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Sample records for acute hospital setting

  1. Influenza in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Cassandra D; Farr, Barry M; Hall, Keri K; Hayden, Frederick G

    2002-03-01

    Influenza poses special hazards inside healthcare facilities and can cause explosive outbreaks of illness. Healthcare workers are at risk of acquiring influenza and thus serve as an important reservoir for patients under their care. Annual influenza immunisation of high-risk persons and their contacts, including healthcare workers, is the primary means of preventing nosocomial influenza. Despite influenza vaccine effectiveness, it is substantially underused by healthcare providers. Influenza can be diagnosed by culturing the virus from respiratory secretions and by rapid antigen detection kits; recognition of a nosocomial outbreak is important in order to employ infection-control efforts. Optimal control of influenza in the acute-care setting should focus upon reducing potential influenza reservoirs in the hospital, including: isolating patients with suspected or documented influenza, sending home healthcare providers or staff who exhibit typical symptoms of influenza, and discouraging persons with febrile respiratory illness from visiting the hospital during a known influenza outbreak in the community. (Note: influenza and other respiratory viruses can cause non-febrile illness but are still transmissible.) The antiviral M2 protein inhibitors (amantadine, rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (zanamivir, oseltamivir) have proven efficacy in treating and preventing influenza illness; however, their role in the prevention and control of influenza in the acute hospital setting remains to be more fully studied.

  2. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. Nursing sabbatical in the acute care hospital setting: a cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaar, Gina L; Swenty, Constance F; Phillips, Lori A; Embree, Jennifer L; McCool, Isabella A; Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    Practice-based acute care nurses experience a high incidence of burnout and dissatisfaction impacting retention and innovation and ultimately burdening the financial infrastructure of a hospital. Business, industry, and academia have successfully implemented professional sabbaticals to retain and revitalize valuable employees; however, the use is infrequent among acute care hospitals. This article expands upon the synthesis of evidence supporting nursing sabbaticals and suggests this option as a fiscally sound approach for nurses practicing in the acute care hospital setting. A cost-benefit analysis and human capital management strategies supporting nursing sabbaticals are identified.

  4. Health professionals' experience of teamwork education in acute hospital settings: a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kylie; Jordan, Zoe; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is seen as an important element of patient care in acute hospital settings. The complexity of the journey of care for patients highlights the need for health professionals to collaborate and communicate clearly with each other. Health organizations in western countries are committed to improving patient safety through education of staff and teamwork education programs have been integral to this focus. There are no current systematic reviews of the experience of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The objective of this systematic review was to search for the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. This review considered studies reporting on experiences of registered health professionals who work in acute hospitals. This included medical, nursing and midwifery and allied health professionals. The focus of the meta-synthesis was the experiences and reflections of health professionals who were involved in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The geographical context for this review was acute hospitals in rural or metropolitan settings in Australia and overseas countries. The review focused on the experiences of health professionals who work in acute hospitals and participated in teamwork education programs. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research.In the absence of research studies, other text such as opinion papers, discussion papers and reports were considered. Studies published in English and from 1990 to 2013 were included in this review. The literature search for relevant papers occurred between 13 September and 26 October 2013. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched were PubMed, CINAHL, Embase and Scopus. The

  5. Hospital-based acute care after outpatient colonoscopy: implications for quality measurement in the ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P; Burkardt, Deepika D'Cunha; Ranasinghe, Isuru; Gross, Cary P

    2014-09-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers now report immediate hospital transfer rates as a measure of quality. For patients undergoing colonoscopy, this measure may fail to capture adverse events, which occur after discharge yet still require a hospital-based acute care encounter. We conducted this study to estimate rates of immediate hospital transfer and hospital-based acute care following outpatient colonoscopy performed in ambulatory surgery centers. Using state ambulatory surgery databases from the 2009-2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent colonoscopy. Immediate hospital transfer and overall acute health care utilization in the 14 days following colonoscopy was determined from corresponding inpatient, ambulatory surgery, and emergency department databases. To compare rates across centers while accounting for differences in patient populations, we calculated risk-standardized rates using hierarchical generalized linear modeling. The final sample included 1,137,381 colonoscopy discharges from 1019 centers. At the ambulatory surgery center level, the median risk-standardized hospital transfer rate was 0.0% (interquartile range=0.0%), whereas the hospital-based acute care rate was 2.1% (interquartile range=0.6%), with few centers (N=36) having no observed encounters. No correlation was noted between the risk-standardized hospital transfer and hospital-based acute care rates (volume weighted correlation coefficient=0.04, P=0.16). Patients more frequently experience hospital-based acute care encounters after colonoscopy than the need for immediate hospital transfer. Broadening existing quality measures to include hospital-based acute care in the postdischarge period may provide a more complete measure of quality.

  6. Recovery-oriented practices of psychiatric-mental health nursing staff in an acute hospital setting.

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    McLoughlin, Kris A; Du Wick, Amanda; Collazzi, Charlene M; Puntil, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    There is a national initiative to integrate recovery-oriented practices into the delivery of mental health services. Few empirical studies have been conducted to measure these practices in psychiatric-mental health (PMH) nursing, particularly in short-term acute hospital settings. This study examined the reliability of the Recovery Self Assessment-Registered Nurse Version (RSA-RN) and explored recovery practices of PMH nurses and nursing staff in an acute treatment setting. A descriptive one-group design with convenience sampling was employed. One hundred and five participants completed the RSA-RN and the demographic data form. The RSA-RN full-scale instrument demonstrated excellent internal consistency, and the five subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Significant, favorable relationships were found between RSA-RN scores and nursing staff who (a) had formal education in mental health recovery, (b) considered themselves knowledgeable about recovery, and (c) considered their place of work to be "recovery-oriented." The RSA-RN is a useful tool in measuring recovery-oriented practice. Formal education should be considered as an intervention to increase recovery-oriented practices in PMH nursing.

  7. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  8. Impact of a fall prevention programme in acute hospital settings in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, S L; Hafizah, N; Lee, J Y; Loo, Y L; Muthu, R

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to develop a multifaceted strategy using tailored interventions to implement a fall prevention programme, and to achieve a change in fall prevention practices and a reduction in fall incidence at an acute care hospital in Singapore. A comparative study was conducted at two acute care hospitals (intervention and control) in Singapore. Pre-intervention, post-intervention and six-month follow-up knowledge assessments of 641 nursing staff, and audits of fall rates and fall prevention practices were performed to determine the effectiveness of a multifaceted strategy with targeted interventions in supporting the implementation of a fall prevention programme. The mean post-knowledge test scores at six months were statistically significantly higher (t[516] is -3.3, p-value is less than 0.01) at the intervention hospital (10.3 +/- 2.3) compared to the scores at the control hospital (9.8 +/- 1.8). Increased compliance with the use of fall risk assessment tools was evident in 99.4 percent and 99.3 percent of all patient records at the control and intervention hospitals, respectively. Following the implementation strategy for a fall prevention programme, there was a non-significant reduction in fall rates from 1.44 to 1.09 per 1,000 patient days at the intervention hospital. No reduction in the fall rate was observed at the control hospital. A multifaceted strategy for the implementation of a fall prevention programme was effective in increasing nurses' knowledge and the use of the fall risk assessment, but did not have a statistically significant impact on a reduction in the fall rate. The increase in nurses' knowledge and change in nursing practice were important markers of success in terms of fall prevention at the acute hospitals.

  9. Evaluation of phenytoin serum levels following a loading dose in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selioutski, Olga; Grzesik, Katherine; Vasilyeva, Olga N; Hilmarsson, Ágúst; Fessler, A James; Liu, Lynn; Gross, Robert A

    2017-11-01

    Due to the complex pharmacokinetic profiles of phenytoin (PHT) and fosphenytoin (FOS), achieving sustained, targeted serum PHT levels in the first day of use is challenging. A population based approach was used to analyze total serum PHT (tPHT) level within 2-24h of PHT/FOS loading with or without supplementary maintenance or additional loading doses among PHT-naïve patients in the acute hospital setting. Adequate tPHT serum level was defined as ≥20μg/mL. Among 494 patients with 545 tPHT serum levels obtained in the first 2-24h after the loading dose (LD), tPHT serum levels of either

  10. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting: the Irish results of the ENDORSE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, O

    2012-05-01

    ENDORSE (Epidemiologic International Day for the Evaluation of Patients at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism in the Acute Hospital Care Setting), is a multinational, cross-sectional survey of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk prevalence and effective prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting. Three Irish hospitals enrolled in the study. The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines were employed to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis. Of 552 patients, 297 (53.8%) and 255 (46.2%) were categorised as surgical or medical, respectively, with 175 (59%) surgical and 109 (43%) medical patients deemed to be at risk for VTE. Of these, only 112 (64%) and 51 (47%) received recommended VTE prophylaxis, respectively. The results are consistent with those observed in other countries and demonstrate a high prevalence of risk for VTE and a low rate of prophylaxis use, particularly in medical patients. Awareness of VTE guidelines should be an integral component of health policy.

  11. Comparison of the ICF core set for cardiopulmonary conditions in the acute hospital setting among different types of transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinhua; Reimann, Silke; Timrott, Kai; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Schwarze, Monika; Fischer, Michael J

    2010-12-01

    To compare the functioning profiles of patients receiving different types of organ transplants using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The patients (n =102) were enrolled between days 5 and 10 after discharge following receipt of an organ transplant,and assessed for sociodemographic variables, the Functional Independence Measure and Barthel Index, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability,and Health core set for cardiopulmonary conditions in the acute hospital, augmented with three additional categories.Analysis was conducted by grouping the patients as follows: (1) kidney transplants; (2) all other kinds of transplants. Functional Independence Measure/Barthel Index scores were significantly higher in group 1 compared with group 2. Prevalences of 30% or greater for any impairment were noted for seven b factors, one s factor,and one d factor in group 1, whereas the corresponding numbers for group 2 were 14, 2, and 8, respectively. When prevalences of 30% or greater were calculated for severe or total impairment for all factors, there were none for group 1, but six factors for group 2. For the six factors, the prevalence difference between the groups was significant in five after a full Bonferroni correction (P < 0.000002). The factors with the highest barriers were e110 (products or substances for personal consumption, 36%) and e120(products and technology for personal use in daily living,42%) in group 2 (both significant with P < 0.000001 when compared with the respective prevalences in group 1).Although exercise seems to be the most needed rehabilitation function for kidney transplant patients, other transplant patients will require considerably more rehabilitation intervention.

  12. The mental health of nurses in acute teaching hospital settings: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Lin; Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Gallagher, Robyn; Duffield, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Background Nursing is an emotionally demanding profession and deficiencies in nurses? mental wellbeing, characterised by low vitality and common mental disorders, have been linked to low productivity, absenteeism and presenteeism. Part of a larger study of nurses? health, the aim of this paper was to describe the mental health status and related characteristics of nurses working in two acute metropolitan teaching hospitals. Methods A cross sectional survey design was used. The Registered and ...

  13. Quantitative systematic review of multi-professional teamwork and leadership training to optimize patient outcomes in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husebø, Sissel Eikeland; Akerjordet, Kristin

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of multi-professional teamwork (MPTW) and leadership training interventions on patient outcomes in acute hospital settings. Although investigations of teamwork and leadership training in acute hospital settings indicate that such programs can optimize patient outcomes, evidence-based recommendations on the content, duration and frequency of training programs associated with clinical evidence are still absent. Quantitative systematic review. A search was conducted for relevant papers published during the period from 2000-February 2014. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria and were appraised for quality and a risk-of-bias assessment was conducted. The review used a structured approach for literature search, data evaluation, analysis and presentation. A narrative summary was used to report results. Two MPTW and leadership interventions in stroke units have the greatest impact on patient outcomes in acute hospital settings. The interventions' impact on patient outcomes, explored in the ten remaining studies, is associated with great uncertainty due to several alternative explanations of the findings. Research designs that test such interventions must be improved before recommendations on the ultimate program can be made. This can be achieved by strengthening the design, methodology and descriptions of interventions and the use of more consistent patient outcomes. Building a safety culture adjacent to implementing teamwork and leadership training interventions is essential for improving patient outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Environmental scan of infection prevention and control practices for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo, Wrechelle; Geransar, Rose; Clayden, Nancy; Jones, Jessica; de Grood, Jill; Joffe, Mark; Taylor, Geoffrey; Missaghi, Bayan; Pearce, Craig; Ghali, William; Conly, John

    2017-10-01

    Ward closure is a method of controlling hospital-acquired infectious diseases outbreaks and is often coupled with other practices. However, the value and efficacy of ward closures remains uncertain. To understand the current practices and perceptions with respect to ward closure for hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in acute care hospital settings across Canada. A Web-based environmental scan survey was developed by a team of infection prevention and control (IPC) experts and distributed to 235 IPC professionals at acute care sites across Canada. Data were analyzed using a mixed-methods approach of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. A total of 110 completed responses showed that 70% of sites reported at least 1 outbreak during 2013, 44% of these sites reported the use of ward closure. Ward closure was considered an "appropriate," "sometimes appropriate," or "not appropriate" strategy to control outbreaks by 50%, 45%, and 5% of participants, respectively. System capacity issues and overall risk assessment were main factors influencing the decision to close hospital wards following an outbreak. Results suggest the use of ward closure for containment of hospital-acquired infectious disease outbreaks in Canadian acute care health settings is mixed, with outbreak control methods varying. The successful implementation of ward closure was dependent on overall support for the IPC team within hospital administration. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does HIPE data capture the complexity of stroke patients in an acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, B

    2010-01-01

    The Hospital Inpatient Enquiry (HIPE) system is currently used as a principle source of national data on discharges from acute hospitals. The Casemix Programme is used to calculate funding for patient care (HIPE activity and Specialty Costs Returns). Th coding is usually undertaken by clerical personnel. We were concerned that the medical complexity of our stroke patients was not captured by the process. The aims of this study were to compare activity coded by HIPE coding staff and medical staff in consecutive stroke patients discharged from the hospital. One hundred consecutive discharged patients with stroke as primary diagnosis were coded by clerical staff [usual practice] and by medical staff. We compared the coding and any differences. We calculated the financial comparison of subsequent differences in Diagnostic Related Groups (DRGs) and Relative Values (RVs). Clinician coded DRGs resulted in a higher assigned RV in 45 cases. The total RV value for HIPE using clerical coding was 595,268.94 euros and using medical coding was 725,252.16 euros. We conclude that medical input is useful in detailing the complications arising in stroke patients. We suggest that physicians should assist in the HIPE coding process in order to capture clinical complexity, so that funding can be appropriately assigned to manage these complex patients.

  16. Delirium Detection and Impact of Comorbid Health Conditions in a Post-Acute Rehabilitation Hospital Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Stelmokas

    Full Text Available Misdiagnosis and under-detection of delirium may occur in many medical settings. This is important to address as delirium clearly increases risk of morbidity and mortality in such settings. This study assessed whether Veterans who screened positive on a delirium severity measure (Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale; MDAS differed from those with and without corresponding medical documentation of delirium in terms of cognitive functioning, psychiatric/medical history, and medication use. A medical record review of 266 inpatients at a VA post-acute rehabilitation unit found that 10.9% were identified as delirious according to the MDAS and/or medical records. Of the Veterans who screened positive on the MDAS (N = 19, 68.4% went undetected by medical screening. Undetected cases had a higher number of comorbid medical conditions as measured by the Age-Adjusted Charlson Index (AACI scores (median = 9, SD = 3.15; U = 5.5, p = .003 than medically documented cases. For Veterans with a score of 7 or greater on the AACI, the general relative risk for delirium was 4.46. Delirium is frequently under-detected in a post-acute rehabilitation unit, particularly for Veterans with high comorbid illness. The relative risk of delirium is up to 4.46 for those with high medical burden, suggesting the need for more comprehensive delirium screening in these patients.

  17. Nursing Education Interventions for Managing Acute Pain in Hospital Settings: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes and Teaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Gareth; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the effects of nursing education interventions on clinical outcomes for acute pain management in hospital settings, relating interventions to health care behavior change theory. Three databases were searched for nursing education interventions from 2002 to 2015 in acute hospital settings with clinical outcomes reported. Methodological quality was rated as strong, moderate, or weak using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. The 12 eligible studies used varied didactic and interactive teaching methods. Several studies had weaknesses attributable to selection biases, uncontrolled confounders, and lack of blinding of outcome assessors. No studies made reference to behavior change theory in their design. Eight of the 12 studies investigated nursing documentation of pain assessment as the main outcome, with the majority reporting positive effects of education interventions on nursing pain assessment. Of the remaining studies, two reported mixed findings on patient self-report of pain scores as the key measure, one reported improvements in patient satisfaction with pain management after a nursing intervention, and one study found an increase in nurses' delivery of a relaxation treatment following an intervention. Improvements in design and evaluation of nursing education interventions are suggested, drawing on behavior change theory and emphasizing the relational, contextual, and emotionally demanding nature of nursing pain management in hospital settings. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 'Being a conduit' between hospital and home: stakeholders' views and perceptions of a nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasalu, Munikumar Ramasamy; Clarke, Amanda; Atkinson, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    To explore and critically examine stakeholders' views and perceptions concerning the nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Service in an acute hospital setting and to inform sustainability, service development and future service configuration. The drive in policy and practice is to enable individuals to achieve their preferred place of care during their last days of life. However, most people in UK die in acute hospital settings against their wishes. To facilitate individuals' preferred place of care, a large acute hospital in northeast England implemented a pilot project to establish a nurse-led Macmillan Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service. A pluralistic evaluation design using qualitative methods was used to seek stakeholders' views and perceptions of this service. In total, 12 participants (five bereaved carers and seven health professionals) participated in the evaluation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with bereaved carers who used this service for their relatives. A focus group and an individual interview were undertaken with health professionals who had used the service since its inception. Individual interviews were also conducted with the Discharge Facilitator and service manager. Analysis of all data was guided by Framework Analysis. Four key themes emerged relating to the role of the Discharge Facilitator Service: achieving preferred place of care; the Discharge Facilitator as the 'conduit' between hospital and community settings; delays in hospital discharge and stakeholders' perceptions of the way forward for the service. The Discharge Facilitator Service acted as a reliable resource and support for facilitating the fast-tracking of end-of-life patients to their preferred place of care. Future planning for hospital-based palliative care discharge facilitating services need to consider incorporating strategies that include: increased profile of the service, expansion of service provision and the Discharge Facilitator's earlier

  19. Validation of the palliative performance scale in the acute tertiary care hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajide, Oludamilola; Hanson, Laura; Usher, Barbara M; Qaqish, Bahjat F; Schwartz, Robert; Bernard, Stephen

    2007-02-01

    Physicians are often asked to prognosticate patient survival. However, prediction of survival is difficult, particularly with critically ill and dying patients within the hospitals. The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) was designed to assess functional status and measure progressive decline in palliative care patients, yet it has not been validated within hospital health care settings. This study explores the application of the PPS for its predictive ability related to length of survival. Other variables examined were correlates of symptom distress in a tertiary academic setting. Patients were assigned a score on the PPS ranging from 0% to 100% at initial consultation. Standardized symptom assessments were carried out daily, and survival was determined by medical record review and search of the National Death Index. Of 261 patients seen since January 2002, 157 had cancer and 104 had other diagnoses. PPS scores ranged from 10% to 80% with 92% of the scores between 10% and 40%. Survival ranged from 0 to 30 months, with a median of 9 days. By 90 days, 83% of patients had died. Proportional hazards regression estimates showed that a 10% decrement in PPS score was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.65 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-1.92). Proportional odds regression models showed that a lower PPS was significantly associated with higher levels of dyspnea. The PPS correlated well with length of survival and with select symptom distress scores. We consider it to be a useful tool in predicting outcomes for palliative care patients.

  20. The mental health of nurses in acute teaching hospital settings: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Lin; Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Gallagher, Robyn; Duffield, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Nursing is an emotionally demanding profession and deficiencies in nurses' mental wellbeing, characterised by low vitality and common mental disorders, have been linked to low productivity, absenteeism and presenteeism. Part of a larger study of nurses' health, the aim of this paper was to describe the mental health status and related characteristics of nurses working in two acute metropolitan teaching hospitals. A cross sectional survey design was used. The Registered and Enrolled Nurse workforce, employed on any form of contract, at two teaching hospitals in Sydney Australia were invited to participate. The survey tool was compiled of validated tools and questions. Family and medical history and health risk-related characteristics, current psycho-active medications, smoking status, alcohol intake, eating disorders, self-perceived general health, mental health and vitality, demographic, social and occupational details were collected. A total of 1215 surveys were distributed with a usable response rate of 382 (31.4%). Altogether 53 nurses (14%) reported a history of mental health disorders, of which n = 49 (13%) listed diagnoses of anxiety and/or depression; 22 (6%) were currently taking psychoactive medication. Symptoms that could potentially indicate a mental health issue were more common, with 248 (65.1%) reporting they had experienced symptoms sometimes or often in the last 12 month. Nurses had better mental health if they had better general health, lived with a spouse/ partner rather than alone, had fewer symptoms, sleep problems or disordered eating behaviours, were not an informal carer and did not work nights. Nurses had greater vitality if they were male, had better general health, fewer sleep problems or symptoms generally and lived with a spouse/ partner rather than alone; less vitality if they were an informal carer or had disordered eating. Nurses and their managers should strive to create workplaces where working practices promote nurses' health

  1. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Marika; McKinley, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery. PMID:25785497

  2. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Demers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed in a rehabilitation hospital, over 4 weeks. The dance intervention followed the structure of an usual dance class, but the exercises were modified and progressed to meet each individual’s needs. The dance intervention, delivered in a group format, was feasible in a rehabilitation setting. A 45-min dance class of moderate intensity was of appropriate duration and intensity for individuals with subacute stroke to avoid excessive fatigue and to deliver the appropriate level of challenge. The overall satisfaction of the participants towards the dance class, the availability of space and equipment, and the low level of risks contributed to the feasibility of a dance intervention designed for individuals in the subacute stage of post-stroke recovery.

  3. Comparison between ultrasound and noncontrast helical computed tomography for identification of acute ureterolithiasis in a teaching hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Ronan Marquez Ferreira de Souza

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown noncontrast computed tomography (NCT to be more effective than ultrasound (US for imaging acute ureterolithiasis. However, to our knowledge, there are few studies directly comparing these techniques in an emergency teaching hospital setting. The objectives of this study were to compare the diagnostic accuracy of US and NCT performed by senior radiology residents for diagnosing acute ureterolithiasis; and to assess interobserver agreement on tomography interpretations by residents and experienced abdominal radiologists. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study of 52 consecutive patients, who underwent both US and NCT within an interval of eight hours, at Hospital São Paulo. METHODS: US scans were performed by senior residents and read by experienced radiologists. NCT scan images were read by senior residents, and subsequently by three abdominal radiologists. The interobserver variability was assessed using the kappa statistic. RESULTS: Ureteral calculi were found in 40 out of 52 patients (77%. US presented sensitivity of 22% and specificity of 100%. When collecting system dilatation was associated, US demonstrated 73% sensitivity, 82% specificity. The interobserver agreement in NCT analysis was very high with regard to identification of calculi, collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat. CONCLUSIONS: US has limited value for identifying ureteral calculi in comparison with NCT, even when collecting system dilatation is present. Residents and abdominal radiologists demonstrated excellent agreement rates for ureteral calculi, identification of collecting system dilatation and stranding of perinephric fat on NCT.

  4. Determining a set of measurable and relevant factors affecting nursing workload in the acute care hospital setting: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myny, Dries; Van Hecke, Ann; De Bacquer, Dirk; Verhaeghe, Sofie; Gobert, Micheline; Defloor, Tom; Van Goubergen, Dirk

    2012-04-01

    While there has been great interest in the effect of nurse staffing levels have on the quality of care in hospitals, less attention has been given to determining the factors that affect the nursing workload. There are no existing studies that help define measurable factors that have a clear relation to nursing workload. The aim of this study was to determine the most important and measurable factors, other than patient acuity, that influence nursing workload. A cross-sectional design. Hospitals within the acute hospital care setting. Persons with a nursing educational background, working in Belgian acute care hospitals. A self-administered questionnaire was developed based on the results of an integrative review, the use of focus groups and a survey on measurability and relevance of the included factors. The questionnaire listed relevant and measurable factors related to nursing workload. Weight and frequency of each factor was assessed. The initial list consisted of 94 factors. These factors were regrouped and organised into a questionnaire of 28 measurable and sufficiently relevant factors affecting the nursing workload. More than half of the initial factors seemed to be relevant, but hard to measure on a daily basis. Based on the impact of each factor, the number of work interruptions was the most important factor related to nursing workload. It is unlikely that a workload instrument will ever be able to take into account all possible factors affecting the nursing workload. Nevertheless, the number of work interruptions, the patient turnover rate and the number of mandatory registrations should be included in the development or revision of a workload measurement tool. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Attitudes and behaviors of hospital staff toward elders in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2002-11-01

    This study was a grounded-theory approach to the social processes engaged in by elderly people while in the hospital. Staff behaviors were identified along two continua, attitude, which affected the elders' dignity and autonomy, and managing care, which affected the elders' health. Elders described the physicians' role as the director of their health care. The elders characterized the nurses' role to provide their medications and direct needs, whereas the nurses identified their role as providing education and emotional support. Implications and recommendations for practice are offered. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  6. Feasibility of Delivering a Dance Intervention for SubAcute Stroke in a Rehabilitation Hospital Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Marika Demers; Patricia McKinley

    2015-01-01

    Dance can be a promising treatment intervention used in rehabilitation for individuals with disabilities to address physical, cognitive and psychological impairments. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of a modified dance intervention as an adjunct therapy designed for people with subacute stroke, in a rehabilitation setting. Using a descriptive qualitative study design, a biweekly 45-min dance intervention was offered to individuals with a subacute stroke followed...

  7. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  8. Human resource management strategies for the retention of nurses in acute care settings in hospitals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Pamela; Moxham, Lorna; Dwyer, Trudy

    2007-04-01

    It is paramount that there is an adequate nursing workforce supply for now and in the future, to achieve equitable and quality health outcomes and consumer access to healthcare, regardless of geographic location. Nursing forms the largest body of employees in the health care system, spanning all segments of care. A shortage of nurses, particularly in the acute care settings in hospitals, jeopardizes the provision of quality health care to consumers. This article provides a literature review of Australian State and Federal Government reports into nurse retention. All reports discuss staff turnover rates; the average age of nurses; enrolment numbers in nursing courses; workloads; nursing workforce shortfalls and the effect on the work environment; leadership and management styles; organizational culture; change management; the mobility of nursing qualifications both locally and internationally and the critical need to value nurses. Then why has the situation of nurse retention not improved? Possible reasons for the continued nurse shortage and the promise of strategic HRM in addressing nurse retention are discussed.

  9. The effectiveness of interventions in the prevention and management of aggressive behaviours in patients admitted to an acute hospital setting: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kynoch, Kate; Wu, Chiung-Jung Jo; Chang, Anne M

    2009-01-01

    Violence in healthcare has been widely reported and healthcare workers, particularly nurses in the acute care setting, are ill-equipped to manage patients who exhibit aggressive traits. An initial search of the Cochrane Library and the Joanna Briggs Institute did not reveal any published systematic reviews recommending strategies to manage aggressive and/or violent behaviours in patients admitted to an acute hospital setting. This systematic review aims to establish best practice in the prevention and management of aggressive behaviours in patients admitted to an acute hospital setting. A three-step search strategy was utilised during this review. Major databases searched included: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Health source, Web of science, EMBASE, the Cochrane library and Database of abstracts of reviews of effects (DARE) as well as PubMed. The search included published and unpublished studies and papers in English from 1990-2007. This review considered any randomised controlled trials (RCT) that evaluated the effectiveness of interventions in the prevention and management of patients who exhibit aggressive behaviours in an acute hospital setting. In the absence of RCT's, other research designs such as non-randomised controlled trials and before and after studies were considered for inclusion in the narrative summary to enable the identification of current approaches and possible future strategies for preventing and managing patient aggression in acute care areas. Each included study was assessed by two independent reviewers using the appropriate appraisal checklist developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from the papers included in this review using the standardised data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta Analysis of Statistics: Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) package. The studies included in this review were not suitable for meta-analysis and therefore the results are presented in narrative form. Twelve

  10. Experiences of the Implementation of a Learning Disability Nursing Liaison Service within an Acute Hospital Setting: A Service Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, Amy; Bailey, Carol; Gates, Bob; Sooben, Roja

    2014-01-01

    It has been well documented that people with learning disabilities receive poor care in acute settings. Over the last few years, a number of learning disability liaison nurse services have developed in the United Kingdom as a response to this, but there has been a failure to systematically gather evidence as to their effectiveness. This article…

  11. A comparison of precipitants and mortality when acute decompensated heart failure occurs in the community and hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D McD; Fui, M Ng Tang; Chung, A R; Gani, L; Zajac, J D; Burrell, L M

    2012-08-01

    We aimed to compare the precipitants of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) among patients admitted with diagnoses inclusive of ADHF (community patients) and patients admitted without ADHF but who developed it during their stay (hospital patients). This was a prospective, analytical, observational study undertaken in the Austin Hospital, a major metropolitan teaching hospital (September 2008-February 2010). Consecutive patients admitted to a general medicine unit, and diagnosed and treated for ADHF were enrolled. The unit medical staff completed a specifically designed data collection document. Three hundred and fifty-nine patients were enrolled (42.9% male, mean age 81.9 years). The community (n=312) and hospital (n=47) patient groups did not differ in age, gender, risk variables (living alone, cognitive impairment, multiple medications, compliance), cardiac failure medication use or cause of known heart failure (ischaemia, hypertension, valve dysfunction, 'other') (p>0.05). The ADHF precipitants comprised infection (39.8% patients), myocardial ischaemia (17.3%), tachyarrhythmia (16.2%), non-compliance with fluid and salt restriction (9.2%), non-compliance with medication (6.7%), renal failure (5.8%), medication reduction (5.0%), intravenous fluid complication (3.9%) and 'other' causes (13.9%). Significantly more hospital patients had their ADHF precipitated by intravenous fluid complications (25.5% versus 0.6%, pheart failure precipitated in hospital is a dangerous condition with a high mortality. While infection and myocardial ischaemia are the common precipitants, complications of intravenous fluid use, an iatrogenic condition, may be considerable and are potentially avoidable. Copyright © 2012 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Exercise therapy for low back pain: a small-scale exploratory survey of current physiotherapy practice in the Republic of Ireland acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Karol; Doody, Catherine; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2006-11-01

    A small-scale exploratory cross-sectional survey investigated the current use of a range of exercise therapy approaches for low back pain (LBP) by outpatient physiotherapists in the acute hospital setting in the Republic of Ireland, where the majority of publicly funded treatment is delivered. Of the 120 postal questionnaires distributed to 24 physiotherapy departments, 87 were returned (72.5% response rate). The results showed specific spinal stabilization exercises were the most popular exercise therapy for acute (39%; n = 35) and chronic (51%; n = 48) LBP, followed by the McKenzie approach (acute LBP (ALBP) 35.6%; n = 32: chronic LBP (CLBP) 17%; n = 16), and abdominal exercise (ALBP 11.1%; n = 10: CLBP 9.6%; n = 9). The most popular forms of exercise therapy used by outpatient physiotherapists in acute hospital settings in Ireland lack support from evidence-based clinical guidelines, and further large-scale high quality randomized controlled trials of these approaches are warranted. Further research should also establish the use of exercise therapy and attitudes to clinical guidelines of physiotherapists in other countries and healthcare settings.

  13. Comparison of the prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with acute respiratory infections at different hospital settings in North China, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianxing; Xie, Zhengde; Zhang, Tiegang; Lu, Yanqin; Fan, Hongwei; Yang, Donghong; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe; Shen, Kunling; Huang, Fang; Han, Jinxiang; Li, Taisheng; Gao, Zhancheng; Ren, Lili; Wang, Jianwei

    2018-02-08

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are a great public health challenge globally. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in patients with ARIs attending at different hospital settings is fully undetermined. Laboratory-based surveillance for ARIs was conducted at inpatient and outpatient settings of 11 hospitals in North China. The first 2-5 patients with ARIs were recruited in each hospital weekly from 2012 through 2015. The presence of respiratory viruses was screened by PCR assays. The prevalence of respiratory viruses was determined and compared between patients at different hospital settings. A total of 3487 hospitalized cases and 6437 outpatients/Emergency Department (ED) patients were enrolled. The most commonly detected viruses in the hospitalized cases were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, 33.3%) in children less than two years old, adenoviruses (13.0%) in patients 15-34 years old, and influenza viruses (IFVs, 9.6%) in patients ≥65 years. IFVs were the most common virus in outpatient/ED patients across all age groups (22.7%). After controlling for the confounders caused by other viruses and covariates, adenoviruses (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 3.97, 99% confidence interval [99% CI]: 2.19-7.20) and RSV (aOR: 2.04, 99% CI: 1.34-3.11) were independently associated with increased hospitalization in children, as well as adenoviruses in adults (aOR: 2.14, 99% CI: 1.19-3.85). Additionally, co-infection of RSV with IFVs was associated with increased hospitalization in children (aOR: 12.20, 99% CI: 2.65-56.18). A substantial proportion of ARIs was associated with respiratory viruses in North China. RSV, adenoviruses, and co-infection of RSV and IFVs were more frequent in hospitalized children (or adenoviruses in adults), which might predict the severity of ARIs. Attending clinicians should be more vigilant of these infections.

  14. [Road traffic injuries in Catalonia (Spain): an approach using the minimum data set for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clèries, Montse; Bosch, Anna; Vela, Emili; Bustins, Montse

    2015-09-01

    To verify the usefulness of the minimum data set (MDS) for acute-care hospitals and emergency resources for the study of road traffic injuries and to describe the use of health resources in Catalonia (Spain). The study population consisted of patients treated in any kind of emergency service and patients admitted for acute hospitalization in Catalonia in 2013. A descriptive analysis was performed by age, gender, time and clinical variables. A total of 48,150 patients were treated in hospital emergency departments, 6,210 were attended in primary care, and 4,912 were admitted to hospital. There was a higher proportion of men (56.2%), mainly aged between 20 and 40 years. Men accounted for 54.9% of patients with minor injuries and 75.1% of those with severe injuries. Contusions are the most common injury (30.2%), followed by sprains (28.7%). Fractures mostly affected persons older than 64 years, internal injuries particularly affected men older than 64 years, and wounds mainly affected persons younger than 18 years and older than 64 years. In the adult population, the severity of the injuries increased with age, leading to longer length of stay and greater complexity. Hospital mortality was 0.2%. Fractures, internal injuries and wounds were more frequent in the group of very serious injuries, and sprains and contusions in the group of minor injuries. MDS records (acute hospitals and emergency resources) provide information that is complementary to other sources of information on traffic accidents, increasing the completeness of the data. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  17. Using sense-making theory to aid understanding of the recognition, assessment and management of pain in patients with dementia in acute hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn; Lichtner, Valentina; Allcock, Nick; Briggs, Michelle; James, Kirstin; Keady, John; Lasrado, Reena; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Swarbrick, Caroline; José Closs, S

    2016-01-01

    The recognition, assessment and management of pain in hospital settings is suboptimal, and is a particular challenge in patients with dementia. The existing process guiding pain assessment and management in clinical settings is based on the assumption that nurses follow a sequential linear approach to decision making. In this paper we re-evaluate this theoretical assumption drawing on findings from a study of pain recognition, assessment and management in patients with dementia. To provide a revised conceptual model of pain recognition, assessment and management based on sense-making theories of decision making. The research we refer to is an exploratory ethnographic study using nested case sites. Patients with dementia (n=31) were the unit of data collection, nested in 11 wards (vascular, continuing care, stroke rehabilitation, orthopaedic, acute medicine, care of the elderly, elective and emergency surgery), located in four NHS hospital organizations in the UK. Data consisted of observations of patients at bedside (170h in total); observations of the context of care; audits of patient hospital records; documentary analysis of artefacts; semi-structured interviews (n=56) and informal open conversations with staff and carers (family members). Existing conceptualizations of pain recognition, assessment and management do not fully explain how the decision process occurs in clinical practice. Our research indicates that pain recognition, assessment and management is not an individual cognitive activity; rather it is carried out by groups of individuals over time and within a specific organizational culture or climate, which influences both health care professional and patient behaviour. We propose a revised theoretical model of decision making related to pain assessment and management for patients with dementia based on theories of sense-making, which is reflective of the reality of clinical decision making in acute hospital wards. The revised model recognizes the

  18. What is the role of specialist palliative care in an acute hospital setting? A qualitative study exploring views of patients and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Grace M; Ewing, Gail; Booth, Sara

    2012-12-01

    Since the medical specialty of palliative medicine was recognized in 1988, the role of hospital specialist palliative care services has been developing, extending to patients who have a life-limiting illness but are not in the terminal phase. This qualitative study aims to explore patient and carer perspectives of the role of palliative care in the acute hospital setting, with patients not imminently dying. Semi-structured interviews with 12 patients and 10 carers. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Patients recruited were adults who had palliative care input for symptom control or psychological support and were discharged either to general ward care or to home. The family member/friend designated as their carer was also approached to take part. All patients in this study were treated in an acute hospital, described as a bewildering and pressured environment of care. Initial perceptions of palliative care were varied, some interpreting referral as an indication that they were approaching the end of life. However, after palliative care input, patients and carers developed an understanding of their role which they saw as three-fold: physical symptom control, psychological support and a reliable liaison. The theme of cross-cutting interviews was that the palliative care team made time for patients, giving them a sense of value and worth. Feeling their care was a priority and being listened to made palliative care input effective. These findings will aid continuing development and evaluation of palliative care teams, in the domains of effectiveness as well as patient experience.

  19. Neuropsychological Counseling in Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Explores integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology in hospital setting. Sees example of such interchange occurring in rehabilitation unit or hospital where psychologist has responsibilities for helping patients, families, and staff to understand implications of central nervous system dysfunction and to adapt to changes. Discusses…

  20. Assessing the economic value of avoiding hospital admissions by shifting the management of gram+ acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections to an outpatient care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektare, V; Khachatryan, A; Xue, M; Dunne, M; Johnson, K; Stephens, J

    2015-01-01

    To estimate, from a US payer perspective, the cost offsets of treating gram positive acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSI) with varied hospital length of stay (LOS) followed by outpatient care, as well as the cost implications of avoiding hospital admission. Economic drivers of care were estimated using a literature-based economic model incorporating inpatient and outpatient components. The model incorporated equal efficacy, adverse events (AE), resource use, and costs from literature. Costs of once- and twice-daily outpatient infusions to achieve a 14-day treatment were analyzed. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Costs were adjusted to 2015 US$. Total non-drug medical cost for treatment of ABSSSI entirely in the outpatient setting to avoid hospital admission was the lowest among all scenarios and ranged from $4039-$4924. Total non-drug cost for ABSSSI treated in the inpatient setting ranged from $9813 (3 days LOS) to $18,014 (7 days LOS). Inpatient vs outpatient cost breakdown was: 3 days inpatient ($6657)/11 days outpatient ($3156-$3877); 7 days inpatient ($15,017)/7 days outpatient ($2495-$2997). Sensitivity analyses revealed a key outpatient cost driver to be peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) costs (average per patient cost of $873 for placement and $205 for complications). Drug and indirect costs were excluded and resource use was not differentiated by ABSSSI type. It was assumed that successful ABSSSI treatment takes up to 14 days per the product labels, and that once-daily and twice-daily antibiotics have equal efficacy. Shifting ABSSSI care to outpatient settings may result in medical cost savings greater than 53%. Typical outpatient scenarios represent 14-37% of total medical cost, with PICC accounting for 28-43% of the outpatient burden. The value of new ABSSSI therapies will be driven by eliminating the need for PICC line, reducing length of stay and the ability to completely avoid a hospital stay.

  1. Chest pain in an out-of-hospital emergency setting: no relationship between pain severity and diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, Michel; Saget, Diane; Ruscev, Mirko; Gonzalez, Geraldine; Ameur, Lydia; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Adnet, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Chest pain frequently prompts emergency medical services (EMS) call-outs. Early management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cases is crucial, but there is still controversy over the relevance of pain severity as a diagnostic criterion. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of chest pain at the time of out-of-hospital emergency care and diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This was a subsidiary analysis of prehospital data collated prospectively by EMS in a large suburb. It concerned patients with chest pain taken to hospital by a mobile intensive care unit. Pain was rated on EMS arrival using a visual analog, numeric or verbal rating scale and classified on severe or not severe according to the pain score. A diagnosis of AMI was confirmed or ruled out on the basis of 2 plasma troponin measurements and/or coronary angiography results. Among the cohort of 2,279 patients included, 234 were suitable for analysis, of which 109 (47%) were diagnosed with AMI. The rate of severe pain on EMS arrival was not significantly different between AMI patients and no myocardial infarction patients (49% [95% CI 40 to 58] and 43% [34 to 52], respectively; P = 0.3; odds ratio 1.3 [0.8 - 2.3] after adjustment for age and gender). In our out-of-hospital emergency setting, the severity of chest pain was not a useful diagnostic criterion for AMI. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  2. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) and Potential Cost Savings and Shortened Bed Stays In an Acute Hospital Setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Brien, C

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral inserted central catheters (PICCs) have increasingly become the mainstay of patients requiring prolonged treatment with antibiotics, transfusions, oncologic IV therapy and total parental nutrition. They may also be used in delivering a number of other medications to patients. In recent years, bed occupancy rates have become hugely pressurized in many hospitals and any potential solutions to free up beds is welcome. Recent introductions of doctor or nurse led intravenous (IV) outpatient based treatment teams has been having a direct effect on early discharge of patients and in some cases avoiding admission completely. The ability to deliver outpatient intravenous treatment is facilitated by the placement of PICCs allowing safe and targeted treatment of patients over a prolonged period of time. We carried out a retrospective study of 2,404 patients referred for PICCs from 2009 to 2015 in a university teaching hospital. There was an exponential increase in the number of PICCs requested from 2011 to 2015 with a 64% increase from 2012 to 2013. The clear increase in demand for PICCs in our institution is directly linked to the advent of outpatient intravenous antibiotic services. In this paper, we assess the impact that the use of PICCs combined with intravenous outpatient treatment may have on cost and hospital bed demand. We advocate that a more widespread implementation of this service throughout Ireland may result in significant cost savings as well as decreasing the number of patients on hospital trollies.

  3. Use of Risk Assessment Tool for Inpatient Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage after Falls in Acute Care Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyabe, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Severe injuries such as intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) are the most serious problem after falls in hospital, but they have not been considered in risk assessment scores for falls. We tried to determine the risk factors for ICH after falls in 20,320 inpatients (696,364 patient-days) aged from 40 to 90 years who were admitted to a tertiary-care university hospital. Possible risk factors including STRATIFY risk score for falls and FRAX™ risk score for fractures were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Fallers accounted for 3.2% of the patients, and 5.0% of the fallers suffered major injuries, including peripheral bone fracture (59.6%) and ICH (23.4%). In addition to STRATIFY, FRAX™ was significantly associated not only with bone fractures but also ICH. Concomitant use of risk score for falls and risk score for fractures might be useful for the prediction of major injuries such as ICH after falls. PMID:22980233

  4. The interRAI Acute Care instrument incorporated in an eHealth system for standardized and web-based geriatric assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in the acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Els; Wellens, Nathalie I H; Flamaing, Johan; Declercq, Anja; Moons, Philip; Boonen, Steven; Milisen, Koen

    2013-09-05

    The interRAI Acute Care instrument is a multidimensional geriatric assessment system intended to determine a hospitalized older persons' medical, psychosocial and functional capacity and needs. Its objective is to develop an overall plan for treatment and long-term follow-up based on a common set of standardized items that can be used in various care settings. A Belgian web-based software system (BelRAI-software) was developed to enable clinicians to interpret the output and to communicate the patients' data across wards and care organizations. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the (dis)advantages of the implementation of the interRAI Acute Care instrument as a comprehensive geriatric assessment instrument in an acute hospital context. In a cross-sectional multicenter study on four geriatric wards in three acute hospitals, trained clinical staff (nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, and geriatricians) assessed 410 inpatients in routine clinical practice. The BelRAI-system was evaluated by focus groups, observations, and questionnaires. The Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats were mapped (SWOT-analysis) and validated by the participants. The primary strengths of the BelRAI-system were a structured overview of the patients' condition early after admission and the promotion of multidisciplinary assessment. Our study was a first attempt to transfer standardized data between home care organizations, nursing homes and hospitals and a way to centralize medical, allied health professionals and nursing data. With the BelRAI-software, privacy of data is guaranteed. Weaknesses are the time-consuming character of the process and the overlap with other assessment instruments or (electronic) registration forms. There is room for improving the user-friendliness and the efficiency of the software, which needs hospital-specific adaptations. Opportunities are a timely and systematic problem detection and continuity of care. An actual shortage of

  5. Creating opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred care: how nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use communication strategies when managing medications in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    management in an acute hospital setting. Language discourses shaped and were shaped by complex power relations between patients and clinicians and among clinicians themselves. Clinicians need to be encouraged to have regular conversations to talk about and challenge each other's practices. More emphasis should be placed on ensuring that patients are given opportunities to voice their concerns about how their medications are managed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Crisis leadership in an acute clinical setting: christchurch hospital, new zealand ICU experience following the february 2011 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravsky, Lev

    2015-04-01

    On Tuesday, February 22, 2011, a 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch, New Zealand. This qualitative study explored the intensive care units (ICUs) staff experiences and adopted leadership approaches to manage a large-scale crisis resulting from the city-wide disaster. To date, there have been a very small number of research publications to provide a comprehensive overview of crisis leadership from the perspective of multi-level interactions among staff members in the acute clinical environment during the process of the crisis management. The research was qualitative in nature. Participants were recruited into the study through purposive sampling. A semi-structured, audio-taped, personal interview method was chosen as a single data collection method for this study. This study employed thematic analysis. Formal team leadership refers to the actions undertaken by a team leader to ensure the needs and goals of the team are met. Three core, formal, crisis-leadership themes were identified: decision making, ability to remain calm, and effective communication. Informal leaders are those individuals who exert significant influence over other members in the group to which they belong, although no formal authority has been assigned to them. Four core, informal, crisis-leadership themes were identified: motivation to lead, autonomy, emotional leadership, and crisis as opportunity. Shared leadership is a dynamic process among individuals in groups for which the objective is to lead one another to the achievement of group or organizational goals. Two core, shared-leadership themes were identified: shared leadership within formal medical and nursing leadership groups, and shared leadership between formal and informal leaders in the ICU. The capabilities of formal leaders all contributed to the overall management of a crisis. Informal leaders are a very cohesive group of motivated people who can make a substantial contribution and improve overall team performance in a

  7. A simulation study of the interception of prescribing errors by clinical pharmacists in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruba, Thibaut; Boussadi, Abdelali; Lenain, Emilie; Korb-Savoldelli, Virginie; Gillaizeau, Florence; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the performance of several pharmacists in the same department who analysed the same prescriptions in a simulation study. One hundred prescriptions were retrospectively extracted from the prospective database of our hospital. Five clinical pharmacists working in the same department were asked to analyse individually the order lines of each prescription as if it were part of their routine daily practice. Afterward, an independent committee of five other clinical pharmacists reviewed the same 100 prescriptions. We calculated the sensitivity and the specificity of error detection in a line order by using the results of the committee as the gold standard. A total of 908 order lines were analysed (mean 9 ± 3 order lines per prescription). Fifty-one medication errors were identified by the committee (5.6%), including 23 related to laboratory test results: renal failure, or therapeutic concentrations being too low or too high. The sensitivity of the five pharmacists ranged between 19.6% and 56.9% and the specificity between 92.8% and 98.7%. The rates of agreement between each pharmacist and the committee, assessed using kappa coefficient, were between 0.20 and 0.39. The main factors affecting sensitivity and/or specificity in univariate analysis were the number of drugs per prescription, type of drug prescribed (ATC classification) and the glomerular filtration rate. Discrepancies between the performances of pharmacists exist, as there are between other health care professionals. Pharmacist training, standardization of the pharmaceutical analysis of drug prescription, and implementation of a clinical decision support system allowing biological values to be linked to drug prescriptions could improve individual performance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Economic Impact of Oritavancin for the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections in the Emergency Department or Observation Setting: Cost Savings Associated with Avoidable Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodise, Thomas P; Fan, Weihong; Sulham, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    Data indicate that acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) patients without major comorbidities can be managed effectively in the outpatient setting. Because most patients with ABSSSIs present to the emergency department, it is essential that clinicians identify candidates for outpatient treatment given the substantially higher costs associated with inpatient care. We examined the potential cost avoidance associated with shifting care from inpatient treatment with vancomycin to outpatient treatment with oritavancin for ABSSSI patients without major complications or comorbidities. A decision analytic, cost-minimization model was developed to compare costs of inpatient vancomycin versus outpatient oritavancin treatment of ABSSSI patients with few or no comorbidities (Charlson Comorbidity Index score ≤1) and no life-threatening conditions presenting to emergency department. Hospital discharge data from the Premier Research Database was used to determine the costs associated with inpatient vancomycin treatment. Mean costs for inpatient treatment with vancomycin ranged from $5973 to $9885, depending on Charlson Comorbidity Index score and presence of systemic symptoms. Switching an individual patient from inpatient vancomycin treatment to outpatient oritavancin treatment was estimated to save $1752.46 to $6475.87 per patient, depending on Charlson Comorbidity Index score, presence of systemic symptoms, and use of observation status. Assuming some patients may be admitted to the hospital after treatment with oritavancin, it is estimated that up to 38.12% of patients could be admitted while maintaining budget neutrality. This cost-minimization model indicates that use of oritavancin in the emergency department or observation setting is associated with substantial cost savings compared with inpatient treatment with vancomycin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. First-generation versus third-generation comprehensive geriatric assessment instruments in the acute hospital setting: a comparison of the Minimum Geriatric Screening Tools (MGST) and the interRAI Acute Care (interRAI AC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellens, N I H; Deschodt, M; Flamaing, J; Moons, P; Boonen, S; Boman, X; Gosset, C; Petermans, J; Milisen, K

    2011-08-01

    Comparison of the first-generation Minimum Geriatric Screening Tools (MGST) and the third-generation interRAI Acute Care (interRAI AC). Based on a qualitative multiphase exchange of expert opinion, published evidence was critically analyzed and translated into a consensus. Both methods are intended for a multi-domain geriatric assessment in acute hospital settings, but each with a different scope and goal. MGST contains a collection of single-domain, internationally validated instruments. Assessment is usually triggered by care givers' clinical impression based on geriatric expertise. A limited selection of domains is usually assessed only once, by disciplines with domain-specific expertise. Clinical use results in improvement to screen geriatric problems. InterRAI AC, tailored for acute settings, intends to screen a large number of geriatric domains. Based on systematic observational data, risk domains are triggered and clinical guidelines are suggested. Multiple observation periods outline the evolution of patients' functioning over stay in comparison to the premorbid situation. The method is appropriate for application on geriatric and non-geriatric wards, filling geriatric knowledge gaps. The interRAI Suite contains a common set of standardized items across settings, facilitating data transfer in transitional care. The third-generation interRAI AC has advantages compared to the first-generation MGST. A cascade system is proposed to integrate both, complementary methods in practice. The systematic interRAI AC assessment detects risk domains. Subsequently, clinical protocols suggest components of the MGST as additional assessment. This cascade approach unites the strength of exhaustive assessment of the interRAI AC with domain-specific tools of the MGST.

  10. Does physical exercise improve ADL capacities in people over 65 years with moderate or severe dementia hospitalized in an acute psychiatric setting? A multisite randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürge, Elisabeth; Berchtold, André; Maupetit, Christine; Bourquin, Nathalie M-P; von Gunten, Armin; Ducraux, Daniel; Zumbach, Serge; Peeters, Anne; Kuhne, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Several studies on the effect of physical exercise on activities of daily living (ADL) for people with dementia exist; yet, data concerning the specific context of acute psychiatric hospitals remain scant. This study measured the effect of a physical exercise program on ADL scores in patients with moderate to severe dementia hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward. A multicenter clinical trial was conducted in five Swiss and Belgian psychiatric hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated to either an experimental group (EG) or a control group (CG). Members of the EG received 20 physical exercise sessions (strengthening, balance, and walking) over a four-week period while members of the CG participated in social interaction sessions of equivalent duration and frequency, but without physical exercise. The effect of exercise on ADL was measured by comparing scores of the Barthel Index and the Functional Independence Measure in the EG and CG before and after the intervention, and two weeks later. Hundred and sixty patients completed the program. Characteristics of participants of both groups were similar at the inception of the study. The mean ADL score of EG decreased slightly over time, whereas that of the CG significantly decreased compared to initial scores. Overall differences between groups were not significant; however, significant differences were found for mobility-related items. ADL scores in elderly with moderate to severe dementia deteriorate during acute psychiatric hospitalization. An exercise program delays the loss of mobility but does not have a significant impact on overall ADL scores.

  11. Magnet hospital characteristics in acute general hospitals in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate characteristics of the nursing practice environment and the impact of organizational structures and processes on nursing in 11 major acute general hospitals in Ireland from the perspective of staff-nurses (n = 368) and Directors of Nursing (n = 10). The study was descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative. The Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) and an instrument developed by Havens were used and Directors of Nursing supplied hospital documentary evidence of organizational structures and processes. A convenience sample of 368 staff-nurses and 10 Directors of Nursing, participated. Staff-nurses had a moderately positive perception of relationships with doctors (2.77); autonomy in practice (2.56); organizational support (2.51) and control over practice settings (2.35). A significant statistical difference was found between the practice environments in the 11 hospitals, particularly in relation to organizational support (P = 0.001); control over practice setting (P = 0.003); nurse autonomy (P = 0.004) and nurse-doctor relationships (P = 0.024). When comparisons were made with US Magnet hospital research findings, lower scores on all dimensions of professional practice environment were achieved by Irish nurses.

  12. Respirator Use in a Hospital Setting: Establishing Surveillance Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Mary I.; Ficken, Meredith E.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Talbot, Thomas R.; Swift, Melanie D.; McGown, Paula W.; Wheaton, Robert F.; Bruer, Michele; Little, Steven W.; Oke, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Information that details use and supply of respirators in acute care hospitals is vital to prevent disease transmission, assure the safety of health care personnel, and inform national guidelines and regulations. Objective To develop measures of respirator use and supply in the acute care hospital setting to aid evaluation of respirator programs, allow benchmarking among hospitals, and serve as a foundation for national surveillance to enhance effective Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) use and management. Methods We identified existing regulations and guidelines that govern respirator use and supply at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). Related routine and emergency hospital practices were documented through an investigation of hospital administrative policies, protocols, and programs. Respirator dependent practices were categorized based on hospital workflow: Prevention (preparation), patient care (response), and infection surveillance (outcomes). Associated data in information systems were extracted and their quality evaluated. Finally, measures representing major factors and components of respirator use and supply were developed. Results Various directives affecting multiple stakeholders govern respirator use and supply in hospitals. Forty-seven primary and secondary measures representing factors of respirator use and supply in the acute care hospital setting were derived from existing information systems associated with the implementation of these directives. Conclusion Adequate PPE supply and effective use that limit disease transmission and protect health care personnel are dependent on multiple factors associated with routine and emergency hospital practices. We developed forty-seven measures that may serve as the basis for a national PPE surveillance system, beginning with standardized measures of respirator use and supply for collection across different hospital types, sizes, and locations to inform hospitals, government agencies

  13. Acute Hospitalization of the Older Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Pedersen, Mette Merete; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Acute hospitalization of older patients may be associated with loss of muscle strength and functional performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hospitalization as a result of medical disease on muscle strength and functional performance in older medical ...

  14. The Effect of Furosemide Dose Administered in the Out-of-hospital Setting on Renal Function Among Patients with Suspected Acute Decompensated Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, L Celeste; Mehrtens, Gia M; Pores, Noah; Pickrell, Christie; Tanis, James; Satty, Timothy; Chuang, Michelle; Young, Tina C; Merlin, Mark A

    2015-02-01

    The most effective dose of prehospital furosemide in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) has not yet been identified and concerns of worsening renal function have limited its use. To assess if administering high-dose furosemide is associated with worsening renal function. The authors conducted a 2-center chart review for patients who presented via a single Emergency Medical Service (EMS) from June 5, 2009 through May 17, 2013. Inclusion criteria were shortness of breath, primarily coded as ADHF, and the administration of furosemide prior to emergency department (ED) arrival. A total of 331 charts were identified. The primary endpoint was an increase in creatinine (Cr) of more than 0.3 mg/dL from admission to any time during hospital stay. Exploratory endpoints included survival, length-of-stay (LOS), disposition, urine output in the ED, change in BUN/Cr from admission to discharge, and change in Cr from admission to 72 hours and discharge. When treated as a binary variable, there was no association observed between an increase in Cr of more than 0.3 mg/dL and prehospital furosemide dose. Baseline characteristics found to be associated with dose were included in the logistic regression model. Lowering the dose of prehospital furosemide was associated with higher odds of attaining a 0.3 mg/dL increase in Cr (adjusted OR = 1.49 for a 20 mg decrease; P = .019). There was no association found with any of the exploratory endpoints. Patients who received higher doses of furosemide prehospitally were less likely to have an increase of greater than 0.3 mg/dL in Cr during the hospital course.

