effectively conduct influenza surveillance. To compare influenza-related epidemiologic data, from October 2010 through March 2013, we enrolled hospitalized severe acute respiratory infection (SARI; fever with respiratory symptoms) and acute febrile illness (AFI; fever without respiratory or other localizing symptoms) patients from three referral hospitals in Ghana. Demographic and epidemiologic data were obtained from enrolled patients after which nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were collected, and processed by molecular methods for the presence of influenza viruses. Of 730 SARI patients, 59 (8%) were influenza positive; of 543 AFI patients, 34 (6%) were positive for influenza. Both SARI and AFI surveillance yielded influenza A(H3N2) (3% versus 1%), A(H1N1)pdm09 (2% versus 1%), and influenza B (3% versus 4%) in similar proportions. Data from both syndromes show year-round influenza transmission but with increased caseloads associated with the rainy seasons. As an appreciable percentage of influenza cases (37%) presented without defined respiratory symptoms, and thus met the AFI but not the SARI definition, it is important to consider broader screening criteria (i.e., AFI) to identify all laboratory-confirmed influenza. The identified influenza transmission seasonality has important implications for the timing of related public health interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    . 2. Describe the significance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of quality health care. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The purpose of the current project was to (a) examine the type of information accompanying patients on transfer from acute care to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), (b) discuss how these findings meet existing standards, and (c) make recommendations to improve transfer of essential information. The study was a retrospective convenience sample chart audit in one SNF. All patients admitted from an acute care hospital to the SNF were examined. The audit checklist was developed based on recommendations by local and national standards. One hundred fifty-five charts were reviewed. Transferring of physician contact information was missing in 65% of charts. The following information was also missing from charts: medication lists (1%), steroid tapering instructions (42%), antiarrhythmic instructions (38%), duration/indication of anticoagulant medications (25%), and antibiotic medications (22%). Findings support the need for improved transitional care models and better communication of information between care settings. Recommendations include designating accountability and chart audits comparing timeliness, completeness, and accuracy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(3), 19-28.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Trends in Incidence of Hospitalized Acute Myocardial Infarction in the Cardiovascular Research Network (CVRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kristi; Go, Alan S; Leong, Thomas K; Boudreau, Denise M; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E; Fortmann, Stephen P; Goldberg, Robert J; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Magid, David J; Margolis, Karen L; McNeal, Catherine J; Newton, Katherine M; Novotny, Rachel; Quesenberry, Charles P; Rosamond, Wayne D; Smith, David H; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Vupputuri, Suma; Waring, Stephen C; Williams, Marc S; Sidney, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring trends in cardiovascular events can provide key insights into the effectiveness of prevention efforts. Leveraging data from electronic health records provides a unique opportunity to examine contemporary, community-based trends in acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations. We examined trends in hospitalized acute myocardial infarction incidence among adults aged ≥25 years in 13 US health plans in the Cardiovascular Research Network. The first hospitalization per member for acute myocardial infarction overall and for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification primary discharge codes in each calendar year from 2000 through 2008. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence was calculated per 100,000 person-years using direct adjustment with 2000 US census data. Between 2000 and 2008, we identified 125,435 acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years) of acute myocardial infarction decreased an average 3.8%/y from 230.5 in 2000 to 168.6 in 2008. Incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction decreased 8.7%/y from 104.3 in 2000 to 51.7 in 2008, whereas incidence of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction increased from 126.1 to 129.4 between 2000 and 2004 and then decreased thereafter to 116.8 in 2008. Age- and sex-specific incidence rates generally reflected similar patterns, with relatively larger decreases in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction rates in women compared with men. As compared with 2000, the age-adjusted incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in 2008 was 48% lower among men and 61% lower among women. Among a large, diverse, multicenter community-based insured population, there were significant decreases in incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction and the more serious ST-segment elevation

  20. Spirometry for patients in hospital and one month after admission with an acute exacerbation of COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Kenealy, Timothy; Rea,; Adair,; Robinson,; Sheridan,Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Harry Rea1, Timothy Kenealy1, Jacqui Adair1, Elizabeth Robinson2, Nicolette Sheridan31Section of Integrated Care, South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, 2Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, 3Section of Integrated Care, South Auckland Clinical School and School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New ZealandAim: To assess whether spirometry done in hospital during an admission for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstr...

  1. Recovery from Hospital-Acquired Anemia after Acute Myocardial Infarction and Effect on Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Salisbury, Adam C.; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Amin, Amit P.; Reid, Kimberly J.; Alexander, Karen P.; Spertus, John A.; Masoudi, Frederick A.

    2011-01-01

    New onset, hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) during acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is independently associated with poor outcomes. Patterns of recovery from HAA after AMI and their association with mortality and health status are unknown. In the prospective 24-center TRIUMPH registry, we identified 530 AMI patients with HAA (defined as normal hemoglobin at admission with development of anemia by discharge) who had repeat, protocol-driven hemoglobin measurement 1 month after discharge. The 1-m...

  2. Outpatient treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo: poisoning pattern, factors associated with hospitalization, and mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Cathrine; Vallersnes, Odd M; Jacobsen, Dag; Ekeberg, Oivind; Hovda, Knut E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Most patients with acute poisoning are treated as outpatients worldwide. In Oslo, these patients are treated in a physician-led outpatient clinic with limited diagnostic and treatment resources, which reduces both the costs and emergency department overcrowding. We describe the poisoning patterns, treatment, mortality, factors associated with hospitalization and follow-up at this Emergency Medical Agency (EMA, "Oslo Legevakt"), and we evaluate the safety of this current pr...

  3. Human Parechovirus Infection in Children Hospitalized with Acute Gastroenteritis in Sri Lanka▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngan Thi Kim; Takanashi, Sayaka; Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Trinh, Quang Duy; Abeysekera, Chandra; Abeygunawardene, Asiri; Khamrin, Pattara; Okitsu, Shoko; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Of 362 fecal specimens collected from infants and children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Sri Lanka from September 2005 to August 2006, 30 (8.3%) were positive for human parechovirus (HPeV). Six different HPeV genotypes, including HPeV1, -3, -4, -5, -10, and -11, were identified, of these, HPeV11 was reported for the first time. PMID:21048003

  4. Operationalization and reliability testing of ICF categories relevant for physiotherapists' interventions in the acute hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Grill, E; Gloor-Juzi, T; Huber, E O; Stucki, G

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To operationalize items based on categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) relevant to patient problems that are addressed by physiotherapeutic interventions in the acute hospital, and to test the reliability of these items when applied by physiotherapists. Methods: A selection of 124 ICF categories was operationalized in a formal decision-making and consensus process. The reliability of the newly operationalized item list ...

  5. Acute Poisoning in Children Referred to Qazvin Children Hospital (2009 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirzadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute poisoning in children (APC is a preventable cause of pediatric emergency visits. Patterns of acute poisoning in children are different in various regions and times. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of acute poisoning in children, who were referred to the emergency department of Qods teaching hospital in Qazvin, Iran. Methods In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, all children younger than 13 years old, admitted to the Qods teaching hospital in Qazvin (Iran, were assessed during September 2009 to September 2012. Demographic and clinical symptoms and signs of poisoned cases, poisonous agents and outcome of patients were studied. Results Four hundreds and thirty-four (2.59% of total hospital admission patients with APC were admitted to the emergency department during the study period; 63.36% were male. Overall, 345 (79.5% cases were under 6 years old. Drugs (265 cases were common agents for APC. The ingestion route was responsible in 391 of APC. Methadone, benzodiazepines and kerosene were the most frequent poisonous agents. Neurologic symptoms and signs (256 cases were the most common presentation of APC. Forty-five patients (10.36% were admitted to the PICU. Three deaths (%0.06 occurred with monoxide carbon and methadone poisoning. Monoxide carbon poisoning was the deadliest agent. Conclusions Acute poisoning in children is a serious preventable cause of hospital admissions. It is one of the differential diagnoses in patients with sudden onset of neurological, alimentary, respiratory symptoms and signs, who are visited at the emergency department. Parental awareness and education about keeping potential poisoning agents safely is essential to reduce APC in children.

  6. The Economic Crisis and Acute Myocardial Infarction: New Evidence Using Hospital-Level Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbica, Aleksandra; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Ghislandi, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This research sought to assess whether and to what extent the ongoing economic crisis in Italy impacted hospitalizations, in-hospital mortality and expenditures associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The data were obtained from the hospital discharge database of the Italian Health Ministry and aggregated at the hospital level. Each hospital (n = 549) was observed for 4 years and was geographically located within a "Sistema Locale del Lavoro" (SLL, i.e., clusters of neighboring towns with a common economic structure). For each SLL, the intensity of the crisis was determined, defined as the 2012-2008 increase in the area-specific unemployment rate. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach was employed to compare the increases in AMI-related outcomes across different quintiles of crisis intensity. Hospitals located in areas with the highest intensity of crisis (in the fifth quintile) had an increase of approximately 30 AMI cases annually (approximately 13%) compared with hospitals in area with lower crisis intensities (pcrisis. Policies aimed to contrast unemployment in the community by keeping and reintegrating workers in jobs could also have positive impacts on adverse health outcomes, especially in areas of high crisis intensity.