  15. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Pain Management in the Acute Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Background Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. Purpose and Setting This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flags...

  16. Absenteeism in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taunton, R L; Perkins, S; Oetker-Black, S; Heaton, R

    1995-09-01

    Lack of standardization in formulas for calculating absenteeism impeded comparison among institutions and comparison to rates reported for the health care industry. Even though illness related benefits, replacement costs for absent employees and attendance incentives absorbed scarce financial resources, more than 40% of hospitals had no standard for excessive absence. Directors of nursing were concerned about staffing and the possibility that employees were tiring to the point of becoming ill. Among directors, concern about absenteeism was greatest in urban hospitals of 100-200 beds.

  17. Occupational therapy in Australian acute hospitals: A modified practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Ongoing changes to health-care funding Australia wide continue to influence how occupational therapists practise in acute hospitals. This study describes the practice challenges experienced by Western Australian acute care occupational therapists. Then, it explores if and how acute care occupational therapists are modifying their practice in response to these practice changes. This study used a qualitative grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 13 purposively selected acute care occupational therapists from four Western Australian metropolitan hospitals. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method to provide detailed descriptions of acute care occupational therapy practice and to generate theory. Five conceptual categories were developed. The first two addressed practice challenges: pragmatic organisational influences on client care and establishing a professional identity within the multidisciplinary team. Three categories related to therapist responses are as follows: becoming the client advocate, being the facilitator and applying clinical reasoning. Finally, modified practice was identified as the core category which explains the process whereby acute care occupational therapists are ensuring they remain relevant and authentic in the acute care context. Western Australian acute care occupational therapists are practising in a highly complex health context that presents many challenges. They are responding by using a modified form of practice that ensures occupational therapy skills remain relevant within the narrow confines of this health setting. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  18. Hospital medicine (Part 2): what would improve acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    There are so many obvious delays and inefficiencies in our traditional system of acute hospital care; it is clear that if outcomes are to be improved prompt accurate assessment immediately followed by competent and efficient treatment is essential. Early warning scores (EWS) help detect acutely ill patients who are seriously ill and likely to deteriorate. However, it is not known if any EWS has universal applicability to all patient populations. The benefit of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) such as Medical Emergency Teams has yet to be proven, possibly because doctors and nurses are reluctant to call the RRS for help. Reconfiguration of care delivery in an Acute Medical Assessment Unit has been suggested as a "proactive" alternative to the "reactive" approach of RRS. This method ensures every patient is in an appropriate and safe environment from the moment of first contact with the hospital. Further research is needed into what interventions are most effective in preventing the deterioration and\\/or resuscitating seriously ill patients. Although physicians expert in hospital care decrease the cost and length of hospitalization without compromising outcomes hospital care will continue to be both expensive and potentially dangerous.

  19. Dermatology referrals in the hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walia N

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Dermatology consultation occurs mainly in the outpatient setting. The reasons for inpatient dermatologic consultation by other specialties in a hospital, its frequency and its impact on health care are largely unrecorded. METHODS: We retrospectively studied the records of 971 hospitalized patients or patients being evaluated in emergency services for which a dermatologist′s consultation was requested over a 5 - year period in a medium sized military hospital. The demographic details, specialties requiring consultation, provisional diagnosis and dermatological investigations done were tabulated. RESULTS: Dermatologic consultation changed the dermatologic diagnosis and treatment in more than 2/3rd of the patients. Generally, the dermatologic diagnoses most frequently missed by the referring service were common conditions with established treatment. CONCLUSION: The overall impact of dermatologic consultation on health delivery to patients was substantial. Important recommendations to any health care system are offered.

  20. Improving sleep for patients in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Christine; Flood, David; Brittin, Andy; Miles, Jane

    2015-03-11

    Sleep is important to health and recovery from illness, but is known to be difficult in hospital. This article describes a quality improvement project conducted on 18 wards in acute hospitals. Patients reported sleeping an average of five hours per night, and 47% (352/749) rated their sleep quality as good or excellent in hospital. Individualised ward action plans were implemented. At follow up, disturbance by noise and light had fallen significantly and 69% (540/783) of patients rated their sleep as good or excellent, 22% more than before the intervention (Psleep.

  1. Development of a hospital reiki training program: training volunteers to provide reiki to patients, families, and staff in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Julie; Reilly, Patricia M; Buchanan, Teresa M

    2014-01-01

    Creating a healing and healthy environment for patients, families, and staff is an ongoing challenge. As part of our hospital's Integrative Care Program, a Reiki Volunteer Program has helped to foster a caring and healing environment, providing a means for patients, family, and staff to reduce pain and anxiety and improve their ability to relax and be present. Because direct care providers manage multiple and competing needs at any given time, they may not be available to provide Reiki when it is needed. This program demonstrates that a volunteer-based program can successfully support nurses in meeting patient, family, and staff demand for Reiki services.

  2. central hospital with acute coronary syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge about coronary artery disease among patients admitted to Aseer central hospital with acute coronary syndrome. Abdullah S. Assiri. Department of Internal Medicine. College of Medicine & Medical Sciences. King Khalid University. Interventional Cardiology Consultant and Chief of Cardiology. Aseer Central ...

  3. Medicinal Cannabis: History, Pharmacology, And Implications for the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Mary Barna; Abazia, Daniel T

    2017-03-01

    The authors review the historical use of medicinal cannabis and discuss the agent's pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, select evidence on medicinal uses, and the implications of evolving regulations on the acute care hospital setting.

  4. PRIORITY SETTING IN AN ACUTE CARE HOSPITAL IN ARGENTINA: A QUALITATIVE CASE STUDY DISTRIBUCIÓN PRIORITARIA EN UN HOSPITAL DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS EN ARGENTINA: ESTUDIO CUALITATIVO DE UN CASO DISTRIBUIÇÃO PRIORITÁRIA EM UM HOSPITAL DE CUIDADOS INTENSIVOS NA ARGENTINA: ESTUDO QUALITATIVO DE UM CASO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Gordon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe and evaluate priority setting in an Acute Care hospital in Argentina, using Accountability for Reasonableness, an ethical framework for fair priority setting. Methods: Case Study involving key informant interviews and document review. Thirty respondents were identified using a snowball sampling strategy. A modified thematic approach was used in analyzing the data. Results: Priorities are primarily determined at the Department of Health. The committee which is supposed to set priorities within the hospital was thought not to have much influence. Decisions were based on government policies and objectives, personal relationships, economic, political, historical and arbitrary reasons. Decisions at the DOH were publicized through internet; however, apart from the tenders and a general budget, details of hospital decisions were not publicized. CATA provided an accessible but ineffective forum for appeals. There were no clear mechanisms for appeals and leadership to ensure adherence to a fair process. Conclusions: In spite of their efforts to ensure fairness, Priority setting in the study hospital did not meet all the four conditions of a fair process. Policy discussions on improving legitimacy and fairness provided an opportunity for improving fairness in the hospital and Accountability for Reasonableness might be a useful framework for analysis and for identifying and improving strategies.Propósito: Describir y evaluar el establecimiento de prioridades en un hospital de cuidados intensivos en Argentina, empleando la Administración Razonable como marco ético para una justa asignación. Métodos: Estudio de un Caso que incluía entrevistas a un informante y revisión de documentos. Se identificó a treinta participantes empleando la estrategia de muestras tipo "bola de nieve". Al analizar los datos, se empleó un enfoque temático modificado. Resultados: Las prioridades se determinan principalmente en el Departamento de Salud

  5. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Episode-of-Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) Measure 7. Electronic Clinical Quality Measures 8... for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year... 0938-AR73 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  6. Clustering of acute respiratory infection hospitalizations in childcare facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Benn, Christine Stabell; Simonsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics.......To estimate how risk of acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalization in children attending childcare facilities with a recently (within 1 month) hospitalized child is affected by gender, age and other characteristics....

  7. Acute confusional state-associated factors in older adults admitted to a tertiary hospital emergency unit

    OpenAIRE

    Amado Tineo, José Percy; Servicio de Emergencia Adultos, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Chucas Ascencio, Luis Alberto; Servicio de Emergencia Adultos, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Rojas Moya, César Rigoberto; Servicio de Emergencia Adultos, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Pintado Caballero,, Silvia; Servicio de Emergencia Adultos, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Cerrón Aguilar, Carlos Alberto; Servicio de Emergencia Adultos, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Vásquez Alva, Rolando; Servicio de Emergencia Adultos, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, EsSalud, Lima, Perú

    2013-01-01

    Acute confusional state is a frequent problem in the elderly and is increased by acute pathologies. Objectives: To determine the frequency of acute confusional state in non-critical elderly emergency service inpatients and to identify associated factors. Design: Cross sectional study. Setting: Emergency Unit, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins, Lima, Peru. Participants: Sixty-year-old or older patients hospitalized in an emergency unit. Interventions: Between May and August 2010 and...

  8. Factors influencing hospital implementation of acute pain management practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H J; Lagasse, R S; Ciccone, K; Jakubowski, M S; Kitain, E M

    2001-06-01

    To identify factors that may influence the implementation of acute pain management guidelines in hospital settings. Two questionnaire surveys. Healthcare Association of New York State, Albany, NY. The surveys were administered to 220 hospitals in New York State regarding their acute pain management practices and resources available. One survey was addressed to each hospital's chief executive officer (CEO) and the second survey was addressed to the clinical director of the Department of Anesthesiology or Acute Pain Service. The barriers and incentives to guideline implementation identified by CEOs were analyzed using factor analysis. Logistic regression was employed to determine predictors of guideline implementation by linking the CEOs' survey data with the clinical directors' report of guideline usage. According to clinical directors, only 27% of the responding hospitals were using a published pain management practice guideline. Factors predictive of guideline implementation include resource availability and belief in the benefits of using guidelines to improve quality of care or to achieve economic/legal advantages. Guideline implementation, however, does not necessarily include applying all key elements recommended by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (formerly Agency for Health Care Policy and Research) guideline. For example, a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach to pain control was used in only 42% of the hospitals, and underutilization of nonpharmacologic therapies to control pain was widespread. Resource availability, particularly staff with expertise in pain management and existence of a formal quality assurance program to monitor pain management, was significantly predictive of compliance with key guideline elements. Resource availability significantly influences the implementation of pain management practice guidelines in hospital settings. Implementation is often incomplete because various factors affect the feasibility of

  9. Dialysis Requiring Acute Kidney Injury in Acute Cerebrovascular Accident Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint A; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Kamat, Sunil; Annapureddy, Narender; Benjo, Alexandre; Thakar, Charuhas V

    2015-11-01

    The epidemiology of dialysis requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admissions is poorly understood with previous studies being from a single center or year. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the yearly incidence trends of AKI-D in hospitalizations with AIS and ICH from 2002 to 2011. We also evaluated the trend of impact of AKI-D on in-hospital mortality and adverse discharge using adjusted odds ratios (aOR) after adjusting for demographics and comorbidity indices. We extracted a total of 3,937,928 and 696,754 hospitalizations with AIS and ICH, respectively. AKI-D occurred in 1.5 and 3.5 per 1000 in AIS and ICH admissions, respectively. Incidence of admissions complicated by AKI-D doubled from 0.9/1000 to 1.7/1000 in AIS and from 2.1/1000 to 4.3/1000 in ICH admissions. In AIS admissions, AKI-D was associated with 30% higher odds of mortality (aOR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.48; Paccident continues to grow and is associated with increased mortality and adverse discharge. This highlights the need for early diagnosis, better risk stratification, and preparedness for need for complex long-term care in this vulnerable population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Performance of in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization: Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motomura Noboru

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective In-hospital mortality is an important performance measure for quality improvement, although it requires proper risk adjustment. We set out to develop in-hospital mortality prediction models for acute hospitalization using a nation-wide electronic administrative record system in Japan. Methods Administrative records of 224,207 patients (patients discharged from 82 hospitals in Japan between July 1, 2002 and October 31, 2002 were randomly split into preliminary (179,156 records and test (45,051 records groups. Study variables included Major Diagnostic Category, age, gender, ambulance use, admission status, length of hospital stay, comorbidity, and in-hospital mortality. ICD-10 codes were converted to calculate comorbidity scores based on Quan's methodology. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was then performed using in-hospital mortality as a dependent variable. C-indexes were calculated across risk groups in order to evaluate model performances. Results In-hospital mortality rates were 2.68% and 2.76% for the preliminary and test datasets, respectively. C-index values were 0.869 for the model that excluded length of stay and 0.841 for the model that included length of stay. Conclusion Risk models developed in this study included a set of variables easily accessible from administrative data, and still successfully exhibited a high degree of prediction accuracy. These models can be used to estimate in-hospital mortality rates of various diagnoses and procedures.

  11. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nore Anne K

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40% were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84% were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%, were frequently comatose (35%, had respiratory depression (37%, and many received naloxone (49%. The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%, fewer were comatose (10%, and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%. Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%, 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often

  12. Mentoring Nurse Practitioners in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pop, Rodica S

    2017-08-01

    Nursing philosophy is the foundation of nurse practitioner (NP) training. However, NP practice is based on the medical care model. Thus, the necessity of mediating between these two approaches is often problematic for new NPs who are transitioning into their new roles. Mentoring has been used successfully to facilitate role transition and role understanding for nurses, NPs, and physicians. However, mentoring has been rarely studied in NPs. The purpose of this study was to develop a theory of mentoring for new NPs in a hospital setting. Grounded theory methodology was used. The sampling approach was initially purposive and was then shifted to theoretical to ensure the collection of meaningful data. Semistructuredinterviews were recorded and transcribed into Word documents for analysis. The three-phase analysis developed by Corbin and Strauss was initiated after the second interview. Sixteen participants (eight mentors and eight mentees) were interviewed between February and June 2011. The core category that emerged from the data was "defining self," and the main categories were forming the relationship, developing the relationship, and mentoring outcomes. A well-designed formal mentoring program may greatly improve the transition of NPs into a new role. The theory generated by the data from these study participants provides clearly defined categories that may be operationally defined and utilized to develop evaluation tools for mentoring programs.

  13. Abuse in Hospital-Based Birth Settings?

    OpenAIRE

    Hodges, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Are laboring and birthing women treated abusively in the hospital? Although seldom recognized as abuse or violence against women, bullying and medical treatments under false pretenses, even in a hospital, constitute abuse and a basic human rights issue that needs attention. Naming the problem is a first step. The power of medical authority, the lack of accountability in the hospital hierarchical system, policies and protocols, and expectations of compliancy all make an environment ripe for ab...

  14. Perception of patient safety culture in Slovenian acute general hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this research was to measure patient safety culture in all Slovenian acute general hospitals.Methods: The hospital survey on patient safety culture questionnaire developed by researchers at Westat was used. Prior to this study, the questionnaire was psychometrically tested in three pilot hospitals and the results showed no need to modify the original model for the Slovene setting. Responses were scored on the 5-level Likert scale. The questionnaire was distributed to all hospital staff. After the exclusion of 159 questionnaires, which did not fulfil the inclusion criteria, 2932 (48.5 % questionnaires were analysed. Descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis, reliability of the scales, and construct validity were computed. For each item the percentage of positive, neutral and negative responses were calculated. Areas for improvement were defined as those answered positively by 50 % or less of the respondents. With one-way analysis of variance a comparison of the means among different sizes of the hospitals was performed.Results: The confirmative factor analysis showed adequate fit for the model and the questionnaire reliability was also adequate. The average positive percentage for all 12 composites was 53 %. Composite scores of patient safety culture revealed that none reached the level that would establish safety strengths. Statistically significant differences of means for hospital size were found (d.f. 2, 337,006; p < 0,0005 but were practically unimportant.Conclusion: The survey showed overall low patient safety culture, however it has provided the first insight into patient safety culture in acute general hospitals in Slovenia with several opportunities for improvement.

  15. Mortality associated with gastrointestinal bleeding events: Comparing short-term clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding and acute myocardial infarction in a US managed care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mel Wilcox

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available C Mel Wilcox1, Byron L Cryer2, Henry J Henk3, Victoria Zarotsky3, Gergana Zlateva41University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA; 2University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX; 3i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 4Pfizer, Inc., New York, NY, USA Objectives: To compare the short-term mortality rates of gastrointestinal (GI bleeding to those of acute myocardial infarction (AMI by estimating the 30-, 60-, and 90-day mortality among hospitalized patients.Methods: United States national health plan claims data (1999–2003 were used to identify patients hospitalized with a GI bleeding event. Patients were propensity-matched to AMI patients with no evidence of GI bleed from the same US health plan.Results: 12,437 upper GI-bleed patients and 22,847 AMI patients were identified. Propensity score matching yielded 6,923 matched pairs. Matched cohorts were found to have a similar Charlson Comorbidity Index score and to be similar on nearly all utilization and cost measures (excepting emergency room costs. A comparison of outcomes among the matched cohorts found that AMI patients had higher rates of 30-day mortality (4.35% vs 2.54%; p < 0.0001 and rehospitalization (2.56% vs 1.79%; p = 0.002, while GI bleed patients were more likely to have a repeat procedure (72.38% vs 44.95%; p < 0.001 following their initial hospitalization. The majority of the difference in overall 30-day mortality between GI bleed and AMI patients was accounted for by mortality during the initial hospitalization (1.91% vs 3.58%.Conclusions: GI bleeding events result in significant mortality similar to that of an AMI after adjusting for the initial hospitalization.Keywords: gastrointestinal, bleeding, mortality, acute myocardial infarction, claims analysis

  16. MEDPAR Limited Data Set (LDS) - Hospital (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MedPAR consolidates Inpatient Hospital or Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) claims data from the National Claims History (NCH) files into stay level records.

  17. Acute bbdomen at El Obeid Hospital,Western Sudan. | Doumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute abdominal pain is the presenting complaint in emergency departments of all hospitals worldwide, resulting in a huge drain of human and non-human resources. Objectives: To study the pattern, causes and management outcomes of patients presenting with acute abdomen to El Obeid Hospital, Western ...

  18. Analysis of Surfing Injuries Presenting in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubbal, Kevin T; Chen, Charlie; Costantini, Todd; Herrera, Fernando; Dobke, Marek; Suliman, Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Surfing is a rapidly growing major worldwide sport; however, little is understood regarding severe injuries and resulting hospital admissions. This study explores surfing-related injuries in the major surfing hub of San Diego presenting in the acute trauma setting. The purpose of this study is to address the void of information regarding severe surfing injuries in the trauma setting, including injury patterns, associated hospitalization course, and risk factors. Understanding the injury patterns in surfing accidents is crucial for proper management of surfing injuries. A retrospective analysis was performed of all surfing-related injuries in a Level 1 trauma center between 2000 and 2016. A total of 93 patients were identified. Body parts most commonly affected include the head (42, 46%), face (21, 22%), and spine (47, 51%). Twenty-eight (30%) patients required surgical intervention, including 19 for spinal injuries, 3 for facial injuries, 4 for upper extremity injuries, and 2 for lower extremity injuries. The distribution for most presentations (55, 59%) occurred in the summer months between July and September. The Injury Severity Score demonstrated strong positive correlation with the length of hospital stay, with a Pearson coefficient of 0.52 (P injuries in patients presenting with surfing injuries in the trauma setting, consistent with its presentation as a high velocity and high impact injury. With plastic surgeons often treating severe head and facial injuries, understanding the injury patterns in severe surfing accidents is crucial for proper management. High rates of positive alcohol and drug screening signal the importance to bring awareness to the dangers of surfing under the influence.

  19. Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of acute respiratory infections in hospitalized children under five years of age in Jos Nigeria. ... Abstract. Background: Acute respiratory infections are the commonest cause of acute morbidity in children especially those under five in the developing countries. ... prevalence of 43.5/1000 person per year (39/897).

  20. Occupational health in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Blacklaws

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Health services and especially hospitals, are amongst the employers with the largest number of employees in the country. Those employed in the service have the right to as high a standard of occupational health as found in industry at its best. Health services in hospitals should use techniques of preventive employees and reduces absenteeism due to sickness and other causes. It health requirements of the employees. Hospitals should serve as examples to the public regarding health education, preventive medicine and job safety. Hospitals have a moral and legal obligation to: — provide a safe and healthful working environment for employees; — protect employees from special risks and hazards associated with their occ u p a t i o n s , su c h as c o n t a g io u s diseases; — protect patients from risks associated with unhealthy employees. Experience in other employee groups has shown that an occupational health service results in healthier, more effective employees and reduces absenteeism due to sickness and other causes. It also reduces labour turnover and Workmen’s compensation and other insurance claims.

  1. Children hospitalized due to acute otitis media: how does this condition differ from acute mastoiditis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Saat, Riste; Lempinen, Laura; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical picture and microbiological findings of children hospitalized due to acute otitis media and to analyze how it differs from acute mastoiditis. A retrospective review of the medical records of all children (0-16 years) hospitalized due to acute otitis media in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Helsinki University Hospital, between 2003 and 2012. Comparison with previously published data of children with acute mastoiditis (n=56) from the same institute and period of time. The most common pathogens in the children hospitalized due to acute otitis media (n=44) were Streptococcus pneumoniae (18%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (16%), Streptococcus pyogenes (14%), and Staphylococcus aureus (14%). One of the most common pathogens of out-patient acute otitis media, Haemophilus influenzae, was absent. Otorrhea was common in infections caused by S. pyogenes and otorrhea via tympanostomy tube in infections caused by P. aeruginosa. In children under 2 years-of-age, the most common pathogens were S. pneumoniae (43%), Moraxella catarrhalis (14%), and S. aureus (7%). S. pyogenes and P. aeruginosa were only found in children over 2 years-of-age. Previous health problems, bilateral infections, and facial nerve paresis were more common in children hospitalized due to acute otitis media, compared with acute mastoiditis, but they also demonstrated lower CRP values and shorter duration of hospital stay. The number of performed tympanostomies and mastoidectomies was also comparatively smaller in the children hospitalized due to acute otitis media. S. aureus was more common and S. pneumoniae, especially its resistant strains, was less common in the children hospitalized due to acute otitis media than acute mastoiditis. Acute otitis media requiring hospitalization and acute mastoiditis compose a continuum of complicated acute otitis media that differs from common out-patient acute otitis media. The bacteriology of children hospitalized due to acute otitis media

  2. Validation of the PHEEM instrument in a Danish hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aspegren, Knut; Bastholt, Lars; Bested, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) has been translated into Danish and then validated with good internal consistency by 342 Danish junior and senior hospital doctors. Four of the 40 items are culturally dependent in the Danish hospital setting. Factor analysis...

  3. Safety of Intranasal Fentanyl in the Out-of-Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anders P H; Pedersen, Danny M B; Trautner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    : In this prospective observational study, we administered intranasal fentanyl in the out-of-hospital setting to adults and children older than 8 years with severe pain resulting from orthopedic conditions, abdominal pain, or acute coronary syndrome refractory to nitroglycerin spray. Patients received 1 to 3 doses...

  4. Nurse odor perception in various Japanese hospital settings

    OpenAIRE

    Horiguchi, Masami; Shudo, Erika; Sato, Kumiko; Nakamura, Madoka; Sai, Wakana; Ohinata, Terumi

    2015-01-01

    Because unpleasant hospital odors affect the nursing environment, we investigated nurses' perceptions of the odors of various hospital settings: hospital rooms, nurse stations, and human waste disposal rooms to discard the urine, stools and diapers. A questionnaire based on the Japanese Ministry of the Environment's guidelines on odor index regulation was used to assess nurses' perceptions of odor intensity, comfort, tolerability, and description in the aforementioned settings. Questionnaires...

  5. Acute appendicitis in Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hospital is a tertiary care facility in competition with a large number of private hospitals with different levels of competence. Objective: The objective of the study is to review the outcome of the surgical management of acute appendicitis in our hospital. Method: A retrospective study of subjects who had appendectomy for ...

  6. Nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards: A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tove, Lindhardt; Hallberg, Ingalill Rahm; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    . OBJECTIVE: To illuminate nurses' experience of collaboration with relatives of frail elderly patients in acute hospital wards, and of the barriers and promoters for collaboration. DESIGN AND SETTING: The design was descriptive. Three acute units in a large Danish university hospital participated...

  7. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennerby, Cathy

    2012-02-01

    AIM: This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. BACKGROUND: The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children\\'s hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about \\'near misses\\

  8. Physician failure to stratify patients hospitalized with acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mitchell D; Greco, Allison; Mukhtar, Umer; Dunn, Jonathan; Scharf, Michael L

    2017-12-01

    In 2011, the AHA recommended risk stratification of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Failure to risk stratify may cause under recognition of intermediate-risk PE and its attendant short- and long-term consequences. We sought to determine if patients hospitalized with acute PE were appropriately risk stratified according to the 2011 AHA Scientific Statement within our hospital system and whether differences exist in adherence to risk stratification by hospital or treating hospital service. We also wished to know the frequency of in-hospital consultations for acute PE which might assist in the risk stratification process. This is a retrospective chart audit of all patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of acute PE between January 2011 and December 2013 at our 937-bed metropolitan, three hospital system comprised of academic University, neuroscience Specialty, and teaching Community hospitals. We evaluated the presence of imaging, laboratory tests, and specialty consultation within 72 h of PE diagnosis by hospital. 701 patients with acute PE were admitted to our hospital system during the study period. 308 patients (43.9%) met criteria for intermediate-risk PE. 347 patients (49.5%) were considered 'Low-Risk - At Risk', patients defined in a low-risk category not having undergone all recommended risk stratification testing and so truly may have been in a higher risk category. No specialty consultations were utilized for 265 patients (37.8%). Our large metropolitan hospital system inadequately risk stratifies hospitalized patients with acute PE. Because nearly one-half of patients with acute PE did not have all recommended testing, clinicians may be under recognizing patients with intermediate-risk PE and their risk for long-term morbidity. Specialty consultations were underutilized and may help guide medical decision-making.

  9. Hospital-based, acute care after ambulatory surgery center discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P; Vashi, Anita A; Ross, Joseph S; Gross, Cary P

    2014-05-01

    As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. This process, however, may underestimate the acute care needs of patients after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or operative procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1 per 1,000 discharges (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8 per 1,000 discharges (95% confidence interval 31.6-32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median = 1.0/1,000 discharges [25th-75th percentile = 1.0-2.0]), whereas substantial variation existed in adjusted, hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0-39.0]). Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory care at surgery centers, hospital transfer at time of discharge from the ambulatory care center is a rare event. In contrast, the rate of need for hospital-based, acute care in the first week afterwards is nearly 30-fold greater, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  10. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  11. Health professional perspectives on lifestyle behaviour change in the paediatric hospital setting: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Laura; Powell, Jane; Wordsworth, Sharon; Cummins, Carole

    2014-03-13

    Research exists examining the challenges of delivering lifestyle behaviour change initiatives in practice. However, at present much of this research has been conducted with primary care health professionals, or in acute adult hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators associated with implementing routine lifestyle behaviour change brief advice into practice in an acute children's hospital. Thirty-three health professionals (nurses, junior doctors, allied health professionals and clinical support staff) from inpatient and outpatient departments at a UK children's hospital were interviewed about their attitudes and beliefs towards supporting lifestyle behaviour change in hospital patients and their families. Responses were analysed using thematic framework analysis. Health professionals identified a range of barriers and facilitators to supporting lifestyle behaviour change in a children's hospital. These included (1) personal experience of effectiveness, (2) constraints associated with the hospital environment, (3) appropriateness of advice delivery given the patient's condition and care pathway and (4) job role priorities, and (5) perceived benefits of the advice given. Delivery of lifestyle behaviour change advice was often seen as an educational activity, rather than a behaviour change activity. Factors underpinning the successful delivery of routine lifestyle behaviour change support must be understood if this is to be implemented effectively in paediatric acute settings. This study reveals key areas where paediatric health professionals may need further support and training to achieve successful implementation.

  12. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Reshetko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  13. ANALYSIS OF PRE-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Reshetko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the pre-hospital treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina in 2001 and 2006.Material and methods. Retrospective pre-hospital treatment survey was performed in 1114 patients with acute coronary syndrome (acute myocardial infarction (AMI or unstable angina (UA in 2001 and 2006.Results. For acute myocardial infarction use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin was 0%, 0%, 81,5% in 2001 and 23,9%, 8%, 13,4% in 2006, respectively. Use of aspirin, β-blockers, heparin in unstable angina were 0%, 16,2%, 12,3% in 2001 and 3,4%, 1,6%, 0,5% in 2006, respectively. Fibrinolytic therapy was not provided. Polypragmasia reduced in 2006 in comparison with 2001.Conclusions. This survey demonstrates the discordance between existing current practice and guidelines for acute coronary syndrome.

  14. Acute IPPS - Disproportionate Share Hospital - DSH

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — There are two methods for a hospital to qualify for the Medicare DSH adjustment. The primary method is for a hospital to qualify based on a statutory formula that...

  15. Acute Perforated Peptic Ulcer at El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The pattern of peptic ulcer disease and its complications has changed during the last two to three decades. Objectives: To state the frequency of acute peptic ulcer perforations and outcomes of their management at El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan. Materials and Methods: This is an audit of patients with acute ...

  16. Nurse odor perception in various Japanese hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Horiguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Because unpleasant hospital odors affect the nursing environment, we investigated nurses' perceptions of the odors of various hospital settings: hospital rooms, nurse stations, and human waste disposal rooms to discard the urine, stools and diapers. A questionnaire based on the Japanese Ministry of the Environment's guidelines on odor index regulation was used to assess nurses' perceptions of odor intensity, comfort, tolerability, and description in the aforementioned settings. Questionnaires were distributed to nursing department directors at three Japanese hospitals, who then disseminated the questionnaires to nursing staff. Of the 1,151 questionnaires distributed, 496 nurses participated. Human waste disposal rooms had greater odor intensity and were perceived as more uncomfortable than the other settings. Unpleasant odors in disposal rooms, hospital rooms, and nurse stations were rated as slightly intolerable in comparison. Hospital and disposal rooms were mainly described as having a “pungent odor such as of urine and stool.” In contrast, nurse stations were described as having other unpleasant odors, such as chemical, human-body-related, or sewage-like odors. Given that nurses spend much of their time in hospital rooms and nurse stations, odor management in these two settings would likely improve nurses' working conditions at hospitals. Improving odors at nurse stations is feasible. Such improvements could have indirect effects on nurse turnover and burnout.

  17. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., 485, and 489 RIN 0938-AP80; RIN 0938-AP33 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY...: Correction of final rules and interim final rule with comment period. SUMMARY: This document corrects...

  18. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Annmarie T; Jørgensen, Henrik; Jørsboe, Hanne Blæhr; Odby, Annette; Brabrand, Mikkel; Steinmetz, Jacob; Mackenhauer, Julie; Kirkegaard, Hans; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013. The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators - of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery) as well as time for triage and physician judgment. Data are currently gathered from The Danish National Patient Registry, two existing databases (Danish Stroke Register and Danish Database for Emergency Surgery), and will eventually include data from the local and regional clinical logistic systems. The DDAEHC also includes age, sex, Charlson Comorbidity Index conditions, civil status, residency, and discharge diagnoses. The DDAEHC expects to include 1.7 million acute and emergency contacts per year. The DDAEHC is a new database established by the Danish Regions including all acute and emergency hospital contacts in Denmark. The database includes specific outcome and process health care quality indicators as well as demographic and other basic information with the purpose to be used for enhancement of quality of acute care.

  19. Implementing managed alcohol programs in hospital settings: A review of academic and grey literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Hannah L; Kassam, Shehzad; Salvalaggio, Ginetta; Hyshka, Elaine

    2018-01-18

    People with severe alcohol use disorders are at increased risk of poor acute-care outcomes, in part due to difficulties maintaining abstinence from alcohol while hospitalised. Managed alcohol programs (MAP), which administer controlled doses of beverage alcohol to prevent withdrawal and stabilise drinking patterns, are one strategy for increasing adherence to treatment, and improving health outcomes for hospital inpatients with severe alcohol use disorders. Minimal research has examined the implementation of MAPs in hospital settings. We conducted a scoping review to describe extant literature on MAPs in community settings, as well as the therapeutic provision of alcohol to hospital inpatients, to assess the feasibility of implementing formal MAPs in hospital settings and identify knowledge gaps requiring further study. Four academic and 10 grey literature databases were searched. Evidence was synthesised using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Forty-two studies met review inclusion criteria. Twenty-eight examined the administration of alcohol to hospital inpatients, with most reporting positive outcomes related to prevention or treatment of alcohol withdrawal. Fourteen studies examined MAPs in the community and reported that they help stabilise drinking patterns, reduce alcohol-related harms and facilitate non-judgemental health and social care. MAPs in the community have been well described and research has documented effective provision of alcohol in hospital settings for addressing withdrawal. Implementing MAPs as a harm reduction approach in hospital settings is potentially feasible. However, there remains a need to build off extant literature and develop and evaluate standardised MAP protocols tailored to acute-care settings. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  20. The Comfort Measures Order Set at a Tertiary Care Academic Hospital: Is There a Comparable Difference in End-of-Life Care Between Patients Dying in Acute Care When CMOS Is Utilized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Christine; Stilos, Kalli; Nowell, Allyson; Lau, Fanchea; Moore, Jennifer; Wynnychuk, Lesia

    2017-10-05

    Standardized protocols have been previously shown to be helpful in managing end-of-life (EOL) care in hospital. The comfort measures order set (CMOS), a standardized framework for assessing imminently dying patients' symptoms and needs, was implemented at a tertiary academic hospital. We assessed whether there were comparable differences in the care of a dying patient when the CMOS was utilized and when it was not. A retrospective chart review was completed on patients admitted under oncology and general internal medicine, who were referred to the inpatient palliative care team for "EOL care" between February 2015 and March 2016. Of 83 patients, 56 (67%) received intiation of the CMOS and 27 (33%) did not for EOL care. There was significant involvement of spiritual care with the CMOS (66%), as compared to the group without CMOS (19%), P care, which was significantly less than the number of symptom management adjustments per patient when CMOS was not used (3.3), P care and assessment across the organization is still required.

  1. Patient safety climate and worker safety behaviours in acute hospitals in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Cakil; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn

    2013-06-01

    To obtain a measure of hospital safety climate from a sample of National Health Service (NHS) acute hospitals in Scotland and to test whether these scores were associated with worker safety behaviors, and patient and worker injuries. Data were from 1,866 NHS clinical staff in six Scottish acute hospitals. A Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire measured hospital safety climate (Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture), worker safety behaviors, and worker and patient injuries. The associations between the hospital safety climate scores and the outcome measures (safety behaviors, worker and patient injury rates) were examined. Hospital safety climate scores were significantly correlated with clinical workers' safety behavior and patient and worker injury measures, although the effect sizes were smaller for the latter. Regression analyses revealed that perceptions of staffing levels and managerial commitment were significant predictors for all the safety outcome measures. Both patient-specific and more generic safety climate items were found to have significant impacts on safety outcome measures. This study demonstrated the influences of different aspects of hospital safety climate on both patient and worker safety outcomes. Moreover, it has been shown that in a hospital setting, a safety climate supporting safer patient care would also help to ensure worker safety. The Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire has proved to be a usable method of measuring both hospital safety climate as well as patient and worker safety outcomes. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Annmarie T; Jørgensen, Henrik; Jørsboe, Hanne Blæhr

    2016-01-01

    to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery) as well as time......AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute...... and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013. MAIN VARIABLES: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators - of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used...

  3. SARS and hospital priority setting: a qualitative case study and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upshur Ross EG

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Priority setting is one of the most difficult issues facing hospitals because of funding restrictions and changing patient need. A deadly communicable disease outbreak, such as the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS in Toronto in 2003, amplifies the difficulties of hospital priority setting. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting in a hospital in response to SARS using the ethical framework 'accountability for reasonableness'. Methods This study was conducted at a large tertiary hospital in Toronto, Canada. There were two data sources: 1 over 200 key documents (e.g. emails, bulletins, and 2 35 interviews with key informants. Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation. Results Participants described the types of priority setting decisions, the decision making process and the reasoning used. Although the hospital leadership made an effort to meet the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness', they acknowledged that the decision making was not ideal. We described good practices and opportunities for improvement. Conclusions 'Accountability for reasonableness' is a framework that can be used to guide fair priority setting in health care organizations, such as hospitals. In the midst of a crisis such as SARS where guidance is incomplete, consequences uncertain, and information constantly changing, where hour-by-hour decisions involve life and death, fairness is more important rather than less.

  4. Acute stress impairs set-shifting but not reversal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, K A; Floresco, S B; Phillips, A G

    2013-09-01

    The ability to update and modify previously learned behavioral responses in a changing environment is essential for successful utilization of promising opportunities and for coping with adverse events. Valid models of cognitive flexibility that contribute to behavioral flexibility include set-shifting and reversal learning. One immediate effect of acute stress is the selective impairment of performance on higher-order cognitive control tasks mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not the hippocampus. Previous studies show that the mPFC is required for set-shifting but not for reversal learning, therefore the aim of the present experiment is to assess whether exposure to acute stress (15 min of mild tail-pinch stress) given immediately before testing on either a set-shifting or reversal learning tasks would impair performance selectively on the set-shifting task. An automated operant chamber-based task, confirmed that exposure to acute stress significantly disrupts set-shifting but has no effect on reversal learning. Rats exposed to an acute stressor require significantly more trials to reach criterion and make significantly more perseverative errors. Thus, these data reveal that an immediate effect of acute stress is to impair mPFC-dependent cognition selectively by disrupting the ability to inhibit the use of a previously relevant cognitive strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute poisoning in a children's hospital: a 2-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazen, L E; Lovejoy, F H; Crone, R K

    1986-02-01

    In a 2-year retrospective review, 90 patients were treated in a children's hospital for acute overdoses. In 90%, the history was the most important indicator of poisoning. On physical examination, 64% of patients were found to have altered sensorium, and 69% of cases were confirmed with a routine qualitative toxicology screening test. Accidental overdoses were most frequently due to ingestion of petroleum distillates, digoxin, carbamazepine, and theophylline. Suicidal patients ingested alcohol, barbiturates, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and aspirin. The majority of children with accidental overdoses received medical attention within 2 hours, but suicidal patients presented significantly later. Appropriate treatment with gastric lavage or emesis was used for 85% of patients on an emergency basis prior to admission. The inpatient therapy is based on continued gastrointestinal decontamination, basic organ system support, and monitoring for toxic effects and complications of therapy. Specific antidotes were available for only 10% of patients. In this study, 50% of patients were able to be discharged to their homes after one day of hospitalization. Pediatric patients treated in the intensive care unit incur less morbidity than adults in a similar setting. Adolescents who attempt suicide and are treated in the intensive care unit are likely to take prescription drugs in a similar manner as their adult counterparts.

  6. Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Trajectories Surrounding Acute Hospitalization of Long-stay Nursing Home Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Robin L.; Petroski, Gregory F.; Mehr, David R.; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Intrator, Orna

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To explore patterns of change in nursing home residents’ activities of daily living (ADLs), particularly surrounding acute hospital stays. DESIGN Longitudinal study using Medicare and Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments SETTING National sample of long-stay nursing home residents PARTICIPANTS We identified 40,128 residents who were hospitalized for the seven most common inpatient diagnoses. Each hospital admission was at least 90 days after any prior hospitalization and had at least two preceding MDS assessments. MEASUREMENTS We represented residents’ ADL function with the MDS ADL-Long form score, a simple sum of seven self-care variables coded from 0 (independent) to 4 (totally dependent). Scores ranged from 0 to 28; higher scores indicated greater impairment. We jointly estimated a linear mixed model describing ADL trajectories with mortality and hospital readmission. RESULTS Before hospitalization, the most common trajectory represented stability (53.7%), with 27.5% of residents worsening and 18.8% improving. ADL function after hospital discharge was most often characterized by stability (43.1%) or worsening (39.2%). Mortality (20.3%) was higher for those with worsening pre-hospital ADL function (28.9%) compared to those with stable (19.1%) or improving (11.3%) trajectories. Hospital diagnosis was associated with both the amount of ADL worsening and the rate of subsequent ADL change. Most residents with the best initial function continued to worsen after hospital discharge. Cognitive impairment was associated with poorer ADL function and accelerated worsening of ADLs. CONCLUSION For many long-stay nursing home residents acute hospitalization is accompanied by substantial and sustained ADL worsening. Thus, acute hospitalization presents an opportunity to revisit care goals; our results can help inform decision-making. PMID:24219192

  7. Variability of patient safety culture in Belgian acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Schrooten, Ward; Wami, Welcome; Aerts, Marc; Barrado, Leandro Garcia; Claes, Neree; Hellings, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to measure differences in safety culture perceptions within Belgian acute hospitals and to examine variability based on language, work area, staff position, and work experience. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed to hospitals participating in the national quality and safety program (2007-2009). Hospitals were invited to participate in a comparative study. Data of 47,136 respondents from 89 acute hospitals were used for quantitative analysis. Percentages of positive response were calculated on 12 dimensions. Generalized estimating equations models were fitted to explore differences in safety culture. Handoffs and transitions, staffing, and management support for patient safety were considered as major problem areas. Dutch-speaking hospitals had higher odds of positive perceptions for most dimensions in comparison with French-speaking hospitals. Safety culture scores were more positive for respondents working in pediatrics, psychiatry, and rehabilitation compared with the emergency department, operating theater, and multiple hospital units. We found an important gap in safety culture perceptions between leaders and assistants within disciplines. Administration and middle management had lower perceptions toward patient safety. Respondents working less than 1 year in the current hospital had more positive safety culture perceptions in comparison with all other respondents. Large comparative databases provide the opportunity to identify distinct high and low scoring groups. In our study, language, work area, and profession were identified as important safety culture predictors. Years of experience in the hospital had only a small effect on safety culture perceptions.

  8. Studying Physician-Patient Communication in the Acute Care Setting: The Hospitalist Rapport Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wendy G.; Winters, Kathryn; Arnold, Robert M.; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; White, Douglas B.; Auerbach, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of studying physician-patient communication in the acute care setting. Methods We recruited hospitalist physicians and patients from two hospitals within a university system and audio-recorded their first encounter. Recruitment, data collection, and challenges encountered were tracked. Results Thirty-two physicians consented (rate 91%). Between August 2008 and March 2009, 441 patients were referred, 210 (48%) were screened, and 119 (66% of 179 eligible) consented. We audio-recorded encounters of 80 patients with 27 physicians. Physicians’ primary concern about participation was interference with their workflow. Addressing their concerns and building the protocol around their schedules facilitated participation. Challenges unique to the acute care setting were: 1) extremely limited time for patient identification, screening, and enrollment during which patients were ill and busy with clinical care activities, and 2) little advance knowledge of when physician-patient encounters would occur. Employing a full-time study coordinator mitigated these challenges. Conclusion Physician concerns for participating in communication studies are similar in ambulatory and acute care settings. The acute care setting presents novel challenges for patient recruitment and data collection. Practice Implications These methods should be used to study provider-patient communication in acute care settings. Future work should test strategies to increase patient enrollment. PMID:20444569

  9. The European quality of care pathways (EQCP study on the impact of care pathways on interprofessional teamwork in an acute hospital setting: study protocol: for a cluster randomised controlled trial and evaluation of implementation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deneckere Svin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although care pathways are often said to promote teamwork, high-level evidence that supports this statement is lacking. Furthermore, knowledge on conditions and facilitators for successful pathway implementation is scarce. The objective of the European Quality of Care Pathway (EQCP study is therefore to study the impact of care pathways on interprofessional teamwork and to build up understanding on the implementation process. Methods/design An international post-test-only cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (cRCT, combined with process evaluations, will be performed in Belgium, Ireland, Italy, and Portugal. Teams caring for proximal femur fracture (PFF patients and patients hospitalized with an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD will be randomised into an intervention and control group. The intervention group will implement a care pathway for PFF or COPD containing three active components: a formative evaluation of the actual teams’ performance, a set of evidence-based key interventions, and a training in care pathway-development. The control group will provide usual care. A set of team input, process and output indicators will be used as effect measures. The main outcome indicator will be relational coordination. Next to these, process measures during and after pathway development will be used to evaluate the implementation processes. In total, 132 teams have agreed to participate, of which 68 were randomly assigned to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Based on power analysis, a sample of 475 team members per arm is required. To analyze results, multilevel analysis will be performed. Discussion Results from our study will enhance understanding on the active components of care pathways. Through this, preferred implementation strategies can be defined. Trail registration NCT01435538

  10. Variability in antibiotic use across Ontario acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlie; Vermeulen, Marian; Wang, Xuesong; Zvonar, Rosemary; Garber, Gary; Daneman, Nick

    2017-02-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is a required organizational practice for Canadian acute care hospitals, yet data are scarce regarding the quantity and composition of antibiotic use across facilities. We sought to examine the variability, and risk-adjusted variability, in antibiotic use across acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada's most populous province. Antibiotic purchasing data from IMS Health, previously demonstrated to correlate strongly with internal antibiotic dispensing data, were acquired for 129 Ontario hospitals from January to December 2014 and linked to patient day (PD) denominator data from administrative datasets. Hospital variation in DDDs/1000 PDs was determined for overall antibiotic use, class-specific use and six practices of clinical or ecological significance. Multivariable risk adjustment for hospital and patient characteristics was used to compare observed versus expected utilization. There was 7.4-fold variability in the quantity of antibiotic use across the 129 acute care hospitals, from 253 to 1873 DDDs/1000 PDs. Variation was evident within hospital subtypes, exceeded that explained by hospital and patient characteristics, and included wide variability in proportion of broad-spectrum antibiotics (IQR 36%-48%), proportion of fluoroquinolones among respiratory antibiotics (IQR 40%-62%), proportion of ciprofloxacin among urinary anti-infectives (IQR 44%-60%), proportion of antibiotics with highest risk for Clostridium difficile (IQR 29%-40%), proportion of 'reserved-use' antibiotics (IQR 0.8%-3.5%) and proportion of anti-pseudomonal antibiotics among antibiotics with Gram-negative coverage (IQR 26%-40%). There is extensive variability in antibiotic use, and risk-adjusted use, across acute care hospitals. This could motivate, focus and benchmark antibiotic stewardship efforts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  11. [Acute pyelonephritis treated under "home hospitalization." Ten years' experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, José; Mendoza, Humberto; Aizpuru, Felipe; Altuna, Elena; Gómez, Montserrat; Cía, Juan M

    2006-12-01

    We present the experience of the Vitoria-Gasteiz Hospital at Home Unit in the treatment of acute pyelonephritis, including an analysis of potential predictors of failure. A total of 369 episodes of acute pyelonephritis without septic shock or renoureteral obstruction are described. After initiating intravenous antibiotic therapy in the hospital emergency department, all patients were referred to the HH. We analyzed the characteristics of the cases and the relationship between several clinical factors and failure of HH care, defined as the need to readmit the patient to conventional hospitalization. During the study period, 280 women and 89 men (age 16-88 years) met the inclusion criteria. Mean length of HH stay was 5 days and duration of intravenous therapy was 3 days. Sixteen of the 369 cases (4%) had to be readmitted to the hospital because of hypotension, vomiting, pain, fever, or signs of obstruction on ultrasound or because they requested it (four patients). Patients who were readmitted had a higher maximum temperature (mean 39.4 vs. 38.7 degrees C; p = 0.006) than those who remained at the HH. There were no differences between the groups with respect to the other clinical variables studied. The evolution of all 16 hospitalized patients was favorable; only one required a urological intervention. Hospital at home care was an effective alternative for managing acute pyelonephritis without shock in 96% of cases referred by the emergency department, and obviated conventional hospital admission, which is usually indicated for this disease.

  12. Therapy of Acute Hypertension in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tennille N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypertension (HTN) in hospitalized children and adolescents occurs relatively frequently and in some cases, if not recognized and treated promptly, it can lead to hypertensive crisis with potentially significant morbidity and mortality. In contrast to adults, where acute HTN is most likely due to uncontrolled primary HTN, children and adolescents with acute HTN are more likely to have secondary HTN. This review will briefly cover evaluation of acute HTN and various age specific etiologies of secondary HTN and provide more in-depth discussion on treatment target, potential risks of acute HTN therapy, available pediatric data on intravenous and oral antihypertensive agents, and propose treatment schema including unique therapy of specific secondary HTN scenarios. PMID:24522943

  13. Unplanned Hospital Visits - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Unplanned Hospital Visits – provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hospital return days (or excess days in acute care) measures, the unplanned...

  14. Music in a Hospital Setting: A Multifaceted Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Costanza; Welch, Graham F.

    2004-01-01

    The article offers an explanation of the effects of music on children within a hospital setting and points up the multifaceted nature of this experience. The nature of the client group allows the musical experience to work on many different levels, such as modifying the child's perception of pain and reducing stress, whilst at the same time having…

  15. Demographic study of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a hospital setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To highlight demographic pattern of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and determine mode and stage of presentation. Design: Prospective analytical study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH)/University of Nairobi, Kenya. Subjects: One hundred and twenty five patients seen at the ENT department of KNH.

  16. Computerized Testing in a Hospital Setting: Psychometric and Psychological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Leif; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This Swedish study sought to evaluate a touch-screen computer-based (CB) test administration system in a hospital setting in comparison with paper-and-pencil administrative routine. Patients were given psychometric tests (involving depression, mood, and intelligence measurement) in both formats. Patient pleasantness, activation, and calmness were…

  17. Rocket grenade injuries: patient management in a field hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedeman, J E

    1994-01-01

    An incident involving RPG-7 (rocket grenade) injuries was managed in a field hospital in the Middle East. Used by guerrilla forces worldwide, the RPG-7 is exemplary of military weapons that produce extensive fragment-related wounds and associated blast effects. The active duty or reserve military physician must be prepared to diagnose and treat such injuries in a remote setting.

  18. The effects of massage therapy on pain management in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rose; White, Barb; Beckett, Cynthia

    2010-03-17

    Pain management remains a critical issue for hospitals and is receiving the attention of hospital accreditation organizations. The acute care setting of the hospital provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of massage therapy for pain management into the team-centered approach of patient care. This preliminary study evaluated the effect of the use of massage therapy on inpatient pain levels in the acute care setting. The study was conducted at Flagstaff Medical Center in Flagstaff, Arizona-a nonprofit community hospital serving a large rural area of northern Arizona. A convenience sample was used to identify research participants. Pain levels before and after massage therapy were recorded using a 0 - 10 visual analog scale. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used for analysis of this descriptive study. Hospital inpatients (n = 53) from medical, surgical, and obstetrics units participated in the current research by each receiving one or more massage therapy sessions averaging 30 minutes each. The number of sessions received depended on the length of the hospital stay. Before massage, the mean pain level recorded by the patients was 5.18 [standard deviation (SD): 2.01]. After massage, the mean pain level was 2.33 (SD: 2.10). The observed reduction in pain was statistically significant: paired samples t(52) = 12.43, r = .67, d = 1.38, p Qualitative data illustrated improvement in all areas, with the most significant areas of impact reported being overall pain level, emotional well-being, relaxation, and ability to sleep. This study shows that integration of massage therapy into the acute care setting creates overall positive results in the patient's ability to deal with the challenging physical and psychological aspects of their health condition. The study demonstrated not only significant reduction in pain levels, but also the interrelatedness of pain, relaxation, sleep, emotions, recovery, and finally, the healing process.

  19. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both unadjusted and adjusted time to event analyses, patients with pneumonia + acute kidney injury

  20. Basic clinical characteristics and hospital outcomes of acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Acute coronary syndrome patients were younger and had more complications than others in the West. ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients are more likely to develop in-hospital complications and to receive reperfusion therapy. The limitation of the study is the lack of follow-up information after ...

  1. Acute kidney injury in a teaching hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Balushi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the incidence, etiology and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI at a teaching hospital in Oman, we studied all adult cases that developed AKI at our hospital from July 2006 to June 2007. Data from the hospital information system (HIS for all adult admissions in the wards and intensive care units for the study period were obtained, and included baseline serum creatinine, serum creatinine on the day of diagnosis, peak serum creatinine, urine output in the last six and 12 hours at the time of diagnosis, etiology of acute renal failure, presence of any co-morbid conditions, and renal replacement therapy and outcome. Of the 19,738 adult admissions, there were 108 episodes of AKI in 100 patients. The incidence of acute renal failure was 0.54%. The etiology of AKI was pre-renal in 55 (50.9%, obstructive in 5 (4.6% and acute tubular necrosis (ATN in the remaining 48 (44.4% patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT was required in 24.1% of cases. Of the patients who developed AKI, 36 (33.33% died during same hospital admission, 37 (34.26% recovered to discharge with no renal impairment, 32 (29.63% recovered with residual renal impairment and 2 (1.85% recovered with dialysis dependence.

  2. Restraint use in acute and critical care settings: changing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Beth

    2002-05-01

    Reduction of physical restraint use in the acute and critical care setting is a complex issue. Ethical considerations, regulatory and professional standards, legal liability concerns, healthcare team members' knowledge and attitudes, and unit culture and practice traditions must all be considered. Restraint reduction programs may use a process improvement format that engages the support of the organization's leadership. Specific interventions for restraint reduction, such as understanding the meaning of a patient's behavior, using a team approach, and involving the family can be evaluated and modified for application in the acute and critical care setting. Successful initiatives to decrease the use of restraint in this setting require an understanding of the many factors that support and oppose this practice.

  3. Quality indicators for integrated care of dysphagia in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Danielle Pedroni; Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim de

    2011-03-01

    This article proposes a panel of quality indicators for the management of swallowing rehabilitation (SR) therapy in a hospital setting. There were four stages in developing these indicators: identifying procedures to be managed; generating indicators and standardizing data collection; identifying the correlation among indicators; and formulating the panel of indicators. The following 12 quality indicators were developed: swallowing evaluation index; individual care index; speech-language pathologist (SLP) care index; number of assisted patients index; severity rate; swallowing diagnosis rate per hospital unit; swallowing rehabilitation demand index; time until first swallowing evaluation; SLP index per hospital bed; time until removal of feeding tube; time until reintroduction of oral feeding; and time until decannulation. The proposed indicators were designed to improve the management of dysphagia in a hospital setting. Measuring these indicators is essential to understanding the patient's needs and providing quality care. Managing care using these indicators will make it easier to track the patient's rehabilitation process, measure the effectiveness of new therapeutic processes and technologies, and evaluate the performance of hospital units relative to other providers in the area. The management of SR using quality indicators allows the effectiveness and efficiency of rehabilitation programs to be clearly evaluated.

  4. C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement in geriatric patients hospitalized for acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Lauretani, Fulvio; Nouvenne, Antonio; Porro, Emanuela; Fanelli, Guido; Maggio, Marcello; Meschi, Tiziana

    2017-01-01

    The physiology of inflammatory response is modified by the aging process and is substantially affected by multimorbidity and disability. Infection is the most frequent cause of acute inflammation in both adult and older subjects. C-reactive protein (CRP) is the most used biomarker of inflammation, and a substantial amount of literature has demonstrated its importance and clinical usefulness in adult subjects. However, the clinical significance of serum CRP determination has not been completely clarified in older subjects with acute infection, especially in the light of the age-related rearrangements in immunity and cytokine production. Thus, in the present review, we focus on the existing knowledge about serum CRP level interpretation in geriatric patients hospitalized with acute infection. Our aims were to determine the significance of CRP measurement at hospital admission for establishing a diagnosis of infection and/or a prognosis and to evaluate whether it is indicated to repeat hs-CRP measurements during hospital stay for monitoring disease course and, possibly, guiding the discharge timing. We concluded that CRP dosage at hospital admission is helpful to detect acute infection, and particularly sepsis, in geriatric patients, and that CRP elevation may provide valuable short-term prognostic information. At the current state of art, serial CRP measurements are instead not indicated to monitor disease course and plan hospital discharge in this setting. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A PERIPHERAL TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Karunahara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES Acute pancreatitis (AP is one of the most common diseases in gastroenterology. Two percent of all patients admitted to hospital are diagnosed with AP. During the last decade, an increasing incidence was observed, mostly because of a higher sensitivity of diagnostic tests. Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis is still symptomatic and no specific medication is available today. As a result of popular belief that the pancreas should be put to rest during acute pancreatitis, the parenteral route for nutrition is still predominantly used in Acute Pancreatitis. There has been increasing evidence; however, about gut being main source of microorganisms causing infectious pancreatic complications and multiorgan failure. In patients with severe pancreatitis, oral intake is inhibited by nausea and subileus. Although some reports show that enteral feeding is possible in acute pancreatitis and associated with fewer septic complications. Although the evidence is inconclusive to support enteral nutrition in all patients with severe acute pancreatitis, the enteral route may be used if tolerated. Supportive treatment is the most important line of management in acute pancreatitis. The aim is to study the management of acute pancreatitis in a peripheral tertiary hospital and to assess the outcome of the management. METHODS & MATERIALS Data Collection: Patients with acute abdominal pain are admitted in hospital and diagnosed as acute pancreatitis based on blood investigations and radiological findings. Patients categorised- Revised Atlanta Classification. Different medical management modes followed and outcomes recorded, tabulated and analysed. Research Design: Retrospective study. Research Settings: Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Government Hospital, Trichy, Tamilnadu. Duration: 5 yrs. (2010-2015 Sample Size: 186. Inclusion Criteria: Patients between 12 and 75 yrs. of age, patients admitted to the hospital as a case of acute pancreatitis, both sexes

  6. The costs of acute readmissions to a different hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Kongstad, Line Planck

    2017-01-01

    data set covering inpatient stays in the period 2008–2010. We exploit the fact that some patients are readmitted within the same DRG and that some of these readmissions occur at different hospitals in a propensity score difference-in-difference design. The estimates are based on a restricted sample....... If teaching hospitals are not compensated for the additional costs of treating different-hospital readmission patients, they might be unfairly funded under a DRG-based payment scheme....

  7. Implementation of the integrated palliative care outcome scale in acute care settings - a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Susanne; Sandberg, J; Brytting, T; Fürst, C J; Wallin, L

    2018-01-21

    Although hospitals have been described as inadequate place for end-of-life care, many deaths still occur in hospital settings. Although patient-reported outcome measures have shown positive effects for patients in need of palliative care, little is known about how to implement them. We aimed to explore the feasibility of a pilot version of an implementation strategy for the Integrated Palliative care Outcome Scale (IPOS) in acute care settings. A strategy, including information, training, and facilitation to support the use of IPOS, was developed and carried out at three acute care units. For an even broader understanding of the strategy, it was also tested at a palliative care unit. A process evaluation was conducted including collecting quantitative data and performing interviews with healthcare professionals. Result Factors related to the design and performance of the strategy and the context contributed to the results. The prevalence of completed IPOS in the patient's records varied from 6% to 44% in the acute care settings. At the palliative care unit, the prevalence in the inpatient unit was 53% and the specialized home care team 35%. The qualitative results showed opposing perspectives concerning the training provided: Related to everyday work at the acute care units and Nothing in it for us at the palliative care unit. In the acute care settings, A need for an improved culture regarding palliative care was identified. A context characterized by A constantly increasing workload, a feeling of Constantly on-going changes, and a feeling of Change fatigue were found at all units. Furthermore, the internal facilitators and the nurse managers' involvement in the implementation differed between the units. Significance of the results The feasibility of the strategy in our study is considered to be questionable and the components need to be further explored to enhance the impact of the strategy and thereby improve the use of IPOS.

  8. Nurses' workarounds in acute healthcare settings: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, Deborah S; Greenfield, David; Travaglia, Joanne F; Long, Janet C; Black, Deborah; Johnson, Julie; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-05-11

    Workarounds circumvent or temporarily 'fix' perceived workflow hindrances to meet a goal or to achieve it more readily. Behaviours fitting the definition of workarounds often include violations, deviations, problem solving, improvisations, procedural failures and shortcuts. Clinicians implement workarounds in response to the complexity of delivering patient care. One imperative to understand workarounds lies in their influence on patient safety. This paper assesses the peer reviewed empirical evidence available on the use, proliferation, conceptualisation, rationalisation and perceived impact of nurses' use of workarounds in acute care settings. A literature assessment was undertaken in 2011-2012. Snowballing technique, reference tracking, and a systematic search of twelve academic databases were conducted to identify peer reviewed published studies in acute care settings examining nurses' workarounds. Selection criteria were applied across three phases. 58 studies were included in the final analysis and synthesis. Using an analytic frame, these studies were interrogated for: workarounds implemented in acute care settings by nurses; factors contributing to the development and proliferation of workarounds; the perceived impact of workarounds; and empirical evidence of nurses' conceptualisation and rationalisation of workarounds. The majority of studies examining nurses' workarounds have been published since 2008, predominantly in the United States. Studies conducted across a variety of acute care settings use diverse data collection methods. Nurses' workarounds, primarily perceived negatively, are both individually and collectively enacted. Organisational, work process, patient-related, individual, social and professional factors contribute to the proliferation of workarounds. Group norms, local and organisational culture, 'being competent', and collegiality influence the implementation of workarounds. Workarounds enable, yet potentially compromise, the execution of

  9. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  10. Smoking restrictions and hospitalization for acute coronary events in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James D.; Demidenko, Eugene; Malenka, David J.; Li, Zhongze; Gohlke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of smoking restrictions in Germany on coronary syndromes and their associated costs. Methods and results All German states implemented laws partially restricting smoking in the public and hospitality sectors between August 2007 and July 2008. We conducted a before-and-after study to examine trends for the hospitalization rate for angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) for an insurance cohort of 3,700,384 individuals 30 years and older. Outcome measures were hospitalization rates for coronary syndromes, and hospitalization costs. Mean age of the cohort was 56 years, and two-thirds were female. Some 2.2 and 1.1% persons were hospitalized for angina pectoris and AMI, respectively, during the study period from January 2004 through December 2008. Law implementation was associated with a 13.3% (95% confidence interval 8.2, 18.4) decline in angina pectoris and an 8.6% (5.0, 12.2) decline in AMI after 1 year. Hospitalization costs also decreased significantly for the two conditions—9.6% (2.5, 16.6) for angina pectoris and 20.1% (16.0, 24.2) for AMI at 1 year following law implementation. Assuming the law caused the observed declines, it prevented 1,880 hospitalizations and saved 7.7 million Euros in costs for this cohort during the year following law implementation. Conclusions Partial smoking restrictions in Germany were followed by reductions in hospitalization for angina pectoris and AMI, declines that continued through 1 year following these laws and resulted in substantial cost savings. Strengthening the laws could further reduce morbidity and costs from acute coronary syndromes in Germany. PMID:22350716

  11. Hospital Medicine (Part 1): what is wrong with acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    Modern hospitals are facing several challenges and, over the last decade in particular, many of these institutions have become dysfunctional. Paradoxically as medicine has become more successful the demand for acute hospital care has increased, yet there is no consensus on what conditions or complaints require hospital admission and there is wide variation in the mortality rates, length of stay and possibly standards of care between different units. Most acutely ill patients are elderly and instead of one straightforward diagnosis are more likely to have a complex combination of multiple co-morbid conditions. Any elderly patient admitted to hospital is at considerable risk which must be balanced against the possible benefits. Although most of the patients in hospital die from only approximately ten diagnoses, obvious life saving treatment is often delayed by a junior doctor in-training first performing an exhaustive complete history and physical, and then ordering a number of investigations before consulting a senior colleague. Following this traditional hierarchy delays care with several "futile cycles" of clinical activity thoughtlessly directed at the patient without any benefit being delivered. If acute hospital medicine is to be improved changes in traditional assumptions, attitudes, beliefs and practices are needed.

  12. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  13. Antimicrobial Stewardship in Acute Care Centres: A Survey of 68 Hospitals in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Nault

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and quantitative monitoring of antimicrobial use are required to ensure that antimicrobials are used appropriately in the acute care setting, and have the potential to reduce costs and limit the spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms and Clostridium difficile. Currently, it is not known what proportion of Quebec hospitals have an ASP and/or monitor antimicrobial use.

  14. Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, A

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +\\/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +\\/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +\\/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +\\/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.

  15. Amplified hearing device use in acute care settings for patients with hearing loss: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Amber R; Roscigno, Cecelia I; Jenerette, Coretta M; Hughart, Kimberly M; Jenkins, Wendy W; Hsu, Wesley

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of using amplified hearing devices (AHD) in acute care settings for patients with hearing loss. Secondary objectives include patient and nurse satisfaction, and nursing perceived productivity. Twenty-five adult hard of hearing patients and 15 nurses were evaluated. Patients with a perceived hearing handicap were identified through the Hearing Handicap for the Elderly Screening Version. Patient and staff nurse surveys were used to assess for satisfaction with using the AHD. Nurses were surveyed to evaluate whether they felt the AHD made patient communication more efficient and effective. Twenty-four patients expressed satisfaction with the AHD and would use it in future hospitalizations. Nurses also reported satisfaction, perceived improvement of patient communication and decreased time spent communicating with patients. Results demonstrate the feasibility of using an AHD in acute care inpatient settings where elderly hard of hearing patients are common. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Acute mesenteric ischemia: experience in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Dildar; Sarfraz, Shahid Latif; Baliga, Suresh K; Hartung, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is an abdominal catastrophe. This has been described as a complex of diseases rather than a single clinical entity. The incidence in United States is 1 in 1000 hospital admissions. The objective of this descriptive study was to determine the clinical presentations and out come after surgery of patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. It was conducted at Dubai Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. All patients having per operative or histopathological diagnosis of acute mesenteric ischemia from 2002 to 2006 were included. There were 16 patients in all. Their mean age was 51 years, 12 were male and 4 were female. Abdominal pain was present in 16 patients, vomiting in 12 and anorexia in 9 patients. Abdominal tenderness was present in 16 patients, abdominal distension and rebound tenderness in 12 patients. Five patients had hypertension, 4 had myocardial infarction and 4 had diabetes mellitus as risk factors. X-Ray abdomen was done in 13 patients, Ultrasound in 9 and CT Scan in one patient. Resection of bowel was done in 14 patients. Post operatively 5 patients developed pneumonia, 3 had wound dehiscence, 3 had sepsis, and 3 had Lower GI bleeding. Five patients were expired after surgery in the hospital. Four patients were lost to follow up. We should have a high index of suspicion for mesenteric ischemia in patients with unexplained abdominal pain. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention improves the outcome.

  18. Factors associated with hospitalization of children with acute odontogenic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klačar Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the sociodemographic and clinical features of odontogenic infections between hospitalized and nonhospitalized children and to show what were the risk factors in children that could predict the course of odontogenic infection and indicate the need for hospital treatment. The design of our study was of the case-control type. The two study groups consisted of 70 inpatients and 35 outpatients with odontogenic infections who were treated at Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Clinical Center in Kragujevac, Serbia. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected retrospectively from patients' hospital records. The following characteristics were significantly associated with hospital treatment of children with acute odontogenic infection: living in a village (OR =7.26,[1.43-36.96], multi-spatial infection (OR =0.04, [0.00-0.91], and affection of upper face (OR = 0.01, [0.00-0.86]. Tooth extraction was important intervention in the treatment regimen and reduced frequency of hospitalization (OR=0.07, [0.01-0.70]. The differences between hospitalized and non-hospitalized children were not significant in regard to: ethnicity, employment of parents, anatomical region of infection, side of the facial infection, source of infection (posterior or anterior deciduous or permanent teeth, and treatment (drainage and incision, oral or parenteral antibiotics. In children with acute odontogenic infection it is necessary to do tooth extraction in timely manner, especially if the source of infection is tooth from upper jaw and if it is multi-spatial infection.

  19. Ingestive Skill Difficulties are Frequent Among Acutely-Hospitalized Frail Elderly Patients, and Predict Hospital Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tina; Faber, Jens Oscar

    2012-01-01

    patients were frequent and characterized by great complexity. This necessitates a broad range of management strategies related to the patients’ ability in positioning, self-feeding skills, as well as oropharyngeal sensorimotor skills. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.3109/02703181.2012.736019......Purpose : To examine the relationship between ingestive skill performance while eating and drinking and frailty status in acutely-hospitalized elderly patients and to examine whether there is a relationship between the proportion of ingestive skill difficulties and Length of Hospital Stay (LOS......) and discharge destination. Methods : Frail (n = 64) and robust (n = 40) acutely-hospitalized elderly patients were assessed using The McGill Ingestive Skills Assessment. Results : Forty-three ingestive skills were significantly more affected in frail patients (21.9% to 95.3%) versus robust patients (2.5% to 65...

  20. Environmental qualities and patient wellbeing in hospital settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine

    2013-01-01

    undertaken by Architecture and Design and the Danish Building Research Institute (Aalborg University) set out in 2008 to review research on the impact of the environmental qualities of health-care facilities on patients and staff. The objective of the review team was to develop a tool that would allow......Within the last decades the impacts of the physical environments of hospitals on healing and health-care outcomes have been subject to ample research. The amount of documentation linking the design of physical environments to patient and staff outcomes is increasing. A Danish research project...

  1. Exploring narratives of psychological input in the acute inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghay-Spire, Eloise G; McGowan, John; Griffiths, Kim; Barazzone, Natalie

    2016-12-01

    This research explored what happens when psychological input is offered in the inpatient setting and examined service users' and staff members' understanding and portrayal of these experiences. Narrative analysis, an interview design, was used to examine experiences of inpatient psychological interventions in National Health Service inpatient mental health settings. Ten participants (four service users and six staff members; five males and five females; seven White British, one White Irish, one Black African, and one Black Caribbean) were recruited via clinical psychologists from an inpatient psychology department and participated in 18- to 90-min interviews. Evidence suggested that direct, indirect, and strategic psychological interventions were used in the inpatient setting, with formulation and the therapeutic relationship conceptualized as common features. Connections between inpatient psychology and change, evidenced in the stories, suggested that interventions can help people make sense of a crisis, improve relationships, and contribute to meaningful recovery. Evidence of barriers suggests that psychological input in this setting might not always be compatible with everyone's needs. This paper explored service users' and staff members' experiences of psychological input in the inpatient setting. The analysis revealed that psychological provision in the inpatient mental health setting is varied and encompasses direct and indirect input, valued by service users and clinicians. It also identified that psychological input in the acute inpatient mental health setting is perceived as meaningful and can lead to changes at an interpersonal and intrapersonal level. There is a sense that providing psychological thinking in the inpatient setting can be challenging due to environmental constraints and individual factors. This highlights the need for further research focused on the costs and clinical effectiveness of providing psychological thinking within the acute

  2. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennerby, Cathy; Joyce, Pauline

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children's hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about 'near misses', parental dissatisfaction, perceived competency weaknesses and rising cost associated with their use. [Young's (2009) Journal of Organisational Change, 22, 524-548] nine-stage change framework was used to guide the implementation of the competency assessment tool within a paediatric acute care setting. The ongoing success of the initiative, from a nurse manager's perspective, relies on structured communication with the agency provider before employing competent agency nurses. Sustainability of the change will depend on nurse managers' persistence in attending the concerns of those resisting the change while simultaneously supporting those championing the change. These key communication and supporting roles highlight the pivotal role held by nurse managers, as gate keepers, in safe-guarding children while in hospital. Leadership qualities of nurse managers will also be challenged in continuing to manage and drive the change where resistance might prevail. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Acute hospital dementia care: results from a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Suzanne; O'Shea, Emma; O'Neill, Desmond; Gallagher, Paul; de Siún, Anna; McArdle, Denise; Gibbons, Patricia; Kennelly, Sean

    2016-05-31

    Admission to an acute hospital can be distressing and disorientating for a person with dementia, and is associated with decline in cognitive and functional ability. The objective of this audit was to assess the quality of dementia care in acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. Across all 35 acute public hospitals, data was collected on care from admission through discharge using a retrospective chart review (n = 660), hospital organisation interview with senior management (n = 35), and ward level organisation interview with ward managers (n = 76). Inclusion criteria included a diagnosis of dementia, and a length of stay greater than 5 days. Most patients received physical assessments, including mobility (89 %), continence (84 %) and pressure sore risk (87 %); however assessment of pain (75 %), and particularly functioning (36 %) was poor. Assessment for cognition (43 %) and delirium (30 %) was inadequate. Most wards have access at least 5 days per week to Liaison Psychiatry (93 %), Geriatric Medicine (84 %), Occupational Therapy (79 %), Speech & Language (81 %), Physiotherapy (99 %), and Palliative Care (89 %) Access to Psychology (9 %), Social Work (53 %), and Continence services (34 %) is limited. Dementia awareness training is provided on induction in only 2 hospitals, and almost half of hospitals did not offer dementia training to doctors (45 %) or nurses (48 %) in the previous 12 months. Staff cover could not be provided on 62 % of wards for attending dementia training. Most wards (84 %) had no dementia champion to guide best practice in care. Discharge planning was not initiated within 24 h of admission in 72 % of cases, less than 40 % had a single plan for discharge recorded, and 33 % of carers received no needs assessment prior to discharge. Length of stay was significantly greater for new discharges to residential care (p < .001). Dementia care relating to assessment, access to certain specialist services

  4. Pre-hospital acute coronary syndrome care in Kerala, India: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amisha; Mohanan, P P; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Huffman, Mark D

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death in India. Many of these deaths are due to acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which require prompt symptom recognition, care-seeking behavior, and transport to a treatment facility in the critical pre-hospital period. In India, little is known about pre-hospital management of individuals with ACS. We aim to understand the facilitators, barriers, and context of optimal pre-hospital ACS care to provide opportunities to reduce pre-hospital delays and improve acute cardiovascular care. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 27 ACS providers in Kerala, India to understand facilitators, barriers, and context to pre-hospital ACS care. Six themes emerged from these interviews and discussions: (1) individuals with ACS misperceive their symptoms as non-cardiac in origin; (2) emergency medical services are infrequently used; (3) insufficient pre-hospital healthcare infrastructure contributes to pre-hospital delay; (4) multiple stops are made before arriving at a facility that can provide definitive diagnosis and treatment; (5) relatively high costs of treatment and lack of widespread health insurance coverage limits care delivery; and (6) novel mobile technologies may allow for faster diagnosis and initiation of treatment in the pre-hospital setting. Individualized patient-based factors (general knowledge of ACS symptoms, socioeconomic position) and broader systems-based factors (ambulance networks, coordination of transport) affect pre-hospital ACS care in Kerala. Improving public awareness of ACS symptoms, increasing appropriate use of emergency medical services, and building a infrastructure for rapid and coordinated transport may improve pre-hospital ACS care. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Identification of barriers that impede the implementation of nicotine replacement therapy in the acute cardiac care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Fiona C; Stocks, Nigel; Barton, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has been shown to increase 12-month abstinence rates by as much as 50% when compared with placebo; however, NRT seems to be underutilized in the acute cardiac setting. This study explores the attitudes and beliefs of healthcare professionals regarding the use of NRT in acute cardiac inpatients, in an effort to identify and expose barriers that may impede the use of this drug in the acute cardiac care environment. Framework analysis formed the methodological foundation of the study and provided the structure for analysis of data generated via qualitative, semistructured one-on-one interviews. A purposive sample of healthcare professionals practicing in the acute cardiac care setting informed the study. Although health care professionals expressed strong views regarding the benefits of implementing NRT as a smoking cessation intervention, barriers were identified that hinder its use. Financial implications, lack of knowledge and safety issues all contributed to the institutional justification for rejecting hospital-based NRT as a secondary prevention intervention in the acute cardiac setting. To proactively reduce the incidence of secondary cardiac events, education of healthcare professionals concerning tobacco addiction and available cessation treatments in the acute cardiac patient is paramount. Nicotine replacement products require further investigation to ascertain their safety and financial viability in the acute cardiac setting. Findings may support the implementation of NRT in the inpatient cardiac setting, and ultimately help curb the incidence of smoking-related mortality owing to secondary cardiac events.

  6. Comparing written programs and self-reported respiratory protection practices in acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sietsema, Margaret; Conroy, Lorraine M; Brosseau, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Airborne biological hazards in hospitals require the use of respiratory protection. A well-implemented respiratory protection program can protect health care workers from these exposures. This study examines the relationship between written respiratory programs and reported practices in health care settings. Twenty-eight hospitals in Illinois and Minnesota were recruited to a study of respiratory protection programs and practices in acute care settings. Interviews were conducted with hospital managers, unit managers, and health care workers from departments where respirators are commonly required. Each hospital's written respiratory protection program was scored for the 11 elements required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), using a standardized tool, for a maximum possible score of 22 (2 pts. per element). Twenty interview questions associated with program practices were also scored by percent correct responses. Written program scores ranged from 2-17 with an average of 9.2. Hospital and unit managers scored on average 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to the OSHA standard; health care workers scored significantly lower, 71% (p respiratory protection programs in the study sites did not provide the level of detail required OSHA. Interview responses representing hospital practices surrounding respiratory protection indicated that hospitals were aware of and following regulatory guidelines.

  7. Practitioner Perspectives on Delivering Integrative Medicine in a Large, Acute Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent C. Nate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We describe the process and challenges of delivering integrative medicine (IM at a large, acute care hospital, from the perspectives of IM practitioners. To date, minimal literature that addresses the delivery of IM care in an inpatient setting from this perspective exists. Methods. Fifteen IM practitioners were interviewed about their experience delivering IM services at Abbott Northwestern Hospital (ANW, a 630-bed tertiary care hospital. Themes were drawn from codes developed through analysis of the data. Results. Analysis of interview transcripts highlighted challenges of ensuring efficient use of IM practitioner resources across a large hospital, the IM practitioner role in affecting patient experiences, and the ways practitioners navigated differences in IM and conventional medicine cultures in an inpatient setting. Conclusions. IM practitioners favorably viewed their role in patient care, but this work existed within the context of challenges related to balancing supply and demand for services and to integrating an IM program into the established culture of a large hospital. Hospitals planning IM programs should carefully assess the supply and demand dynamics of offering IM in a hospital, advocate for the unique IM practitioner role in patient care, and actively support integration of conventional and complementary approaches.

  8. Shared Vision Among Acute Care Magnet® Hospital Nurses: Ordinal Confirmatory Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen; Johantgen, Meg; Newhouse, Robin

    2016-06-02

    Psychometric testing of the Shared Vision (SV) scale that measures team efforts toward common patient-centered goals was initially estimated among rural hospital nurse executives. The purpose of this study was to estimate the scale's reliability (internal consistency), convergent validity (Pearson correlation with Practice Environment Scale), and structural validity (ordinal confirmatory factor analysis) among acute care Magnet(®) hospital nurses. The study sample included 289 nurses from 27 acute care Magnet® hospitals. The scale demonstrated acceptable estimates for internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .902, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.883, 0.919]), convergent validity (r = .720, p < .001), and structural validity with a one-factor structure. The findings of this study supported the reliability and validity of the SV scale as a unidimensional construct in measuring SV among nurses in acute care Magnet® hospitals. Further testing among different nursing providers and health care settings is needed to accumulate evidence and expand use of the instrument. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Fatigue in the acute care and ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Margaret; Patricia, Branowicki

    2014-01-01

    Nurses commonly assess their patients for symptoms and intervene to ease any patient distress, yet children are seldom asked about feeling fatigued. The existing pediatric literature suggests that fatigue goes unrecognized and therefore untreated in children, particularly children experiencing stressful events, such as illness and/or hospitalization. In an effort to better understand the presence of the symptom in our environment we conducted a program specific point prevalence survey. Data were collected on nine inpatient and 11 outpatient units of a university affiliated tertiary care children's hospital. Overall, this sample reported higher levels of fatigue than published data from their healthy and chronically ill peers by total fatigue score and sub scores. This brief description of the symptom in our inpatient and ambulatory settings has provided information that will inform our nursing practice and drive future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Losmapimod on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Glaser, Ruchira; Cavender, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    attenuates inflammation and may improve outcomes. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of losmapimod on cardiovascular outcomes in patients hospitalized with an acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: LATITUDE-TIMI 60, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel......IMPORTANCE: p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-stimulated inflammation is implicated in atherogenesis, plaque destabilization, and maladaptive processes in myocardial infarction (MI). Pilot data in a phase 2 trial in non-ST elevation MI indicated that the p38 MAPK inhibitor losmapimod...... potentially eligible for enrollment if they had been hospitalized with an acute MI and had at least 1 additional predictor of cardiovascular risk. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomized to either twice-daily losmapimod (7.5 mg; n = 1738) or matching placebo (n = 1765) on a background of guideline...

  11. Factors contributing to nursing team work in an acute care tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Suzanne; Higgs, Megan; Manning, Vicki; Netto, Gayle; Fernandez, Ritin

    Effective nursing teamwork is an essential component of quality health care and patient safety. Understanding which factors foster team work ensures teamwork qualities are cultivated and sustained. This study aims to investigate which factors are associated with team work in an Australian acute care tertiary hospital across all inpatient and outpatient settings. All nurses and midwives rostered to inpatient and outpatient wards in an acute care 600 bed hospital in Sydney Australia were invited to participate in a cross sectional survey between September to October 2013. Data were collected, collated, checked and analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 21. Factors reporting a significant correlation with where p team leadership were 3.6 (S.D. 0.57) and 3.8 (SD 0.6) respectively. Leadership and communication between nurses were significant predictors of team work p team work.

  12. Impact of home oxygen therapy on hospital stay for infants with acute bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Marie; Vincent, Melanie; Morneau, Sylvain; Chevalier, Isabelle

    2012-12-01

    Acute bronchiolitis has been associated with an increasing hospitalization rate over the past decades. The aim of this paper was to estimate the impact of home oxygen therapy (HOT) on hospital stay for infants with acute bronchiolitis. A retrospective cohort study was done including all children aged ≤ 12 months discharged from a pediatric tertiary-care center with a diagnosis of bronchiolitis, between November 2007 and March 2008. Oxygen was administered according to a standardized protocol. We assumed children with the following criteria could have been sent home with O(2), instead of being kept in hospital: age ≥ 2 months, distance between home and hospital <50 km, in-hospital observation ≥ 24 h, O(2) requirement ≤ 1.0 L/min, stable clinical condition, no enteral tube feeding, and intravenous fluids <50 mL/kg/day. Children with significant underlying disease were excluded. A total of 177 children were included. Median age was 2.0 months (range 0-11), and median length of stay was 3.0 days (range 0-18). Forty-eight percent of patients (85/177) received oxygen during their hospital stay. Criteria for discharge with HOT were met in 7.1 % of patients, a mean of 1.8 days (SD 1.8) prior to real discharge. The number of patient-days of hospitalization which would have been saved had HOT been available was 21, representing 3.0 % of total patient-days of hospitalization for bronchiolitis over the study period (21/701). In this study setting, few children were eligible for an early discharge with HOT. Home oxygen therapy would not significantly decrease the overall burden of hospitalization for bronchiolitis.

  13. Progressively engaging: constructing nurse, patient, and family relationships in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segaric, Cheryl Ann; Hall, Wendy A

    2015-02-01

    In this grounded theory study, informed by symbolic interactionism, we explain how nurses, patients, and family members construct relationships in acute care settings, including managing effects of work environments. We recruited participants from 10 acute care units across four community hospitals in a Western Canadian city. From 33 hr of participant observation and 40 interviews with 13 nurses, 17 patients, and 10 family members, we constructed the basic social-psychological process of progressively engaging. Nurses, patients, and family members approached constructing relationships through levels of engagement, ranging from perspectives about "just doing the job" to "doing the job with heart." Progressively engaging involved three stages: focusing on tasks, getting acquainted, and building rapport. Workplace conditions and personal factors contributed or detracted from participants' movement through the stages of the process; with higher levels of engagement, participants experienced greater satisfaction and cooperation. Progressively engaging provides direction for how all participants in care can invest in relationships. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Niamh; Daly, Leslie; Murphy, Sean; Smith, Samantha; Hayden, Derek; Ní Chróinín, Danielle; Callaly, Elizabeth; Horgan, Gillian; Sheehan, Orla; Honari, Bahman; Duggan, Joseph; Kyne, Lorraine; Dolan, Eamon; Williams, David; Wiley, Miriam; Kelly, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents. In a population-based prospective study of incident and recurrent stroke treated in hospital and community settings, we investigated direct (healthcare related) and indirect costs for a 2-year period. Survival, disability, poststroke residence, and healthcare use were determined at 90 days, 1 year, and 2 years. Acute hospital cost was determined using a case-mix approach, and other costs using a bottom-up approach (2007 prices). In 568 patients ascertained in 1 year (2006), the total estimated 2-year cost was $33.84 million. In the overall sample, AF-stroke accounted for 31% (177) of patients, but a higher proportion of costs (40.5% of total and 45% of nursing home costs). On a per-patient basis compared with non-AF-stroke, AF-stroke was associated with higher total (P<0.001) and acute hospital costs (P<0.001), and greater nursing home (P=0.001) and general practitioner (P<0.001) costs among 90-day survivors. After stratification by stroke severity in survivors, AF was associated with 2-fold increase in costs in patients with mild-moderate (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 0-15) stroke (P<0.001) but not in severe stroke (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale ≥16; P=0.7). In our population study, AF-stroke was associated with substantially higher total, acute hospital, nursing home, and general practitioner costs per patient. Targeted programs to identify AF and prevent AF-stroke may have significant economic benefits, in addition to health benefits. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Feasibility of using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for evaluation of fall-related risk factors in acute rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih W; Lin, Li F; Chou, Lin C; Wu, Mei J; Liao, Chun D; Liou, Tsan H

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we reported the use of an International Classification of Functioning (ICF) core set that can provide a holistic framework for evaluating the risk factors of falls; however, data on the feasibility of applying this core set are lacking. To investigate the feasibility of applying the fall-related ICF risk-factor core set in the case of patients in an acute-rehabilitation setting. A cross-sectional and descriptive correlational design. Acute-rehabilitation ward. A total of 273 patients who experienced fall at acute-rehabilitation ward. The data on falls were collected from the hospital's Nursing Information System (NIS) and the fall-reporting system (Adverse Event Reporting System, AERS) between 2010 and 2013. The relationship of both systems to the fall-related ICF core set was analyzed to assess the feasibility of their clinical application. We evaluated the feasibility of using the fall-related ICF risk-factor core set by using the frequency and the percentage of the fall patients in of the listed categories. The fall-related ICF risk-factor core set category b735 (muscle tone functions) exhibited a high feasibility (85.95%) for clinical application, and the category b730 (muscle power functions) covered 77.11% of the patients. The feasibility of application of the category d410 (change basic body position) was also high in the case of all fall patients (81.69%). In the acute-rehabilitation setting, the feasibility of application of the fall-related ICF risk-factor core set is high. The fall-related ICF risk-factor core set can help multidisciplinary teams develop fall-prevention strategies in acute rehabilitation wards.

  16. A New Model of Delirium Care in the Acute Geriatric Setting: Geriatric Monitoring Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Mei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium is a common and serious condition, which affects many of our older hospitalised patients. It is an indicator of severe underlying illness and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment, associated with poor survival, functional outcomes with increased risk of institutionalisation following the delirium episode in the acute care setting. We describe a new model of delirium care in the acute care setting, titled Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU where the important concepts of delirium prevention and management are integrated. We hypothesize that patients with delirium admitted to the GMU would have better clinical outcomes with less need for physical and psychotropic restraints compared to usual care. Methods/Design GMU models after the Delirium Room with adoption of core interventions from Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening bright light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythm and improve sleep in the elderly patients. The novelty of this approach lies in the amalgamation of these interventions in a multi-faceted approach in acute delirium management. GMU development thus consists of key considerations for room design and resource planning, program specific interventions and daily core interventions. Assessments undertaken include baseline demographics, comorbidity scoring, duration and severity of delirium, cognitive, functional measures at baseline, 6 months and 12 months later. Additionally we also analysed the pre and post-GMU implementation knowledge and attitude on delirium care among staff members in the geriatric wards (nurses, doctors and undertook satisfaction surveys for caregivers of patients treated in GMU. Discussion This study protocol describes the conceptualization and implementation of a specialized unit for delirium management. We hypothesize that such a model of care will not only result in better clinical outcomes for the elderly patient with delirium compared to usual geriatric care

  17. Methods for extracellular vesicles isolation in a hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías eSáenz-Cuesta

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research in extracellular vesicles (EVs has been rising during the last decade. However, there is no clear consensus on the most accurate protocol to isolate and analyze them. Besides, most of the current protocols are difficult to implement in a hospital setting due to being very time consuming or to requirements of specific infrastructure. Thus, our aim is to compare five different protocols (comprising two different medium-speed differential centrifugation protocols; commercially polymeric precipitation -exoquick-; acid precipitation; and ultracentrifugation for blood and urine samples to determine the most suitable one for the isolation of EVs. Nanoparticle tracking analysis, flow cytometry, western blot, electronic microscopy and spectrophotometry were used to characterize basic aspects of EVs such us concentration, size distribution, cell-origin and transmembrane markers and RNA concentration. The highest EV concentrations were obtained using the exoquick protocol, followed by both differential centrifugation protocols, while the ultracentrifugation and acid-precipitation protocols yielded considerably lower EV concentrations. The five protocols isolated EVs of similar characteristics regarding markers and RNA concentration however standard protocol recovered only small EVs. EV isolated with exoquick presented difficult to be analyzed with western blot. The RNA concentrations obtained from urine-derived EVs were similar to those obtained from blood-derived ones, despite the urine EV concentration being 10 to 20 times lower. We consider that a medium-speed differential centrifugation could be suitable to be applied in a hospital setting due to require the simplest infrastructure and recover higher concentration of EV than standard protocol. A workflow from sampling to characterization of EVs is proposed.

  18. The Balanced Scorecard of acute settings: development process, definition of 20 strategic objectives and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groene, Oliver; Brandt, Elimer; Schmidt, Werner; Moeller, Johannes

    2009-08-01

    Strategy development and implementation in acute care settings is often restricted by competing challenges, the pace of policy reform and the existence of parallel hierarchies. To describe a generic approach to strategy development, illustrate the use of the Balanced Scorecard as a tool to facilitate strategy implementation and demonstrate how to break down strategic goals into measurable elements. Multi-method approach using three different conceptual models: Health Promoting Hospitals Standards and Strategies, the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Model and the Balanced Scorecard. A bundle of qualitative and quantitative methods were used including in-depth interviews, standardized organization-wide surveys on organizational values, staff satisfaction and patient experience. Three acute care hospitals in four different locations belonging to a German holding group. Chief executive officer, senior medical officers, working group leaders and hospital staff. Development and implementation of the Balanced Scorecard. Twenty strategic objectives with corresponding Balanced Scorecard measures. A stepped approach from strategy development to implementation is presented to identify key themes for strategy development, drafting a strategy map and developing strategic objectives and measures. The Balanced Scorecard, in combination with the EFQM model, is a useful tool to guide strategy development and implementation in health care organizations. As for other quality improvement and management tools not specifically developed for health care organizations, some adaptations are required to improve acceptability among professionals. The step-wise approach of strategy development and implementation presented here may support similar processes in comparable organizations.

  19. Factors contributing to fecal incontinence in older people and outcome of routine management in home, hospital and nursing home settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asangaedem Akpan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asangaedem Akpan1,2,3, Margot A Gosney2, James Barrett3,4, 1Directorate of Medicine and Elderly Care, Warrington Hospital, Warrington, Cheshire, UK; 2School of Food Biosciences, The University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, UK; 3Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; 4Directorate of Elderly Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clatterbridge Hospital, Merseyside, UKObjective: Fecal loading, cognitive impairment, loose stools, functional disability, comorbidity and anorectal incontinence are recognized as factors contributing to loss of fecal continence in older adults. The objective of this project was to assess the relative distribution of these factors in a variety of settings along with the outcome of usual management. Methods: One hundred and twenty adults aged 65 years and over with fecal incontinence recruited by convenience sampling from four different settings were studied. They were either living at home or in a nursing home or receiving care on an acute or rehabilitation elderly care ward. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit which factors associated with fecal incontinence were present from subjects who had given written informed consent or for whom assent for inclusion in the study had been obtained.Results: Fecal loading (Homes 6 [20%]; Acute care wards 17 [57%]; Rehabilitation wards 19 [63%]; Nursing homes 21 [70%] and functional disability (Homes 5 [17%]; Acute care wards 25 [83%]; Rehabilitation wards 25 [83%]; Nursing homes 20 [67%] were significantly more prevalent in the hospital and nursing home settings than in those living at home (P < 0.01. Loose stools were more prevalent in the hospital setting than in the other settings (Homes 11 [37%]; Acute care wards 20 [67%]; Rehabilitation wards 17 [57%]; Nursing homes 6 [20%] (P < 0.01. Cognitive impairment was significantly more common in the nursing home than in the other settings (Nursing homes 26 [87%], Homes 5 [17%], Acute care wards 13 [43%], Rehabilitation

  20. Prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Khodadadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aim: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of dehydrating and gastroenteritis among children worldwide. . The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj. Methods: This cross sectional – descriptive study was done on 184 stool samples of children younger than 7 years of age hospitalized at Imam Sajjad hospital of Yasuj in 2011 due to acute gastroenteritis. All samples were routinely analyzed for detection of rotavirus by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA test. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 184 samples analyzed, 52(28.26% were positive.The Results showed significant relationship between the seasonal distribution and virus detection (p=0/001. The highest incidence of rotavirus was seen in autumn with frequency of (48.08% and the lowest in spring (5.77%. Conclusions: According to high prevalence of rotavirus infection, continual surveillance is necessary to provide useful data for formulating effective vaccines and perform diarrhea prevention programs. Key words: Rotavirus, Gastroenteritis, Prevalence, Elisa

  1. In-hospital mortality and long-term survival of patients with acute intoxication admitted to the ICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, Raya; Brinkman, Sylvia; De Keizer, Nicolette F.; Meulenbelt, Jan; De Lange, Dylan W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess in-hospital and long-term mortality of Dutch ICU patients admitted with an acute intoxication. DESIGN: Cohort of ICU admissions from a national ICU registry linked to records from an insurance claims database. SETTING: Eighty-one ICUs (85% of all Dutch ICUs). PATIENTS: Seven

  2. Research Article. Characteristics of Sleep Apnea Assessed Before Discharge in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Heart Failure

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    Kocsis Ildikó

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Evaluation of the characteristics of sleep apnea (SA in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure, considering that undiagnosed SA could contribute to early rehospitalization. Methods. 56 consecutive patients (13 women, 43 men, mean age 63.12 years with acute heart failure, in stable condition, underwent nocturnal polygraphy before hospital discharge. The type and severity of SA was determined. Besides descriptive statistics, correlations between the severity of SA and clinical and paraclinical characteristics were also analyzed (t-test, chi-square test, significancy at alpha 30/h. The apnea was predominantly obstructive (32 cases vs. 12 with central SA. Comparing the patients with mild or no SA with those with severe SA, we did not find statistically significant correlations (p>0.05 between the severity of SA and the majority of main clinical and paraclinical characteristics - age, sex, BMI, cardiac substrates of heart failure, comorbidities. Paradoxically, arterial hypertension (p=0.028 and atrial fibrillation (p=0.041 were significantly more prevalent in the group with mild or no SA. Conclusions. Before discharge, in the majority of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure moderate and severe SA is present, and is not related to the majority of patient related factors. Finding of significant SA in this setting is important, because its therapy could play an important role in preventing readmissions and improving prognosis.

  3. Campylobacter spp among children with acute diarrhea attending Mulago hospital in Kampala--Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mshana, S E; Joloba, M; Kakooza, A; Kaddu-Mulindwa, D

    2009-09-01

    Campylobacter infections occur worldwide. A recent study in Kampala, Uganda, found that 87% of broiler chickens had Campylobacter jejuni; these are potential source of human infection. Isolation rate in developing countries is between 5-35%. This study aimed at finding prevalence of children with campylobacter infection among children with acute diarrhea attending Mulago hospital. The objective was to establish the proportion of children infected with Campylobacter spp among children with acute diarrhea at Mulago hospital. A crossectional study from July to October 2005 was conducted involved 226 children with acute diarrhea. Serial sampling was done a total of 226 stool specimens were obtained and cultured on selective media. Identification was done using biochemical test and susceptibility using standard discs diffusion method. Campylobacter spp were isolated in 21 (9.3%) of 226 stool specimens analyzed. Campylobacter jejuni 17 (80.9%), Campylobacter lari 2 (9.5%), Campylobacter coli 1 (4.5%) and Campylobacter jejuni/coli 1(4.5%). All Campylobacter isolates were sensitive to erythromycin, and 20% had intermediate resistance to Ampicillin. Campylobacter spp are prevalent among children with acute diarrhea in Kampala- Uganda. A large multicenter study should be undertaken so that the extent of campylobacter infection in our setting can be established.

  4. Incidence and Outcome of Acute Cardiorenal Syndrome in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athwani, Vivek; Bhargava, Maneesha; Chanchlani, Rahul; Mehta, Amar Jeet

    2017-06-01

    To determine the incidence, etiology and outcome of Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) in hospitalized children. A prospective cohort study was carried out in 242 children between 6 mo to 18 y of age hospitalized with primary cardiac, renal or any systemic disorder at a tertiary care center in India. The primary outcome was the development of CRS. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the risk of mortality secondary to CRS. Among 242 children, 67 (27.7%) children developed CRS and the rest 175 (72.3%) did not. Among those with CRS, 40.3%, 20.9%, and 38.8% had CRS-1, 3 and 5, respectively. Cardiac diseases leading to CRS were myocarditis (40.7%) followed by congenital heart disease (25.9%), rheumatic heart disease (18.5%), and dilated cardiomyopathy (7.4%); renal disease associated with CRS was acute glomerulonephritis (100%) and major systemic disorders leading to CRS were septicemia (53.8%), malaria (23.1%), scrub typhus (7.7%), and acute gastroenteritis (3.8%). The occurrence of CRS was associated with an increased risk of mortality (OR 6.3, 95% CI: 2.8, 14.1; p 0.000). A subgroup analysis revealed that children with CRS having acute kidney injury stage 2 and 3 also had a higher risk of mortality (p 0.001). The incidence of CRS is quite high in children with cardiac, renal or systemic diseases and is associated with a significant risk of mortality. Children presenting with these illnesses should be monitored for the occurrence of CRS so that early intervention may reduce mortality.

  5. Clinical Predictors of Hospital Admission in Children Aged 0-24 Months with Acute Bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nucksheeba Aziz; Rayees Yousuf; Imran Gattoo; Mohmad Latief

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bronchiolitis is a significant cause of acute morbidity in children less than 2 years old and some children with bronchiolitis are admitted to the hospital. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To identify clinical predictors of hospital admission in children aged 0-24 months with acute bronchiolitis.   METHODS: All children in the age group of 0-24 months presenting with acute bronchiolitis to a dedicated pediatric emergency department of GB pant cantonment children hospital, Govt Medical College ...

  6. [Training to management of violence in hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, B; Mora, M; Blasquez, S; Moussot, P-E; Silva, S; Cocquet, P

    2013-03-01

    Evaluate the typology of violence in hospital setting, study the psychophysiological state of care givers dealing with the aggression and provide appropriate training. Single centre, observational. A first anonymous questionnaire was given to a sample of emergency and intensive care providers in Narbonne Hospital. The parameters studied included: demographics data, the Trait Anxiety Inventory test, the typology of aggressions, and the psycho-physiological state of subjects dealing with the aggression. Robert Paturel, an instructor of French Special Forces (Recherche-Assistance-Intervention-Dissuasion [RAID]), has provided training for the management of violence. A second questionnaire assessed satisfaction for proposed formation. Forty-one questionnaires were returned. The rates of verbal and physical violence touching care givers were respectively 97 % and 41 % (median of 7years [1-36] experience on the job). Eighty-five percent of care givers wanted training in psychology of conflict and 93 % wanted a formation with a self-defense aspect. The first reason of violence was drugs and alcohol abuse. The "tunnel effect" during stress was identified in 34 % of care givers, and 20 % were unaware of its nature. Twenty-one percent of care givers spontaneously adopting a safe distance of more than 1m during a conflict had been physically assaulted versus 63 % for those staying less than 1m (P=0.03). The proposed formation, including psychology of conflict and self-defense, was satisfactory to all care givers who participated (median score 9/10 [7-10]). The verbal and physical violence affecting emergency departments is a common phenomenon warranting appropriate training. The proposed formation included the comprehension of the conflict causality, self-defense and self-control. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Local adaptation and evaluation of a falls risk prevention approach in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Willeke; Hill, Keith D; Bennell, Kim; Vu, Michelle; Haines, Terry P

    2011-04-01

    To determine whether locally adapting a falls risk factor assessment tool results in an instrument with clinimetric properties sufficient to support an acute hospital's falls prevention program. Prospective cohort study of predictive validity and observational investigation of intra- and inter-rater reliability. Acute wards in two large hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. One hundred and thirty acute hospital inpatients participated in the predictive accuracy evaluation, with 25 and 35 inpatients used for the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability analyses, respectively. To develop a falls risk screen and assessment instrument through local adaptation of an existing tool. Clinimetric property analysis of new instrument (Western Health Falls Risk Assessment, WHeFRA) and comparison with 'gold standard tool' (STRATIFY). Fallers, falls and falls per 1000 bed days. Sensitivity (Sens), specificity (Spec), Youden Index (YI) and these three statistics based on event rate of falls (Sens(ER), Spec(ER) and YI(ER)), were calculated to determine predictive accuracy. Reliability was determined using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), weighted kappa and signed rank test. Seven participants (5.4%) fell, with 14 falls (fall rate: 10.7 falls per 1000 patient bed days). The WHeFRA instrument was significantly more accurate at predicting fallers and the rate of falls than the STRATIFY. Intra-rater reliability ICC (95% confidence intervals) for WHeFRA screen was 0.94 (0.86-0.97) and inter-rater reliability was 0.78 (0.61-0.88). Local adaptation of an existing tool resulted in an instrument with favorable clinimetric properties and may be a viable procedure for facilitating falls prevention program development and implementation in acute hospital settings.

  8. Perceptions of physiotherapists about their role in health promotion at an acute hospital: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkeden, S; Walker, K M

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the perceptions of physiotherapists about their role in health promotion in an acute inpatient setting. Qualitative design using focus groups within a constructivist framework. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a constant comparative method. An acute National Health Service (NHS) hospital trust. Three focus groups were conducted with a total of 22 physiotherapists who were recruited purposively from the medical and surgical unit of the study hospital. Participants generally perceived health promotion to be within their scope of practice, particularly in relation to the promotion of physical activity and smoking cessation. Whilst some facilitators to engaging in health promotion were discussed, a large number of barriers to routine engagement in health promotion were identified. These included time constraints, the focus of acute settings on discharge, and scepticism of effectiveness. Pre- and postregistration physiotherapy education as well as mandatory training in NHS trusts should be reviewed to equip the workforce to engage in this crucial area of health care. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

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    Risa Fukuda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods: This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs. The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results: In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions: The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted.

  10. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  11. Etiology of acute bronchiolitis and the relationship with meteorological conditions in hospitalized infants in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Zheng-Rong; Ji, Wei; Wang, Yu-Qing; Yan, Yong-Dong; Shao, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Lan; Xu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of common viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) in hospitalized infants with acute bronchiolitis and study the relationship between bronchiolitis and meteorological conditions...

  12. Surveillance for Hospitalized Acute Respiratory Infection in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verani, Jennifer R.; McCracken, John; Arvelo, Wences; Estevez, Alejandra; Lopez, Maria Renee; Reyes, Lissette; Moir, Juan Carlos; Bernart, Chris; Moscoso, Fabiola; Gray, Jennifer; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4%) cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7%) among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6%) of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0%) had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9%) case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000), followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000). These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and death due to

  13. Surveillance for hospitalized acute respiratory infection in Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Verani

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory infections (ARI are an important cause of illness and death worldwide, yet data on the etiology of ARI and the population-level burden in developing countries are limited. Surveillance for ARI was conducted at two hospitals in Guatemala. Patients admitted with at least one sign of acute infection and one sign or symptom of respiratory illness met the criteria for a case of hospitalized ARI. Nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were collected and tested by polymerase chain reaction for adenovirus, parainfluenza virus types 1,2 and 3, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza A and B viruses, human metapneumovirus, Chlamydia pneumioniae, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Urine specimens were tested for Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen. Blood culture and chest radiograph were done at the discretion of the treating physician. Between November 2007 and December 2011, 3,964 case-patients were enrolled. While cases occurred among all age groups, 2,396 (60.4% cases occurred in children <5 years old and 463 (11.7% among adults ≥65 years old. Viruses were found in 52.6% of all case-patients and 71.8% of those aged <1 year old; the most frequently detected was respiratory syncytial virus, affecting 26.4% of case-patients. Urine antigen testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae performed for case-patients ≥15 years old was positive in 15.1% of those tested. Among 2,364 (59.6% of case-patients with a radiograph, 907 (40.0% had findings suggestive of bacterial pneumonia. Overall, 230 (5.9% case-patients died during the hospitalization. Using population denominators, the observed hospitalized ARI incidence was 128 cases per 100,000, with the highest rates seen among children <1 year old (1,703 per 100,000, followed by adults ≥65 years old (292 per 100,000. These data, which demonstrate a substantial burden of hospitalized ARI in Guatemala due to a variety of pathogens, can help guide public health policies aimed at reducing the burden of illness and

  14. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  15. Association between Stroke Center Hospitalization for Acute Ischemic Stroke and Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Ying; Holloway, Robert G.; Chan, Paul S.; Noyes, Katia; Shah, Manish N.; Ting, Henry H.; Chappel, Andre R.; Peterson, Eric D.; Friedman, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Context Although stroke centers are widely accepted and supported, little is known about their impact on patient outcomes. Objective To examine the association between admission to stroke centers for an acute ischemic stroke and mortality. Design, Setting, and Participants Observational study using data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System. We compared mortality for patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke (n=30,947) between 2005 and 2006 at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals using differential distance to hospitals as an instrumental variable to adjust for potential pre-hospital selection bias. Patients were followed for mortality for 1 year after the index hospitalization through 2007. To assess whether our findings were specific to stroke, we also compared mortality for patients admitted with gastrointestinal hemorrhage (n=39,409) or acute myocardial infarction (n=40,024) at designated stroke centers and non-designated hospitals. Main Outcome Measure Thirty-day all-cause mortality. Results Among 30,947 patients with acute ischemic stroke, 15,297 (49.4%) were admitted to designated stroke centers. Using the instrumental variable analysis, admission to designated stroke centers was associated with greater use of thrombolytic therapy (4.8% vs. 1.7%; adjusted difference 2.2%, 95% CI, 1.6% to 2.8%; P<0.001) and lower 30-day all-cause mortality (10.1% vs. 12.5%; adjusted mortality difference: −2.5%, 95% CI, −3.6% to −1.4%; P<0.001). Differences in mortality also were observed at all time points, including at 1-day, 7-day, and 1-year follow-up. Moreover, the outcome differences were specific to stroke, as stroke centers and non-stroke centers had similar 30-day all-cause mortality rates among those with acute myocardial infarction (adjusted mortality difference: +0.3%, 95% CI, −0.5% to 1.0%; P=0.50) and/or gastrointestinal hemorrhage (adjusted mortality difference: +0.1%, 95% CI, −0.9% to 1.1%; P=0

  16. Quantum Physics Principles and Communication in the Acute Healthcare Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Heidi L; Peyerl, Colleen Kraft; Solheim-Witt, Marit

    This pilot study explores whether clinician awareness of quantum physics principles could facilitate open communication between patients and providers. In the spirit of action research, this study was conceptualized with a holistic view of human health, using a mixed method design of grounded theory as an emergent method. Instrumentation includes surveys and a focus group discussion with twelve registered nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. Findings document that the preliminary core phenomenon, energy as information, influences communication in the healthcare environment. Key emergent themes include awareness, language, validation, open communication, strategies, coherence, incoherence and power. Research participants indicate that quantum physics principles provide a language and conceptual framework for improving their awareness of communication and interactions in the healthcare environment. Implications of this pilot study support the feasibility of future research and education on awareness of quantum physics principles in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute Phase Hyperglycemia among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Coronary Syndrome: Prevalence and Prognostic Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Laftah Wanoose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: Regardless of diabetes status, hyperglycemia on arrival for patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome, has been associated with adverse outcomes including death. The aim of this study is to look at the frequency and prognostic significance of acute phase hyperglycemia among patients attending the coronary care unit with acute coronary syndrome over the in-hospital admission days.Methods: The study included 287 consecutive patients in the Al- Faiha Hospital in Basrah (Southern Iraq during a one year period from December 2007 to November 2008. Patients were divided into two groups with respect to admission plasma glucose level regardless of their diabetes status (those with admission plasma glucose of <140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L and those equal to or more than that. Acute phase hyperglycemia was defined as a non-fasting glucose level equal to or above 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L regardless of past history of diabetes.Results: Sixty one point seven percent (177 of patients were admitted with plasma glucose of ≥140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L. There were no differences were found between both groups regarding the mean age, qualification, and smoking status, but males were predominant in both groups. A family history of diabetes, and hypertension, were more frequent in patients with plasma glucose of ≥140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L. There were no differences between the two groups regarding past history of ischemic heart disease, stroke, lipid profile, troponin-I levels or type of acute coronary syndrome. Again heart failure was more common in the admission acute phase hyperglycemia group, but there was no difference regarding arrhythmia, stroke, or death. Using logistic regression with heart failure as the dependent variable we found that only the admission acute phase hyperglycemia (OR=2.1344, 95�0CI=1.0282-4.4307; p=0.0419 was independently associated with heart failure. While male gender, family history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and

  18. Caring Behaviors: Perceptions of Acute Care Nurses and Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Beth Modic DNP. R.N., CDE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caring behaviors: Perceptions of acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of caring behaviors that influence the patient experience in acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes. Background: Nurses are the caregivers who render most of the direct care patients receive while they are hospitalized. Understanding what patients perceive as caring behaviors is essential in tailoring nursing interventions to meet patient needs. Data sources: Data collection occurred at a 1,200 bed, nonprofit academic medical center located in the Midwest. Description: Sixty-four nurses and 54 patients with diabetes were queried about their experience with diabetes caring behaviors. Conclusion: Nurses consistently reported providing caring behaviors more frequently than patients reported receiving them. Implications: This study has implications for understanding the patient experience in the hospital setting specifically related to patient education. Providing patient education is an important caring intervention that directly affects the patient experience. However, none of the patients in this study identified this as a caring behavior used by nurses.

  19. Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury in medical, surgical, and intensive care unit: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T B Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common complication in hospitalized patients. There are few comparative studies on hospital-acquired AKI (HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU patients. This study was conducted to compare the epidemiological characteristics, clinical profiles, and outcomes of HAAKI among these three units. All adult patients (>18 years of either gender who developed AKI based on RIFLE criteria (using serum creatinine, 48 h after hospitalization were included in the study. Patients of acute on chronic renal failure and AKI in pregnancy were excluded. Incidence of HAAKI in medical, surgical, and ICU wards were 0.54%, 0.72%, and 2.2% respectively ( P < 0.0001. There was no difference in age distribution among the groups, but onset of HAAKI was earliest in the medical ward ( P = 0.001. RIFLE-R was the most common AKI in medical (39.2% and ICU (50% wards but in the surgical ward, it was RIFLE-F that was most common (52.6%. Acute tubular necrosis was more common in ICU ( P = 0.043. Most common etiology of HAAKI in medical unit was drug induced (39.2%, whereas in surgical and ICU, it was sepsis (34% and 35.2% respectively. Mortality in ICU, surgical and medical units were 73.5%, 43.42%, and 37.2%, respectively ( P = 0.003. Length of hospital stay in surgical, ICU and medical units were different ( P = 0.007. This study highlights that the characters of HAAKI are different in some aspects among different hospital settings.

  20. Staff Responses When Parents Hit Children in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Sarah A; Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Taylor, Catherine A; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa; Foster, Rebecca H; Budzak Garza, Ann; Olson-Dorff, Denyse

    Physical punishment of children is a prevalent practice that is condemned by most medical professionals given its link with increased risk of child physical abuse and other adverse child outcomes. This study examined the prevalence of parent-to-child hitting in medical settings and the intervention behaviors of staff who witness it. Staff at a children's medical center and a general medical center completed a voluntary, anonymous survey. We used descriptive statistics to examine differences in the experiences of physicians, nurses, and other medical staff. We used logistic regression to predict intervention behaviors among staff who witnessed parent-to-child hitting. Of the hospital staff who completed the survey (N = 2863), we found that 50% of physicians, 24% of nurses, 27% of other direct care staff, and 17% of nondirect care staff witnessed parent-to-child hitting at their medical center in the past year. A majority of physicians, nurses, and other direct care staff reported intervening sometimes or always. Nondirect care staff rarely intervened. Believing staff have the responsibility to intervene, and having comfortable strategies with which to intervene were strongly predictive of intervention behavior. Staff who did not intervene commonly reported that they did not know how to respond. Many medical center staff witness parent-to-child hitting. Although some of the staff reported that they intervened when they witnessed this behavior, the findings indicate that staff may need training to identify when and how they should respond.