  7. Assessment of functioning in the acute hospital: operationalisation and reliability testing of ICF categories relevant for physical therapists interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Eva; Gloor-Juzi, Thomas; Huber, Erika O; Stucki, Gerold

    2011-01-01

    To operationalize items based on categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) relevant to patient problems that are addressed by physiotherapeutic interventions in the acute hospital, and to test the reliability of these items when applied by physiotherapists. A selection of 124 ICF categories was operation-alized in a formal decision-making and consensus process. The reliability of the newly operationalized item list was tested with a cross-sectional study with repeated measurements. The item writing process resulted in 94 dichotomous and 30 polytomous items. Data were collected in a convenience sample of 28 patients with neurological, musculoske-letal, cardiopulmonary, or internal organ conditions, requiring physical therapy in an acute hospital. Fifty-six percent of the polytomous and 68% of the dichotomous items had a raw agreement of 0.7 or above, whereas 36% of all polytomous and 34% of all dichotomous items had a kappa coefficient of 0.7 and above. The study supports that the ICF is adaptable to professional and setting-specific needs of physiotherapists. Further research towards the development of reliable instruments for physiotherapists based on the ICF seems justified. :

  8. Anemia Rate Assessment in Hospitalized Patients with Acute Bacterial Infection in Qom Hospitals, Qom, Iran, 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Ghanuni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and ObjectivesImmunosuppression is regarded among the risk factors for bacterial infection. But in recent studies, anemia was considered a predisposing factor for bacterial infections. The main goals of this study was to assess the rate of anemia in hospitalized patients with acute bacterial infection and to determine the relationship between anemia and bacterial infection as a predisposing factor.Methods 311 hospitalized patients whose bacterial infection was well documented based on the files present in Kamkar, Arabnia, Fatemi, and Sahamieh hospitals in Qom, Iran, were selected for the present study. They were categorized into various age groups from newborns to the elderly. The data included, age, sex, Hb of the patients the first, third and discharge day, HCT in the first, third and discharge day, MCV, MCH, MCHC, WBC in the first, third, fourth day, Diff in the first and fourth days, ESR, CRP, maximum of fever and disease, chronic disease, smoking. A P<0.05 was considered as being significant.Results On the basis of hemoglobin rate, 43.9 % of patients had anemia as a co-disease. There was no anemia among newborns, but 57% of infants had it. Patients who had pyorrheal lymphadenitis had maximum rate of anemia among other patients. ConclusionOn the average, the rate of anemia in this study was 2.1 times more than that of general population in Qom, as well as in any of the age groups. This difference indicates that anemia rate in patients with acute bacterial infections is more common than general population. However, more studies are needed for the assessment of the relationship between anemia and bacterial infection as a predisposing factor. But it seems that the hemoglobin level and severity of disease have direct effects on each other. Keywords: Anemia; Bacterial Infections; Patients; Qom, Iran.

  9. Comparison between Urine Protein: Creatinine Ratios of Samples Obtained from Dogs in Home and Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M E; Specht, A; Hill, R C

    2015-01-01

    The urine protein:creatinine ratio (UPC) is used to quantify urine protein excretion and guide recommendations for monitoring and treatment of proteinuria. Home urine samples will have lower UPCs than hospital samples. The objectives were to compare UPCs of samples collected in each setting and to determine whether environment of sample collection might affect staging, monitoring or treatment recommendations. Twenty-four client-owned dogs. Prospective, nonmasked study. Clients collected a urine sample from their dog at home and a second sample was collected at the hospital. Dogs receiving corticosteroids or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were excluded, as were those with urine samples of inadequate volume, no protein on dipstick analysis, or active urine sediment. Samples were refrigerated after collection, dipstick and sediment evaluations were completed and each sample was frozen at -80°C within 12 hours. UPCs were performed on frozen samples within 2 months. From 81 paired samples, 57 were excluded. Of the remaining 24, 12/24 (50%) had higher hospital sample UPCs, 9/24 (38%) had identical UPCs, and 3/24 (12%) had lower hospital UPCs. The UPCs of hospital samples were higher than home samples for the total population (P = .005) and the subset with UPC > 0.5 (P = .001). Setting and related circumstances of urine collection in dogs is associated with UPC differences; results are usually higher in hospital than in home samples. This difference has the potential to affect clinical interpretation. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Facilities available in French hospitals treating acute stroke patients: comparison with 24 other European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, D; Cordonnier, C; Debette, S; Hacke, W; Ringelstein, E B; Giroud, M; Mas, J L; Kaste, M

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the proportion of French hospitals meeting criteria for primary (PSC) or comprehensive (CSC) stroke centres, with that of 24 other European countries. We surveyed 121 randomly selected hospitals admitting stroke patients routinely in France and 765 in other European countries. We determined the proportion of hospitals meeting criteria for CSC and PSC according to the EUSI experts definition. The 121 selected hospitals had treated 37,778 patients in 2005 (mean 312), i.e. approximately 25% of all strokes supposed to have occurred in France. Eleven hospitals had an acute stroke care unit, versus 448 of 765 other Hospitals (OR 0.07; 95% CI, OR 0.04-0.13). rt-PA was given to 622 patients (2.2% of ischaemic strokes, versus 3.3% for the other countries). No hospital met criteria for CSC, and only 2 (1.7%) met criteria for PSC. Many facilities considered as necessary by experts were less available, especially personnel, brain CT-scan, ECG monitoring and rt-PA protocols. However, CT angiography 24 h/24, and air ambulance were more often available. Only a few French hospitals offer an optimal level of care for stroke patients. This result contrasts with the high cost of stroke care in France, suggesting an inappropriate use of resources. Conclusions useful for health administrators are: (i) to offer more facilities in reasonably equipped hospitals; (ii) to prevent admission of stroke patients in small under-equipped hospitals; (iii) to promote specific stroke nurse instruction; and (iv) to promote a better organisation of stroke care over the territory.

  11. Hospital arrival time and functional outcome after acute ischaemic stroke: results from the PREMIER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Jiménez, C; Ruiz-Sandoval, J L; Chiquete, E; Vega-Arroyo, M; Arauz, A; Murillo-Bonilla, L M; Ochoa-Guzmán, A; Carrillo-Loza, K; Ramos-Moreno, A; Barinagarrementeria, F; Cantú-Brito, C

    2014-05-01

    Information regarding hospital arrival times after acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) has mainly been gathered from countries with specialised stroke units. Little data from emerging nations is available. We aim to identify factors associated with achieving hospital arrival times of less than 1, 3, and 6 hours, and analyse how arrival times are related to functional outcomes after AIS. We analysed data from patients with AIS included in the PREMIER study (Primer Registro Mexicano de Isquemia Cerebral) which defined time from symptom onset to hospital arrival. The functional prognosis at 30 days and at 3, 6, and 12 months was evaluated using the modified Rankin Scale. Among 1096 patients with AIS, 61 (6%) arrived in <1 hour, 250 (23%) in <3 hours, and 464 (42%) in <6 hours. The factors associated with very early (<1 hour) arrival were family history of ischemic heart disease and personal history of migraines; in <3 hours: age 40-69 years, family history of hypertension, personal history of dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease, and care in a private hospital; in <6 hours: migraine, previous stroke, ischaemic heart disease, care in a private hospital, and family history of hypertension. Delayed hospital arrival was associated with lacunar stroke and alcoholism. Only 2.4% of patients underwent thrombolysis. Regardless of whether or not thrombolysis was performed, arrival time in <3 hours was associated with lower mortality at 3 and 6 months, and with fewer in-hospital complications. A high percentage of patients had short hospital arrival times; however, less than 3% underwent thrombolysis. Although many factors were associated with early hospital arrival, it is a priority to identify in-hospital barriers to performing thrombolysis. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. [Detection of palliative care needs in an acute care hospital unit. Pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calero, Miguel Ángel; Julià-Mora, Joana María; Prieto-Alomar, Araceli

    2016-01-01

    Previous to wider prevalence studies, we designed the present pilot study to assess concordance and time invested in patient evaluations using a palliative care needs assessment tool. We also sought to estimate the prevalence of palliative care needs in an acute care hospital unit. A cross-sectional study was carried out, 4 researchers (2 doctors and 2 nurses) independently assessed all inpatients in an acute care hospital unit in Manacor Hospital, Mallorca (Spain), using the validated tool NECPAL CCOMS-ICO©, measuring time invested in every case. Another researcher revised clinical recordings to analise the sample profile. Every researcher assessed 29 patients, 15 men and 14 women, mean age 74,03 ± 10.25 years. 4-observer concordance was moderate (Kappa 0,5043), tuning out to be higher between nurses. Mean time per patient evaluation was 1.9 to 7.72 minutes, depending on researcher. Prevalence of palliative care needs was 23,28%. Moderate concordance lean us towards multidisciplinary shared assessments as a method for future research. Avarage of time invested in evaluations was less than 8 minutes, no previous publications were identified regarding this variable. More than 20% of inpatients of the acute care unit were in need of palliative care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of acute diarrhoeal disease at Edendale Hospital: Are standard treatment guidelines followed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kershinee Reddy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diarrhoeal disease (DD is a major cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. In South Africa (SA, it ranks as one of the top five causes of under-5 mortality. Local and global guidelines on the management of acute DD are readily available. The Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs and Essential Drugs List for Hospital Level Paediatrics are a recognised standard of care for children in SA hospitals. However, children still die from this preventable disease. Objective. To determine whether doctors adhered to standard treatment guidelines when treating children under 5 years of age presenting to Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal Province, with acute DD. Methods. The study was a retrospective clinical audit of individual patient records. Results. One hundred and thirty-five patient records were reviewed. Forty-seven percent had a correct nutritional assessment, 41% were correctly assessed for shock and 27% for dehydration. Appropriate investigations were undertaken in 12%. Ninety-seven percent of patients had appropriate fluid plans prescribed. Zinc was prescribed in only 39% of patients, whereas 84% were appropriately not prescribed antibiotics and no patients received anti-diarrhoeal medication. In 90% of patients, the correct post-care patient referral was made, and 47% of caregivers were adequately advised about ongoing care of their children. Conclusion. This study identifies substantial non-adherence to the SA STGs for the management of young children with acute DD.