  1. The prevalence of Capgras syndrome in a university hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamam, Lut; Karatas, Gonca; Zeren, Tayfun; Ozpoyraz, Nurgul

    2003-10-01

    Capgras syndrome (CS), the most common type of delusional misidentification syndrome, is the delusional belief that significant people in the patient's life have been replaced by identical doubles. Capgras syndrome is thought to be a rare syndrome which commonly occurs in a psychotic context. The objective of this study was to estimate the 5-year prevalence rate of CS in a university hospital in-patient setting and determine associated etiological and sociodemographic factors. All patient files and medical records were reviewed in detail for the presence of Capgras syndrome. The sociodemographic variables, clinical manifestations, and psychiatric and medical diagnoses of patients who fulfilled clinical criteria for Capgras syndrome were recorded for statistical evaluation. The retrospective evaluation of patient files in 920 cases admitted to our psychiatric in-patient unit over 5 years revealed that 12 patients fulfilled the criteria for Capgras syndrome. The crude prevalence of Capgras syndrome in this population during 5-year period was 1.3% (1.8% for females, 0.9% for males). Schizophrenia (50%) was the most common psychiatric diagnosis in these patients. Only two patients presented with an organic etiology underlying Capgras syndrome. The results of this study indicate that Capgras syndrome is not a rare syndrome, and commonly occurs during the course of either functional or organic psychotic illness. Age seems to be an important predicting factor for the etiology of psychosis underlying Capgras syndrome.

  2. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Yee Cheong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods: Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4 were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music and days 2 and 3 (with CMT. Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS. Results: Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01 in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01 in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014. Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01 and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045 were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion: These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation.

  3. A novel integrated care pathway for people with dementia presenting to acute hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Timmons, Suzanne; Mannix, Mary; McKiernan, Margaret; Connolly, Maria; Foley, Mary J; Cahill, Siobhan; Chorcorain, Aoife Ni

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Almost 30% of older people admitted to acute hospitals in Ireland have dementia, but only 1/3 of these have a known diagnosis in the community. Thus hospital staff are often treating patients with dementia without knowing it. Acute hospitalisation is a pivotal time for a person with dementia, associated with longer length of stay, poor assessment by hospital staff of the dementia, and often discharge to long-term care post hospitalisation. No hospital in Ireland had a functionin...

  4. Oxygen in the Setting of Acute Myocardial Infarction: Is It Really a Breath of Fresh Air?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomba, Rohit S; Nijhawan, Karan; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-03-01

    Supplemental oxygen has been used in the setting of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Once an official recommendation in the guidelines for the management of acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, it is now mentioned as an intervention to be considered. Data for the use of supplemental oxygen or AMI are limited, and some data have suggested associated harm. We performed a systematic review of the literature and a subsequent meta-analysis of the data to determine the effect of high concentration oxygen versus titrated oxygen or room air in the setting of AMI. The following end points were studied: in-hospital mortality, opiate use, percentage of infarcted myocardium by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mass of infarcted myocardium by MRI. No significant difference was noted with end points when comparing those randomized to high-concentration oxygen versus those randomized to titrated oxygen or room air in the setting of AMI. No significant publication bias was identified although this could not be assessed for all end points. High-concentration oxygen may not offer any benefit when compared to titrated oxygen or room air. A large, randomized trial is warranted to further delineate these differences with respect to multiple end points. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The social practice of rescue: the safety implications of acute illness trajectories and patient categorisation in medical and maternity settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Sandall, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The normative position in acute hospital care when a patient is seriously ill is to resuscitate and rescue. However, a number of UK and international reports have highlighted problems with the lack of timely recognition, treatment and referral of patients whose condition is deteriorating while being cared for on hospital wards. This article explores the social practice of rescue, and the structural and cultural influences that guide the categorisation and ordering of acutely ill patients in different hospital settings. We draw on Strauss et al.'s notion of the patient trajectory and link this with the impact of categorisation practices, thus extending insights beyond those gained from emergency department triage to care management processes further downstream on the hospital ward. Using ethnographic data collected from medical wards and maternity care settings in two UK inner city hospitals, we explore how differences in population, cultural norms, categorisation work and trajectories of clinical deterioration interlink and influence patient safety. An analysis of the variation in findings between care settings and patient groups enables us to consider socio-political influences and the specifics of how staff manage trade-offs linked to the enactment of core values such as safety and equity in practice. © 2015 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  6. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients.

  7. Perceptions of physiotherapy best practice in total knee arthroplasty in hospital outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sampa Samanta; Luccisano, Mary; Evans, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine experienced physiotherapists' perceptions of best practices for patients following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in publicly funded outpatient hospital settings in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The secondary objective was to identify the facilitators of and barriers to implementing best practices in the subacute phase of rehabilitation. A qualitative, descriptive, focused ethnographic approach was used to explore physiotherapists' perceptions of best practices for patients with TKA. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with expert physiotherapists acting as key informants. A snowball sampling method was used to recruit physiotherapists in the GTA. Interviews were conducted in person by two of the investigators. Physiotherapists from seven acute-care hospitals in the GTA participated in the study. Analysis of the 140 pages of transcripts from the interviews with 10 physiotherapists revealed that participants perceived best practices as encompassing the adoption of a client-centred approach; inter-professional collaboration; aggressive rehabilitation for patients who are unsuccessful in achieving their outcomes; the use of relevant outcome measures; and consideration of the impact of scarce resources on care. The findings of this study highlight physiotherapists' perceived best practices for patients with TKA and the unique contribution that hospital-based outpatient physiotherapy can make to patients' rehabilitation.

  8. Acupuncture in the Inpatient Acute Care Setting: A Pragmatic, Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Painovich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of acupuncture in a hospital setting. Methods. This 18-month pragmatic randomized controlled trial used a two-tiered consent process for all patients admitted to the acute care unit by study physician groups. The primary study comparison was between those randomized (using biased-coin randomization after initial consent to be offered acupuncture or not. The primary outcome was length of stay (LOS. Other measures include costs, self-reported anxiety, depression, health status, and patient satisfaction. Results. Of the 383 patients consented to the study, 253 were randomized to be offered acupuncture, and 130 were not offered acupuncture. Of those offered acupuncture, 173 (69% accepted and received daily acupuncture. On average, patients offered acupuncture had longer LOSs (4.9 versus 4.1 days than those not offered acupuncture (=.047. Adjustment for diagnosis and severity mix reduced this difference and its significance (=.108. No other significant differences in outcomes were found. Patients who were more anxious (=.000 or depressed (=.017 at admission tended to more often accept acupuncture when offered. Conclusion. Acupuncture is accepted by a majority of hospitalized acute care patients. However, it did not reduce LOS in this already short-stay population.

  9. LACK OF NOTIFICATION OF COMPULSORY NOTIFICATION DISEASES IN HOSPITAL SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Griep

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This research encompasses the diseases of compulsory lack of notification inhospital settings and its interface with the Health Information System (Sistema de Informaçãode Saúde – SIS developed and implemented by the Welfare System in Brazil (Sistema Únicode Saúde – SUS. It tries to identify the elements epidemiology is based on, referring to itsaspects as basis for the development of epidemiologic monitoring actions of contagiousdiseases in the country. It focuses on the following question: what are the factors thatcontribute and/or determine the flaws in the process of notification for compulsory notificationdiseases? The results obtained through a questionnaire presented to the personnel responsiblefor the Hospital Infection Control Service (Serviço de Controle de Infecção Hospitalar showtheir lack of preparedness and technical knowledge, as well as their team’s, in relation to thedynamic functioning of the Epidemiologic Vigilance Service (Serviço de VigilânciaEpidemiológica. It points to the flaws due to the influence exerted by the public and/or privatecharacter of the institutions and considers the possibility of lack of commitment and responsibility of the multi-professional team in the maintenance of the preestablished flow. As aproposal, we present an adoption of continuous educational actions through the implementationof a Long Distance Post Graduation course, aiming for the development of new possibilities forthe teaching-learning process, characterized by the ongoing quest for new knowledge and focuson the student. The implementation of a local and municipal Permanent Habilitation Programmay complement the need for updating, as well as make the discussion of the cases and dataof the reality possible, thus aiming to adopt joined measures in order to cope with the presentedepidemiologic situations.

  10. Nurses' perceptions of professional dignity in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Laura; Kangasniemi, Mari Katariina; Rocco, Gennaro; Alvaro, Rosaria; Stievano, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The concept of dignity can be divided into two main attributes: absolute dignity that calls for recognition of an inner worth of persons and social dignity that can be changeable and can be lost as a result of different social factors and moral behaviours. In this light, the nursing profession has a professional dignity that is to be continually constructed and re-constructed and involves both main attributes of dignity. The purpose of this study was to determine how nurses described nursing's professional dignity in internal medicine and surgery departments in hospital settings. The research design was qualitative. This study was approved by the ethics committees of the healthcare organizations involved. All the participants were provided with information about the purpose and the nature of the study. A total of 124 nurses participated in this study. The data were collected using 20 focus group sessions in different parts of Italy. The data were analysed by means of a conventional inductive content analysis starting from the information retrieved in order to extract meaning units and sorting the arising phenomena into conceptually meaningful categories and themes. Nursing's professional dignity was deeply embedded in the innermost part of individuals. Regarding the social part of dignity, a great importance was put on the values that compose nursing's professional identity, the socio-historical background and the evolution of nursing in the area considered. The social part of dignity was also linked to collaboration with physicians and with healthcare assistants who were thought to have a central role in easing work strain. Equally important, though, was the relationship with peers and senior nurses. The organizational environments under scrutiny with their low staffing levels, overload of work and hierarchical interactions did not promote respect for the dignity of nurses. To understand these professional values, it is pivotal to comprehend the role of different

  11. From acute care to home care: the evolution of hospital responsibility and rationale for increased vertical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilwali, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    The responsibility of hospitals is changing. Those activities that were once confined within the walls of the medical facility have largely shifted outside them, yet the requirements for hospitals have only grown in scope. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the development of accountable care organizations, financial incentives are focused on care coordination, and a hospital's responsibility now includes postdischarge outcomes. As a result, hospitals need to adjust their business model to accommodate their increased need to impact post-acute care settings. A home care service line can fulfill this role for hospitals, serving as an effective conduit to the postdischarge realm-serving as both a potential profit center and a risk mitigation offering. An alliance between home care agencies and hospitals can help improve clinical outcomes, provide the necessary care for communities, and establish a potentially profitable product line.

  12. Causes of Acute Poisoning Hospital admission in Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj, 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammad Hosseini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: About 7% of patient referred to hospital are various forms of poisoning. This study was performed to determine the major causes of acute poisoning leading to Hospitalization at Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Yasuj, Iran. Methods: This descriptive study was performed from August 2007 to July 2008 on 470 cases of poisonings referred to Shahid Beheshti hospital of Yasuj. Demographic characteristics, time of poisoning, poisoning factor, history of previous poisoning, history of psychiatric disease, medication and other therapeutic intervention based on questionnaires and interviews with patients or companions of patients were recorded. Data were analyzed by Chi-Square Test. Results: Majority of poisoned patients were single females, in the age range of 21-30 years, unemployed, lived in urban areas, and had at least a diploma. The majority of cases were intentional poisoning with a history of depression, previous poisoning and attempted suicide. Significant relationship were seen between poisoning, age, sex, and job, (p0.05. Conclusion: With respect to the results of this study, the majority of these poisonings occurred among young, single and unemployed females due to suicide and drug intoxication. Necessary actions should be done in drug usage and maintenance, taking action against non-prescription drugs and giving proper public education to families.

  13. TREATMENT COMPLIANCE, IN PATIENS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROM BEFORE HOSPITALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lukina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to study adherence prior hospitalization, and the most important factors of adherence in hospitalized patients with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Materials and methods. This study included all patients admitted to the Cardiology Department of the Clinical Hospital № 2 Lyubertsy with a diagnosis of ACS. All the patients were asked to complete a questionnaire on assessing adherence during their stay in hospital. Results. Under obtain preliminary results (six months from the start of the study the study included 130 patients with ACS: 79 men and 51 women. Half of the patients (n = 61 are constantly observed by a doctor, and the other half almost did not seek for medical help. According to the Moriscos–Green test 71 persons (54.6 % were adherented to medical treatment, 55 patients were found to have low adherence to therapy. Only 42 patients, one-third of the survey participants took all drugs recommended by the doctor . Less than 9 % of patients hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS took statins, one third of patients were recommended to take aspirin. Primary cause of recommendations for medical therapy is forgetfulness (18.5 %, about 10 % of patients are afraid of the side effects of drugs. The main way to improve patient adherence to therapy was mentioned like information from the doctor about the possibility of improving the life and disease prognosis (62.3 %, quality of life, improving well-being(25.8 %, only 4 patients (3 % were totally unwilling to comply with medical recommendations. Conclusion. Specially designed questionnaire gave possibility to assess a number of facts (very low prescription of some of the main groups of cardiac drugs, high mortality identified in the study of the, and their possible causes. In addition to the personal factors of patients (forgetfulness, the main causes of poor adherence to treatment is the lack of awareness of patients about their illness, the possibilities of modern therapy

  14. Applying lean Six Sigma to reduce linen loss in an acute care hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying lean Six Sigma to reduce linen loss in an acute care hospital. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... This paper describes a case study in an acute care hospital that formed a cross-functional team to apply the Lean Six Sigma problem solving methodology and tools to improve the linen ...

  15. Establishing an end-of-life program in an academic acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsell, Colleen; Adorno, Gail; Guin, Peggy

    2003-01-01

    The primary goal of end-of-life (EOL) care is to relieve suffering through measures that improve comfort and address the psychological, social, and spiritual needs of the dying. This article discusses the components of a pilot project that focused on palliative EOL care at an academic acute care hospital. An interdisciplinary team of nurses, social workers, chaplains, patient care coordinators, and advanced practice nurses established a common vision for the care of patients who were "in the dying process," or were expected to die during their hospitalizations. A nurse-social worker "Care-Pair Team" completed a consistent interdisciplinary EOL care needs assessment when treatment goals became strictly palliative. Interventions were driven by a clinical pathway and a pre-printed physician's order set that continually clarified the goals of treatment. Key elements of the program included leadership support, advance directives, education, communication, family involvement, symptom management, professional collaboration, and outcomes measurement.

  16. Management of levofloxacin induced anaphylaxis and acute delirium in a palliative care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunangshu Ghoshal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Levofloxacin is a commonly prescribed antibiotic for managing chest and urinary tract infections in a palliative care setting. Incidence of Levofloxacin-associated anaphylaxis is rare and delirium secondary to Levofloxacin is a seldom occurrence with only few published case reports. It is an extremely rare occurrence to see this phenomenon in combination. Early identification and prompt intervention reduces both mortality and morbidity. A 17-year-old male with synovial sarcoma of right thigh with chest wall and lung metastasis and with no prior psychiatric morbidity presented to palliative medicine outpatient department with community-acquired pneumonia. He was initiated on intravenous (IV Ceftriaxone and IV Levofloxacin. Post IV Levofloxacin patient developed anaphylaxis and acute delirium necessitating IV Hydrocortisone, IV Chlorpheneramine, Oxygen and IV Haloperidol. Early detection and prompt intervention helped in complete recovery. Patient was discharged to hospice for respite after 2 days of hospitalization and then discharged home. Acute palliative care approach facilitated management of two life-threatening medical complications in a palliative care setting improving both quality and length of life.

  17. The scale of hospital production in different settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Hollingsworth, Bruce; Birch, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the productive efficiency of 141 public hospitals from 1998-2004 in two Canadian provinces; one a small province with a few small cities and a generally more rural population and the other a large province that is more urban in nature, with a population who mainly live in large...... cities. The relative efficiencies of the hospitals, the changes in productivity during this time period, and the relationship between efficiency and the size or scale of the hospitals are investigated using data envelopment analysis. The models for the production of health care use case mix adjusted...... hospital discharges as the output, and nursing hours as inputs. We find clear differences between the two provinces. Making use of ‘own’ and ‘meta’ technical efficiency frontiers, we demonstrate that efficient units in the larger and more urban province are larger than non-efficient units in that province...

  18. 2009 VHA Facility Quality and Safety Report - Hospital Settings

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2008 Hospital Report Card was mandated by the FY08 Appropriations Act, and focused on Congressionally-mandated metrics applicable to general patient populations....

  19. Misdiagnosing absent pedicle of cervical spine in the acute trauma setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad H. Abduljabbar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms.

  20. Surgically treated acute abdomen at Gondar University Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute abdomen is an acute onset of abdominal disease entities that require immediate surgical intervention in most of the cases. The numbers of researches done on acute abdomen in general are Very few in Ethiopia. The main objective of this study was to document the burden of acute abdomen in general ...

  1. Caring Behaviors: Perceptions of Acute Care Nurses and Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Beth Modic DNP. R.N., CDE; Sandra L. Siedlecki Ph.D., R.N.; Mary T. Quinn Griffin Ph.D., R.N. FAAN, ANEF; c Joyce J. Fitzpatrick Ph.D. R.N., FAAN

    2014-01-01

    Caring behaviors: Perceptions of acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of caring behaviors that influence the patient experience in acute care nurses and hospitalized patients with diabetes. Background: Nurses are the caregivers who render most of the direct care patients receive while they are hospitalized. Understanding what patients perceive as caring behaviors is essential in tailoring nursing interventi...

  2. Examining sustainability in a hospital setting: case of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sharon; Pieters, Karen; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Reece, Robin; Reid, Robert D

    2011-09-14

    The Ottawa Model of Smoking Cessation (OMSC) is a hospital-based smoking cessation program that is expanding across Canada. While the short-term effectiveness of hospital cessation programs has been documented, less is known about long-term sustainability. The purpose of this exploratory study was to understand how hospitals using the OMSC were addressing sustainability and determine if there were critical factors or issues that should be addressed as the program expanded. Six hospitals that differed on OMSC program activities (identify and document smokers, advise quitting, provide medication, and offer follow-up) were intentionally selected, and two key informants per hospital were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Key informants were asked to reflect on the initial decision to implement the OMSC, the current implementation process, and perceived sustainability of the program. Qualitative analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted and themes related to problem definition, stakeholder influence, and program features emerged. Sustainability was operationalized as higher performance of OMSC activities than at baseline. Factors identified in the literature as important for sustainability, such as program design, differences in implementation, organizational characteristics, and the community environment did not explain differences in program sustainability. Instead, key informants identified factors that reflected the interaction between how the health problem was defined by stakeholders, how priorities and concerns were addressed, features of the program itself, and fit within the hospital context and resources as being influential to the sustainability of the program. Applying a sustainability model to a hospital smoking cessation program allowed for an examination of how decisions made during implementation may impact sustainability. Examining these factors during implementation may provide insight into issues affecting program

  3. Investigating suspected acute pulmonary embolism - what are hospital clinicians thinking?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQueen, A.S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)], E-mail: andrewmcqueen7@hotmail.com; Worthy, S. [Department of Radiology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Keir, M.J. [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Aims: To assess local clinical knowledge of the appropriate investigation of suspected acute pulmonary embolism (PE) and this compare with the 2003 British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines as a national reference standard. Methods: A clinical questionnaire was produced based on the BTS guidelines. One hundred and eight-six participants completed the questionnaires at educational sessions for clinicians of all grades, within a single NHS Trust. The level of experience amongst participants ranged from final year medical students to consultant physicians. Results: The clinicians were divided into four groups based on seniority: Pre-registration, Junior, Middle, and Senior. Forty-six point eight percent of all the clinicians correctly identified three major risk factors for PE and 25.8% recognized the definition of the recommended clinical probability score from two alternatives. Statements regarding the sensitivity of isotope lung imaging and computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) received correct responses from 41.4 and 43% of participants, respectively, whilst 81.2% recognized that an indeterminate ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q) study requires further imaging. The majority of clinicians correctly answered three clinical scenario questions regarding use of D-dimers and imaging (78, 85, and 57.5%). There was no statistically significant difference between the four groups for any of the eight questions. Conclusions: The recommended clinical probability score was unfamiliar to all four groups of clinicians in the present study, and the majority of doctors did not agree that a negative CTPA or isotope lung scintigraphy reliably excluded PE. However, questions based on clinical scenarios received considerably higher rates of correct responses. The results indicate that various aspects of the national guidelines on suspected acute pulmonary embolism are unfamiliar to many UK hospital clinicians. Further research is needed to identify methods to improve

  4. Missed opportunities to transition from nebulizers to inhalers during hospitalization for acute asthma: A multicenter observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Valerie G; Hasegawa, Kohei; Heidt, Jonathan; Bittner, Jane C; Camargo, Carlos A

    2017-11-01

    Hospitalizations for acute asthma are thought to be highly preventable through the use of efficacious medications, though many patients have poor metered-dose inhaler (MDI) techniques, thus lessening these medications' real-world effectiveness. Teaching MDI techniques during hospitalization may therefore lead to improved outcomes. However, MDIs may be underutilized to deliver short-acting β-agonists (SABAs) in the inpatient setting, despite equivalent efficacy to nebulizer delivery. We sought to characterize delivery methods of SABAs among hospitalized patients with acute asthma to understand if there are missed opportunities for self-management education. In this secondary analysis of a cross-sectional 25-center chart review study of children and adults (ages 2-54 years) hospitalized for acute asthma across 18 states (2012-2013), we studied SABA therapy delivery methods during hospitalization and receipt of action plans and follow-up visits. Unadjusted associations were analyzed using chi-square, Fisher's exact, or Kruskal-Wallis tests. Of 987 patients, 44% received only nebulizer-SABA (children 32% vs. adults 53%; p vs. adults 47%; p nebulizer- vs. MDI-SABA were significantly less likely to receive individualized action plans (p vs. 78%, p vs. 59%, p < 0.001) at discharge. Opportunities exist to increase the delivery of MDI-SABA during hospitalization, particularly for adult inpatients with asthma. Further studies are needed to determine if increased use of MDI-delivered therapies improves patient education and outcomes.

  5. Incidence and relevance of acute kidney injury in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Giancarlo; Cabiati, Angelo; Bertoli, Silvio V; Assanelli, Emilio; Marana, Ivana; De Metrio, Monica; Rubino, Mara; Moltrasio, Marco; Grazi, Marco; Campodonico, Jeness; Milazzo, Valentina; Veglia, Fabrizio; Lauri, Gianfranco; Bartorelli, Antonio L

    2013-03-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs frequently in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and is associated with adverse short- and long-term outcomes. To date, however, no standardized definition of AKI has been used for patients with ACS. As a result, information on its true incidence and the clinical and prognostic relevance according to the severity of renal function deterioration are still lacking. We retrospectively studied 3,210 patients with ACS. AKI was identified on the basis of the changes in serum creatinine during hospitalization according to the AKI Network criteria. Overall, 409 patients (13%) developed AKI: 262 (64%) had stage 1, 25 (6%) stage 2, and 122 (30%) stage 3 AKI. In-hospital mortality was greater in patients with AKI than in those without AKI (21% vs 1%; p <0.001). The adjusted risk of death increased with increasing AKI severity. Compared to no AKI, the adjusted odds ratio for death was 3.5 (95% confidence interval 1.79 to 6.83) with stage 1 AKI and 31.2 (95% confidence interval 16.96 to 57.45) with stage 2 to 3 AKI. A significant parallel increase in major adverse cardiac events was also observed comparing patients without AKI and those with stage 2 to 3 AKI. In conclusion, in patients with ACS, AKI is a frequent complication, and the graded increase of its severity, as assessed using the AKI Network classification, is associated with a progressive increased risk of in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of quality indicators for monitoring outcomes of frail elderly hospitalised in acute care health settings: Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travers Catherine M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frail older people admitted to acute care hospitals are at risk of a range of adverse outcomes, including geriatric syndromes, although targeted care strategies can improve health outcomes for these patients. It is therefore important to assess inter-hospital variation in performance in order to plan and resource improvement programs. Clinical quality outcome indicators provide a mechanism for identifying variation in performance over time and between hospitals, however to date there has been no routine use of such indicators in acute care settings. A barrier to using quality indicators is lack of access to routinely collected clinical data. The interRAI Acute Care (AC assessment system supports comprehensive geriatric assessment of older people within routine daily practice in hospital and includes process and outcome data pertaining to geriatric syndromes. This paper reports the study protocol for the development of aged care quality indicators for acute care hospitals. Methods/Design The study will be conducted in three phases: 1. Development of a preliminary inclusive set of quality indicators set based on a literature review and expert panel consultation, 2. A prospective field study including recruitment of 480 patients aged 70 years or older across 9 Australian hospitals. Each patient will be assessed on admission and discharge using the interRAI AC, and will undergo daily monitoring to observe outcomes. Medical records will be independently audited, and 3. Analysis and compilation of a definitive quality indicator set, including two anonymous voting rounds for quality indicator inclusion by the expert panel. Discussion The approach to quality indicators proposed in this protocol has four distinct advantages over previous efforts: the quality indicators focus on outcomes; they can be collected as part of a routinely applied clinical information and decision support system; the clinical data will be robust and will

  7. Determinants of pre-hospital pharmacological intervention and its association with outcome in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandmark, Rasmus; Herlitz, Johan; Axelsson, Christer; Claesson, Andreas; Bremer, Anders; Karlsson, Thomas; Jimenez-Herrera, Maria; Ravn-Fischer, Annica

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was a) To identify predictors of the use of aspirin in the pre-hospital setting in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and b) To analyze whether the use of any of the recommended medications was associated with outcome. All patients with a final diagnosis of AMI, transported by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and admitted to the coronary care unit at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, in 2009-2011, were included. 1,726 patients were included. 58 % received aspirin by the EMS. Ischemic heart disease (IHD) was suspected in 84 %. Among patients who did not receive aspirin IHD was still suspected in 67 %. Among patients in whom IHD was suspected, and who were not on chronic treatment with aspirin the following predicted its pre-hospital use: a) age (odds ratio 0.98; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.96-0.99); b) a history of myocardial infarction (2.21; 1.21-4.04); c) priority given by EMS (8.07; 5.42-12.02); d) ST-elevation on ECG on admission to hospital (2.22; 1.50-3.29); e) oxygen saturation > 90 % (3.37; 1.81-6.27). After adjusting for confounders among patients who were not on chronic aspirin, only nitroglycerin of the recommended medications was associated with a reduced risk of death within 1 year (hazard ratio 0.40; 95 % CI 0.23-0.70). Less than six out of ten patients with AMI received pre-hospital aspirin. Five clinical factors were independently associated with the pre-hospital administration of aspirin. This suggests that the decision to treat is multifactorial, and it highlights the lack of accurate diagnostic tools in the pre-hospital environment. Nitroglycerin was independently associated with a reduced risk of death, suggesting that we select the use for a low-risk cohort.

  8. Sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management practices, and in-hospital outcomes in patients hospitalized in a Vietnamese hospital with a first acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L; Ha, Duc Anh; Phan, Dat Tuan; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Nguyen, Viet Lan; Nguyen, Nguyen Hanh; Nguyen, Ha; Goldberg, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi. The objectives of this observational study were to examine sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and mortality in patients hospitalized with an initial AMI. The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010. The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. Women were older (70 vs. 64 years) and were more likely than men to have had hyperlipidemia previously diagnosed (10% vs. 2%). During hospitalization, women were less likely to have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with men (57% vs. 74%), and women were more likely to have developed heart failure compared with men (19% vs. 10%). Women experienced higher in-hospital case-fatality rates (CFRs) than men (13% vs. 4%) and these differences were attenuated after adjustment for age and history of hyperlipidemia (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.01, 6.89), and receipt of PCI during hospitalization (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 0.77, 5.09). Our pilot data suggest that among patients hospitalized with a first AMI in Hanoi, women experienced higher in-hospital CFRs than men. Full-scale surveillance of all Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi medical centers is needed to confirm these findings. More targeted and timely educational and treatment approaches for women appear warranted.

  9. Sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management practices, and in-hospital outcomes in patients hospitalized in a Vietnamese hospital with a first acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa L Nguyen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi. The objectives of this observational study were to examine sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and mortality in patients hospitalized with an initial AMI. METHODS: The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010. RESULTS: The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. Women were older (70 vs. 64 years and were more likely than men to have had hyperlipidemia previously diagnosed (10% vs. 2%. During hospitalization, women were less likely to have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI compared with men (57% vs. 74%, and women were more likely to have developed heart failure compared with men (19% vs. 10%. Women experienced higher in-hospital case-fatality rates (CFRs than men (13% vs. 4% and these differences were attenuated after adjustment for age and history of hyperlipidemia (OR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.01, 6.89, and receipt of PCI during hospitalization (OR: 2.09; 95% CI: 0.77, 5.09. CONCLUSIONS: Our pilot data suggest that among patients hospitalized with a first AMI in Hanoi, women experienced higher in-hospital CFRs than men. Full-scale surveillance of all Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi medical centers is needed to confirm these findings. More targeted and timely educational and treatment approaches for women appear warranted.

  10. Sarcopenia and malnutrition in acutely ill hospitalized elderly: Prevalence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Anna Paola; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Mazzone, Andrea; Pittella, Francesca; Landi, Francesco; Zambon, Antonella; Annoni, Giorgio

    2015-08-01

    Data about the prevalence of sarcopenia among hospitalized patients is lacking and it is unclear whether the diagnostic criteria commonly used in community-dwellers is applicable in acutely ill subjects. The aims of this report are: (i) to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia among hospitalized patients; (ii) to assess whether the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria are applicable in an acute care setting; and (iii) to assess the mortality rate at 3 months. 103 patients admitted to the Acute Geriatric Clinic were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥65 years and malnutrition or risk of malnutrition, according to the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form. Sarcopenia was diagnosed using the EWGSOP criteria by means of bioimpedance analysis, handgrip strength and gait speed, within 72 h of admission. Information on deaths was obtained by telephone interview at 3 months following discharge. Sarcopenia was diagnosed in 22 patients (21.4%). Twenty-three patients (22.3%) were not able to perform the gait speed and/or the handgrip strength because bedridden or requiring intensive treatments. In this group, a definite diagnosis of sarcopenia was not possible, lacking at least one EWGSOP criteria. Eleven (10.7%) patients died within the 3 months post-discharge period. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that sarcopenic patients died significantly more frequently than others (log-rank p ≤ 0.001). In a population of hospitalized elderly malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, sarcopenia is highly prevalent and associated with an increased risk to die in the short-term. Furthermore, the EWGSOP criteria cannot be satisfactorily applied in a relevant proportion of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  12. Art viewing directives in hospital settings effect on mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Potash, Jordan S; Fang, Fan; Rollins, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect viewing directives can have when encountering art in hospitals. A secondary objective of the study was to understand the responses of viewers to an art exhibit on the theme of medical student empathy toward patient pain and suffering. Displaying art in hospitals has been credited with increasing well-being of patients, visitors, and staff. Generally, hospital curators have focused on the type of art to display (natural, symbolic, and abstract). This focus has neglected the possibility that in addition to the type of art, the way that viewers engage art may also be responsible for the healing effect. Participants (n = 97) were randomly allocated into one of the viewing directives: (1) reflecting on one artwork, (2) creating a drawing or poem in response to one artwork, or (3) no direction. Prior to looking at the art and immediately after, participants were administered the Brief Mood Introspection Scale (BMIS) and offered an opportunity to participate in an interview. Pre-post results of the BMIS demonstrated that viewers who received directions achieved some therapeutic effect. Qualitative themes from the post-exhibit interviews identified that the empathy themed exhibit was well received, although there were differences among responses from patients, visitors, and staff. The results imply that hospitals may consider offering prompts to help viewers engage with art to enhance mood and exhibiting art that demonstrates empathy for patient suffering. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Posttraumatic stress following childbirth in homelike- and hospital settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stramrood, C.A.; Paarlberg, K.M.; Huis In 't Veld, E.M.; Berger, L.W.; Vingerhoets, A.J.; Weijmar Schultz, W.C.; van Pampus, M.G.

    Methods. aEuro integral Multi-center cross-sectional study at midwifery practices, general hospitals and a tertiary (university) referral center. An unselected population of 907 women was invited to complete questionnaires on PTSD, demographic, psychosocial, and obstetric characteristics 2 to 6

  14. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older stroke patients. In conclusion, considerable differences were established between age and gender stroke patient groups, confirming the need of permanent national stroke registry and subsequent targeted action in secondary care, and prevention with education on risk factors, preferably personally tailored.

  15. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. [Continuity of care from the acute care hospital: Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Casals, Montserrat; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Alsina-Ribas, Anna; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Oriol-Ruscalleda, Margarita; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    To describe the profile of patients treated by a Continuity of Care Manager in an acute-care center during the first six months of its activity, as well as the profile of patients treated and the resource allocation. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with complex care needs requiring continuity of care liaison, and who were attended by the Continuity of Care Nurse during the period from October 2013 to March 2014. Patient characteristics, their social environment and healthcare resource allocation were registered and analyzed. A total of 1,034 cases of demand that corresponded to 907 patients (women 55.0%; age 80.57±10.1; chronic 47.8%) were analyzed, of whom 12.2% were readmitted. In the multivariate model, it was observed that the variables associated with readmission were polypharmacy (OR: 1.86; CI: 1.2-2.9) and fall history prior to admission (OR: 0.586; CI: 0.36-2-88). Patients treated by a Continuity of Care Nurse are over 80 years, with comorbidities, geriatric syndromes, complex care, and of life needs, to whom an alternative solution to hospitalization is provided, thus preventing readmissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Depression After First Hospital Admission for Acute Coronary Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Mårtensson, Solvej; Wium-Andersen, Ida Kim

    2016-01-01

    We examined incidence of depression after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and whether the timing of depression onset influenced survival. All first-time hospitalizations for ACS (n = 97,793) identified in the Danish Patient Registry during 2001-2009 and a reference population were followed....... In total, 19,520 (20.0%) ACS patients experienced depression within 2 years after the event. The adjusted rate ratio for depression in ACS patients compared with the reference population was 1.28 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 1.30). During 12 years of follow-up, 39,523 (40.4%) ACS patients and 27......,931 (28.6%) of the reference population died. ACS patients with recurrent (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.57, 1.67) or new-onset (HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.60, 1.72) depression had higher mortality rates than patients with no depression. In the reference population, the corresponding relative estimates...

  18. Hospitalizations and outpatient visits for rhinovirus-associated acute respiratory illness in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E Kathryn; Linder, Jodell; Kraft, David; Johnson, Monika; Lu, Pengcheng; Saville, Benjamin R; Williams, John V; Griffin, Marie R; Talbot, H Keipp

    2016-03-01

    Rhinovirus is linked to asthma exacerbations and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations in adults. The severity and rates of rhinovirus acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs) in adults are uncertain. We sought to determine rhinovirus-associated ARI rates in adults presenting for care in multiple settings and identify factors associated with rhinovirus detection. This prospective, population-based cohort enrolled Tennessee residents 18 years or older in the emergency department (ED), outpatient clinics, or hospitalized for ARI from December 2008 to May 2010. Nasal/throat swabs were collected and tested for rhinovirus and other viruses by using RT-PCR. Rates of ED visits and hospitalizations were calculated and rhinovirus-positive and rhinovirus-negative patients were compared. Among 2351 enrollees, rhinovirus was detected in 247 (11%). There were 7 rhinovirus-associated ED visits and 3 hospitalizations per 1000 adults annually. Patients with rhinovirus, compared with virus-negative ARI, were more likely to present with wheezing (odds ratio [OR], 1.7; 95% CI, 1.23-2.35; P Rhinovirus is associated with a substantial number of ED visits and hospitalizations for ARIs in adults. There may be modifiable factors that can reduce the likelihood of presenting with rhinovirus-associated ARIs. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  19. Secular trends and seasonality in first-time hospitalization for acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Thomas; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2004-01-01

    changes in seasonality. Methods: The study was based on 17,989 patients hospitalized with first-time acute myocardial infarction identified in the Hospital Discharge Registry of the County of North Jutland, Denmark, from 1 January 1983 to 31 December 1999. The seasonality of acute myocardial infarction...... of these seasonal patterns remained stable throughout the study period despite the decline in hospitalizations for acute myocardial infarction. Conclusion> Hospitalizations for first-time acute myocardial infarction decreased from 1983 to 1999, but the seasonal pattern remained stable over time....... was estimated using a Poisson regression model. Results: The incidence rate decreased by 3.2 % (95% confidence interval: 2.7-3.3%) annually. Hospitalizations followed different seasonal patterns depending on age, but not on gender. In the

  20. Care transitions for frail, older people from acute hospital wards within an integrated healthcare system in England: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Baillie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Frail older people experience frequent care transitions and an integrated healthcare system could reduce barriers to transitions between different settings. The study aimed to investigate care transitions of frail older people from acute hospital wards to community healthcare or community hospital wards, within a system that had vertically integrated acute hospital and community healthcare services. Theory and methods: The research design was a multimethod, qualitative case study of one healthcare system in England; four acute hospital wards and two community hospital wards were studied in depth. The data were collected through: interviews with key staff (n =17; focus groups (n = 9 with ward staff (n = 36; interviews with frail older people (n = 4. The data were analysed using the framework approach. Findings: Three themes are presented: Care transitions within a vertically integrated healthcare system, Interprofessional communication and relationships; Patient and family involvement in care transitions. Discussion and conclusions: A vertically integrated healthcare system supported care transitions from acute hospital wards through removal of organisational boundaries. However, boundaries between staff in different settings remained a barrier to transitions, as did capacity issues in community healthcare and social care. Staff in acute and community settings need opportunities to gain better understanding of each other’s roles and build relationships and trust.

  1. Care transitions for frail, older people from acute hospital wards within an integrated healthcare system in England: a qualitative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Baillie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Frail older people experience frequent care transitions and an integrated healthcare system could reduce barriers to transitions between different settings. The study aimed to investigate care transitions of frail older people from acute hospital wards to community healthcare or community hospital wards, within a system that had vertically integrated acute hospital and community healthcare services.Theory and methods: The research design was a multimethod, qualitative case study of one healthcare system in England; four acute hospital wards and two community hospital wards were studied in depth. The data were collected through: interviews with key staff (n =17; focus groups (n = 9 with ward staff (n = 36; interviews with frail older people (n = 4. The data were analysed using the framework approach. Findings: Three themes are presented: Care transitions within a vertically integrated healthcare system, Interprofessional communication and relationships; Patient and family involvement in care transitions.Discussion and conclusions: A vertically integrated healthcare system supported care transitions from acute hospital wards through removal of organisational boundaries. However, boundaries between staff in different settings remained a barrier to transitions, as did capacity issues in community healthcare and social care. Staff in acute and community settings need opportunities to gain better understanding of each other’s roles and build relationships and trust.

  2. Hydroxyurea and acute painful crises in sickle cell anemia: effects on hospital length of stay and opioid utilization during hospitalization, outpatient acute care contacts, and at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballas, Samir K; Bauserman, Robert L; McCarthy, William F; Castro, Oswaldo L; Smith, Wally R; Waclawiw, Myron A

    2010-12-01

    Exploratory findings from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of hydroxyurea (MSH) in sickle cell anemia (SS). Recurrent acute painful crises may be mild, moderate, or severe in nature and often require treatment at home, in acute care facilities as outpatients, and in the hospital with oral and/or parenteral opioids. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of hydroxyurea (HU) on length of stay (LOS) in hospital and opioid utilization during hospitalization, outpatient acute care contacts, and at home. Data from patient diaries, follow-up visit forms, and medical contact forms for the 299 patients enrolled in the MSH were analyzed. Types and dosages of at home, acute care, and in-hospital analgesic usage were explored descriptively. At-home analgesics were used on 40% of diary days and 80% of two-week follow-up periods, with oxycodone and codeine the most frequently used. Responders to HU used analgesics on fewer days. During hospitalization, 96% were treated with parenteral opioids, with meperidine the most frequently used; oxycodone was the most commonly used oral medication. The average LOS for responders to HU was about two days less than for other groups, and their cumulative time hospitalized during the trial was significantly less than for nonresponders or placebo groups (Popioids during acute care crises (P=0.015). Beneficial effects of HU include shortening the duration of hospitalization because of acute painful episodes and reducing the net amount of opioid utilization. Copyright © 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. All rights reserved.

  3. Spiritual Care in a Hospital Setting: Nurses’ and Patients’ Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlasblom, J.P.; Steen, van der J.T.; Jochemsen, H.

    2012-01-01

    The Trent Universities Interprofessional Learning in Practice (TUILIP) project aimed to establish interprofessional learning (IPL) for healthcare students in clinical practice settings. Ten IPL facilitators were employed in eight varied practice setting pilot sites for up to a year to research,

  4. Reducing Uncertainty for Acute Febrile Illness in Resource-Limited Settings: The Current Diagnostic Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Matthew L; Manabe, Yukari C

    2017-06-01

    AbstractDiagnosing the cause of acute febrile illness in resource-limited settings is important-to give the correct antimicrobials to patients who need them, to prevent unnecessary antimicrobial use, to detect emerging infectious diseases early, and to guide vaccine deployment. A variety of approaches are yielding more rapid and accurate tests that can detect more pathogens in a wider variety of settings. After decades of slow progress in diagnostics for acute febrile illness in resource-limited settings, a wave of converging advancements will enable clinicians in resource-limited settings to reduce uncertainty for the diagnosis of acute febrile illness.

  5. B-type natriuretic peptide and risk of acute kidney injury in patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moltrasio, Marco; Cabiati, Angelo; Milazzo, Valentina; Rubino, Mara; De Metrio, Monica; Discacciati, Andrea; Rumi, Paola; Marana, Ivana; Marenzi, Giancarlo

    2014-03-01

    To investigate whether admission B-type natriuretic peptide levels predict the development of acute kidney injury in acute coronary syndromes. Prospective study. Single-center study, 13-bed intensive cardiac care unit at a University Cardiological Center. Six-hundred thirty-nine acute coronary syndromes patients undergoing emergency and urgent percutaneous coronary intervention. None. We measured B-type natriuretic peptide at hospital admission in acute coronary syndromes patients (55% ST-elevation myocardial infarction and 45% non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction). Acute kidney injury was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria: stage 1 was defined as a serum creatinine increase greater than or equal to 0.3 mg/dL from baseline; stage 2 as a serum creatinine increase greater than two- to three-fold from baseline; stage 3 as a serum creatinine increase greater than three-fold from baseline, or greater than or equal to 4.0 mg/dL with an acute increase greater than 0.5 mg/dL, or need for renal replacement therapy. Acute kidney injury was developed in 85 patients (13%) and had a higher in-hospital mortality than patients without acute kidney injury (14% vs 1%; p < 0.001). B-type natriuretic peptide levels were higher in acute kidney injury patients than in those without acute kidney injury (264 [112-957] vs 98 [44-271] pg/mL; p < 0.001) and showed a significant gradient according to acute kidney injury severity (224 [96-660] pg/mL in stage 1 and 939 [124-1,650] pg/mL in stage 2-3 acute kidney injury; p < 0.001). The risk of developing acute kidney injury increased in parallel with B-type natriuretic peptide quartiles (5%, 9%, 15%, and 24%, respectively; p < 0.001). When B-type natriuretic peptide was evaluated, in terms of capacity to predict acute kidney injury, the area under the curve was 0.702 (95% CI, 0.642-0.762). In patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndromes, B-type natriuretic peptide levels measured at admission are

  6. Enhancing adult therapeutic interpersonal relationships in the acute health care setting: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornhaber R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Kornhaber,1 Kenneth Walsh,1,2 Jed Duff,1,3 Kim Walker1,3 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Alexandria, NSW, 2Tasmanian Health Services – Southern Region, Hobart, TAS, 3St Vincent’s Private Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Therapeutic interpersonal relationships are the primary component of all health care interactions that facilitate the development of positive clinician–patient experiences. Therapeutic interpersonal relationships have the capacity to transform and enrich the patients’ experiences. Consequently, with an increasing necessity to focus on patient-centered care, it is imperative for health care professionals to therapeutically engage with patients to improve health-related outcomes. Studies were identified through an electronic search, using the PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO databases of peer-reviewed research, limited to the English language with search terms developed to reflect therapeutic interpersonal relationships between health care professionals and patients in the acute care setting. This study found that therapeutic listening, responding to patient emotions and unmet needs, and patient centeredness were key characteristics of strategies for improving therapeutic interpersonal relationships. Keywords: health, acute care, therapeutic interpersonal relationships, relational care integrative review 

  7. Language, identity and representation: occupation and occupational therapy in acute settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Clare; Whiteford, Gail

    2008-09-01

    This article presents findings from a participatory action research study into the experience and use of occupation, theory and evidence in the everyday practice of a group of occupational therapists working in a large metropolitan hospital delivering a range of acute services, in Melbourne, Australia. Narrative data gathered from 11 individual interviews and 10 group discussions were analysed through numerous iterative cycles to explore research issues and evaluate research actions. This article discusses why the participating occupational therapists chose to change the language they used to describe their practice from a focus on 'function' to a focus on 'occupation'. This change improved the therapists' levels of confidence, strengthened their professional identities and provided for a sense of renewed empowerment within the organisation. The findings suggest that occupational therapists in acute settings can utilise language more effectively to augment their ability to promote the vital and unique contribution that occupational therapy has to make. Such small, yet powerful changes can empower occupational therapists to address long-standing dilemmas of representation and enable transformative practices.

  8. Prevalence of comorbidities and their impact on hospital management and short-term outcomes in Vietnamese patients hospitalized with a first acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa L Nguyen

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi for purposes of describing the prevalence of cardiovascular (CVD and non-CVD comorbidities and their impact on hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and short-term mortality in these patients.The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010.The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. The proportions of patients with none, any 1, and ≥ 2 CVD comorbidities were 34%, 42%, and 24%, respectively. Among the CVD comorbidities, hypertension was the most commonly reported (59%. There were decreasing trends in the proportion of patients who were treated with effective cardiac medications and coronary interventions as the number of CVD comorbidities increased. Patients with multiple CVD comorbidities tended to develop acute clinical complications and die at higher rates during hospitalization compared with patients with no CVD comorbidities (Odds Ratio: 1.40; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.40-4.84.Our data suggest that patients with multiple cardiac comorbidities tended to experience high in-hospital death rates in the setting of AMI. Full-scale surveillance of Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi hospitals is needed to confirm these findings. Effective strategies to manage Vietnamese patients hospitalized with AMI who have multiple comorbidities are warranted to improve their short-term prognosis.

  9. Prevalence of comorbidities and their impact on hospital management and short-term outcomes in Vietnamese patients hospitalized with a first acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L; Nguyen, Quang Ngoc; Ha, Duc Anh; Phan, Dat Tuan; Nguyen, Nguyen Hanh; Goldberg, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Vietnam. We conducted a pilot study of Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at the Vietnam National Heart Institute in Hanoi for purposes of describing the prevalence of cardiovascular (CVD) and non-CVD comorbidities and their impact on hospital management, in-hospital clinical complications, and short-term mortality in these patients. The study population consisted of 302 Hanoi residents hospitalized with a first AMI at the largest tertiary care medical center in Hanoi in 2010. The average age of study patients was 66 years and one third were women. The proportions of patients with none, any 1, and ≥ 2 CVD comorbidities were 34%, 42%, and 24%, respectively. Among the CVD comorbidities, hypertension was the most commonly reported (59%). There were decreasing trends in the proportion of patients who were treated with effective cardiac medications and coronary interventions as the number of CVD comorbidities increased. Patients with multiple CVD comorbidities tended to develop acute clinical complications and die at higher rates during hospitalization compared with patients with no CVD comorbidities (Odds Ratio: 1.40; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.40-4.84). Our data suggest that patients with multiple cardiac comorbidities tended to experience high in-hospital death rates in the setting of AMI. Full-scale surveillance of Hanoi residents hospitalized with AMI at all Hanoi hospitals is needed to confirm these findings. Effective strategies to manage Vietnamese patients hospitalized with AMI who have multiple comorbidities are warranted to improve their short-term prognosis.

  10. The importance of clinical leadership in the hospital setting

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, John; Jackson,Debra; Mannix,Judy; Davidson,Patricia Mary; Hutchinson,Marie

    2014-01-01

    John Daly,1 Debra Jackson,1 Judy Mannix,2 Patricia M Davidson,1,3 Marie Hutchinson4 1Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Sydney, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3School of Nursing, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia Abstract: In many areas of the developed world, contemporary hospital care is confronted by workforce challenges, changing consumer expect...

  11. Trends in hospital discharges, management and in-hospital mortality from acute myocardial infarction in Switzerland between 1998 and 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the late nineties, no study has assessed the trends in management and in-hospital outcome of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Switzerland. Our objective was to fill this gap. Methods Swiss hospital discharge database for years 1998 to 2008. AMI was defined as a primary discharge diagnosis code I21 according to the ICD10 classification. Invasive treatments and overall in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Overall, 102,729 hospital discharges with a diagnosis of AMI were analyzed. The percentage of hospitalizations with a stay in an Intensive Care Unit decreased from 38.0% in 1998 to 36.2% in 2008 (p for trend Switzerland, a steep rise in hospital discharges and in revascularization procedures for AMI occurred between 1998 and 2008. The increase in revascularization procedures could explain the decrease in in-hospital mortality rates. PMID:23530470

  12. 48 Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis in an Outpatient Setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... report the presentation of acute acalculous cholecystitis in two young African men admitted for the first time within days of each other. ... Recognition of AAC in a subset of young male patients presenting de novo with right upper quadrant pain is stressed. .... Glenn F, Becheer CG. Acalculous cholecystitis: An ...

  13. 48 Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis in an Outpatient Setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... cholecystitis associated with Q fever; report of seven cases and eview of the literature. Eur J. Clin Microbiol Infec Dis. 2003; 22(4):. 222-7. 10. Mishra OP, Das BK, Prakash J. Acute acalculous cholecystitis in typhoid fever. J Trop Pediatr. 1996; 42 (1); 58-9. 11. Maggi. 12. Rucci m, Puente AP, Rothenberg RE,.

  14. Colourful Privacy: Designing Visible Privacy Settings with Teenage Hospital Patients

    OpenAIRE

    van der Velden, Maja; Machniak, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports from a qualitative study based on the analysis of semi-structured interviews and Participatory Design activities with hospitalised teenagers with chronic health challenges. We studied how teenage patients manage their online privacy, with a focus on the design and use of privacy settings. We found that the majority of participants preferred to visualise privacy settings through the use colours and to personalise access control. They also considered these necessary on more se...

  15. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  16. Violence to staff in a general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, R; Shuttleworth, S; Hill, L

    1996-08-01

    The problem of aggression to staff in a general hospital was examined from the perspective of Poyner & Warne's (1986) model of workplace violence. A total of 396 staff (39% response rate) provided information on their experience of violence in the past year and a subsample were additionally interviewed about their current levels of mental health (GHQ). Some 72 staff (21% of respondents had been physically assaulted and 90% of these assaulted staff worked beyond the accident and emergency department, e.g. in medical wards. Nurses were physically assaulted, threatened and verbally abused at higher rates than other professionals. Employee factors (younger age, shorter National Health Service experience and attendance at violence training) were significantly associated with assault (P < 0.05). Postoperative confusion, receiving treatment and delayed treatment were common precursors of aggression. Mental health was significantly worse amongst staff exposed to threats (P < 0.01). This exploratory study establishes that violence is a problem across a number of general hospital departments and occupations and we argue that effective training should be made more available for staff at risk of assault.

  17. [Nutritional support in the home-based hospitalization setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, L; Planas, M; Pérez-Portabella, C; Vélez, C; San José, A

    2009-01-01

    The Hospital at Home (HAD) is a choice of care that enables own care in a hospital at home patient. Moreover, the nutritional support (NS) -enteral or parenteral nutrition- is usually indicated in patients with serious underlying disease, and/or frequently remain severely disabled. To analyze the characteristics of the patients, attended at home for specific questions of the NS that receive. descriptive and retrospective study of the patients attended by the Nutritional Support Unit (NSU), in the area of the HAD, from September 1, 2006 until August 31, 2007. At home, the realized procedure was: refill of gastrostomia or jejunostomia feeding tube in 158 cases; modification of the guideline of enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) in 53 cases; training of the skill of artificial nutrition in 14 cases. 39 visits were realized by complications -by infection or lead throught the estoma and by obstruction of the feeding tube-. Only in 3 patients (7.7%) the domiciliary assistance indicated the movement of the patient to the Emergency Unit. In our center, the infrastructure of the HAD has allowed to give answer to the needs of the patients who receive NS at home in our area of influence.

  18. Pending Laboratory Tests and the Hospital Discharge Summary in Patients Discharged To Sub-Acute Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walz, Stacy E; Smith, Maureen; Cox, Elizabeth; Sattin, Justin; Kind, Amy J. H

    2011-01-01

    ...) tests at the time of hospital discharge for general medical patients. However, the prevalence and communication of pending labs within a high-risk population, specifically those patients discharged to sub-acute care (i.e...

  19. The effect of integration of hospitals and post-acute care providers on Medicare payment and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konetzka, R Tamara; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Werner, Rachel M

    2018-02-07

    In this paper we examine empirically the effect of integration on Medicare payment and rehospitalization. We use 2005-2013 data on Medicare beneficiaries receiving post-acute care (PAC) in the U.S. to examine integration between hospitals and the two most common post-acute care settings: skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and home health agencies (HHA), using two measures of integration-formal vertical integration and informal integration representing preferential relationships between providers without formal relationships. Our identification strategy is twofold. First, we use longitudinal models with a fixed effect for each hospital-PAC pair in a market to test how changes in integration impact patient outcomes. Second, we use an instrumental variable approach to account for patient selection into integrated providers. We find that vertical integration between hospitals and SNFs increases Medicare payments and reduces rehospitalization rates. However, vertical integration between hospitals and HHAs has little effect, nor does informal integration between hospitals and either PAC setting. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Selection criteria of mobile lifters in the hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriero, G; Ottonello, M; Franchignoni, F

    2002-01-01

    The manual handling of patients with limited mobility represents the major cause of musculoskeletal injury to the spine in paramedical health care workers. Within the hospital, the more complex procedures of patient transfer often require the use of mobile hoists. The aim of this paper is to describe the basic criteria for the selection of such hoists. The main characteristics of a hoist are its stability, the sling attachment, the speed of operation, range of movement of the spreader bar, safety of the operation being performed, patient comfort, the physical effort required on the part of the health care worker, manoeuvrability and simplicity of use. Important organizational-structural features to evaluate include: the type of patient normally present in the unit concerned, the specific movement to be performed, the structural characteristics of the environment, and the work organization of the personnel.

  1. Study of Acute Alcohol Poisoning in Children Admitted to a Emergency Hospital Pirogov in Sofia, Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    Loukova, Anelia

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the current study is to analyze the medical and social dimensions of acute alcohol poisoning in children with regard of improving prevention of addictive habitis and develop effective preventative strategies for reducing underage alcohol consumption.Material and Methods: We have studied the patients at the age up to 18 years with acute alcohol poisoning hospitalized in the Children Toxicology Department of Emergency Hospital Pirogov, Sofia, Bulgaria, from January 1, 2007 to Ju...

  2. Anxiety, depression and pain intensity in patients with low back pain who are admitted to acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Long Chau; Lee, Iris Fung-Kam

    2008-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between anxiety, depression and pain intensity in patients with low back pain who are newly admitted to an acute care hospital setting. Previous studies have supported the idea that anxiety and depression play a significant role in chronic low back pain, but the relationship between anxiety, depression and pain intensity in patients with low back pain who are newly admitted to hospital has not been adequately explored. The study reported here was descriptive correlational in design. The sample was 102 Chinese patients with low back pain who were newly admitted to an acute care hospital in Hong Kong. Data were collected through individual interviews, using an 11-point numerical pain rating scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. In addition, demographic data were identified from the medical record. There were 48 male and 54 female adult participants in the study. The average anxiety and depression level of the participants was 19.46 (SD 9.02) on a scale of 0-42, which is higher than the normal level. The level of anxiety and depression was significantly positively correlated with pain intensity (r = 0.471, p anxiety and depression are not only associated with pain intensity but that they also, partly, predict pain intensity in patients with low back pain who are newly admitted to an acute care hospital. Relevance to clinical practice. The results of this study support the assessment of and intervention in anxiety and depression symptoms in the provision of pain-relief nursing treatment in patients with low back pain who are admitted to acute care hospitals.

  3. Delivery of physical therapy in the acute care setting: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freburger, Janet K; Heatwole Shank, Kendra; Knauer, Stefanie R; Montmeny, Richard M

    2012-02-01

    Population-based studies on physical therapy use in acute care are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine population-based, hospital discharge data from North Carolina to describe the demographic and diagnostic characteristics of individuals who receive physical therapy and, for common diagnostic subgroups, to identify factors associated with the receipt of and intensity of physical therapy use. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Hospital discharge data for 2006-2007 from the 128 acute care hospitals in the state were examined to identify the most common diagnoses that receive physical therapy and to describe the characteristics of physical therapy users. For 2 of the most common diagnoses, logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the receipt and intensity of physical therapy. Of the more than 2 million people treated in acute care hospitals, 22.5% received physical therapy (mean age=66 years; 58% female). Individuals with osteoarthritis (admitted for joint replacement) and stroke were 2 of the most common patient types to receive physical therapy. Almost all individuals admitted for a joint replacement received physical therapy, with little between-hospital variation. Between-hospital variation in physical therapy use for stroke was greater. Demographic and hospital-related factors were associated with physical therapy use and physical therapy intensity for both diagnoses, after controlling for illness severity and comorbidities. Data from only one state were examined, and the studied variables were limited. The use and intensity of physical therapy for stroke and joint replacement in acute care hospitals in North Carolina vary by clinical and nonclinical factors. Reasons behind the association of hospital characteristics and physical therapy use need further investigation.

  4. The effectiveness of nurse-delivered aromatherapy in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill R; Rivard, Rachael L; Griffin, Kristen H; Kolste, Alison K; Joswiak, Denise; Kinney, Mary Ellen; Dusek, Jeffery A

    2016-04-01

    To examine the use and effectiveness of essential oil therapeutic interventions on pain, nausea, and anxiety, when provided by nurses to patients in acute hospital settings across a large health system. This study expands upon the limited body of literature on aromatherapy use among inpatients. Retrospective, effectiveness study using data obtained from electronic health records. Ten Allina Health hospitals located in Minnesota and western Wisconsin. Nurse-delivered aromatherapy. Change in patient-reported pain, anxiety, and nausea, rated before and after receiving aromatherapy using a numeric rating scale (0-10). There were 10,262 hospital admissions during the study time frame in which nurse-delivered aromatherapy was part of patient care. The majority of admissions receiving aromatherapy were females (81.71%) and white (87.32%). Over 75% of all aromatherapy sessions were administered via inhalation. Lavender had the highest absolute frequency (49.5%) of use regardless of mode of administration, followed by ginger (21.2%), sweet marjoram (12.3%), mandarin (9.4%), and combination oils (7.6%). Sweet marjoram resulted in the largest single oil average pain change at -3.31 units (95% CI: -4.28, -2.33), while lavender and sweet marjoram had equivalent average anxiety changes at -2.73 units, and ginger had the largest single oil average change in nausea at -2.02 units (95% CI: -2.55, -1.49). Essential oils generally resulted in significant clinical improvements based on their intended use, although each oil also showed ancillary benefits for other symptoms. Future research should explore use of additional essential oils, modes of administration, and different patient populations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Thrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke is associated with lower long-term hospital bed day use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Thorkild; Schmitz, Marie Louise; Simonsen, Claus Z

    2016-01-01

    Background  Thrombolysis with intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator improves functional outcome in acute ischemic stroke. Few studies have investigated the effects of thrombolysis in a real-world setting. We evaluated the impact of thrombolysis on long-term hospital bed day use...... patients admitted to stroke centers not yet offering thrombolysis in 2004-2006. The outcomes were length of the stroke admission, total all-cause hospital bed day use during the first year after the stroke, and the long-term risk of readmissions. Thrombolysed and non-thrombolysed patients were compared......-thrombolysed group (adjusted geometric mean ratio, 0.88; 95% CI: 0.78-1.00). The median all-cause hospital bed day use within the first year was 12 days in the thrombolysed group and 19 days in the non-thrombolysed group (adjusted geometric mean ratio, 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73-0.92). There was no significant difference...

  6. Prevalence of respiratory syncytial virus infection among hospitalized children presenting with acute lower respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Soham; Shamsundar, Ranjani; Shet, Anita; Chawan, Rashmi; Srinivasa, Hiresave

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of RSV among hospitalized young children presenting with ALRI in Bangalore, India. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen detection was performed by direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining on 77 nasopharyngeal wash samples collected from hospitalized children below 2 years of age with a diagnosis of acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI). Out of 77 samples tested for RSV with DFA, 17 (22.1%) were found RSV-positive with a mean age of 8.24 ± 7.21 months (M:F = 1.8:1). Three children had congenital cardiac disease and one child had a history of prematurity. One child had re-infection within one month of primary infection. RSV-infected children were more likely to have a diagnosis of bronchiolitis than RSV-negative children (p infection is a significant cause of morbidity among children presenting with ALRI in southern India. In resource-limited settings, DFA can be used as an important tool for rapid detection of RSV and can potentially eliminate prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  7. Hospital variation in noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Vivek T; Kim, Nancy; Dai, Ying; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Safavi, Kyan C; Bikdeli, Behnood; Lindenauer, Peter K; Testani, Jeffrey; Dries, Daniel L; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2014-05-01

    Although noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) for patients with acute decompensated heart failure was introduced almost 20 years ago, the variation in its use among hospitals remains unknown. We sought to define hospital practice patterns of NIPPV use for acute decompensated heart failure and their relationship with intubation and mortality. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a database maintained by Premier, Inc., that includes a date-stamped log of all billed items for hospitalizations at >400 hospitals. We examined hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure in this database from 2005 to 2010 and included hospitals with annual average volume of >25 such hospitalizations. We identified 384 hospitals that encompassed 524 430 hospitalizations (median annual average volume: 206). We used hierarchical logistic regression models to calculate hospital-level outcomes: risk-standardized NIPPV rate, risk-standardized intubation rate, and in-hospital risk-standardized mortality rate. We grouped hospitals into quartiles by risk-standardized NIPPV rate and compared risk-standardized mortality rates and risk-standardized intubation rates across quartiles. Median risk-standardized NIPPV rate was 6.2% (interquartile range, 2.8%-9.3%; 5th percentile, 0.2%; 95th percentile, 14.8%). There was no clear pattern of risk-standardized mortality rates across quartiles. The bottom quartile of hospitals had higher risk-standardized intubation rate (11.4%) than each of the other quartiles (9.0%, 9.7%, and 9.1%; Pvariation exists among hospitals in the use of NIPPV for acute decompensated heart failure without evidence for differences in mortality. There may be a threshold effect in relation to intubation rates, with the lowest users of NIPPV having higher intubation rates. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Rhinovirus-C detection in children presenting with acute respiratory infection to hospital in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawkner-Corbett, David W; Khoo, Siew Kim; Duarte, Carminha M; Bezerra, Patricia G M; Bochkov, Yury A; Gern, James E; Le Souef, Peter N; McNamara, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is a common cause of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. We aimed to characterize the clinical and demographic features associated with different RV species detected in children attending hospital with ARI, from low-income families in North-east Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 630 children infected with RV-A and RV-C. However, in children with asthma/EVW, RV-C was detected relatively more frequently than RV-A (23% vs. 5%; P = 0.04). Our findings highlight RV as a potentially important pathogen in this setting. Generally, clinical and demographic features were similar in children in whom RV-A and C species were detected. However, RV-C was more frequently found in children with asthma/EVW than RV-A. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Reiki and its journey into a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryak, Elizabeth; Vitale, Anne

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest among health care providers, especially professional nurses to promote caring-healing approaches in patient care and self-care. Health care environments are places of human caring and holistic nurses are helping to lead the way that contemporary health care institutions must become holistic places of healing. The practice of Reiki as well as other practices can assist in the creation of this transformative process. Abington Memorial Hospital (AMH) in Abington, Pennsylvania is a Magnet-designated health care facility with an Integrative Medicine Services Department. AMH's Integrative Medicine staff focuses on the integration of holistic practices, such as Reiki into traditional patient care. Reiki services at AMH were initiated about 10 years ago through the efforts of a Reiki practitioner/nurse and the vision that healing is facilitated through the nurturing of the mind, body, and spirit for healing and self-healing. AMHs-sustained Reiki program includes Reiki treatments and classes for patients, health care providers, and community members. This program has evolved to include a policy and annual competency for any Reiki-trained nurse and other employees to administer Reiki treatments at the bedside.

  10. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  11. HIV Infection in hospitalized under-5 children with acute watery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-12-31

    Dec 31, 2011 ... Five of them presented within 48 hours of diarrhoea . Associated illness. Three had malaria while two had acute respiratory infec- tion in addition to acute diarrhea. Past Medical History. Two had been admitted earlier for febrile illness but no previous history of blood transfusion. None had a chronic illness.

  12. Staging and defining characteristics of pressure ulcers using photographs by staff nurses in acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesada, Elizabeth C; Warren, Joan I; Goodman, Dorothy; Iliuta, Ruth W; Thurkauf, Gail; McLaughlin, Maureen K; Johnson, Joyce E; Strassner, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a digital photograph obtained by a staff nurse in the acute care setting could be used to determine staging and wound characteristics of a pressure ulcer when viewed by a panel of wound experts as compared to a bedside assessment by a wound expert. One hundred digital photographs of pressure ulcers were obtained from 69 patients on general and critical care medical-surgical nursing units from 2 Magnet-designated hospitals belonging to a large Mid-Atlantic health care system. Four certified wound ostomy nurses (CWONs), 2 at each hospital site, identified patients with a pressure ulcer for bedside assessment and digital photography. This multisite nonexperimental study compared bedside assessment of wound characteristics and staging of 100 pressure ulcers by the hospital CWON to assessment of the same wound by an expert panel of 3 CWONs via digital photography. This study examined 13 wound characteristics and a total score on the Bates-Jensen Wound Assessment Tool (BWAT) as well as the staging of a pressure ulcer using the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel definitions. A nonprobability sampling plan used a convenience sample of 69 adult inpatients at the 2 hospitals to obtain photographs of 100 pressure ulcers. : The BWAT, formerly the Pressure Sore Status Tool, was used by the bedside and expert panelists to assess the pressure ulcer characteristics. This tool assesses 13 wound characteristics from best to worst, using a modified Likert scale. Studies examining reliability and validity of the BWAT support it as an effective instrument. Interrater reliability among the hospital CWONs using bedside assessment and panelist CWONs using digital photography assessment for the BWAT 13 characteristics ranged from slight to fair agreement for skin color surrounding wound (κ range = 0.12-0.21, P ≤ .02) to fair to moderate agreement for necrotic tissue type (κ range = 0.37-0.60, P = .000). Only slight agreement for total BWAT

  13. Nationwide trends of hospital admissions for acute cholecystitis in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Jobanputra, Yash; Garg, Sushil K; Patwardhan, Soumil; Mehta, Dhruv

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Acute cholecystitis is a fairly common inpatient diagnosis among the gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to use a national database of US hospitals to evaluate the incidence and costs of hospital admissions associated with acute cholecystitis. Method: We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample Database (NIS) for all patients in which acute cholecystitis (ICD-9 codes: 574.00, 574.01, 574.30, 574.31, 574.60, 574.61 or 575.0) was the principal discharge diagnosis from 1997 to 2012. The NIS is the largest all-payer inpatient database in the United States and contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each year. The statistical significance of the difference in the number of hospital discharges, lengths of stay and associated hospital costs over the study period was determined by using the Chi-square test for trends. Results: In 1997, there were 149 661 hospital admissions with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, which increased to 215 995 in 2012 ( P acute cholecystitis decreased by 17% between 1997 and 2012 (i.e. from 4.7 days to 3.9 days; (P acute cholecystitis has increased significantly in the United States over the last 16 years, along with a great increase in the associated hospital charges. However, there has been a gradual decline in the mean length of stay. Inpatient costs associated with acute cholecystitis contribute significantly to the total healthcare bill. Further research on cost-effective evaluation and management of acute cholecystitis is required. PMID:27174434

  14. Hospital quality measures: are process indicators associated with hospital standardized mortality ratios in French acute care hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantcha, Marcus; Le-Pogam, Marie-Annick; Calmus, Sophie; Grenier, Catherine; Evrard, Isabelle; Lamarche-Vadel, Agathe; Rey, Grégoire

    2017-08-22

    Results of associations between process and mortality indicators, both used for the external assessment of hospital care quality or public reporting, differ strongly across studies. However, most of those studies were conducted in North America or United Kingdom. Providing new evidence based on French data could fuel the international debate on quality of care indicators and help inform French policy-makers. The objective of our study was to explore whether optimal care delivery in French hospitals as assessed by their Hospital Process Indicators (HPIs) is associated with low Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios (HSMRs). The French National Authority for Health (HAS) routinely collects for each hospital located in France, a set of mandatory HPIs. Five HPIs were selected among the process indicators collected by the HAS in 2009. They were measured using random samples of 60 to 80 medical records from inpatients admitted between January 1st, 2009 and December 31, 2009 in respect with some selection criteria. HSMRs were estimated at 30, 60 and 90 days post-admission (dpa) using administrative health data extracted from the national health insurance information system (SNIIR-AM) which covers 77% of the French population. Associations between HPIs and HSMRs were assessed by Poisson regression models corrected for measurement errors with a simulation-extrapolation (SIMEX) method. Most associations studied were not statistically significant. Only two process indicators were found associated with HSMRs. Completeness and quality of anesthetic records was negatively associated with 30 dpa HSMR (0.72 [0.52-0.99]). Early detection of nutritional disorders was negatively associated with all HSMRs: 30 dpa HSMR (0.71 [0.54-0.95]), 60 dpa HSMR (0.51 [0.39-0.67]) and 90 dpa HSMR (0.52 [0.40-0.68]). In absence of gold standard of quality of care measurement, the limited number of associations suggested to drive in-depth improvements in order to better determine associations

  15. Microbial contamination of nonsterile pharmaceuticals in public hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Mugoyela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Veronica Mugoyela1, Kennedy D Mwambete21Department of Medicinal Chemistry, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, TanzaniaPurpose: Contamination of pharmaceuticals with microorganisms irrespective whether they are harmful or nonpathogenic can bring about changes in physicochemical characteristics of the medicines. Although sterility is not a requirement in official compendia for nonsterile pharmaceuticals, bioburdens need to be within acceptable limits. Therefore, this study investigated microbial contamination of 10 nonsterile pharmaceuticals frequently delivered to outpatients by identifying and quantifying microbial contaminants and susceptibility pattern testing on the microbes isolated.Methods: The study was carried out at Amana Municipal Hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The protocol for the study involved structured selection of representative tablets, syrups, and capsules from the hospital’s outpatient pharmacy. Constitutive microorganisms were elaborated and enumerated using standard microbiologic procedures.Results: Results showed that 50% of all tested products were heavily contaminated, and the predominant contaminants comprised Klebsiella, Bacillus, and Candida species. Furthermore, the results showed that the isolated Bacillus and Klebsiella species were resistant to Augmentin® and cloxacillin. The differences in means for cfu/mL and zones of inhibition among the microorganisms isolated were considered significant at P < 0.05.Conclusion: The nonsterile pharmaceuticals were presumably microbiologically contaminated due to poor handling during dispensing, repackaging, and/or nonadherence to good manufacturing practice. Therefore, training and educating the dispensers, as well as patients, on the proper handling and use of medicines cannot be overemphasized, because these are key aspects in controlling cross-contamination of medicines.Keywords: microorganisms

  16. Senile anorexia in acute-ward and rehabilitations settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Savina, C; Piredda, M; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Domiguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Cannella, C

    2008-10-01

    The most common pathological change in eating behaviour among older persons is anorexia, which accounts for a large percent of undernutrition in older adults. The main research aims are to determine, in a sample of acute and rehabilitation elderly subjects, the prevalence of anorexia of aging and the causes most impacting on senile anorexia. four different Units cooperated to this research study. Patients were recruited from geriatric acute and rehabilitation wards in Italy. Each Research Unit, for the estimation of the prevalence of anorexia in elderly subjects evaluated all the patients aged over 65 recruited from April 2006 to June 2007. Nutritional status, depression, social, functional and cognitive status, quality of life, health status, chewing, swallowing, sensorial functions were evaluated in anorexic patients and in a sample of "normal eating" elderly subjects. 96 anorexic subjects were selected in acute and rehabilitation wards (66 women; 81.5 +/- 7 years; 30 men: 81.8 +/- 8 years. The prevalence of anorexia in the sample was 33.3% in women and 26.7% in men. Anorexic subjects were older and more frequently needed help for shopping and cooking. A higher (although not statistically significant) level of comorbidity was present in anorexic subjects. These subjects reported constipation and epigastrium pain more frequently. Nutritional status parameters (MNA, anthropometry, blood parameters) were significantly worst in anorexic subjects whereas CRP was higher. Chewing and swallowing efficiencies were significantly impaired and eating patterns were different for anorexic subjects with a significant reduction of protein rich foods. consequences of anorexia can be extremely serious and deeply affect both patient's mobility, mortality and quality of life. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to perform a special evaluation of the nutritional risk, to constantly evaluate the nutritional status and feeding intake of older patients, to identify and treat the

  17. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES IN ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN CELJE GENERAL HOSPITAL IN 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Veninšek

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. DIGAMI study showed that intrahospital mortality and mortality at one year after myocardial infarction can be significantly reduced in diabetics treated in acute phase of myocardial infarction by GI infusion and afterwards for at least three months with intensive insulin treatment. Mortality can be reduced for more than 50% in a subgroup of patients younger than 70 years, without congestive heart failure, with first myocardial infarction, not treated with insulin or digitalis. In this perspective we reviewed treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in 1999 in Celje General Hospital.Methods. We reviewed documentation of treatment of all diabetics with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. We collected data on number of newly discovered diabetes, on previous treatment of diabetes, on treatment of diabetes during hospitalization and at discharge, on drugs used for treatment of diabetes and on mortality during hospitalization.Results. Diabetics presented 20% of all patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. None of patients received GI infusion, none had intensively managed blood sugar. 24% of patients were treated with sulfonylureas in acute phase of myocardial infarction. 33% of patients were discharged from hospital with insulin therapy. Intrahospital mortality was 9%, comparable with patients without diabetes.Conclusions. In 1999 was intrahospital treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in Celje General Hospital successful as their intrahospital mortality equaled non-diabetics. Treatment of diabetes itself, during hospitalization and after discharge, on the other hand, in 1999 had not been up to date according to results of recent studies. In our opinion, it is mandatory for diabetologist to make part of the team that treats diabetic with acute myocardial infarction

  18. Structured physical exercise improves neuropsychiatric symptoms in acute dementia care : a hospital-based RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleiner, Tim; Dauth, Hannah; Gersie, Marleen; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Haussermann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary objective of this trial is to investigate the effects of a short-term exercise program on neuropsychiatric signs and symptoms in acute hospital dementia care. METHODS: Within a hospital-based randomized controlled trial, the intervention group conducted a 2-week exercise

  19. Etiology of acute bronchiolitis and the relationship with meteorological conditions in hospitalized infants in China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zheng-Rong; Ji, Wei; Wang, Yu-qing; Yan, Yong-Dong; Shao, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Lan; Xu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of common viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) in hospitalized infants with acute bronchiolitis and study the relationship between bronchiolitis and meteorological conditions. Methods: A 2-year prospective study was conducted on infants with a first episode of bronchiolitis admitted to Respiratory Department of Suzhou Children's Hospital. Demographic and clinical characteristics and meteorological conditions were obtained and analyzed. Results: Pathogens ...

  20. Variations in levels of care within a hospital provided to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Caring for trauma patients is a dynamic process, and it is often necessary to move the trauma patient around the hospital to different locations. This study attempted to document the quality of observations performed on acute trauma patients as they moved through the hospital during the first 24 hours of care.

  1. Twenty-Four-Hour Mobility During Acute Hospitalization in Older Medical Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Petersen, Janne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inactivity during hospitalization in older medical patients may lead to functional decline. This study quantified 24-hour mobility, validated the accelerometers used, and assessed the daily level of basic mobility in acutely admitted older medical patients during their hospitalization....... METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study in older medical patients able to walk independently (ambulatory patients) and those not able to walk independently (nonambulatory patients) on admission. The 24-hour mobility level during hospitalization was assessed by measuring the time in lying, sitting......%-100% with positions performed by older medical patients. CONCLUSIONS: Older acutely hospitalized medical patients with walking ability spent 17h/d of their in-hospital time in bed, and the level of in-hospital mobility seemed to depend on the patients' level of basic mobility. The accelerometers were valid...

  2. Transient and persistent worsening renal function during hospitalization for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greiner, Melissa A; Sharma, Puza P; DeVore, Adam D; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2014-12-01

    Transient and persistent worsening renal function (WRF) may be associated with different risks during hospitalization for acute heart failure. We compared outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure with transient, persistent, or no WRF. We identified patients 65 years or older hospitalized with acute heart failure from a clinical registry linked to Medicare claims data. We defined WRF as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥ 0.3 mg/dL after admission. We further classified patients with WRF by the difference between admission and last recorded serum creatinine levels into transient WRF (acute heart failure were associated with higher adjusted risks for 90-day all-cause postadmission mortality. Patients with persistent WRF had worse outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of antimicrobial use in US acute care hospitals, May-September 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Shelley S; Edwards, Jonathan R; Beldavs, Zintars G; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Janelle, Sarah J; Kainer, Marion A; Lynfield, Ruth; Nadle, Joelle; Neuhauser, Melinda M; Ray, Susan M; Richards, Katherine; Rodriguez, Richard; Thompson, Deborah L; Fridkin, Scott K

    2014-10-08

    Inappropriate antimicrobial drug use is associated with adverse events in hospitalized patients and contributes to the emergence and spread of resistant pathogens. Targeting effective interventions to improve antimicrobial use in the acute care setting requires understanding hospital prescribing practices. To determine the prevalence of and describe the rationale for antimicrobial use in participating hospitals. One-day prevalence surveys were conducted in acute care hospitals in 10 states between May and September 2011. Patients were randomly selected from each hospital's morning census on the survey date. Data collectors reviewed medical records retrospectively to gather data on antimicrobial drugs administered to patients on the survey date and the day prior to the survey date, including reasons for administration, infection sites treated, and whether treated infections began in community or health care settings. Antimicrobial use prevalence, defined as the number of patients receiving antimicrobial drugs at the time of the survey divided by the total number of surveyed patients. Of 11,282 patients in 183 hospitals, 5635 (49.9%; 95% CI, 49.0%-50.9%) were administered at least 1 antimicrobial drug; 77.5% (95% CI, 76.6%-78.3%) of antimicrobial drugs were used to treat infections, most commonly involving the lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, or skin and soft tissues, whereas 12.2% (95% CI, 11.5%-12.8%) were given for surgical and 5.9% (95% CI, 5.5%-6.4%) for medical prophylaxis. Of 7641 drugs to treat infections, the most common were parenteral vancomycin (1103, 14.4%; 95% CI, 13.7%-15.2%), ceftriaxone (825, 10.8%; 95% CI, 10.1%-11.5%), piperacillin-tazobactam (788, 10.3%; 95% CI, 9.6%-11.0%), and levofloxacin (694, 9.1%; 95% CI, 8.5%-9.7%). Most drugs administered to treat infections were given for community-onset infections (69.0%; 95% CI, 68.0%-70.1%) and to patients outside critical care units (81.6%; 95% CI, 80.4%-82.7%). The 4 most common treatment

  4. [Hospital readmissions related to drug interactions: a retrospective study in a hospital setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Cristiano Soares de; Tavares, Ludmila Santana; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2012-12-01

    To examine the relationship between potential drug interactions and hospital readmissions. Retrospective study with 1,487 adult patients (> 18 years old) admitted to a general hospital in the city of Vitória da Conquista, Northeastern Brazil, from January to December 2007. Data were collected from Hospital Admission Authorization (AIH) forms in the Brazilian National Health System Hospital Database (SIH/SUS). Probabilistic linkage was used to combine multiple AIH forms from the same admission into a single record and to identify readmissions. Information on prescriptions was manually added to the SIH/SUS records. Logistic regression was used to quantitatively assess the impact of drug interactions on hospital readmissions. Cox regression was performed to test the impact of this variable on time to first readmission. A total of 99 readmissions (7% of all patients) were identified. Potential drug interactions were found in 35% of all prescriptions evaluated. Patients with potential drug interactions in a prior admission were more likely to be readmitted. The adjusted odds ratio indicated a 2.4-fold increase in odds of being readmitted; and the adjusted hazard ratio showed that this risk was increased by 79% in patients with potential drug interactions (p < 0.01). The study results suggest an association between prior drug interactions and increased risk of readmission. Health professionals should be aware of potential hazard of certain drug combinations and closely monitor high-risk patients such as elderly patients and those with renal impairment.

  5. Setting up a child eye care centre: the Mercy Eye Hospital, Abak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To document and share our experience in setting up a Child Eye Care Centre within a rural mission eye hospital and document subsequent development of services. Method: The location of the project was Mercy Eye Hospital (MEH) Abak, Akwa Ibom State in the South South zone of Nigeria). Consent to commence ...

  6. Specialist outreach clinics in primary care and rural hospital settings (Cochrane Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight SE,

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Specialist outreach clinics in primary care and rural hospital settings. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2003, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD003798.pub2. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003798.pub2.

  7. Management of acute pain in the postoperative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Winfried; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2018-01-01

    /unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly-trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level where major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving......Despite the introduction of evidence-based recommendations for postoperative pain management (POPM), the consensus is that pain control remains suboptimal. Barriers to achieving patient-satisfactory analgesia include deficient knowledge regarding POPM among staff, lack of instructions, insufficient...... clinical outcomes. Changes in structure and processes to deliver high-level quality care need to be regularly audited to ensure translation into better outcomes. QIs can help drive this process by providing an indicator of current levels of performance. In addition, outcomes QIs can be used to benchmark...

  8. Management of acute pain in the postoperative setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meissner, Winfried; Huygen, Frank Jpm; Neugebauer, Edmund A M

    2017-01-01

    /unsuccessful. In the hospital sector the development and implementation of QIs is complex. The nature of POPM requires a highly-trained, multidisciplinary team and it is at this level where major improvements can be made. Greater involvement of patients regarding pain management is also seen as a priority area for improving......Despite the introduction of evidence-based recommendations for postoperative pain management (POPM), the consensus is that pain control remains suboptimal. Barriers to achieving patient-satisfactory analgesia include deficient knowledge regarding POPM among staff, lack of instructions, insufficient...... clinical outcomes. Changes in structure and processes to deliver high-level quality care need to be regularly audited to ensure translation into better outcomes. QIs can help drive this process by providing an indicator of current levels of performance. In addition, outcomes QIs can be used to benchmark...

  9. Acute cholecystitis mimicking or accompanying cardiovascular disease among Japanese patients hospitalized in a Cardiology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Michishige; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Morita, Hideaki; Miyamura, Masatoshi; Sohmiya, Koichi; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2015-12-19

    Acute cholecystitis sometimes displays symptoms and electrocardiographic changes mimicking cardiovascular problems. It may also coexist with cardiovascular disorders. We analyzed the clinical characteristic of the cardiac patients who were diagnosed with acute cholecystitis during hospitalization in the cardiology department. Using the department database, we identified 16 patients who were diagnosed with acute cholecystitis during the hospitalization in the cardiology department between June 2010 and June 2014. Five patients who were initially suspected to have cardiac problems (acute coronary syndrome, four patients; Adams-Stokes syndrome, one patient) owing to their symptoms were subsequently diagnosed with acute cholecystitis. Two of these patients showed electrocardiographic changes mimicking myocardial ischemia, and three tested positive for a biomarker (heart-type fatty acid binding protein) of acute myocardial injury. The 11 remaining cardiac patients were diagnosed with acute cholecystitis during their hospitalization or at the time of admission. Prolonged fasting and/or staying in an intensive care unit (ICU) may have contributed to their condition. Among these 11 patients, aortic dissection was the most prevalent underlying cardiac condition, affecting 5 patients. Although it is a rare condition, acute cholecystitis may coexist with or be misdiagnosed as a cardiovascular disorder. This possibility should not be overlooked in cardiac patients because a delay in treatment may result in critical complications.

  10. Factors Contributing to Readmission of Seniors into Acute Care Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Vaughn; Ehlman, Katie; Conners, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Medicare spending is expected to increase by 79% between the years 2010 and 2020, caused, in-part, by hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. This study identified factors contributing to hospital readmissions in a midwest heath service area (HSA), using Coleman's Transition Care Model as the theoretical framework. The researchers…

  11. Mortality following acute pancreatitis: social deprivation, hospital size and time of admission: record linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephen E; Thorne, Kymberley; Evans, P Adrian; Akbari, Ashley; Samuel, David G; Williams, John G

    2014-08-28

    Very little is known about whether mortality following acute pancreatitis may be influenced by the following five factors: social deprivation, week day of admission, recruitment of junior doctors in August each year, European Working Time Directives (EWTDs) for junior doctors' working hours and hospital size. The aim of this study was to establish how mortality following acute pancreatitis may be influenced by these five factors in a large cohort study. Systematic record linkage of inpatient, mortality and primary care data for 10 589 cases of acute pancreatitis in Wales, UK (population 3.0 million), from 1999 to 2010. The main study outcome measure was mortality at 60 days following the date of admission. Mortality was 6.4% at 60 days. There was no significant variation in mortality according to social deprivation or the week day of admission. There was also no significant variation according to calendar month for acute pancreatitis overall or for gallstone aetiology, but for alcoholic acute pancreatitis, mortality was increased significantly by 93% for admissions during the months of August and September and 102% from August to October when compared with all other calendar months. Mortality was increased significantly for alcoholic aetiology in August 2004, the official month that the first EWTD was implemented, but there were no other increases following the first or second EWTDs. There were also indications of increased mortality in large hospitals when compared with small hospitals, for acute pancreatitis overall and for gallstone aetiology but not for alcoholic acute pancreatitis, although these increases in mortality were of quite marginal significance. Although we found some evidence of increased mortality for patients admitted with alcoholic acute pancreatitis during August to October, in August 2004, and in large hospitals for acute pancreatitis overall and for gallstone aetiology, the study factors had limited impact on mortality following acute

  12. Older Patients in the Acute Setting - Is There a Better Solution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressel, Eckart; Reichstein Wejse, Miriam; Demény, Ann Kathrin

    Background A substantial amount of older (>65 years) patients admitted to the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) at Bispebjerg Hospital are often characterized by complex health related and medication problems, functional loss and atypical presentation of symptoms. We established a Geriatric Acute Team (GATE....... The control group received treatment after usual standard at the AMU, whereas, the case group received an acute geriatric assessment and follow-up in GATE conducted by a senior consultant in geriatric medicine. Data were retrieved from the patient’s medical journals and included demographic and medical...... and 58 % had more than 3 simultaneous present diseases. Implementing GATE resulted in shorter hospitalization times at AMU (p=0.03), fewer doctors attending the single patient (p=0.02), fewer 30-day readmission (p=0.05) and more patients being transferred to the geriatric ward (p=0.002). Conclusion...

  13. Nursing students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in placements outside traditional hospital settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida T; Berntsen, Karin; Brynildsen, Grethe; Hestetun, Margrete

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives To explore students' opinions of the learning environment during clinical placement in settings outside traditional hospital settings. Background Clinical placement experiences may influence positively on nursing students attitudes towards the clinical setting in question. Most studies exploring the quality of clinical placements have targeted students' experience in hospital settings. The number of studies exploring students' experiences of the learning environment in healthcare settings outside of the hospital venue does not match the growing importance of such settings in the delivery of health care, nor the growing number of nurses needed in these venues. Design A survey design was used. Method The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory was administered to two cohorts of undergraduate nursing students (n = 184) after clinical placement in mental health care, home care and nursing home care. Results Nursing students' overall contentment with the learning environment was quite similar across all three placement areas. Students in mental health care had significantly higher scores on the subscale individualisation, and older students had significantly higher scores on the total scale. Compared with other studies where the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory has been used, the students' total scores in this study are similar or higher than scores in studies including students from hospital settings. Conclusion Results from this study negate the negative views on clinical placements outside the hospital setting, especially those related to placements in nursing homes and mental healthcare settings. Relevance to clinical practice Students' experience of the learning environment during placements in mental health care, home care and nursing homes indicates the relevance of clinical education in settings outside the hospital setting. PMID:24460862

  14. Nursing students' perceptions of their clinical learning environment in placements outside traditional hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida T; Berntsen, Karin; Brynildsen, Grethe; Hestetun, Margrete

    2014-10-01

    To explore students' opinions of the learning environment during clinical placement in settings outside traditional hospital settings. Clinical placement experiences may influence positively on nursing students attitudes towards the clinical setting in question. Most studies exploring the quality of clinical placements have targeted students' experience in hospital settings. The number of studies exploring students' experiences of the learning environment in healthcare settings outside of the hospital venue does not match the growing importance of such settings in the delivery of health care, nor the growing number of nurses needed in these venues. A survey design was used. The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory was administered to two cohorts of undergraduate nursing students (n = 184) after clinical placement in mental health care, home care and nursing home care. Nursing students' overall contentment with the learning environment was quite similar across all three placement areas. Students in mental health care had significantly higher scores on the subscale individualisation, and older students had significantly higher scores on the total scale. Compared with other studies where the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory has been used, the students' total scores in this study are similar or higher than scores in studies including students from hospital settings. Results from this study negate the negative views on clinical placements outside the hospital setting, especially those related to placements in nursing homes and mental healthcare settings. Students' experience of the learning environment during placements in mental health care, home care and nursing homes indicates the relevance of clinical education in settings outside the hospital setting. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Exploring perceptions of a learning organization by RNs and relationship to EBP beliefs and implementation in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Nicolette

    2009-01-01

    Health care professionals are expected to provide patient care based on best evidence. The context of the acute care setting presents a challenging environment for registered nurses (RNs) to utilize research and implement best evidence in practice. No organizational infrastructure has been identified that offers acute care RNs the support needed for evidence-based practice (EBP). The value of "learning organizations" has long been understood by corporate leaders. Potentially, the dimensions of a "learning organization" may offer a supportive EBP infrastructure for acute care RNs. (1) What is the relationship of the characteristics of the learning organization to registered nurses' beliefs regarding EBP? (2) Is there an impact of EBP beliefs on RNs' implementation of EBP? A descriptive, survey design study was conducted. Three established questionnaires were distributed to 1,750 RNs employed within six acute care hospitals. There were 594 questionnaires returned for a response rate of 34%. RNs rated their organizations in the mid-range on the dimensions of learning organization. Perceptions of the learning organization were found to be significant, although relatively small, predictors explaining 6% of knowledge beliefs, 11% of value beliefs, and 14% of resource beliefs. EBP beliefs explained 23% of EBP implementation reported by RNs. The study results indicate relationships between RNs' reported perception of a learning organization and EBP beliefs, and between EBP beliefs and implementation. However, findings were mixed. Overall, nurses rated their organizations the lowest in the dimensions of "promote inquiry and dialogue" and "empower people toward a collective vision." Leaders have an opportunity to offer a more supportive infrastructure through improving their organization in these two areas. RN beliefs explained 23% of EBP implementation in this study with a residual 77% yet to be identified. Acute care hospitals were perceived mid-range on learning

  16. Relationship of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Certified Nurses and Healthcare-Acquired Conditions in Acute Care Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Diane K; Bergquist-Beringer, Sandra; Cramer, Emily

    The purpose of this study was to describe the (a) number and types of employed WOC certified nurses in acute care hospitals, (b) rates of hospital-acquired pressure injury (HAPI) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), and (c) effectiveness of WOC certified nurses with respect to lowering HAPI and CAUTI occurrences. Retrospective analysis of data from National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators. The sample comprised 928 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) hospitals that participated in the 2012 NDNQI RN Survey (source of specialty certification data) and collected HAPI, CAUTI, and nurse staffing data during the years 2012 to 2013. We analyzed years 2012 to 2013 data from the NDNQI. Descriptive statistics summarized the number and types of employed WOC certified nurses, the rate of HAPI and CAUTI, and HAPI risk assessment and prevention intervention rates. Chi-square analyses were used to compare the characteristics of hospitals that do and do not employ WOC certified nurses. Analysis-of-covariance models were used to test the association between WOC certified nurses and HAPI and CAUTI occurrences. Just more than one-third of the study hospitals (36.6%) employed WOC certified nurses. Certified continence care nurses (CCCNs) were employed in fewest number. Hospitals employing wound care specialty certified nurses (CWOCN, CWCN, and CWON) had lower HAPI rates and better pressure injury risk assessment and prevention practices. Stage 3 and 4 HAPI occurrences among hospitals employing CWOCNs, CWCNs, and CWONs (0.27%) were nearly half the rate of hospitals not employing these nurses (0.51%). There were no significant relationships between nurses with specialty certification in continence care (CWOCN, CCCN) or ostomy care (CWOCN, COCN) and CAUTI rates. CWOCNs, CWCNs, and CWONs are an important factor in achieving better HAPI outcomes in acute care settings. The role of CWOCNs, CCCNs, and COCNs in CAUTI prevention warrants further

  17. The induction of acute psychosis in a group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C

    1979-04-01

    The case histories of two patients are described, each of whom suffered a severe psychotic decompensation, one apparently schizophreniform and the other affective, after attending a seven day marathon group conducted by a charismatic, aggressive leader. The work of Yalom and Lieberman is reviewed, with regard to leader and participant characteristics in encounter group casualties. Drawing upon the work of Bion and Kernberg, a specific means for the induction of psychosis is suggested, involving primitive splitting and the projection of "all bad" self-object constellations within a group setting.

  18. 30-day in-hospital mortality after acute myocardial infarction in Tuscany (Italy: An observational study using hospital discharge data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seghieri Chiara

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of mortality in the world. One of the outcome indicators recently used to measure hospital performance is 30-day mortality after acute myocardial infarction (AMI. This indicator has proven to be a valid and reproducible indicator of the appropriateness and effectiveness of the diagnostic and therapeutic process for AMI patients after hospital admission. The aim of this study was to examine the determinants of inter-hospital variability on 30-day in-hospital mortality after AMI in Tuscany. This indicator is a proxy of 30-day mortality that includes only deaths occurred during the index or subsequent hospitalizations. Methods The study population was identified from hospital discharge records (HDRs and included all patients with primary or secondary ICD-9-CM codes of AMI (ICD-9 codes 410.xx that were discharged between January 1, 2009 and November 30, 2009 from any hospital in Tuscany. The outcome of interest was 30-day all-cause in-hospital mortality, defined as a death occurring for any reason in the hospital within 30 days of the admission date. Because of the hierarchical structure of the data, with patients clustered into hospitals, random-effects (multilevel logistic regression models were used. The models included patient risk factors and random intercepts for each hospital. Results The study included 5,832 patients, 61.90% male, with a mean age of 72.38 years. During the study period, 7.99% of patients died within 30 days of admission. The 30-day in-hospital mortality rate was significantly higher among patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI compared with those with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI. The multilevel analysis which included only the hospital variance showed a significant inter-hospital variation in 30-day in-hospital mortality. When patient characteristics were added to the model, the hospital variance decreased. The

  19. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: monitoring and patient education--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2013-05-01

    The results of the 2012 American Society of Health-System Pharmacists national survey of pharmacy practice in U.S. hospital settings are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1413 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals were surveyed by mail. SDI Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from SDI's hospital database. In this national probability sample survey, the response rate was 34.0%. The rate of pharmacist monitoring of most patients (i.e., >75%) in hospitals has increased, from 20.3% in 2000 to 46.5% in 2012. Therapeutic drug monitoring programs are in place at most hospitals; at more than 80% of hospitals, pharmacists have the authority to order laboratory tests and adjust medication dosages. A safety culture assessment has been conducted at 72.4% of hospitals. Pharmacists routinely perform discharge counseling in 24.7% of hospitals. At most hospitals, nurses are primarily responsible for medication reconciliation, but 65.9% of pharmacy directors would like pharmacy to have this responsibility. Computerized prescriber order entry is now used in 54.4% of hospitals, with barcode-assisted medication administration used in 65.5% and smart pumps used in 77% of hospitals. The majority of hospitals have fully or partially implemented electronic health records. An increase in the use of remote pharmacist review of medication orders has reduced the percentage of hospitals where orders are not reviewed before a dose is administered to 32%. Pharmacists continue to improve medication use in U.S. hospitals through patient monitoring and education, safety initiatives, collaborative practices with other health care professionals, assisting in the adoption of technologies, and the provision of pharmacy services to outpatients.

  20. ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings: Monitoring and patient education--2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Craig A; Schneider, Philip J; Scheckelhoff, Douglas J

    2010-04-01

    Results of the 2009 ASHP national survey of pharmacy practice in hospital settings that pertain to monitoring and patient education are presented. A stratified random sample of pharmacy directors at 1364 general and children's medical-surgical hospitals in the United States were surveyed by mail. SDI Health supplied data on hospital characteristics; the survey sample was drawn from SDI's hospital database. The response rate was 40.5%. Virtually all hospitals (97.3%) had pharmacists regularly monitor medication therapy in some capacity; nearly half monitored 75% or more of their patients. Over 92% had pharmacists routinely monitor serum medication concentrations or their surrogate markers, and most hospitals allowed pharmacists to order initial serum concentrations (80.1%) and adjust dosages (79.2%). Interdisciplinary committees reviewed adverse drug events in 89.3% of hospitals. Prospective analysis was conducted by 66.2% of hospitals, and retrospective analysis was performed by 73.6%. An assessment of safety culture had been conducted by 62.8% of hospitals. Most hospitals assigned oversight for patient medication education to nursing (89.0%), but many hospitals (68.9%) reported that pharmacists provided medication education to 1-25% of patients. Computerized prescriber-order-entry systems with clinical decision support were in place in 15.4%, bar-code-assisted medication administration systems were used by 27.9%, smart infusion pumps were used in 56.2%, and complete electronic medical record systems were in place in 8.8% of hospitals. The majority of hospitals (64.7%) used an integrated pharmacy practice model using clinical generalists. Pharmacists were significantly involved in monitoring medication therapy. Pharmacists were less involved in medication education activities. Technologies to improve the use of medications were used in an increasing percentage of hospitals. Hospital pharmacy practice was increasingly integrated, with pharmacists having both

  1. A concise drug alerting rule set for Chinese hospitals and its application in computerized physician order entry (CPOE)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Yinsheng; Long, Xin; Chen, Weihong; Li, Haomin; Duan, Huilong; Shang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    ... hospitals.A 2600-bed general hospital in China.In order to implement the drug rule set in clinical information settings, an information model for drug rules was designed and a rule authoring tool was developed accordingly...

  2. Gender inequality in acute coronary syndrome patients at Omdurman Teaching Hospital, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyder O Mirghani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender differences among patients with the acute coronary syndrome is still being debated, no research has been done on gender inequality among coronary syndrome patients in Sudan. Objectives: To study gender differences in presentation, management, and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in Sudan. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive longitudinal study was conducted in Omdurman Teaching Hospital between July 2014 and August 2015. Patients were invited to sign a written informed consent form, were interviewed and examined by a physician, and then followed during their hospital stay. Information collected includes coronary risk factors, vital signs, echocardiography findings, arrhythmias, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, and death. The Ethical Committee of Omdurman Teaching Hospital approved the research. Results: A total of 197 consecutive acute coronary syndrome patients were included, 43.1% were females. A significant statistical difference was evident between males and females regarding the type of acute coronary syndrome, its presentation, and time of presentation to the hospital, smoking, and receipt of thrombolysis (P 0.05. Conclusion: Women were less likely to receive thrombolytic therapy, present with chest pain, and diagnosed with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. No gender differences were found in acute coronary syndrome risk factors apart from smoking, which was more common in males, and there were no differences between males and females as regards in-hospital complications.

  3. Measuring the context of care in an Australian acute care hospital: a nurse survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Timothy J; Kitson, Alison L

    2010-08-02

    This study set out to achieve three objectives: to test the application of a context assessment tool in an acute hospital in South Australia; to use the tool to compare context in wards that had undergone an evidence implementation process with control wards; and finally to test for relationships between demographic variables (in particular experience) of nurses being studied (n = 422) with the dimensions of context. The Alberta Context Tool (ACT) was administered to all nursing staff on six control and six intervention wards. A total of 217 (62%) were returned (67% from the intervention wards and 56% from control wards). Data were analysed using Stata (v9). The effect of the intervention was analysed using nested (hierarchical) analysis of variance; relationships between nurses' experience and context was examined using canonical correlation analysis. Results confirmed the adaptation and fit of the ACT to one acute care setting in South Australia. There was no difference in context scores between control and intervention wards. However, the tool identified significant variation between wards in many of the dimensions of context. Though significant, the relationship between nurses' experience and context was weak, suggesting that at the level of the individual nurse, few factors are related to context. Variables operating at the level of the individual showed little relationship with context. However, the study indicated that some dimensions of context (e.g., leadership, culture) vary at the ward level, whereas others (e.g., structural and electronic resources) do not. The ACT also raised a number of interesting speculative hypotheses around the relationship between a measure of context and the capability and capacity of staff to influence it.We propose that context be considered to be dependent on ward- and hospital-level factors. Additionally, questions need to be considered about the unit of measurement of context in studies of knowledge implementation

  4. Measuring the context of care in an Australian acute care hospital: a nurse survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Timothy J

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study set out to achieve three objectives: to test the application of a context assessment tool in an acute hospital in South Australia; to use the tool to compare context in wards that had undergone an evidence implementation process with control wards; and finally to test for relationships between demographic variables (in particular experience of nurses being studied (n = 422 with the dimensions of context. Methods The Alberta Context Tool (ACT was administered to all nursing staff on six control and six intervention wards. A total of 217 (62% were returned (67% from the intervention wards and 56% from control wards. Data were analysed using Stata (v9. The effect of the intervention was analysed using nested (hierarchical analysis of variance; relationships between nurses' experience and context was examined using canonical correlation analysis. Results Results confirmed the adaptation and fit of the ACT to one acute care setting in South Australia. There was no difference in context scores between control and intervention wards. However, the tool identified significant variation between wards in many of the dimensions of context. Though significant, the relationship between nurses' experience and context was weak, suggesting that at the level of the individual nurse, few factors are related to context. Conclusions Variables operating at the level of the individual showed little relationship with context. However, the study indicated that some dimensions of context (e.g., leadership, culture vary at the ward level, whereas others (e.g., structural and electronic resources do not. The ACT also raised a number of interesting speculative hypotheses around the relationship between a measure of context and the capability and capacity of staff to influence it. We propose that context be considered to be dependent on ward- and hospital-level factors. Additionally, questions need to be considered about the unit of measurement

  5. A concise drug alerting rule set for Chinese hospitals and its application in computerized physician order entry (CPOE)

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, Yinsheng; Long, Xin; Chen, Weihong; Li,Haomin; Duan, Huilong; Shang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background A minimized and concise drug alerting rule set can be effective in reducing alert fatigue. Objectives This study aims to develop and evaluate a concise drug alerting rule set for Chinese hospitals. The rule set covers not only western medicine, but also Chinese patent medicine that is widely used in Chinese hospitals. Setting A 2600-bed general hospital in China. Methods In order to implement the drug rule set in clinical information settings, an information model for drug rules wa...

  6. The effect of hospital volume on patient outcomes in severe acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Hsiu-Nien

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the relation between hospital volume and outcome in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP. The determination is important because patient outcome may be improved through volume-based selective referral. Methods In this cohort study, we analyzed 22,551 SAP patients in 2,208 hospital-years (between 2000 and 2009 from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Primary outcome was hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay and charges. Hospital SAP volume was measured both as categorical and as continuous variables (per one case increase each hospital-year. The effect was assessed using multivariable logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations accounting for hospital clustering effect. Adjusted covariates included patient and hospital characteristics (model 1, and additional treatment variables (model 2. Results Irrespective of the measurements, increasing hospital volume was associated with reduced risk of hospital mortality after adjusting the patient and hospital characteristics (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.995, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.993-0.998 for per one case increase. The patients treated in the highest volume quartile (≥14 cases per hospital-year had 42% lower risk of hospital mortality than those in the lowest volume quartile (1 case per hospital-year after adjusting the patient and hospital characteristics (adjusted OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.83. However, an inverse relation between volume and hospital stay or hospital charges was observed only when the volume was analyzed as a categorical variable. After adjusting the treatment covariates, the volume effect on hospital mortality disappeared regardless of the volume measures. Conclusions These findings support the use of volume-based selective referral for patients with SAP and suggest that differences in levels or processes of care among hospitals may have contributed to the volume

  7. Esophagus and contralateral lung-sparing IMRT for locally advanced lung cancer in the community hospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny eKao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The optimal technique for performing lung IMRT remains poorly defined. We hypothesize that improved dose distributions associated with normal tissue sparing IMRT can allow for safe dose escalation resulting in decreased acute and late toxicity. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 82 consecutive lung cancer patients treated with curative intent from 1/10 to 9/14. From 1/10 to 4/12, 44 patients were treated with the community standard of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or IMRT without specific esophagus or contralateral lung constraints (standard RT. From 5/12 to 9/14, 38 patients were treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT with selective sparing of contralateral lung and esophagus. The study endpoints were dosimetry, toxicity and overall survival.Results: Despite higher mean prescribed radiation doses in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT cohort (64.5 Gy vs. 60.8 Gy, p=0.04, patients treated with normal tissue-sparing IMRT had significantly lower lung V20, V10, V5, mean lung, maximum esophagus and mean esophagus doses compared to patients treated with standard RT (p≤0.001. Patients in the normal tissue-sparing IMRT group had reduced acute grade ≥3 esophagitis (0% vs. 11%, p<0.001, acute grade ≥2 weight loss (2% vs. 16%, p=0.04, late grade ≥2 pneumonitis (7% vs. 21%, p=0.02. The 2-year overall survival was 52% with normal tissue-sparing IMRT arm compared to 28% for standard RT (p=0.015.Conclusion: These data provide proof of principle that suboptimal radiation dose distributions are associated with significant acute and late lung and esophageal toxicity that may result in hospitalization or even premature mortality. Strict attention to contralateral lung and esophageal dose volume constraints are feasible in the community hospital setting without sacrificing disease control.

  8. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-10-31

    The oral health of older people in acute hospitals has rarely been studied. Hospital admission provides a prime opportunity for identification and rectification of problems, and oral health promotion. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presents the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. Searches of electronic databases and the websites of relevant professional health service bodies in the UK were undertaken to identify articles and guidelines. The literature shows a high prevalence of oro-dental disease in this population, with many known detrimental effects, combined with suboptimal oral hygiene and mouth care provision in acute hospitals. Several guidelines exist, although the emphasis on oral health is weaker than other aspects of hospital care. Older adults admitted to acute hospitals have a high burden of oro-dental disease and oral and mouth care needs, but care provision tends to be suboptimal. The literature is growing, but this area is still relatively neglected. Great potential exists to develop oral and mouth care in this context. The second part of this article explores clinical recommendations. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  9. Manual cleaning of hospital mattresses: an observational study comparing high- and low-resource settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, J.; Hakizimana, B.; Meintjes, W.A.; Nillessen, M.; Both, E. de; Voss, A.; Mehtar, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) are more frequently encountered in low- than in high-resource settings. There is a need to identify and implement feasible and sustainable approaches to strengthen HAI prevention in low-resource settings. AIM: To evaluate the biological contamination

  10. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  11. Serum zinc levels in hospitalized children with acute lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tel:+2348033704168, +2348185415491. E-mail: rasheedahbidmus@yahoo.com their intra-cellular multiplication.6,7. Zinc deficiency decreases the ability of ..... 1. Johnson WBR, Aderele WI, Osinusi K, Gbadero D. Acute lower respiratory infections in hospitalised urban pre-school Nigerian children: a clinical overview. Afr J.

  12. Serum zinc levels in hospitalized children with acute lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Macronutrient deficiency has continued to attract significant research interest, whereas the import of micronutrients like zinc has only recently become the focus of interest. Thus against the background of a dearth of data on zinc levels in Nigerian children with Acute Lower Respiratory Infection (ALRI), this study ...

  13. Acute kidney injury risk factor recognition in three teaching hospitals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A key objective of the Nephrology Sister Centre Programme between the renal units in Cardiff and Addis Ababa, sponsored by the International Society of Nephrology, is to facilitate development of the local clinical service in Ethiopia specifically focused on the management of acute kidney injury (AKI).

  14. The Influence of Hyperglycemia at Admission on In-hospital Arrhythmia Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fariz M.Z Zein

    2015-12-01

    were no association between type of ACS, diabetes mellitus (DM, obesity, and hypertension, with the in-hospital arrhythmias. In multivariate analysis, the adjusted OR of HA was 2.85 (95% CI 1.35-6.02, and DM was the confounding variable. Conclusion: the incidence of in-hospital arrhythmias in patients with ACS was 21.55% (95% CI 16.26-26.84. Hyperglycemia at admission may increase the risk of in-hospital arrhythmia in patients with ACS. Key words: hyperglycemia at admission; in-hospital arrhythmia; acute coronary syndrome

  15. Predictors of oedema among children hospitalized with severe acute malnutrition in Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girma, Tsinuel; Kæstel, Pernille; Mølgaard, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition has two main clinical manifestations, i.e., oedematous and non-oedematous. However, factors of oedema are not well established.......Severe acute malnutrition has two main clinical manifestations, i.e., oedematous and non-oedematous. However, factors of oedema are not well established....

  16. Examination of the Use of Healing Touch by Registered Nurses in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel G; Friesen, Mary Ann; Swengros, Diane; Herbst, Anna; Mangione, Lucrezia

    2017-03-01

    Acute care nursing is currently undergoing unprecedented change, with health systems becoming more open to nonpharmacological approaches to patient care. Healing Touch (HT) may be a valuable intervention for acute care patients. Research has shown that HT helps both the patient and the caregiver; however, no study to date has examined the impact that the education of nurses in and their use of HT have on daily care delivery in the acute care setting. The purpose of the current qualitative study was to examine the use of HT by registered nurses in the acute care setting during their delivery of patient care, as well as the impact of education in and use of HT on the nurses themselves. Five themes were identified: (1) use of HT techniques, processes, and sequence; (2) outcomes related to HT; (3) integration of HT into acute care nursing practice; (4) perceptions of HT, from skepticism to openness; and (5) transformation through HT. Education in HT and delivery of this modality by nurses in the acute care setting provide nurses with a transformative tool to improve patient outcomes.

  17. Multidisciplinary team interventions to optimise health outcomes for older people in acute care settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Louise D; Phillips, Jane L; Newton, Phillip J; Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Al Abed, Naser; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge facing our health care systems internationally is managing the needs of increasing numbers of older people in hospital with chronic and complex conditions. A multidisciplinary approach is considered central to tailoring and targeting approaches to gerontological care, although this is often not realised in reality. Comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is seen as gold standard, though they are not readily available in many acute settings, compounded by the requirement for time, coordination of multidisciplinary specialties, and reimbursement issues. This systematic review aimed to identify multidisciplinary team interventions to optimise health outcomes for older people in acute care settings. Systematic review of randomised controlled trials reporting acute care multidisciplinary team based interventions, to improve care outcomes for hospitalised older people. Electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL (EBSCO), Cochrane and PsycINFO) were searched from 1 January 2000 to 1 July 2014 in the English language. Data was extracted by two reviewers and checked by a third reviewer to resolve any conflicts. Seven articles reporting RCTs met the systematic review inclusion criteria. The heterogeneity of study populations, multidisciplinary team interventions and outcome measures necessitated the use of narrative analysis. Three common elements of these studies included: (i) tailored treatment by clinicians with geriatric expertise (ii) a focus on transitional care interventions that enhance discharge planning; and (iii) communication an essential ingredient to improving care. The tailoring of treatment, underpinned with clear communication strategies can reduce emergency department re-admission rates, mortality and functional decline of older people. Refining health professionals roles and responsibilities within transition models is an essential component that can improve health outcomes for older people in acute care settings. Crown Copyright © 2015

  18. Impact of pharmacy intervention on the use of proton-pump inhibitors in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Richard; Smith, Lori

    2013-12-01

    Determine effectiveness of pharmacy-driven medical staff training regarding proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. This study was performed in two parts. Part I evaluated baseline PPI usage within the hospital. Part II evaluated the effect of pharmacy-driven medical staff education on PPI prescribing patterns. Data were collected retrospectively via electronic chart review. Passavant Area Hospital in Jacksonville, Illinois, is a 99-bed community hospital. Patients' profiles were selected if administration of at least one PPI was electronically charted during their hospital stay. Patients discharged from the emergency department were not included in the study. There were a total of 1,089 charts reviewed (Part I: N=565; Part II: N=524). The average patient age was 66.5 years. Part I results were presented to the pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committee and medical staff. A series of three educational presentations were subsequently given to medical staff. Part II results were reported to the P&T committee, with further interventions to be determined after consulting with hospital administration and medical staff. Improvement of appropriate acute PPI therapy. Secondary outcome measures included duration of acute therapy and continuation of chronic therapy. There was improvement in the appropriate usage of PPI for stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) (P=0.1216), decreased chronic PPI therapy (P=0.0054), and increased documentation of PPI indication (P=0.0365). A decrease of appropriate acute duration of PPI for SUP was also observed (PPharmacy interventions have an overall positive impact on appropriate use of PPI therapy.

  19. Short-term effects of Italian smoking regulation on rates of hospital admission for acute myocardial infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barone-Adesi, Francesco; Vizzini, Loredana; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    We used the hospital discharge records of Piedmont region (northern Italy) to evaluate whether a national law banning smoking in public resulted in a short-term reduction in hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI...

  20. Clinical Spectrum of Acute Renal Failure in Dammam Central Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghacha Reda

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty consecutive patients of acute renal failure (ARF seen over a period of two years at the Dammam Central Hospital, Dammam were studied. The mean age of the patients was 39.3 years ranging from 14 to 90 years. The main etiological factors for ARF were acute tubular necrosis (67.5% and obstructive uropathy (30%. The mortality rate was 26% and the poor prognostic factors included sepsis, acidosis, shock and the need for emergency hemodialysis.