  14. Effects of vitamin C and vitamin D administration on mood and distress in acutely hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Liu, Xing Jian; Robitaille, Line; Eintracht, Shaun; MacNamara, Elizabeth; Hoffer, L John

    2013-09-01

    Hypovitaminosis C and D are highly prevalent in acute-care hospitals. Malnutrition with regard to these vitamins has been linked to mood disturbance and cognitive dysfunction. The objective was to determine whether vitamin C or D supplementation improves mood state or reduces psychological distress in acutely hospitalized patients with a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and D. A randomized, double-blind, active-control clinical trial compared the effects of vitamin C (500 mg twice daily) with those of high-dose vitamin D (5000 IU/d) on mood (Profile of Mood States) and psychological distress (Distress Thermometer). Vitamin C provided for a mean of 8.2 d increased plasma vitamin C concentrations to normal (P vitamin D provided for a mean of 8.1 d increased plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations (P vitamin C group were greater than those in the vitamin D group (P = 0.045 for mood; P = 0.009 for distress). Short-term therapy with vitamin C improves mood and reduces psychological distress in acutely hospitalized patients with a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis C and D. No conclusion is possible regarding the effects of vitamin D because the dose and duration of therapy were insufficient to raise 25(OH)D concentrations into the normal range. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01630720.

  15. Mobile Phones as a Potential Vehicle of Infection in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Foong, Yi; Green, Mark; Zargari, Ahmad; Siddique, Romana; Tan, Vanessa; Brain, Terry; Ogden, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the potential role of mobile phones as a reservoir for bacterial colonization and the risk factors for bacterial colonization in a hospital setting. We screened 226 staff members at a regional Australian hospital (146 doctors and 80 medical students) between January 2013 and March 2014. The main outcomes of interest were the types of microorganisms and the amount of contamination of the mobile phones. This study found a high level of bacterial contamination (n = 168/226, 74%) on the mobile phones of staff members in a tertiary hospital, with similar organisms isolated from the staff member's dominant hand and mobile phones. While most of the isolated organisms were normal skin flora, a small percentage were potentially pathogenic (n = 12/226, 5%). Being a junior medical staff was found to be a risk factor for heavy microbial growth (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.54, 10.37). Only 31% (70/226) of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely, and only 21% (47/226) reported using alcohol containing wipes on their phones. This study demonstrates that mobile phones are potentially vehicles for pathogenic bacteria in a hospital setting. Only a minority of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely. Disinfection guidelines utilizing alcohol wipes should be developed and implemented.

  16. Determinants of in-hospital death after acute spinal cord injury: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selassie, A W; Varma, A; Saunders, L L; Welldaregay, W

    2013-01-01

    First, to evaluate the influence of comorbid diseases and concomitant injuries on the risk of in-hospital death after traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). Second, to identify the risk characteristics of TSCI patients with likelihood of death. Population-based retrospective cohort study. Sixty-two acute care hospitals in South Carolina, USA. Records of 3389 TSCI patients hospitalized with acute TSCI were evaluated. Days elapsing from the date of injury to date of death established the survival time (T). Cox regression examined risk of in-hospital death as a function of counts of comorbid conditions and injuries along with their joint effects controlling for other covariates. Counts of comorbid conditions and injuries showed dose-dependent risk of death while in-hospital independent of demographical and clinical covariates. Hazard ratios (HR) for counts 3+, 2 and 1 comorbid conditions were 2.19 (P<0.001), 1.73 (P=0.005) and 1.20 (P=0.322), respectively. For counts of 4+, 3 and 2 other injuries were 1.85 (P<0.001), 1.81 (P<0.001) and 1.46 (P=0.022), respectively. The joint effect of the two was transadditive with statistically significant HR ranging from 1.72-3.14. Counts of comorbid conditions and injured body regions strongly indicate risk of in-hospital death after TSCI and their joint effects elicited dose-dependent gradient independent of demographical and clinical covariates. Assessing risk of in-hospital death based on joint use of counts of comorbid diseases and injuries is highly informative to target TSCI patients at high risk of dying.

  17. Health literacy and mortality: a cohort study of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-04-29

    More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for death among patients with LHL was 1.32 (95%confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 1.66, P=0.02) compared to BHLS>9 [corrected].Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  18. A CONCERN OF E-WASTE IN THE HOSPITAL SETTING AND ITS WAYS OF DISPOSAL

    OpenAIRE

    Manjula Shantaram; Shaistah Shafy; Rifna Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    The most effective solution to the growing e-waste problem is to recycle raw materials from end-of-life electronics. Most electronic devices contain a range of materials, including metals that can be recovered for future uses. By dismantling and providing reuse possibilities, intact natural resources are conserved and air and water pollution caused by hazardous dumping is avoided. Objectives of our study were to understand the various issues of e-waste management in the hospital settings and ...

  19. The Study of the Optimal Parameter Settings in a Hospital Supply Chain System in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chang Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed the optimal parameter settings for the hospital supply chain system (HSCS when either the total system cost (TSC or patient safety level (PSL (or both simultaneously was considered as the measure of the HSCS’s performance. Four parameters were considered in the HSCS: safety stock, maximum inventory level, transportation capacity, and the reliability of the HSCS. A full-factor experimental design was used to simulate an HSCS for the purpose of collecting data. The response surface method (RSM was used to construct the regression model, and a genetic algorithm (GA was applied to obtain the optimal parameter settings for the HSCS. The results show that the best method of obtaining the optimal parameter settings for the HSCS is the simultaneous consideration of both the TSC and the PSL to measure performance. Also, the results of sensitivity analysis based on the optimal parameter settings were used to derive adjustable strategies for the decision-makers.

  20. Suicidal behaviour characteristics and factors associated with mortality in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Esteban-Vasallo, María; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas

    2016-04-29

    Suicide is a major public health problem worldwide, and an approach is necessary due to its high potential for prevention. This paper examines the main characteristics of people admitted to hospitals in the Community of Madrid (Spain) with suicidal behaviour, and the factors associated with their hospital mortality. A study was conducted on patients with E950-E959 codes of suicide and self-inflicted injuries of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, contained in any diagnostic field of the minimum basic data set at hospital discharge between 2003 and 2013. Sociodemographic, clinical and health care variables were assessed by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis in the evaluation of factors associated with hospital mortality. Hospital suicidal behaviour predominates in women (58.7%) and in middle-age. Hospital mortality is 2.2% (1.6% in women and 3.2% in men), increasing with age. Mental disorders are detected 3-4 times more in secondary diagnoses. The main primary diagnosis (>74%) is poisoning with substances, with lower mortality (∼1%) than injury by hanging and jumping from high places (≥12%), which have the highest numbers. Other factors associated with increased mortality include different medical comorbidities and severity of the injury, while length of stay and mental disorders are protective factors. Type of hospital, poisoning, and Charlson index are associated differently with mortality in men and women. Hospitalised suicidal acts show a low mortality, mainly related to comorbidities and the severity of injuries. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the pressure ulcer prevention clinical decision report for bedside nurses in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, A; Tschannen, D; Guo, Y; Kazemi, J

    2011-01-01

    Hospital stays for patients with pressure ulcers (PU) increased nearly 80% from 1992 to 2006. Most PU's developed during an admission, often despite preventive efforts from clinical staff. Data from Electronic medical records (EMR's) were used to prepare daily patient risk factor and PU information for nurses to help prevent PU development and exacerbations. THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO DETERMINE WHETHER: 1) dissemination of an automated daily report with patient risk and current status of pressure ulcers ("PU Daily") helps prevent the development of pressure ulcers, and 2) using the PU Daily information impacts the severity of pressure ulcers that develop in an acute care setting. A pre-post study with four control units was designed to determine the impact of the PU Daily in intensive care units (ICU) in a large medical center. The control units included ICU's using the same EMR and similar complexity of cases with a high risk of developing a PU. The pre-post study took place over a six month period (March - August 2009). A total of 6,735 cases were included in the study. The intervention unit showed a significant decrease (p = 0.004) in PU's at post-evaluation; none of the four comparison units showed a decrease at the pintervention led to a significant reduction in the total number of PU's documented (p intervention with the PU Daily showed a significant decrease in the total PU's and severity of PU's and allowed for implementation of interventions that help prevent the development of PU's. As EMR's become more widely available, this intervention showed a reduction in PU's. Future studies should further develop this intervention and include multiple institutions and patient populations.

  2. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 shortens acute infectious diarrhea in a pediatric outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ener Cagri Dinleyici

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Two randomized controlled clinical trials have shown thatLactobacillus (L reuteri DSM 17938 reduces the duration of diarrhea in children hospitalized due to acute infectious diarrhea. This was the first trial evaluating the efficacy of L. reuteri DSM 17938 in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea.METHODS: This was a multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, case control clinical trial in children with acute watery diarrhea. A total of 64 children who presented at outpatient clinics were enrolled. The probiotic group received 1 × 108 CFU L. reuteri DSM 17938 for five days in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS and the second group was treated with ORS only. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhea (in hours. The secondary endpoint was the number of children with diarrhea at each day of the five days of intervention. Adverse events were also recorded.RESULTS: The mean duration of diarrhea was significantly reduced in the L. reuteri group compared to the control group (approximately 15 h, 60.4 ± 24.5 h [95% CI: 51.0-69.7 h] vs. 74.3 ± 15.3 h [95% CI: 68.7-79.9 h], p < 0.05. The percentage of children with diarrhea was lower in the L. reuteri group (13/29; 44.8% after 48 h than the control group (27/31; 87%; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.79,p < 0.01. From the 72nd hour of intervention onwards, there was no difference between the two groups in the percentage of children with diarrhea. No adverse effects related to L. reuteri were noted.CONCLUSION:L. reuteri DSM 17938 is effective, safe, and well-tolerated in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea.