  1. Nurse practitioners--where do they belong within the organizational structure of the acute care setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Sherif, C

    1995-01-01

    Nurse practitioners are expanding their scope of practice and moving into acute care settings. Striving to be part of the nursing organizational structure in the acute care setting will keep NP's practice firmly rooted in nursing theory. Remaining within the nursing realm will enable them to receive support and guidance from their nursing colleagues while advancing the profession through their knowledge and expertise. Within the nursing organizational structure, NPs can become leaders as clinicians and role models. Without the formal support of the nursing organizational structure, the unique skills and contributions nurse practitioners furnish to the profession will be lost, as others will then dictate the NP role and scope of practice within the acute care setting.

  2. [Effect of Silencing SET Gene on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia NB4-R1 Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Mei; He, Peng-Cheng; Qi, Jun; Liu, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Hua-Chao

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of silencing SET gene on the biological characteristics of acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4-R1 cells. The expression vector of pGCSIL containing SET-shRNA were transfected into 293T cells by using other packaging plasmids. The supernatant of the 293T cells was harvested for lentivirus. The SET-shRNA lentiviral vector was transfected into acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4-R1 cells and a stably transfected cell line was established. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot were used to assay the silencing efficiency on SET gene and the expression of PP2A. The cell cycle distribution was tested by flow cytometry. The expression of SET in experimental group statistically decreased as compared with that of the control group. The expression of PP2A was obviously raised at the level of mRNA and protein. The percentage of NB4-R1 cells in G0/G1 phase significantly increased, while the percentage of cells in S phase significantly decreased. The silencing gene in acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4-R1 cells using SET-shRNA lentiviral vector can increase the expression of PP2A and interfere of the cell cycle in NB4-R1 cells. This study has laid a experimental base for targed therapy of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  3. Clinical Predictors of Hospital Admission in Children Aged 0-24 Months with Acute Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nucksheeba Aziz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Bronchiolitis is a significant cause of acute morbidity in children less than 2 years old and some children with bronchiolitis are admitted to the hospital. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To identify clinical predictors of hospital admission in children aged 0-24 months with acute bronchiolitis.   METHODS: All children in the age group of 0-24 months presenting with acute bronchiolitis to a dedicated pediatric emergency department of GB pant cantonment children hospital, Govt Medical College Srinagar,   from April 2012-March 2013 were included in the study, provided they met the inclusion criteria. Non-parametric numerical variables were analyzed using Mann Whitney u test. Chi square was used to analyzecategorical variables, p value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: 763(552(72.3% male, mean age 8.52+/- 3.59 months children (0-24months presented with acute bronchiolitis during the study period. 435(313 (72% male, mean age 6.69+/-3.8 monthspatients were admitted to the hospital. The eight best predictors of admission (age, respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, fever, grunt, dehydration and duration of symptoms were determined. CONCLUSION:This study has identified clinical predictors of admission in children aged 0-24 months with acute bronchiolitis. This information can be used as a guide in deciding whether to admit a child with bronchiolitis.

  4. Impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality, length of hospitalization and rates of re-hospitalization in a general hospital setting in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite Silmara AO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients is known to be related to a higher incidence of clinical and surgical complications and poorer outcomes. Adequate glycemic control and earlier diagnosis of type 2 diabetes during hospitalization are cost-effective measures. Methods This prospective cohort study was designed to determine the impact of hyperglycemia on morbidity and mortality in a general hospital setting during a 3-month period by reviewing patients' records. The primary purposes of this trial were to verify that hyperglycemia was diagnosed properly and sufficiently early and that it was managed during the hospital stay; we also aimed to evaluate the relationship between in-hospital hyperglycemia control and outcomes such as complications during the hospital stay, extent of hospitalization, frequency of re-hospitalization, death rates and number of days in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit after admission. Statistical analyses utilized the Kruskall-Wallis complemented by the "a posteriori" d.m.s. test, Spearman correlation and Chi-squared test, with a level of significance of 5% (p Results We reviewed 779 patient records that fulfilled inclusion criteria. The patients were divided into 5 groups: group (1 diabetic with normal glycemic levels according to American Diabetes Association criteria for in-hospital patients (n = 123; group (2 diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 76; group (3 non-diabetics with hyperglycemia (n = 225; group (4diabetics and non-diabetics with persistent hyperglycemia during 3 consecutive days (n = 57 and group (5 those with normal glucose control (n = 298. Compared to patients in groups 1 and 5, patients in groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher mortality rates (17.7% vs. 2.8% and Intensive Care Unit admissions with complications (23.3% vs. 4.5%. Patients in group 4 had the longest hospitalizations (mean 15.5 days, and group 5 had the lowest re-hospitalization rate (mean of 1.28 hospitalizations. Only

  5. Cost-effectiveness of hospital treatment and outcomes of acute methanol poisoning during the Czech Republic mass poisoning outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulisek, Jan; Balik, Martin; Polak, Ferdinand; Waldauf, Petr; Pelclova, Daniela; Belohlavek, Jan; Zakharov, Sergey

    2017-06-01

    During an outbreak of mass methanol poisoning in the Czech Republic in 2012-2014, we compared the total hospital costs and one-year medical costs in the patients treated with different antidotes (fomepizole versus ethanol) and modalities of hemodialysis (intermittent hemodialysis, IHD, versus continuous renal replacement therapy, CRRT). Cross-sectional study in 106 patients with confirmed diagnosis treated in 30 ICU settings. For each patient, the following data were analyzed: admission laboratory data, GCS, PSS, ICU length of stay, organ failures, treatment, outcome, and total hospital costs. Of 83 survivors, in 54 (65%) patients the follow-up examination, quality of life measurement with SF36 questionnaire two years after discharge, and one-year medical costs analysis were performed. The median total hospital costs were 7200 (IQR 1500-10,900) euros and the median one-year medical costs were 1447 (IQR 133-1163) euros in the study population. The total hospital costs were higher in the patients treated with fomepizole comparing to ethanol: 12,890 (IQR 6910-16,210) versus 5590 (IQR 1430-6940) euros (p0.05). The total hospital costs in the patients with acute methanol poisoning were more than three times higher in the patients treated with fomepizole than in the patients treated with ethanol after adjustment for the severity of poisoning. The dialysis modality did not affect the total hospital costs, but the trend to lower costs was present in IHD-group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Variations and determinants of hospital costs for acute stroke in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade W Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The burden of stroke is high and increasing in China. We modelled variations in, and predictors of, the costs of hospital care for patients with acute stroke in China. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Baseline characteristics and hospital costs for 5,255 patients were collected using the prospective register-based ChinaQUEST study, conducted in 48 Level 3 and 14 Level 2 hospitals in China during 2006-2007. Ordinary least squares estimation was used to determine factors associated with hospital costs. Overall mean cost of hospitalisation was 11,216 Chinese Yuan Renminbi (CNY (≈US$1,602 per patient, which equates to more than half the average annual wage in China. Variations in cost were largely attributable to stroke severity and length of hospital stay (LOS. Model forecasts showed that reducing LOS from the mean of 20 days for Level 3 and 18 days for Level 2 hospitals to a duration of 1 week, which is common among Western countries, afforded cost reductions of 49% and 19%, respectively. Other lesser determinants varied by hospital level: in Level 3 hospitals, health insurance and the occurrence of in-hospital complications were each associated with 10% and 18% increases in cost, respectively, whilst treatment in a teaching hospital was associated with approximately 39% decrease in cost on average. For Level 2 hospitals, stroke due to intracerebral haemorrhage was associated with a 19% greater cost than for ischaemic stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Changes to hospital policies to standardise resource use and reduce the variation in LOS could attenuate costs and improve efficiencies for acute stroke management in China. The success of these strategies will be enhanced by broader policy initiatives currently underway to reform hospital reimbursement systems.

  7. Bereavement Support in an Acute Hospital: An Irish Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Trish; Foreman, Maeve; Curry, Philip; O'Driscoll, Siobhan; McCormack, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the first Irish study to examine a hospital-based bereavement care program, 1 year's cohort of bereaved people was surveyed. A response rate of over 40% provided 339 completed questionnaires from bereaved next-of-kin. The findings suggest that a tiered pyramid model of bereavement care (the Beaumont model) may be functional in a number of ways.…

  8. Increase in hospital admissions for acute childhood asthma in Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These were compared with total admissions for non-surgical causes and lower respiratory tract illness as well as those for bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Asthma admissions showed a sharp upward trend from 1978 to 1984, a slower rise through 1987 and a levelling off since. The profile of hospital admissions for respiratory ...

  9. Acute Stroke at The University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was a prospective study of all stroke patients admitted to the University College Hospital Ibadan Nigeria between July 2002 and September 2003.The diagnosis of stroke was mainly clinical using the WHO clinical criteria. Only 21 patients had Cranial CT scans due to the frequent breakdown of the machine during the ...

  10. Acute pancreatitis at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    guidelines (1,2) with respect to diagnostic modalities, severity stratification, critical care unit (CCU) management for severe disease, timing of treatment intervention strategies and mortality. DESIGN: Retrospective audit of hospital records. METHODS: The medical records of all patients admitted to the AKUH with a diagnosis ...

  11. Hospital cost of Clostridium difficile infection including the contribution of recurrences in French acute-care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Monnier, A; Duburcq, A; Zahar, J-R; Corvec, S; Guillard, T; Cattoir, V; Woerther, P-L; Fihman, V; Lalande, V; Jacquier, H; Mizrahi, A; Farfour, E; Morand, P; Marcadé, G; Coulomb, S; Torreton, E; Fagnani, F; Barbut, F

    2015-10-01

    The impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on healthcare costs is significant due to the extra costs of associated inpatient care. However, the specific contribution of recurrences has rarely been studied. The aim of this study was to estimate the hospital costs of CDI and the fraction attributable to recurrences in French acute-care hospitals. A retrospective study was performed for 2011 on a sample of 12 large acute-care hospitals. CDI costs were estimated from both hospital and public insurance perspectives. For each stay, CDI additional costs were estimated by comparison to controls without CDI extracted from the national DRG (diagnosis-related group) database and matched on DRG, age and sex. When CDI was the primary diagnosis, the full cost of stay was used. A total of 1067 bacteriological cases of CDI were identified corresponding to 979 stays involving 906 different patients. Recurrence(s) were identified in 118 (12%) of these stays with 51.7% of them having occurred within the same stay as the index episode. Their mean length of stay was 63.8 days compared to 25.1 days for stays with an index case only. The mean extra cost per stay with CDI was estimated at €9,575 (median: €7,514). The extra cost of CDI in public acute-care hospitals was extrapolated to €163.1 million at the national level, of which 12.5% was attributable to recurrences. The economic burden of CDI is substantial and directly impacts healthcare systems in France. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Another link to improving the working environment in acute care hospitals: registered nurses' spirit at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Ann-Marie; Wagner, Joan I

    2013-12-01

    Hospitals are situated within historical and socio-political contexts; these influence the provision of patient care and the work of registered nurses (RNs). Since the early 1990s, restructuring and the increasing pressure to save money and improve efficiency have plagued acute care hospitals. These changes have affected both the work environment and the work of nurses. After recognizing this impact, healthcare leaders have dedicated many efforts to improving the work environment in hospitals. Admirable in their intent, these initiatives have made little change for RNs and their work environment, and thus, an opportunity exists for other efforts. Research indicates that spirit at work (SAW) not only improves the work environment but also strengthens the nurse's power to improve patient outcomes and contribute to a high-quality workplace. In this paper, we present findings from our research that suggest SAW be considered an important component in improving the work environment in acute care hospitals.

  13. Ways to Reduce In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Artamonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze a medical care system for acute coronary syndrome (ACS in a large city in terms of in-hospital cardiogenic shock mortality risk management. Materials and methods. The health care facility management system for a risk for cardiogenic shock (CS and its poor outcome (death was a methodological basis of this study. The information from case histories of ACS patients consecutively admitted to the Kemerovo Cardiology Dispensary (Kemerovo, Russia in the period 2006 to 2011 was used to develop an electronic database. Sampling included 19281 patients with ACS, 6537 with myocardial infarction (MI, 493 with CS. Results and discussion. The medical care system for patients with ACS encompasses an emergency team (a prehospital level, a specialized cardiac hospital (an in-hospital level with a multistage therapeutic and diagnostic process in relation the severity of a patient’s status. The management is based on the principle of continuity of care, by applying the well-defined activity algorithms through valid information exchange and risk stratification for poor outcomes of ACS. An antishock team working just in the admission unit of a hospital was set up to treat high CS risk patients. A systems approach allowed the strategy of early specialized medical care to be developed with a priority of primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI as reperfusion therapy in patients with ST-elevation MI. In 2006-2011, every three patients with suspected ACS had verified MI that was com_ plicated by CS in 7.5%. In the CS group, the in-hospital mortality rates totaled 88.0% of cases; that after primary Адрес для корреспонденции (Correspondence to: PCI was 62.2%. In the examined period, the introduction of innovation clinical and organizational approaches provided a reduction in this indicator by 17.6 and 37.5%, respectively. Conclusion. The efficiency of risk management for CS and its poor outcomes in patients with ACS is

  14. Examining guideline-concordant care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI): the case of hospitalized post-acute and long-term care (PAC/LTC) residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Tiffany A; Levy, Cari R

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have examined differences in care for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) according to patient characteristics such as age, gender, or insurance, but little attention has been given to whether admission source is related to guideline adherence. To investigate: (1) the use of aspirin and reperfusion in the care of post-acute/long-term care (PAC/LTC) patients who are hospitalized for AMI, and (2) 30-day mortality associated with these treatments. Secondary examination of data from the Cooperative Cardiovascular Project (CCP) national baseline data. A total of 4013 U.S. hospitals. Patients hospitalized with a confirmed AMI admitted from PAC/LTC (n = 8151) or community-dwelling (n = 120,032) settings. Early administration of aspirin and reperfusion via either thrombolysis or percutaneous intervention. PAC/LTC patients were less likely to receive treatment for AMI, even after adjustment for multiple variables associated with treatment choice. Differences persisted with additional econometric adjustment using seemingly-unrelated regression. Multivariable logistic regression results indicated that aspirin was related to improved 30-day survival for both PAC/LTC and community admissions (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.58 for PAC/LTC, and OR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.54-0.60 for community). Reperfusion was associated with higher ORs for mortality for eligible patients admitted from community setting (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35), but ideally-eligible candidates had lower ORs for mortality (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35-0.95 for PAC/LTC, and OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68-0.81 for community). Patients transferred from PAC/LTC settings were less likely to receive early treatment for AMI than other patients. Future trials should inform which guidelines are applicable to PAC/LTC patients.

  15. Prognostic Impact of In-Hospital and Postdischarge Heart Failure in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulo, Gerhard; Igland, Jannicke; Nygård, Ottar

    2017-01-01

    . Logistic and Cox regression models were used to explore the excess mortality associated with HF categories. Changes over time in the excess mortality were assessed by testing the interaction between HF status and study year. In-hospital HF increased in-hospital mortality 1.79 times (odds ratio [OR], 1......BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a serious complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We explored the excess mortality associated with HF as an early or late complication of AMI and describe changes over time in such excess mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients hospitalized...... with an incident AMI and without history of prior HF hospitalization were followed up to 1 year after AMI discharge for episodes of HF. New HF episodes were classified as in-hospital HF if diagnosed during the AMI hospitalization or postdischarge HF if diagnosed within 1 year after discharge from the incident AMI...

  16. The Feasibility of performing resistance exercise with acutely ill hospitalized older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rockwood Kenneth

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For older adults, hospitalization frequently results in deterioration of mobility and function. Nevertheless, there are little data about how older adults exercise in the hospital and definitive studies are not yet available to determine what type of physical activity will prevent hospital related decline. Strengthening exercise may prevent deconditioning and Pilates exercise, which focuses on proper body mechanics and posture, may promote safety. Methods A hospital-based resistance exercise program, which incorporates principles of resistance training and Pilates exercise, was developed and administered to intervention subjects to determine whether acutely-ill older patients can perform resistance exercise while in the hospital. Exercises were designed to be reproducible and easily performed in bed. The primary outcome measures were adherence and participation. Results Thirty-nine ill patients, recently admitted to an acute care hospital, who were over age 70 [mean age of 82.0 (SD= 7.3] and ambulatory prior to admission, were randomized to the resistance exercise group (19 or passive range of motion (ROM group (20. For the resistance exercise group, participation was 71% (p = 0.004 and adherence was 63% (p = 0.020. Participation and adherence for ROM exercises was 96% and 95%, respectively. Conclusion Using a standardized and simple exercise regimen, selected, ill, older adults in the hospital are able to comply with resistance exercise. Further studies are needed to determine if resistance exercise can prevent or treat hospital-related deterioration in mobility and function.

  17. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  18. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Administration HCO High-cost outlier HCRIS Hospital Cost Report Information System HHA Home health agency HHS... Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Endovascular Graft III. Proposed Changes to the Hospital Wage Index for... Chemotherapy Is Considered or Administered Within 4 Months (120 Days) of Surgery to Patient Under the Age of 80...

  19. 78 FR 61197 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... that we identified to be subsection (d) hospitals and subsection (d) Puerto Rico hospitals eligible to... SEASONAL INFLUENZA VACCINE , in the table heading, line 2, the phrase ``PERCENTAGE OF RESIDENTS'' is... AND APPROPRIATELY GIVEN THE SEASONAL INFLUENZA VACCINE , in the table heading, line 2, the phrase...

  20. Complementary Health Practitioners in the Acute and Critical Care Setting: Nursing Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramlich, Debra

    2017-06-01

    In response to the rising demand by patients and their families for complementary health approaches, hospitals are increasingly integrating complementary health approaches with their conventional medical practices to create healing environments. Results of the 2010 Complementary and Alternative Medicine Survey of Hospitals indicated that the top 6 inpatient modalities included pet therapy, massage therapy, music or art therapy, guided imagery, relaxation therapy, and Reiki and therapeutic touch. Whether complementary health approaches are provided by complementary health practitioners through hospital-based integrative medicine programs, volunteer practitioners, or bedside nurses, the regulatory, legal, ethical, and safety concerns remain constant. Previous articles in this column of Critical Care Nurse provided an overview of complementary health approaches that nurses may encounter in their practices, with specific attention to implications for acute and critical care nurses, as well as important legal, ethical, safety, quality, and financial implications that acute and critical care nurses should consider when integrating complementary health approaches with conventional care. This column provides the acute and critical care nurse with key information about validation of credentials, experience, and competence of nurses and volunteers providing complementary health approaches, as well as about institutional policies and scope of practice. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  1. Clinical profile and influences on outcomes in patients hospitalized for acute pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kytö, Ville; Sipilä, Jussi; Rautava, Päivi

    2014-10-28

    The clinical profile with regard to sex and the influences on outcomes in patients who have been hospitalized for acute pericarditis is largely uncharacterized. We studied all patients aged ≥16 years admitted to the hospital because of acute pericarditis (postpericardiotomy and myocardial infarction associated pericarditis were excluded). Data were collected from a Finnish national registry that included data on all cardiovascular admissions (670 409) during 9.5 years in 29 hospitals nationwide. During the study period, there were 1361 admissions for acute pericarditis. Pericarditis patients were more likely to be male (64.9% of patients) than female (35.1%), with an age-adjusted likelihood ratio of 1.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.65-2.06; Ppericarditis was 3.32 per 100 000 person-years. Men 16 to 65 years of age were at higher risk for pericarditis (relative risk, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.81-2.26; Ppericarditis caused 0.20% (95% CI, 0.19%-0.22%) of all cardiovascular admissions. The proportion of pericarditis-caused admissions declined by an estimated 51% per 10-year increase in age. The in-hospital mortality rate for acute pericarditis was 1.1% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.8%). Mortality increased with age (hazard ratio, 3.26; 95% CI, 1.78-5.95 per 10-year increase in age; P=0.0001) and severe coinfection (pneumonia or septicemia; hazard ratio, 13.46; 95% CI, 2.26-80.01; Ppericarditis are more commonly male. Increasing age and severe coinfection are associated with greater in-hospital mortality in hospitalized acute pericarditis patients. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Impact of treatment policies on patient outcomes and resource utilization in acute cholecystitis in Japanese hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Genki

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although currently available evidence predominantly recommends early laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC for the treatment of acute cholecystitis, this strategy has not been widely adopted in Japan. Herein, we describe a hospital-based study of patients with acute cholecystitis in 9 Japanese teaching hospitals in order to evaluate the impact of different institutional strategies in treating acute cholecystitis on overall patient outcomes and medical resource utilization. Methods From an administrative database and chart review, we identified 228 patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis who underwent cholecystectomy between April 2001 and June 2003. In order to examine the relationship between hospitals' propensity to perform LC and patient outcomes and/or medical resource utilization, we divided the hospitals into three groups according to the observed to expected ratio of performing LC (LC propensity, and compared the postoperative complication rate, length of hospitalization (LOS, and medical charges. Results No hospital adopted the policy of early surgery, and the mean overall LOS among the subjects was 30.9 days. The use of laparoscopic surgery varied widely across the hospitals; the adjusted rates of LC to total cholecystectomies ranged from 9.5% to 77%. Although intra-operative complication rate was significantly higher among patients whom LC was initially attempted when compared to those whom OC was initially attempted (9.7% vs. 0%, there was no significant association between LC propensity and postoperative complication rates. Although the postoperative time to oral intake and postoperative LOS was significantly shorter in hospitals with high use of LC, the overall LOS did not differ among hospital groups with different LC propensities. Medical charges were not associated with LC propensity. Conclusion Under the prevailing policy of delayed surgery, in terms of the postoperative complication rate and medical resource

  3. Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis and cough and hospital admissions for respiratory infections: time trends analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Saxena, Sonia; Hueston, William J; Everett, Charles J; Majeed, Azeem

    2006-07-01

    To examine the relationship between ambulatory antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis and cough with hospital admissions for respiratory infections in the USA between 1996 and 2003. Analysis of data on antibiotic prescribing for episodes of acute bronchitis/cough illness in ambulatory care and hospitalization for respiratory infections for adults between 1996 and 2003 in the USA. USA: ambulatory prescribing behaviour was derived from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey while hospitalizations in acute care hospitals were assessed in the National Hospital Discharge Survey. Adults 18-64 years old. None. Proportion of visits for acute bronchitis/cough receiving a prescription for antibiotics and hospitalization for respiratory infections. Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing practices for acute bronchitis/cough and hospitalizations for respiratory infections exhibited non-linear patterns over the 8 year period. However, antibiotic prescribing practices for acute bronchitis/cough and hospitalizations for respiratory infections had a weak/moderate negative association. For three of the seven yearly changes in prescribing and hospitalizations as one increased the other decreased (P<0.01). Ambulatory antibiotic prescribing for respiratory tract infections was inversely associated with hospital admissions for respiratory tract infections.

  4. Hospital-Level Care at Home for Acutely Ill Adults: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David M; Ouchi, Kei; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Diamond, Keren; Licurse, Adam; Pu, Charles T; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-02-06

    Hospitals are standard of care for acute illness, but hospitals can be unsafe, uncomfortable, and expensive. Providing substitutive hospital-level care in a patient's home potentially reduces cost while maintaining or improving quality, safety, and patient experience, although evidence from randomized controlled trials in the US is lacking. Determine if home hospital care reduces cost while maintaining quality, safety, and patient experience. Randomized controlled trial. Adults admitted via the emergency department with any infection or exacerbation of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or asthma. Home hospital care, including nurse and physician home visits, intravenous medications, continuous monitoring, video communication, and point-of-care testing. Primary outcome was direct cost of the acute care episode. Secondary outcomes included utilization, 30-day cost, physical activity, and patient experience. Nine patients were randomized to home, 11 to usual care. Median direct cost of the acute care episode for home patients was 52% (IQR, 28%; p = 0.05) lower than for control patients. During the care episode, home patients had fewer laboratory orders (median per admission: 6 vs. 19; p Home patients were more physically active (median minutes, 209 vs. 78; p home patients, one occurred in control patients. Median direct cost for the acute care plus 30-day post-discharge period for home patients was 67% (IQR, 77%; p home-care services (22% vs. 55%; p = 0.08) and fewer readmissions (11% vs. 36%; p = 0.32). Patient experience was similar in both groups. The use of substitutive home-hospitalization compared to in-hospital usual care reduced cost and utilization and improved physical activity. No significant differences in quality, safety, and patient experience were noted, with more definitive results awaiting a larger trial. Trial Registration NCT02864420.

  5. Acute hospital costs after minimally invasive versus open lumbar interbody fusion: data from a US national database with 6106 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Y; Lerner, Jason; Lesko, James; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-08-01

    Retrospective multi-institutional database review. To determine if minimally invasive interbody fusion is associated with cost savings when compared with open surgery. Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgeries are increasingly recognized as equivalent to open procedures. Although these techniques have been advocated for reducing pain, disability, and length of hospitalization, to date there has been little data demonstrating these benefits. This study analyzed inpatient hospital records from the Premier Perspective database (2002 to 2009), including patients who underwent a posterior lumbar fusion with interbody cage placement by ICD-9 code, and had implant charge codes that allowed determination if MIS pedicle screws were utilized. Exclusion criteria included a refusion surgery, deformity, >2 levels, and anterior fusion. Total costs were adjusted for covariates (age, sex, race, hospital geography and setting, payor, and comorbidities) using an analysis of covariance model. A total of 6106 patients were identified (1667 MIS and 4439 open). Length of stay (LOS) for 1-level MIS surgery averaged of 3.35 days versus 3.6 days for open surgery (P≤0.006). For 2-level MIS surgery LOS averaged of 3.4 days versus 4.03 days for open surgery (P≤0.001). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $29,187 for 1-level MIS procedures versus $29,947 for open surgery, a nonsignificant difference (P=0.55). Total inflation-adjusted acute hospitalization cost averaged $2106 lower for 2-level MIS surgery (total costs of $33,879 for MIS vs. $35,984 for open surgery, P=0.0023). Cost savings were attributable primarily to lower room and board ($857), operating room ($359), pharmacy ($304), and laboratory ($166) costs in the MIS group. High variances in the 2-level open surgery with prolonged hospital stay also accounted for overall cost differences. This data from a large nationwide sample of hospitalizations demonstrates that MIS lumbar interbody fusion results in a

  6. Effectiveness of a clinical pathway for acute stroke care in a district general hospital: an audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegert Richard J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organised stroke care saves lives and reduces disability. A clinical pathway might be a form of organised stroke care, but the evidence for the effectiveness of this model of care is limited. Methods This study was a retrospective audit study of consecutive stroke admissions in the setting of an acute general medical unit in a district general hospital. The case-notes of patients admitted with stroke for a 6-month period before and after introduction of the pathway, were reviewed to determine data on length of stay, outcome, functional status, (Barthel Index, BI and Modified Rankin Scale, MRS, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP sub-type, use of investigations, specific management issues and secondary prevention strategies. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences in case-mix. Results N = 77 (prior to the pathway and 76 (following the pathway. The median (interquartile range, IQR age was 78 years (67.75–84.25, 88% were European NZ and 37% were male. The median (IQR BI at admission for the pre-pathway group was less than the post-pathway group: 6 (0–13.5 vs. 10 (4–15.5, p = 0.018 but other baseline variables were statistically similar. There were no significant differences between any of the outcome or process of care variables, except that echocardiograms were done less frequently after the pathway was introduced. A good outcome (MRS Conclusion A clinical pathway for acute stroke management appeared to have no benefit for the outcome or processes of care and may even have been associated with worse outcomes. These data support the conclusions of a recent Cochrane review.

  7. Acute hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation: population-based study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Niamh

    2014-10-30

    No economic data from population-based studies exist on acute or late hospital, community, and indirect costs of stroke associated with atrial fibrillation (AF-stroke). Such data are essential for policy development, service planning, and cost-effectiveness analysis of new therapeutic agents.

  8. An analysis of acute admissions to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid turnover of patients in a general hospital psychiatric unit demands stabilization and discharge as soon as possible. It is likely that patients are being prematurely discharged because of this pressure. Aim: The study sought to analyse admissions to an acute psychiatric unit with a view to determining the demographic ...

  9. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  10. Accuracy of various iron parameters in the prediction of iron deficiency in an acute care hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, K. H.; Tan, H. L.; Lai, H. C.; Kuperan, P.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Iron parameters like serum ferritin and iron saturation are routinely used in diagnosing iron deficiency. However, these tests are influenced by many factors. We aimed to review the accuracy of iron parameters among inpatients in an acute care hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From

  11. Bacteriology in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted to hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette V; Janner, Julie H; Nielsen, Susanne D

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the bacterial flora and antimicrobial sensitivity in sputum from patients admitted to hospital with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) in order to recommend the best empirical treatment for these patients. The survey was a retrospective study of a...

  12. Early Percutaneous Cholecystostomy in Severe Acute Cholecystitis Reduces the Complication Rate and Duration of Hospital Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chung-Kai; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Chan, Che-Chang; Perng, Chin-Lin; Chen, Chun-Ku; Fang, Wen-Liang; Lin, Han-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The optimal timing of percutaneous cholecystostomy for severe acute cholecystitis is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the timing of percutaneous cholecystostomy and its relationship to clinical outcomes in patients with inoperable acute severe cholecystitis. From 2008 to 2010, 209 consecutive patients who were admitted to our hospital due to acute cholecystitis and were treated by percutaneous cholecystostomy were retrospectively reviewed. The time periods from symptom onset to when percutaneous cholecystostomy was performed and when patients were discharged were recorded. In the 209 patients, the median time period between symptom onset and percutaneous cholecystostomy was 23 hours (range, 3–95 hours). The early intervention group (≤24 hours, n = 109) had a significantly lower procedure-related bleeding rate (0.0% vs 5.0%, P = 0.018) and shorter hospital stay (15.8 ± 12.9 vs 21.0 ± 17.5 days) as compared with the late intervention group (>24 hours, n = 100). Delayed percutaneous cholecystostomy was a significant independent factor for a longer hospital stay (odds ratio 3.03, P = 0.001). In inoperable patients with acute severe cholecystitis, early percutaneous cholecystostomy reduced hospital stay and procedure-related bleeding without increasing the mortality rate. PMID:26166097

  13. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in setting acute exposure guideline levels for methylene chloride.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Peter Martinus Jozef; Zeilmaker, Marco Jacob; Eijkeren, Jan Cornelis Henri van

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) are derived to protect the human population from adverse health effects in case of single exposure due to an accidental release of chemicals into the atmosphere. AEGLs are set at three different levels of increasing toxicity for exposure durations ranging from

  14. Guidance document for setting an Acute Reference Dose in Dutch national pesticide evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaij MTM van; CSR

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a proposal for the procedures for setting an Acute Reference Dose (ARfD) for pesticides evaluated in the Netherlands. This deals with both evaluations on the national level (on behalf of the Dutch Board for the Authorisation of Pesticides (CTB)) and evaluations at the European

  15. Sustainability of Evidence-Based Acute Pain Management Practices for Hospitalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Clayton J; Xie, Xian-Jin; Herr, Keela A; Titler, Marita G

    2017-11-01

    Little is known regarding sustainability of evidence-based practices (EBPs) following implementation. This article reports sustainability of evidence-based acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults following testing of a multifaceted Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP) implementation intervention. A cluster randomized trial with follow-up period was conducted in 12 Midwest U.S. hospitals (six experimental, six comparison). Use of evidence-based acute pain management practices and mean pain intensity were analyzed using generalized estimating equations across two time points (following implementation and 18 months later) to determine sustainability of TRIP intervention effects. Summative Index scores and six of seven practices were sustained. Experimental and comparison group differences for mean pain intensity over 72 hours following admission were sustained. Results revealed most evidence-based acute pain management practices were sustained for 18 months following implementation. Further work is needed to identify factors affecting sustainability of EBPs to guide development and testing of sustainability strategies.

  16. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  17. Low frequency of asymptomatic carriage of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in an acute care geriatric hospital: prospective cohort study in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pires

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of asymptomatic carriers of toxigenic Clostridium difficile (TCD in nosocomial cross-transmission remains debatable. Moreover, its relevance in the elderly has been sparsely studied. Objectives To assess asymptomatic TCD carriage in an acute care geriatric population. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study at the 296-bed geriatric hospital of the Geneva University Hospitals. We consecutively recruited all patients admitted to two 15-bed acute-care wards. Patients with C. difficile infection (CDI or diarrhoea at admission were excluded. First bowel movement after admission and every two weeks thereafter were sampled. C. difficile toxin B gene was identified using real-time polymerase chain-reaction (BD MAXTMCdiff. Asymptomatic TCD carriage was defined by the presence of the C. difficile toxin B gene without diarrhoea. Results A total of 102 patients were admitted between March and June 2015. Two patients were excluded. Among the 100 patients included in the study, 63 were hospitalized and 1 had CDI in the previous year, and 36 were exposed to systemic antibiotics within 90 days prior to admission. Overall, 199 stool samples were collected (median 2 per patient, IQR 1-3. Asymptomatic TCD carriage was identified in two patients (2 %. Conclusions We found a low prevalence of asymptomatic TCD carriage in a geriatric population frequently exposed to antibiotics and healthcare. Our findings suggest that asymptomatic TCD carriage might contribute only marginally to nosocomial TCD cross-transmission in our and similar healthcare settings.

  18. No Racial Difference in Rehabilitation Therapy Across All Post-Acute Care Settings in the Year Following a Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Feng, Chunyang; Burke, James F

    2017-12-01

    Black stroke survivors experience greater poststroke disability than whites. Differences in post-acute rehabilitation may contribute to this disparity. Therefore, we estimated racial differences in rehabilitation therapy utilization, intensity, and the number of post-acute care settings in the first year after a stroke. We used national Medicare data to study 186 168 elderly black and white patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of stroke in 2011. We tabulated the proportion of stroke survivors receiving physical, occupational, and speech and language therapy in each post-acute care setting (inpatient rehabilitation facility, skilled nursing facility, and home health agency), minutes of therapy, and number of transitions between settings. We then used generalized linear models to determine whether racial differences in minutes of physical therapy were influenced by demographics, comorbidities, thrombolysis, and markers of stroke severity. Black stroke patients were more likely to receive each type of therapy than white stroke patients. Compared with white stroke patients, black stroke patients received more minutes of physical therapy (897.8 versus 743.4; P <0.01), occupational therapy (752.7 versus 648.9; P <0.01), and speech and language therapy (865.7 versus 658.1; P <0.01). There were no clinically significant differences in physical therapy minutes after adjustment. Blacks had more transitions (median, 3; interquartile range, 1-5) than whites (median, 2; interquartile range, 1-5; P <0.01). There are no clinically significant racial differences in rehabilitation therapy utilization or intensity after accounting for patient characteristics. It is unlikely that differences in rehabilitation utilization or intensity are important contributors to racial disparities in poststroke disability. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Health literacy and 30-day hospital readmission after acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Fang, Gang; Annis, Izabela E; O'Conor, Rachel; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the validity of a predictive model of health literacy, and to examine the relationship between derived health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting and participants A National Institute of Aging (NIA) study cohort of 696 adult, English-speaking primary care patients, aged 55–74 years, was used to assess the validity of derived health literacy estimates. Claims from 7733 Medicare beneficiaries hospitalised for AMI in 2008 in North Carolina and Illinois were used to investigate the association between health literacy estimates and 30-day hospital readmissions. Measures The NIA cohort was administered 3 common health literacy assessments (Newest Vital Sign, Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults, and Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine). Health literacy estimates at the census block group level were derived via a predictive model. 30-day readmissions were measured from Medicare claims data using a validated algorithm. Results Fair agreement was found between derived estimates and in-person literacy assessments (Pearson Correlation coefficients: 0.38–0.51; κ scores: 0.38–0.40). Medicare enrollees with above basic literacy according to derived health literacy estimates had an 18% lower risk of a 30-day readmission (RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.92) and 21% lower incidence rate of 30-day readmission (IRR=0.79, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87) than patients with basic or below basic literacy. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk of 30-day readmission was 12% lower (p=0.03), and the incidence rate 16% lower (pliteracy. Conclusions Health literacy, as measured by a predictive model, was found to be a significant, independent predictor of 30-day readmissions. As a modifiable risk factor with evidence-based solutions, health literacy should be considered in readmission reduction efforts. PMID:26068508

  20. Levetiracetam as adjunctive therapy for acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youland, Kelly M; Miller, Ryan F; Mahoney, Lisa J; Borgert, Andrew J; Gundrum, Jacob D

    2014-12-01

    Benzodiazepines are often considered the standard of care for managing symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Because of potential adverse effects, other agents have been evaluated in this patient population. Previous studies have produced mixed results on the efficacy of levetiracetam in alcohol withdrawal. The objective of this study was to determine whether adjunctive levetiracetam reduces the amount of symptom-triggered benzodiazepines required by patients experiencing symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients who experienced symptoms of alcohol withdrawal while hospitalized. The outcomes of patients who received adjunctive levetiracetam were compared with those of patients who received only the standard of care (control group). Two hundred fifty patients (125 in each cohort) were included. No significant differences were found in the benzodiazepine requirements of the 2 cohorts. The control group required a median average daily dose of 2.0 mg of lorazepam (range, 0.1-17 mg/d) compared with the levetiracetam group, which required a median average daily dose of 1.3 mg of lorazepam (range, 0.0-53.5 mg/d) (P = 0.09). The patients in the control group required a median total of 6 mg of lorazepam during their hospitalization compared with a median total of 5.5 mg in the levetiracetam group. Both cohorts had a median length of stay of 3 days, although those in the levetiracetam group had a shorter length of intensive care unit stay and spent less time mechanically ventilated. The adjunctive use of levetiracetam does not significantly reduce the benzodiazepine requirements of patients experiencing symptoms of alcohol withdrawal in the inpatient setting.

  1. Lack of Needs Assessment in Cancer Survivorship Care and Rehabilitation in Hospitals and Primary Care Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Jensen, Charlotte Maria; Maribo, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    the aim of this study was to describe specific survivorship care and rehabilitation needs and plans as stated by patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed and when primary care survivorship care and rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs assessment forms from cancer patients at two hospitals and two...... primary care settings were analyzed. The forms included stated needs and survivorship care and rehabilitation plans. All data were categorized using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results: Eighty-nine patients at hospitals and 99 in primary care, stated...... their needs. Around 50% of the patients completed a survivorship care and rehabilitation plan. In total, 666 (mean 7.5) needs were stated by hospital patients and 836 (mean 8.0) by those in primary care. The needs stated were primarily within the ICF component “body functions and structure”, and the most...

  2. [RIFLE and AKIN criteria for mortality and risk factors of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Shaobin; Liu, Qing; Pan, Peng; Xu, Jun; Liu, Na; Li, Ying; Liu, Hong; Peng, Youming; Sun, Lin; Liu, Fuyou

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the mortality and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients by the risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease (RIFLE) and acute kidney injury network (AKIN). We constructed a retrospective study of all AKI patients in the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University between February 2006 and January 2011. The diagnosis and classification of AKI were reconfirmed and categorized by RIFLE and AKIN criteria. To compare the clinical characteristics, mortality and associated risk factors in AKI patients by the RIFLE and AKIN stage, univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed. The patients were diagnosed as AKI by AKIN (n=1027) or by RIFLE criteria (n=1020). There was no significant difference in the hospital mortality, hospital length stay (days), or the proportion of complete recovery in each stage of AKI patients by RIFLE and AKIN (P>0.05). In the univariate analysis, age, pre-renal causes, proportion of hospital acquired AKI, mechanical ventilation, hypotension, the number of failed organs, acute tubular necrosis-index severity score (ATN-ISS), and the peak of serum potassium ion concentration were significantly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that age older than 65, hospital acquired AKI, hypotension, number of failed organs, ATN-ISS scores, and the peak of serum potassium ion concentration were independent risk factors for hospital mortality. Both RIFLE and AKIN criteria have similar scientific value in assessing hospital mortality. AKI stage is associated with the recent prognosis of AKI patients.

  3. The trend of acute burns pre-hospital management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Hamdiya

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Burn injuries are common in our settings, a more reason for all to know the immediate intervention to give to victims of such accidents. The kind of first aid administered to burns victims possibly affects the burns management outcome. Thus, the earlier the right intervention implemented, the lesser the complications.

  4. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  5. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  6. [Chest radiographs in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis: real information or just irradiation?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsin, A; Gorincour, G; Bresson, V; Oudyi, M; David, M; Mancini, J; Chabrol, B; Devred, P; Bosdure, E; Dubus, J-C

    2012-12-01

    To describe the chest radiographs of infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis and to assess whether patient management changed after radiography. All infants hospitalized in our pediatric unit with a first episode of acute bronchiolitis from October 2010 to March 2012 were included in the study. Infants with chronic disease or transferred from a pediatric intensive care unit were excluded. The following data were collected: sex, age, neonatal history, atopy, tobacco exposure, admission criteria, treatment, laboratory parameters, ultrasonography and its outcome, results of chest radiography on admittance, the reason for a second chest radiograph, change in management as a result of the radiograph. The study comprised 232 infants (median age 2.2 months, boys 56%, positive respiratory syncytial virus 73.4%). Among them, 227 children had a routine chest radiograph revealing distension and/or bronchial wall thickening (n=141, 62.4%), focal opacity (19.9%), or atelectasis (17.7%). This radiograph led to the prescription of antibiotics in six patients (2.6%) and allowed the diagnosis of vascular abnormality to be made in one case (0.4%). Thirty-five patients (15.4%) had a second chest radiograph during their hospitalization owing to oxygen dependency (n=21), respiratory distress (n=11), persistent fever (n=2), or no reason specified (n=1). Pneumonia (n=7) and/or atelectasis (n=15) were then found in 62.9%. Patient management (antibiotics, postural maneuvers) was modified in six patients (17.1%). Routine chest radiographs contribute only partially to the treatment of infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis. However, radiography is useful when the hospitalized child does not improve at the expected rate or if the disease is severe. The indication of chest radiography in infants hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis should be discussed on a case by a case basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The adenoviral infections in children admitted to hospital with pneumonia, acute bronchiolitis or respiratory viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecu, Cristina; Mihai, Maria E; Alexandrescu, Viorel I; Orăşanu, Dumitru; Zapucioiu, Carmen; Matei, Dumitru; Craiu, M; Cochino, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the percent of infections with adenovirus (ADV) in children who had pneumonia, acute bronchiolitis or viral respiratory infections and were admitted to two pediatrics hospitals in Bucharest (Grigore Alexandrescu Hospital and Alfred Rusescu Hospital). 70 children aged one month - five years, admitted to the above mentioned pediatrics hospitals in Bucharest, who were negative for the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and the human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) by Reverse Transcription -Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). 48 of them presented pneumonia upon admission to hospital, 6--acute bronchiolitis and 16 respiratory viral infections. Samples (nasal swabs) were taken from patients and introduced in viral transport medium. RT-PCR for RSV and hMPV, Multiplex PCR by seeplex multi-detection system with Seeplex RV/PB 18 ASE Detection for detection of 5 pneumonial bacteria and Real-Time PCR, Duplica Real Time Adenovirus Detection for ADV. Of the total 70 patients negative for RSV, hMPV and 5 pneumonial bacteria (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila), 10 were ADV positive; none of the children < 6 months (N = 16) presented ADV infection. In the 6 months - 2 years group (N = 35), 6 were ADV positive. In the 2 - 5 years group (N = 19), 4 were ADV positive. The percent of ADV infections in children hospitalized with acute respiratory infections (ARI) caused by neither RSV or hMPV is 14.2%. ADV is most frequently encountered in the 6 months - 2 years and then 2 - 5 years groups, but the most severe pneumonia forms can be seen in the 6 months - 2 years group. In children < 6 months with acute bronchiolitis ADV was not found to be an etiologic agent.

  8. Antibiotic use and clinical outcomes in the acute setting under management by an infectious diseases acute physician versus other clinical teams: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Nicola Jk; Jones, Nicola; Quan, T Phuong; Mistry, Vikash; Crook, Derrick; Peto, Tim; Walker, A Sarah

    2016-08-23

    To assess the magnitude of difference in antibiotic use between clinical teams in the acute setting and assess evidence for any adverse consequences to patient safety or healthcare delivery. Prospective cohort study (1 week) and analysis of linked electronic health records (3 years). UK tertiary care centre. All patients admitted sequentially to the acute medical service under an infectious diseases acute physician (IDP) and other medical teams during 1 week in 2013 (n=297), and 3 years 2012-2014 (n=47 585). Antibiotic use in days of therapy (DOT): raw group metrics and regression analysis adjusted for case mix. 30-day all-cause mortality, treatment failure and length of stay. Antibiotic use was 173 vs 282 DOT/100 admissions in the IDP versus non-IDP group. Using case mix-adjusted zero-inflated Poisson regression, IDP patients were significantly less likely to receive an antibiotic (adjusted OR=0.25 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.84), p=0.03) and received shorter courses (adjusted rate ratio (RR)=0.71 (95% CI 0.54 to 0.93), p=0.01). Clinically stable IDP patients of uncertain diagnosis were more likely to have antibiotics held (87% vs 55%; p=0.02). There was no significant difference in treatment failure or mortality (adjusted p>0.5; also in the 3-year data set), but IDP patients were more likely to be admitted overnight (adjusted OR=3.53 (95% CI 1.24 to 10.03), p=0.03) and have longer length of stay (adjusted RR=1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36), p=0.007). The IDP-led group used 30% less antibiotic therapy with no adverse clinical outcome, suggesting antibiotic use can be reduced safely in the acute setting. This may be achieved in part by holding antibiotics and admitting the patient for observation rather than prescribing, which has implications for costs and hospital occupancy. More information is needed to indicate whether any such longer admission will increase or decrease risk of antibiotic-resistant infections. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  9. Hospital Mortality of Septic Acute Kidney Injury Requiring Renal Replacement Therapy in the Postoperative Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Lun Liu

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: The hospital mortality of postoperative elderly patients with septic AKI was more than 60% and was not affected by age. Mechanical ventilator use was the major risk factor and prognostic factor for elderly patients in this clinical setting.

  10. Nutritional screening for improving professional practice for patient outcomes in hospital and primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Vali, Yasaman; Murray, Susan M; Wonderling, David; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-06-06

    Given the prevalence of under-nutrition and reports of inadequate nutritional management of patients in hospitals and the community, nutritional screening may play a role in reducing the risks of malnutrition. Screening programmes can invoke costs to health systems and patients. It is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes. To examine the effectiveness of nutritional screening in improving quality of care (professional practice) and patient outcomes compared with usual care. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June 2012 to find relevant studies. Randomised controlled studies, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies assessing the effectiveness of nutritional screening were eligible for inclusion in the review. We considered process outcomes (for example patient identification, referral to dietitian) and patient outcomes (for example mortality, change in body mass index (BMI)). Participants were adult patients aged 16 years or over. We included studies conducted in different settings, including hospitals, out-patient clinics, primary care or long term care settings. We independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included studies. Meta-analysis was considered but was not conducted due to the discrepancies between the studies. The studies were heterogeneous in their design, setting, intervention and outcomes. We analysed the data using a narrative synthesis approach. After conducting initial searches and screening the titles and abstracts of the identified literature, 77 full text papers were retrieved and read. Ultimately three studies were included. Two controlled before-after studies were conducted in hospital settings (one in the UK and one in the Netherlands) and one cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary care setting (in the USA).The study conducted in

  11. Geriatric Conditions in Acutely Hospitalized Older Patients: Prevalence and One-Year Survival and Functional Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Hoogerduijn, Jita G.; de Haan, Rob J.; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Lagaay, A. Margot; Verhaar, Harald J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; Levi, Marcel; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2011-01-01

    Background To study the prevalence of eighteen geriatric conditions in older patients at admission, their reporting rate in discharge summaries and the impact of these conditions on mortality and functional decline one year after admission. Method A prospective multicenter cohort study conducted between 2006 and 2008 in two tertiary university teaching hospitals and one regional teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Patients of 65 years and older, acutely admitted and hospitalized for at least 48 hours, were invited to participate. Eighteen geriatric conditions were assessed at hospital admission, and outcomes (mortality, functional decline) were assessed one year after admission. Results 639 patients were included, with a mean age of 78 years. IADL impairment (83%), polypharmacy (61%), mobility difficulty (59%), high levels of primary caregiver burden (53%), and malnutrition (52%) were most prevalent. Except for polypharmacy and cognitive impairment, the reporting rate of the geriatric conditions in discharge summaries was less than 50%. One year after admission, 35% had died and 33% suffered from functional decline. A high Charlson comorbidity index score, presence of malnutrition, high fall risk, presence of delirium and premorbid IADL impairment were associated with mortality and overall poor outcome (mortality or functional decline). Obesity lowered the risk for mortality. Conclusion Geriatric conditions were highly prevalent and associated with poor health outcomes after admission. Early recognition of these conditions in acutely hospitalized older patients and improving the handover to the general practitioner could lead to better health outcomes and reduce the burden of hospital admission for older patients. PMID:22110598

  12. [A set of quality and safety indicators for hospitals of the "Agencia Valenciana de Salud"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot-Marzal, C M; Mira-Solves, J J; Guilabert-Mora, M; Pérez-Jover, V; Pablo-Comeche, D; Quirós-Morató, T; Cuesta Peredo, D

    2014-01-01

    To prepare a set of quality and safety indicators for Hospitals of the «Agencia Valenciana de Salud». The qualitative technique Metaplan® was applied in order to gather proposals on sustainability and nursing. The catalogue of the «Spanish Society of Quality in Healthcare» was adopted as a starting point for clinical indicators. Using the Delphi technique, 207 professionals were invited to participate in the selecting the most reliable and feasible indicators. Lastly, the resulting proposal was validated with the managers of 12 hospitals, taking into account the variability, objectivity, feasibility, reliability and sensitivity, of the indicators. Participation rates varied between 66.67% and 80.71%. Of the 159 initial indicators, 68 were prioritized and selected (21 economic or management indicators, 22 nursing indicators, and 25 clinical or hospital indicators). Three of them were common to all three categories and two did not match the specified criteria during the validation phase, thus obtaining a final catalogue of 63 indicators. A set of quality and safety indicators for Hospitals was prepared. They are currently being monitored using the hospital information systems. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montse Ballbè

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain. To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals —the early adopters— based on Rogers’ theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units. Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals’ awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings.

  14. Priority setting for technology adoption at a hospital level: relevant issues from the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettieri, Emanuele; Masella, Cristina

    2009-04-01

    The increasing pace of development of healthcare technologies obliges hospitals to increase both the rationality and the accountability of priority setting for technology adoption. This paper aims at identifying which are the relevant issues for technology assessment and selection at a hospital level and at grouping them in a reference framework. An electronic search from January 1990 onwards, covering PubMed, Medline and CILEA, has been carried out in order to collect the relevant contributions. A total of 20 studies were selected from the fields of health policy, management of technology and biomedical engineering. Two main assessment perspectives have been identified and detailed: value generation at a hospital level and level of sustainability in the implementation stage. Four types of investment in technology at a hospital level have been identified combining the perspectives. Moreover, the two perspectives have been deployed in a list of 19 relevant issues that should be reviewed during the budget process. The proposed framework can aid priority setting for technology adoption at a hospital level and contribute to increase both the rationality and the accountability of technology assessment and selection in the budget process.

  15. Assessing appropriateness of parenteral nutrition usage in an acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Niamh D; Neary, Elaine; Power, Siobhan; Feehan, Sinead; Duggan, Sinead N

    2013-04-01

    Although parenteral nutrition (PN) has become an integral component of patient care, the risks and costs associated with this therapy must be weighed against the benefits. The Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at our tertiary referral, university-affiliated hospital has audited the use of enteral nutrition and PN based on criteria devised from guidelines developed by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.). We aimed to examine the use of PN over time and in particular to investigate the appropriate and inappropriate use of this feeding method. Each patient referred for PN was assessed by a dietitian and need for PN evaluated. The appropriateness of the PN was categorized according to predefined criteria. A total of 1191 patients had 1409 episodes of PN during the study period. According to the predefined criteria, 82% of PN episodes were considered "appropriate." PN was "appropriate but avoidable" in 13% of cases. In 5% of episodes, the commencement of PN was considered "inappropriate." The use of appropriate PN increased significantly over the study period (P = .018). Most PN episodes were deemed appropriate. We saw 5% inappropriate usage, which is lower than reported in comparable studies. This study underlines the importance of continuous audit and evaluation of practice to maintain appropriate and evidence-based practice in nutrition support.

  16. Patients With Fibrotic Interstitial Lung Disease Hospitalized for Acute Respiratory Worsening: A Large Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moua, Teng; Westerly, Blair D; Dulohery, Megan M; Daniels, Craig E; Ryu, Jay H; Lim, Kaiser G

    2016-05-01

    Acute respiratory worsening (ARW) requiring hospitalization in patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease (f-ILD) is common. Little is known about the frequency and implications of ARW in IPF and non-IPF ILD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation (AE) vs known causes of ARW. All consecutive patients with f-ILD hospitalized with ARW at our institution from 2000 to 2014 were reviewed. ARW was defined as any worsening of respiratory symptoms with new or worsened hypoxemia or hypercapnia within 30 days of admission. Suspected AE was defined using modified 2007 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria. Known causes of ARW were reviewed and collated along with in-hospital and all-cause mortality postdischarge. A total of 220 patients (100 with IPF and 120 non-IPF) composed 311 admissions for ARW. Suspected AE (SAE) comprised 52% of ARW admissions, followed by infection (20%), and subacute progression of disease (15%). In-hospital mortality was similar in patients with IPF vs patients without (55 vs 45%, P = .18), but worse in suspected AE admission types (OR, 3.1 [1.9-5.14]). One-year survival after last ARW admission for the whole cohort was 22%, despite only 27% of patients presenting with baseline oxygen requirement at admission and a mean admission Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 5.4 (expected 1-year survival, 89%). Survival after discharge was similar between SAE and secondary ARW admission types in both IPF and non-IPF patients. Among patients with f-ILD, hospitalization for ARW appears associated with significant in-hospital and postdischarge mortality regardless of underlying fibrotic lung disease or non-AE cause of acute respiratory decline. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood lactate as a predictor for in-hospital mortality in patients admitted acutely to hospital: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Ole; Grunnet, Niels; Barfod, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    of deterioration, but patients with even lower lactate levels should be considered for serial lactate monitoring. The correlation between lactate levels in arterial and venous blood was found to be acceptable, and venous sampling should therefore be encouraged, as the risk and inconvenience for this procedure......BACKGROUND: Using blood lactate monitoring for risk assessment in the critically ill patient remains controversial. Some of the discrepancy is due to uncertainty regarding the appropriate reference interval, and whether to perform a single lactate measurement as a screening method at admission...... to the hospital, or serial lactate measurements. Furthermore there is no consensus whether the sample should be drawn from arterial, peripheral venous, or capillary blood. The aim of this review was: 1) To examine whether blood lactate levels are predictive for in-hospital mortality in patients in the acute...

  18. The Relationship between Poverty and Healthcare Seeking among Patients Hospitalized with Acute Febrile Illnesses in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Trent Herdman

    Full Text Available Delays in seeking appropriate healthcare can increase the case fatality of acute febrile illnesses, and circuitous routes of care-seeking can have a catastrophic financial impact upon patients in low-income settings. To investigate the relationship between poverty and pre-hospital delays for patients with acute febrile illnesses, we recruited a cross-sectional, convenience sample of 527 acutely ill adults and children aged over 6 months, with a documented fever ≥38.0 °C and symptoms of up to 14 days' duration, presenting to a tertiary referral hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh, over the course of one year from September 2011 to September 2012. Participants were classified according to the socioeconomic status of their households, defined by the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative's multidimensional poverty index (MPI. 51% of participants were classified as multidimensionally poor (MPI>0.33. Median time from onset of any symptoms to arrival at hospital was 22 hours longer for MPI poor adults compared to non-poor adults (123 vs. 101 hours rising to a difference of 26 hours with adjustment in a multivariate regression model (95% confidence interval 7 to 46 hours; P = 0.009. There was no difference in delays for children from poor and non-poor households (97 vs. 119 hours; P = 0.394. Case fatality was 5.9% vs. 0.8% in poor and non-poor individuals respectively (P = 0.001-5.1% vs. 0.0% for poor and non-poor adults (P = 0.010 and 6.4% vs. 1.8% for poor and non-poor children (P = 0.083. Deaths were attributed to central nervous system infection (11, malaria (3, urinary tract infection (2, gastrointestinal infection (1 and undifferentiated sepsis (1. Both poor and non-poor households relied predominantly upon the (often informal private sector for medical advice before reaching the referral hospital, but MPI poor participants were less likely to have consulted a qualified doctor. Poor participants were more likely to attribute delays in

  19. [Update on the management of acute viral bronchiolitis: proposed guidelines of Grand Ouest University Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, M; Cros, P; Gouin, M; Oillic, H; Bihouée, T; Denoual, H; Barzic, A; Duigou, A-L; Vrignaud, B; Levieux, K; Vabres, N; Fleurence, E; Darviot, E; Cardona, J; Guitteny, M-A; Marot, Y; Picherot, G; Gras-Le Guen, C

    2014-01-01

    While our European and North American colleagues have recently updated their recommendations, the 2000 Consensus Conference remains the main guideline on management of acute viral bronchiolitis in France. We aimed to establish an updated inter-regional protocol on management of acute viral bronchiolitis in infants. Pediatricians, pediatric pulmonologists, and emergency physicians of the Grand Ouest University Hospitals (France) gathered to analyze the recent data from the literature. Criteria to distinguish childhood asthma from acute viral bronchiolitis were established, then prescriptions of diagnostic tests, antibiotics, and chest physiotherapy were defined and reserved for very limited situations. Similarly, the modalities of oxygen therapy prescription and nutritional support were proposed. Finally, other therapeutics such as nebulized hypertonic saline seem promising, but their place in the treatment of acute bronchiolitis in infants remains unclear. This work has provided new proposals for management of acute viral bronchiolitis and helped standardize practices within the Grand Ouest University Hospitals. This local organization could lay the keystone for working toward guidelines initiated by learned societies at the national level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploratory Use of Microaerosol Decontamination Technology (PAEROSOL) in Enclosed, Unoccupied Hospital Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainina, Evguenia I.; McCune, D. E.; Luna, Maria L.; Cook, J. E.; Soltis, Michele A.; Demons, Samandra T.; Godoy-Kain, Patricia; Weston, J. H.

    2012-05-31

    The goal of this study was to validate the previously observed high biological kill performance of PAEROSOL, a semi-dry, micro-aerosol decontamination technology, against common HAI in a non-human subject trial within a hospital setting of Madigan Army Medical Center (MAMC) on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to validating the disinfecting efficacy of PAEROSOL, the objectives of the trial included a demonstration of PAEROSOL environmental safety, (i.e., impact to hospital interior materials and electronic equipment exposed during testing) and PAEROSOL parameters optimization for future deployment.

  1. Supervisory needs of research doctoral students in a university teaching hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Patrina Hy; Oldmeadow, Wendy; Jones, Cheryl A

    2012-10-01

    Teaching hospitals affiliated with universities are now common sites for research higher degree supervision. We hypothesised that the hospital environment poses unique challenges to supervision compared with the traditional university research institute setting. This study aimed to identify and rank important supervision issues in a clinical setting from the students' perspective. Using the Delphi method to explore issues and facilitate consensus, small group discussions were conducted with 10 research doctoral students from a tertiary teaching hospital. We identified supervision issues that are unique to the hospital-based context. These include the demands placed on supervisors combining clinical and supervisory roles, the challenges of academic medical/scientific writing and career issues for students who are already established in their professions. Other issues identified, common to all doctoral students, include differing expectations between students and supervisors (with students wanting support for their career plans, training in research skills and increasing autonomy and responsibility), supervisor access, quality and frequency of meetings, lack of training in writing and dealing with conflicts. Our research identified that postgraduate students of supervisors who combine clinical and supervisory roles report significant issues with supervision, some of which are unique to the clinical setting. Clinician researchers who supervise postgraduate students need to balance clinical and supervisory responsibilities, identify and negotiate student expectations early in candidature and provide career counselling to students who are already highly experienced. Furthermore, clinician supervisors should undertake postgraduate supervisor training programme tailored to the hospital setting to better support their students. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of

  2. An investigation of nurse education service models in acute care metropolitan hospitals across Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Carolyn; Alliex, Selma

    2017-10-24

    This paper outlines a study that was undertaken to investigate the different nurse education service models being utilised in acute care metropolitan hospitals across Australia with a view to make recommendations for future nurse education service delivery within healthcare organisations. This research study used a mixed methods approach comprising three phases. Phase one involved interviews and focus groups with nurse educators at one tertiary teaching hospital in Perth, Western Australia (WA). Phase two involved focus groups and interviews with nurse educators and coordinators of nurse education services in acute care metropolitan hospitals in W.A. Phase three of the study consisted of the development of a survey tool from the findings of the previous phases and a national survey of nurse educators in acute care metropolitan hospitals across Australia. The findings of this study demonstrate that a centralised nurse education service model undertakes more functions than, and delivers significant advantages over, the decentralised and combination models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. DATA MINING APPROACH FOR IN-HOSPITAL TREATMENT OUTCOME IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladojević, Miroslava; Čanković, Milenko; Čemerlić, Snežana; Mihajlović, Bojan; Ađić, Filip; Jaraković, Milana

    2015-01-01

    Risk stratification is nowadays crucial when estimating the patient's prognosis in terms of treatment outcome and it also helps in clinical decision making. Several risk assessment models have been developed to predict short-term outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study was aimed at developing an outcome prediction model for patients with acute coronary syndrome submitted to percutaneus coronary intervention using data mining approach. A total of 2030 patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome and treated with percutaneous coronary intervention from December 2008 to December 2011 were assigned to a derivation cohort. Demographic and anamnestic data, clinical characteristics on admission, biochemical analysis of blood parameters on admission, and left ventricular ejection fraction formed the basis ofthe study. A number of machine learning algorithms available within Waikato Environment for Knowledge Discovery had been evaluated and the most successful was chosen. The predictive model was subsequently validated in a different population of 931 patients (validation cohort), hospitalized during 2012. The best prediction results were achieved using Alternating Decision Tree classifier, which was able to predict in-hospital mortality with 89% accuracy, and preserved good performance on validation cohort with 87% accuracy. Alternating Decision Tree classifier identified a subset of 6 attributes most relevant to mortality prediction: systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, left ventricular ejection fraction, age, and troponin value. Data mining approach enabled the authors to develop a model capable of predicting the in-hospital outcome following percutaneous coronary intervention. The model showed excellent sensitivity and specificity during internal validation.

  4. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... I-O Input-Output IOM Institute of Medicine IPF Inpatient psychiatric facility IPFQR Inpatient... Disorders of the Circulatory System) a. Discharge/Transfer to Designated Disaster Alternative Care Site b... Program e. Proposed Disaster/Extraordinary Circumstance Waivers under the Hospital VBP Program 10...

  5. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... grammatical error in our discussion of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) indicators. On... Hospital Quality Reporting Program (PCHQR), we made a grammatical error. On page 53601, in the table... requirements for the LTCH Quality Reporting Program, we made a grammatical error in our response to a comment...

  6. Terapia ocupacional en un hospital general de pacientes agudos = Occupational therapy in a general hospital for acute pacients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocello, M. G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Desde su creación, el Hospital Provincial “Dr. José María Cullen” posee la característica de ser un hospital de emergencias, sostenido por la Sociedad de Beneficencia y la Hermanas de la Caridad.Su funcionamiento responde a un Modelo Clínico-Asistencial, lo cual influye en la inserción de Terapia Ocupacional debiendo adaptar sus funciones a las características de la Institución.Los marcos de referencia teóricos y programas que se implementandeber ser acordes con las necesidades surgidas de un Hospital General de Agudos y de emergencias.En el Sector de Terapia Ocupacional se desarrolla la actividad docente cumpliendo con los requisitos reglamentados por el Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Santa Fe.ABSTRACT Ever since its start the Provincial Hospital “Dr. José María Cullen” is characterised for being an emergency hospital under the guidance of the Benfit Society of Hermanas de la Caridad.Its function responds to a Clinical Assistential Model, which influences the insertion of Occupational Therapy, adapting its functiones to the characteristics of the Institution as and when called for.The theoretical points of reference and programmes that are used must be in accordance with tehe necessities that appear in an Acute and Emergency General Hospital.In the Occupational Therapy Sector the teaching activity is developed as required by rules and regulations of the Ministry of Health for the Province of Santa Fe.

  7. Multiple Chronic Conditions and Psychosocial Limitations in Patients Hospitalized with an Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisminetzky, Mayra; Gurwitz, Jerry; McManus, David D; Saczynski, Jane S; Erskine, Nathaniel; Waring, Molly E; Anatchkova, Milena; Awad, Hamza; Parish, David C; Lessard, Darleen; Kiefe, Catarina; Goldberg, Robert

    2016-06-01

    As adults live longer, multiple chronic conditions have become more prevalent over the past several decades. We describe the prevalence of, and patient characteristics associated with, cardiac- and non-cardiac-related multimorbidities in patients discharged from the hospital after an acute coronary syndrome. We studied 2174 patients discharged from the hospital after an acute coronary syndrome at 6 medical centers in Massachusetts and Georgia between April 2011 and May 2013. Hospital medical records yielded clinical information including presence of eight cardiac-related and eight non-cardiac-related morbidities on admission. We assessed multiple psychosocial characteristics during the index hospitalization using standardized in-person instruments. The mean age of the study sample was 61 years, 67% were men, and 81% were non-Hispanic whites. The most common cardiac-related morbidities were hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes (76%, 69%, and 31%, respectively). Arthritis, chronic pulmonary disease, and depression (20%, 18%, and 13%, respectively) were the most common noncardiac morbidities. Patients with ≥4 morbidities (37% of the population) were slightly older and more frequently female than those with 0-1 morbidity; they were also heavier and more likely to be cognitively impaired (26% vs 12%), have symptoms of moderate/severe depression (31% vs 15%), high perceived stress (48% vs 32%), a limited social network (22% vs 15%), low health literacy (42% vs 31%), and low health numeracy (54% vs 42%). Multimorbidity, highly prevalent in patients hospitalized with an acute coronary syndrome, is strongly associated with indices of psychosocial deprivation. This emphasizes the challenge of caring for these patients, which extends well beyond acute coronary syndrome management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  9. Safety Culture and Mortality after Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Study of Medicare Beneficiaries at 171 Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahian, David M; Liu, Xiu; Rossi, Laura P; Mort, Elizabeth A; Normand, Sharon-Lise T

    2017-10-09

    To investigate the association between hospital safety culture and 30-day risk-adjusted mortality for Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a large, diverse hospital cohort. The final analytic cohort consisted of 19,357 Medicare AMI discharges (MedPAR data) linked to 257 AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture surveys from 171 hospitals between 2008 and 2013. Observational, cross-sectional study using hierarchical logistic models to estimate the association between hospital safety scores and 30-day risk-adjusted patient mortality. Odds ratios of 30-day, all-cause mortality, adjusting for patient covariates, hospital characteristics (size and teaching status), and several different types of safety culture scores (composite, average, and overall) were determined. No significant association was found between any measure of hospital safety culture and adjusted AMI mortality. In a large cross-sectional study from a diverse hospital cohort, AHRQ safety culture scores were not associated with AMI mortality. Our study adds to a growing body of investigations that have failed to conclusively demonstrate a safety culture-outcome association in health care, at least with widely used national survey instruments. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Recovery-focussed care: How it can be utilized to reduce aggression in the acute mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eric; Wynaden, Dianne; Heslop, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Consumer aggression is common in the acute mental health inpatient setting. Mental health nurses can utilize a range of interventions to prevent aggression or reduce its impact on the person and others who have witnessed the event. Incorporating recovery-focussed care into clinical practice is one intervention, as it fosters collaborative partnerships with consumers. It promotes their engagement in decisions about their care and encourages self-management of their presenting behaviours. It also allows the consumer to engage in their personal recovery as their mental health improve. Yet there is a paucity of literature on how nurses can utilize recovery-focussed care with consumers who are hospitalized and in the acute phase of their illness. In the present study, we report the findings of a scoping review of the literature to identify how recovery-focussed care can be utilized by nurses to reduce the risk of consumer aggression. Thirty-five papers met the inclusion criteria for review. Four components were identified as central to the use of recovery-focussed care with consumers at risk of becoming aggressive: (i) seeing the person and not just their presenting behaviour; (ii) interact, don't react; (iii) coproduction to achieve identified goals; and (iv) equipping the consumer as an active manager of their recovery. The components equip nurses with strategies to decrease the risk of aggression, while encouraging consumers to self-manage their challenging behaviours and embark on their personal recovery journey. Further research is required to evaluate the translation of these components clinically in the acute care setting. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Risk factors predict frequent hospitalization in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei X

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Xia Wei,1,2,* Zhengquan Ma,2,* Nan Yu,3 Jingting Ren,2 Chenwang Jin,1 Jiuyun Mi,2 Meijuan Shi,1 Libin Tian,2 Yanzhong Gao,4 Youmin Guo1 1Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The Ninth Hospital of Xi’an Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, 3Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Shaanxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shaanxi, 4Department of Radiology, The Ninth Hospital of Xi’an Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: COPD is a heterogeneous disease, and the available prognostic indexes are therefore limited. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with acute exacerbation leading to hospitalization.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective study of consecutive patients with COPD (meeting the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] diagnostic criteria hospitalized at the Ninth Hospital of Xi’an Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University between October 2014 and September 2016. During follow-up after first hospitalization, the patients who had been rehospitalized within 1 year for acute exacerbation were grouped into the frequent exacerbation (FE group, while the others were grouped into the infrequent exacerbation (IE group. The baseline demographic, clinical, laboratory, pulmonary function, and imaging data were compared between the two groups.Results: Compared with the IE group, the FE group had lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC (P=0.005, FEV1%pred (P=0.002, maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF25–75%pred (P=0.003, and ratio of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity to alveolar ventilation (DLCO/VA (P=0.03 and higher resonant frequency (Fres; P=0.04. According to generations of bronchi, the percentage of the wall area

  12. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  13. Acute or chronic respiratory failure. Assessment and management of patients with COPD in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G A; Hall, J B

    1989-06-16

    Patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure exhibit severe pulmonary impairment as a baseline characteristic. Additional minor insults can precipitate cardiopulmonary failure that requires hospital admission and possibly mechanical ventilation. Our approach to these patients emphasizes evaluation of the imbalance between neuromuscular competence and mechanical load on the respiratory system. In this way, reversible factors can be identified and corrected before they progress to inspiratory muscle fatigue and respiratory failure. For cases in which deterioration is inexorable, guidelines for mechanical ventilation are given and approaches to eventual liberation from the ventilator are reviewed.

  14. In-hospital direct cost of acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioldasis, G; Talelli, P; Chroni, E; Daouli, J; Papapetropoulos, T; Ellul, J

    2008-10-01

    The geographic inequity and the wide variation in the patterns of care of stroke found across Europe together with the lack of health economics evaluation in Greece led to this prospective study, aiming to provide data on in-hospital direct cost of patients with an acute stroke in Greece, and to identify independent prognostic factors. Demographic and clinical data were recorded on 429 consecutive patients with an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Greece during a period of 18 months. The costs incurred were estimated using the official financial charts listing in euro (euro), the real expenditure of all hospital departments. The direct in-hospital cost for all stroke cases was 1,551,445euro for a total of 4674 days (331.9euro per day in-hospital). The mean in-hospital cost per stroke patient was 3624.9euro (+/-2695.4). Hemorrhagic strokes were significantly more expensive than the ischemic strokes [mean 5305.4 (+/-4204.8)euro and 3214.5 (+/-1976.2)euro, respectively) and lacunar strokes the least expensive among ischemic stroke subtypes. The length of stay was highly correlated with in-hospital total cost. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that admission ward, stroke severity on admission, stroke type and status discharge were independent predictors of cost. Purchasers in our health services should differentiate in their cost estimates and pricing schemes between types of cerebrovascular events. Future studies should focus on modifiable factors related, not only with stroke characteristics, but also with operational policies of hospitals, that may influence length of stay.

  15. Smoking-attributable morbidity: acute care hospital diagnoses and days of treatment in Canada, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehm Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is one of the most important risk factors for burden of disease. Our objective was to estimate the number of hospital diagnoses and days of treatment attributable to smoking for Canada, 2002. Methods Distribution of exposure was taken from a major national survey of Canada, the Canadian Community Health Survey. For chronic diseases, risk relations were taken from the published literature and combined with exposure to calculate age- and sex-specific smoking-attributable fractions (SAFs. For fire deaths, SAFs were taken directly from available statistics. Information on morbidity, with cause of illness coded according to the International Classification of Diseases version 10, was obtained from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Results For Canada in 2002, 339,179 of all hospital diagnoses were estimated to be attributable to smoking and 2,210,155 acute care hospital days. Ischaemic heart disease was the largest single category in terms of hospital days accounting for 21 percent, followed by lung cancer at 9 percent. Smoking-attributable acute care hospital days cost over $2.5 billion in Canada in 2002. Conclusion Since the last major project produced estimates of this type, the rate of hospital days per 100,000 population has decreased by 33.8 percent. Several possible factors may have contributed to the decline in the rate of smoking-attributable hospital days: a drop in smoking prevalence, a decline in overall hospital days, and a shift in distribution of disease categories. Smoking remains a significant health, social, and economic burden in Canada.

  16. Development of smartphone application that aids stroke screening and identifying nearby acute stroke care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo Suk; Heo, JoonNyung; Kim, Jinkwon; Kim, Young Dae; Song, Tae Jin; Park, Eunjeong; Heo, Ji Hoe

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of thrombolytic treatment are time-dependent. We developed a smartphone application that aids stroke patient self-screening and hospital selection, and may also decrease hospital arrival time. The application was developed for iPhone and Android smartphones. Map data for the application were adopted from the open map. For hospital registration, a web page (http://stroke119.org) was developed using PHP and MySQL. The Stroke 119 application includes a stroke screening tool and real-time information on nearby hospitals that provide thrombolytic treatment. It also provides information on stroke symptoms, thrombolytic treatment, and prescribed actions when stroke is suspected. The stroke screening tool was adopted from the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale and is displayed in a cartoon format. If the user taps a cartoon image that represents abnormal findings, a pop-up window shows that the user may be having a stroke, informs the user what to do, and directs the user to call emergency services. Information on nearby hospitals is provided in map and list views, incorporating proximity to the user's location using a Global Positioning System (a built-in function of smartphones). Users can search for a hospital according to specialty and treatment levels. We also developed a web page for hospitals to register in the system. Neurology training hospitals and hospitals that provide acute stroke care in Korea were invited to register. Seventy-seven hospitals had completed registration. This application may be useful for reducing hospital arrival times for thrombolytic candidates.

  17. Rescuing the pleasure of playing of child with cancer in a hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Liliane Faria; Cabral, Ivone Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    to dimension spaces and people that act on playing of children with cancer in outpatient treatment. qualitative research developed with the creative sensitive method. A total of twenty two family members of seven children with cancer in outpatient treatment at a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro participated of this research. Data were generated in the family members' homes, from September 2011 to May 2012. after the diagnosis of childhood cancer, there was a change of scene and in the people who interact and play with children. Hospital has a central place for it, since children discover the pleasure of playing in this setting. the health care professional, especially nurses, who work on hospital care needs, should develop the ability of facilitate playing and therefore, enable care that promotes childhood development.

  18. Building a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care in an acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Donnelle; Matzel, Stephen Chavez

    2013-01-01

    A transdisciplinary team is an essential component of palliative and end-of-life care. This article will demonstrate how to develop a transdisciplinary approach to palliative care, incorporating nursing, social work, spiritual care, and pharmacy in an acute care setting. Objectives included: identifying transdisciplinary roles contributing to care in the acute care setting; defining the palliative care model and mission; identifying patient/family and institutional needs; and developing palliative care tools. Methods included a needs assessment and the development of assessment tools, an education program, community resources, and a patient satisfaction survey. After 1 year of implementation, the transdisciplinary palliative care team consisted of seven palliative care physicians, two social workers, two chaplains, a pharmacist, and End-of-Life Nursing Consortium (ELNEC) trained nurses. Palomar Health now has a palliative care service with a consistent process for transdisciplinary communication and intervention for adult critical care patients with advanced, chronic illness.

  19. Effective change management in a regional Sub-acute Ambulatory Care Services setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce W

    2012-02-01

    Government policies and community expectations in Australia continually lead to calls for healthcare change. These changes are often met with resistance from clinicians and managers. Making change happen requires consideration of the way policies, culture, context, shared vision and leadership can drive or impede change. This reflective case study critically investigates one change process; the evolution of a Sub-acute Ambulatory Care Services (SACS) program in an Australian regional hospital over a 3-year period. The new Community Rehabilitation Services (CRS) program evolved from a merger of Centre and Home Based Rehabilitation (CBR and HBR). Hospital amalgamations, closures and privatisation, and the Department of Health policy relating to SACS, ambulatory care and rehabilitation were some of the key elements explored in this paper.

  20. Risk factors leading to increased rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute care child and adolescent psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Logan; Pullen, Lisa M; Savage, Jennifer; Cayce, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents in the United States, with suicidal behavior peaking in adolescence. Suicidal and self-harming behavior is often chronic, with an estimated 15-30% of adolescents who attempt suicide having a second suicide attempt within a year. The focus of acute psychiatric hospitalization is on stabilization of these psychiatric symptoms resulting at times in premature discharge. Finding from studies based on high rehospitalization rates among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital indicates that adolescents continue to experience crisis upon discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital, leading to the question of whether or not these adolescents are being discharged prematurely. A chart review was performed on 98 adolescent clients admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital to identify risk factors that may increase rehospitalization among adolescents admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital. Clients admitted to the hospital within a 12-month time frame were compared to clients who were not readmitted during that 12-month period. History of self-harming behavior and length of stay greater than 5 days were found to be risk factors for rehospitalization. Adolescent clients who are admitted to an acute psychiatric hospital with a history of self-harming behavior and extended length of stay need to be identified and individualized treatment plans implemented for preventing repeat hospitalizations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Management of acute coronary syndromes at hospital discharge: do targeted educational interventions improve practice quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gregory M; Thompson, Angus; Pulver, Lisa K; Robertson, Marion B; Brieger, David; Wai, Angela; Tett, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines exist for the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), yet adherence is suboptimal. The Discharge Management of Acute Coronary Syndrome project used a quality improvement approach, with targeted intervention strategies to optimize: prescription of guideline-recommended medications; education regarding lifestyle modifications, including cardiac rehabilitation (CR); and communication between hospital staff, patients, and general practitioners. Hospitals across Australia participated in a quality improvement cycle of audit, feedback, intervention, and reaudit. Interventions involved educational meetings, academic detailing and point-of-care reminders, and feedback of baseline audit results. Outcome measures included prescription of guideline-recommended medications, referral to CR, and documentation and communication of management plan. At baseline, 49 hospitals recruited 1,545 patients, and postintervention, 45 hospitals remained active in the project and recruited 1,589 patients. Three thousand and thirty-four hospital staff attended group education or academic detailing sessions. Postintervention, there was a significant increase in the prescription of all four guideline-recommended medications (69% vs. 57%; pplans. Targeted educational interventions used as part of a quality improvement cycle can enhance adherence to evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with ACS. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  2. The impact of the Danish smoking ban on hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tabita Maria; Møller, Lisbeth; Jørgensen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    August 2007.Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the Danish SB on hospital admissions for AMI.Methods: Poisson regression models were used to analyse changes over time in AMI-admissions in Denmark. We investigated a seven year period: five years before and two years after implementation of the SB. We......Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke is associated with an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The positive impact of a smoking ban on AMI hospitalization rates has been demonstrated both inside and outside Europe. A national smoking ban (SB) was implemented in Denmark on 15...

  3. Mobile Phones as a Potential Vehicle of Infection in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao Foong, Yi; Green, Mark; Zargari, Ahmad; Siddique, Romana; Tan, Vanessa; Brain, Terry; Ogden, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate the potential role of mobile phones as a reservoir for bacterial colonization and the risk factors for bacterial colonization in a hospital setting. We screened 226 staff members at a regional Australian hospital (146 doctors and 80 medical students) between January 2013 and March 2014. The main outcomes of interest were the types of microorganisms and the amount of contamination of the mobile phones. This study found a high level of bacterial contamination (n = 168/226, 74%) on the mobile phones of staff members in a tertiary hospital, with similar organisms isolated from the staff member's dominant hand and mobile phones. While most of the isolated organisms were normal skin flora, a small percentage were potentially pathogenic (n = 12/226, 5%). Being a junior medical staff was found to be a risk factor for heavy microbial growth (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.54, 10.37). Only 31% (70/226) of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely, and only 21% (47/226) reported using alcohol containing wipes on their phones. This study demonstrates that mobile phones are potentially vehicles for pathogenic bacteria in a hospital setting. Only a minority of our participants reported cleaning their phones routinely. Disinfection guidelines utilizing alcohol wipes should be developed and implemented.

  4. Pre-hospital electrocardiographic severity and acuteness scores predict left ventricular function in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fakhri, Yama; Ersbøll, Mads; Køber, Lars

    2016-01-01

    ) according to the combination of ischemia severity (Sclarovsky-Birnbaum grades) and acuteness (Anderson-Wilkins scores) in the pre-hospital electrocardiogram (ECG). METHODS: In a predefined secondary analysis of a prospective study, the severity and acuteness scores were performed on the pre-hospital ECG....... Patients were assessed with respect to 4 classifications which were not mutually exclusive: severe ischemia (+SI) or non-severe ischemia (-SI) and acute ischemia (+AI) or non-acute ischemia (-AI). LVF was assessed by global longitudinal strain (GLS) within 48hours of admission. Adjusted linear regression...

  5. Identification of cerebral perfusion using arterial spin labeling in patients with seizures in acute settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roh-Eul Yoo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the utility of arterial spin labeling perfusion-weighted imaging (ASL-PWI in patients with suspected seizures in acute settings. A total of 164 patients who underwent ASL-PWI for suspected seizures in acute settings (with final diagnoses of seizure [n = 129], poststroke seizure [n = 18], and seizure mimickers [n = 17], were included in this retrospective study. Perfusion abnormality was analyzed for: (1 pattern, (2 multifocality, and (3 atypical distribution against vascular territories. Perfusion abnormality was detected in 39% (50/129 of the seizure patients, most (94%, 47/50 being the hyperperfusion pattern. Of the patients with perfusion abnormality, multifocality or hemispheric involvement and atypical distribution against vascular territory were revealed in 46% (23/50 and 98% (49/50, respectively. In addition, seizures showed characteristic features including hyperperfusion (with or without non-territorial distribution on ASL-PWI, thus differentiating them from poststroke seizures or seizure mimickers. In patients in whom seizure focus could be localized on both EEG and ASL-PWI, the concordance rate was 77%. The present study demonstrates that ASL-PWI can provide information regarding cerebral perfusion status in patients with seizures in acute settings and has the potential to be used as a non-invasive imaging tool to identify the cerebral perfusion in patients with seizures.

  6. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    . 2. Describe the significance of interprofessional collaboration in the delivery of quality health care. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. The purpose of the current project was to (a) examine the type of information accompanying patients on transfer from acute care to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), (b) discuss how these findings meet existing standards, and (c) make recommendations to improve transfer of essential information. The study was a retrospective convenience sample chart audit in one SNF. All patients admitted from an acute care hospital to the SNF were examined. The audit checklist was developed based on recommendations by local and national standards. One hundred fifty-five charts were reviewed. Transferring of physician contact information was missing in 65% of charts. The following information was also missing from charts: medication lists (1%), steroid tapering instructions (42%), antiarrhythmic instructions (38%), duration/indication of anticoagulant medications (25%), and antibiotic medications (22%). Findings support the need for improved transitional care models and better communication of information between care settings. Recommendations include designating accountability and chart audits comparing timeliness, completeness, and accuracy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(3), 19-28.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Risk factors for acute care hospital readmission in older persons in Western countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mona Kyndi; Meyer, Gabriele; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    by a manual search for additional studies. METHODOLOGICAL QUALITY: Methodological quality was assessed independently by two reviewers, using the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI) critical appraisal tool. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were....... To allow health professionals to focus more intensively on patients at risk of readmission, there is a need to identify the characteristics of those patients. OBJECTIVES: To identify and synthesize the best available evidence on risk factors for acute care hospital readmission within one month of discharge...... related to socio-demographics, health characteristics and clinical and organizational factors related to the care pathway. TYPES OF STUDIES: The current review considered analytical and descriptive epidemiological study designs that evaluated risk factors for acute care hospital readmission. OUTCOMES...

  8. Trends in Incidence of Hospitalized Acute Myocardial Infarction in the Cardiovascular Research Network (CVRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Kristi; Go, Alan S; Leong, Thomas K; Boudreau, Denise M; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E; Fortmann, Stephen P; Goldberg, Robert J; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Magid, David J; Margolis, Karen L; McNeal, Catherine J; Newton, Katherine M; Novotny, Rachel; Quesenberry, Charles P; Rosamond, Wayne D; Smith, David H; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Vupputuri, Suma; Waring, Stephen C; Williams, Marc S; Sidney, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring trends in cardiovascular events can provide key insights into the effectiveness of prevention efforts. Leveraging data from electronic health records provides a unique opportunity to examine contemporary, community-based trends in acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations. We examined trends in hospitalized acute myocardial infarction incidence among adults aged ≥25 years in 13 US health plans in the Cardiovascular Research Network. The first hospitalization per member for acute myocardial infarction overall and for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification primary discharge codes in each calendar year from 2000 through 2008. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence was calculated per 100,000 person-years using direct adjustment with 2000 US census data. Between 2000 and 2008, we identified 125,435 acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years) of acute myocardial infarction decreased an average 3.8%/y from 230.5 in 2000 to 168.6 in 2008. Incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction decreased 8.7%/y from 104.3 in 2000 to 51.7 in 2008, whereas incidence of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction increased from 126.1 to 129.4 between 2000 and 2004 and then decreased thereafter to 116.8 in 2008. Age- and sex-specific incidence rates generally reflected similar patterns, with relatively larger decreases in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction rates in women compared with men. As compared with 2000, the age-adjusted incidence of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in 2008 was 48% lower among men and 61% lower among women. Among a large, diverse, multicenter community-based insured population, there were significant decreases in incidence of hospitalized acute myocardial infarction and the more serious ST-segment elevation

  9. Use of portable electronic devices in a hospital setting and their potential for bacterial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amber; Rao, Amitha; Reyes-Sacin, Carlos; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Szpunar, Susan; Riederer, Kathleen; Kaye, Keith; Fishbain, Joel T; Levine, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Portable electronic devices are increasingly being used in the hospital setting. As with other fomites, these devices represent a potential reservoir for the transmission of pathogens. We conducted a convenience sampling of devices in 2 large medical centers to identify bacterial colonization rates and potential risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention and control of infection in non-acute healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Helen; Wright, Debbie; Jones, Martin; Dias, Esther; Pronyszyn, Anna; Hughes, Kath; Hawker, Karen; Newsham, Linda; O'Donovan, Tracey

    This article discusses the main principles of infection prevention and control in non-acute healthcare settings. It explores the use of a set of ten tools developed by the Infection Control Nurses Association (ICNA) to audit infection prevention and control, using the standard statements and criteria within the tools as a checklist. The results of the audit of facilities, commodities and practice using the ICNA audit tools will help staff to identify areas of best practice and areas where improvements are needed to enhance patient care.

  11. The Study of the Optimal Parameter Settings in a Hospital Supply Chain System in Taiwan

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    Hung-Chang Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposed the optimal parameter settings for the hospital supply chain system (HSCS when either the total system cost (TSC or patient safety level (PSL (or both simultaneously was considered as the measure of the HSCS’s performance. Four parameters were considered in the HSCS: safety stock, maximum inventory level, transportation capacity, and the reliability of the HSCS. A full-factor experimental design was used to simulate an HSCS for the purpose of collecting data. The response surface method (RSM was used to construct the regression model, and a genetic algorithm (GA was applied to obtain the optimal parameter settings for the HSCS. The results show that the best method of obtaining the optimal parameter settings for the HSCS is the simultaneous consideration of both the TSC and the PSL to measure performance. Also, the results of sensitivity analysis based on the optimal parameter settings were used to derive adjustable strategies for the decision-makers.

  12. Suicidal behaviour characteristics and factors associated with mortality in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendra-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Esteban-Vasallo, María; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas

    2016-04-29

    Suicide is a major public health problem worldwide, and an approach is necessary due to its high potential for prevention. This paper examines the main characteristics of people admitted to hospitals in the Community of Madrid (Spain) with suicidal behaviour, and the factors associated with their hospital mortality. A study was conducted on patients with E950-E959 codes of suicide and self-inflicted injuries of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, contained in any diagnostic field of the minimum basic data set at hospital discharge between 2003 and 2013. Sociodemographic, clinical and health care variables were assessed by uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis in the evaluation of factors associated with hospital mortality. Hospital suicidal behaviour predominates in women (58.7%) and in middle-age. Hospital mortality is 2.2% (1.6% in women and 3.2% in men), increasing with age. Mental disorders are detected 3-4 times more in secondary diagnoses. The main primary diagnosis (>74%) is poisoning with substances, with lower mortality (∼1%) than injury by hanging and jumping from high places (≥12%), which have the highest numbers. Other factors associated with increased mortality include different medical comorbidities and severity of the injury, while length of stay and mental disorders are protective factors. Type of hospital, poisoning, and Charlson index are associated differently with mortality in men and women. Hospitalised suicidal acts show a low mortality, mainly related to comorbidities and the severity of injuries. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. The Economic Crisis and Acute Myocardial Infarction: New Evidence Using Hospital-Level Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Objective This research sought to assess whether and to what extent the ongoing economic crisis in Italy impacted hospitalizations, in-hospital mortality and expenditures associated with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The data were obtained from the hospital discharge database of the Italian Health Ministry and aggregated at the hospital level. Each hospital (n = 549) was observed for 4 years and was geographically located within a “Sistema Locale del Lavoro” (SLL, i.e., clusters of neighboring towns with a common economic structure). For each SLL, the intensity of the crisis was determined, defined as the 2012–2008 increase in the area-specific unemployment rate. A difference-in-differences (DiD) approach was employed to compare the increases in AMI-related outcomes across different quintiles of crisis intensity. Results Hospitals located in areas with the highest intensity of crisis (in the fifth quintile) had an increase of approximately 30 AMI cases annually (approximately 13%) compared with hospitals in area with lower crisis intensities (pcrisis. Policies aimed to contrast unemployment in the community by keeping and reintegrating workers in jobs could also have positive impacts on adverse health outcomes, especially in areas of high crisis intensity. PMID:26574745

  14. Timing, setting and incidence of cardiovascular complications in patients with acute myocardial infarction submitted to primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglioli, Cristina; Margheri, Massimo; Valente, Serafina; Comeglio, Marco; Lazzeri, Chiara; Chechi, Tania; Armentano, Corinna; Romano, Salvatore Mario; Falai, Massimiliano; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND At the Istituto di Clinica Medica Generale e Cardiologia (Florence, Italy), the widespread use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has markedly changed the hospital course of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). These patients are typically transferred to the coronary care unit (CCU) only after primary PCI, whereas during the thrombolytic era, patients were first admitted to CCU before reperfusion. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS The incidence, timing and setting of complications from symptom onset to hospital discharge in 689 consecutive AMI patients undergoing PCI were evaluated. RESULTS Ventricular fibrillation occurred in 11% of patients, and most episodes (94.7%) occurred before or during PCI. Of all patients, 6.3% developed complete atrioventricular block (CAVB), and in 86.3% of these cases, the CAVB occurred before or during PCI; in 94.5%, a CAVB resolution occurred in the catheterization laboratory (CL). Thirty-one patients (4.5%) had impending shock on admission to the CL. Cardiogenic shock developed in 29 patients (4.2%), mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. Only four patients (less than 1%) developed cardiogenic shock later during their hospital course. Similarly, circulatory and ventilatory support, as well as temporary pacing and cardiac defibrillation, were used mostly in the prehospital phase or in the CL. During the CCU stay, 45 patients (6.5%) had hemorrhagic or vascular complications, and the incidence of post-PCI ischemia and early reocclusion of the culprit vessel were low (2.1% and 0.6%, respectively). Thus, cardiac complications usually associated with AMI were observed mainly before hospital admission or in the CL during the reopening of the target vessel. These complications were rarely observed after a successful PCI. CONCLUSIONS For AMI patients, the CL is not only the site of PCI, it is also where most life-threatening cardiac complications are observed and treated. PMID:17036099

  15. Epidemiology of viral-associated acute lower respiratory tract infection among children prevalence setting, South Africa, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Cheryl; Walaza, Sibongile; Moyes, Jocelyn; Groome, Michelle; Tempia, Stefano; Pretorius, Marthi; Hellferscee, Orienka; Dawood, Halima; Chhagan, Meera; Naby, Fathima; Haffejee, Summaya; Variava, Ebrahim; Kahn, Kathleen; Nzenze, Susan; Tshangela, Akhona; von Gottberg, Anne; Wolter, Nicole; Cohen, Adam L; Kgokong, Babatyi; Venter, Marietjie; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-01-01

    Data on the epidemiology of viral-associated acute lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) from high HIV prevalence settings are limited. We aimed to describe LRTI hospitalizations among South African children aged prevalence among tested children was 12% (705/5964). The overall prevalence of respiratory viruses identified was 78% (6517/8393), including 37% rhinovirus, 26% respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), 7% influenza and 5% human metapneumovirus. Four percent (253/6612) tested positive for pneumococcus. The annual incidence of LRTI hospitalization ranged from 2530 to 3173/100,000 population and was highest in infants (8446-10532/100,000). LRTI incidence was 1.1 to 3.0-fold greater in HIV-infected than HIV-uninfected children. In multivariable analysis, compared to HIV-uninfected children, HIV-infected children were more likely to require supplemental-oxygen [odds ratio (OR): 1.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-1.7)], be hospitalized >7 days (OR: 3.8, 95% CI: 2.8-5.0) and had a higher case-fatality ratio (OR: 4.2, 95% CI: 2.6-6.8). In multivariable analysis, HIV-infection (OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 2.2-6.1), pneumococcal coinfection (OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1-5.6), mechanical ventilation (OR: 6.9, 95% CI: 2.7-17.6) and receipt of supplemental-oxygen (OR: 27.3, 95% CI: 13.2-55.9) were associated with death. HIV-infection was associated with an increased risk of LRTI hospitalization and death. A viral pathogen, commonly RSV, was identified in a high proportion of LRTI cases.

  16. Clinical course and frequency of complications in children hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis

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    Mašić Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute bronchiolitis is the most common disease of the respiratory tract in children, in 75% of cases caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. There is a risk for complicated clinical course in premature infants and the ones with chronic diseases (chronic lung disease, congenital heart disease or neuromuscular disease. Aim: The evaluation of clinical course of acute bronchiolitis and estimation of possible influences of therapeutic interventions or previous chronic diseases on the outcome. Material and methods: This retrospective study included all patients admitted for acute bronchiolitis in the Department of Pulmonology, Mother and Child Health Institute of Serbia 'Dr Vukan Cupic', from September 2014 to March 2015. The enzyme immunoassay membrane test was used for detection of RSV antigen from nasopharyngeal aspirates in all patients. The influence of age, previous chronic diseases, the occurrence of complications on clinical course and length of the hospital stay, were analyzed. Results: Out of186 patients included, 137 were younger than the age of 6 months. Infection with RSV was confirmed in 53.2% of patients, with the highest rate in December (69.2%. The atelectasis was confirmed in 9 patients, and 44.4% of them had some of the chronic diseases (p < 0.05. Flexible bronchoscopy was performed in 27 patients and 44% of them had previous chronic disease (p < 0.001. Multiple regression model showed that presence of atelectasis, RSV infection and chronic disease correlates with the length of hospital stay. Most of the patients were treated with inhalations of bronchodilators and 3% saline. Systemic corticosteroids and supplemental oxygen were used most frequently for those patients with longer hospital stay (p < 0.001. In three patients (1.6% mechanical ventilation was needed, with favorable outcome. Conclusion: The clinical course and the length of stay in patients hospitalized for acute bronchiolitis is influenced mostly by

  17. Human Parechovirus Infection in Children Hospitalized with Acute Gastroenteritis in Sri Lanka▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngan Thi Kim; Takanashi, Sayaka; Tran, Dinh Nguyen; Trinh, Quang Duy; Abeysekera, Chandra; Abeygunawardene, Asiri; Khamrin, Pattara; Okitsu, Shoko; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Of 362 fecal specimens collected from infants and children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Sri Lanka from September 2005 to August 2006, 30 (8.3%) were positive for human parechovirus (HPeV). Six different HPeV genotypes, including HPeV1, -3, -4, -5, -10, and -11, were identified, of these, HPeV11 was reported for the first time. PMID:21048003

  18. Patients Undergoing Subacute Physical Rehabilitation following an Acute Hospital Admission Demonstrated Improvement in Cognitive Functional Task Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. McPhail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study investigated cognitive functioning among older adults with physical debility not attributable to an acute injury or neurological condition who were receiving subacute inpatient physical rehabilitation. Design. A cohort investigation with assessments at admission and discharge. Setting. Three geriatric rehabilitation hospital wards. Participants. Consecutive rehabilitation admissions (n=814 following acute hospitalization (study criteria excluded orthopaedic, neurological, or amputation admissions. Intervention. Usual rehabilitation care. Measurements. The Functional Independence Measure (FIM Cognitive and Motor items. Results. A total of 704 (86.5% participants (mean age = 76.5 years completed both assessments. Significant improvement in FIM Cognitive items (Z-score range 3.93–8.74, all P<0.001 and FIM Cognitive total score (Z-score = 9.12, P<0.001 occurred, in addition to improvement in FIM Motor performance. A moderate positive correlation existed between change in Motor and Cognitive scores (Spearman’s rho = 0.41. Generalized linear modelling indicated that better cognition at admission (coefficient = 0.398, P<0.001 and younger age (coefficient = −0.280, P<0.001 were predictive of improvement in Motor performance. Younger age (coefficient = −0.049, P<0.001 was predictive of improvement in FIM Cognitive score. Conclusions. Improvement in cognitive functioning was observed in addition to motor function improvement among this population. Causal links cannot be drawn without further research.

  19. Priority setting in hospitals: fairness, inclusiveness, and the problem of institutional power differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jennifer L; Martin, Douglas K; Singer, Peter A

    2005-12-01

    Priority setting tends to take place in health care settings that are hierarchical and politically complex. Fair processes, as defined for example by Daniels' and Sabin's accountability for reasonableness framework, have been identified as essential for securing socially acceptable priority setting decisions. However, power differences in the decision-making context can pose a serious impediment to fair priority setting in health care organizations. Comparatively little attention has been paid to examining the institutional conditions within which priority setting decisions are made. We review a case study of priority setting in hospital operational planning in Toronto, which had been designed by executive leaders to be broadly inclusive of senior and middle-level clinical and administrative leaders. We report three power differences that arose as limiting factors on the inclusiveness of the priority setting process. We argue that these findings have significant theoretical implications for the accountability for reasonableness framework and propose a fifth condition, the "empowerment condition", which states that there should be efforts to minimise power differences in the decision-making context and to optimise effective opportunities for participation in priority setting.

  20. Excess long-term mortality among hospital survivors of acute myocardial infarction. Soroka Acute Myocardial Infarction (SAMI) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakht, Y; Gilutz, H; Shiyovich, A

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated long-term survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in unselected 'real life' patients according to the various risk groups, and it's persistence with time after AMI as compared with the matched general population. Retrospective study. Data were collected from 2671 AMI hospital survivors (tertiary medical centre in Israel), which included demographics, clinical characteristics of AMI, comorbidities, interventions and test results. All-cause mortality during the 10-year follow-up period was compared with age-, sex- and ethnicity/religion-matched general population using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs). Overall mortality of AMI patients (48.6%) was higher than the general population (SMR, 2.2; P < 0.001). Mortality rates and SMRs tended to be greater in higher risk strata of patients, Jews vs Muslims, women vs men, non-ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) vs ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-invasive treatment vs invasive treatment, and recurrent vs first AMI. Mortality rates increased with age, but SMRs were highest in the youngest group. Through the follow-up period, SMR was highest during the first year after discharge (SMR, 4.85; P < 0.001) and higher in 7th-10th years compared with 2nd-6th years. Patients who survived hospital admission with AMI continue to be at higher (approximately twice) risk of death compared with the general population for at least 10-year follow-up period and especially throughout the first and 7th-10th years after AMI, young women, high-risk patients, Jews, NSTEMI, non-invasively treated and recurrent AMI. These findings can assist healthcare providers and decision makers prioritizing targets of secondary prevention and allocation of resources. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Role of clevidipine butyrate in the treatment of acute hypertension in the critical care setting: a review

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    Ahmed S Awad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Awad, Michael E GoldbergDepartment of Anesthesiology, Cooper University Hospital, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Camden Campus, Camden, New Jersey, USAAbstract: Acutely elevated blood pressure in the critical care setting is associated with a higher risk of acute end-organ damage (eg, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and renal failure and perioperative bleeding. Urgent treatment and careful blood pressure control are crucial to prevent significant morbidity. Clevidipine butyrate (Cleviprex™ is an ultrashort-acting, third-generation intravenous calcium channel blocker. It is an arterial-selective vasodilator with no venodilatory or myocardial depressive effects. Clevidipine has an extremely short half-life of approximately 1 minute as it is rapidly metabolized by blood and tissue esterases. These metabolites are then primarily eliminated through urine and fecal pathways. The rapid onset and the short duration of action permit tighter and closer adjustment of the blood pressure than is possible with other intravenous agents.Keywords: calcium channel blocker, antihypertensive medications, end-organ damage, hypertensive crisis, hypertensive urgency

  2. Management of acute diarrhoeal disease at Edendale Hospital: Are standard treatment guidelines followed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kershinee Reddy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diarrhoeal disease (DD is a major cause of childhood mortality in developing countries. In South Africa (SA, it ranks as one of the top five causes of under-5 mortality. Local and global guidelines on the management of acute DD are readily available. The Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs and Essential Drugs List for Hospital Level Paediatrics are a recognised standard of care for children in SA hospitals. However, children still die from this preventable disease. Objective. To determine whether doctors adhered to standard treatment guidelines when treating children under 5 years of age presenting to Edendale Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal Province, with acute DD. Methods. The study was a retrospective clinical audit of individual patient records. Results. One hundred and thirty-five patient records were reviewed. Forty-seven percent had a correct nutritional assessment, 41% were correctly assessed for shock and 27% for dehydration. Appropriate investigations were undertaken in 12%. Ninety-seven percent of patients had appropriate fluid plans prescribed. Zinc was prescribed in only 39% of patients, whereas 84% were appropriately not prescribed antibiotics and no patients received anti-diarrhoeal medication. In 90% of patients, the correct post-care patient referral was made, and 47% of caregivers were adequately advised about ongoing care of their children. Conclusion. This study identifies substantial non-adherence to the SA STGs for the management of young children with acute DD.

  3. [Detection of palliative care needs in an acute care hospital unit. Pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calero, Miguel Ángel; Julià-Mora, Joana María; Prieto-Alomar, Araceli

    2016-01-01

    Previous to wider prevalence studies, we designed the present pilot study to assess concordance and time invested in patient evaluations using a palliative care needs assessment tool. We also sought to estimate the prevalence of palliative care needs in an acute care hospital unit. A cross-sectional study was carried out, 4 researchers (2 doctors and 2 nurses) independently assessed all inpatients in an acute care hospital unit in Manacor Hospital, Mallorca (Spain), using the validated tool NECPAL CCOMS-ICO©, measuring time invested in every case. Another researcher revised clinical recordings to analise the sample profile. Every researcher assessed 29 patients, 15 men and 14 women, mean age 74,03 ± 10.25 years. 4-observer concordance was moderate (Kappa 0,5043), tuning out to be higher between nurses. Mean time per patient evaluation was 1.9 to 7.72 minutes, depending on researcher. Prevalence of palliative care needs was 23,28%. Moderate concordance lean us towards multidisciplinary shared assessments as a method for future research. Avarage of time invested in evaluations was less than 8 minutes, no previous publications were identified regarding this variable. More than 20% of inpatients of the acute care unit were in need of palliative care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical outcomes of acute kidney injury developing outside the hospital in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgutalp, K; Bardak, S; Horoz, M; Helvacı, I; Demir, S; Kiykim, A A

    2017-01-01

    Although various studies have improved our knowledge about the clinical features and outcomes of acute kidney injury developing in the hospital (AKI-DI) in elderly subjects, data about acute kidney injury developing outside the hospital (AKI-DO) in elderly patients (age ≥ 65 years) are still extremely limited. This study was performed to investigate prevalence, clinical outcomes, hospital cost and related factors of AKI-DO in elderly and very elderly patients. We conducted a prospective, observational study in patients (aged ≥ 65 years) who were admitted to our center between May 01, 2012, and May 01, 2013. Subjects with AKI-DO were divided into two groups as "elderly" (group 1, 65-75 years old) and "very elderly" (group 2, >75 years old). Control group (group 3) consisted of the hospitalized patients aged 65 years and older with normal serum creatinine level. In-hospital outcomes and 6-month outcomes were recorded. Rehospitalization rate within 6 months of discharge was noted. Hospital costs and mortality rates of each group were investigated. Risk factors for AKI-DO were determined. The incidence of AKI-DO that required hospitalization in elderly and very elderly patients was 5.8 % (136/2324) and 11 % (100/905), respectively (p elderly patients (p elderly patients than elderly ones, especially in male gender. Use of ACEI, ARB, NSAID and radiocontrast agents is the main risk factors for the development of AKI-DO in the elderly.

  5. Level of Physical Activity and In-Hospital Course of Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Goes Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the modern world. A sedentary lifestyle, present in 85% of the Brazilian population, is considered a risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. However, the correlation of a sedentary lifestyle with cardiovascular events (CVE during hospitalization for ACS is not well established. Objective: To evaluate the association between physical activity level, assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, with in-hospital prognosis in patients with ACS. Methods: Observational, cross-sectional, and analytical study with 215 subjects with a diagnosis of ACS consecutively admitted to a referral hospital for cardiac patients between July 2009 and February 2011. All volunteers answered the short version of the IPAQ and were observed for the occurrence of CVE during hospitalization with a standardized assessment conducted by the researcher and corroborated by data from medical records. Results: The patients were admitted with diagnoses of unstable angina (34.4%, acute myocardial infarction (AMI without ST elevation (41.4%, and AMI with ST elevation (24.2%. According to the level of physical activity, the patients were classified as non-active (56.3% and active (43.7%. A CVE occurred in 35.3% of the cohort. The occurrence of in-hospital complications was associated with the length of hospital stay (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 and physical inactivity (OR = 2.54, and was independent of age, systolic blood pressure, and prior congestive heart failure. Conclusion: A physically active lifestyle reduces the risk of CVE during hospitalization in patients with ACS.

  6. Retail food reform: How to effectively bridge what we say and what we do in our hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojeiji, Laurie; Taylor, Andra; Boland, Cholly; Brennan, Carolyn; Penney, Randy

    2017-03-01

    Hospital leaders in Eastern Ontario, Canada, have acknowledged the critical role of food to health and the need for progressive change that goes beyond personal responsibility paradigms. The Healthy Foods in Champlain Hospitals program aims to create supportive, healthy nutrition environments in hospital retail food settings. Twenty independent hospital corporations have collectively initiated a plan to transition cafeteria, vending, franchise, and volunteer operations towards healthier offerings. Hospitals are actively implementing a set of progressively phased, evidence-based nutrition criteria, which cover food and beverage categories, preparation methods, product placement, and provision of nutrition information. Implementation strategies and successes, as well as challenges and limitations, are discussed.

  7. Health literacy and mortality: a cohort study of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Candace D; Cawthon, Courtney; Kripalani, Sunil; Liu, Dandan; Storrow, Alan B; Roumie, Christianne L

    2015-04-29

    More than 30% of patients hospitalized for heart failure are rehospitalized or die within 90 days of discharge. Lower health literacy is associated with mortality among outpatients with chronic heart failure; little is known about this relationship after hospitalization for acute heart failure. Patients hospitalized for acute heart failure and discharged home between November 2010 and June 2013 were followed through December 31, 2013. Nurses administered the Brief Health Literacy Screen at admission; low health literacy was defined as Brief Health Literacy Screen ≤9. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to first rehospitalization and, separately, time to first emergency department visit within 90 days of discharge. Cox proportional hazards models determined their relationships with health literacy, adjusting for age, gender, race, insurance, education, comorbidity, and hospital length of stay. For the 1379 patients, average age was 63.1 years, 566 (41.0%) were female, and 324 (23.5%) had low health literacy. Median follow-up was 20.7 months (interquartile range 12.8 to 29.6 months), and 403 (29.2%) patients died. Adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for death among patients with LHL was 1.32 (95%confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 1.66, P=0.02) compared to BHLS>9 [corrected].Within 90 days of discharge, there were 415 (30.1%) rehospitalizations and 201 (14.6%) emergency department visits, with no evident association with health literacy. Lower health literacy was associated with increased risk of death after hospitalization for acute heart failure. There was no evident relationship between health literacy and 90-day rehospitalization or emergency department visits. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  8. Falling behind: a substantive theory of care for older people with cognitive impairment in acute settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anita; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Edvardsson, David

    2013-06-01

    To develop a theoretical understanding of the processes hindering person-centred care of older people with cognitive impairment in acute care settings. Although person-centred care with its holistic focus on the biopsychosocial needs of patients is commonly considered the gold standard care for older people with cognitive impairment, the extent to which care is person-centred can increase in acute care settings generally. Grounded theory inspired by Strauss and Corbin. The study used a grounded theory approach to generate and analyse data from a Swedish sample of acute care staff, patients and family members. The substantive theory postulates that staff risks 'falling behind' in meeting the needs of older patients with cognitive impairment if working without consensus about the care of these patients, if the organisation is disease-oriented and efficiency-driven, and if the environment is busy and inflexible. This facilitated 'falling behind' in relation to meeting the multifaceted needs of older patients with cognitive impairment and contributed to patient suffering, family exclusion and staff frustration. The theory highlights aspects of importance in the provision of person-centred care of older people with cognitive impairment in acute settings and suggests areas to consider in the development of caring environments in which the place, pace and space can meet the needs of the older person. The proposed substantive theory can be used to critically examine current ward practices and routines, and the extent to which these support or inhibit high-quality person-centred care for older patients with known or unknown cognitive impairments. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Individualizing and optimizing the use of early warning scores in acute medical care for deteriorating hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capan, Muge; Ivy, Julie S; Rohleder, Thomas; Hickman, Joel; Huddleston, Jeanne M

    2015-08-01

    While early warning scores (EWS) have the potential to identify physiological deterioration in an acute care setting, the implementation of EWS in clinical practice has yet to be fully realized. The primary aim of this study is to identify optimal patient-centered rapid response team (RRT) activation rules using electronic medical records (EMR)-derived Markovian models. The setting for the observational cohort study included 38,356 adult general floor patients hospitalized in 2011. The national early warning score (NEWS) was used to measure the patient health condition. Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests were used to identify statistically significant subpopulations as a function of the admission type (medical or surgical), frailty as measured by the Braden skin score, and history of prior clinical deterioration (RRT, cardiopulmonary arrest, or unscheduled ICU transfer). Statistical tests identified 12 statistically significant subpopulations which differed clinically, as measured by length of stay and time to re-admission (P < .001). The Chi-square test of independence results showed a dependency structure between subsequent states in the embedded Markov chains (P < .001). The SMDP models identified two sets of subpopulation-specific RRT activation rules for each statistically unique subpopulation. Clinical deterioration experience in prior hospitalizations did not change the RRT activation rules. The thresholds differed as a function of admission type and frailty. EWS were used to identify personalized thresholds for RRT activation for statistically significant Markovian patient subpopulations as a function of frailty and admission type. The full potential of EWS for personalizing acute care delivery is yet to be realized. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute traumatic coagulopathy among major trauma patients in an urban tertiary hospital in sub Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujuni Erick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality from trauma remains a major public health issue as it is the leading cause of death in persons aged 5 to 44 years .Uncontrolled hemorrhage and coagulopathy is responsible for over 50% of all trauma related deaths within the first 48hrs of admission. Coagulation profiles are not routinely done among trauma patients in resource limited settings and there is a paucity of data on acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC in sub Saharan Africa. The study was conducted to evaluate the prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time (PT/PTT as predictors of mortality and morbidity among major trauma patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was carried out, in which major trauma patients admitted in A&E department between December 2011 to April 2012 were recruited. Five (5 mls of venous blood was drawn from a convenient vein within 10 minutes of the patient’s arrival at A&E for analysis of PT/PTT. Patients were stratified into two groups by the presence/absence of coagulopathy then followed up for a 2 week period for morbidity and mortality. Results A total of 182 major trauma patients were recruited; 149 (81.9% were males, the mean age was 29.5 years (SD 9.8. Prevalence of coagulopathy was 54% (98/182. The mean ISS for the ATC group was 36.9 and the non ATC group was 26.9 (p=0.001. Patients with ATC stayed longer in hospital 11.24 days than non ATC patients 8 days (p=0.001. ATC was strongly associated with ARI (p= 0.003. Mortality was more in the ATC group 29 deaths compared to 9 deaths in the non ATC group. PTT was a strong independent predictor of mortality. Conclusion A significant proportion of major trauma patients were coagulopathic. Initial coagulation profile is useful in predicting outcomes for major trauma patients.