  3. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 shortens acute infectious diarrhea in a pediatric outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Dalgic, Nazan; Guven, Sirin; Metin, Ozge; Yasa, Olcay; Kurugol, Zafer; Turel, Ozden; Tanir, Gonul; Yazar, Ahmet Sami; Arica, Vefik; Sancar, Mesut; Karbuz, Adem; Eren, Makbule; Ozen, Metehan; Kara, Ates; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Two randomized controlled clinical trials have shown that Lactobacillus (L) reuteri DSM 17938 reduces the duration of diarrhea in children hospitalized due to acute infectious diarrhea. This was the first trial evaluating the efficacy of L. reuteri DSM 17938 in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea. This was a multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, case control clinical trial in children with acute watery diarrhea. A total of 64 children who presented at outpatient clinics were enrolled. The probiotic group received 1×10(8)CFU L. reuteri DSM 17938 for five days in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) and the second group was treated with ORS only. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhea (in hours). The secondary endpoint was the number of children with diarrhea at each day of the five days of intervention. Adverse events were also recorded. The mean duration of diarrhea was significantly reduced in the L. reuteri group compared to the control group (approximately 15h, 60.4±24.5h [95% CI: 51.0-69.7h] vs. 74.3±15.3h [95% CI: 68.7-79.9h], pL. reuteri group (13/29; 44.8%) after 48h than the control group (27/31; 87%; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.79, pL. reuteri were noted. L. reuteri DSM 17938 is effective, safe, and well-tolerated in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Innes, Anthea; Scerri, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Although literature describing and evaluating training programmes in hospital settings increased in recent years, there are no reviews that summarise these programmes. This review sought to address this, by collecting the current evidence on dementia training programmes directed to staff working in general hospitals. Literature from five databases were searched, based on a number of inclusion criteria. The selected studies were summarised and data was extracted and compared using narrative synthesis based on a set of pre-defined categories. Methodological quality was assessed. Fourteen peer-reviewed studies were identified with the majority being pre-test post-test investigations. No randomised controlled trials were found. Methodological quality was variable with selection bias being the major limitation. There was a great variability in the development and mode of delivery although, interdisciplinary ward based, tailor-made, short sessions using experiential and active learning were the most utilised. The majority of the studies mainly evaluated learning, with few studies evaluating changes in staff behaviour/practices and patients' outcomes. This review indicates that high quality studies are needed that especially evaluate staff behaviours and patient outcomes and their sustainability over time. It also highlights measures that could be used to develop and deliver training programmes in hospital settings.

  5. Predictors of a nursing home placement from a non-acute geriatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, B S; Sharma, J C; Allen, S C; Vassallo, M

    2003-02-01

    Identifying patients who need Nursing Home (NH) care following a hospital admission is important. To identify the factors that predispose to an NH discharge. Prospective observational study with blinded end-point evaluation. A non-acute geriatric hospital. Two hundred consecutive elderly patients who were admitted for rehabilitation following treatment for an acute illness. Discharge to an NH or home. Thirty-five out of the 150 live discharges (23.3%) were to an NH. NH discharges had a longer length of stay (38.5 versus 19.8 days; p falls (p = 0.02) and to have sustained a fall while in hospital (p = 0.001). Multiple logistic regression identified confusion (p = 0.001), incontinence (p = 0.02), falls in hospital (p = 0.01), gait abnormalities (p factors present: 4.28% for 0-2 factors, 25.8% for 3-4 factors and 81.8% for 5-6 factors (p factors should be the target of specific rehabilitation in an attempt to reduce the risk of discharge to a nursing home and improve patient outcome.

  6. Precipitating Factors for Acute Heart Failure Hospitalization and Long-Term Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, Anat; Maor, Elad; Sabbag, Avi; Chernomordik, Fernando; Elis, Avishay; Arbel, Yaron; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud; Klempfner, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients have frequent exacerbations leading to high consumption of medical services and recurrent hospitalizations.Different precipitating factors have various effects on long-term survival.We investigated 2212 patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of either acute HF or acute exacerbation of chronic HF. Patients were divided into 2 primary precipitant groups: ischemic (N = 979 [46%]) and nonischemic (N = 1233 [54%]). The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality.Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of a nonischemic precipitant was associated with a favorable in-hospital outcome (OR 0.64; CI 0.43-0.94), but with a significant increase in the risk of 10-year mortality (HR 1.12; CI 1.01-1.21). Consistently, the cumulative probability of 10-year mortality was significantly higher among patients with a nonischemic versus ischemic precipitant (83% vs 90%, respectively; Log-rank P value term outcomes (OR 1.56, [P long-term (HR 1.59 [P hospitalization has important short- and long-term implications that can be used for improved risk stratification and management.

  7. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-11-30

    Acute hospital admission provides an excellent opportunity to address poor oral health in older people, a group rarely seen by dental professionals and for who oral health activity in hospital is inconsistent and generally suboptimal. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presented the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. The second article explores clinical recommendations. A change in philosophy is needed to embed oral care as an essential component of holistic practice. More research is needed to determine the best ways to assess and treat oro-dental problems in older people, and promote and restore their oral health in hospitals. Great potential exists to innovate and develop new ways of providing care to this group. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  8. Do-not-resuscitate orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction: the Worcester Heart Attack Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Elizabeth A; Yarzebski, Jorge L; Goldberg, Robert J; Wheeler, Brownell; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Lessard, Darleen M; Bedell, Susanna E; Gore, Joel M

    2004-04-12

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in Americans. Despite increased interest in end-of-life care, data regarding the use of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in acutely ill cardiac patients remain extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to describe use of DNR orders, treatment approaches, and hospital outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The study sample consisted of 4621 residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction at all metropolitan Worcester, Mass, area hospitals in five 1-year periods from 1991 to 1999. Significant increases in the use of DNR orders were observed during the study decade (from 16% in 1991 to 25% in 1999). The elderly, women, and patients with previous diabetes mellitus or stroke were more likely to have DNR orders. Patients with DNR orders were significantly less likely to be treated with effective cardiac medications, even if the DNR order occurred late in the hospital stay. Less than 1% of patients were noted to have DNR orders before hospital admission. Patients with DNR orders were significantly more likely to die during hospitalization than patients without DNR orders (44% vs 5%). The results of this community-wide study suggest increased use of DNR orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction during the past decade. Use of certain cardiac therapies and hospital outcomes are different between patients with and without DNR orders. Further efforts are needed to characterize the use of DNR orders in patients with acute coronary disease.

  9. A nationwide hospital survey on patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals: setting priorities at the launch of a 5-year patient safety plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Peleman, Hilde; Schrooten, Ward

    2012-09-01

    To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sought by hierarchical cluster analysis. 90 acute, 42 psychiatric and 11 long-term care hospitals submitted their data for comparison to other hospitals. The benchmark database included 55 225 completed questionnaires (53.7% response rate). Overall dimensional scores were low, although scores were found to be higher for psychiatric and long-term care hospitals than for acute hospitals. The overall perception of patient safety was lower in French-speaking hospitals. Hierarchical clustering of dimensions resulted in two distinct clusters. Cluster I grouped supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety, organisational learning-continuous improvement, teamwork within units and communication openness, while Cluster II included feedback and communication about error, overall perceptions of patient safety, non-punitive response to error, frequency of events reported, teamwork across units, handoffs and transitions, staffing and management support for patient safety. The nationwide safety culture assessment confirms the need for a long-term national initiative to improve patient safety culture and provides each hospital with a baseline patient safety culture profile to direct an intervention plan. The identification of clusters of safety culture dimensions indicates the need for a different approach and context towards the implementation of interventions aimed at improving the safety culture. Certain clusters require unit level improvements, whereas others demand a hospital-wide policy.

  10. Vision and hearing impairments and their associations with falling and loss of instrumental activities in daily living in acute hospitalized older persons in five Nordic hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, Else Vengnes; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen; Noro, Anja; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Jensdóttir, Anna Birna; Ljunggren, Gunnar; Bucht, Gösta; Björnson, Leif Jan; Jonsén, Elisabeth; Schroll, Marianne; Jónsson, Palmi V

    2009-12-01

    Many older people believe sensory problems are inevitably, a part of growing old, and avoid assessment and help. Such problems are often also overlooked by health professionals. The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of hearing and vision impairment and their associations with loss of instrumental activities in daily living (IADL) and risk of falling in patients aged 75 years or older, admitted to a medical ward in an acute hospital in each of the five Nordic countries. The Minimum Data Set for Acute Care was used for data collection in 770 patients. Premorbid data, admission data and history of falls over 3 months were obtained on admission by interview and observation. Hearing impairment was present if the patient required a quiet setting to be able to hear normal speech. Vision impairment was defined as unable to read regular print in a newspaper. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed. Forty-eight per cent of the patients had a hearing impairment, 32.3% had vision impairment and 20.1% had both. Hearing impairment was associated with falling but not in the logistic regression model. Hearing and vision impairment were associated with loss of IADL but only combined impairment was independently. Hearing and vision impairments were frequent among older patients in the medical wards. Falling was associated with hearing loss and IADL loss with hearing, vision and combined impairments. Sensory loss was also associated with fear of falling. It is recommended routinely to screen sensory functions in older patients in a medical setting. Intervention studies are needed to determine whether improvements in hearing and vision can prevent falls and further loss of function in this patient population.

  11. An oasis in the hospital: the perceived benefits of a cancer support center in a hospital setting offering complementary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anne M; Bulsara, Caroline E; Joske, David J L; Petterson, Anna S; Nowak, Anna K; Bennett, Kellie S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of persons attending a cancer support center, providing emotional support to cancer patients through self-selected complementary therapies offered free of charge through qualified volunteer therapists. A grounded theory methodology was used. Sources of data were 16 semistructured interviews with persons attending the center. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Analysis was conducted using the constant comparative method. The overarching theme that emerged in this study was the benefits attributed to attendance at the cancer support center. The center was described as an "oasis" in the hospital, and three aspects relating to this were identified: (a) facilitating comfort, (b) increasing personal control, and (c) helping make sense of the cancer experience. A drop-in center offering complementary therapies appeared to enable coping with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer by facilitating comfort and increasing perceptions of personal control. The center also helped some participants to make sense of their experience with cancer. This research has provided a unique insight into the ongoing emotional needs of cancer patients, and directions for further development and research into the provision of holistic care for patients within a hospital setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Risk factors for acute care hospital readmission in older persons in Western countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mona Kyndi; Meyer, Gabriele; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital readmission in older persons is common and reported as a post-discharge adverse outcome from hospitalization. Readmission relates to a mix of factors associated with increasing age, living conditions, progression of disease as well as factors related to the processes of care...... extracted verbatim using a data extraction form, which identified the components from the standardized JBI data extraction tool from JBI-MAStARI and was adapted to the needs of the present review. DATA SYNTHESIS: Due to the clinical and methodological heterogeneity of the studies included, a narrative...... summary and metasynthesis of the quantitative findings was conducted. RESULTS: Based on a review of nine studies from ten Western countries, we found several significant risk factors pertaining to readmission to an acute care hospital within one month of discharge in persons aged 65 years and over...

  13. Outcomes of acute exacerbations in COPD in relation to pre-hospital oxygen therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J; Terkelsen, Jakob; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital, high-concentration oxygen therapy during acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) has been associated with increased mortality. Recent COPD guidelines have encouraged titrated oxygen therapy with a target saturation range of 88-92%. Oxygen...... therapy leading to saturation above 92% is defined as 'inappropriate oxygen therapy'. OBJECTIVES: To examine the frequency of inappropriate oxygen therapy and whether inappropriate oxygen therapy in the ambulance in an urban area with short transit time to hospital was associated with poor outcome....... METHODS: In an audit of 405 consecutive patients with AECOPD arriving by ambulance to Hvidovre Hospital, details of transit time, oxygen administration, saturation, and arterial blood gases were registered. Outcomes were respiratory acidosis, need of supported ventilation, length of hospitalisation...

  14. Characteristics of severe acute respiratory infectionassociated hospitalization in Yemen, 2014/15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, A A K; Al-Kohani, A; Shadoul, A; Al-Mahaqri, A; Bin Yahya, M; Saleh, A H; Al-Adeemy, D; Khan, W; Malik, M

    2016-10-02

    This study aims to describe etiological agents, demographic details of patients, seasonality and underlying conditions among patients hospitalized due to viral severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in Yemen. We carried out a retrospective descriptive analysis of data from January 2014 to December 2015. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from each patient for laboratory testing. A total of 1346 diagnostic specimens were tested, of which 733 (54%) were positive for influenza viruses. Influenza A(H3) and A(H1N1) pdm09 predominated. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was reported predominantly among children (41%). Males (61%) were more affected than females. The median age was 1 year (range 0.5-94.0). The median length of hospitalization was 6 days. Chronic cardiovascular disease was the most commonly reported underlying condition, but 67% had no documented underlying disease. Respiratory viruses, particularly RSV, adenovirus and influenza, were commonly associated with hospitalization for SARI.

  15. Restorative green outdoor environments at acute care hospitals - case studies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Shukor, Shureen Faris Binti

    design guidelines which formed a survey tool called the Common Design Recommendations (CDRs). The CDRs were later used to analyze the design characteristics of the five hospitals’ GOEs. The Perceived Restorativeness Scale (PRS), which was included in the questionnaire, was used with the intention......The PhD thesis is based on research which was conducted between 2009 and 2012. It deals with green outdoor environments (GOEs) at acute care hospitals in the capital region of Denmark. The aim of this PhD study is to gain deeper knowledge about the design and use of GOEs which supports mental...... of identifying which hospital GOE was perceived by the users as being the most restorative. The findings show that the GOE at Bispebjerg Hospital, the design characteristics of which conform to three themes in the CDR, is perceived as having the most restorative potential compared to the others which conform...

  16. Current and future use of ICT for patient care and management in German acute hospitals--a comparison of the nursing and the hospital managers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, U; Sellemann, B

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at gaining comprehensive information on the current status of patient care and management applications used in German acute hospitals. Since the degree of ICT coverage in hospitals depends on the attitude of the key decision makers we also wanted to capture their plans and priorities and herewith try to predict future use. We therefore conducted a nation-wide survey including all acute hospitals in Germany in which two questionnaires were mailed to each hospital, one to the nursing managers, the other to the hospital managers. Six hundred hospitals participated in the survey which corresponds to an overall response rate of 27.6%. Accounting (84%) was found to be the most prevalent management module. Rostering was implemented in every second hospital. For clinical applications laboratory systems ranked first (69%). Ordering systems were used in nearly every second hospital. Nineteen percent of the hospitals reported employing an electronic patient record, 7% a nursing documentation system. Ranked by their priorities ordering systems hold the first position and care planning the last position. According to their plans, hospital managers, not nursing managers, intend to introduce nursing documentation. In contrast, nursing managers favor ordering and rostering for the near future. There is still a preponderance of management-oriented systems in German hospitals, yet clinical applications, in particular those supporting communications, will gain ground. The future of documentation systems is unclear, unless they not only provide statistical data for the management but support the clinical process properly.

  17. Individual psychological therapy in an acute inpatient setting: Service user and psychologist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Catherine; Pistrang, Nancy; Huddy, Vyv; Williams, Claire

    2018-01-18

    The acute inpatient setting poses potential challenges to delivering one-to-one psychological therapy; however, there is little research on the experiences of both receiving and delivering therapies in this environment. This qualitative study aimed to explore service users' and psychologists' experiences of undertaking individual therapy in acute inpatient units. It focused on the relationship between service users and psychologists, what service users found helpful or unhelpful, and how psychologists attempted to overcome any challenges in delivering therapy. The study used a qualitative, interview-based design. Eight service users and the six psychologists they worked with were recruited from four acute inpatient wards. They participated in individual semi-structured interviews eliciting their perspectives on the therapy. Service users' and psychologists' transcripts were analysed together using Braun and Clarke's (2006, Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77) method of thematic analysis. The accounts highlighted the importance of forming a 'human' relationship - particularly within the context of the inpatient environment - as a basis for therapeutic work. Psychological therapy provided valued opportunities for meaning-making. To overcome the challenges of acute mental health crisis and environmental constraints, psychologists needed to work flexibly and creatively; the therapeutic work also extended to the wider context of the inpatient unit, in efforts to promote a shared understanding of service users' difficulties. Therapeutic relationships between service users and clinicians need to be promoted more broadly within acute inpatient care. Psychological formulation can help both service users and ward staff in understanding crisis and working collaboratively. Practice-based evidence is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of adapted psychological therapy models. Developing 'human' relationships at all levels of acute inpatient care continues to be an

  18. Effective strategies for nurse retention in acute hospitals: a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Heede, Koen; Florquin, Mieke; Bruyneel, Luk; Aiken, Linda; Diya, Luwis; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Sermeus, Walter

    2013-02-01

    The realization of an organizational context that succeeds to retain nurses within their job is one of the most effective strategies of dealing with nursing shortages. First, to examine the impact of nursing practice environments, nurse staffing and nurse education on nurse reported intention to leave the hospital. Second, to provide understanding of which best practices in the organization of nursing care are being implemented to provide sound practice environments and to retain nurses. 3186 bedside nurses of 272 randomly selected nursing units in 56 Belgian acute hospitals were surveyed. A GEE logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the impact of organization of nursing care on nurse reported intention to leave controlling for differences in region (Walloon, Flanders, and Brussels), hospital characteristics (technology level, teaching status, and size) and nurse characteristics (experience, gender, and age). For the second objective, in-depth semi-structured interviews with the chief nursing officers of the three high and three low performing hospitals on reported intention to leave were held. 29.5% of Belgian nurses have an intention-to-leave the hospital. Patient-to-nurse staffing ratios and nurse work environments are significantly (pretention were--in contrast to the low performing hospitals--characterized by a flat organization structure with a participative management style, structured education programs and career opportunities for nurses. This study, together with the international body of evidence, suggests that investing in improved nursing work environments is a key strategy to retain nurses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In-hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction in Kosovo: Asingle center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajraktari, G.; Gjoka, S.; Rexhepaj, N.; Daullxhiu, I.; Thaqi, K.; Pacolli, S.; Sylejmani, X.; Elezi, S.

    2008-01-01

    Randomized trials have demonstrated that primary angioplasty is moreeffective than intravenous thrombolysis in reducing mortality and morbidityin patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study wasto assess the in-hospital mortality of patients with AMI admitted to the onlytertiary care center in Kosovo, where coronary percutaneous interventionprocedures are unavailable. We also assessed the impact of age and gender onin-hospital mortality. Consecutive patients with the diagnosis of AMI,admitted in our institution between 1999 and 2007, were included in thisretrospective study. Of 2848 patients (mean age 61+- 1.3 years, 73.4% males)admitted with AMI, 292 (10.25%) died during in-hospital stay. The overallin-hospital mortality was 12.3% for women and 9.5% for men (P<05). Women weresignificantly older than men (64.2+-11 years vs. 59.7+-11.8 years, P<.05).Mean length of stay was 12.0+-94 for women and 10.7+-7.6 for men. From 1999break was detected by the application of thepatients with Ami but themortality rate remained stable. Compared to developed countries, patientswith AMI in Kososvo present at an early age but have a higher mortality rate.Women with AMI had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality rate thanmen. The lack of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures in AMIpatients may have contributed to the high in-hospital mortality in ourpopulation. (auhor)

  20. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Gual, Antoni; Nieva, Gemma; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain). To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals -the early adopters- based on Rogers' theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units). Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals' awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. An Observational study of prehospital and hospital delay in reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction at a University Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among Indian adults, and approximately 50% of deaths usually occur during the 1st hour after symptom onset before arriving at the hospital. A study was planned to evaluate the prehospital and hospital delay in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 390 patients with AMI admitted to the Department of Cardiology between March 2014 and August 2015. Detailed patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and prehospital and hospital delay were reviewed. Results: The mean age of presentation for male and female was 57 ± 12.91 and 61.5 ± 12.83 years, respectively. The mean prehospital delay, time to act after chest pain, and travel time were 9.08 ± 6.3, 7.16 ± 6.1, and 1.84 ± 0.8 h, respectively, and only three (9.7% patients reached the hospital within 2 h after symptom onset. Out of 300 patients who received reperfusion therapy, thrombolysis was done in 276 (92% patients while primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in only 24 (8% patients. Mean door-to-needle (D-N time and door-to-device time for those who received reperfusion therapy were 27.8 ± 4.3 and 78.95 ± 9.5 min, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the prehospital delay was significantly associated with older age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, having atypical pain, and lack of knowledge regarding the seriousness of chest pain. Conclusion: Approximately 79% of total prehospital delay was due to patient-related factors; old age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, atypical angina, and lack of knowledge being the significant attributes. D-N time and door-to-device time were within the limits of those recommended by current guidelines.

  2. Nutrition screening tools: Does one size fit all? A systematic review of screening tools for the hospital setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Guaitoli, P.R.; Jansma, E.P.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims: Numerous nutrition screening tools for the hospital setting have been developed. The aim of this systematic review is to study construct or criterion validity and predictive validity of nutrition screening tools for the general hospital setting. Methods: A systematic review of

  3. Prognostic models for predicting posttraumatic seizures during acute hospitalization, and at 1 and 2 years following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Anne C; Wagner, Amy K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Brooks, Maria M; Zafonte, Ross D; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Fabio, Anthony; Hammond, Flora M; Dreer, Laura E; Bushnik, Tamara; Walker, William C; Brown, Allen W; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Shea, Timothy; Krellman, Jason W; Rosenthal, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures (PTS) are well-recognized acute and chronic complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk factors have been identified, but considerable variability in who develops PTS remains. Existing PTS prognostic models are not widely adopted for clinical use and do not reflect current trends in injury, diagnosis, or care. We aimed to develop and internally validate preliminary prognostic regression models to predict PTS during acute care hospitalization, and at year 1 and year 2 postinjury. Prognostic models predicting PTS during acute care hospitalization and year 1 and year 2 post-injury were developed using a recent (2011-2014) cohort from the TBI Model Systems National Database. Potential PTS predictors were selected based on previous literature and biologic plausibility. Bivariable logistic regression identified variables with a p-value load, and pre-injury limitation in learning/remembering/concentrating as significant PTS predictors during acute hospitalization. Significant predictors of PTS at year 1 were subdural hematoma (SDH), contusion load, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, preinjury mental health treatment/psychiatric hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Year 2 significant predictors were similar to those of year 1: SDH, intraparenchymal fragment, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Corrected concordance (C) statistics were 0.599, 0.747, and 0.716 for acute hospitalization, year 1, and year 2 models, respectively. The prognostic model for PTS during acute hospitalization did not discriminate well. Year 1 and year 2 models showed fair to good predictive validity for PTS. Cranial surgery, although medically necessary, requires ongoing research regarding potential benefits of increased monitoring for signs of epileptogenesis, PTS prophylaxis, and/or rehabilitation/social support. Future studies should

  4. Acute Pesticide Poisoning in Children: Hospital Review in Selected Hospitals of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elikana Lekei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute pesticide poisoning (APP is a serious problem worldwide. Because the burden of childhood APP is unknown in Tanzania, this study describes the distribution, circumstances, and patterns of APP involving children under 18 years in Tanzania. Methodology. A 12-month prospective study was conducted in 10 Tanzanian healthcare facilities in 2006 using a data collection tool for surveillance. Results. Of 53 childhood poisoning cases identified, 56.6% were female. The most common poisoning circumstances were accidents (49.1% and suicide (30.2%. The most vulnerable children were 16-17 years old (30.2%. Suicide was significantly more common in females (PRR females/males = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.03–2.68 and accidental cases were more common in children aged 10 years or younger. Suicide was concentrated in children over 10 years, comprising 53% of cases in this age group. Organophosphates (OPs, zinc phosphide, and endosulfan were common amongst reported poisoning agents. The annual APP incidence rate was 1.61/100,000. Conclusion. APP is common among children in this region of Tanzania. Prevention of suicide in older children should address mental health issues and control access to toxic pesticides. Prevention of accidents in younger children requires safer storage and hygiene measures. Diverse interventions are needed to reduce pesticide poisoning among children in Tanzania.

  5. Acute viral gastroenteritis in children hospitalized in Iksan, Korea during December 2010 - June 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whoan So

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Viral etiology is common in cases of children with acute diarrhea, and antibiotic therapy is usually not required. Therefore, it is important to determine the distribution of common viruses among children hospitalized with acute diarrhea. Methods: We included 186 children who suffered from acute diarrhea and were hospitalized at the Wonkwang University Hospital Pediatric ward from December 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 in this study. Stool samples were collected and multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR was used to simultaneously determine the viral etiology such as rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus.&lt;br&gt; Results: Causative viruses were detected in 72 of the 186 cases (38.7%. The mean age of the viruspositive cases was 1 year and 9 months (range, 1 month to 11 years. Rotavirus was detected in 50/186 (26.9%; norovirus, in 18/186 (9.7%; and astrovirus, in 3/186 cases (1.6%. Adenovirus was not detected in any of the cases. Proportions of norovirus genogroups I and II were 21.1% and 78.9%, respectively. Four of the 51 rotavirus-positive cases (7.8% had received rotavirus vaccination at least once. The mean duration of diarrhea was 2.8 days (range, 1 to 10 days and vomiting occurred in 39 of the 72 cases (54.2%.&lt;br&gt; Conclusion: Viral etiology was confirmed in about one-third of the children with acute diarrhea, and the most common viral agent was rotavirus, followed by norovirus.

  6. Molecular detection and characterization of sapovirus in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofang; Yamamoto, Dai; Saito, Mariko; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Ablola, Adrianne; Tandoc, Amado O; Segubre-Mercado, Edelwisa; Lupisan, Socorro P; Okamoto, Michiko; Furuse, Yuki; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    Human sapovirus (SaV) is a causative agent of acute gastroenteritis. Recently, SaV detection has been increasing worldwide due to the emerging SaV genotype I.2. However, SaV infection has not been reported in the Philippines. To evaluate the prevalence and genetic diversity of SaV in hospitalized children aged less than 5 years with acute gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from children with acute gastroenteritis at three hospitals in the Philippines from June 2012 to August 2013. SaV was detected by reverse transcription real-time PCR, and the polymerase and capsid gene sequences were analyzed. Full genome sequencing and recombination analysis were performed on possible recombinant viruses. SaV was detected in 7.0% of the tested stool samples (29/417). In 10 SaV-positive cases, other viruses were also detected, including rotavirus (n=6), norovirus (n=2), and human astrovirus (n=2). Four known SaV genotypes (GI.1 [7], GI.2 [2], GII.1 [12], and GV [2]) and one novel recombinant (n=3) were identified by polymerase and capsid gene sequence analysis. Full genome sequencing revealed that the 5' nontranslated region (NTR) and nonstructural protein region of the novel recombinant were closely related to the GII.1 Bristol/98/UK variant, whereas the structural protein region and 3' NTR were closely related to the GII.4 Kumamoto6/Mar2003/JPN variant. SaV was regularly detected in hospitalized children due to acute gastroenteritis during the study period. A novel recombinant, SaV GII.1/GII.4, was identified in three cases at two different study sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Who leaves the hospital against medical advice in the orthopaedic setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Mariano E; van Dijk, C Niek; Ring, David

    2015-03-01

    Patients who leave the hospital against medical advice are at risk for readmission and for a variety of complications and are likely to consume more healthcare resources. However, little is known about which factors, if any, may be associated with self-discharge (discharge against medical advice) among orthopaedic inpatients. We studied the frequency and factors associated with self-discharge in patients hospitalized for orthopaedic trauma and musculoskeletal infection. Using discharge records from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2002-2011), we identified approximately 7,067,432 patient hospitalizations for orthopaedic trauma and 5,488,686 for musculoskeletal infection. We calculated the proportions of admissions that ended in self-discharge for both trauma and infection patients; then, we examined patient demographics, diagnoses, and hospital factors. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to determine independent predictors of self-discharge. Approximately one in 333 (0.3%) patients hospitalized for an isolated fracture and one in 47 (2.1%) patients with musculoskeletal infection left against medical advice. Patient characteristics associated with self-discharge included age medical comorbidity (trauma: OR 0.94 per one-unit increase in the number of comorbidities, 95% CI 0.93-0.95, p medical advice than patients with lower extremity fractures. Among infection hospitalizations, patients with cellulitis had the highest odds of self-discharge compared with carbuncle/furuncle (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.5, p < 0.001). Self-discharges were more likely to occur at hospitals of larger size (trauma: OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.2, p < 0.001; infection: nonsignificant), located in urban settings (trauma: OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4, p < 0.001; infection: OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.5-1.6, p < 0.001), and in the Northeast (trauma: OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.6-1.8, p < 0.001; infection: OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.6-1.6, p < 0.001) than at small, rural hospitals in the South. Our data can be used to

  8. Mental health nurses' perceptions of good work in an acute setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; Jackson, Debra; Hunt, Glenn E

    2012-10-01

    Frequently, research and conference papers explore difficult or problematic areas of practice that can inadvertently render daily nursing accomplishments invisible and create the perception of a discipline in crisis. In this qualitative study, we explore the views of registered nurses about achievements in the workplace and good nursing work in an acute inpatient mental health setting in Sydney, Australia. Mental health nurses were asked a series of questions about their experiences and understanding of what constitutes good nursing work as well as their sense of optimism about their work. A total of 40 structured face-to-face interviews were completed. Among the responses to questions about achievements and good nursing practice, five broad themes were identified: i) teamwork; (ii) interpersonal interactions with patients; (iii) providing practical and holistic support to patients; (iv) patients' mental health improvements; and (v) optimism-pessimism continuum. Findings contribute to a discussion of good nursing work in acute mental health settings, as well as self-perceptions of optimism and hopefulness, which are important contributors to positive, supportive health-care settings and patient recovery. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  9. Perfectionism Group Treatment for Eating Disorders in an Inpatient, Partial Hospitalization, and Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A; Brosof, Leigh C; Vanzhula, Irina A; Bumberry, Laura; Zerwas, Stephanie; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2017-11-01

    Perfectionism is elevated in individuals with eating disorders and is posited to be a risk factor, maintaining factor, and treatment barrier. However, there has been little literature testing the feasibility and effectiveness of perfectionism interventions in individuals specifically with eating disorders in an open group format. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of (a) a short cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism intervention delivered in an inpatient, partial hospitalization, and outpatient for eating disorders setting (combined N = 28; inpatient n = 15; partial hospital n = 9; outpatient n = 4), as well as (b) a training for disseminating the treatment in these settings (N = 9). Overall, we found that it was feasible to implement a perfectionism group in each treatment setting, with both an open and closed group format. This research adds additional support for the implementation of perfectionism group treatment for eating disorders and provides information on the feasibility of implementing such interventions across multiple settings. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  10. In-hospital elderly mortality and associated factors in 12 Italian acute medical units: findings from an exploratory longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Elisa; De Togni, Stefano; Guarnier, Annamaria; Barelli, Paolo; Zambiasi, Paola; Allegrini, Elisabetta; Bazoli, Letizia; Casson, Paola; Marin, Meri; Padovan, Marisa; Picogna, Michele; Taddia, Patrizia; Salmaso, Daniele; Chiari, Paolo; Frison, Tiziana; Marognolli, Oliva; Canzan, Federica; Saiani, Luisa; Palese, Alvisa

    2017-06-01

    Given the progressive demographic ageing of the population and the National Health System reforms affecting care at the bedside, a periodic re-evaluation of in-hospital mortality rates and associated factors is recommended. To describe the occurrence of in-hospital mortality among patients admitted to acute medical units and associated factors. Two hypotheses (H) were set as the basis of the study: patients have an increased likelihood to die H 1 : at the weekend when less nursing care is offered; H 2 : when they receive nursing care with a skill-mix in favour of Nursing Aides instead of Registered Nurses. Secondary analysis of a prospective study of patients >65 years consecutively admitted in 12 Italian medical units. Data on individual and nursing care variables were collected and its association with in-hospital mortality was analysed by stepwise logistic regression analysis. In-hospital mortality occurrence was 6.8 %, and 37 % of the patients died during the weekend. The logistic regression model explained 34.3 % (R 2 ) of the variance of in-hospital mortality: patients were six times (95 % CI = 3.632-10.794) more likely at risk of dying at weekends; those with one or more AEDs admissions in the last 3 months were also at increased risk of dying (RR 1.360, 95 % CI = 1.024-1.806) as well as those receiving more care from family carers (RR = 1.017, 95 % CI = 1.009-1.025). At the nursing care level, those patient receiving less care by RNs at weekends were at increased risk of dying (RR = 2.236, 95 % CI = 1.270-3.937) while those receiving a higher skill-mix, thus indicating that more nursing care was offered by RNs instead of NAs were at less risk of dying (RR = 0.940, 95 % CI = 0.912-0.969). Within the limitations of this secondary analysis, in addition to the role of some clinical factors, findings suggest redesigning acute care at weekends ensuring consistent care both at the hospital and at the nursing care levels.

  11. A Retrospective Audit of In-Hospital 30-day Mortality from Acute Myocardial Infarction in Connolly Hospital Blanchardstown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hensey, M

    2017-09-01

    In 2015, The Department of Health published the first annual report of the “National Healthcare Quality Reporting System.” Connolly Hospital was reported to a mortality rate within 30 days post-Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) of 9.87 per 100 cases which was statistically significantly higher than the national rate. We carried out a retrospective audit of patients who were HIPE-coded as having died within 30 days of AMI from 2011-2013 and identified 42 patients. On review, only 23 patients (54.8%) were confirmed as having had an AMI. We identified 12 patients who had AMI included on death certificate without any evidence for same. If the 22 patients incorrectly coded were excluded, the mortality rate within 30 days post-AMI in CHB would fall to 4.14 deaths per 100 cases, well below the national average. Inaccuracies of data collection can lead to erroneous conclusions when examining healthcare data.

  12. Antibiotic therapy for acute Q fever in The Netherlands in 2007 and 2008 and its relation to hospitalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Riphagen-Dalhuisen, J.; Wijers, N.; Hak, E.; van der Sande, M. A. B.; Morroy, G.; Schneeberger, P. M.; Schimmer, B.; Notermans, D. W.; van der Hoek, W.

    Data about the effectiveness of different antibiotic regimens for the treatment of acute Q fever from clinical studies is scarce. We analysed the antibiotic treatment regimens of acute Q fever patients in 2007 and 2008 in The Netherlands and assessed whether hospitalization after a minimum of 2 days

  13. Age-related in-hospital mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, A.R.; Rafique, S.; Ahmed, R.Z.; Anjum, A.H.; Tarin, S.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the in-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction among different age groups. Subjects and Methods: The subjects were 460 admitted patients of acute myocardial infarction who fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into four age groups. Group-I included patients in 20-40 years, group-II (41-50 years), group-III (51-60 years) and group-IV (>60 years). Mortality was compared between different age groups by Chi-square and linear-regression models. Results: The total in-hospital mortality was 16.7%. It gradually increased from 5.6% in group-I (20-40 years) patients to 21% in group-IV (>60 years) patients. While mortality in groups group-II (41-50 years) and group-III (51-60 years) patients was 16.7% and 18.6% respectively. A marked increase in mortality was noted with increase in age. Group- IV (>60 years) patients presented 2 hours late to the hospital than the group-I (20-40 years) patients. There was no statistical difference in site of infarction in different age groups. Old age (group-IV i.e. >60 years old) was more associated with heart failure (higher Killip class) on presentation. Lesser number of patients in group-IV received thrombolytic therapy than group-I. Only 31.09% patients in group-IV and 62.5% patients in group-I received streptokinase therapy respectively. Conclusion: In patients with acute myocardial infarction age was a powerful independent predictor of in-hospital mortality and complications. (author)

  14. Predictors of length of stay in an acute psychiatric inpatient facility in a general hospital: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda L. Baeza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There have been significant reductions in numbers of psychiatric beds and length of stay (LOS worldwide, making LOS in psychiatric beds an interesting outcome. The objective of this study was to find factors measurable on admission that would predict LOS in the acute psychiatric setting. Methods: This was a prospective, observational study. Results: Overall, 385 subjects were included. The median LOS was 25 days. In the final model, six variables explained 14.6% of the variation in LOS: not having own income, psychiatric admissions in the preceding 2 years, high Clinical Global Impression and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale scores, diagnosis of schizophrenia, and history of attempted suicide. All variables were associated with longer LOS, apart from history of attempted suicide. Conclusions: Identifying patients who will need to stay longer in psychiatric beds remains a challenge. Improving knowledge about determinants of LOS could lead to improvements in the quality of care in hospital psychiatry.

  15. Hospital Acquired Thrombosis (HAT) Prevention in an Acute Hospital; A Single Centre Cross-Sectional Study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, MI

    2017-04-01

    Evidence based guidelines are effective in reducing incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) which is associated with morbidly, mortality and economic burden. This study aimed to identify the proportion of inpatients who had a VTE risk assessment (RA) performed and who received thromboprophylaxis (TP), in Cork University Hospital. There was no structured RA tool at the time; information was obtained from medical and drug charts to ascertain if a RA was performed. Patients were then RA by researchers and stratified as per NICE guidelines and the proportion who received TP was calculated. One thousand and nineteen inpatients were screened. Risk was documented in 24% of cases. TP was prescribed in 43.2% of inpatients. Following application of a RA tool >80% were at high risk of VTE with low risk of bleeding with TP prescription in 46.3% of inpatients. A national collaborative effort should be encouraged to develop a standardized approach for safe RA of inpatients and prescription of TP for prevention of HAT

  16. [Acute pain therapy in German hospitals as competitive factor. Do competition, ownership and case severity influence the practice of acute pain therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Hinz, J; Meißner, W; Stamer, U; Bauer, M; Petzke, F

    2015-07-01

    Due to the implementation of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, the competitive pressure on German hospitals increased. In this context it has been shown that acute pain management offers economic benefits for hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the competitive situation, the ownership and the economic resources required on structures and processes for acute pain management. A standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management was mailed to the 885 directors of German departments of anesthesiology listed as members of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin). For most hospitals a strong regional competition existed; however, this parameter affected neither the implementation of structures nor the recommended treatment processes for pain therapy. In contrast, a clear preference for hospitals in private ownership to use the benchmarking tool QUIPS (quality improvement in postoperative pain therapy) was found. These hospitals also presented information on coping with the management of pain in the corporate clinic mission statement more often and published information about the quality of acute pain management in the quality reports more frequently. No differences were found between hospitals with different forms of ownership in the implementation of acute pain services, quality circles, expert standard pain management and the implementation of recommended processes. Hospitals with a higher case mix index (CMI) had a certified acute pain management more often. The corporate mission statement of these hospitals also contained information on how to cope with pain, presentation of the quality of pain management in the quality report, implementation of quality circles and the implementation of the expert standard pain management more frequently. There were no differences in the frequency of using the benchmarking

  17. Prevalence of Echocardiography Use in Patients Hospitalized with Confirmed Acute Pulmonary Embolism: A Real-World Observational Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Rong; Chow, Vincent; Lau, Jerrett K; Thomas, Liza; Kritharides, Leonard; Ng, Austin Chin Chwan

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) carries an increased risk of death. Using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to assist diagnosis and risk stratification is recommended in current guidelines. However, its utilization in real-world clinical practice is unknown. We conducted a retrospective observational study to delineate the prevalence of inpatient TTE use following confirmed acute PE, identify predictors for its use and its impact on patient's outcome. Clinical details of consecutive patients (2000 to 2012) from two tertiary-referral hospitals were retrieved from dedicated PE databases. All-cause and cause-specific mortality was tracked from a state-wide death registry. In total, 2306 patients were admitted with confirmed PE, of whom 687 (29.8%) had inpatient TTE (39.3% vs 14.4% between sites, PTTE use, while malignancy was a negative predictor. Overall mortality was 41.4% (mean follow-up 66.5±49.5months). Though inpatient TTE use was not an independent predictor for all-cause or cardiovascular mortality in multivariable analysis, in the inpatient TTE subgroup, right ventricle-right atrial pressure gradient (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02 per-1mmHg increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.03) and moderate/severe aortic stenosis (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.20-4.27) independently predicted all-cause mortality. Inpatient TTE is used infrequently in real-world clinical settings following acute PE despite its usefulness in risk stratification, prognostication and assessing comorbid cardiac pathologies. Identifying patients that will benefit most from a TTE assessment following an acute PE episode and reducing barriers in accessing TTE should be explored.

  18. Formation and function of acute stroke-ready hospitals within a stroke system of care recommendations from the brain attack coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Jensen, Mary E Lee; Latchaw, Richard E; Crocco, Todd J; George, Mary G; Baranski, James; Bass, Robert R; Ruff, Robert L; Huang, Judy; Mancini, Barbara; Gregory, Tammy; Gress, Daryl; Emr, Marian; Warren, Margo; Walker, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Many patients with an acute stroke live in areas without ready access to a Primary or Comprehensive Stroke Center. The formation of care facilities that meet the needs of these patients might improve their care and outcomes and guide them and emergency responders to such centers within a stroke system of care. The Brain Attack Coalition conducted an electronic search of the English medical literature from January 2000 to December 2012 to identify care elements and processes shown to be beneficial for acute stroke care. We used evidence grading and consensus paradigms to synthesize recommendations for Acute Stroke-Ready Hospitals (ASRHs). Several key elements for an ASRH were identified, including acute stroke teams, written care protocols, involvement of emergency medical services and emergency department, and rapid laboratory and neuroimaging testing. Unique aspects include the use of telemedicine, hospital transfer protocols, and drip and ship therapies. Emergent therapies include the use of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator and the reversal of coagulopathies. Although many of the care elements are similar to those of a Primary Stroke Center, compliance rates of ≥67% are suggested in recognition of the staffing, logistical, and financial challenges faced by rural facilities. ASRHs will form the foundation for acute stroke care in many settings. Recommended elements of an ASRH build on those proven to improve care and outcomes at Primary Stroke Centers. The ASRH will be a key component for patient care within an evolving stroke system of care.

  19. A retrospective observational study of the effectiveness of paliperidone palmitate on acute inpatient hospitalization rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressington, Daniel; Stock, Jon; Hulbert, Sabina; MacInnes, Douglas

    2015-07-01

    This retrospective mirror-image observational study aimed to establish the effects of the long-acting antipsychotic injection paliperidone palmitate (PP) on acute inpatient hospitalization rates. We utilized routinely collected clinical data to compare the number and length of acute patient admissions 1 year before and 1 year after initiation of PP. A single cohort of 66 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and who had received monthly injections of PP for at least 1 year were included in the analysis. The mean number of acute inpatient admissions fell from 0.86 in the year before PP initiation to 0.23 in the following year (P = 0.001), and there was a numerical but nonsignificant decrease in the number of bed days from 32.48 to 31.22 over the study duration. The median number of bed days in the year before PP initiation was 20, and in the year after initiation it was 0. The median number of admissions also fell from 1 to 0 during the same period. The results of the study should be treated cautiously because of the limitations of the study design but suggest that patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who continue treatment with PP over 12 months experience a significant reduction in hospital admissions compared with the previous year.

  20. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  1. [Viruses and clinical features associated with hospitalized children with acute respiratory infections in Lhasa, Tibet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Deng, Jie; Qian, Yuan; Zhu, Ru-nan; Sun, Yu; Zhao, Lin-qing; Wang, Fang; Shan, Min-na; Deji, Mei-duo

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the viral etiology and clinical features of hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infections in Tibet. Nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were collected from children with acute respiratory tract infection hospitalized at the department of Pediatrics, Tibet Autonomous Region People's Hospital from April to July, 2011. The specimens of nasopharyngeal aspirate were screened for antigens of 7 common respiratory viruses by direct immunofluorescence (DIF) [respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus (ADV), parainfluenza viruses type I-III, influenza virus A and B] and human metapneumovirus. Clinical data of the children were analyzed by statistical software SPSS16. A total of 167 children with acute respiratory tract infections hospitalized from April to July 2011 were enrolled in this investigation. Sixty-five out of 167 specimens were positive for viral antigens. The virus positive rate for specimens was 38.9% (65/167). Two of 65 positive specimens were positive for 2 virus antigens (RSV + influenza B) and (hMPV + parainfluenza virus type III), respectively. RSV was detected in 45 cases (67.2%, 45/67) which was the most predominant, followed by parainfluenza virus type III detected in 7 cases (10.4%, 7/67), ADV in 6 cases (9.0%, 6/67), parainfluenza virus type I in 4 cases (6.0%, 4/67), influenza virus type B in 3 cases (4.5%, 3/67), and hMPV in 2 cases (3.0%, 2/67). In addition to clinical manifestations of pneumonia, such as cough and shortness of breath, only 3 virus positive cases (6.67%) presented with wheezing, but the signs of severe cyanosis, fine rales in lung were common. Most of the children in this study recovered soon, only a few younger children with underlying diseases or complications had severe illness. Virus is an important pathogen for acute respiratory infections for hospitalized children in Tibet. RSV was the most predominant etiological agent, especially for those younger than 3 years old.

  2. The difference in pharmacists' interventions across the diverse settings in a children's hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesty Utami Ramadaniati

    Full Text Available This study aimed to document and compare the nature of clinical pharmacists' interventions made in different practice settings within a children's hospital.The primary investigator observed and documented all clinical interventions performed by clinical pharmacists for between 35-37 days on each of the five study wards from the three practice settings, namely general medical, general surgical and hematology-oncology. The rates, types and significance of the pharmacists' interventions in the different settings were compared.A total of 982 interventions were documented, related to the 16,700 medication orders reviewed on the five wards in the three practice settings over the duration of the study. Taking medication histories and/or patient counselling were the most common pharmacists' interventions in the general settings; constituting more than half of all interventions. On the Hematology-Oncology Ward the pattern was different with drug therapy changes being the most common interventions (n = 73/195, 37.4% of all interventions. Active interventions (pharmacists' activities leading to a change in drug therapy constituted less than a quarter of all interventions on the general medical and surgical wards compared to nearly half on the specialty Hematology-Oncology Ward. The majority (n = 37/42, 88.1% of a random sample of the active interventions reviewed were rated as clinically significant. Dose adjustment was the most frequent active interventions in the general settings, whilst drug addition constituted the most common active interventions on the Hematology-Oncology Ward. The degree of acceptance of pharmacists' active interventions by prescribers was high (n = 223/244, 91.4%.The rate of pharmacists' active interventions differed across different practice settings, being most frequent in the specialty hematology-oncology setting. The nature and type of the interventions documented in the hematology-oncology were also different

  3. Validity and reliability of the minimum basic data set in estimating nosocomial acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Redondo-González

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rotavirus is the principal cause of nosocomial acute gastroenteritis (NAGE under 5 years of age. The objective is to evaluate the validity and reliability of the minimum basic data set (MBDS in estimating the NAGE caused by rotavirus (NAGER and to analyze any changes during the three years that the Rotarix® and Rotateq® vaccines were used in Spain. Material and methods: A descriptive, retrospective study was carried out in the University Hospital of Guadalajara (UHG (Spain between 2003-2009 using the MBDS, positive microbiological results for rotavirus (PMRs, and medical histories. Three methods of estimation were used: 1 An ICD-9-CM code 008.61 in the secondary diagnosis fields (DIAG2 of MBDS; 2 method 1 and/or PMRs with a current or recent hospitalization; and 3 the reference method or method 2 contrasted with patient medical histories. The validity of methods 1 a