  11. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Gual, Antoni; Nieva, Gemma; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain). To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals -the early adopters- based on Rogers' theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units). Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals' awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nutrition screening tools: Does one size fit all? A systematic review of screening tools for the hospital setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Guaitoli, P.R.; Jansma, E.P.; de Vet, H.C.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims: Numerous nutrition screening tools for the hospital setting have been developed. The aim of this systematic review is to study construct or criterion validity and predictive validity of nutrition screening tools for the general hospital setting. Methods: A systematic review of

  13. ST-segment elevation in lead aVR in the setting of acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabati, Maryam; Emadi, Marzieh; Mollaalipour, Maede; Bagheri, Babak; Nouraei, Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the value of aVR ST-segment elevation (STE) during acute non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina. STE in lead aVR has been associated with severe coronary lesions in patients with acute coronary syndromes. However, there are conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of this finding. We evaluated the initial electrocardiogram (ECG) in 129 patients admitted to our hospital with acute NSTEMI or unstable angina without STE in leads other than aVR or V1. STE in aVR lead was measured and echocardiography and coronary angiography were performed within 48-72 hours after hospitalization. Overall, 40.3% (52 patients) had more than 0.05 mv STE in lead aVR. These patients had an increased prevalence of ST ≥ 1 mm in lead V1, a more frequent and extensive ST-segment depression (STD) in other leads, a higher prevalence of anterior and lateral STD and a lower frequency of isolated negative T waves. It was also strongly associated with cardiac enzyme rising and a trend toward higher 3-month mortality. Furthermore, patients with STE in lead aVR were more likely to have three-vessel or multivessel disease, higher Gensini score of the coronary arteries, lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and higher incidence of mitral regurgitation (MR). Our study showed that among ECG markers, the sole criterion STE in lead aVR was independently associated with atherosclerosis severity and decreased LVEF. Also, it was significantly associated with the presence of MR.

  14. Incidence and consequence of acute kidney injury in unselected emergency admissions to a large acute UK hospital trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challiner, Rachael; Ritchie, James P; Fullwood, Catherine; Loughnan, Paul; Hutchison, Alastair J

    2014-05-29

    AKI is common among hospital in-patients and places a huge financial burden on the UK National Health Service, causing increased length of hospital stay and use of critical care services, with increased requirement for complex interventions including dialysis. This may account for up to 0.6% of the total Health Service budget. To investigate the incidence and consequences of AKI, all unselected emergency admissions to a large acute UK single centre University Teaching Hospital over two separate 7 day periods were reviewed. A retrospective audit of 745 case records was undertaken (54.6% male) including laboratory data post-discharge or death, with classification of AKI by RIFLE, AKIN and AKIB criteria. Participants were included whether admitted via their general practitioners, the emergency department, or as tertiary specialty transfers. Outcome measures were presence or absence of AKI recorded using each of the three AKI criteria, length of hospital stay (LOS), admission to, and LOS in critical care, and mortality. The most severe grade of AKI only, at any time during the admission, was recorded to prevent double counting. Renal outcome was determined by requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), and whether those receiving RRT remained dialysis dependent or not. AKI incidence was 25.4% overall. With approximately one third present on admission and two thirds developing post admission. The AKI group had LOS almost three times higher than the non AKI group (10 vs 4 days). Requirement for critical care beds was 8.1% in the AKI group compared to 1.7% in non AKI group. Overall mortality was 5.5%, with the AKI group at 11.4% versus 3.3% in the non AKI group. AKI in acute unselected hospital admissions is more common than existing literature suggests, affecting 25% of unselected admissions. In many this is relatively mild and may resolve spontaneously, but is associated with increased LOS, likelihood of admission to critical care, and risk of death. If targeted

  15. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-11-30

    Acute hospital admission provides an excellent opportunity to address poor oral health in older people, a group rarely seen by dental professionals and for who oral health activity in hospital is inconsistent and generally suboptimal. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presented the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. The second article explores clinical recommendations. A change in philosophy is needed to embed oral care as an essential component of holistic practice. More research is needed to determine the best ways to assess and treat oro-dental problems in older people, and promote and restore their oral health in hospitals. Great potential exists to innovate and develop new ways of providing care to this group. ©2017 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  16. Consumption of systemic antifungal agents among acute care hospitals in Catalonia (Spain), 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevilla, Esther; Grau, Santiago; Mojal, Sergi; Palomar, Mercedes; Matas, Lurdes; Gudiol, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Objective To know the patterns and consumption trends (2008-2013) of antifungal agents for systemic use in 52 acute care hospitals affiliated to VINCat Program in Catalonia (Spain). Methods Consumption was calculated in defined daily doses (DDD)/100 patient-days and analyzed according to hospital size and complexity and clinical departments. Results Antifungal consumption was higher in intensive care units (ICU) (14.79) than in medical (3.08) and surgical departments (1.19). Fluconazole was the most consumed agent in all type of hospitals and departments. Overall antifungal consumption increased by 20.5%during the study period (p = 0.066); a significant upward trend was observed in the consumption of both azoles and echinocandins. In ICUs, antifungal consumption increased by 12.4% (p = 0.019). Conclusions The study showed a sustained increase in the overall consumption of systemic antifungals in a large number of acute care hospitals of different characteristics in Catalonia. In ICUs there was a trend towards the substitution of older agents by the new ones.

  17. Viral Etiologies of Acute Respiratory Infections among Hospitalized Vietnamese Children in Ho Chi Minh City, 2004-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, A.H.L.; van Doorn, H.R.; Nghiem, M.N.; Bryant, J.E.; Hoang, T.H.T.; Do, Q.H.; Le Van, T.; Tran, T.T.; Wills, B.; Nguyen, V.C.; Vo, M.H.; Vo, C.K.; Nguyen, M.D.; Farrar, J.; Tran, T.H.; de Jong, M.D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The dominant viral etiologies responsible for acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are poorly understood, particularly among hospitalized children in resource-limited tropical countries where morbidity and mortality caused by ARIs are highest. Improved etiological insight is needed to

  18. An Observational study of prehospital and hospital delay in reperfusion for acute myocardial infarction at a University Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Choudhary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among Indian adults, and approximately 50% of deaths usually occur during the 1st hour after symptom onset before arriving at the hospital. A study was planned to evaluate the prehospital and hospital delay in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of 390 patients with AMI admitted to the Department of Cardiology between March 2014 and August 2015. Detailed patient demographics, socioeconomic status, and prehospital and hospital delay were reviewed. Results: The mean age of presentation for male and female was 57 ± 12.91 and 61.5 ± 12.83 years, respectively. The mean prehospital delay, time to act after chest pain, and travel time were 9.08 ± 6.3, 7.16 ± 6.1, and 1.84 ± 0.8 h, respectively, and only three (9.7% patients reached the hospital within 2 h after symptom onset. Out of 300 patients who received reperfusion therapy, thrombolysis was done in 276 (92% patients while primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed in only 24 (8% patients. Mean door-to-needle (D-N time and door-to-device time for those who received reperfusion therapy were 27.8 ± 4.3 and 78.95 ± 9.5 min, respectively. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the prehospital delay was significantly associated with older age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, having atypical pain, and lack of knowledge regarding the seriousness of chest pain. Conclusion: Approximately 79% of total prehospital delay was due to patient-related factors; old age, female sex, rural background, diabetes, atypical angina, and lack of knowledge being the significant attributes. D-N time and door-to-device time were within the limits of those recommended by current guidelines.

  19. Prognostic Impact of In-Hospital and Postdischarge Heart Failure in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulo, Gerhard; Igland, Jannicke; Nygard, Ottar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is a serious complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We explored the excess mortality associated with HF as an early or late complication of AMI and describe changes over time in such excess mortality. Methods and Results: All patients hospitalized....... Logistic and Cox regression models were used to explore the excess mortality associated with HF categories. Changes over time in the excess mortality were assessed by testing the interaction between HF status and study year. In‐hospital HF increased in‐hospital mortality 1.79 times (odds ratio [OR], 1.......79; 95% CI: 1.68–1.91). The excess mortality associated with HF increased by 4.3 times from 2001 to 2009 (P interaction

  20. [Acute diabetic complications attended in a hospital emergency department: a descriptive analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Almazán, María; Montero-Carretero, Teresa; Sánchez-Ramón, Susana; Jorge-Bravo, M Teresa; Crespo-Soto, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the characteristics of acute diabetic complications attended in a hospital emergency department. Cross-sectional, descriptive, retrospective study of patients with hyper- and hypoglycemic emergencies attended in a tertiary-care university hospital emergency department. We included 237 patients with a mean (SD) age of 61 (26) years. Diabetes had been diagnosed previously in 86.5% (type 2 in 74% and type 1 in 26%). Hyperglycemic emergencies were treated in 72%. The most frequent reasons for decompensation were poor control of type 1 diabetes (41.2%) and infections in type 2 diabetes (51.5%). Twenty-eight percent had low blood sugar levels caused by poor control of disease (50%). Patients with hypoglycemia had shorter mean stays. More admissions were made in type 2 diabetes than in type 1. Type 2 diabetes leads to more visits to the emergency department, more admissions, and a longer hospital stay than type 1 diabetes.

  1. Intervention analysis of introduction of rotavirus vaccine on hospital admissions rates due to acute diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Teixeira Masukawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of rotavirus vaccine on hospitalization rates for acute diarrhea in children younger than 5 years old after the introduction of the vaccine in 2006. A descriptive analytical observational study was carried out of the hospitalization rates occurred between 2000 and 2011 in 22 Regional Health Centers of Paraná State, Brazil. The effect of the vaccine was assessed by applying the SARIMA/Box-Jenkins time series methodology of intervention analysis, which allows verifying the slopes of the series are different after the introduction of the vaccine and estimating the magnitude of these effects for children younger than five years of age, by age group, for each region center. It was verified a statistically significant reduction by center/month on hospitalization rates for children 1 year old and younger, with averages of 47% and 58%, respectively, in December 2011.

  2. Restorative green outdoor environments at acute care hospitals - case studies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Shukor, Shureen Faris Binti

    The PhD thesis is based on research which was conducted between 2009 and 2012. It deals with green outdoor environments (GOEs) at acute care hospitals in the capital region of Denmark. The aim of this PhD study is to gain deeper knowledge about the design and use of GOEs which supports mental......, and relaxing. In general, employees spent the least time in the GOEs (between 5 to 10 minutes) due to their work schedule compared to patients who spent between 10 to 20 minutes. Personal interviews with 15 employees from all five hospitals indicated what employees experience in the GOEs and what improvements...... they would like to see. Among the recommendations from the employees was easy access, a window view of the GOE and private spaces for staff. The inclusion of water features was the most popular. The preference for sun and fresh air indicates that many hospital users would like to spend time outside...

  3. Acute Pesticide Poisoning in Children: Hospital Review in Selected Hospitals of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elikana Lekei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute pesticide poisoning (APP is a serious problem worldwide. Because the burden of childhood APP is unknown in Tanzania, this study describes the distribution, circumstances, and patterns of APP involving children under 18 years in Tanzania. Methodology. A 12-month prospective study was conducted in 10 Tanzanian healthcare facilities in 2006 using a data collection tool for surveillance. Results. Of 53 childhood poisoning cases identified, 56.6% were female. The most common poisoning circumstances were accidents (49.1% and suicide (30.2%. The most vulnerable children were 16-17 years old (30.2%. Suicide was significantly more common in females (PRR females/males = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.03–2.68 and accidental cases were more common in children aged 10 years or younger. Suicide was concentrated in children over 10 years, comprising 53% of cases in this age group. Organophosphates (OPs, zinc phosphide, and endosulfan were common amongst reported poisoning agents. The annual APP incidence rate was 1.61/100,000. Conclusion. APP is common among children in this region of Tanzania. Prevention of suicide in older children should address mental health issues and control access to toxic pesticides. Prevention of accidents in younger children requires safer storage and hygiene measures. Diverse interventions are needed to reduce pesticide poisoning among children in Tanzania.

  4. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 shortens acute infectious diarrhea in a pediatric outpatient setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ener Cagri Dinleyici

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Two randomized controlled clinical trials have shown thatLactobacillus (L reuteri DSM 17938 reduces the duration of diarrhea in children hospitalized due to acute infectious diarrhea. This was the first trial evaluating the efficacy of L. reuteri DSM 17938 in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea.METHODS: This was a multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, case control clinical trial in children with acute watery diarrhea. A total of 64 children who presented at outpatient clinics were enrolled. The probiotic group received 1 × 108 CFU L. reuteri DSM 17938 for five days in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS and the second group was treated with ORS only. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhea (in hours. The secondary endpoint was the number of children with diarrhea at each day of the five days of intervention. Adverse events were also recorded.RESULTS: The mean duration of diarrhea was significantly reduced in the L. reuteri group compared to the control group (approximately 15 h, 60.4 ± 24.5 h [95% CI: 51.0-69.7 h] vs. 74.3 ± 15.3 h [95% CI: 68.7-79.9 h], p < 0.05. The percentage of children with diarrhea was lower in the L. reuteri group (13/29; 44.8% after 48 h than the control group (27/31; 87%; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.79,p < 0.01. From the 72nd hour of intervention onwards, there was no difference between the two groups in the percentage of children with diarrhea. No adverse effects related to L. reuteri were noted.CONCLUSION:L. reuteri DSM 17938 is effective, safe, and well-tolerated in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea.

  5. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 shortens acute infectious diarrhea in a pediatric outpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Dalgic, Nazan; Guven, Sirin; Metin, Ozge; Yasa, Olcay; Kurugol, Zafer; Turel, Ozden; Tanir, Gonul; Yazar, Ahmet Sami; Arica, Vefik; Sancar, Mesut; Karbuz, Adem; Eren, Makbule; Ozen, Metehan; Kara, Ates; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Two randomized controlled clinical trials have shown that Lactobacillus (L) reuteri DSM 17938 reduces the duration of diarrhea in children hospitalized due to acute infectious diarrhea. This was the first trial evaluating the efficacy of L. reuteri DSM 17938 in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea. This was a multicenter, randomized, single-blinded, case control clinical trial in children with acute watery diarrhea. A total of 64 children who presented at outpatient clinics were enrolled. The probiotic group received 1×10(8)CFU L. reuteri DSM 17938 for five days in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) and the second group was treated with ORS only. The primary endpoint was the duration of diarrhea (in hours). The secondary endpoint was the number of children with diarrhea at each day of the five days of intervention. Adverse events were also recorded. The mean duration of diarrhea was significantly reduced in the L. reuteri group compared to the control group (approximately 15h, 60.4±24.5h [95% CI: 51.0-69.7h] vs. 74.3±15.3h [95% CI: 68.7-79.9h], pdiarrhea was lower in the L. reuteri group (13/29; 44.8%) after 48h than the control group (27/31; 87%; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.34-0.79, pdiarrhea. No adverse effects related to L. reuteri were noted. L. reuteri DSM 17938 is effective, safe, and well-tolerated in outpatient children with acute infectious diarrhea. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics and in-hospital outcomes of patients with acute coronary syndromes and heart failure in the United Arab Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Shehab, Abdulla; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Almahmeed, Wael; Bustani, Nazar; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas; Yusufali, Afzal; Wassef, Adel; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brek, Azan Bin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Heart failure (HF) is a serious complication of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and is associated with high in-hospital mortality and poor long-term survival. The aims of this study were to describe the clinical characteristics, management and in-hospital outcomes of coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with HF in the United Arab Emirates. Findings The study was selected from the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE), a prospective multi-national, multicenter regi...

  7. A Retrospective Audit of In-Hospital 30-day Mortality from Acute Myocardial Infarction in Connolly Hospital Blanchardstown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hensey, M

    2017-09-01

    In 2015, The Department of Health published the first annual report of the “National Healthcare Quality Reporting System.” Connolly Hospital was reported to a mortality rate within 30 days post-Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) of 9.87 per 100 cases which was statistically significantly higher than the national rate. We carried out a retrospective audit of patients who were HIPE-coded as having died within 30 days of AMI from 2011-2013 and identified 42 patients. On review, only 23 patients (54.8%) were confirmed as having had an AMI. We identified 12 patients who had AMI included on death certificate without any evidence for same. If the 22 patients incorrectly coded were excluded, the mortality rate within 30 days post-AMI in CHB would fall to 4.14 deaths per 100 cases, well below the national average. Inaccuracies of data collection can lead to erroneous conclusions when examining healthcare data.

  8. Implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings: a qualitative analysis of clinical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhan, Melissa L; Riera, Antonio; Kurtz, Jordan C; Schaeffer, Paula; Asnes, Andrea G

    2015-01-01

    Technologies are not always successfully implemented into practice. This study elicited experiences of acute care providers with the introduction of technology and identified barriers and facilitators in the implementation process. A qualitative study using one-on-one interviews among a purposeful sample of 19 physicians and nurses within 10 emergency departments and intensive care units was performed. Grounded theory, iterative data analysis and the constant comparative method were used to inductively generate ideas and build theories. Five major categories emerged: decision-making factors, the impact on practice, technology's perceived value, facilitators and barriers to implementation. Barriers included negative experiences, age, infrequent use and access difficulties. A positive outlook, sufficient training, support staff and user friendliness were facilitators. This study describes strategies implicated in the successful implementation of newly adopted technology in acute care settings. Improved implementation methods and evaluation of implementation processes are necessary for successful adoption of new technology.

  9. Infection prevention and control measures for acute respiratory infections in healthcare settings: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, W H; Conly, J M; Pessoa-Silva, C L; Malik, M; Eremin, S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses account for the majority of the acute respiratory tract infections (ARIs) globally with a mortality exceeding 4 million deaths per year. The most commonly encountered viruses, in order of frequency, include influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza and adenovirus. Current evidence suggests that the major mode of transmission of ARls is through large droplets, but transmission through contact (including hand contamination with subsequent self-inoculation) and infectious respiratory aerosols of various sizes and at short range (coined as "opportunistic" airborne transmission) may also occur for some pathogens. Opportunistic airborne transmission may occur when conducting highrisk aerosol generating procedures and airborne precautions will be required in this setting. General infection control measures effective for all respiratory viral infections are reviewed and followed by discussion on some of the common viruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the recently discovered novel coronavirus.

  10. Acute viral gastroenteritis in children hospitalized in Iksan, Korea during December 2010 - June 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whoan So

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Viral etiology is common in cases of children with acute diarrhea, and antibiotic therapy is usually not required. Therefore, it is important to determine the distribution of common viruses among children hospitalized with acute diarrhea. Methods: We included 186 children who suffered from acute diarrhea and were hospitalized at the Wonkwang University Hospital Pediatric ward from December 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 in this study. Stool samples were collected and multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR was used to simultaneously determine the viral etiology such as rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus.&lt;br&gt; Results: Causative viruses were detected in 72 of the 186 cases (38.7%. The mean age of the viruspositive cases was 1 year and 9 months (range, 1 month to 11 years. Rotavirus was detected in 50/186 (26.9%; norovirus, in 18/186 (9.7%; and astrovirus, in 3/186 cases (1.6%. Adenovirus was not detected in any of the cases. Proportions of norovirus genogroups I and II were 21.1% and 78.9%, respectively. Four of the 51 rotavirus-positive cases (7.8% had received rotavirus vaccination at least once. The mean duration of diarrhea was 2.8 days (range, 1 to 10 days and vomiting occurred in 39 of the 72 cases (54.2%.&lt;br&gt; Conclusion: Viral etiology was confirmed in about one-third of the children with acute diarrhea, and the most common viral agent was rotavirus, followed by norovirus.

  11. The 6-PACK programme to decrease falls and fall-related injuries in acute hospitals: protocol for an economic evaluation alongside a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Renata; Barker, Anna; Zavarsek, Silva; Watts, Jennifer J; Haines, Terry; Hill, Keith; Sherrington, Cathie; Brand, Caroline; Jolley, Damien; Stoelwinder, Just

    2012-04-01

    Falls are a common hospital occurrence complicating the care of patients. From an economic perspective, the impact of in-hospital falls and related injuries is substantial. However, few studies have examined the economic implications of falls prevention interventions in an acute care setting. The 6-PACK programme is a targeted nurse delivered falls prevention programme designed specifically for acute hospital wards. It includes a risk assessment tool and six simple strategies that nurses apply to patients classified as high-risk by the tool. To examine the incremental cost-effectiveness of the 6-PACK programme for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries, compared with usual care practice, from an acute hospital perspective. The 6-PACK project is a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) that includes 24 acute medical and surgical wards from six hospitals in Australia to investigate the efficacy of the 6-PACK programme. This economic evaluation will be conducted alongside the 6-PACK cluster RCT. Outcome and hospitalisation cost data will be prospectively collected on approximately 16,000 patients admitted to the participating wards during the 12-month trial period. The results of the economic evaluation will be expressed as 'cost or saving per fall prevented' and 'cost or saving per fall-related injury prevented' calculated from differences in mean costs and effects in the intervention and control groups, to generate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). This economic evaluation will provide an opportunity to explore the cost-effectiveness of a targeted nurse delivered falls prevention programme for reducing in-hospital falls and fall-related injuries. This protocol provides a detailed statement of a planned economic evaluation conducted alongside a cluster RCT to investigate the efficacy of the 6-PACK programme to prevent falls and fall-related injuries. The protocol for the cluster RCT is registered with the Australian New Zealand

  12. Hospital Incidence and Outcomes of the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Using the Kigali Modification of the Berlin Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, Elisabeth D; Kiviri, Willy; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Mueller, Ariel; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M; Officer, Laurent; Novack, Victor; Mutumwinka, Marguerite; Talmor, Daniel S; Fowler, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the incidence of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in high- and middle-income countries vary from 10.1 to 86.2 per 100,000 person-years in the general population. The epidemiology of ARDS has not been reported for a low-income country at the level of the population, hospital, or intensive care unit (ICU). The Berlin definition may not allow identification of ARDS in resource-constrained settings. To estimate the incidence and outcomes of ARDS at a Rwandan referral hospital using the Kigali modification of the Berlin definition: without requirement for positive end-expiratory pressure, hypoxia cutoff of SpO2/FiO2 less than or equal to 315, and bilateral opacities on lung ultrasound or chest radiograph. We screened every adult patient for hypoxia at a public referral hospital in Rwanda for 6 weeks. For every patient with hypoxia, we collected data on demographics and ARDS risk factors, performed lung ultrasonography, and evaluated chest radiography when available. Forty-two (4.0%) of 1,046 hospital admissions met criteria for ARDS. Using various prespecified cutoffs for the SpO2/FiO2 ratio resulted in almost identical hospital incidence values. Median age for patients with ARDS was 37 years, and infection was the most common risk factor (44.1%). Only 30.9% of patients with ARDS were admitted to an ICU, and hospital mortality was 50.0%. Using traditional Berlin criteria, no patients would have met criteria for ARDS. ARDS seems to be a common and fatal syndrome in a hospital in Rwanda, with few patients admitted to an ICU. The Berlin definition is likely to underestimate the impact of ARDS in low-income countries, where resources to meet the definition requirements are lacking. Although the Kigali modification requires validation before widespread use, we hope this study stimulates further work in refining an ARDS definition that can be consistently used in all settings.

  13. Hospital Acquired Thrombosis (HAT) Prevention in an Acute Hospital; A Single Centre Cross-Sectional Study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, MI

    2017-04-01

    Evidence based guidelines are effective in reducing incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) which is associated with morbidly, mortality and economic burden. This study aimed to identify the proportion of inpatients who had a VTE risk assessment (RA) performed and who received thromboprophylaxis (TP), in Cork University Hospital. There was no structured RA tool at the time; information was obtained from medical and drug charts to ascertain if a RA was performed. Patients were then RA by researchers and stratified as per NICE guidelines and the proportion who received TP was calculated. One thousand and nineteen inpatients were screened. Risk was documented in 24% of cases. TP was prescribed in 43.2% of inpatients. Following application of a RA tool >80% were at high risk of VTE with low risk of bleeding with TP prescription in 46.3% of inpatients. A national collaborative effort should be encouraged to develop a standardized approach for safe RA of inpatients and prescription of TP for prevention of HAT

  14. Unmet supportive needs of cancer patients in an acute care hospital in Japan--a census study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Park, Sunre; Kimura, Rieko; Suyama, Ikuko; Koyama, Yurie; Takeuchi, Mari; Yoshikawa, Hiroka; Hashiguchi, Saori; Shirahase, Joichiro; Kato, Motoichiro; Takeda, Junzo; Kashima, Haruo

    2010-11-01

    Little research has been done on supportive needs of cancer patients in acute hospitals in Japan. This study aims to comprehensively assess the unmet supportive needs of hospitalized cancer patients, as well as literacy and utilization of appropriate professional care. All cancer patients (aged 20 to 80 years) who were hospitalized in a university hospital in Tokyo during the designated 3-day period between September 1 and October 31, 2007 were recruited for participation in the study. The M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, Brief Cancer-Related Worry Inventory, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. Patients' knowledge and use of relevant services were evaluated. The results were compared with those of non-cancer patients in the same treatment settings. A total of 125 cancer patients and 59 non-cancer patients were enrolled. Cancer patients and non-cancer patients equally suffered from physical symptoms (15-26% had severe appetite loss, 18-19% had severe dry mouth, and 16-22% had severe pain); however, psychological distress of cancer patients exceeded that of non-cancer patients (28.0% vs 8.5%; p ≤ 0.05). Severe psychological distress was associated with severe worry about future prospects or interpersonal and social issues and presence of two or more severe symptoms. Two thirds of the patients with severe psychological distress knew about the psychiatric division, but only one third actually sought treatment. Needs related to psychological issues were more prevalent among cancer patients than among non-cancer patients, despite a similar level of physical distress. Special attention should be paid to cancer patients who worry over future prospects or interpersonal and social issues, and those who have two or more severe symptoms.

  15. Clinical impact of potentially inappropriate medications during hospitalization of acutely ill older patients with multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hege; Hvidsten, Lara T; Gløersen, Gløer; Wyller, Torgeir Bruun; Wang-Hansen, Marte Sofie

    2015-01-01

    To identify potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), to compare drug changes between geriatric and other medical wards, and to investigate the clinical impact of PIMs in acutely hospitalized older adults. Retrospective study of 232 home-dwelling, multimorbid older adults (aged ≥75 years) acutely admitted to Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. PIMs were identified by Norwegian general practice (NORGEP) criteria and Beers' 2012 criteria. Clinical correlates were laboratory measures, functional and mental status, physical frailty, and length of stay. Mean (SD) age was 86 (5.7) years, and length of stay was 6.5 (4.8) days. During the stay, the mean number of drugs used regularly changed from 7.8 (3.6) to 7.9 (3.6) (p = 0.22), and drugs used pro re nata (prn) changed from 1.4 (1.6) to 2.0 (1.7) (p PIM changed from 39.2% to 37.9% (p = 0.076), while anticholinergics and benzodiazepines were reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.02). The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages (p PIMs (p PIMS and clinical outcomes were identified, but the concomitant use of ≥3 psychotropic/opioid drugs was associated with reduced hand-grip strength (p ≤ 0.012). Hospitalization did not change polypharmacy or PIMs. Drug treatment was more appropriate on the geriatric than other medical wards. No clinical impact of PIMs was observed, but prescribers should be vigilant about concomitant prescription of ≥3 psychotropics/opioids. Acute hospitalization of older patients with multimorbidity did not increase polypharmacy or potentially inappropriate medications. Prescription of anticholinergics and benzodiazepines was significantly reduced. The geriatric ward reduced drug dosages and discontinued potentially inappropriate medications more frequently than the other medical wards.

  16. Contributions of Paulo Freire to understanding the dialogic leadership exercise of nurses in the hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amestoy, Simone Coelho; Oliveira, Anelise Freitas Lins de; Thofehrn, Maira Buss; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Santos, Bianca Pozza Dos; Bao, Ana Cristina Pretto

    2017-04-04

    To know the understanding of nurses regarding the exercise of dialogic leadership in the hospital setting, and the challenges of leadership. Qualitative and exploratory-descriptive study Thirty-five nurses of a mid-sized hospital in the city of Pelotas/RS participated in this study. Data were collected by means of semi-structured interviews, subsequently analysed using the operative proposal of Minayo. The results led to the following categories: exercise of dialogic leadership and challenges in the exercise of dialogic leadership. Dialogic leadership is understood as being the nurses' ability to coordinate and organise the nursing team in horizontally-oriented relationships guided by dialogue. Regarding the challenges, the nurses stressed the lack of professional experience, and relationships of hierarchy and power. Leadership based on dialogue can facilitate the management of care, of the nursing team, and of health services.

  17. Detection of Measles Virus RNA in Air and Surface Specimens in a Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Werner E; McNall, Rebecca J; Blevins, Maria W; Turner, JoLyn; Lopareva, Elena N; Rota, Paul A; Stehle, John R

    2016-02-15

    Measles virus (MeV) is known to be highly contagious, with an infectious period lasting from 4 days before to 4 days after rash onset. An unvaccinated, young, female patient with measles confirmed by direct epidemiologic link was hospitalized on day 5 after rash onset. Environmental samples were collected over the 4-day period of hospitalization in a single room. MeV RNA was detectable in air specimens, on surface specimens, and on respirators on days 5-8 after rash onset. This is the first report of environmental surveillance for MeV, and the results suggest that MeV-infected fomites may be present in healthcare settings. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Relationship between consumption of MRSA-active antibiotics and burden of MRSA in acute care hospitals in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Santiago; Fondevilla, Esther; Freixas, Núria; Mojal, Sergi; Sopena, Nieves; Bella, Feliu; Gudiol, Francesc

    2015-04-01

    To analyse the possible relationship between consumption of old and new MRSA-active antibiotics and burden of MRSA in acute care hospitals in Catalonia during the period 2007-12. Fifty-four hospitals participating in the VINCat Programme were included. Proportion of MRSA (resistant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus per 100 isolates of S. aureus tested), incidence of new cases of infection [new cases of MRSA per 1000 occupied bed-days (OBD)] and incidence of cases of bacteraemia (MRSA bacteraemia cases per 1000 OBD) were determined to estimate the annual MRSA burden. Antibiotic consumption was calculated in DDD/100 OBD. Cost was expressed in euros/100 OBD. MRSA rates remained stable over the study period, with the proportion of MRSA ranging from 20% to 22.82% in 2007 and 2012, respectively (P=0.864). Consumption of old MRSA-active antibiotics (vancomycin and teicoplanin) did not change significantly, with values from 1.51 to 2.07 DDD/100 OBD (P=0.693). Consumption of new MRSA-active antibiotics (linezolid and daptomycin) increased significantly, with values rising from 0.24 to 1.49 DDD/100 OBD (P<0.001). Cost increased by almost 200%. A widespread and steady increase in consumption of new MRSA-active antibiotics was observed among acute care hospitals in Catalonia, in spite of a stable MRSA burden. At the same time, consumption of old drugs remained stable. Such trends resulted in a significant increase in cost. Our findings suggest that factors other than the proportion of methicillin resistance among S. aureus may influence the use of old and new MRSA-active antibiotics in the clinical setting. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Individual psychological therapy in an acute inpatient setting: Service user and psychologist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Catherine; Pistrang, Nancy; Huddy, Vyv; Williams, Claire

    2018-01-18

    The acute inpatient setting poses potential challenges to delivering one-to-one psychological therapy; however, there is little research on the experiences of both receiving and delivering therapies in this environment. This qualitative study aimed to explore service users' and psychologists' experiences of undertaking individual therapy in acute inpatient units. It focused on the relationship between service users and psychologists, what service users found helpful or unhelpful, and how psychologists attempted to overcome any challenges in delivering therapy. The study used a qualitative, interview-based design. Eight service users and the six psychologists they worked with were recruited from four acute inpatient wards. They participated in individual semi-structured interviews eliciting their perspectives on the therapy. Service users' and psychologists' transcripts were analysed together using Braun and Clarke's (2006, Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77) method of thematic analysis. The accounts highlighted the importance of forming a 'human' relationship - particularly within the context of the inpatient environment - as a basis for therapeutic work. Psychological therapy provided valued opportunities for meaning-making. To overcome the challenges of acute mental health crisis and environmental constraints, psychologists needed to work flexibly and creatively; the therapeutic work also extended to the wider context of the inpatient unit, in efforts to promote a shared understanding of service users' difficulties. Therapeutic relationships between service users and clinicians need to be promoted more broadly within acute inpatient care. Psychological formulation can help both service users and ward staff in understanding crisis and working collaboratively. Practice-based evidence is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of adapted psychological therapy models. Developing 'human' relationships at all levels of acute inpatient care continues to be an

  20. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  1. Interdisciplinary medication decision making by pharmacists in pediatric hospital settings: An ethnographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Ellie; Kinney, Sharon; Weiner, Carlye; Newall, Fiona; Williams, Allison; Cranswick, Noel; Wong, Ian; Borrott, Narelle; Manias, Elizabeth

    2017-03-22

    Children are particularly vulnerable to experiencing medication incidents in hospitals. Making sound medication decisions is therefore of paramount importance. Prior research has principally described pharmacists' role in reducing medication errors. There is a dearth of information about pharmacists' interactions with pediatric hospital staff across disciplines in resolving medication issues. The aim of this study was to examine interdisciplinary medication decision making by pharmacists in pediatric hospital settings. An ethnographic design was undertaken comprising observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Audio-recorded data were analyzed thematically. The study was conducted in three wards of an Australian pediatric tertiary teaching hospital, comprising general surgical, gastroenterology, endocrinology, neurology, adolescent and rehabilitation settings. Pharmacists, registered nurses and doctors were recruited from diverse clinical wards following information sessions. Pharmacists were central to complex pediatric medication decision making, intervening about dosage, administration, drug interactions and authorities. Pharmacists proactively contacted doctors and nurses about prescribing issues; conversely, staff routinely approached pharmacists for medication advice. Pharmacists were perceived as medication experts, their extensive knowledge valued in resolving complex issues: when off-label medications were prescribed, when protocols were absent or ambiguous, where tension existed between protocol adherence and patient safety, and where patients on multiple medications were at risk of medication error. Pharmacists had strong relationships with doctors and nurses, which had a bearing on pharmacists' input in interventions. Furthermore, pharmacists identified prescribing errors through strategies, such as case note review and medication reconciliation, although the lack of emergency department pharmacists and limited after-hours staffing posed

  2. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation before defibrillation in the out-of-hospital setting: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Christian; Williams, Brett; Boyle, Malcolm J

    2012-10-01

    Many studies over the past decade have investigated delaying initial defibrillation to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), as it has been associated with increased rates of restoration of spontaneous circulation and/or survival. Since 2006, a number of studies have investigated these procedures. The objective of this study was to undertake a literature review examining the commencement of CPR before defibrillation in the out-of-hospital setting. A literature review was undertaken using the electronic medical databases Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINHAL Plus, Cochrane Systematic Review and Meditext, from their commencement to the end of June 2011. Keywords used in the search included: CPR, defibrillation, ventricular fibrillation, VF, EMS, EMT, paramedic, emergency medical service, emergency medical technician, prehospital, out-of-hospital and ambulance. References of relevant articles were also reviewed. Of the 3079 articles located, 10 met the inclusion criteria. The results of these studies showed conflicting results. All retrospective studies (n=6) indicated a benefit in performing pre-shock CPR on patients with ventricular fibrillation for durations between 90 and 180 s. Conversely, all randomised controlled trials demonstrated no benefit from providing CPR before defibrillation compared with immediate defibrillation for return of spontaneous circulation, neurological outcome and/or survival to hospital discharge. However, none of the studies reported evidence that CPR before defibrillation is harmful. Conflicting evidence remains regarding the benefit of CPR before defibrillation. The establishment of a consistent timeframe of chest compressions before defibrillation in the out-of-hospital setting will provide uniformity in standards in clinical practice and education and training.

  3. Justified skepticism about Apgar scoring in out-of-hospital birth settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünebaum, Amos; McCullough, Laurence B; Brent, Robert L; Arabin, Birgit; Levene, Malcolm I; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-07-01

    The Apgar score is used worldwide to assess the newborn infant shortly after birth. Apgar scores, including mean scores and those with high cut-off scores, have been used to support claims that planned home birth is as safe as hospital birth. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of 5 min Apgar scores among different birth settings and providers in the USA. We obtained data from the National Center for Health Statistics of the US Centers for Disease Control birth certificate data for 2007-2010 for all singleton, term births of infants weighing ≥2500 g (n=13,830,531). Patients were then grouped into six categories by birth setting and birth attendant: hospital-based physician, hospital-based midwife, freestanding birth center with either certified nurse midwife and/or other midwife, and home-based delivery with either certified nurse midwife or other midwife. The distribution of each Apgar score from 0 to 10 was assessed for each group. Newborns delivered by other midwives or certified nurse midwives (CNMs) in a birthing center or at home had a significantly higher likelihood of a 5 min maximum Apgar score of 10 than those delivered in a hospital [52.63% in birthing centers, odds ratio (OR) 29.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 28.29-30.06, and 52.44% at home, OR 28.95, 95% CI: 28.40-29.50; CNMs: 16.43% in birthing centers, OR 5.16, 95% CI: 4.99-5.34, and 36.9% at home births, OR 15.29, 95% CI: 14.85-15.73]. Our study shows an inexplicable bias of high 5 min Apgar scores of 10 in home or birthing center deliveries. Midwives delivering at home or in birthing centers assigned a significantly higher proportion of Apgar scores of 10 when compared to midwives or physicians delivering in the hospital. Studies that have claimed the safety of out-of-hospital deliveries by using higher mean or high cut-off 5 min Apgar scores and reviews based on these studies should be treated with skepticism by obstetricians and midwives, by pregnant women, and by

  4. Costs of Providing Infusion Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in a Hospital-based Infusion Center Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Jordana; Ogden, Kristine; Nickman, Nancy; Halpern, Michael T; Cifaldi, Mary; Ganguli, Arijit; Bao, Yanjun; Garg, Vishvas

    2017-08-01

    Many hospital-based infusion centers treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with intravenous biologic agents, yet may have a limited understanding of the overall costs of infusion in this setting. The purposes of this study were to conduct a microcosting analysis from a hospital perspective and to develop a model using an activity-based costing approach for estimating costs associated with the provision of hospital-based infusion services (preparation, administration, and follow-up) in the United States for maintenance treatment of moderate to severe RA. A spreadsheet-based model was developed. Inputs included hourly wages, time spent providing care, supply/overhead costs, laboratory testing, infusion center size, and practice pattern information. Base-case values were derived from data from surveys, published studies, standard cost sources, and expert opinion. Costs are presented in year-2017 US dollars. The base case modeled a hospital infusion center serving patients with RA treated with abatacept, tocilizumab, infliximab, or rituximab. Estimated overall costs of infusions per patient per year were $36,663 (rituximab), $36,821 (tocilizumab), $44,973 (infliximab), and $46,532 (abatacept). Of all therapies, the biologic agents represented the greatest share of overall costs, ranging from 87% to $91% of overall costs per year. Excluding infusion drug costs, labor accounted for 53% to 57% of infusion costs. Biologic agents represented the highest single cost associated with RA infusion care; however, personnel, supplies, and overhead costs also contributed substantially to overall costs (8%-16%). This model may provide a helpful and adaptable framework for use by hospitals in informing decision making about services offered and their associated financial implications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gaps in Provision of Primary and Specialty Palliative Care in the Acute Care Setting by Race and Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Elizabeth; Hope, Aluko A; Allyn, Katherine; Szalkiewicz, Elissa; Gary, Brittany; Gong, Michelle N

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has identified a large unmet need in provision of specialist-level palliative care services in the hospital. How much of this gap is filled by primary palliative care provided by generalists or nonpalliative specialists has not been quantified. Estimates of racial and ethnic disparities have been inconsistent. The objective of this study was to 1) estimate primary and specialty palliative care delivery and to measure unmet needs in the inpatient setting and 2) explore racial and ethnic disparities in palliative care delivery. This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study of 55,658 adult admissions to two acute care hospitals in the Bronx in 2013. Patients with palliative care needs were identified by criteria adapted from the literature. The primary outcomes were delivery of primary and specialist-level palliative care. In all, 18.5% of admissions met criteria for needing palliative care. Of those, 18% received specialist-level palliative care, an estimated 30% received primary palliative care, and 37% had no evidence of palliative care or advance care planning. Black and Hispanic patients were not less likely to receive specialist-level palliative care (adjusted odds ratio [OR] black patients = 1.18, 95% CI 0.98, 1.42; adjusted OR Hispanic patients = 1.24, 95% CI 1.04, 1.48), but they were less likely to receive primary palliative care (adjusted OR black patients = 0.41, 95% CI 0.20, 0.84; adjusted OR Hispanic patients = 0.48, 95% CI 0.25, 0.94). Even when considering primary and specialty palliative care, hospitalized patients have a high prevalence of unmet palliative care need. Further research is needed understand racial and ethnic disparities in palliative care delivery. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Acute pain therapy in German hospitals as competitive factor. Do competition, ownership and case severity influence the practice of acute pain therapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Hinz, J; Meißner, W; Stamer, U; Bauer, M; Petzke, F

    2015-07-01

    Due to the implementation of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) system, the competitive pressure on German hospitals increased. In this context it has been shown that acute pain management offers economic benefits for hospitals. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the competitive situation, the ownership and the economic resources required on structures and processes for acute pain management. A standardized questionnaire on structures and processes of acute pain management was mailed to the 885 directors of German departments of anesthesiology listed as members of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin). For most hospitals a strong regional competition existed; however, this parameter affected neither the implementation of structures nor the recommended treatment processes for pain therapy. In contrast, a clear preference for hospitals in private ownership to use the benchmarking tool QUIPS (quality improvement in postoperative pain therapy) was found. These hospitals also presented information on coping with the management of pain in the corporate clinic mission statement more often and published information about the quality of acute pain management in the quality reports more frequently. No differences were found between hospitals with different forms of ownership in the implementation of acute pain services, quality circles, expert standard pain management and the implementation of recommended processes. Hospitals with a higher case mix index (CMI) had a certified acute pain management more often. The corporate mission statement of these hospitals also contained information on how to cope with pain, presentation of the quality of pain management in the quality report, implementation of quality circles and the implementation of the expert standard pain management more frequently. There were no differences in the frequency of using the benchmarking

  7. Predictors of effective de-escalation in acute inpatient psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Mary; Stewart, Duncan; James, Karen; Richardson, Michelle; Renwick, Laoise; Brennan, Geoffrey; Bowers, Len

    2016-08-01

    To explore the factors that influence the use of de-escalation and its success in halting conflict in acute psychiatric inpatient setting. De-escalation is the use of verbal and nonverbal communication to reduce or eliminate aggression and violence during the escalation phase of a patient's behaviour. Although de-escalation is a first-line intervention in aggression management in acute psychiatric settings, little is known about the use or effectiveness of this technique. A retrospective case note analysis. For each patient (n = 522), their involvement in conflict (e.g. aggression) or containment (e.g. coerced medication) during the first two weeks of their admission was recorded. The frequency and order of the conflict and containment events were identified during each shift. The sequences of events occurring in shifts involving de-escalation were analysed. Sequences where de-escalation ended the pattern of conflict or containment were categorised as 'successful', and all others were categorised as 'unsuccessful'. Over half of patients (53%) experienced de-escalation during the first two weeks of admission, with the majority of these (37%) experiencing multiple episodes. De-escalation was successful in approximately 60% of cases. Successful de-escalations were preceded by fewer, and less aggressive, conflict events, compared with unsuccessful de-escalations, which were most frequently followed by administration of pro re nata medication. Patients with a history of violence were more likely to experience de-escalation, and it was more likely to be unsuccessful. De-escalation is frequently effective in halting a sequence of conflict in acute inpatient settings, but patients with a history of violence may be specifically challenging. These findings provide support for de-escalation in practice but suggest that nurses may lack confidence in using the technique when the risk of violence is greater. Providing evidence-based staff training may improve staff confidence

  8. Can patients report patient safety incidents in a hospital setting? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jane K; Armitage, Gerry

    2012-08-01

    Patients are increasingly being thought of as central to patient safety. A small but growing body of work suggests that patients may have a role in reporting patient safety problems within a hospital setting. This review considers this disparate body of work, aiming to establish a collective view on hospital-based patient reporting. This review asks: (a) What can patients report? (b) In what settings can they report? (c) At what times have patients been asked to report? (d) How have patients been asked to report? 5 databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, (Kings Fund) HMIC and PsycINFO) were searched for published literature on patient reporting of patient safety 'problems' (a number of search terms were utilised) within a hospital setting. In addition, reference lists of all included papers were checked for relevant literature. 13 papers were included within this review. All included papers were quality assessed using a framework for comparing both qualitative and quantitative designs, and reviewed in line with the study objectives. Patients are clearly in a position to report on patient safety, but included papers varied considerably in focus, design and analysis, with all papers lacking a theoretical underpinning. In all papers, reports were actively solicited from patients, with no evidence currently supporting spontaneous reporting. The impact of timing upon accuracy of information has yet to be established, and many vulnerable patients are not currently being included in patient reporting studies, potentially introducing bias and underestimating the scale of patient reporting. The future of patient reporting may well be as part of an 'error detection jigsaw' used alongside other methods as part of a quality improvement toolkit.

  9. Predictors of myocardial damage prior to hospital admission among patients with acute chest pain or other symptoms raising a suspicion of acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Leif; Isaksson, Leif; Axelsson, Christer; Nordlander, Rolf; Herlitz, Johan

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate factors which, prior to hospital admission, predict the development of acute coronary syndrome or acute myocardial infarction among patients who call for an ambulance due to suspected acute coronary syndrome. Prospective observational study. All the patients who called for an ambulance due to suspected acute coronary syndrome in South Hospital's catchment area in Stockholm and in the Municipality of Göteborg between January and November 2000, were included. On arrival of the ambulance crew, a blood sample was drawn for bedside analysis of serum myoglobin, creatine kinase (CK)MB and troponin-I. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was simultaneously recorded. In all, 538 patients took part in the survey. Their mean age was 69 years and 58% were men. In all, 307 patients (57.3%) had acute coronary syndrome and 158 (29.5%) had acute myocardial infarction. Independent predictors of the development of acute coronary syndrome were a history of myocardial infarction (P=0.006), angina pectoris (P=0.005) or hypertension (P=0.017), ECG changes with ST elevation (Psyndrome, predictors of myocardial damage can be defined prior to hospital admission on the basis of previous history, sex, ECG changes, the elevation of biochemical markers and the interval from the onset of symptoms until the ambulance reaches the patient.

  10. First report of leprosy presenting as acute polyarthritis in the setting of type I downgrading lepra reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Raqum, Haneen Adel; Uppal, S S; El Abdalghani, Rana Abdul Rahman; Lasheen, Ibrahim

    2006-02-01

    Leprosy is a rare cause of acute polyarthritis. We describe the occurrence of oedema of the hands and feet and acute polyarthritis in the setting of type I (downgrading) lepra reaction in an untreated patient with borderline leprosy. This case report further expands the range of articular manifestations that can occur in leprosy.

  11. Managing exudate and maceration in venous leg ulceration within the acute health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Annemarie

    2017-11-08

    Exudate has beneficial effects in normal wound healing but detrimental consequences for chronic wounds. Practitioners need to identify and treat its cause, and manage the exudate and prevent if from damaging periwound skin. Management involves dressings of the most appropriate absorbency and other products, and avoiding maceration of periwound skin; compression therapy is the gold standard treatment for treating oedema and venous leg ulceration. Nurses in acute settings may not have the skills to implement or maintain compression therapy; this article is intended for nurses who may have to manage these patients temporarily while they are admitted to secondary care and may not have the skills.

  12. Workplace violence in the hospital psychiatric setting. An occupational health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, B

    1996-12-01

    1. Assault directed against psychiatric staff is emerging as a serious occupational health problem. Governmental regulatory agencies, unions, and academic research have identified workplace assault in the psychiatric setting as a serious workplace health issue. 2. Violence directed against psychiatric nursing personnel is increasing. Increases in assault are related to shorter hospitalizations, cutbacks in mental health services, and the increasing number of clients with criminal histories and personality disorders. 3. Reduction in staff assault can best be accomplished using an injury epidemiology occupational health focus. Identifying hazards, energy transfer mechanisms, and other environmental factors contributing to staff injuries can reduce or eliminate the morbidity associated with client assault.

  13. Exploring the effect of sound and music on health in hospital settings: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyendo, Timothy Onosahwo

    2016-11-01

    positive emotion, and decreasing the levels of stressful conditions. Whilst sound holds both negative and positive aspects of the hospital ecosystem and may be stressful, it also possesses a soothing quality that induces positive feelings in patients. Conceptualizing the nature of sound in the hospital context as a soundscape, rather than merely noise can permit a subtler and socially useful understanding of the role of sound and music in the hospital setting, thereby creating a means for improving the hospital experience for patients and nurses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Developing an ICF core set for sub-acute stages of spinal cord injury in Taiwan: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Chou; Yen, Tze-Hsun; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Lin, Yen-Nung; Wang, Yen-Ho; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an ICF core set describing sub-acute spinal cord injury (SCI) specifically for Taiwanese patients. A consensus process using three rounds of Delphi technique was conducted. Twenty multidisciplinary participants from various institutions were recruited. The questionnaire used in this study comprised 118 ICF second-level categories relevant to the sub-acute stage of SCI. A five-point Likert scale was used, and participants were asked to assign weights to the effect of each category on activities of daily life after SCI. The consensus among ratings was assessed using Spearman's rho and semi-interquartile range (SIQR) indices. The core set for post-acute SCI was developed from categories that attained a mean score of ≥3.8 in the third round of the Delphi exercise. The core set for sub-acute SCI contained 58 categories. Of these, 24 comprised the component of body functions (b), 5 comprised body structures (s), 21 comprised activities and participation (d), and 8 comprised environmental factors (e). The preliminary core set for sub-acute SCI offers a comprehensive system of disability assessment and verification after people have sustained an SCI. Further validation is required. Implication for Rehabilitation The preliminary core set for sub-acute SCI offers a comprehensive system for disability assessment related to SCI among Taiwanese patients. This core set reflected problems commonly encountered by patients with SCI. This core set reflects appropriate cultural and geographic perspectives in adjustment to SCI.

  15. Clinical Predictors of Hospital-acquired Pneumonia Associated with Acute Ischemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Suárez Quesada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: hospital-acquired pneumonia is a constant challenge given the current microbiological spectrum, antimicrobial resistance together with its high mortality, morbidity and hospital costs. Objective: to identify the clinical predictors of pneumonia associated with acute ischemic stroke. Methods: a prospective cohort study was conducted in 201 patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to the stroke unit of the General Carlos Manuel de Céspedes Teaching Hospital during the first seven days after the onset, from January 2012 through December 2013. The independent predictors of hospital-acquired pneumonia were obtained using multivariable logistic regression. Results: fifty six point seven percent were male. The mean age was 64.17 ± 14.33 years. Cases of hospital-acquired pneumonia associated with stroke accounted for 19, 9 %. Subjects who developed pneumonia were older (68.55 ± 13.51 vs. 63.08 ± 14.36 years, had a lower score in the Glasgow Coma Scale (8.00 ± 2.60 vs. 14.00 ± 2.82, and an increased number of leukocytes at admission (10.888 ± 3.487 vs. 9.233 ± 2.539 × 109/L. The following independent factors were identified: Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 11 (OR: 26.099; 95 % CI 7.164-85.075, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR: 8.896; 95 % CI 1.203-65.779, dysphagia (OR: 7.652; 95 % CI 2.369- 24.720, history of heart failure (OR: 4.583; 95 % CI 1.240- 16.932 and dysarthria/severe motor aphasia (OR: 4.222; 95 % CI 1.374- 12.975. Conclusions: the resulting logistic regression model is valid for predicting post-stroke pneumonia based on data routinely acquired.

  16. Duration of hospitalization as a measure of cost on Children's Cancer Group acute lymphoblastic leukemia studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynon, P S; Bostrom, B C; Hutchinson, R J; Lange, B J; Nachman, J B; Steinherz, P G; Sensel, M G; Lee, M K; Stram, D O; Sather, H N

    2001-04-01

    We used duration of hospitalization as a surrogate for cost and event-free survival as a measure of effectiveness to estimate the cost-effectiveness ratios of various treatment regimens on Children's Cancer Group trials for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The analyses included 4,986 children (2 to 21 years of age) with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia enrolled onto risk-adjusted protocols between 1988 and 1995. Analyses were based on a model of 100 patients. The marginal cost-effectiveness ratio (hospital days per additional patient surviving event-free) was the difference in total duration of hospitalization divided by the difference in number of event-free survivors at 5 years for two regimens. Relapse-adjusted marginal cost of frontline therapy was the difference in total duration of hospitalization for frontline therapy plus relapse therapy divided by the difference in number of event-free survivors at 5 years on the frontline therapy for two regimens. One or two delayed intensification (DI) phases, augmented therapy, and dexamethasone all improved outcome. Marginal cost-effectiveness of these regimens compared with the control regimens was 133 days per patient for DI, 117 days per patient for double DI, and 41 days per patient for augmented therapy. Dexamethasone resulted in 17 fewer days per patient. Relapse-adjusted marginal costs were 68 days per patient for DI and 52 days for double DI. Augmented therapy and dexamethasone-based therapy resulted in 16 and 82 fewer hospital days, respectively. The estimated cost-effectiveness for treating any first relapse was 250 days per patient. DI, double DI, augmented therapy, and dexamethasone-based therapy are cost-effective strategies compared with current treatment of first relapse.

  17. Impact of adverse events on hospital disposition in community-dwelling seniors admitted to acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy; Guernsey, Judith Read; MacKinnon, Neil J; Kovacs, George

    2009-01-01

    Older adults (> or =65 years) have been identified as a high-risk group for the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) in hospital. The purpose of this paper is to describe the association between AEs and disposition for a population of hospitalized seniors. All community-dwelling seniors admitted to an acute care in-patient unit were eligible for inclusion in this retrospective cohort study conducted at an adult tertiary care facility in Atlantic Canada between July 1, 2005, and March 31, 2006. AEs were identified from administrative data using validated screening criteria derived from the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnosis and external cause of injury codes. Of the 982 eligible patients, 140 (14%) had evidence of at least one AE. There were 136 in-hospital deaths (14%). There was no significant difference in the proportion of deaths between those who experienced an AE and those who did not. However, of the 29 patients who were discharged to a long-term care facility, a significantly higher proportion had an in-hospital AE (6% versus 2%, p < .009). The potential contribution of an AE to the subsequent placement in a long-term care facility offers a compelling reason to develop prevention strategies for hospitalized seniors.

  18. Metabolic acidosis as a risk factor for the development of acute kidney injury and hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiachang; Wang, Yimei; Geng, Xuemei; Chen, Rongyi; Xu, Xialian; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lin, Jing; Teng, Jie; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2017-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis has been proved to be a risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease, but its relation to acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been investigated. In general, a diagnosis of metabolic acidosis is based on arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis, but the diagnostic role of carbon dioxide combining power (CO2CP) in the venous blood may also be valuable to non-respiratory patients. This retrospective study included all adult non-respiratory patients admitted consecutively to our hospital between October 01, 2014 and September 30, 2015. A total of 71,089 non-respiratory patients were included, and only 4,873 patients were evaluated by ABG analysis at admission. In patients with ABG, acidosis, metabolic acidosis, decreased HCO3(-) and hypocapnia at admission was associated with the development of AKI, while acidosis and hypocapnia were independent predictors of hospital mortality. Among non-respiratory patients, decreased CO2CP at admission was an independent risk factor for AKI and hospital mortality. ROC curves indicated that CO2CP was a reasonable biomarker to exclude metabolic acidosis, dual and triple acid-base disturbances. The effect sizes of decreased CO2CP on AKI and hospital mortality varied according to age and different underlying diseases. Metabolic acidosis is an independent risk factor for the development of AKI and hospital mortality. In non-respiratory patient, decreased CO2CP is also an independent contributor to AKI and mortality and can be used as an indicator of metabolic acidosis.

  19. The impact of the board's strategy-setting role on board-management relations and hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Vera Antonia; Schreyögg, Jonas; Schultz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate governance of hospitals largely depends on effective cooperation between governing boards and hospital management. Governing boards play an important role in strategy-setting as part of their support for hospital management. However, in certain situations, this active strategic role may also generate discord within this relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of the roles, attributes, and processes of governing boards on hospital performance. We examine the impact of the governing board's strategy-setting role on board-management collaboration quality and on financial performance while also analyzing the interaction effects of board diversity and board activity level. The data are derived from a survey that was sent simultaneously to German hospitals and their associated governing board, combined with objective performance information from annual financial statements and quality reports. We use a structural equation modeling approach to test the model. The results indicate that different board characteristics have a significant impact on hospital performance (R = .37). The strategy-setting role and board-management collaboration quality have a positive effect on hospital performance, whereas the impact of strategy-setting on collaboration quality is negative. We find that the positive effect of strategy-setting on performance increases with decreasing board diversity. When board members have more homogeneous backgrounds and exhibit higher board activity levels, the negative effect of the strategy-setting on collaboration quality also increases. Active strategy-setting by a governing board may generally improve hospital performance. Diverse members of governing boards should be involved in strategy-setting for hospitals. However, high board-management collaboration quality may be compromised if managerial autonomy is too highly restricted. Consequently, hospitals should support board-management collaboration about

  20. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners