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Sample records for acute generalized exanthematous

  1. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoroff, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    The key clinical features of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) are the acute occurrence of numerous pinhead-sized nonfollicular sterile pustules on an edematous erythema accompanied by fever and leukocytosis. Histology shows mainly spongiform subcorneal and/or intraepidermal pustules, frequently a marked edema of the papillary dermis, neutrophils, and often eosinophils. AGEP is a reaction pattern mostly caused by drugs, the ones with the highest risk being antibacterial agents like ampicillin/amoxicillin, and quinolones, pristinamycin, anti-infective sulfonamides, the antimycotic drug terbinafine, (hydroxy)chloroquine, and diltiazem. In addition, a large number of other drugs as well as infections have been reported as triggers. AGEP is an acute and sometimes severe reaction. When the causative agent is withdrawn, it usually resolves quickly without specific treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidoroff, A

    2014-05-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a reaction pattern mostly caused by drugs. It is characterized by the rapid occurrence of dozens to thousands pinhead-sized, non-follicular, sterile pustules on a slightly edematous erythematous base, commonly with accentuation in the major flexures and usually accompanied by a facial edema, fever and leukocytosis. Histology reveals spongiform subcorneal and/or intraepidermal pustules, an inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils and often eosinophils and frequently a marked edema of the papillary dermis. Even if in single case reports a large number of drugs has been described as triggers for AGEP, larger studies have revealed a list with an elevated risk to cause the reaction which includes antibacterial agents like ampicillin/amoxicillin, quinolones, pristinamycin, anti-infective sulfonamides, the antimycotic drug terbinafine, (hydroxy)chloroquine, and diltiazem. In some cases infections have been reported as triggers. AGEP is an acute and--especially in patients with concomitant diseases--sometimes severe reaction. Withdrawal of the causative agent usually leads to a rapid and complete resolution--even without further specific therapy.

  3. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis provoked by furosemide

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    Andżelika Schwann-Majewska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a skin disease characterized by the sudden appearance of generalized pustules, accompanied by elevated body temperature and neutrophilia. Objective. Presentation of a patient with AGEP provoked by furosemide. Case report. We present a case of a 65-year-old patient diagnosed with and treated for generalized pustular eruption, with fever and changes in laboratory tests. Numerous coexisting medical conditions and a great number of frequently changed drugs (ciprofloxacin, allopurinol, folic acid, calcium carbonate, cyclophosphamide, atorvastatin, betaxolol and furosemide hindered identification of the causative factor. Conclusions. On the basis of the medical history and clinical picture, the patient was diagnosed with generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by furosemide.

  4. [Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by piroxicam].

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    Bissinger, Ingrid; Matute-Turizo, Gustavo; Mejía-Barreneche, María Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Between 62 and 90% of cases of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis are caused by drugs. Its onset is rapid with generalized pustules, fever, and blood neutrophil count over 7000; pustules resolve spontaneously in less than 15 days. A case associated with piroxicam described. A 36-year-old with initial erythema of the thorax and abdomen, accompanied by burning, without fever, which later spread to his forearms, upper arms, and thighs, with face edema. A week earlier he had taken piroxicam for low back pain; at the time of hospitalization he received antihistamines, and topical and systemic steroids. Full blood count showed leukocytes at 8920, eosinophils at 600, neutrophils at 6600, total serum IgE at 188 UI, C-reactive protein at 2.9 mg/L, and no liver, kidney, or lung involvement. Treatment was initiated with intravenous antihistamines and ranitidine, saline, topical Vaseline plus topical mupirocin, and systemic steroids. On the second day of hospitalization neutrophils increased to 9000 and PCR to 3.3. The score to evaluate acute exanthematous pustulosis in the patient was 8, giving a definitive diagnosis. The differential diagnosis should be established primarily with pustular psoriasis. The prognosis is generally good, as reported.

  5. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to tetrazepam.

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    Thomas, E; Bellón, T; Barranco, P; Padial, A; Tapia, B; Morel, E; Alves-Ferreira, J; Martín-Esteban, M

    2008-01-01

    Tetrazepam is a benzodiazepine that is widely used in Spain as a muscle relaxant, with occasional cutaneous side effects. We report a patient who developed a generalized pruriginous cutaneous reaction compatible with acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) due to tetrazepam. Patch tests with bromazepam, diazepam, and tetrazepam were negative at 48 and 72 hours; however, the tetrazepam patch showed a positive reaction at 10 days. Immunohistochemical studies revealed a mononuclear infiltrate composed of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Analysis of interleukin (IL) 8 expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed increased IL-8 mRNA levels in patch test-positive skin. Lymphoblast transformation test (LTT) was positive with tetrazepam but not with diazepam. Positive patch test and LTT suggested that tetrazepam-specific lymphocytes might be responsible for a T cell-mediated reaction. These results support previous data suggesting an important role for IL-8 and drug-specific T cells in the pathogenesis ofAGEP and imply that the reaction was specific to tetrazepam with no cross-reactivity to other benzodiazepines.

  6. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP): A review and update.

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    Szatkowski, Jesse; Schwartz, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a severe cutaneous adverse reaction characterized by the rapid development of nonfollicular, sterile pustules on an erythematous base. It is attributed to drugs in the majority of cases. Antibiotics are the most common cause of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis; however, a wide variety of drugs has been associated with this condition. Typically, within 48 hours of ingesting the causative medication, there is acute onset of fever and pustulosis with leukocytosis. In severe cases there can be mucous membrane and systemic organ involvement. Histologic findings include intracorneal, subcorneal, and/or intraepidermal pustules with papillary dermal edema containing neutrophils and eosinophils. Treatment focuses on removal of the causative drug, supportive care, infection prevention, and the often beneficial use of a potent topical steroid. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Due to Oral Use of Blue Dyes

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    Sener, Osman; Kose, Ösman; Safali, Mukerrem

    2011-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare severe pustular cutaneous adverse reaction characterized by a rapid clinical course with typical histological findings. It is accompanied by fever and acute eruption of non-follicular pustules overlying erythrodermic skin. The causative agents are most frequently antibacterial drugs. We present a patient with acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by methylene blue and indigotin dyes. PMID:22016599

  8. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: report of 12 cases and literature review.

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    Guevara-Gutierrez, Elizabeth; Uribe-Jimenez, Elia; Diaz-Canchola, Margarita; Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto

    2009-03-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is an acute pustular eruption occurring after infection and/or drug ingestion, with spontaneous cure after a single eruption. To communicate a series of cases of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. A retrospective analysis was performed on cases of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, observed between 1993 and 2006 at the Dermatology Department, Hospital General de Occidente, Jalisco, Mexico. Twelve patients were included, with a predominance of male patients and a mean age of 28 years. The most common cause was drugs, detected in 83% of cases, and most of these were a result of anticonvulsants and antimicobials. The most frequent symptoms were itching, present in all cases, and fever, present in 92% of cases. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is considered to be a distinct clinical and histopathologic entity. Because of its self-resolving character, early recognition can help to avoid unnecessary diagnostic studies and treatments.

  9. The spectrum of histopathological features in acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis : a study of 102 cases

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    Halevy, S.; Kardaun, S. H.; Davidovici, B.; Wechsler, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare severe pustular reaction pattern with a typical clinical picture. Objectives To characterize the histopathological features of AGEP in a large series of cases with a validated diagnosis. Methods A multinational retrospective

  10. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Induced by Cefepime: A Case Report

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    L.F.F. Botelho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a rare cutaneous rash characterized by widespread sterile nonfollicular pustules. Cefepime is a fourth generation cephalosporin, used to treat severe infections. A 67-year-old man was admitted with acute gastroenterocolitis. On the seventh day, the patient developed a nosocomial pneumonia and cefepime was initiated. On the fourth day of cephalosporin treatment, he presented with a maculopapular, pruritic eruption affecting the face, neck, abdomen and limbs. One day later he developed disseminated pustular lesions and his temperature was 37°C. Laboratory analysis evidenced leukocytosis and skin biopsy showed subcorneal pustule, edema in the papillary dermis, perivascular inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils, leukocytoclasia and red cell extravasation in the epidermis. Cefepime was suspended and within 4 days the non-follicular pustules cleared following a desquamation. AGEP is a disease attributed to a variety of causes, but in 90% of the cases it is due to an adverse drug reaction. Antibiotics are implicated in 80% of these cases, mostly penicillins and macrolides. There are few cases associated with cephalosporins. It is very important to consider AGEP in cases of acute pustular rashes and drugs should be investigated as causative agents.

  11. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) triggered by a spider bite.

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    Makris, Michael; Spanoudaki, Nektaria; Giannoula, Fani; Chliva, Caterina; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios

    2009-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare and severe cutaneous reaction usually triggered by drugs. Other causative factors such as viral infections are rarely involved. In this study, we report a case of AGEP caused by a spider bite. A 56-year-old woman was referred to the allergy unit after a spider bite at the left popliteal fossa, while gardening, 5 days earlier. The offending spider was captured and identified by an entomologist as belonging to the Loxosceles rufescens species. No acute reaction was observed; however, after 24 hours, due to the occurrence of typical dermonecrotic skin lesions associated with erythema and edema, Cefuroxime and Clindamycin were administered intramuscularly after medical advice was given. Almost 72 hours after the spider bite, an erythematous and partly edematous eruption appeared locally in the gluteus area bilaterally, which progressively expanded to the trunk, arms and femors. Within 24 hours dozens of small, pinhead sized, non-follicular pustules were present, mainly in the folds. The patient complained of a burning sensation of the skin in addition to pruritus; and simultaneously had a fever of 38-39 degrees C as the eruption expanded. A spider bite may represent a possible causative factor of AGEP. A spider's venom contains sphingomyelinase that stimulates the release of IL8 and GM-CSF, which are involved in AGEP pathogenesis. Whether or not the con-current use of antibiotics has an effect in AGEP appearance when combined with a spider's venom, cannot be excluded.

  12. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by hydroxychloroquine: a case with atypical clinical presentation.

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    Duman, Hatice; Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Kocaturk, Emek; Cure, Kubra; Mansuroglu, Ilknur

    2017-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare drug-induced eruption that is characterized by acute, nonfollicular sterile pustules on an erythematous and edematous base. The most frequently implicated drugs are beta-lactam antibiotics. Hydroxychloroquine has been widely used to treat dermatologic and rheumatologic diseases and has been reported as a rare cause of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. A 42-year-old female presented with pustular lesions on the skin surface with erythema, facial edema, and occasional atypical target-like lesions after 21 days of treatment with 200mg/day hydroxychloroquine for rheumatoid arthritis, diagnosed one month previously. We report a case with acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by hydroxychloroquine and treated with dapsone and systemic corticosteroid.

  13. Case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by ampicillin/cloxacillin sodium in a pregnant woman.

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    Matsumoto, Yuka; Okubo, Yukari; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Tomonobu; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2008-06-01

    We report a case of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) induced by ampicillin/cloxacillin sodium (ABPC/MCIPC) in a pregnant woman. AGEP is caused mostly by drugs. Among them, beta-lactam antibiotics account for a high proportion of the cases, predominantly by amoxicillin. To our knowledge, this is only the second case ever reported in the Japanese language published work of AGEP induced by ABPC/MCIPC.

  14. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia in a child following Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

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    Lane, Leanna; McCoppin, Holly H; Dyer, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Previously reported cases of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis secondary to brown recluse spider bite have been questioned due to lack of identification of the spider or because of the concomitant administration of antibiotics. We report a 9-year-old boy who arrived at the emergency department with a confirmed Loxosceles reclusa bite to the neck. On the third day of hospitalization, he developed hundreds of monomorphous, sterile pustules, initially in intertriginous areas. The eruption disseminated and was followed by pinpoint desquamation typical for acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. During this he also developed late onset Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and systemic loxoscelism. Sphingomyelinase in Loxosceles venom induces the production of interleukin-8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, providing a mechanism by which Loxosceles reclusa bite may trigger acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. We suggest that this case adds Loxosceles envenomation to the spectrum of agents that can trigger acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Leucomycin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis complicated with pitting edema of the legs

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    Chu-Ju Hung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is characterized by fever, sterile nonfollicular pustules, and neutrophilia. More than 90% of cases of AGEP are induced by antibiotics such as aminopenicillins and macrolides. However, little is known about the side effects associated with leucomycin. To the best of our knowledge, the following case is the first one reporting leucomycin-induced AGEP. The case presented here is of a 43-year-old man who suffered from generalized pustulosis and severe leg edema 2 days after taking leucomycin for an upper respiratory tract infection. With discontinuation of leucomycin and a short course of systemic steroid treatment, these symptoms were gradually relieved.

  16. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis induced by the essential oil of Pistacia lentiscus.

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    Zaraa, I; Ben Taazayet, S; Trojjet, S; El Euch, D; Chelly, I; Haouet, S; Mokni, M; Ben Osman, A

    2012-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an uncommon pustular eruption characterized by small nonfollicular pustules on an erythematous background, sometimes associated with fever and neutrophilia. Over 90% of cases are drug-induced; however, it can be caused in rare cases by other agents. We report two cases of AGEP secondary to ingestion of Pistacia lentiscus essential oil, the first two such cases to our knowledge. The cutaneous morphology, disease course and histological findings were consistent with a definite diagnosis of AGEP, based on the criteria of the EuroSCAR study group. These two cases highlight the need to consider herbal extracts as a potential rare cause of AGEP and to ensure the safety of herbal medicines. © The Author(s). CED © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Induced by Cetirizine in a Child A Case Report

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    Gunseli Pancar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP, is a rare cutaneous rash characterized by widespread sterile non-follicular pustules. AGEP is a rare disease in childhood and it is often due to drugs. Antibiotics, sulphanamides and antipyretic-analgesics are the main reasons of this drug reaction . Cetirizine is a second generation antihistamine is often used in the treatment of angioedema, atopic dermatitis and urticaria in children. Cetirizine induced AGEP was not reported in the literature. In this case a twelve year old child was admitted with urticarial plaques located on her trunk. She developed maculopapular lesions and pustular eruption with Cetirizine (once a day treatment. Cetirizine was stopped and the nonfollicular pustules cleared with a desquamation. The result of the oral challenge test was positive. We present this rare case to show that the antihistamines (cetirizine may cause AGEP in childhood.

  18. T-cell involvement in drug-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis

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    Britschgi, Markus; Steiner, Urs C.; Schmid, Simone; Depta, Jan P.H.; Senti, Gabriela; Bircher, Andreas; Burkhart, Christoph; Yawalkar, Nikhil; Pichler, Werner J.

    2001-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an uncommon eruption most often provoked by drugs, by acute infections with enteroviruses, or by mercury. It is characterized by acute, extensive formation of nonfollicular sterile pustules on erythematous background, fever, and peripheral blood leukocytosis. We present clinical and immunological data on four patients with this disease, which is caused by different drugs. An involvement of T cells could be implied by positive skin patch tests and lymphocyte transformation tests. Immunohistochemistry revealed a massive cell infiltrate consisting of neutrophils in pustules and T cells in the dermis and epidermis. Expression of the potent neutrophil-attracting chemokine IL-8 was elevated in keratinocytes and infiltrating mononuclear cells. Drug-specific T cells were generated from the blood and skin of three patients, and phenotypic characterization showed a heterogeneous distribution of CD4/CD8 phenotype and of T-cell receptor Vβ-expression. Analysis of cytokine/chemokine profiles revealed that IL-8 is produced significantly more by drug-specific T cells from patients with AGEP compared with drug-specific T cells from patients that had non-AGEP exanthemas. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the involvement of drug-specific T cells in the pathomechanism of this rather rare and peculiar form of drug allergy. In addition, they indicate that even in some neutrophil-rich inflammatory responses specific T cells are engaged and might orchestrate the immune reaction. PMID:11390425

  19. Rapid Involution of Pustules during Topical Steroid Treatment of Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis

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    Christiane Kley

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a dramatic generalized pustular rash of severe onset, which is considered a serious cutaneous adverse reaction to drugs. However, even though the clinical features are impressive and are often accompanied by systemic inflammation, it can be controlled quickly and safely by topical steroids subsequent to interruption of the offending drug. Here, we describe the management of a case and the evolution of the pustular rash. An elderly woman consulted with a generalized crop of 2–3 mm, nonfollicular pustules on erythematous background. In the 4 preceding weeks, she had been using amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for a bacterial implant infection and rivaroxaban. The clinical EuroSCAR criteria including the histology confirmed AGEP. Her medication was stopped and topical clobetasol propionate was used. Within 24 h, the development of new pustules ceased and the patient was discharged after 7 days of hospitalization with only a faint, diffuse erythema and focal desquamation remaining. This and many other cases in the literature suggest that topical steroids should be considered as a first-line treatment option, especially as systemic steroids themselves can sometimes induce generalized pustulosis.

  20. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: report of five cases and systematic review of clinical and histopathological findings.

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    Vassallo, C; Derlino, F; Brazzelli, V; D'Ospina, R D; Borroni, G

    2014-06-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare, drug-related pustular eruption usually starting from folds with edema and erythema and with subsequent spreading. Clinically AGEP is characterized by the sudden appearance of dozen of sterile, non follicular, small pustules on erythematous and edematous skin. Mild non erosive mucosal involvement, mostly oral, may sometimes occur. Fever, neutrophilia and peripheral blood eosinophilia (in a third of patients) are present. Other skin signs such as facial edema, purpura, target-like lesions and blisters have been described but are not typical for AGEP. Diagnostic criteria for AGEP were established by an international committee of experts, the European Study of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions (EuroSCAR). The most relevant histopathological feature is represented by the detection of non-follicular subcorneal and/or intracorneal spongiform pustules that are usually large, contiguous and tend to coalesce. After elimination of the causative drug, pustules usually spontaneously disappear in a few days with desquamation and the reaction fully resolves within 15 days. Internal organs are not usually involved and no systemic treatment is required. Withdrawal of the culprit drug is mandatory. Although AGEP is a self-limiting disease with a favourable prognosis, secondary infections are a not infrequent complication in patients in poor general medical conditions. The reported mortality is about 5%. The most severe cases are associated with drug rechallenge.

  1. Severe flucloxacillin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)-like features : does overlap between AGEP and TEN exist? Clinical report and review of the literature

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    van Hattem, S.; Beerthuizen, G. I.; Kardaun, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are rare but severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions. Especially in TEN, large areas of the skin and mucosae may become detached. Although AGEP and SJS/TEN are distinct entities with

  2. Pustulosis exántematica aguda generalizada: Presentación de un caso y revisión de la literatura Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis: A case report and review of the literature

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    MS Meneses

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La pustulosis exantemática aguda generalizada (PEAG es una enfermedad poco frecuente, de patogenia desconocida, provocada generalmente por fármacos, entre los que se encuentran en primer lugar, los antibióticos del grupo de los betalactámicos. Se presenta el caso de una paciente con esta entidad, provocada por amoxicilina-clavulánico con gran extensión de las lesiones.Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a rare disease, with unknown pathogenesis, usually caused by drugs where we can find in the first place, antibiotics that are part of the betalactam group. A case of a patient with this entity, caused by amoxicillin-clavulanic with great extension of the lesions is reported.

  3. Pustulosis exantemática aguda generalizada asociada a Epstein Barr: A propósito de un caso. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated to Epstein Barr: A propose of a case

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    A L Scaglione

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La pustulosis exantemática aguda generalizada (PEAG es una rara afección de hipersensibilidad, inducida principalmente por drogas y se manifiesta por una erupción aguda de pústulas estériles, acompañada de fiebre, que regresa en pocos días luego de discontinuar el fármaco causante. Se comunica el caso de una paciente de 23 años de edad, sin antecedentes de psoriasis que consulta por fiebre y una erupción pustulosa generalizada, asociada a la ingesta previa de amoxicilina y ácido clavulánico en el contexto de una mononucleosis infecciosa, con resolución espontánea del cuadro. El cultivo microbiológico no objetivó gérmenes patógenos.Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a rare skin eruption most commonly caused by medications. It is characterized by an acute eruption of sterile pustules and it is accompanied by an episode of fever, which regresses a few days after discontinuation of the drug that caused the condition. We report a case 23 year-old woman without history of psoriasis, that consults for fever and an acute generalized pustular eruption after amoxicillin, with clavulanic acid administration in a mononucleosis infection context, which resolved spontaneously. The microbiologic culture was negative for pathogenic germens.

  4. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis induced by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia prophylaxis with dapsone.

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    Vas, A; Laws, P; Marsland, Am; McQuillan, O

    2013-09-01

    We describe the case of HIV-1 infected patient presenting to hospital with a severe cutaneous adverse drug reaction shortly after commencing dapsone therapy as Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia prophylaxis. To the best of our knowledge, acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis has not been reported as a reaction to dapsone in the setting of HIV.

  5. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Triggered by a Spider Bite

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    Michael Makris

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: A spider bite may represent a possible causative factor of AGEP. A spider's venom contains sphingomyelinase that stimulates the release of IL8 and GM-CSF, which are involved in AGEP pathogenesis. Whether or not the con-current use of antibiotics has an effect in AGEP appearance when combined with a spider's venom, cannot be excluded.

  6. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis and other severe drug eruptions from over the counter medications: A case report and review of the literature.

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    Kline, Amy; Fischer, Gayle

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis in an 11-year-old girl who used Duro-Tuss, an over-the-counter cough mixture containing pholcodine, and present a comprehensive review of the literature on severe drug reactions resulting from using non-prescription medications. This case reinforces the importance of taking a complete medication history. © 2015 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  7. Acute Paraplegia After General Anesthesia

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    Gholam Hossein Ghaedi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute paraplegia is a rare but catastrophic complication of surgeries performed on aorta and corrective operations of vertebral column. Trauma to spinal cord after spinal anesthesia and ischemia of spinal cord also may lead to acute paraplegia. Acute paraplegia as a complication of general anesthesia in surgeries performed on sites other than aorta and vertebral column is very rare. Here we present a 56 year old woman with acute paraplegia due to spinal cord infarction after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia probably caused by atherosclerosis of feeding spinal arteries and ischemia of spinal cord after reduction of blood flow possibly due to hypotension during general anesthesia.

  8. Acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis secondary to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-02

    Nov 2, 2012 ... Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADRs) are a common complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and of drugs used to treat opportunistic infections.1 The common clinical manifestations range from mild maculopapular eruptions to the more severe recognised spectrum of Stevens-Johnson. Syndrome ...

  9. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  10. General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Acute Neck Pain in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Vos (Kees)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractWe performed a prospective cohort study with one-year follow-up of patients with acute neck pain in general practice. Patients above 18 years of age consulting their GP for non-specific acute neck pain lasting no longer than six weeks were invited to participate. Self-administered

  12. [Approach of acute bronchitis in general practice].

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    Rausch, S

    2010-09-01

    Acute bronchitis is a frequent infection in general practice. Its origin is usually viral, but frequently, antibiotics are prescribed in this situation, without any clinical benefit. There are several reasons for this, the most important is probably the difficulty of GP's to distinguish on clinical ground alone between "viral type, meaning spontaneously healing ", and "bacterial type, meaning potentially dangerous" acute respiratory infections. The emergence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics is defined by the W.H.O. as a major problem of public health. One of the most important measures is the diminution of antibiotic prescriptions. The approach outlined here will help this purpose. The combination of four clinical parameters (fever acute bronchitis being sufficiently characteristic of "a viral type" of infection. In case of doubt, the measurement of the CRP, allows to avoid antibiotics if the value is normal (or slightly elevated). This approach is valuable in adults with an otherwise normal health, outside severe chronic illness (which could weaken immunity) and for adults <65 years of age.

  13. Acute referral of patients from general practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer Mogensen, Christian; Mortensen, Anne Mette; Staehr, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the most efficient organization of admissions to an emergency hospital. It is important to know, who should be in front when the GP requests an acute admission. The aim of the study was to analyse how experienced ED nurses perform when assessing requests...

  14. Guidelines prescribed by general practitioners to patients with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guidelines prescribed by general practitioners to patients with acute low back pain regarding “return to work”. PA Hough, FC Van Rooyen, E Bredenkamp, K Brough, M Ferreira, H Myburgh, C Snyman, C Van Niekerk ...

  15. Nested-multiplex PCR detection of Orthopoxvirus and Parapoxvirus directly from exanthematic clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trindade Giliane S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Orthopoxvirus (OPV and Parapoxvirus (PPV have been associated with worldwide exanthematic outbreaks. Some species of these genera are able to infect humans and domestic animals, causing serious economic losses and public health impact. Rapid, useful and highly specific methods are required to detect and epidemiologically monitor such poxviruses. In the present paper, we describe the development of a nested-multiplex PCR method for the simultaneous detection of OPV and PPV species directly from exanthematic lesions, with no previous viral isolation or DNA extraction. Methods and Results The OPV/PPV nested-multiplex PCR was developed based on the evaluation and combination of published primer sets, and was applied to the detection of the target pathogens. The method showed high sensitivity, and the specificity was confirmed by amplicon sequencing. Exanthematic lesion samples collected during bovine vaccinia or contagious ecthyma outbreaks were submitted to OPV/PPV nested-multiplex PCR and confirmed its applicability. Conclusion These results suggest that the presented multiplex PCR provides a highly robust and sensitive method to detect OPV and PPV directly from clinical samples. The method can be used for viral identification and monitoring, especially in areas where OPV and PPV co-circulate.

  16. Acute dermatomyositis associated with generalized subcutaneous edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Hong; Lim, Sung-Ryoun; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Lee, Kyung-Ju; Myung, Dae-Seong; Jeong, Hae-Chang; Yoon, Woong; Lee, Shin-Seok; Park, Yong-Wook

    2008-06-01

    Generalized subcutaneous edema is an uncommon manifestation of inflammatory myopathy. We report a 48-year-old female patient who presented with severe generalized edema, an erythematous skin rash, dysphagia and proximal muscle weakness. She was diagnosed with dermatomyositis from the clinical signs, increased muscle enzymes, electromyographic findings and a muscle biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased signal intensity in the muscular and subcutaneous layers. The conditions causing generalized edema were excluded. It was concluded that the generalized edema was secondary to dermatomyositis. Aggressive treatments with high-dose glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents were used to control the severe subcutaneous edema.

  17. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Due to Labetalol; Drug Fever and Leukocytosis Caused by Tigecycline; Toxic Hepatitis Induced by Methylprednisolone Intravenous Pulse Dosing; Mitoxantrone-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw; Medications with Anticholinergic Effects and Their Implications in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancano, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Med Watch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to Med Watch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA's Med Watch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA Med Watch partner. PMID:27354743

  18. Acute dermatomyositis with subcutaneous generalized edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner de Castro, Gláucio R; Appenzeller, Simone; Bértolo, Manoel B; Costallat, Lílian T L

    2006-11-01

    The authors report a 40-year-old Caucasian man with relapsing muscle and skin involvement of dermatomyositis treated with high-dose corticosteroids, taken orally, and methotrexate and human gamma globulin, both administered intravenously. After 4 months of aggressive treatment, he presented with generalized edema, considered secondary to dermatomyositis. Aggressive immunosuppression did not stop disease progression. The literature concerning anasarca due to inflammatory myopathies is revised.

  19. General Information about Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... General information about clinical trials is also available. Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia may include the ... information about clinical trials is also available. Recurrent Acute Promyelocytic ... of recurrent acute promyelocytic leukemia may include ...

  20. [Antibiotic prescribing in acute respiratory tract infections in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, S; Bjerrum, L; Feja, C; Lallana, M J; Poncel, A; Rabanaque, M J

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a worldwide threat to public health. Acute respiratory tract infections are the main reason for antibiotic prescribing in the Spanish paediatric population. The aim of the study was to describe the frequency of antibiotic prescription and their pattern of use in acute respiratory tract infections diagnosed in children in Primary Care in Aragón (Spain). A study was conducted over a 1-year period on children between 0 and 14 years-old, recording all episodes of acute otitis, acute pharyngotonsillitis, non-specific upper respiratory infection, and acute bronchitis. The proportion of episodes within each diagnosis receiving an antibiotic prescription was calculated, and the prescribing pattern was determined. Half (50%) of the children in Aragón were diagnosed with a respiratory tract infection during the study period. Non-specific upper respiratory infection was the most frequent diagnosis. An antibiotic was prescribed in 75% of pharyngotonsillitis episodes, 72% of otitis, 27% of bronchitis, and 16% of non-specific upper respiratory infections. Broad spectrum antibiotics, mainly amoxicillin and amoxicillin-clavulanic, were predominantly prescribed. Antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections in children was generally high, and the choice of antibiotics was probably inappropriate in a high percentage of cases. Therefore an improvement in antibiotic prescribing in children appears to be needed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Generalized acute mucocutaneous herpes simplex type 2 with fatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopyan, L; Young, A W; Menegus, M

    1977-06-01

    To our knowledge, we present the first culturally documented case of generalized acute mucocutaneous herpes simplex type 2 in an immunosuppressed adult who died during the course of the disease. The picture of the clinical spectrum of herpetic disease in immunosuppressed patients is detailed, and the need for typing the virus, particularly in the disseminated form, and for clarifying possible differences in epidemiology, clinical expression, and prognosis is emphasized.

  2. The outcomes of the elderly in acute care general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Louis, E; Sudarshan, M; Al-Habboubi, M; El-Husseini Hassan, M; Deckelbaum, D L; Razek, T S; Feldman, L S; Khwaja, K

    2016-02-01

    Elderly patients form a growing subset of the acute care surgery (ACS) population. Older age may be associated with poorer outcomes for some elective procedures, but there are few studies focusing on outcomes for the elderly ACS population. Our objective is to characterize differences in mortality and morbidity for acute care surgery patients >80 years old. A retrospective review of all ACS admissions at a large teaching hospital over 1 year was conducted. Patients were classified into non-elderly (4 days) hospital stay (p = 0.05), increased postoperative complications (p = 0.002), admission to the ICU (p = 0.002), and were more likely to receive a non-operative procedure (p = 0.003). No difference was found (p = NS) for patient flow factors such as time to consult general surgery, time to see consult by general surgery, and time to operative management and disposition. Compared to younger patients admitted to an acute care surgery service, patients over 80 years old have a higher risk of complications, are more likely to require ICU admission, and stay longer in the hospital.

  3. Management of acute rhinosinusitis in Danish general practice: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen JG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Jens Georg HansenDepartment of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital and Aalborg Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkPurpose: To evaluate whether the ongoing debate over diagnostic problems and treatment choices for acute rhinosinusitis has had any influence on the management of the disease.Methods: We randomly selected 300 Danish general practitioners (GPs from the files of the Research Unit for General Practice at Aarhus University. Invitations to participate and a questionnaire were sent to the GPs by mail.Results: A total of 149 (49% GPs answered the questionnaire. When asked about symptoms, the highest priority was given to sinus pain and signs of tenderness. The most frequent examinations were objective examination of the ear-nose-throat (ENT, palpation of the maxillofacial area, and C-reactive protein point-of-care testing (or CRP rapid test. Nearly all GPs prescribed local vasoconstrictors, and in 70% of cases, antibiotics were prescribed. Phenoxymethylpenicillin was the preferred antibiotic. Use of the CRP rapid test, years in practice, or employment in an ENT department did not have a significant impact on the diagnostic certainty and antibiotic prescribing rate.Conclusion: The clinical diagnoses are based on a few symptoms, signs, and the CRP rapid test. Other examinations, including imaging techniques, are seldom used. Phenoxymethylpenicillin is the preferred antibiotic, and the GPs' diagnostic certainty was 70%.Keywords: general practice, acute rhinosinusitis, diagnosis, treatment, antibiotic

  4. Perception of patient safety culture in Slovenian acute general hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of this research was to measure patient safety culture in all Slovenian acute general hospitals.Methods: The hospital survey on patient safety culture questionnaire developed by researchers at Westat was used. Prior to this study, the questionnaire was psychometrically tested in three pilot hospitals and the results showed no need to modify the original model for the Slovene setting. Responses were scored on the 5-level Likert scale. The questionnaire was distributed to all hospital staff. After the exclusion of 159 questionnaires, which did not fulfil the inclusion criteria, 2932 (48.5 % questionnaires were analysed. Descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis, reliability of the scales, and construct validity were computed. For each item the percentage of positive, neutral and negative responses were calculated. Areas for improvement were defined as those answered positively by 50 % or less of the respondents. With one-way analysis of variance a comparison of the means among different sizes of the hospitals was performed.Results: The confirmative factor analysis showed adequate fit for the model and the questionnaire reliability was also adequate. The average positive percentage for all 12 composites was 53 %. Composite scores of patient safety culture revealed that none reached the level that would establish safety strengths. Statistically significant differences of means for hospital size were found (d.f. 2, 337,006; p < 0,0005 but were practically unimportant.Conclusion: The survey showed overall low patient safety culture, however it has provided the first insight into patient safety culture in acute general hospitals in Slovenia with several opportunities for improvement.

  5. Asthma in adult patients presenting with symptoms of acute bronchitis in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, HA; Postma, DS; de Bock, GH; Huysman, DAN; van Houwelingen, HC; Springer, MP

    Objectives - To investigate the association between asthma and acute bronchitis in adults and to ascertain criteria to help general practitioners (GPs) differentiate between acute bronchitis and asthma. Design - Descriptive study. Setting - Primary health care centre in The Netherlands. Patients -

  6. Magnet hospital characteristics in acute general hospitals in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Maureen; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate characteristics of the nursing practice environment and the impact of organizational structures and processes on nursing in 11 major acute general hospitals in Ireland from the perspective of staff-nurses (n = 368) and Directors of Nursing (n = 10). The study was descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative. The Nursing Work Index-Revised (NWI-R) and an instrument developed by Havens were used and Directors of Nursing supplied hospital documentary evidence of organizational structures and processes. A convenience sample of 368 staff-nurses and 10 Directors of Nursing, participated. Staff-nurses had a moderately positive perception of relationships with doctors (2.77); autonomy in practice (2.56); organizational support (2.51) and control over practice settings (2.35). A significant statistical difference was found between the practice environments in the 11 hospitals, particularly in relation to organizational support (P = 0.001); control over practice setting (P = 0.003); nurse autonomy (P = 0.004) and nurse-doctor relationships (P = 0.024). When comparisons were made with US Magnet hospital research findings, lower scores on all dimensions of professional practice environment were achieved by Irish nurses.

  7. Gout - a guide for the general and acute physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Roddy, Edward; Doherty, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Gout is the most prevalent inflammatory arthritis and affects 2.5% of the general population in the UK. It is also the only arthritis that has the potential to be cured with safe, inexpensive and well tolerated urate-lowering treatments, which reduce serum uric acid by either inhibiting xanthine oxidase - eg allopurinol, febuxostat - or by increasing the renal excretion of uric acid. Of these, xanthine oxidase inhibitors are used first line and are effective in 'curing' gout in the vast majority of patients. Gout can be diagnosed on clinical grounds in those with typical podagra. However, in those with involvement of other joints, joint aspiration is recommended to demonstrate monosodium urate crystals and exclude other causes of acute arthritis, such as septic arthritis. However, a clinical diagnosis of gout can be made if joint aspiration is not feasible. This review summarises the current understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, investigations and treatment of gout. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. A high incidence of exanthematous eruption associated with niacin/laropiprant combination in Hong Kong Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y-L; Hu, M; Chang, M; Tomlinson, B

    2013-12-01

    Niacin commonly causes cutaneous flushing, which is partially alleviated by laropiprant, a selective antagonist of prostaglandin D2 at the DP1 receptor. Here we report an unusually high incidence of exanthematous eruption associated with the use of the extended-release (ER) niacin/laropiprant combination treatment in Hong Kong Chinese patients. Among 201 patients treated with ER niacin/laropiprant 1000/20 mg over 7 days to assess flushing symptoms and 166 of the patients who continued the treatment for 12 weeks (doubling the dose after 4 weeks), 28 patients (14%) developed a highly pruritic cutaneous eruption at a mean of 5 days after starting the treatment or 4 days after increasing the dose. This resolved over several days after drug withdrawal with symptomatic treatment. Compared with the subjects who completed 12-weeks treatment uneventfully, those who developed cutaneous eruption were older, had significantly lower body weight, were taking background lipid-lowering treatment more frequently and had greater flushing responses in the first few days of treatment. The relationship of the exanthematous eruption with lower body weight and the increase in dosage suggests a pharmacokinetic effect that may be related to increased exposure to niacin or its metabolites and provoked by inhibition of the DP1 receptor with laropiprant, as we have not seen this rash with niacin used alone. This may suggest that the southern Chinese population may have some genetic predisposition; as such, a high frequency of exanthematous reactions has not been reported in other populations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Treatment of acute otitis media in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plejdrup Hansen, Malene; Jarbol, Dorte Ejg; Gahrn-Hansen, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Recommendations for antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) have changed over the years, and today many experts recommend initial observation. However, antibiotic prescribing should be considered in children aged......Recommendations for antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) have changed over the years, and today many experts recommend initial observation. However, antibiotic prescribing should be considered in children aged...

  10. [The practice guideline 'Acute cough' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    The practice guideline 'Acute cough' from the Dutch College of General Practitioners stresses the fact that a cough of less than 3 weeks' duration seldom heralds serious pathology. However, for sound reassurance of patients presenting with a cough of short duration, the general practitioner needs to

  11. Manifestações articulares nas viroses exantemáticas Joint complaints in exanthematic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Artimos de Oliveira

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A freqüência de manifestações articulares foi avaliada em 251 pacientes com diagnóstico clínico e laboratorial (detecção de IgM por ensaio imunoenzimático de virose exantemática. As artropatias (artralgia e/ou artrite foram mais observadas nos casos de dengue (49% e de rubéola (38,2% do que naqueles com parvovirose humana (30% e sarampo (28,1%. Com exceção do sarampo, as artropatias predominaram nos adultos (315 anos de idade, sendo tal diferença estatisticamente significativa. A ocorrência maior de artropatias em adultos foi mais evidente nos pacientes com parvovirose (75%, rubéola (65% e dengue (57,7% do que naqueles com sarampo (31%. As queixas articulares também predominaram nos pacientes do sexo feminino para todas as viroses avaliadas. Os resultados encontrados demonstram o freqüente acometimento articular nas doenças estudadas, e indicam a necessidade de comprovação laboratorial para o diagnóstico diferencial entre elas.The frequency of arthropathy was evaluated in 251 patients with clinical and serological diagnosis (specific IgM detection by enzyme immunoassay of exanthematic disease. Arthropathy (arthralgia and/or arthritis was more frequent in dengue fever (49% and rubella (38.2% cases than in human parvovirus (30% and measles (28.1% cases. Except for measles cases, joint complaints prevailed in adults (315 years of age and this difference was significant. The higher frequency of arthropathy in adults was more evident in human parvovirus (75%, rubella (65% and dengue fever (57.7% cases than in measles cases (31%. Arthropathy was also more frequent in females for all rash diseases studied. The results of this study showed the high occurrence of joint complaints in the diseases described here and the importance of laboratory confirmation for their differential diagnosis.

  12. Quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars; Arpi, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To develop quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections, tailored to the Danish general practice setting. Design: A RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used. Setting: General practice. Subjects: A panel of nine experts, mainly...... general practitioners, was asked to rate the relevance of 64 quality indicators for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute respiratory tract infections based on guidelines. Subsequently, a face-to-face meeting was held to resolve misinterpretations and to achieve consensus. Main outcome measures...... with acute respiratory tract infections and to identify where there is a need for future quality improvements....

  13. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear...... if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456...... prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second...

  14. Acute pain management in general practice: steps to effective pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pain is one of the most common complaints that general practitioners encounter in everyday practice. The swift and effective management of pain is a medical mandate, not only to fulfil an ethical obligation to the patient, but also to prevent long-term complications, such as chronic pain. General practitioners are often ...

  15. Acute pain management in general practice: Steps to effective pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pain is one of the most common complaints that general practitioners encounter in everyday practice. The swift and effective management of pain is a medical mandate, not only to fulfil an ethical obligation to the patient, but also to prevent long-term complications, such as chronic pain. General practitioners are often ...

  16. Acute bronchitis: general practitioners' views regarding diagnosis and treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, T.J.M.; Hermans, J.; Kaptein, A.A.; Wijkel, D.; Mulder, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    A survey was conducted among 800 Dutch general practitioners to establish their views on the diagnosis and treatment of bronchitis and related disorders with reference to 12 theoretical patients. The answers of the 467 respondents (response rate 60%) showed no clear relationship between signs and

  17. Emergency medicine and "acute" general practice: comparing apples with oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, S; Cunningham, P; Talbot-Stern, J; Walker, S

    2000-01-01

    Emergency Departments (EDs) operate at the interface between the inpatient and ambulatory sectors of health care. Because of shared funding between the Commonwealth and States for ambulatory care, there has been intense focus on the ED patient population, and the potential to shift the locus of care for non-inpatients. One of the frequently cited models for the provision of after-hours GP services is the Balmain General Practice Casualty (GPC). This paper analyses the GPC model, looking in detail at casemix, clinical quality, waiting times and cost-effectiveness. It is argued that the services provided and the casemix of the patient population of GPC and EDs are distinctly different. Cost-effectiveness for GPC has not been objectively established. Health service planning should recognise the distinct but complementary roles of general practice and emergency medicine. Evaluation of alternative models of service provision should critically examine the available evidence, and comparisons should be based on a precise analysis of equivalent services.

  18. MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES IN ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN CELJE GENERAL HOSPITAL IN 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Veninšek

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. DIGAMI study showed that intrahospital mortality and mortality at one year after myocardial infarction can be significantly reduced in diabetics treated in acute phase of myocardial infarction by GI infusion and afterwards for at least three months with intensive insulin treatment. Mortality can be reduced for more than 50% in a subgroup of patients younger than 70 years, without congestive heart failure, with first myocardial infarction, not treated with insulin or digitalis. In this perspective we reviewed treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in 1999 in Celje General Hospital.Methods. We reviewed documentation of treatment of all diabetics with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. We collected data on number of newly discovered diabetes, on previous treatment of diabetes, on treatment of diabetes during hospitalization and at discharge, on drugs used for treatment of diabetes and on mortality during hospitalization.Results. Diabetics presented 20% of all patients with acute myocardial infarction treated in Celje General Hospital in 1999. None of patients received GI infusion, none had intensively managed blood sugar. 24% of patients were treated with sulfonylureas in acute phase of myocardial infarction. 33% of patients were discharged from hospital with insulin therapy. Intrahospital mortality was 9%, comparable with patients without diabetes.Conclusions. In 1999 was intrahospital treatment of diabetics with acute myocardial infarction in Celje General Hospital successful as their intrahospital mortality equaled non-diabetics. Treatment of diabetes itself, during hospitalization and after discharge, on the other hand, in 1999 had not been up to date according to results of recent studies. In our opinion, it is mandatory for diabetologist to make part of the team that treats diabetic with acute myocardial infarction

  19. An analysis of acute admissions to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid turnover of patients in a general hospital psychiatric unit demands stabilization and discharge as soon as possible. It is likely that patients are being prematurely discharged because of this pressure. Aim: The study sought to analyse admissions to an acute psychiatric unit with a view to determining the demographic ...

  20. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections in general practices - The Netherlands, winter 1997/98

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen MLA; Bartelds AIM; Wilbrink B; Verweij C; Bijlsma K; Nat H van der; Boswijk H; Boer AB de; Sprenger MJW; Dorigo-Zetsma JW; NIVEL; CIE; NIVEL; LIS

    1999-01-01

    To provide insight into the virological aetiology of influenza-like illnesses and other acute respiratory infections, nose/throat swabs were taken by 30 general practitioners of the sentinel surveillance network of the Netherlands Institute of Primary Health Care from a random selection of patients

  1. Antibiotic prescription patterns of South African general medical practitioners for treatment of acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, N B Q; Solanki, G C; Kredo, T; Lalloo, R

    2017-01-30

    Antibiotic resistance is a significant public health problem. Prudent use of antibiotics is crucial in reducing this resistance. Acute bronchitis is a common reason for consultations with general medical practitioners, and antibiotics are often prescribed even though guidelines recommend not prescribing them for uncomplicated acute bronchitis. To analyse the antibiotic prescription patterns of South African (SA) general medical practitioners in the treatment of acute bronchitis. The 2013 claims for members of 11 health insurance schemes were analysed to assess antibiotic prescription patterns for patients diagnosed with acute bronchitis. The patterns were assessed by type of bronchitis, chronic health status of the patients, sex and age group. The types of antibiotic prescribed were also analysed. Of 166 821 events analysed, an antibiotic was prescribed in more than half (52.9%). There were significant differences by type of bronchitis and chronic health status. Patients with viral bronchitis were more likely to be prescribed an antibiotic than those with bacterial bronchitis (odds ratio (OR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08 - 1.26). Patients with a chronic illness were less likely to be prescribed an antibiotic than those without (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.57 - 0.60). More than 70% of the antibiotics prescribed were cephalosporins, penicillins and other beta-lactams. Prescription rates of antibiotics for acute bronchitis by SA general medical practitioners are high. There is an urgent need to follow the guidelines for antibiotic use for acute bronchitis to reduce the likelihood of increasing resistance to available antibiotics.

  2. [Generalized gingival enlargement--early clinic manifestation in acute leukemia. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogălniceanu, D; Trandafir, Violeta; Trandafir, Daniela; Popescu, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia is a hematological disorder arises from a hematopoietic stem cell characterized by a disordered differentiation and proliferation of neoplastic cells. Rapidly forming generalized gingival hyperplasia is usually the first sign of this disease (especially in acute forms). This case report describes a 54-year-old female who presented rapid gingival enlargement in only three weeks time, heralding the presence of acute monocytic leukemia (AML-FAB M5). The patient was immediately referred for hematologic management, but died five weeks later. Dentists and generalists should always be on guard to observe any oral manifestations that may lead to the early diagnostic of systemic diseases.

  3. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    French, Simon D; McKenzie, Joanne E; O'Connor, Denise A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP) in general practice. Methods: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (cont...

  4. Acute Generalized Erythrodermic Pustular Psoriasis Associated with Bupropion/Naltrexone (Contrave®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka A; Cassel, Kerry P; Moscati, Ronald M; Eckersley, David

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of erythrodermic pustular psoriasis associated with initiation of bupropion/naltrexone (Contrave®; Orexigen Therapeutics, La Jolla, CA) in a patient with no history of psoriasis. A 55-year-old woman was transferred to our tertiary medical center from a community hospital for possible Stevens-Johnson syndrome 3 weeks after initiation of bupropion/naltrexone. The patient was admitted to the burn unit for wound treatment and hydration. She received intravenous cyclosporine during the admission that resulted in acute kidney injury and the therapy was discontinued. The skin biopsy ruled out Stevens-Johnson syndrome and was more consistent with generalized pustular psoriasis. After discharge, the patient followed up with her dermatologist. She was diagnosed with acute generalized and erythrodermic psoriasis and the patient was restarted on cyclosporine 100 mg twice a day. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Few case reports of bupropion-induced generalized pustular psoriasis and erythrodermic psoriasis in patients with a history of psoriasis have been reported. To our knowledge, acute generalized erythrodermic pustular psoriasis associated with bupropion/naltrexone has not been reported in a patient without history of psoriasis. Due to increases in obesity and increases in prescribing of bupropion/naltrexone SR, health care providers should be aware of this possible severe adverse reaction. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blankenship Charles L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage.

  6. Nontrauma emergency surgery: optimal case mix for general surgery and acute care surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Miller, Barbra S; Doherty, Gerard M; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hemmila, Mark R; Park, Pauline K; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Sihler, Kristen C; Wahl, Wendy L; Wang, Stewart C; Napolitano, Lena M

    2011-11-01

    To examine the case mix and patient characteristics and outcomes of the nontrauma emergency (NTE) service in an academic Division of Acute Care Surgery. An NTE service (attending, chief resident, postgraduate year-3 and postgraduate year-2 residents, and two physician assistants) was created in July 2005 for all urgent and emergent inpatient and emergency department general surgery patient consults and admissions. An NTE database was created with prospective data collection of all NTE admissions initiated from November 1, 2007. Prospective data were collected by a dedicated trauma registrar and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-intensive care unit (ICU) coordinator daily. NTE case mix and ICU characteristics were reviewed for the 2-year time period January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2009. During the same time period, trauma operative cases and procedures were examined and compared with the NTE case mix. Thousand seven hundred eight patients were admitted to the NTE service during this time period (789 in 2008 and 910 in 2009). Surgical intervention was required in 70% of patients admitted to the NTE service. Exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopy was performed in 449 NTE patients, comprising 37% of all surgical procedures. In comparison, only 118 trauma patients (5.9% of admissions) required a major laparotomy or thoracotomy during the same time period. Acuity of illness of NTE patients was high, with a significant portion (13%) of NTE patients requiring ICU admission. NTE patients had higher admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scores [61.2 vs. 58.8 (2008); 58.2 vs. 55.8 (2009)], increased mortality [(9.71% vs. 4.89% (2008); 6.78% vs. 5.16% (2009)], and increased readmission rates (15.5% vs. 7.4%) compared with the total surgical ICU (SICU) admissions. In an era of declining operative caseload in trauma, the NTE service provides ample opportunity for complex general surgery decision making and operative procedures for

  7. Long-term prognosis of acute back pain in patients seen in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge; Hansen, Vivian Kjær

    1999-01-01

    practice in Denmark. The patients were those aged 18-60 years consulting their GP due to an episode of LBP lasting less than 2 weeks. The GPs collected data regarding 34 exposure variables, including their global assessment of the likelihood of chronic LBP. Outcome variables were collected from......OBJECTIVES: We aimed to examine the prognosis of acute low back pain (LBP) in patients in general practice and to identify prognostic factors associated with the long-term prognosis based on information immediately available to the GP. METHOD: We conducted a prospective cohort study in general...... to develop chronic LBP and (iii) a history of LBP having caused previous sick leave. CONCLUSIONS: LBP in general practice has a good prognosis with regard to sick leave, but a high proportion of patients continue to complain of LBP. We were not able to identify objective measures that strongly predict...

  8. Outcome after acute myocardial infarction: a comparison of patients seen by cardiologists and general physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanka David

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI has improved over the last 50 years with the more frequent use of effective medicines and procedures. The clinical benefit of the speciality of the attending physician is less clear. The United Kingdom National Service Framework for coronary heart disease (CHD suggested that patients with CHD are likely to benefit from cardiological supervision. We set out to assess the effect of access to cardiologists on survival among AMI patients admitted in two UK hospitals. Methods The study was conducted in a university hospital and a district general hospital in England. Information was obtained on age, sex, ethnicity, Carstairs socioeconomic deprivation category derived from postcode of residence, comorbidity, distance from hospital and medication from all patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction in two acute trusts between July 1999 and June 2000. Record linkage to subsequent Hospital Episode Statistics and Registrar General's death records provided follow up information on procedures and mortality up to eighteen months after admission. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the main hypothesis controlling for confounding. The main outcome measure was 18-month survival after myocardial infarction. Results Access to a cardiologist was univariately associated with improved survival (hazard ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.25. This effect remained after controlling for the effect of patient characteristics (hazard ratio 0.22, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.25. The effect disappeared after controlling for access to effective medication (hazard ratio 0.70, 95% CI 0.33 to 1.46. Conclusions Access to a cardiologist is associated with better survival compared to no access to a cardiologist among a cohort of patients already admitted with AMI. This effect is mainly due to the more frequent use of effective medicines by the group referred to cardiologists. Hospitals may improve

  9. Generalized Safety and Efficacy of Simplified Intravenous Thrombolysis Treatment (SMART) Criteria in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sigrid B; Barazangi, Nobl; Chen, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) exclusion criteria may substantially limit the use of thrombolysis. Preliminary data have shown that the SMART (Simplified Management of Acute stroke using Revised Treatment) criteria greatly expand patient...... eligibility by reducing thrombolysis exclusions, but they have not been assessed on a large scale. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of general adoption of SMART thrombolysis criteria to a large regional stroke network. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who received IV thrombolysis...... application of SMART criteria is safe and effective. Widespread application of these criteria could substantially increase the proportion of patients who might qualify for treatment....

  10. DETECTION OF CASES OF PARVOVIRUS INFECTION IN THE SYSTEM FOR EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEILLANCE OF EXANTHEMATIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Lavrentyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The drastic decrease of the incidence of Measles and Rubella at the stage of elimination of these infections is notified on the territory of North- Western Federal Region (NWFR of Russia. At the same time the number of cases with the error clinical diagnosis of Measles and Rubella increased. The most frequent error is the infection caused by Parvovirus (PVI. The disease is of the independent particular medical and social significance for obstetrics, maternity and childhood protection, blood donation service, transplantation of organs/tissue etc. The aim of the current study was to estimate the prevalence of PVI on the territory of NWFR of Russia in different periods of 2009–2012 and 2015–2016. The data of the laboratory diagnosis of PVI for patients with exanthema were analyzed. Materials and methods. The serum specimens of patients with exanthema from bank of sera of St. Petersburg Subnational Measles/Rubella laboratory, collected in 2009–2012 (n = 495 and in 2015 (n = 336 as well as 69 sera of patients with exanthema from the “Infectious Disease Hospital N30” in St. Petersburg, collected in March-May, 2016 were studied. The specific IgM-PV B19 antibodies were determined by the «recomWELL Parvovirus B19 IgM» (MICROGEN GmbH, Germany ELISA test-system. The presen ce of the specific IgM-PV B19 antibodies in sera of patients was the evidence of the acute PVI. Results. The obtained results demonstrated the prevalence of PVI on the territory of NWFR. In 2009–2012 as well as in 2015 years PVI was revealed on the overwhelming majority (9 of 11 of administrative territories of the NWFR. The essential predominance of PVI was determined in St. Petersburg and bordering territories of NWFR (Kaliningrad Oblast’, Leningrad Oblast’, Republic of Karelia. In 2010, 2011 and 2015 years the part of sera detected as IgM-PV B19 positive on an average was equal to 14%. Meanwhile in 2012 the part of the detected IgM-PV B19 positive sera was

  11. Terapia ocupacional en un hospital general de pacientes agudos = Occupational therapy in a general hospital for acute pacients

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    Ocello, M. G

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Desde su creación, el Hospital Provincial “Dr. José María Cullen” posee la característica de ser un hospital de emergencias, sostenido por la Sociedad de Beneficencia y la Hermanas de la Caridad.Su funcionamiento responde a un Modelo Clínico-Asistencial, lo cual influye en la inserción de Terapia Ocupacional debiendo adaptar sus funciones a las características de la Institución.Los marcos de referencia teóricos y programas que se implementandeber ser acordes con las necesidades surgidas de un Hospital General de Agudos y de emergencias.En el Sector de Terapia Ocupacional se desarrolla la actividad docente cumpliendo con los requisitos reglamentados por el Ministerio de Salud de la Provincia de Santa Fe.ABSTRACT Ever since its start the Provincial Hospital “Dr. José María Cullen” is characterised for being an emergency hospital under the guidance of the Benfit Society of Hermanas de la Caridad.Its function responds to a Clinical Assistential Model, which influences the insertion of Occupational Therapy, adapting its functiones to the characteristics of the Institution as and when called for.The theoretical points of reference and programmes that are used must be in accordance with tehe necessities that appear in an Acute and Emergency General Hospital.In the Occupational Therapy Sector the teaching activity is developed as required by rules and regulations of the Ministry of Health for the Province of Santa Fe.

  12. Management of intra-operative acute pulmonary embolism during general anesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuanyuan; Wen, Shuai; Chen, Gezi; Zhang, Wei; Ai, Yanqiu; Yuan, Jingjing

    2017-05-26

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) can be life-threatening. Early detection is even more difficult for patients under general anesthesia as common symptoms are not available and the pathophysiological course of intra-operative APE is influenced by procedures of surgery and anesthesia, which makes patients under general anesthesia a distinctive group. We report a case of APE during orthopedic surgery under general anesthesia. A 64-year-old female with atrial fibrillation and surgical history of varicosity underwent total right hip replacement surgery under general anesthesia. No arterial or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found prior to the surgery, but APE still occurred intraoperatively. The sudden decrease in PETCO2 and increase in PaCO2 combined other clues raised the suspect of APE, which is further evidenced by transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE). Multidisciplinary consultation was started immediately. After discussion with the consultation team and communication with patient's family members, anticoagulation therapy was started and IVC filter was placed to prevent PE recurrence. The patient went through the operation and discharged uneventfully 30 days later. Pulmonary embolism is a rare and potentially high-risk perioperative situation, with a difficult diagnosis when occurs under anesthesia. The separation phenomenon of decrease in PETCO2 and increase in PaCO2 might be a useful and suggestive sign, enabling prompt management and therefore improving the prognosis.

  13. Atrial fibrillation: prevalence and management in an acute general medical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, F M; Singh, Y; Persson, S; Gamble, G D; Braatvedt, G D

    1999-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common comorbid condition in patients admitted to hospital. In managing patients with AF, recent research has highlighted the importance of heart rate control, cardioversion, maintenance of sinus rhythm and anticoagulation for the prevention of thromboembolism. To determine the prevalence of AF in patients admitted acutely to the general medical service at Auckland Hospital and to assess the adequacy of heart rate control, the number cardioverted and the use of warfarin to prevent thromboembolism. Prospective review of all acute admissions to the general medical service over a 12 week period. Information was collected from hospital notes on the patients' present and past medical conditions, admission and discharge cardiac medication and the use of investigations, particularly thyroid function tests and echocardiography. The heart rate on discharge, number cardioverted either during the admission or after discharge and the number given warfarin and aspirin were recorded. One hundred and forty-seven patients (aged 38-96, mean age 76 years and 52% male) were admitted in AF 165 times out of the 1637 admissions over the study period (a prevalence of 10.4%, 95% CI 8.6-11.5%). The main causes of admission were heart failure (23%), pneumonia or sepsis (17%), cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) (14%) and ischaemic heart disease (11%). Past medical history included hypertension (46%), ischaemic heart disease (39%), congestive heart failure (58%), valvular heart disease (12%), chronic obstructive airways disease (24%), CVA, TIA or thromboembolic event (24%) and diabetes (17%). Thyroid function tests were performed in 50% of patients and echocardiograms in 38%. Heart rate control at discharge could not be assessed, as this was not recorded prior to any patient's discharge. Seventy-eight per cent of patients were discharged on digoxin but only 29% on drugs that control the heart rate with exercise. Five patients out

  14. Dependent generalized Dirichlet process priors for the analysis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcella, William; De Iorio, Maria; Favaro, Stefano; Rosner, Gary L

    2017-09-06

    We propose a novel Bayesian nonparametric process prior for modeling a collection of random discrete distributions. This process is defined by including a suitable Beta regression framework within a generalized Dirichlet process to induce dependence among the discrete random distributions. This strategy allows for covariate dependent clustering of the observations. Some advantages of the proposed approach include wide applicability, ease of interpretation, and availability of efficient MCMC algorithms. The motivation for this work is the study of the impact of asparginage metabolism on lipid levels in a group of pediatric patients treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Effectiveness of a clinical pathway for acute stroke care in a district general hospital: an audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegert Richard J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organised stroke care saves lives and reduces disability. A clinical pathway might be a form of organised stroke care, but the evidence for the effectiveness of this model of care is limited. Methods This study was a retrospective audit study of consecutive stroke admissions in the setting of an acute general medical unit in a district general hospital. The case-notes of patients admitted with stroke for a 6-month period before and after introduction of the pathway, were reviewed to determine data on length of stay, outcome, functional status, (Barthel Index, BI and Modified Rankin Scale, MRS, Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project (OCSP sub-type, use of investigations, specific management issues and secondary prevention strategies. Logistic regression was used to adjust for differences in case-mix. Results N = 77 (prior to the pathway and 76 (following the pathway. The median (interquartile range, IQR age was 78 years (67.75–84.25, 88% were European NZ and 37% were male. The median (IQR BI at admission for the pre-pathway group was less than the post-pathway group: 6 (0–13.5 vs. 10 (4–15.5, p = 0.018 but other baseline variables were statistically similar. There were no significant differences between any of the outcome or process of care variables, except that echocardiograms were done less frequently after the pathway was introduced. A good outcome (MRS Conclusion A clinical pathway for acute stroke management appeared to have no benefit for the outcome or processes of care and may even have been associated with worse outcomes. These data support the conclusions of a recent Cochrane review.

  16. Relationship between the general condition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with remission rate and convulsion as an adverse effect chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdi Andid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study on the relationship between the general condition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with remission rale and convulsion as an adverse effect of chemotherapy was conducted in leukemia patients of the hematology-oncology subdivision, Departmenl of Child Health, Medical School, University of North Sumatra, Medan. Of 114 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 81 (71.05% received chemotherapy, 31 patients among them was in good general condition. Remission rate of the 31 patients was 80.6% (25 children. Whereas in the remaining 50 patients, the remission rate among them was 84% (42 patients. There was no significant relationship between their general condition to the recurrence rate of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients who had been administered chemotherapy during induction phase. Convulsion was found In 2 cases, due to CNS leukemia.

  17. Acute care surgery: defining mortality in emergency general surgery in the state of Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Mayur; Tesoriero, Ronald; Bruns, Brandon R; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Chen, Hegang; Diaz, Jose J

    2015-04-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is a major component of acute care surgery, however, limited data exist on mortality with respect to trauma center (TC) designation. We hypothesized that mortality would be lower for EGS patients treated at a TC vs non-TC (NTC). A retrospective review of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database from 2009 to 2013 was performed. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma EGS ICD-9 codes were used to identify EGS patients. Data collected included demographics, TC designation, emergency department admissions, and All Patients Refined Severity of Illness (APR_SOI). Trauma center designation was used as a marker of a formal acute care surgery program. Primary outcomes included in-hospital mortality. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed controlling for age. There were 817,942 EGS encounters. Mean ± SD age of patients was 60.1 ± 18.7 years, 46.5% were males; 71.1% of encounters were at NTCs; and 75.8% were emergency department admissions. Overall mortality was 4.05%. Mortality was calculated based on TC designation controlling for age across APR_SOI strata. Multivariable logistic regression analysis did not show statistically significant differences in mortality between hospital levels for minor APR_SOI. For moderate APR_SOI, mortality was significantly lower for TCs compared with NTCs (p surgery patients treated at TCs had lower mortality for moderate APR_SOI, but increased mortality for extreme APR_SOI when compared with NTCs. Additional investigation is required to better evaluate this unexpected finding. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An observational study in psychiatric acute patients admitted to General Hospital Psychiatric Wards in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margari Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives this Italian observational study was aimed at collecting data of psychiatric patients with acute episodes entering General Hospital Psychiatric Wards (GHPWs. Information was focused on diagnosis (DSM-IV, reasons of hospitalisation, prescribed treatment, outcome of aggressive episodes, evolution of the acute episode. Methods assessments were performed at admission and discharge. Used psychometric scales were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS and the Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30. Results 864 adult patients were enrolled in 15 GHPWs: 728 (320 M; mean age 43.6 yrs completed both admission and discharge visits. A severe psychotic episode with (19.1% or without (47.7% aggressive behaviour was the main reason of admission. Schizophrenia (42.8% at admission and 40.1% at discharge and depression (12.9% at admission and 14.7% at discharge were the predominant diagnoses. The mean hospital stay was 12 days. The mean (± SD total score of MOAS at admission, day 7 and discharge was, respectively, 2.53 ± 5.1, 0.38 ± 2.2, and 0.21 ± 1.5. Forty-four (6.0% patients had episodes of aggressiveness at admission and 8 (1.7% at day 7. A progressive improvement in each domain/item vs. admission was observed for MOAS and BPRS, while NOSIE-30 did not change from day 4 onwards. The number of patients with al least one psychotic drug taken at admission, in the first 7 days of hospitalisation, and prescribed at discharge, was, respectively: 472 (64.8%, 686 (94.2% and 676 (92.9%. The respective most frequently psychotic drugs were: BDZs (60.6%, 85.7%, 69.5%, typical anti-psychotics (48.3%, 57.0%, 49.6%, atypical anti-psychotics (35.6%, 41.8%, 39.8% and antidepressants (40.9%, 48.8%, 43.2%. Rates of patients with one, two or > 2 psychotic drugs taken at admission and day 7, and prescribed at discharge, were, respectively: 24.8%, 8.2% and 13.5% in mono-therapy; 22.0%, 20

  19. Characterisation of antibiotic prescriptions for acute respiratory tract infections in Danish general practice: a retrospective registry based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Saust, Laura Trolle; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-05-19

    Inappropriate use of antibiotics is contributing to the increasing rates of antimicrobial resistance. Several Danish guidelines on antibiotic prescribing for acute respiratory tract infections in general practice have been issued to promote rational prescribing of antibiotics, however it is unclear if these recommendations are followed. We aimed to characterise the pattern of antibiotic prescriptions for patients diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infections, by means of electronic prescriptions, labeled with clinical indications, from Danish general practice. Acute respiratory tract infections accounted for 456,532 antibiotic prescriptions issued between July 2012 and June 2013. Pneumonia was the most common indication with 178,354 prescriptions (39%), followed by acute tonsillitis (21%) and acute otitis media (19%). In total, penicillin V accounted for 58% of all prescriptions, followed by macrolides (18%) and amoxicillin (15%). The use of second-line agents increased with age for all indications, and comprised more than 40% of the prescriptions in patients aged >75 years. Women were more often prescribed antibiotics regardless of clinical indication. This is the first Danish study to characterise antibiotic prescription patterns for acute respiratory tract infections by data linkage of clinical indications. The findings confirm that penicillin V is the most commonly prescribed antibiotic agent for treatment of patients with an acute respiratory tract infection in Danish general practice. However, second-line agents like macrolides and amoxicillin with or without clavulanic acid are overused. Strategies to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing especially for pneumonia, acute otitis media and acute rhinosinusitis are warranted. TRACKING THE OVERUSE OF ANTIBIOTICS: Better adherence to guidelines for prescribing antibiotics for different respiratory tract infections are warranted in Danish general practice. The over-use of antibiotics, particularly so

  20. Toxic epidermal necrolysis, DRESS, AGEP : Do overlap cases exist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvresse, Sophie; Valeyrie-Allanore, Laurence; Ortonne, Nicolas; Konstantinou, Marie Pauline; Kardaun, Sylvia H.; Bagot, Martine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    Background: Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and epidermal necrolysis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome-toxic epidermal necrolysis [SJS-TEN]). Because of the varied

  1. Chlamydia pneumoniae and mycoplasma pneumoniae in children with acute respiratory infection in general practices in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjhie, J.H.T.; Dorigo-Zetsma, J.W.; Roosendaal, R.; Brule, A.J.C. van den; Bestebroer, T.M.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.

    2000-01-01

    In this retrospective study Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in samples (n=457) from children presenting with acute respiratory infection to general practitioners during 1992-97. Samples were collected in autumn and winter,

  2. Preferences of general practitioners regarding an application running on a personal digital assistant in acute stroke care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis in 't Veld, M.H.A.; van Til, Janine Astrid; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2005-01-01

    An application was developed to optimize information exchange in acute stroke care, with which general practitioners (GPs) could consult hospital emergency units. However, it was difficult to obtain clear preferences from GPs regarding the functional requirements of the information to be transferred

  3. Surveillance of acute respiratory infections in general practices - The Netherlands, winters 1998/1999 and 1999/2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandhof WE van den; Bartelds AIM; Wilbrink B; Verweij C; Bijlsma K; Nat H van der; Boswijk H; Pronk JDD; Dorigo-Zetsma JW; Heijnen MLA; NIVEL; CIE; LIS

    2001-01-01

    To provide insight into the virological aetiology of influenza-like illnesses and other acute respiratory infections, nose/throat swabs were taken by 30-35 general practitioners of the sentinel surveillance network of The Netherlands Institute of Health Services Research from a random selection of

  4. Mobile task management tool that improves workflow of an acute general surgical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Elizabeth; McDonald, Rod; Savage, Earle; Floyd, Richard; Butler, Anthony; Rumball-Smith, Alistair; Connor, Saxon

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and being able to measure constraints within a health system is crucial if outcomes are to be improved. Current systems lack the ability to capture decision making with regard to tasks performed within a patient journey. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of a mobile task management tool on clinical workflow within an acute general surgical service by analysing data capture and usability of the application tool. The Cortex iOS application was developed to digitize patient flow and provide real-time visibility over clinical decision making and task performance. Study outcomes measured were workflow data capture for patient and staff events. Usability was assessed using an electronic survey. There were 449 unique patient journeys tracked with a total of 3072 patient events recorded. The results repository was accessed 7792 times. The participants reported that the application sped up decision making, reduced redundancy of work and improved team communication. The mode of the estimated time the application saved participants was 5-9 min/h of work. Of the 14 respondents, nine discarded their analogue methods of tracking tasks by the end of the study period. The introduction of a mobile task management system improved the working efficiency of junior clinical staff. The application allowed capture of data not previously available to hospital systems. In the future, such data will contribute to the accurate mapping of patient journeys through the health system. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. The impact of an acute care surgery team on general surgery residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Quinton; McVay, Derek; Johnson, Eric K; Maykel, Justin A; Champagne, Bradley J; Steele, Scott R

    2014-11-01

    Acute care surgical teams (ACSTs) have limited data in residency. We sought to determine the impact of an ACST on the depth and breadth of general surgery resident training. One year prior to and after implementation of an ACST, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs spanning multiple postgraduate year levels were compared for numbers, case types, and complexity. We identified 6,009 cases, including 2,783 after ACST implementation. ACSTs accounted for 752 cases (27%), with 39.2% performed laparoscopically. ACST cases included biliary (19.4%), skin/soft tissue (10%), hernia (9.8%), and appendix (6.5%). Second-year residents performed a lower percentage of laparoscopic cases after the creation of the ACST (20.4% vs 26.3%; P = .003), while chief residents performed a higher percentage (42.1 vs 37.4; P = .04). Case numbers and complexity following ACST development were unchanged within all year groups (P > .1). ACST in a residency program does not sacrifice resident case complexity, diversity, or volume. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. General Anesthesia Versus Conscious Sedation in Acute Stroke Treatment: The Importance of Head Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, H., E-mail: hendrik.janssen@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany); Buchholz, G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Germany); Killer, M. [Paracelsus Medical University, Neurology/Research Institute of Neurointervention (Austria); Ertl, L.; Brückmann, H. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany); Lutz, J. [Ingolstadt Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    PurposeWhile today mechanical thrombectomy is an established treatment option for main branch occlusions in anterior circulation stroke, there is still an ongoing debate on the kind of anesthesia to be preferred. Introducing a simple method for head stabilization, we analyzed safety and duration of endovascular recanalization procedures under general anesthesia (GA) and conscious sedation (CS).MethodsWe retrospectively identified 84 consecutive patients who underwent mechanical thrombectomy owing to acute anterior circulation stroke. Fifty-three were treated under GA and 31 under CS equipped with a standard cervical collar to reduce head movement. We evaluated recanalization results, in-house time to start recanalization, procedure times, technical and clinical complication rates, and conversion rates from CS to GA.ResultsRecanalization of mTICI ≥2b was achieved in 80 % under CS and in 81 % under GA. Median in-house time to start recanalization for CS was 60 min (IQR 28; 44–72) and 77 min (IQR 23; 68–91) for GA (P = 0.001). Median procedure time under CS was 35 min (IQR 43; 69–25) and 41 min (IQR 43; 66–23) for GA (P = 0.9). No major complications such as ICH occurred in either group, and no conversions from CS to GA were necessary.ConclusionMechanical thrombectomy can be performed faster and safely under CS in combination with simple head immobilization using a standard cervical collar.

  7. Circulatory and Respiratory Parameters during Acute Endovascular Stroke Therapy in Conscious Sedation or General Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiyanapurath, Sibu; Schönenberger, Silvia; Rosales, Maritoni L; Carrilho Romeiro, Ana M; Möhlenbruch, Markus; Bendszus, Martin; Hacke, Werner; Bösel, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Whether patients suffering from acute ischemic stroke and undergoing endovascular recanalization should be treated under general anesthesia (GA) or conscious sedation (CS) is a matter of debate. According to retrospective studies, GA appears to be associated with a worse outcome than CS. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, but hypotension and hypocapnia during GA have been suggested. There are no prospective data on this question. We prospectively analyzed consecutive patients who were treated with endovascular recanalization from 11, 2013 to 03, 2014 regarding blood pressure, end-tidal carbon dioxide (etCO2), cerebral oximetry (by near-infrared spectroscopy), ventilation parameters, response to commands, basic parameters (age, gender, percentage of posterior circulation stroke, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score [NIHSSS] on admission, NIHSSS at discharge, rate of successful recanalization [thrombolysis in cerebral infarction scale >2a], duration of intervention, symptom-to-recanalization time, and door-to-needle time), and medication used. Forty-four patients (29 under GA and 15 in CS) were included. Significant differences between the groups (GA versus CS) were found in the median dose of norepinephrine (.4 mg/hour versus .1 mg/hour, P = .003), mean systolic blood pressure (139.67 mm Hg versus 155.00 mm Hg, P = .003), mean duration of relative hypotension (systolic blood pressure hyperventilation. The impact of these physiological differences on outcome needs to be studied in randomized trials. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acalculous Acute Cholecystitis in Previously Healthy Children: General Overview and Analysis of Pediatric Infectious Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Poddighe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC is an inflammation of the gallbladder, which does not appear to be associated with the presence of gallstones. AAC is estimated to represent more than 50% of cases of acute cholecystitis in the pediatric population. Although this pathology was initially described in critically ill patients, actually most pediatric cases have been observed during several infectious diseases. Particularly, here we reviewed pediatric infectious acute acalculous cholecystitis and analyzed the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of bacterial and viral forms.

  9. An analysis of acute admissions to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Aim: The study sought to analyse admissions to an acute psychiatric unit with a view to determining the demographic distribution of the patients, duration ... males with a past psychiatric history of either an Axis I or a co-morbid Axis II disorder, and had defaulted on their regular follow up. .... The effectiveness of stigma coping.

  10. Acute low back pain management in general practice: uncertainty and conflicting certainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlow, Ben; Dean, Sarah; Perry, Meredith; Mathieson, Fiona; Baxter, G David; Dowell, Anthony

    2014-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a significant health problem and common reason to visit the GP. Evidence suggests GPs experience difficulty applying evidence-based guidelines. Explore GPs' underlying beliefs about acute LBP and how these influence their clinical management of patients. Eleven GPs from one geographical region within New Zealand were recruited by purposive sampling. Audio recordings of semi-structured qualitative interviews were transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with an Interpretive Description framework. Four key themes emerged related to the causes of acute LBP, GP confidence, communicating diagnostic uncertainty and encouraging movement and activity. Acute LBP was seen as a direct representation of tissue injury, consequently the assessment and management of patients' attitudes and beliefs was not a priority. Participants' confidence was decreased due to a perceived inability to diagnose or influence the tissue injury. Despite this, diagnoses were provided to patients to provide reassurance and meet expectations. Guideline recommendations regarding activity conflicted with a perceived need to protect damaged tissue, resulting in reported provision of mixed messages about the need to be both active and careful. GPs' initial focus upon tissue injury during acute care, and providing a diagnostic label, may influence patients' subsequent alignment with a biomedical perspective and contribute to consultation conflict and patients' perception of blame when discussion of psychosocial influences is introduced. Demonstrating the relevance of the biopsychosocial model to acute LBP may improve GPs' alignment with guidelines, improve their confidence to manage these patients and ultimately improve outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Antibiotic use among older adults on an acute care general surgery service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, André S; Bailey, Jon G; Davis, Philip J B; Johnson, Paul M

    2017-12-01

    Antibiotics play an important role in the treatment of many surgical diseases that affect older adults, and the potential for inappropriate use of these drugs is high. Our objective was to describe antibiotic use among older adults admitted to an acute care surgery service at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Detailed data regarding diagnosis, comorbidities, surgery and antibiotic use were retrospectively collected for patients 70 years and older admitted to an acute care surgery service. We evaluated antibiotic use (perioperative prophylaxis and treatment) for appropriateness based on published guidelines. During the study period 453 patients were admitted to the acute care surgery service, and 229 underwent surgery. The most common diagnoses were small bowel obstruction (27.2%) and acute cholecystitis (11.0%). In total 251 nonelective abdominal operations were performed, and perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 49.5% of cases. The most common prophylaxis errors were incorrect timing (15.5%) and incorrect dose (12.4%). Overall 206 patients received treatment with antibiotics for their underlying disease process, and 44.2% received appropriate first-line drug therapy. The most common therapeutic errors were administration of second- or third-line antibiotics without indication (37.9%) and use of antibiotics when not indicated (12.1%). There was considerable variation in the duration of treatment for patients with the same diagnoses. Inappropriate antibiotic use was common among older patients admitted to an acute care surgery service. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to ensure patients receive optimal care in this complex hospital environment.

  12. SPECTRUM OF ACUTE GLOMERULO NEPHRITIS IN CHILDREN AT GOVERNMENT GENERAL HOSPITAL, ANANTAPURAMU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Aim of the study is to study the spectrum of AGN in children and to assess the age, sex and seasonal incidence and prognostic factors. Acute glomerulonephritis is one of the most common condition seen in children. The study group included 50 children. In most of the children presenting complaints s of are puffiness of face, haematuria and oliguria. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty children who were admitted in the government hospital during the period of September 2013 to January 2015 were included in the stud y. RESULTS: The maximum admissions were seen from the months of September to December. Common age group was between 3 and 8 years. Rare age group was below 2 years. Hypertension was noticed in 32 out of 50 children. Albuminuria and hematuria were commonest urinary abnormalities. CONCLUSION: acute glomerulonephritis is less common below 2 years. Hypertension was of varying degree. Cardiomegaly by x - ray was an added feature.

  13. Alcohol intake in patients admitted acutely to a general medical unit.

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, J. A.; McCance, D. R.; Lundy, F.T.; Widsom, G. B.; Hayes, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    The role of alcohol in causing acute medical admissions is recognised but not well quantified. Using a questionnaire we have studied prospectively alcohol intake in patients aged 18-60 years admitted to a medical unit and have analysed the contribution of alcohol to their admission. One hundred and six patients (61 male: 45 female) who fulfilled our preset age criteria were studied. Alcohol intake (mean +/- SEM) was 9 +/- 1 and 12 +/- 1 units on average and heavy drinking days respectively, a...

  14. Management of the acute scrotum in a district general hospital: 10-year experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajchner, Lukas

    2012-01-31

    The acutely painful scrotum is a common urologic emergency. The primary objective of management is to avoid testicular loss. This requires a high index of clinical suspicion and prompt surgical intervention. In our series conducted between January 1996 and December 2005, 119 patients (age range: 4-62 years) underwent emergency operative exploration for acute scrotal pain. The most common finding was torted cyst of Morgagni (63\\/119, 52.9%), followed by testicular torsion (41\\/119, 34.4%). The majority of testicular torsions occurred in the pubertal group (22\\/41, 53.6%). Only one patient in this group had an unsalvageable testis necessitating orchidectomy, a testicular loss rate in torsion of 2.4%. There were no postoperative wound infections or scrotal haematomas. Testicular salvage depends critically on early surgical intervention, so the delay incurred in diagnostic imaging may extend the period of ischaemia. Furthermore, all radiological investigations have a certain false-negative rate. We advocate immediate surgical exploration of the acute scrotum. We report a low orchidectomy rate (2.4%) in testicular torsion.

  15. The treatment of acute bronchitis by general practitioners in the UK. Results of a cross sectional postal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Nigel P; Fahey, Tom

    2002-07-01

    In Australia and the UK acute bronchitis is a common presenting problem in general practice. When symptoms persist management can be difficult and despite evidence that antibiotics are usually ineffective their use is widespread. To describe prescribing behaviour for acute bronchitis by general practitioners in the United Kingdom. Cross sectional postal survey of UK GPs. Four hundred and nineteen (73%) GPs responded. Purulent sputum, fever and crepitations/crackles on chest examination were the most important reasons for prescribing antibiotics: 89% of GPs said the colour of the sputum influenced their decision; amoxycillin was the first choice; 40% of GPs believed that at least one in five consultations for ARI were affected by patient factors, usually to maintain patient satisfaction. 47% of GPs advised the use of bronchodilators, and 96% recommended the symptomatic use of paracetamol and fluids. General practitioners are influenced to use antibiotics by patient symptoms and signs for which there is little evidence. Patient psychosocial factors influence prescribing. Until clearer research findings from new studies are available, GPs may opt for a 'just in case' prescription.

  16. Should treatment of (sub)acute low back pain be aimed at psychosocial prognostic factors? Cluster randomised clinical trial in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, Petra; van der Windt, Daniëlle A. W. M.; van der Horst, Henriëtte E.; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Stalman, Wim A. B.; Bouter, Lex M.

    2005-01-01

    To compare the effects of a minimal intervention strategy aimed at assessment and modification of psychosocial prognostic factors and usual care for treatment of (sub)acute low back pain in general practice. Cluster randomised clinical trial. 60 general practitioners in 41 general practices. 314

  17. Tissue Doppler echocardiography predicts acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiovascular death in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2015-01-01

    with a normal conventional echocardiographic examination [per cm/s decrease: HR 1.18 (1.08-1.28), P factors, even......AIMS: To improve risk prediction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, we need sensitive markers of cardiac dysfunction; Echocardiographic Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) is feasible and harmless and may be ideal for this purpose. METHODS AND RESULTS: Within the community-based Copenhagen City...... Heart Study, 2064 participants were examined by echocardiography including TDI and followed (median 10.9 years) with regard to cardiovascular death, heart failure, or acute myocardial infarction (n = 277). Impaired systolic (s') and diastolic (e' and a') function according to age and sex as assessed...

  18. Risk factors for acute gangrenous cholecystitis in emergency general surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourikian, Seda; Anand, Rahul J; Aboutanos, Michel; Wolfe, Luke G; Ferrada, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Acute gangrenous cholecystitis (AGC) is a medical emergency that carries high morbidity. The objective of this study is to define risk factors for this disease. A retrospective review of patients who underwent cholecystectomy while admitted to the Acute Care Surgery Service from January 2009 to April 2014 was performed. Specimen reports were evaluated to identify patients with AGC and cholecystitis without necrosis (CN). Preoperative factors as well as outcomes were compared between the groups. A total of 483 patents underwent cholecystectomy. Four hundred fifty-nine patients were found to have CN and 24 patients were found to have AGC. Pre-existent factors such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, and systemic inflammatory response syndrome predicted AGC on a logistic regression. Patients with AGS were also more commonly older, male, and had a higher preoperative bilirubin. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with AGC (12.5% vs .9%, P = .003). AGC carries an increased mortality rate compared with CN. Older patients with diabetes, coronary artery disease, and elevated bilirubin should be suspected of having AGC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Geographic Diffusion and Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: An Uneven Solution to the National Emergency General Surgery Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Ingraham, Angela M; Daniel, Vijaya T; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2017-10-04

    Owing to lack of adequate emergency care infrastructure and decline in general surgery workforce, the United States faces a crisis in access to emergency general surgery (EGS) care. Acute care surgery (ACS), an organized system of trauma, general surgery, and critical care, is a proposed solution; however, ACS diffusion remains poorly understood. To investigate geographic diffusion of ACS models of care and characterize the communities in which ACS implementation is lagging. A national survey on EGS practices was developed, tested, and administered at all 2811 US acute care hospitals providing EGS to adults between August 2015 and October 2015. Surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at these hospitals were approached. If these surgeons failed to respond to the initial survey implementation, secondary surgeons or chief medical officers at hospitals with only 1 general surgeon were approached. Survey responses on ACS implementation were linked with geocoded hospital data and national census data to determine geographic diffusion of and access to ACS. We measured the distribution of hospitals with ACS models of care vs those without over time (diffusion) and by US counties characterized by sociodemographic characteristics of county residents (access). Survey response rate was 60% (n = 1690); 272 responding hospitals had implemented ACS by 2015, steadily increasing from 34 in 2001 to 125 in 2010. Acute care surgery implementation has not been uniform. Rural regions have limited ACS access, with hospitals in counties with greater than the 75th percentile population having 5.4 times higher odds (95% CI, 1.66-7.35) of implementing ACS than hospitals in counties with less than 25th percentile population. Communities with greater percentages of adults without a college degree also have limited ACS access (OR, 3.43; 95% CI, 1.81-6.48). However, incorporating EGS into ACS models may be a potential equalizer for poor, black, and Hispanic communities. Understanding and

  20. Anticonvulsant effects of mefloquine on generalized tonic-clonic seizures induced by two acute models in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Javier; Ballesteros-Zebadúa, Paola; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, Joaquín

    2015-03-01

    Mefloquine can cross the blood-brain barrier and block the gap junction intercellular communication in the brain. Enhanced electrical coupling mediated by gap junctions is an underlying mechanism involved in the generation and maintenance of seizures. For this reason, the aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the systemic administration of mefloquine on tonic-clonic seizures induced by two acute models such as pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock. All the control rats presented generalized tonic-clonic seizures after the administration of pentylenetetrazole. However, the incidence of seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole significantly decreased in the groups administered systematically with 40 and 80 mg/kg of mefloquine. In the control group, none of the rats survived after the generalized tonic-clonic seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole, but survival was improved by mefloquine. Besides, mefloquine significantly modified the total spectral power as well as the duration, amplitude and frequency of the epileptiform activity induced by pentylenetetrazole. For the maximal electroshock model, mefloquine did not change the occurrence of tonic hindlimb extension. However, this gap junction blocker significantly decreased the duration of the tonic hindlimb extension induced by the acute electroshock. These data suggest that mefloquine at low doses might be eliciting some anticonvulsant effects when is systemically administered to rats.

  1. General

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page S20: NMR compound 4i. Page S22: NMR compound 4j. General: Chemicals were purchased from Fluka, Merck and Aldrich Chemical Companies. All the products were characterized by comparison of their IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic data and their melting points with reported values. General procedure ...

  2. Association of waist circumference with outcomes in an acute general surgical unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas; Gosal, Preet; Seal, Alexa; McGirr, Joe; Williams, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Obesity prevalence is increasing in Australia, particularly in non-metropolitan areas. The effect of obesity on acute surgical outcomes is not known. We aimed to record waist circumference (WC) (surrogate for obesity) amongst acute surgical unit (ASU) patients in a New South Wales regional hospital, and compare outcome measures (length of stay (LOS), unplanned return to theatre, readmission rates, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality). Retrospective cohort study of 4 months of consecutive ASU admissions, excluding age World Health Organization WC definitions as high-risk or non-high-risk (increased-risk and no-risk). Of 695 admissions, 512 met the inclusion criteria (47.1% female, average age 52.8 years (SD 22.3)), with 85.1% (P < 0.001) of females and 69.4% (P = 0.166) of males having an increased- or high-risk WC. This compares to rates amongst inner regional populations of 71.0% (female) and 66.4% (male). LOS was longer for high-risk patients (5.0 days versus 3.7 days, P = 0.002). However, the mean age of high-risk patients was greater (56.6 years versus 46.9 years, P = 0.001) and LOS was longer for those aged ≥60 (P < 0.001). After controlling for age, high-risk WC was not associated with any outcome measure, except amongst ICU admissions, where high-risk patients stayed longer (15.5 days versus 6.8 days, P < 0.001). Increased- and high-risk WC was overrepresented amongst female ASU patients. High-risk WC was associated with a significantly greater LOS in patients admitted to ICU. High-risk WC was not associated with other outcomes independent of age. WC is useful for quantifying obesity in the inpatient setting. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. [The reporting system of acute pesticides poisoning and general situation of pesticides poisoning in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-yang; Wang, Hong-fei; Yin, Yu

    2005-10-01

    To introduce the reporting system of acute pesticides poisoning and analyze epidemiologic characteristics of pesticides poisoning from reported cases in China. Case reports in the data base of reporting system for occupational diseases were computed by Excel for windows and statistical significance by SAS 6.12. A total of 108 372 cases were reported from 1997 to 2003. Among them, the incidence of occupational poisoning, and non-occupational poisoning accounted for 25.39%, and 74.61% respectively. The fatality rate was 6.86%. The average age was 36.83 years for all pesticides poisoning patients, and 15-59 years old patients accounted for 84.11%. Among 0-14 years old non-occupational poisoning patients, 0-4 years children accounted for 33.51%. Male patients were in the majority in occupational pesticides poisoning, female in non-occupational. Insecticides especially organophosphorus insecticides such as methamidophos, parathion, and omethoate comprised a higher proportion, accounting for 86.02% of the pesticides poisoning. More attention should be paid to pesticides poisoning by the government and medical workers engaged in public health.

  4. Measures of acute physiology, comorbidity and functional status to differentiate illness severity and length of stay among acute general medical admissions: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggan, P J; Akram, F; Er, B H D; Christen, L S J; Weixian, L; Lim, V; Huang, Y; Merchant, R A

    2015-07-01

    Simple measures of acute physiologic compromise, functional status and comorbidity may help clinicians to make decisions relating to clinical care and resource utilisation. To explore the usefulness of common assessment tools in predicting outcomes of (i) death or intensive care unit (ICU) admission and (ii) length of hospital stay at a busy tertiary hospital in Singapore. Three hundred and ninety-eight consecutive admissions to two general medicine teams were prospectively assessed during 2 months in 2011. Patients were followed until discharge or transfer to ICU/high dependency unit (HDU). Data collected included routine demographic data, final diagnosis, comorbid conditions including a weighted prognostic comorbidity index (the updated Charlson index) and the modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) at presentation to the emergency department. The admission modified Barthel Index was recorded for patients aged 65 and over. Death and total length of hospital stay were recorded in all cases. Of 398 patients, 16 (4 %) died or were transferred to ICU and 99 (25%) stayed for more than 7 days. Medical early warning (MEW) scores of ≥5 were significantly associated with death or ICU admission (hazard ratio 5.50, 95% confidence interval 1.77-17.07, P = 0.003). There was no independent association between this outcome and the Charlson score or admission Barthel Index. Excess length of stay was associated with a modified Barthel Index ≤17 and altered mental status at presentation. Among unselected general medical patients, MEW scores of ≥5 were significantly associated with death or ICU admissions and only functional status and altered mental status were independent predictors of excess length of stay. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Acute respiratory symptoms and general illness during the first year of life: a population-based birth cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Linstow, Marie-Louise; Holst, Klaus Kähler; Larsen, Karina

    2008-01-01

    (median: 5.1, inter-quartile range (IQR): 3.3-7.8) of acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI) (nasal discharge and > or = 1 of the following symptoms: cough, fever, wheezing, tachypnea, malaise, or lost appetite) and 5.6 episodes (median: 4.3, IQR: 2.1-7.3) of simple rhinitis per 365 days at risk......Respiratory symptoms are common in infancy. Most illnesses occurring among children are dealt with by parents and do not require medical attention. Nevertheless, few studies have prospectively and on a community-basis assessed the amount of respiratory symptoms and general illness in normal infants....... Determinants for respiratory symptoms were increasing age, winter season, household size, size of residence, day-care attendance, and having siblings aged 1-3 years attending a day nursery. In conclusion, the present study provides detailed data on the occurrence of disease symptoms during the first year...

  6. The general characteristics of acute urticaria attacks and the factors predictive of progression to chronic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comert, S; Celebioglu, E; Karakaya, G; Kalyoncu, A F

    2013-01-01

    The natural history of progression from acute urticaria (AU) to chronic urticaria (CU) remains poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the potential triggers of AU attacks and factors associated with their duration, as well as the factors which may be predictive of progression to CU. The study included 281 AU patients (AU group). Data were obtained from 207 AU patients retrospectively and from 74 AU patients prospectively. The CU group consisted of 953 patients, whose data were previously published. According to the medical history, the most common potential triggers of AU attacks were drugs (38.1%); infections (35.2%); stress (24.7%); and foods (17.8%). Attack duration was shorter in cases in which food (p=0.04) or infection (p=0.04) was the suspected trigger. Patients with a history of rhinitis (p=0.04) and food allergy (p=0.04), and positive skin prick test results for pollens (p=0.02) and dog (p=0.02) also had attacks of shorter duration. Patients with asthma had attacks of longer duration (p=0.01). Based on history and/or provocation test results, the prevalence of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity (NSAIDH) was significantly higher in the CU group than the AU group (24.9% vs. 4.3%, respectively, (p<0.01)), as was antibiotic hypersensitivity (10.6% vs. 4.6%, respectively, (p<0.01)) and food allergy (18.3% vs. 3.9%, respectively, (p<0.01)). 7.97; 95%CI: 4.33-14.66; p<0.01) and food allergy (OR: 5.17; 95%CI: 2.71-9.85; p<0.01) were observed to be independent factors associated with CU. As NSAIDH and food allergy were associated with CU, their presence should be carefully evaluated in patients with AU in order to predict progression to CU. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sugrue, Michael

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.

  8. Collaboration between physicians and a hospital-based palliative care team in a general acute-care hospital in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishikitani Mariko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continual collaboration between physicians and hospital-based palliative care teams represents a very important contributor to focusing on patients' symptoms and maintaining their quality of life during all stages of their illness. However, the traditionally late introduction of palliative care has caused misconceptions about hospital-based palliative care teams (PCTs among patients and general physicians in Japan. The objective of this study is to identify the factors related to physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with hospital-based PCTs. Methods This cross-sectional anonymous questionnaire-based survey was conducted to clarify physicians' attitudes toward continual collaboration with PCTs and to describe the factors that contribute to such attitudes. We surveyed 339 full-time physicians, including interns, employed in a general acute-care hospital in an urban area in Japan; the response rate was 53% (N = 155. We assessed the basic characteristics, experience, knowledge, and education of respondents. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main factors affecting the physicians' attitudes toward PCTs. Results We found that the physicians who were aware of the World Health Organization (WHO analgesic ladder were 6.7 times (OR = 6.7, 95% CI = 1.98-25.79 more likely to want to treat and care for their patients in collaboration with the hospital-based PCTs than were those physicians without such awareness. Conclusion Basic knowledge of palliative care is important in promoting physicians' positive attitudes toward collaboration with hospital-based PCTs.

  9. [Study of Staphylococcus aureus infections in a general acute care hospital (2002-2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togneri, Ana M; Podestá, Laura B; Pérez, Marcela P; Santiso, Gabriela M

    A twelve-year retrospective review of Staphylococcus aureus infections in adult and pediatric patients (AP and PP respectively) assisted in the Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos Evita in Lanús was performed to determine the incidence, foci of infection, the source of infection and to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance. An amount of 2125 cases of infection in AP and 361 in PP were documented. The incidence in AP decreased significantly in the last three years (χi2; p<0.05); in PP it increased significantly during the last five years (χ2; p<0.0001). In both populations was detected a notable increase in skin infections and associated structures (PEA) in bacteremia to the starting point of a focus on PEA, and in total S. aureus infections of hospital-onset (χ2; p < 0.005). Methicillin-resistance (MRSA) increased from 28 to 78% in PP; in AP it remained around 50%, with significant reduction in accompanying antimicrobial resistance to non-β-lactams in both groups of MRSA. In S. aureus documented from community onset infections (CO-MRSA) in the last three years, the percentage of methicillin-resistance was 57% in PP and 37% in AP; in hospital-onset infections it was 43% and 63% respectively. Although data showed that S. aureus remains a pathogen associated with the hospital-onset, there was an increase of CO-MRSA infections with predominance in PEA in both populations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of Upper Limb Recovery, General Disability, and Rehabilitation Status by Activity Measurements Assessed by Accelerometers or the Fugl-Meyer Score in Acute Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebruers, Nick; Truijen, Steven; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter P.

    Objective This study investigated the clinical predictive value of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) arm score and the upper limb activity assessed by accelerometers in patients with hemiparesis after acute stroke. Design The prospective cohort (n = 129) was recruited from a general hospital; activity

  11. First report of mesalamine (5-aminosalicylic acid) as the causative agent in a case of acute generalized exanthamous pustulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocci, Erin; Park, Kelly; Hutchens, Kelli; Winterfield, Laura

    2017-01-15

    Acute generalized exanthamous pustulosis (AGEP)is a rare eruption of non-follicular sterile pustuleson a diffuse background of erythema and edema,commonly associated with fever and leukocytosis.Antibiotics are implicated in most cases; however,other drugs have been reported to cause AGEP. Wereport a case of a 73-year-old man with a historyof ulcerative colitis who presented with a diffusepustular rash, renal failure, elevated liver functiontests, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. A week priorto admission, the patient was started on mesalamineto treat colitis. Upon admission, a workup includinga skin biopsy was performed and was consistentwith AGEP. Mesalamine was discontinued, and thepatient's skin eruption, renal function, liver functiontests, and leukocytosis subsequently improved.Mesalamine has an unknown mechanism of action.However, it is thought to be an anti-inflammatoryagent that blocks the production of leukotrienesand prostaglandins and is an immunosuppressantthat increases the release of adenosine, whichinterferes with leukocyte function. The decrease inprostaglandin synthesis or deregulation of leukocytefunction caused by mesalamine may be the etiologyin this case. Discontinuation of the offending agentleads to resolution of AGEP, as it did in this patient.

  12. Nurses' worry or concern and early recognition of deteriorating patients on general wards in acute care hospitals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douw, Gooske; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Holwerda, Tineke; Huisman-de Waal, Getty; van Zanten, Arthur R H; van Achterberg, Theo; van der Hoeven, Johannes G

    2015-05-20

    Nurses often recognize deterioration in patients through intuition rather than through routine measurement of vital signs. Adding the 'worry or concern' sign to the Rapid Response System provides opportunities for nurses to act upon their intuitive feelings. Identifying what triggers nurses to be worried or concerned might help to put intuition into words, and potentially empower nurses to act upon their intuitive feelings and obtain medical assistance in an early stage of deterioration. The aim of this systematic review is to identify the signs and symptoms that trigger nurses' worry or concern about a patient's condition. We searched the databases PubMed, CINAHL, Psychinfo and Cochrane Library (Clinical Trials) using synonyms related to the three concepts: 'nurses', 'worry/concern' and 'deterioration'. We included studies concerning adult patients on general wards in acute care hospitals. The search was performed from the start of the databases until 14 February 2014. The search resulted in 4,006 records, and 18 studies (five quantitative, nine qualitative and four mixed-methods designs) were included in the review. A total of 37 signs and symptoms reflecting the nature of the criterion worry or concern emerged from the data and were summarized in 10 general indicators. The results showed that worry or concern can be present with or without change in vital signs. The signs and symptoms we found in the literature reflect the nature of nurses' worry or concern, and nurses may incorporate these signs in their assessment of the patient and their decision to call for assistance. The fact that it is present before changes in vital signs suggests potential for improving care in an early stage of deterioration.

  13. The use of routine EEG in acute ischemic stroke patients without seizures: generalized but not focal EEG pathology is associated with clinical deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Marc E; Ebert, Anne D; Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios

    2017-05-01

    Specialized electroencephalography (EEG) methods have been used to provide clues about stroke features and prognosis. However, the value of routine EEG in stroke patients without (suspected) seizures has been somewhat neglected. We aimed to assess this in a group of acute ischemic stroke patients in regard to short-term prognosis and basic stroke features. We assessed routine (10-20) EEG findings in 69 consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients without seizures. Associations between EEG abnormalities and NIHSS scores, clinical improvement or deterioration as well as MRI stroke characteristics were evaluated. Mean age was 69 ± 18 years, 43 of the patients (62.3%) were men. Abnormal EEG was found in 40 patients (58%) and was associated with higher age (p = 0.021). The most common EEG pathology was focal slowing (30; 43.5%). No epileptiform potentials were found. Abnormal EEG in general and generalized or focal slowing in particular was significantly associated with higher NIHSS score on admission and discharge as well as with hemorrhagic transformation of the ischemic lesion. Abnormal EEG and generalized (but not focal) slowing were associated with clinical deterioration ( p = 0.036, p = 0.003). Patients with lacunar strokes had no EEG abnormalities. Abnormal EEG in general and generalized slowing in particular are associated with clinical deterioration after acute ischemic stroke. The study demonstrates the value of routine EEG as a simple diagnostic tool in the evaluation of stroke patients especially with regard to short-term prognosis.

  14. Combined determination of highly sensitive troponin T and copeptin for early exclusion of acute myocardial infarction: first experience in an emergency department of a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotze U

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich Lotze1, Holger Lemm2, Anke Heyer2, Karin Müller31Department of Internal Medicine, German Red Cross Hospital Sondershausen, Sondershausen, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Laboratory Medicine, Saale-Unstrut Hospital Naumburg, Naumburg, GermanyBackground: The purpose of this observational study was to test the diagnostic performance of the Elecsys® troponin T high-sensitive system combined with copeptin measurement for early exclusion of acute myocardial infarction (MI in clinical practice.Methods: Troponin T high-sensitive (diagnostic cutoff: <14 pg/mL and copeptin (diagnostic cutoff: <14 pmol/L levels were determined at admission in addition to other routine laboratory parameters in patients with suspected acute MI presenting to the emergency department of a general hospital over a period of five months.Results: Data from 142 consecutive patients (mean age 71.2 ± 13.5 years, 76 men were analyzed. Final diagnoses were acute MI in 13 patients (nine ST elevation MI, four non-ST elevation MI, 9.2% unstable angina pectoris in three (2.1%, cardiac symptoms not primarily associated with myocardial ischemia in 79 (55.6%, and noncardiac disease in 47 patients (33.1%. The patients with acute MI were younger and had higher troponin T high-sensitive and copeptin values than patients without acute MI. Seventeen patients had very high copeptin values (>150 pmol/L, one of whom had a level of >700 pmol/L and died of pulmonary embolism. A troponin T high-sensitive level of <14 pg/mL in combination with copeptin <14 pmol/L at initial presentation ruled out acute MI in 45 of the 142 patients (31.7%, each with a sensitivity and negative predictive value of 100%.Conclusion: According to this early experience, a single determination of troponin T high-sensitive and copeptin may enable early and accurate exclusion of acute MI in one third of patients, even in an emergency department of a general hospital.Keywords: highly sensitive troponin T

  15. Risk of hospitalization among survivors of childhood and adolescent acute lymphoblastic leukemia compared to siblings and a general population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Judy Y; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Fluchel, Mark N; Sweeney, Carol; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2017-08-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) has a high survival rate, but cancer-related late effects in the early post-treatment years need documentation. Hospitalizations are an indicator of the burden of late effects. We identify rates and risk factors for hospitalization from five to ten years after diagnosis for childhood and adolescent ALL survivors compared to siblings and a matched population sample. 176 ALL survivors were diagnosed at ≤22 years between 1998 and 2008 and treated at an Intermountain Healthcare facility. The Utah Population Database identified siblings, an age- and sex-matched sample of the Utah population, and statewide inpatient hospital discharges. Sex- and birth year-adjusted Poisson models with Generalized Estimating Equations and robust standard errors calculated rates and rate ratios. Cox proportional hazards models identified demographic and clinical risk factors for hospitalizations among survivors. Hospitalization rates for survivors (Rate:3.76, 95% CI=2.22-6.36) were higher than siblings (Rate:2.69, 95% CI=1.01-7.18) and the population sample (Rate:1.87, 95% CI=1.13-3.09). Compared to siblings and population comparisons, rate ratios (RR) were significantly higher for survivors diagnosed between age 6 and 22 years (RR:2.87, 95% CI=1.03-7.97 vs siblings; RR:2.66, 95% CI=1.17-6.04 vs population comparisons). Rate ratios for diagnosis between 2004 and 2008 were significantly higher compared to the population sample (RR:4.29, 95% CI=1.49, 12.32), but not siblings (RR:2.73, 95% CI=0.54, 13.68). Survivors originally diagnosed with high-risk ALL did not have a significantly higher risk than siblings or population comparators. However, high-risk ALL survivors (Hazard ratio [HR]:3.36, 95% CI=1.33-8.45) and survivors diagnosed from 2004 to 2008 (HR:9.48, 95% CI=1.93-46.59) had the highest risk compared to their survivor counterparts. Five to ten years after diagnosis is a sensitive time period for hospitalizations in the ALL population. Survivors of

  16. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

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    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  17. Blood urea nitrogen-to-creatinine ratio in the general population and in patients with acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsue, Yuya; van der Meer, Peter; Damman, Kevin; Metra, Marco; O'Connor, Christopher M; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G; Givertz, Michael M; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Dittrich, Howard C; Gansevoort, Ron T; Bakker, Stephan J L; van der Harst, Pim; Hillege, Hans L; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Voors, Adriaan A

    2017-03-01

    The blood urea nitrogen-to-creatinine (BUN/creatinine) ratio has been proposed as a useful parameter in acute heart failure (AHF), but data on the normal range and the added value of the ratio compared with its separate components in patients with AHF are lacking. The aim of this study is to define the normal range of BUN/creatinine ratio and to investigate its clinical significance in patients with AHF. In 4484 subjects from the general population without cardiovascular comorbidities, we calculated age-specific and sex-specific normal values of the BUN/creatinine ratio, deriving a higher and lower than normal range of BUN/creatinine ratio (exceeding the 95% prediction intervals). Association of abnormal range to prognosis was tested in 2033 patients with AHF for the outcome of all-cause death through 180 days, death or cardiovascular or renal rehospitalisation through 60 days and heart failure (HF) rehospitalisation within 60 days. In a cohort of patients with AHF, 482 (24.6%) and 28 (1.4%) patients with HF were classified into higher and lower than normal range groups, respectively. In Cox regression analysis, higher than normal range of BUN/creatinine ratio group was an independent predictor for all-cause death (HR: 1.86, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.66) and death or cardiovascular or renal rehospitalisation (HR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.82), but not for HF rehospitalisation (HR: 1.23, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.86) after adjustment for other prognostic factors including both creatinine and BUN. In patients with AHF, BUN/creatinine higher than age-specific and sex-specific normal range is associated with worse prognosis independently from both creatinine and BUN. CLINICAL TRIALS: gov identifier NCT00328692 and NCT00354458. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Blood urea nitrogen-to-creatinine ratio in the general population and in patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsue, Yuya; van der Meer, Peter; Damman, Kevin; Metra, Marco; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G.; Givertz, Michael M.; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van der Harst, Pim; Hillege, Hans L.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    Objective The blood urea nitrogen-to-creatinine (BUN/creatinine) ratio has been proposed as a useful parameter in acute heart failure (AHF), but data on the normal range and the added value of the ratio compared with its separate components in patients with AHF are lacking. The aim of this study is

  19. REMARKS ON A GENERALIZATION OF A QUESTION RAISED BY PÁL ERDOS CONCERNING A GEOMETRIC INEQUALITY IN ˝ ACUTE TRIANGLES

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    Béla FINTA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give a negative answer to a possible generalization of an open question raised by Pál Erd˝os, concerning an inequality in acute triangles. We prove here that from a < b < c does not follow a 2k + l 2k a < b2k + l 2k b < c2k + l 2k c in every acute triangle ABC, nor the opposite chain of inequalities, where k ∈ N, k ≥ 2, and a, b, c denotes the length of the triangles sites , while la, lb, lc denotes the length of the interior angle bisectors, as usual. We achieve this by constructing effectively two counterexamples, one for each type of inequalities

  20. Influence of the duration of penicillin prescriptions on outcomes for acute sore throat in adults: the DESCARTE prospective cohort study in UK general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Stuart, Beth; Hobbs, Fd Richard; Butler, Chris C; Hay, Alastair D; Campbell, John; Delaney, Brendan C; Broomfield, Sue; Barratt, Paula; Hood, Kerenza; Everitt, Hazel; Mullee, Mark; Williamson, Ian; Mant, David; Little, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Guidelines recommend 10-day treatment courses for acute sore throat, but shorter courses may be used in practice. To determine whether antibiotic duration predicts adverse outcome of acute sore throat in adults in routine care. A secondary analysis of the DESCARTE (Decision rule for the Symptoms and Complications of Acute Red Throat in Everyday practice) prospective cohort study of 12 829 adults presenting in UK general practice with acute sore throat. A brief clinical proforma was used to collect symptom severity and examination findings at presentation. Outcomes were collected by notes review, a sample also completed a symptom diary. The primary outcome was re-consultation with new/non-resolving symptoms within 1 month. The secondary outcome was 'global' poorer symptom control (longer than the median duration or higher than median severity). Antibiotics were prescribed for 62% (7872/12 677) of participants. The most commonly prescribed antibiotic was phenoxymethylpenicillin (76%, 5656/7474) and prescription durations were largely for 5 (20%), 7 (57%), or 10 (22%) days. Compared with 5-day courses, those receiving longer courses were less likely to re-consult with new or non-resolving symptoms (5 days 15.3%, 7 days 13.9%, 10 days 12.2%, 7-day course adjusted risk ratio (RR) 0.92 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.76 to 1.11] and 10-days RR 0.86 [95% CI = 0.59 to 1.23]) but these differences did not reach statistical significance. In adults prescribed antibiotics for sore throat, the authors cannot rule out a small advantage in terms of reduced re-consultation for a 10-day course of penicillin, but the effect is likely to be small. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  1. Prediction of persistent post-operative pain: Pain-specific psychological variables compared with acute post-operative pain and general psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn-Hofmann, C; Scheel, J; Dimova, V; Parthum, A; Carbon, R; Griessinger, N; Sittl, R; Lautenbacher, S

    2018-01-01

    Psychological variables and acute post-operative pain are of proven relevance for the prediction of persistent post-operative pain. We aimed at investigating whether pain-specific psychological variables like pain catastrophizing add to the predictive power of acute pain and more general psychological variables like depression. In all, 104 young male patients undergoing thoracic surgery for pectus excavatum correction were studied on the pre-operative day (T0) and 1 week (T1) and 3 months (T2) after surgery. They provided self-report ratings (pain-related: Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale = PASS, Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire = PVAQ; general psychological: Screening for Somatoform Symptoms, State-Anxiety Inventory-X1, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale = CES-D). Additional predictors (T1) as well as criterion variables (T2) were pain intensity (Numerical Rating Scale) and pain disability (Pain Disability Index). Three months after surgery, 25% of the patients still reported clinically relevant pain (pain intensity ≥3) and over 50% still reported pain-related disability. Acute post-operative pain as well as general psychological variables did not allow for a significant prediction of persistent post-operative pain; in contrast, pain-related psychological variables did. The best single predictors were PASS for pain intensity and PVAQ for pain disability. Pain-related psychological variables derived from the fear-avoidance model contributed significantly to the prediction of persistent post-operative pain. The best possible compilation of these measures requires further research. More general psychological variables may become relevant predictors later in the medical history. Our results suggest that pain-specific psychological variables such as pain anxiety and pain hypervigilance add significantly to the prediction of persistent post-operative pain and might even outperform established predictors such as

  2. Risk factors for incident delirium in an acute general medical setting: a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Emily Jane; Phillips, Nicole M; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Hutchinson, Alison M

    2017-03-01

    To determine predisposing and precipitating risk factors for incident delirium in medical patients during an acute hospital admission. Incident delirium is the most common complication of hospital admission for older patients. Up to 30% of hospitalised medical patients experience incident delirium. Determining risk factors for delirium is important for identifying patients who are most susceptible to incident delirium. Retrospective case-control study with two controls per case. An audit tool was used to review medical records of patients admitted to acute medical units for data regarding potential risk factors for delirium. Data were collected between August 2013 and March 2014 at three hospital sites of a healthcare organisation in Melbourne, Australia. Cases were 161 patients admitted to an acute medical ward and diagnosed with incident delirium between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Controls were 321 patients sampled from the acute medical population admitted within the same time range, stratified for admission location and who did not develop incident delirium during hospitalisation. Identified using logistic regression modelling, predisposing risk factors for incident delirium were dementia, cognitive impairment, functional impairment, previous delirium and fracture on admission. Precipitating risk factors for incident delirium were use of an indwelling catheter, adding more than three medications during admission and having an abnormal sodium level during admission. Multiple risk factors for incident delirium exist; patients with a history of delirium, dementia and cognitive impairment are at greatest risk of developing delirium during hospitalisation. Nurses and other healthcare professionals should be aware of patients who have one or more risk factors for incident delirium. Knowledge of risk factors for delirium has the potential to increase the recognition and understanding of patients who are vulnerable to delirium. Early recognition and

  3. IMPLEmenting a clinical practice guideline for acute low back pain evidence-based manageMENT in general practice (IMPLEMENT: Cluster randomised controlled trial study protocol

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    Francis Jill

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence generated from reliable research is not frequently implemented into clinical practice. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are a potential vehicle to achieve this. A recent systematic review of implementation strategies of guideline dissemination concluded that there was a lack of evidence regarding effective strategies to promote the uptake of guidelines. Recommendations from this review, and other studies, have suggested the use of interventions that are theoretically based because these may be more effective than those that are not. An evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the management of acute low back pain was recently developed in Australia. This provides an opportunity to develop and test a theory-based implementation intervention for a condition which is common, has a high burden, and for which there is an evidence-practice gap in the primary care setting. Aim This study aims to test the effectiveness of a theory-based intervention for implementing a clinical practice guideline for acute low back pain in general practice in Victoria, Australia. Specifically, our primary objectives are to establish if the intervention is effective in reducing the percentage of patients who are referred for a plain x-ray, and improving mean level of disability for patients three months post-consultation. Methods/Design This study protocol describes the details of a cluster randomised controlled trial. Ninety-two general practices (clusters, which include at least one consenting general practitioner, will be randomised to an intervention or control arm using restricted randomisation. Patients aged 18 years or older who visit a participating practitioner for acute non-specific low back pain of less than three months duration will be eligible for inclusion. An average of twenty-five patients per general practice will be recruited, providing a total of 2,300 patient participants. General practitioners in the

  4. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    The interferon (IFN) response to viral pathogens is critical for host survival. In humans and mouse models, defects in IFN responses can result in lethal herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, usually from encephalitis. Although rare, HSV-1 can also cause fulminant hepatic failure, which is often fatal. Although herpes simplex encephalitis has been extensively studied, HSV-1 generalized infections and subsequent acute liver failure are less well understood. We previously demonstrated that IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice are exquisitely susceptible to liver infection following corneal infection with HSV-1. In this study, we used bone marrow chimeras of IFN-αβγR(-/-) (AG129) and wild-type (WT; 129SvEv) mice to probe the underlying IFN-dependent mechanisms that control HSV-1 pathogenesis. After infection, WT mice with either IFN-αβγR(-/-) or WT marrow exhibited comparable survival, while IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice with WT marrow had a significant survival advantage over their counterparts with IFN-αβγR(-/-) marrow. Furthermore, using bioluminescent imaging to maximize data acquisition, we showed that the transfer of IFN-competent hematopoietic cells controlled HSV-1 replication and damage in the livers of IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice. Consistent with this, the inability of IFN-αβγR(-/-) immune cells to control liver infection in IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice manifested as profoundly elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, indicative of severe liver damage. In contrast, IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice receiving WT marrow exhibited only modest elevations of AST and ALT levels. These studies indicate that IFN responsiveness of the immune system is a major determinant of viral tropism and damage during visceral HSV infections. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is an incurable viral infection with the most significant morbidity and mortality occurring in neonates and patients with compromised immune systems. Severe pathologies from HSV include the

  5. The clinical efficacy and safety evaluation of ticagrelor for acute coronary syndrome in general ACS patients and diabetic patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiutong; Jiang, Xin; Huang, Sichao; Zhang, Tiantian; Chen, Lin; Xie, Siwen; Mo, Enpan; Xu, Jun; Cai, Shaohui

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a systematic evaluation was conducted to estimate the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor for treating acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in general ACS patients and a diabetes mellitus (DM) group. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, CNKI databases was conducted to analyze relevant randomized controlled trails (RCTs) of ticagrelor treating ACS during 2007 to 2015. Article screening, quality accessing and data extracting was independently undertaken by two reviewers. A meta-analysis was performed to clarify the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor in general ACS patients, and a meta-regression analysis was taken to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor in DM patients compared with general ACS patients. Twenty-two studies with 35004 participants were included. The meta-analysis result implicated that ticagrelor could: 1) reduce the incidence of the composite endpoint [OR = 0.83, 95%CI (0.77, 0.90), Pticagrelor could 1) reduce the platelet reactivity of patients at maintenance dose [MD = -44.59, 95%CI (-59.16, -30.02), PTicagrelor could reduce the incidence of composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke as well as platelet reactivity in DM patients with ACS, while not increasing the risk of bleeding. Because there are differences in platelet reactivity between DM patients and general ACS patients, we suggest that caution is needed when using ticagrelor in clinical applications.

  6. Development and validation of an acute kidney injury risk index for patients undergoing general surgery: results from a national data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheterpal, Sachin; Tremper, Kevin K; Heung, Michael; Rosenberg, Andrew L; Englesbe, Michael; Shanks, Amy M; Campbell, Darrell A

    2009-03-01

    The authors sought to identify the incidence, risk factors, and mortality impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) after general surgery using a large and representative national clinical data set. The 2005-2006 American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant use data file is a compilation of outcome data from general surgery procedures performed in 121 US medical centers. The primary outcome was AKI within 30 days, defined as an increase in serum creatinine of at least 2 mg/dl or acute renal failure necessitating dialysis. A variety of patient comorbidities and operative characteristics were evaluated as possible predictors of AKI. A logistic regression full model fit was used to create an AKI model and risk index. Thirty-day mortality among patients with and without AKI was compared. Of 152,244 operations reviewed, 75,952 met the inclusion criteria, and 762 (1.0%) were complicated by AKI. The authors identified 11 independent preoperative predictors: age 56 yr or older, male sex, emergency surgery, intraperitoneal surgery, diabetes mellitus necessitating oral therapy, diabetes mellitus necessitating insulin therapy, active congestive heart failure, ascites, hypertension, mild preoperative renal insufficiency, and moderate preoperative renal insufficiency. The c statistic for a simplified risk index was 0.80 in the derivation and validation cohorts. Class V patients (six or more risk factors) had a 9% incidence of AKI. Overall, patients experiencing AKI had an eightfold increase in 30-day mortality. Approximately 1% of general surgery cases are complicated by AKI. The authors have developed a robust risk index based on easily identified preoperative comorbidities and patient characteristics.

  7. A fatal case of acute progression of generalized edema and simultaneous flash pulmonary edema in a patient with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosaki, Yuri; Hayashidani, Shunji; Ouchi, Sayako; Ohshima, Tukasa; Nakano, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2015-04-28

    Idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome is a rare and fatal disease due to the unexplained episodic attacks of capillary leakage of plasma from the intravascular into the interstitial space. The attack consists of three phases, a prodromal phase, peripheral leak phase and recruitment phase. During the peripheral leak phase, generalized edema, mainly in the trunk and extremities, with hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia occurs, while usually the visceral organs like lungs, brain, heart and kidneys seem not to be involved. Treatment of the acute phase is supportive, focusing on adequate but not overzealous fluid resuscitation, because pulmonary edema usually occurs in the recruitment phase. A 65-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital because of severe hypovolemic shock with metabolic acidosis and hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia. Although she was considered to be in the peripheral leak phase of idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome, which could not be diagnosed during the treatment, the generalized edema worsened further, severe flash pulmonary edema progressed rapidly after fluid resuscitation and she died. The autopsy showed generalized edema, especially alveolar pulmonary edema without endothelial apoptosis. Because hypovolemic shock and fatal pulmonary edema may progress rapidly together even in the peripheral leak phase of idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome, we should keep in mind this rare and fatal disease and recognize the pathophysiology to treat it effectively when the patient has hypovolemia with metabolic acidosis.

  8. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  9. A general factor model for the Beck Depression Inventory-II: validation in a sample of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D; Ziegelstein, Roy C; Beck, Christine A; Pilote, Louise

    2008-08-01

    Many studies have linked symptoms of depression after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to negative health outcomes, including mortality. It has been suggested, however, that this link may be due to biased measurement of depressive symptoms in post-AMI patients related to confounding with somatic symptoms related to AMI. The objective of this study was to validate a factor model for the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) that would allow for modeling of depressive symptoms after explicitly removing bias related to somatic symptom overlap. A total of 477 hospitalized post-AMI patients from 10 cardiac care units were administered the BDI-II. Confirmatory factor analysis models for ordinal data were conducted with MPLUS to test the fit of a model with a single General Depression factor (all 21 BDI-II items) and uncorrelated Somatic (5 items) and Cognitive (8 items) factors (G-S-C model) compared to standard correlated two-factor models. The G-S-C model fit as well or better than previously published correlated two-factor models. Seventy-three percent of variance in BDI-II scores is accounted for by the General Depression factor, whereas 11% and 13% respectively are accounted for by uncorrelated Somatic and Cognitive factors. The G-S-C model is a novel approach to understanding the measurement structure of the BDI-II, presents advantageous statistical and interpretive properties compared to standard correlated factor models, and provides a viable mechanism to test links between symptoms of depression, as measured by the General Depression factor, and health outcomes among patients with AMI after explicitly removing variance from somatic symptoms unrelated to the General Depression factor.

  10. Evaluation of a theory-informed implementation intervention for the management of acute low back pain in general medical practice: the IMPLEMENT cluster randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D French

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This cluster randomised trial evaluated an intervention to decrease x-ray referrals and increase giving advice to stay active for people with acute low back pain (LBP in general practice. METHODS: General practices were randomised to either access to a guideline for acute LBP (control or facilitated interactive workshops (intervention. We measured behavioural predictors (e.g. knowledge, attitudes and intentions and fear avoidance beliefs. We were unable to recruit sufficient patients to measure our original primary outcomes so we introduced other outcomes measured at the general practitioner (GP level: behavioural simulation (clinical decision about vignettes and rates of x-ray and CT-scan (medical administrative data. All those not involved in the delivery of the intervention were blinded to allocation. RESULTS: 47 practices (53 GPs were randomised to the control and 45 practices (59 GPs to the intervention. The number of GPs available for analysis at 12 months varied by outcome due to missing confounder information; a minimum of 38 GPs were available from the intervention group, and a minimum of 40 GPs from the control group. For the behavioural constructs, although effect estimates were small, the intervention group GPs had greater intention of practising consistent with the guideline for the clinical behaviour of x-ray referral. For behavioural simulation, intervention group GPs were more likely to adhere to guideline recommendations about x-ray (OR 1.76, 95%CI 1.01, 3.05 and more likely to give advice to stay active (OR 4.49, 95%CI 1.90 to 10.60. Imaging referral was not statistically significantly different between groups and the potential importance of effects was unclear; rate ratio 0.87 (95%CI 0.68, 1.10 for x-ray or CT-scan. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention led to small changes in GP intention to practice in a manner that is consistent with an evidence-based guideline, but it did not result in statistically significant

  11. Physiotherapy alone or in combination with corticosteroid injection for acute lateral epicondylitis in general practice: A protocol for a randomised, placebo-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmedal Øystein

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral epicondylitis is a painful condition responsible for loss of function and sick leave for long periods of time. In many countries, the treatment guidelines recommend a wait-and-see policy, reflecting that no conclusions on the best treatment can be drawn from the available research, published studies and meta-analyses. Methods/Design Randomized double blind controlled clinical trial in a primary care setting. While earlier trials have either compared corticosteroid injections to physical therapy or to naproxen orally, we will compare the clinical effect of physiotherapy alone or physiotherapy combined with corticosteroid injection in the initial treatment of acute tennis elbow. Patients seeing their general practitioner with lateral elbow pain of recent onset will be randomised to one of three interventions: 1: physiotherapy, corticosteroid injection and naproxen or 2: physiotherapy, placebo injection and naproxen or 3: wait and see treatment with naproxen alone. Treatment and assessments are done by two different doctors, and the contents of the injection is unknown to both the treating doctor and patient. The primary outcome measure is the patient's evaluation of improvement after 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks. Secondary outcome measures are pain, function and severity of main complaint, pain-free grip strength, maximal grip strength, pressure-pain threshold, the patient's satisfaction with the treatment and duration of sick leave. Conclusion This article describes a randomized, double blind, controlled clinical trial with a one year follow up to investigate the effects of adding steroid injections to physiotherapy in acute lateral epicondylitis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00826462

  12. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap.

  13. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap. PMID:22992300

  14. Аnticonvulsant effects of citicoline and diazepam at their combined application on model of the acute generalized convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazole in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L V; Karpova, M N; Zinkovski, K A; Klishina, N Yu

    2016-01-01

    Studying of efficiency of the combined application of the citicoline possessing nootropic and anticonvulsive action and antiepileptic drug of diazepam on the acute generalized convulsions (AGC) caused by a convulsant pentylentetrazole (PTZ). Experiments are executed on the male Wistar rats (n = 68) weighing 160-190 g on the AGС model caused by of PTZ in a dose of 80 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.). For studying of efficiency of the combined use of drugs determined the minimum anticonvulsive action of a citicoline (Tserakson, «Nicomed Ferrer Internacional, S.A.») and diazepam (Relanium, Warsaw pharmaceutical plant of Polf AO, Warsaw, Poland). For this citicoline were administered i.p. in doses 500 and 300 mg/kg 1 hour before the PTZ and diazepam - in doses of 0,5 and 0,25 mg/kg 30 min before administration of PTZ. Control animals were injected with saline to the same extent and under the same experimental conditions. It is shown that the combined administration of a citicoline and diazepam in minimum active doses (300 and 0.25 mg/kg respectively), increases anticonvulsive properties of both drugs. The combined administration of citicoline with diazepam in minimally active doses enhances anticonvulsant properties of both drugs, thereby reducing the risk of development of side effects. In addition, the research may serve as experimental justification for the use of drugs in case of convulsions for the purpose beneficial effect on cognitive function and delays of progressing of neurodegenerative processes.

  15. [The influence of acute hypercapnia on the permeability of the blood-brain barrier for gentamycin under conditions of general anesthesia in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulski, C

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the work was to demonstrate whether acute hypercapnia (paCO2 > 65 mm Hg) influenced the permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB). Twelve Chinchilla rabbits which underwent general anaesthesia were randomly divided into 2 groups. The animals were sedated with intravenous administration of pentobarbital, then were subjected to endotracheal intubation and connected to volume-controlled respirator (Zimmermann pump). Artificial ventilation using air/oxygen mixture was applied. Auricular artery, inferior caval vein and aorta were catheterized with a catheter being also placed in the lateral ventricle of the brain. General anaesthesia was supported with continuous intravenous administration of pentobarbital. To maintain normal paCO2 values, the investigation was performed under normal ventilation in control group (5 rabbits). Controlled hypoventilation was applied to achieve an increase of paCO2 in the shortest possible time in the investigated group (7 rabbits). Heart rate (HR), systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP) and mean (MAP) arterial blood pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were continuously recorded. Gentamycin was applied as the marker of function of BBB, because it couldn't penetrate into the cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous administration under physiological conditions. BBB function in normal and significantly increased paCO2 was evaluated using gentamycin permeability indexes (QG), defined as gentamycin concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid to serum gentamycin concentration in the same moment of trial. Comparative analysis of the QG index for both groups according to values achieved before the trial and after 1 and 3 hours of experiment indicates the degree of BBB damage. Non-parametric differences significance test according to Kolmogorow-Smirnow was applied for statistical verification of the results. Significance level for the trial was alpha = 0.05. None of the monitored parameters has changed in

  16. Improving early exclusion of acute coronary syndrome in primary care: the added value of point-of-care troponin as stated by general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Michelle M A; Noltes, Amber M; Koffijberg, Hendrik; IJzerman, Maarten J; Kusters, Ron

    2017-07-01

    Aim To investigate general practitioners' (GPs') desire and perceived added value of point-of-care (POC) troponin, its effect on referral decisions, and test requirements. Excluding acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in primary care remains a diagnostic challenges for GPs. Consequently, referral rates of chest pain patients are high, while the incidence of a cardiovascular problem is only 8-15%. Previous studies have shown that GPs are interested in a POC troponin test. This test could enhance rapid exclusion of ACS, thereby preventing unnecessary patient distress, without compromising safety and while reducing costs. However, using this test is not recommended in current guidelines due to uncertainty in the test's potential added value, and the lower sensitivity early after symptom onset as compared with troponin tests in a regular laboratory. An online survey containing 34 questions was distributed among 837 Dutch GPs in June 2015. Findings A total of 126 GPs (15.1%) completed at least 75% of the questions. 67.1% of GPs believe that POC troponin tests have moderate to very high added value. Although the availability of a POC test is expected to increase the frequency at which troponin tests are used, it likely decreases (immediate) referral rates. Of the responding GPs, 78.3% only accept 10 min as the maximum test duration, 78.1% think reimbursement of the POC device is required for implementation, and 68.9% consider it necessary that it can be performed with a finger prick blood sample. In conclusion, according to GPs, the POC troponin test can be of added value to exclude ACS early on. Actual test implementation will depend on test characteristics, including test duration, type of blood sample required, and reimbursement of the analyzer.

  17. Mortality and readmission rates in patients hospitalized for acute decompensated heart failure: a comparison between cardiology and general-medicine service outcomes in an underserved population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Ahmed M; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Iqbal, Muhammad; Wang, Dan; Negassa, Abdissa; Zolty, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    With recent legislation imposing penalties on hospitals for above-average 30-day all-cause readmissions for patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), there is concern these penalties will more heavily impact hospitals serving socioeconomically vulnerable and underserved populations. Patients with ADHF and low socioeconomic status have better postdischarge mortality and readmission outcomes when cardiologists are involved in their in-hospital care. We retrospectively searched the electronic medical record for patients hospitalized for ADHF from 2001 to 2010 in 3 urban hospitals within a large university-based health system. These patients were divided into 2 groups based on whether a cardiologist was involved in their care or not. Measured outcomes were 30- and 60-day postdischarge mortality and readmission rates. Out of the 7516 ADHF patients, 1434 patients were seen by a cardiologist (19%). These patients had lower 60-day mortality (5.4% vs 7.0%; hazard ratio [HR]: 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.52-0.96, P = 0.034) and lower 30- and 60-day readmission rates (16.7% vs 20.6%; HR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.66-0.89, P = 0.002, and 26.1% vs 30.2%; HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.72-0.92, P = 0.003, respectively). There was no significant difference in the in-hospital mortality between the 2 groups. Compared with other races, whites with systolic HF have marginally lower HF-related readmission rates when treated by cardiologists. In this cohort of ADHF patients from the Bronx, New York, involvement of a cardiologist resulted in improved short-term mortality and readmission outcomes compared with treatment by general internal medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Introduction of a Microsoft Excel-based unified electronic weekend handover document in Acute and General Medicine in a DGH: aims, outcomes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostelec, Pablo; Emanuele Garbelli, Pietro; Emanuele Garbelli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    On-call weekends in medicine can be a busy and stressful time for junior doctors, as they are responsible for a larger pool of patients, most of whom they would have never met. Clinical handover to the weekend team is extremely important and any communication errors may have a profound impact on patient care, potentially even resulting in avoidable harm or death. Several senior clinical bodies have issued guidelines on best practice in written and verbal handover. These include: standardisation, use of pro forma documents prompting doctors to document vital information (such as ceiling of care/resuscitation status) and prioritisation according to clinical urgency. These guidelines were not consistently followed in our hospital site at the onset of 2014 and junior doctors were becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the handover processes. An initial audit of handover documents used across the medical division on two separate weekends in January 2014, revealed high variability in compliance with documentation of key information. For example, ceiling of care was documented for only 14-42% of patients and resuscitation status in 26-72% of patients respectively. Additionally, each ward used their own self-designed pro forma and patients were not prioritised by clinical urgency. Within six months from the introduction of a standardised, hospital-wide weekend handover pro forma across the medical division and following initial improvements to its layout, ceiling of therapy and resuscitation status were documented in approximately 80% of patients (with some minor variability). Moreover, 100% of patients in acute medicine and 75% of those in general medicine were prioritised by clinical urgency and all wards used the same handover pro forma.

  19. The General Public’s Awareness of Early Symptoms of and Emergency Responses to Acute Myocardial Infarction and Related Factors in South Korea: A National Public Telephone Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Sook Kim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prompt treatment affects prognosis and survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI onset. This study evaluated the awareness of early symptoms of AMI and knowledge of appropriate responses on symptom occurrence, along with related factors. Methods: Participants’ knowledge of the early symptoms of and responses to AMI onset were investigated using a random digit dialing survey. We included 9600 residents of 16 metropolitan cities and provinces in Korea. Results: The proportions of respondents who were aware of early symptoms of AMI ranged from 32.9% (arm or shoulder pain to 79.1% (chest pain and discomfort. Of the respondents, 67.0% would call an ambulance if someone showed signs of AMI, 88.7% knew ≥1 symptom, 10.9% knew all five symptoms, and 3.1% had excellent knowledge (correct identification of all five AMI symptoms, not answering “Yes” to the trap question, and correctly identifying calling an ambulance as the appropriate response when someone is exhibiting AMI symptoms. The odds ratio (OR for having excellent knowledge was significantly higher for those who graduated college or higher (OR 3.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09–10.76 than for those with less than a primary school education, as well as for subjects with AMI advertisement exposure (OR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.10–2.02 and with knowledge of AMI (OR 1.63; 95% CI, 1.16–2.27. The 60- to 79-year-old group had significantly lower OR for excellent knowledge than the 20- to 39-year-old group (OR 0.53; 95% CI, 0.28–0.99. Conclusions: Awareness of AMI symptoms and the appropriate action to take after symptom onset in South Korea was poor. Therefore, educational and promotional strategies to increase the overall awareness in the general public, especially in the elderly and those with low education levels, are needed.

  20. The trAPP-study: cost-effectiveness of an unsupervised e-health supported neuromuscular training program for the treatment of acute ankle sprains in general practice: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailuhu, Adinda K E; Verhagen, Evert A L M; van Ochten, John M; Bindels, Patrick J E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2015-04-09

    Ankle sprains are one of the most frequent injuries of the musculoskeletal system, with yearly around 680.000 new sprains in The Netherlands. Of these, about 130.000 people will visit the general practitioner (GP) each year. In addition, patients have an increased risk of a recurrent ankle sprain and about a third report at least one re-sprain. No optimal treatment strategy has proven to be effective in general practice, however promising results were achieved in a preventive trial among athletes. Therefore, the objective is to examine the (cost)-effectiveness of an unsupervised e-health supported neuromuscular training program in combination with usual care in general practice compared to usual care alone in patients with acute ankle sprains in general practice. This study is a multi-center, open-label randomized controlled trial, with a one-year follow-up. Patients with an acute lateral ankle sprain, aged between 14 and 65 years and visiting the GP within three weeks of injury are eligible for inclusion. Patients will be randomized in two study groups. The intervention group will receive, in addition to usual care, a standardized eight-week neuromuscular training program guided by an App. The control group will receive usual care in general practice alone. The primary outcome of this study is the total number of ankle sprain recurrences reported during one year follow-up. Secondary outcomes are subjective recovery after one year follow-up, pain at rest and during activity, function, return to sport, cost-effectiveness and compliance of the intervention. Measurements will take place monthly for the study period of 12 months after baseline measurement. For general practitioners the treatment of acute ankle sprains is a challenge. A neuromuscular training program that has proven to be effective for athletes might be a direct treatment tool for acute ankle sprains in general practice. Positive results of this randomized controlled trial can lead to changes in

  1. Efficacy of paracetamol, diclofenac and advice for acute low back pain in general practice: design of a randomized controlled trial (PACE Plus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schreijenberg; P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); Y. van Trier (Yvonne); D. Rizopoulos (Dimitris); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); L. Voogt; C. Maher (Chris); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Low back pain is common and associated with a considerable burden to patients and society. There is uncertainty regarding the relative benefit of paracetamol and diclofenac and regarding the additional effect of pain medication compared with advice only in patients with acute

  2. Evaluating the level of adherence to Ministry of Health guidelines in the management of Severe Acute Malnutrition at Garissa Provincial General hospital, Garissa, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfa, Osman; Njai, Daniel; Ahmed, Laving; Admani, Bashir; Were, Fred; Wamalwa, Dalton; Osano, Boniface; Mburugu, Patrick; Mohamed, Musa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Half of Kenya's high infant and under five mortality rates is due to malnutrition. Proper implementation of World Health Organization's (WHO) Evidence Based Guidelines (EBG) in management of severe acute malnutrition can reduce mortality rates to less than 5%. The objectives were to establish the level of adherence to WHO guideline and the proportion of children appropriately managed for severe acute malnutrition (steps 1-8) as per the WHO protocol in the management of severe acute malnutrition. This was a short longitudinal study of 96 children, aged 6-59 months admitted to the pediatric ward with diagnosis of severe acute malnutrition. Methods Data was extracted from patients’ medical files and recorded into an audit tool to compare care provided in this hospital with WHO guidelines. Results Non-edematous malnutrition was the commonest presentation (93.8%). A higher proportion (63.5%) of patients was male. Most (85.4%) of patients were younger than 2 years. Patients with non-edematous malnutrition were younger (mean age for non-edematous malnutrition was 16 (± 10.6) months versus 25 (± 13.7) months in edematous malnutrition). The commonest co- morbid condition was diarrhea (52.1%). Overall, 13 children died giving an inpatient case fatality rate of 13.5%. Appropriate management was documented in only 14.6% for hypoglycemia (step1), 5.2% for hypothermia (step 2) and 31.3% for dehydration (step 3). Conclusion The level of adherence to MOH guidelines was documented in 5 out of the 8 steps. Appropriate management of children with severe acute malnutrition was inadequate at Garissa hospital. PMID:25237411

  3. Efficacy of movement control exercises versus general exercises on recurrent sub-acute nonspecific low back pain in a sub-group of patients with movement control dysfunction. protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehtola Vesa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice guidelines recommend various types of exercise for chronic back pain but there have been few head-to-head comparisons of these interventions. General exercise seems to be an effective option for management of chronic low back pain (LBP but very little is known about the management of a sub-acute LBP within sub-groups. Recent research has developed clinical tests to identify a subgroup of patients with chronic non-specific LBP who have movement control dysfunction (MD. Method/Design We are conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT to compare the effects of general exercise and specific movement control exercise (SMCE on disability and function in patients with MD within recurrent sub-acute LBP. The main outcome measure is the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Discussion European clinical guideline for management of chronic LBP recommends that more research is required to develop tools to improve the classification and identification of specific clinical sub-groups of chronic LBP patients. Good quality RCTs are then needed to determine the effectiveness of specific interventions aimed at these specific target groups. This RCT aims to test the hypothesis whether patients within a sub-group of MD benefit more through a specific individually tailored movement control exercise program than through general exercises.

  4. Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Most cases of acute bronchitis get better within several days. But your cough ... that cause colds and the flu often cause acute bronchitis. These viruses spread through the air when people ...

  5. A fatal case of acute progression of generalized edema and simultaneous flash pulmonary edema in a patient with idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome: a case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirosaki, Yuri; Hayashidani, Shunji; Ouchi, Sayako; Ohshima, Tukasa; Nakano, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    .... During the peripheral leak phase, generalized edema, mainly in the trunk and extremities, with hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia occurs, while usually the visceral organs like lungs, brain, heart...

  6. The incidence of colon cancer among patients diagnosed with left colonic or sigmoid acute diverticulitis is higher than in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jeremy; Thomopoulos, Theodoros; Usel, Massimo; Gjika, Ergys; Bouchardy, Christine; Morel, Philippe; Ris, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Considering the low incidence of colon cancer after an initial episode of colonic diverticulitis in some categories of patients, some authors suggested to exempt them from colonoscopy. However, this incidence has never been compared to that of a reference population, and predictors of cancer are still poorly investigated. We aimed to determine the 1-year incidence of colon cancer at the site of diverticulitis in patients diagnosed with left colonic or sigmoid acute diverticulitis, to compare this incidence to a reference population to state whether endoscopy is required or not, and to identify predicting factors of cancer to better target subpopulations needing that examination. All patients admitted at the University Hospitals of Geneva for left colonic or sigmoid acute diverticulitis were included. Patients with a previous history of colon cancer or non-available for follow-up were excluded. Demographic data, haemoglobin values, and the Hinchey score were documented. This cohort was matched with the Geneva Cancer Registry to look for cancer occurrence at the site of diverticulitis within 1 year. Predictors of cancer were assessed using univariate logistic regression and the risk of cancer by comparing observed cases to a reference population using standardized incidence ratios. The final cohort included 506 patients. Eleven (2.2 %) had a diagnosis of cancer at the site of diverticulitis within 1 year. The mean age was significantly different between patients with cancer and others. No predictor of cancer could be identified, except a trend for an increased risk with advancing age (p = 0.067). The standardized incidence ratios showed a 44-fold increased risk of cancer among the cohort compared to the reference population. Colonoscopy should be continued after an initial diagnosis of left colonic or sigmoid acute diverticulitis, irrespective of the clinical or radiological presentations.

  7. Costs and Cost-effectiveness of Epidural Steroids for Acute Lumbosacral Radicular Syndrome in General Practice An Economic Evaluation Alongside a Pragmatic Randomized Control Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker-Huiges, Antje; Vermeulen, Karin; Winters, Jan C.; van Wijhe, Marten; van der Meer, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Study Design. A pragmatic, randomized, controlled, single-blinded trial in Dutch general practice. Objective. Assessing the costs and cost-effectiveness of adding segmental epidural steroid injections to care as usual in radiculopathy in general practice. Summary of Background Data. Lumbosacral

  8. Economic evaluation of active implementation versus guideline dissemination for evidence-based care of acute low-back pain in a general practice setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Mortimer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The development and publication of clinical practice guidelines for acute low-back pain has resulted in evidence-based recommendations that have the potential to improve the quality and safety of care for acute low-back pain. Development and dissemination of guidelines may not, however, be sufficient to produce improvements in clinical practice; further investment in active implementation of guideline recommendations may be required. Further research is required to quantify the trade-off between the additional upfront cost of active implementation of guideline recommendations for low-back pain and any resulting improvements in clinical practice. METHODS: Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside the IMPLEMENT trial from a health sector perspective to compare active implementation of guideline recommendations via the IMPLEMENT intervention (plus standard dissemination against standard dissemination alone. RESULTS: The base-case analysis suggests that delivery of the IMPLEMENT intervention dominates standard dissemination (less costly and more effective, yielding savings of $135 per x-ray referral avoided (-$462.93/3.43. However, confidence intervals around point estimates for the primary outcome suggest that--irrespective of willingness to pay (WTP--we cannot be at least 95% confident that the IMPLEMENT intervention differs in value from standard dissemination. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate that moving beyond development and dissemination to active implementation entails a significant additional upfront investment that may not be offset by health gains and/or reductions in health service utilization of sufficient magnitude to render active implementation cost-effective.

  9. Sub-classification based specific movement control exercises are superior to general exercise in sub-acute low back pain when both are combined with manual therapy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtola, Vesa; Luomajoki, Hannu; Leinonen, Ville; Gibbons, Sean; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2016-03-22

    Clinical guidelines recommend research on sub-groups of patients with low back pain (LBP) but, to date, only few studies have been published. One sub-group of LBP is movement control impairment (MCI) and clinical tests to identify this sub-group have been developed. Also, exercises appear to be beneficial for the management of chronic LBP (CLBP), but very little is known about the management of sub-acute LBP. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to compare the effects of general exercise versus specific movement control exercise (SMCE) on disability and function in patients with MCI within the recurrent sub-acute LBP group. Participants having a MCI attended five treatment sessions of either specific or general exercises. In both groups a short application of manual therapy was applied. The primary outcome was disability, assessed by the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). The measurements were taken at baseline, immediately after the three months intervention and at twelve-month follow-up. Seventy patients met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for the trial. Measurements of 61 patients (SMCE n = 30 and general exercise n = 31) were completed at twelve months. (Drop-out rate 12.9 %). Patients in both groups reported significantly less disability (RMDQ) at twelve months follow-up. However, the mean change on the RMDQ between baseline and the twelve-month measurement showed statistically significantly superior improvement for the SMCE group -1.9 points (-3.9 to -0.5) 95 % (CI). The result did not reach the clinically significant three point difference. There was no statistical difference between the groups measured with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). For subjects with non-specific recurrent sub-acute LBP and MCI an intervention consisting of SMCE and manual therapy combined may be superior to general exercise combined with manual therapy. The study protocol registration number is ISRCTN48684087 . It was registered

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  11. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  12. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  13. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  14. Stages of Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Adult ...

  16. Bronchitis - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute bronchitis is swelling and inflamed tissue in the main ... present only for a short time. Causes When acute bronchitis occurs, it almost always comes after having a ...

  17. Acute cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000264.htm Acute cholecystitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute cholecystitis is sudden swelling and irritation of the gallbladder. ...

  18. An analysis of blood and body fluid exposures sustained by house officers, medical students, and nursing personnel on acute-care general medical wards: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotka, J L; Wong, E S; Williams, D S; Stuart, C G; Markowitz, S M

    1991-10-01

    To prospectively examine the epidemiology of blood and body fluid exposures sustained by medicine housestaff, medical school students, registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and nurses' aides (NAs) on general medicine wards and to define problem areas that may be amenable to change. Daily data collection during 9 months using a self-reporting questionnaire. General medical wards in 2 tertiary referral hospitals. Medicine housestaff/students and nursing personnel. Physicians reported 644 exposures, of which 98 (15.2%), 296 (46.0%), and 250 (38.8%) were sustained by medicine residents, interns, and students, respectively. Blood contact occurred with 591 (91.8%) exposures. For physicians, 575 (89.3%) exposures occurred during venipuncture, intravenous catheter manipulation, and arterial punctures. Interns and students most commonly incurred exposures during venipunctures and intravenous manipulations; residents commonly were exposed during emergent intravenous catheter placements. Five-hundred-twenty-two (81%) exposures occurred between 7 A.M. and 7 P.M. During 524 (81.4%) exposures, physicians were not using barrier devices. Nurses reported 235 exposures, of which 140 (59.6%), 23 (9.8%), and 72 (30.6%) were sustained by RNs, LPNs, and NAs, respectively. RN exposures commonly occurred during intravenous manipulations and glucometer fingersticks. LPNs and NAs incurred a higher percentage of exposures during nonprocedural patient care. Blood contact and wound drainage accounted for 167 (71.1%) and 31 (13.2%) exposures, respectively. Exposures to blood and body fluids frequently are incurred by healthcare workers on general medical wards. Efforts to reduce these exposures should be directed not only at improving procedural skills of healthcare workers for venipunctures, intravenous catheter insertions, and glucometer fingersticks, but also in increasing barrier use during procedural and nonprocedural tasks.

  19. The effects of acute alcohol intoxication, partner risk level, and general intention to have unprotected sex on women's sexual decision making with a new partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Michele Parkhill; Norris, Jeanette; Davis, Kelly Cue; Zawacki, Tina; Morrison, Diane M; George, William H; Kiekel, Preston A

    2011-10-01

    Women account for a quarter of all new HIV/AIDS cases, with approximately 65% having contracted the infection via heterosexual contact. Few experimental studies have examined interactions among background, partner, and situational characteristics in predicting women's sexual decisions. The Cognitive Mediation Model provides a useful theoretical framework for assessing likelihood of unprotected sex. Female social drinkers (n = 230) who had answered questions related to their general intention to have unprotected sex were randomly assigned to an experimental condition based on partner risk level (unknown, low, high) and beverage (control, placebo, low dose, high dose). Participants projected themselves into a story depicting a sexual situation with a man and answered questions about their cognitive appraisals, assertive condom request, and likelihood of unprotected sex. Alcohol effects on appraisal of sexual potential differed by partner risk condition. In the unknown and low risk conditions, placebo and alcohol participants appraised the situation as having greater sexual potential than controls whereas in the high risk condition, only those who consumed alcohol did so. Sexual potential appraisals in turn predicted impelling cognitions about having sex, which in turn predicted assertive condom request and unprotected sex intentions. General intention for unprotected sex independently predicted cognitive appraisals and outcomes. These findings highlight the need for prevention programs that focus on teaching women how to pay attention and consider sexual risk cues presented by potential partners, particularly when under the influence of alcohol.

  20. The Effects of Acute Alcohol Intoxication, Partner Risk Level, and General Intention to Have Unprotected Sex on Women’s Sexual Decision Making with a New Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdie, Michele Parkhill; Norris, Jeanette; Davis, Kelly Cue; Zawacki, Tina; Morrison, Diane M.; George, William H.; Kiekel, Preston A.

    2012-01-01

    Women account for a quarter of all new HIV/AIDS cases, with approximately 65% having contracted the infection via heterosexual contact (CDC, 2008). Few experimental studies have examined interactions among background, partner, and situational characteristics in predicting women’s sexual decisions. The Cognitive Mediation Model provides a useful theoretical framework for assessing likelihood of unprotected sex (Norris, Masters, & Zawacki, 2004). Female social drinkers (n = 230) who had answered questions related to their general intention to have unprotected sex were randomly assigned to an experimental condition based on partner risk level (unknown, low, high) and beverage (control, placebo, low dose, high dose). Participants projected themselves into a story depicting a sexual situation with a man and answered questions about their cognitive appraisals, assertive condom request, and likelihood of unprotected sex. Alcohol effects on appraisal of sexual potential differed by partner risk condition. In the unknown and low risk conditions, placebo and alcohol participants appraised the situation as having greater sexual potential than controls whereas in the high risk condition, only those who consumed alcohol did so. Sexual potential appraisals in turn predicted impelling cognitions about having sex, which in turn predicted assertive condom request and unprotected sex intentions. General intention for unprotected sex independently predicted cognitive appraisals and outcomes. These findings highlight the need for prevention programs that focus on teaching women how to pay attention and consider sexual risk cues presented by potential partners, particularly when under the influence of alcohol. PMID:21859223

  1. Surgically treated acute abdomen at Gondar University Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute abdomen is an acute onset of abdominal disease entities that require immediate surgical intervention in most of the cases. The numbers of researches done on acute abdomen in general are Very few in Ethiopia. The main objective of this study was to document the burden of acute abdomen in general ...

  2. Modeling acute respiratory illness during the 2007 San Diego wildland fires using a coupled emissions-transport system and generalized additive modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Brian; French, Nancy H F; Koziol, Benjamin W; Billmire, Michael; Owen, Robert Chris; Johnson, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Michele; Loboda, Tatiana; Wu, Shiliang

    2013-11-05

    A study of the impacts on respiratory health of the 2007 wildland fires in and around San Diego County, California is presented. This study helps to address the impact of fire emissions on human health by modeling the exposure potential of proximate populations to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) from vegetation fires. Currently, there is no standard methodology to model and forecast the potential respiratory health effects of PM plumes from wildland fires, and in part this is due to a lack of methodology for rigorously relating the two. The contribution in this research specifically targets that absence by modeling explicitly the emission, transmission, and distribution of PM following a wildland fire in both space and time. Coupled empirical and deterministic models describing particulate matter (PM) emissions and atmospheric dispersion were linked to spatially explicit syndromic surveillance health data records collected through the San Diego Aberration Detection and Incident Characterization (SDADIC) system using a Generalized Additive Modeling (GAM) statistical approach. Two levels of geographic aggregation were modeled, a county-wide regional level and division of the county into six sub regions. Selected health syndromes within SDADIC from 16 emergency departments within San Diego County relevant for respiratory health were identified for inclusion in the model. The model captured the variability in emergency department visits due to several factors by including nine ancillary variables in addition to wildfire PM concentration. The model coefficients and nonlinear function plots indicate that at peak fire PM concentrations the odds of a person seeking emergency care is increased by approximately 50% compared to non-fire conditions (40% for the regional case, 70% for a geographically specific case). The sub-regional analyses show that demographic variables also influence respiratory health outcomes from smoke. The model developed in this study allows a

  3. Effect of General Anesthesia and Conscious Sedation During Endovascular Therapy on Infarct Growth and Clinical Outcomes in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Claus Ziegler; Yoo, Albert J; Sørensen, Leif Hougaard

    2018-01-01

    (GA) is associated with worse outcomes compared with conscious sedation (CS). Objective: To examine the effect of type of anesthesia during EVT on infarct growth and clinical outcome. Design, Setting, and Participants: The General or Local Anesthesia in Intra Arterial Therapy (GOLIATH) trial......: Of 128 patients included in the trial, 65 were randomized to GA, and 63 were randomized to CS. For the entire cohort, the mean (SD) age was 71.4 (11.4) years, and 62 (48.4%) were women. Baseline demographic and clinical variables were balanced between the GA and CS treatment arms. The median National...... among patients treated under GA or CS did not reach statistical significance (median [IQR] growth, 8.2 [2.2-38.6] mL vs 19.4 [2.4-79.0] mL; P = .10). There were better clinical outcomes in the GA group, with an odds ratio for a shift to a lower modified Rankin Scale score of 1.91 (95% CI, 1...

  4. Comparisons of the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuowei; Kemp, David E.; Chan, Philip K.; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Gao, Keming

    2012-01-01

    Quetiapine extended-release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR among these psychiatric conditions. The discontinuation due to adverse events (DAEs) and reported somnolence in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine-XR in these psychiatric conditions were examined. The absolute risk reduction or increase and the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) or harm (NNTH) for DAEs and reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR ≥300 mg/d relative to placebo were estimated. Data from one study in schizophrenia (n=465), one in mania (n=316), one in bipolar depression (n=280), two in refractory MDD (n=624), two in MDD (n=669) and three in GAD (n=1109) were available. The risk for DAEs of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in bipolar depression (NNTH=9), refractory MDD (NNTH=8), MDD (NNTH=9), and GAD (NNTH=5), but not in schizophrenia and mania. The risk for reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in schizophrenia (600 mg/d NNTH=15 and 800 mg/d NNTH=11), mania (NNTH=8), bipolar depression (NNTH=4), refractory MDD (NNTH=5), MDD (NNTH=5) and GAD (NNTH=5). These results suggest that patients with GAD had the poorest tolerability during treatment with quetiapine-XR, but they had a similar sensitivity as those with bipolar depression and MDD. Patients with schizophrenia or mania had a higher tolerability and a lower sensitivity than those with bipolar depression, MDD, or GAD. PMID:20875219

  5. Acute Porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besur, Siddesh; Schmeltzer, Paul; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2015-09-01

    Porphyrias are a group of eight metabolic disorders characterized by defects in heme biosynthesis. Porphyrias are classified into two major categories: 1) the acute or inducible porphyrias and 2) the chronic cutaneous porphyrias. The acute hepatic porphyrias are further classified into acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), hereditary coproporphyria, variegate porphyria, and porphyria due to severe deficiency of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) dehydratase (ALADP). AIP is the most common, and ALADP is the least common acute porphyria. The clinical presentations of acute porphyrias are nonspecific. There are no pathognomonic signs or symptoms. The most frequent presenting symptom is abdominal pain, but pain in the chest, back, or lower extremities may also occur. Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality during acute attacks, and hypomagnesemia is also common. Both are risk factors for development of seizures, which occur in ∼ 20-30% of acute attacks. Once suspected, the diagnosis of porphyria can be rapidly established by checking random urinary porphobilinogen. Initial management of acute porphyria includes discontinuation of all potentially harmful drugs and management of symptoms. Acute attacks should be treated emergently with intravenous heme and glucose to avoid considerable morbidity and mortality. Acute attacks last a few days, and the majority of patients are asymptomatic between attacks. Prognosis is good if the condition is recognized early and treated aggressively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analgesia for acute pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    modified by various factors.1. Pain in the acute setting generally manifests as three broad ... based on targeting the correct pathways, although nociceptive and neuropathic pain do often co-occur, e.g. during surgery or ..... codeine following cosmetic facial surgery. J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009;38(5):580–586. 30.

  7. Acute cholecystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Fialkowski, Elizabeth; Halpin, Valerie; Whinney, Robb R

    2008-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis causes unremitting right upper quadrant pain, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and fever, and if untreated can lead to perforations, abscess formation, or fistulae. About 95% of people with acute cholecystitis have gallstones.It is thought that blockage of the bile duct by a gallstone or local inflammation can lead to acute cholecystitis, but we don't know whether bacterial infection is also necessary.

  8. Acute cholecystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Halpin, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis causes unremitting right upper quadrant pain, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and fever, and if untreated can lead to perforations, abscess formation, or fistulae. About 95% of people with acute cholecystitis have gallstones.It is thought that blockage of the cystic duct by a gallstone or local inflammation can lead to acute cholecystitis, but we don't know whether bacterial infection is also necessary.

  9. Acute cholecystitis

    OpenAIRE

    Halpin, Valerie; Gupta, Aditya

    2011-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis causes unremitting right upper quadrant pain, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, and fever, and if untreated can lead to perforations, abscess formation, or fistulae. About 95% of people with acute cholecystitis have gallstones.It is thought that blockage of the bile duct by a gallstone or local inflammation can lead to acute cholecystitis, but we don't know whether bacterial infection is also necessary.

  10. Periodontal Emergencies in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadia, Reena; Ide, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Diagnosing and managing periodontal emergencies is a common part of general dental practice. This article summarises the presentation, aetiology and management of the key periodontal emergencies, including gingival abscess, periodontal abscess, peri-coronitis/peri-coronal abscess, perio-endo lesion/ abscess, necrotising gingivitis and periodontitis, acute herpetic gingivostomatitis, acute physical/chemical/thermal injury and subgingival root fracture.

  11. Bronchitis (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Wark, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Acute bronchitis affects more than 40 in 1000 adults per year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens.The role of smoking or environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear.One third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence.

  12. Acute nierschade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; van Heurn, L.W.E.; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  13. Can lncRNAs be indicators for the diagnosis of early onset or acute schizophrenia and distinguish major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder?-A cross validation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuelian; Niu, Wei; Kong, Lingming; He, Mingjun; Jiang, Kunhong; Chen, Shengdong; Zhong, Aifang; Li, Wanshuai; Lu, Jim; Zhang, Liyi

    2017-06-01

    Depression and anxiety are apparent symptoms in the early onset or acute phase of schizophrenia (SZ), which complicate timely diagnosis and treatment. It is imperative to seek an indicator to distinguish schizophrenia from depressive and anxiety disorders. Using lncRNA microarray profiling and RT-PCR, three up-regulated lncRNAs in SZ, six down-regulated lncRNAs in major depressive disorder (MDD), and three up-regulated lncRNAs in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) had been identified as potential biomarkers. All the lncRNAs were, then, cross-validated in 40 SZ patients, 40 MDD patients, 40 GAD patients, and 40 normal controls. Compared with controls, three up-regulated SZ lncRNAs had a significantly down-regulated expression in GAD, and no remarkable differences existed between MDD and the controls. Additionally, the six down-regulated MDD lncRNAs were expressed in an opposite fashion in SZ, and the expression of the three up-regulated GAD lncRNAs were significantly different between SZ and GAD. These results indicate that the expression patterns of the three up-regulated SZ lncRNAs could not be completely replicated in MDD and GAD, and vice versa. Thus, these three SZ lncRNAs seem to be established as potential indicators for diagnosis of schizophrenia and distinguishing it from MDD and GAD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Screening, detecting and enhancing the yield of previously undiagnosed hepatitis B and C in patients with acute medical admissions to hospital: A pilot project undertaken at the Vancouver General Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapeluto, Jordanna E; Kadatz, Matthew; Wormsbecker, Andrew; Sidhu, Kiran; Yoshida, Eric M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) represent an increasing health burden and morbidity in Canada. Viral hepatitis, specifically HCV, has high prevalence among persons born between 1945 and 1965, with 45% to 85% of infected adults asymptomatic and unaware of their infection. Screening has been shown to be cost effective in the detection and treatment of viral hepatitis. OBJECTIVE: To quantify incidence and identify undocumented HBV and HCV infection in hospitalized patients at a single centre with secondary analysis of risk factors as part of a quality improvement initiative. METHODS: A one-time antibody test was conducted in patients admitted to the acute medicine and gastroenterology services. RESULTS: Over a 12-week period, hospital screening for HBV and HCV was performed in 37.3% of 995 admitted patients. There was identification of 15 previously undiagnosed cases of HCV (4%) and 36 undocumented cases of occult (ie, antihepatitis B core antigen seropositive) or active (ie, hepatitis B surface antigen seropositive) HBV (9.7%). Among patients with positive screens, 60% of seropositive HCV patients had no identifiable risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of HBV and HCV infection among hospitalized patients in Vancouver was higher than that of the general population. Risk factors for contraction are often not identified. These results can be used as part of an ongoing discussion regarding a ‘seek and treat’ approach to the detection and treatment of chronic blood-borne viral illnesses. PMID:24945186

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panicker J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM presents as an acute-onset neurological dysfunction following a triggering event such as an infection or vaccination. Patients present with polysymptomatic neurological dysfunction, and imaging shows multifocal white matter lesions in the brain and spinal cord. Clinical evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid study are most useful in establishing the diagnosis and ruling out important differential diagnoses. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment and the role of other modalities of treatment, such as plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin, require further study. Prognosis is generally good. The recently proposed consensus definitions are likely to facilitate delineation of ADEM from other acquired demyelinating disorders.

  16. Evaluation of a Medical and Mental Health Unit compared with standard care for older people whose emergency admission to an acute general hospital is complicated by concurrent 'confusion': a controlled clinical trial. Acronym: TEAM: Trial of an Elderly Acute care Medical and mental health unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladman John RF

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with delirium and dementia admitted to general hospitals have poor outcomes, and their carers report poor experiences. We developed an acute geriatric medical ward into a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit over an eighteen month period. Additional specialist mental health staff were employed, other staff were trained in the 'person-centred' dementia care approach, a programme of meaningful activity was devised, the environment adapted to the needs of people with cognitive impairment, and attention given to communication with family carers. We hypothesise that patients managed on this ward will have better outcomes than those receiving standard care, and that such care will be cost-effective. Methods/design We will perform a controlled clinical trial comparing in-patient management on a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit with standard care. Study participants are patients over the age of 65, admitted as an emergency to a single general hospital, and identified on the Acute Medical Admissions Unit as being 'confused'. Sample size is 300 per group. The evaluation design has been adapted to accommodate pressures on bed management and patient flows. If beds are available on the specialist Unit, the clinical service allocates patients at random between the Unit and standard care on general or geriatric medical wards. Once admitted, randomised patients and their carers are invited to take part in a follow up study, and baseline data are collected. Quality of care and patient experience are assessed in a non-participant observer study. Outcomes are ascertained at a follow up home visit 90 days after randomisation, by a researcher blind to allocation. The primary outcome is days spent at home (for those admitted from home, or days spent in the same care home (if admitted from a care home. Secondary outcomes include mortality, institutionalisation, resource use, and scaled outcome measures, including quality of

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  18. Acute Cholecystitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schuld, Jochen; Glanemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of acute cholecystitis has been controversially discussed in the literature as there are no high-evidence-level data yet for determining the optimal point in time for surgical intervention...

  19. Bronchitis (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Wark, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Acute bronchitis, with transient inflammation of the trachea and major bronchi, affects over 40/1000 adults a year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens.The role of smoking or environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear.A third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence.

  20. Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic use versus a standard approach for acute respiratory tract infections in primary care: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial and baseline characteristics of participating general practitioners [ISRCTN73182671

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucher Heiner C

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI are among the most frequent reasons for consultations in primary care. Although predominantly viral in origin, ARTI often lead to the prescription of antibiotics for ambulatory patients, mainly because it is difficult to distinguish between viral and bacterial infections. Unnecessary antibiotic use, however, is associated with increased drug expenditure, side effects and antibiotic resistance. A novel approach is to guide antibiotic therapy by procalcitonin (ProCT, since serum levels of ProCT are elevated in bacterial infections but remain lower in viral infections and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this trial is to compare a ProCT-guided antibiotic therapy with a standard approach based on evidence-based guidelines for patients with ARTI in primary care. Methods/Design This is a randomised controlled trial in primary care with an open intervention. Adult patients judged by their general practitioner (GP to need antibiotics for ARTI are randomised in equal numbers either to standard antibiotic therapy or to ProCT-guided antibiotic therapy. Patients are followed-up after 1 week by their GP and after 2 and 4 weeks by phone interviews carried out by medical students blinded to the goal of the trial. Exclusion criteria for patients are antibiotic use in the previous 28 days, psychiatric disorders or inability to give written informed consent, not being fluent in German, severe immunosuppression, intravenous drug use, cystic fibrosis, active tuberculosis, or need for immediate hospitalisation. The primary endpoint is days with restrictions from ARTI within 14 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes are antibiotic use in terms of antibiotic prescription rate and duration of antibiotic treatment in days, days off work and days with side-effects from medication within 14 days, and relapse rate from the infection within 28 days after randomisation. Discussion We aim to include 600

  1. [Acute pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Nah, J J; Collí-Quintal, J

    2000-01-01

    To describe the epidemiologic pattern of acute pesticide poisoning (APP) in a general hospital in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. From 1994 to 1998, 33 patients 13 years of age or older with diagnosis of APP were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze information. Males were frequently affected (82%), specially those coming from rural areas (60%). The mean age of the group was 34 +/- 15.8 years. In 79% of the cases, pesticides were used to commit suicide and 33% of poisoning cases were due to organophospate pesticides. The mortality rate was 12%. In this small sample, acute poisoning from pesticides in the agricultural setting may be underestimated, since it was less frequent than in the general population. APP was more commonly used by indigent people to commit suicide.

  2. General practitioners’ views on the acceptability and applicability of a web-based intervention to reduce antibiotic prescribing for acute cough in multiple European countries: a qualitative study prior to a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthierens Sibyl

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to promote prudent antibiotic prescribing by general practitioners (GPs have often only been developed for use in one country. We aimed to develop an intervention which would be appropriate to implement in multiple European countries in order to offer greater benefit to practice whilst using fewer resources. The INTRO (INternet TRaining for antibiOtic use intervention needed to deliver training to GPs in the use of C-Reactive Protein (CRP near patient tests to help diagnose acute cough and in communication skills to help explain prescribing decisions to patients. We explored GPs’ views on the initial version of INTRO to test acceptability and potentially increase applicability for use in multiple countries before the start of a randomised trial. Method 30 GPs from five countries (Belgium, England, the Netherlands, Poland and Spain, were interviewed using a “think aloud” approach. GPs were asked to work through the intervention and discuss their views on the content and format in relation to following the intervention in their own practice. GPs viewed the same intervention but versions were created in five languages. Data were coded using thematic analysis. Results GPs in all five countries reported the view that the intervention addressed an important topic, was broadly acceptable and feasible to use, and would be a useful tool to help improve clinical practice. However, GPs in the different countries identified aspects of the intervention that did not reflect their national culture or healthcare system. These included perceived differences in communication style used in the consultation, consultation length and the stage of illness at which patient typically presented. Conclusion An online intervention to support evidence-based use of antibiotics is acceptable and feasible to implement amongst GPs in multiple countries. However, tailoring of the intervention to suit national contexts was necessary by

  3. Acute Sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute sinusitis is mostly caused by the common cold. Unless a bacterial infection develops, most cases resolve within a week to 10 days. In ... sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold, which is a viral infection. In some cases, a bacterial infection develops. Risk factors You may ...

  4. Acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsell, Melissa A; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2010-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease most frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. Diagnosis is usually based on characteristic symptoms, often in conjunction with elevated serum pancreatic enzymes. Imaging is not always necessary, but may be performed for many reasons, such as to confirm a diagnosis of pancreatitis, rule out other causes of abdominal pain, elucidate the cause of pancreatitis, or to evaluate for complications such as necrosis or pseudocysts. Though the majority of patients will have mild, self-limiting disease, some will develop severe disease associated with organ failure. These patients are at risk to develop complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation such as pancreatic necrosis, fluid collections, pseudocysts, and pancreatic duct disruption. Validated scoring systems can help predict the severity of pancreatitis, and thus, guide monitoring and intervention.Treatment of acute pancreatitis involves supportive care with fluid replacement, pain control, and controlled initiation of regular food intake. Prophylactic antibiotics are not recommended in acute pancreatitis if there is no evidence of pancreatic infection. In patients who fail to improve, further evaluation is necessary to assess for complications that require intervention such as pseudocysts or pancreatic necrosis. Endoscopy, including ERCP and EUS, and/or cholecystectomy may be indicated in the appropriate clinical setting. Ultimately, the management of the patient with severe acute pancreatitis will require a multidisciplinary approach. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  5. Acute Bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkade, Scott; Long, Natalie A

    2016-10-01

    Cough is the most common illness-related reason for ambulatory care visits in the United States. Acute bronchitis is a clinical diagnosis characterized by cough due to acute inflammation of the trachea and large airways without evidence of pneumonia. Pneumonia should be suspected in patients with tachypnea, tachycardia, dyspnea, or lung findings suggestive of pneumonia, and radiography is warranted. Pertussis should be suspected in patients with cough persisting for more than two weeks that is accompanied by symptoms such as paroxysmal cough, whooping cough, and post-tussive emesis, or recent pertussis exposure. The cough associated with acute bronchitis typically lasts about two to three weeks, and this should be emphasized with patients. Acute bronchitis is usually caused by viruses, and antibiotics are not indicated in patients without chronic lung disease. Antibiotics have been shown to provide only minimal benefit, reducing the cough or illness by about half a day, and have adverse effects, including allergic reactions, nausea and vomiting, and Clostridium difficile infection. Evaluation and treatment of bronchitis include ruling out secondary causes for cough, such as pneumonia; educating patients about the natural course of the disease; and recommending symptomatic treatment and avoidance of unnecessary antibiotic use. Strategies to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use include delayed prescriptions, patient education, and calling the infection a chest cold.

  6. Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia: Causes, Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giacomi, Federica; Vassallo, Robert; Yi, Eunhee S; Ryu, Jay H

    2017-12-05

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is an uncommon acute respiratory illness of varying severity that includes presentation as acute respiratory distress syndrome with fatal outcome. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia may be idiopathic but identifiable causes include smoking and other inhalational exposures, medications and infections. The pathogenesis of acute eosinophilic pneumonia is poorly understood but likely varies depending on the underlying cause. Airway epithelial injury, endothelial injury and release of interleukin-33 are early events that subsequently promote eosinophil recruitment to the lung; eosinophilic infiltration and degranulation appear to mediate subsequent lung inflammation and associated clinical manifestations. Crucial for the diagnosis are the demonstration of pulmonary eosinophilia in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the exclusion of other disease processes that can present with acute pulmonary infiltrates. Although peripheral blood eosinophilia at initial presentation may be a clue in suggesting the diagnosis of acute eosinophilic pneumonia, it may be absent or delayed, especially in smoking-related acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Optimal management of acute eosinophilic pneumonia depends on the recognition and elimination of the underlying cause when identifiable. The cessation of the exposure to the inciting agent, e.g., smoking, and glucocorticoids represent the mainstay of treating acute eosinophilic pneumonia of non-infectious origin. If acute eosinophilic pneumonia is timely recognized and treated, the prognosis is generally excellent with prompt and complete clinical recovery, even in those patients manifesting acute respiratory failure.

  7. Acute oral ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rationale, design and organization of the delayed antibiotic prescription (DAP) trial: a randomized controlled trial of the efficacy and safety of delayed antibiotic prescribing strategies in the non-complicated acute respiratory tract infections in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Respiratory tract infections are an important burden in primary care and it’s known that they are usually self-limited and that antibiotics only alter its course slightly. This together with the alarming increase of bacterial resistance due to increased use of antimicrobials calls for a need to consider strategies to reduce their use. One of these strategies is the delayed prescription of antibiotics. Methods Multicentric, parallel, randomised controlled trial comparing four antibiotic prescribing strategies in acute non-complicated respiratory tract infections. We will include acute pharyngitis, rhinosinusitis, acute bronchitis and acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (mild to moderate). The therapeutic strategies compared are: immediate antibiotic treatment, no antibiotic treatment, and two delayed antibiotic prescribing (DAP) strategies with structured advice to use a course of antibiotics in case of worsening of symptoms or not improving (prescription given to patient or prescription left at the reception of the primary care centre 3 days after the first medical visit). Discussion Delayed antibiotic prescription has been widely used in Anglo-Saxon countries, however, in Southern Europe there has been little research about this topic. The DAP trial wil evaluate two different delayed strategies in Spain for the main respiratory infections in primary care. Trial registration This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number http://NCT01363531. PMID:23682979

  9. Acute abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wig J

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available 550 cases of acute abdomen have been analysed in detail includ-ing their clinical presentation and operative findings. Males are more frequently affected than females in a ratio of 3: 1. More than 45% of patients presented after 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Intestinal obstruction was the commonest cause of acute abdomen (47.6%. External hernia was responsible for 26% of cases of intestinal obstruction. Perforated peptic ulcer was the commonest cause of peritonitis in the present series (31.7% while incidence of biliary peritonitis was only 2.4%.. The clinical accuracy rate was 87%. The mortality in operated cases was high (10% while the over-all mortality rate was 7.5%.

  10. [Acute cholangiocholecystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilescu, S; Rădulescu, D

    1991-01-01

    In analysis of a group of 48 patients, the authors describe an entity they call acute cholangio-cholecystitis (or acute cholecystitis of choledochal origin) and define it by 4 obligatory criteria: 1. vesicular lesion of acute cholecystitis type; 2. the obstruction of the main bile duct in the direction of its junction with the cystic duct; 3. free duct communication between the gallbladder and the main bile ducts; 4. fluid content (purulent gallbladder) found identical over the whole biliary territory (the gallbladder the main bile ducts the intrahepatic bile ducts). This entity represents 7.6% of the total of acute cholecystitis and was met in 2.8% of the total of the interventions for the main bile ducts obstruction. The deficient biological background of the patients (60% over 60 years old), and other seriousness factors--vesicular destructive lesions associated with biliary peritonitis (7/48), the existence of the duct obstruction, usually calculous (42/48), but also hydatic (3/48) or tumoural (3/48), the multitude and seriousness of the associated lesions are emphasized. The surgery, performed in over 80% emergent cases, was directed to the decomprimation of the main biliary axis to which the increase of the gangrenous cholecyst, treatment of the duct obstructive factor, repair of the internal biliary fistulas, treatment of the consequent peritonitis were added. The results, very often good (71%), were shadowed by a series of complications (29%) which ended in deaths (14.5%). The paper pleads for the early surgery of the lithiasic biliary disease, before the appearance of the inevitable complications.

  11. Sinusitis (acute)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  12. Bronchitis (acute).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, Peter

    2011-06-20

    Acute bronchitis affects over 40/1000 adults a year in the UK. The causes are usually considered to be infective, but only around half of people have identifiable pathogens. The role of smoking or of environmental tobacco smoke inhalation in predisposing to acute bronchitis is unclear. One third of people may have longer-term symptoms or recurrence. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for acute bronchitis in people without chronic respiratory disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: analgesics, antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, cephalosporins, penicillins, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole [co-trimoxazole]), antihistamines, antitussives, beta(2) agonists (inhaled or oral), and expectorants/mucolytics.

  13. A Rare Sequela of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kodadhala; Saravana Devulapalli; Mohankumar Kurukumbi; Annapurni Jayam-Trouth

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating disease, typically occurring in children following a febrile infection or a vaccination. Primary and secondary immune responses contribute to inflammation and subsequent demyelination, but the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is strongly suggested by temporal relationship between an infection or an immunization and the onset of neurological symptoms. Biopsy is definitive. In general, ...

  14. Acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Inman, Hayley; Kuehl, Damon

    2014-08-01

    Although great progress has been made in the understanding and treatment of acute leukemia, this disease has not been conquered. For emergency providers (EPs), the presentation of these patients to an emergency department presents a host of challenges. A patient may present with a new diagnosis of leukemia or with complications of the disease process or associated chemotherapy. It is incumbent on EPs to be familiar with the manifestations of leukemia in its various stages and maintain some suspicion for this diagnosis, given the nebulous and insidious manner in which leukemia can present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute T-2 Intoxication: Physiologic Consequences and New Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    although in the monkey, death from respiratory failure has been reported. Following acute trichothecene intoxication , on the other hand, mortality appears...exposure. Despite this fact, detailed physiologic studies of the autonomic nervous system and other neurological consequences of acute trichothecene ... intoxication have been lacking. Moreover, treatment for the mycotoxicoses, whether acute or chronic, is limited. Beyond removal from exposure and general

  16. Neuropsychology of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinanović, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Neuropsychology includes both the psychiatric manifestations of neurological illness (primary brain-based disorders) and neurobiology of "idiopathic" psychiatric disorders. Neurological primary brain disorders provoke broad spectrum of brain pathophysiology that cause deficit sin human behaviour, and the magnitude of neurobehavioral-related problems is a world wide health concern. Speech disorders of aphasic type, unilateral neglect, anosognosia (deficit disorders), delirium and mood disorders (productive disorders) in urgent neurology, first of all in acute phase of stroke are more frequent disorders then it verified in routine exam, not only in the developed and large neurological departments. Aphasia is common consequence of left hemispheric lesion and most common neuropsychological consequence of stroke, with prevalence of one third of all stroke patients in acute phase although exist reports on greater frequency. Unilateral neglect is a disorder that mostly effects the patient after the lesion of the right hemisphere, mostly caused by a cerebrovascular insult (infarct or haemorrhage affecting a large area - up to two thirds of the right hemisphere), and in general the left-side neglect is the most widespread neuropsychological deficit after the lesion of the right cerebral hemisphere. Reports on the incidence of visual neglect vary and they range from 13 to 85%. Anosognosia is on the second place as neuropsychological syndrome of stroke in right hemisphere, characterized by the denial of the motor, visual or cognitive deficit. This syndrome, defined as denial of hemiparesis or hemianopsia, is a common disorder verified in 17-28% of all patents with acute brain stoke. There are different reports on frequency of delirium in acute stroke, from 24 to 48%, and it is more frequent in hemorrhagic then ischemic stoke. Post stroke depression (PSD) is one of the more frequent consequences on the stroke, and the prevalence of PSD has ranged from 5 to 63% of patients in

  17. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, particularly younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  18. Acute Liver Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute liver failure Overview Acute liver failure is loss of liver function that occurs rapidly — in days or weeks — usually in a person who has no pre-existing liver disease. Acute liver failure is less common than ...

  19. Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Qvist, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The classification of acute appendicitis (AA) into various grades is not consistent, partly because it is not clear whether the perioperative or the histological findings should be the foundation of the classification. When comparing results from the literature on the frequency...... patients were included. In 116 (89 %) of these cases, appendicitis was confirmed histological. There was low concordance between the perioperative and histological diagnoses, varying from 16 to 76 % depending on grade of AA. Only 44 % of the patients receiving antibiotics postoperatively had a positive...... peritoneal fluid cultivation. CONCLUSION: There was a low concordance in clinical and histopathological diagnoses of the different grades of appendicitis. Perioperative cultivation of the peritoneal fluid as a standard should be further examined. The potential could be a reduced postoperative antibiotic use...

  20. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney injury. Alternative Names Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal ...

  1. Acupuncture for acute hordeolum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Law, Andrew; Guo, Menghu; Wieland, L. Susan; Shen, Xueyong; Lao, Lixing

    2017-01-01

    Background Hordeolum is an acute, purulent inflammation of the eyelid margin usually caused by obstructed orifices of the sebaceous glands of the eyelid. The condition, which affects sebaceous glands internally or externally, is common. When the meibomian gland in the tarsal plate is affected, internal hordeolum occurs, while when the glands of Zeis or Moll associated with eyelash follicles are affected, external hordeolum, or stye occurs. The onset of hordeolum is usually self limited, and may resolve in about a week with spontaneous drainage of the abscess. When the condition is severe, it can spread to adjacent glands and tissues. Recurrences are very common. As long as an internal hordeolum remains unresolved, it can develop into a chalazion or generalized eyelid cellulitis. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical therapy aimed to treat disease by using fine needles to stimulate specific points on the body. However, it is unclear if acupuncture is an effective and safe treatment for acute hordeolum. Objectives The objective of this review was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture to treat acute hordeolum compared with no treatment, sham acupuncture, or other active treatment. We also compared the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture plus another treatment with that treatment alone. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS), three major Chinese databases, as well as clinical trial registers all through 7 June 2016. We reviewed the reference lists from potentially eligible studies to identify additional randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Selection criteria We included RCTs of people diagnosed with acute internal or external hordeola. We included RCTs comparing acupuncture with sham acupuncture or no treatment, other active treatments, or

  2. Generalized product

    OpenAIRE

    Greco,Salvatore; Mesiar, Radko; Rindone, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation functions on [0,1] with annihilator 0 can be seen as a generalized product on [0,1]. We study the generalized product on the bipolar scale [–1,1], stressing the axiomatic point of view. Based on newly introduced bipolar properties, such as the bipolar increasingness, bipolar unit element, bipolar idempotent element, several kinds of generalized bipolar product are introduced and studied. A special stress is put on bipolar semicopulas, bipolar quasi-copulas and bipolar copulas.

  3. Diagnosing and Treating Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Disease Lookup > Acute Bronchitis Diagnosing and Treating Acute Bronchitis Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Acute Bronchitis ... Symptoms that last a few weeks How Is Acute Bronchitis Diagnosed? Healthcare providers diagnose acute bronchitis by asking ...

  4. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  5. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a nutshell. • A patient with sudden onset of a cold, weak, numb and painful foot has acute lower extremity ischaemia (ALEXI) until proven otherwise. Labelling patients as acute gout, acute phlegmasia (deep vein thrombosis), acute sciatica, etc. may result in unnecessary delays in treatment, with tragic consequences.

  6. Acute otitis externa

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Charles PS

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis externa, also known as ‘swimmer’s ear’, is a common disease of children, adolescents and adults. While chronic suppurative otitis media or acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes or a perforation can cause acute otitis externa, both the infecting organisms and management protocol are different. This practice point focuses solely on managing acute otitis externa, without acute otitis media, tympanostomy tubes or a perforation being present.

  7. Acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis leading to acute renal failure following multiple hornet stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambery Pradeep

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hornet stings are generally associated with local and occasionally anaphylactic reactions. Rarely systemic complications like acute renal failure can occur following multiple stings. Renal failure is usually due to development of acute tubular necrosis as a result of intravascular haemolysis, rhabdomyolysis or shock. Rarely it can be following development of acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis. Case presentation We describe a young male, who was stung on face, head, shoulders and upper limbs by multiple hornets (Vespa orientalis. He developed acute renal failure as a result of acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis and responded to steroids. Conclusion Rare causes of acute renal failure like tubulo-interstitial nephritis should be considered in a patient with persistent oliguria and azotemia following multiple hornet stings. Renal biopsy should be undertaken early, as institution of steroid therapy may help in recovery of renal function

  8. Heart failure-complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2007-10-01

    This article addresses issues related to acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated by heart failure, particularly in elderly patients. Findings have shown that acute MI complicated by congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with a high mortality, and that women with acute MI are more likely to be older and to develop CHF than men with acute MI. In general, management of CHF complicating acute MI is similar in older and younger patients. Actions discussed include hemodynamic monitoring; the administration of oxygen; and the use of morphine, diuretics, nitroglycerin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, spironolactone, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, magnesium, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs. The article also discusses measures for treating arrhythmias and for diagnosing mechanical complications.

  9. Heart-failure-complicating acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses issues related to acute myocardial infarction(MI) complicated by heart failure, particularly in elderly patients. Findings have shown that acute MI complicated by congestive heart failure (CHF) is associated with a high mortality, and that women with acute MI are more likely to be older and to develop CHF than men with acute MI. In general, management of CHF-complicating acute MI is similar in older and younger patients. Actions discussed include hemodynamic monitoring; the administration of oxygen; and the use of morphine, diuretics, nitroglycerin,angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, spironolactone, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, magnesium, digoxin, and positive inotropic drugs. The article also discusses measures for treating arrhythmias and for diagnosing mechanical complications.

  10. General Conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  11. The trAPP-study: Cost-effectiveness of an unsupervised e-health supported neuromuscular training program for the treatment of acute ankle sprains in general practice: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K.E. Mailuhu (Adinda); E.A.L.M. Verhagen (Evert); J.M. van Ochten (John); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Ankle sprains are one of the most frequent injuries of the musculoskeletal system, with yearly around 680.000 new sprains in the Netherlands. Of these, about 130.000 people will visit the general practitioner (GP) each year. In addition, patients have an increased risk of a

  12. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  13. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  14. [Acute hallucinatory psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Raphaël; Smadja, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    The concept of acute delirious puff refers to a transient psychotic state characterized by the sudden outbreak of a polymorphic delusional state in its themes and mecha- nisms. Magnan, in the late of nineteenth century, insti- gated the initial description of this concept. Rediscovered by Henri EY, it's current presence in the French psychiatry despite various attempts to dismantle it results from a singularity based on five cardinal points: it affects young adults, its onset is sudden, delusions are polymorphic and not systematic, there is a marked emotional lability and access is rapidly cured. This entity reveals vulnerability and must be understood carefully by the general practitioner, the issue being the prevention of progression to chronic psychosis.

  15. [Pregnancy-related acute kidney injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowicz, Ewa; Staszków, Monika

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in obstetrics may be caused by the same disorders that are observed in the general population or may be specific for a pregnancy such as: preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome or acute fatty liver of pregnancy. The renal changes may be only temporary, and resolve within a few weeks postpartum, or may become irreversible leading to a progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the article the most important pregnancy related syndromes associated with AKI have been shortly reviewed.

  16. Survival Outcome of Filipino Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated With Modified Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster/Hong Kong Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (BFM95/HKALL97) Protocol in a Tertiary General Hospital From January 2005 to December 2009: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujua, Amanda Christina C; Hernandez, Flerida G

    2017-04-01

    This retrospective cohort study is primarily aimed to evaluate the outcome of children ages 0 to 18 years old, with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and treated with a modified Berlin-Frankfurt-Muenster/Hong Kong Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (BFM95-HKALL97) protocol at University of Santo Tomas Hospital from January 2005 to December 2009. Seventy-eight patients were included. Majority were between 1 and 10 years old (87.2%), male (61.5%), with normal nutritional status, and classified as upper socioeconomic class (65.3%), mainly from National Capital Region (24.3%). Eighty percent had mild anemia and a white cell count FAB L1 morphology and pre-B immunophenotype. Five-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 86.94% and 86.2%, respectively. Among the 69 patients in the efficacy subset analysis, the 5-year OS and EFS rates were 98.36% and 86.80%, respectively. Relapse rate was 14.5%. Only FAB morphology and risk classification were correlated with relapse. Most common complications were febrile neutropenia, sepsis, and oral mucositis during induction phase. No deaths occurred due to treatment complications. In conclusion, using higher doses of methotrexate during consolidation phase improved the 5-year OS and EFS rates of our patients, without an increase in complications or deaths. Other contributing factors include improved adherence to treatment and risk-based treatment classification.

  17. Generalized polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Van Maldeghem, Hendrik

    1998-01-01

    Generalized Polygons is the first book to cover, in a coherent manner, the theory of polygons from scratch. In particular, it fills elementary gaps in the literature and gives an up-to-date account of current research in this area, including most proofs, which are often unified and streamlined in comparison to the versions generally known. Generalized Polygons will be welcomed both by the student seeking an introduction to the subject as well as the researcher who will value the work as a reference. In particular, it will be of great value for specialists working in the field of generalized polygons (which are, incidentally, the rank 2 Tits-buildings) or in fields directly related to Tits-buildings, incidence geometry and finite geometry. The approach taken in the book is of geometric nature, but algebraic results are included and proven (in a geometric way!). A noteworthy feature is that the book unifies and generalizes notions, definitions and results that exist for quadrangles, hexagons, octagons - in the ...

  18. Acute graft versus host disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelsang Georgia B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues. Activated donor T cells damage host epithelial cells after an inflammatory cascade that begins with the preparative regimen. About 35%–50% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients will develop acute GVHD. The exact risk is dependent on the stem cell source, age of the patient, conditioning, and GVHD prophylaxis used. Given the number of transplants performed, we can expect about 5500 patients/year to develop acute GVHD. Patients can have involvement of three organs: skin (rash/dermatitis, liver (hepatitis/jaundice, and gastrointestinal tract (abdominal pain/diarrhea. One or more organs may be involved. GVHD is a clinical diagnosis that may be supported with appropriate biopsies. The reason to pursue a tissue biopsy is to help differentiate from other diagnoses which may mimic GVHD, such as viral infection (hepatitis, colitis or drug reaction (causing skin rash. Acute GVHD is staged and graded (grade 0-IV by the number and extent of organ involvement. Patients with grade III/IV acute GVHD tend to have a poor outcome. Generally the patient is treated by optimizing their immunosuppression and adding methylprednisolone. About 50% of patients will have a solid response to methylprednisolone. If patients progress after 3 days or are not improved after 7 days, they will get salvage (second-line immunosuppressive therapy for which there is currently no standard-of-care. Well-organized clinical trials are imperative to better define second-line therapies for this disease. Additional management issues are attention to wound infections in skin GVHD and fluid/nutrition management in gastrointestinal GVHD. About 50% of patients with acute GVHD will eventually have manifestations of chronic GVHD.

  19. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Canuto, V

    2015-01-01

    This is an English translation of the Italian version of an encyclopedia chapter that appeared in the Italian Encyclopedia of the Physical Sciences, edited by Bruno Bertotti (1994). Following requests from colleagues we have decided to make it available to a more general readership. We present the motivation for constructing General Relativity, provide a short discussion of tensor algebra, and follow the set up of Einstein equations. We discuss briefly the initial value problem, the linear approximation and how should non gravitational physics be described in curved spacetime.

  20. Electrocardiogram interpretation in general practice: relevance to prehospital thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, W A; Saltissi, S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess, in the context of their possible role in prehospital thrombolysis, the ability of general practitioners to recognise acute transmural myocardial ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram. DESIGN--150 doctors (every fifth name) were selected from the alphabetical list of 750 on Merseyside general practitioner register and without prior warning were asked to interpret a series of six 12 lead electrocardiograms. Three of these showed acute transmural ischaemia/infarction, one was normal, and two showed non-acute abnormalities. Details of doctors' ages, postgraduate training, and clinical practice were sought. SETTING--General practitioners' surgeries and postgraduate centres within the Merseyside area. PARTICIPANTS--106 general practitioners (mean age 45 years) agreed to participate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Accuracy of general practitioners' interpretations of the six electrocardiograms. RESULTS--82% of general practitioners correctly recognised a normal electrocardiogram. Recognition of acute abnormalities was less reliable. Between 33% and 61% correctly identified acute transmural ischaemia/infarction depending on the specific trace presented. Accurate localisation of the site of the infarct was achieved only by between 8% and 30% of participants, while between 22% and 25% correctly interpreted non-acute abnormalities. Neither routine use of electrocardiography nor postgraduate hospital experience in general medicine was associated with significantly greater expertise. CONCLUSION--The current level of proficiency of a sample of general practitioners in the Merseyside area in recognising acute transmural ischaemia/infarction on an electrocardiogram suggests that refresher training is needed if general practitioners are to give prehospital thrombolysis. Images PMID:8398491

  1. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  2. [Integral Care Guide for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with a Diagnosis of Depressive Episodes and Recurrent Depressive Disorder: Part II: General Aspects of Treatment, Management of the Acute Phase, Continuation and Maintenance of Patients with a Depression Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia Bohórquez; Valencia, Jenny García; Guarín, Maritza Rodríguez; Borrero, Álvaro Enrique Arenas; Díaz, Sergio Mario Castro; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Riveros, Patricia Maldonado; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; Brito, Enrique; Acosta, Carlos Alberto Palacio; Pedraza, Ricardo Sánchez; González-Pacheco, Juan; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    This article presents recommendations based on evidence gathered to answer a series of clinical questions concerning the depressive episode and the recurrent depressive disorder, with emphasis on general treatment aspects, treatment in the acute phase and management of the continuation/maintenance, all intended to grant health care parameters based on the best and more updated available evidence for achieving minimum quality standards with adult patients thus diagnosed. A practical clinical guide was elaborated according to standards of the Methodological Guide of the Ministry of Social Protection. Recommendation from NICE90 and CANMAT guides were adopted and updated so as to answer the questions posed while de novo questions were developed. Recommendations 5-22 corresponding to management of depression are presented. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a completely revised and expanded version of the previous classic edition ‘General Relativity and Relativistic Astrophysics’. In Part I the foundations of general relativity are thoroughly developed, while Part II is devoted to tests of general relativity and many of its applications. Binary pulsars – our best laboratories for general relativity – are studied in considerable detail. An introduction to gravitational lensing theory is included as well, so as to make the current literature on the subject accessible to readers. Considerable attention is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes. This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel’s proof of his uniqueness theorem, and a derivation of the basic laws of black hole physics. Part II ends with Witten’s proof of the positive energy theorem, which is presented in detail, together with the required tools on spin structures and spinor analysis. In Part III, all of the differential geomet...

  4. General Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-09-25

    Sep 25, 2013 ... general pedagogical knowledge (e.g. classroom control, using group work), pedagogical content knowledge, curriculum knowledge, knowledge of learners and their characteristics, knowledge of educational contexts (e.g. schools and the wider community), and knowledge of educational ends purposes ...

  5. General anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affect your ability to breathe Make you uncomfortable Cause too much anxiety You may also be able to have conscious sedation for your procedure. Sometimes, though, it is not enough to make you comfortable. Children may need general anesthesia for a medical or ...

  6. GENERAL Iarticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 3. Twin Primes and the Pentium Chip. C S Yogananda. General Article Volume 8 Issue 3 March 2003 pp 32-32. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/03/0032-0032. Author Affiliations.

  7. Generalized Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Skov; Lando, David; Pedersen, Lasse Heje

    We characterize when physical probabilities, marginal utilities, and the discount rate can be recovered from observed state prices for several future time periods. We make no assumptions of the probability distribution, thus generalizing the time-homogeneous stationary model of Ross (2015). Recov...... our model empirically, testing the predictive power of the recovered expected return and other recovered statistics....

  8. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    services at public hospitals across the country are currently delivered by IMGs.6 Although some IMGs wish to stay on in the hope of entering ... accredited by the Health Professions Council of South Africa. (HPCSA), the national regulatory authority for medical licensing. The general surgery registrar programme lasts for a.

  9. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  10. Generale preventie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1949-01-01

    In part I of this study a survey has veen given of what Dutch authors have written since 1870, when capital punishment was abolished, on subjects concerning the general preventive effect of punishment. This historical survey ends where, during the years 1940-1945, under the stress of the occupation

  11. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these, patients with external abdominal hernias constituted nine hundred and eighteen. (918). Operation for hernias constituted about 12.5% of the operative workload of the general surgeons in this hospital. The descending order of occurrence of external abdominal hernias was inguinal, femoral and incisional.

  12. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  13. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Celiac Disease Additional Content Medical News Acute Mesenteric Ischemia By Parswa Ansari, MD, Assistant Professor and Program ... Abdominal Abscesses Abdominal Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of ...

  14. Acute Bronchitis - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Acute Bronchitis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Acute Bronchitis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  15. Weight Loss & Acute Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... APF You are here Home Diet and Nutrition Weight loss & acute Porphyria Being overweight is a particular problem ... of carbohydrate and energy in an effort to lose weight can worsen these diseases. Severe acute attacks have ...

  16. Radiology of acute phlebothrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, E.I.; Zeitler, E.

    1980-09-01

    The difference in technique of phlebography in acute phlebothrombosis and that in chronic venous insufficiency is demonstrated. Since acute phlebothrombosis can be cured with good results by thrombectomy and fibrinolysis in the first few days of the disease, phlebography should be performed early, preferably the day on which the presence of acute thrombosis is suspected.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals in Acute Porphyria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, Nanno; Mamedova, Ilahä; Jansman, Frank G A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The acute porphyrias are a group of rare metabolic disorders of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Carriers of the acute porphyria gene are prone to potentially fatal acute attacks, which can be precipitated by drug exposure. It is therefore important to know whether a drug is safe for carriers

  18. Acute mastoiditis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Kristian; Høstmark, Karianne; Hansen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of acute otitis media may lead to more complications. This study evaluates changes in incidence, the clinical and microbiological findings, the complications and the outcome of acute mastoiditis in children in a country employing conservative guidelines in treating acute...

  19. General topology

    CERN Document Server

    Willard, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Among the best available reference introductions to general topology, this volume is appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. Its treatment encompasses two broad areas of topology: ""continuous topology,"" represented by sections on convergence, compactness, metrization and complete metric spaces, uniform spaces, and function spaces; and ""geometric topology,"" covered by nine sections on connectivity properties, topological characterization theorems, and homotopy theory. Many standard spaces are introduced in the related problems that accompany each section (340

  20. Generalized polygons

    CERN Document Server

    Maldeghem, Hendrik

    1998-01-01

    This book is intended to be an introduction to the fascinating theory ofgeneralized polygons for both the graduate student and the specialized researcher in the field. It gathers together a lot of basic properties (some of which are usually referred to in research papers as belonging to folklore) and very recent and sometimes deep results. I have chosen a fairly strict geometrical approach, which requires some knowledge of basic projective geometry. Yet, it enables one to prove some typically group-theoretical results such as the determination of the automorphism groups of certain Moufang polygons. As such, some basic group-theoretical knowledge is required of the reader. The notion of a generalized polygon is a relatively recent one. But it is one of the most important concepts in incidence geometry. Generalized polygons are the building bricks of Tits buildings. They are the prototypes and precursors of more general geometries such as partial geometries, partial quadrangles, semi-partial ge­ ometries, near...

  1. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  2. A randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of vortioxetine 2.5 and 10 mg in acute treatment of adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Jacobsen, Paula L; Serenko, Michael; Chen, Yinzhong

    2014-01-01

    Vortioxetine is a recently approved multimodal antidepressant with anxiolytic properties in preclinical studies. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of vortioxetine in subjects with a primary diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder. Subjects (n = 457) were randomized 1:1:1 to treatment with placebo or vortioxetine 2.5 or 10 mg once daily. The primary efficacy endpoint was reduction in Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) total scores from baseline after 8 weeks of treatment. Key secondary outcomes were changes from baseline in HAM-A total scores for the 2.5 and 10 mg dose, Hospital Anxiety and Depression anxiety subscore, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Sheehan Disability Scale, and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale score, as well as HAM-A response rate at week 8. Neither vortioxetine dose achieved a statistically significant improvement over placebo on the primary endpoint (least-squares mean difference ± standard error from placebo: -0.87 ± 0.803 [p = 0.279] for 2.5 mg and -0.81 ± 0.791 [p = 0.306] for 10 mg vortioxetine) or on any secondary efficacy endpoints. Common adverse events (≥5% in either vortioxetine group) were nausea, dry mouth, headache, diarrhea, constipation, and vomiting. Vortioxetine 2.5 and 10 mg treatment did not significantly improve generalized anxiety disorder symptoms versus placebo. Vortioxetine was safe and well tolerated in this patient population. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Atul; Singhi, Sunit

    2011-10-01

    Chest pain is a worrisome symptom that often causes parents to bring their child to emergency department(ED) for evaluation. In the majority of cases, the etiology of the chest pain is benign, but in one-fourth of the cases symptoms are distressing enough to cause children to miss school. The clinician's primary goal in ED evaluation of chest pain is to identify serious causes and rule out organic pathology. The diagnostic evaluation includes a thorough history and physical examination. Younger children are more likely to have a cardiorespiratory source for their chest pain, whereas an adolescent is more likely to have a psychogenic cause. Children having an organic cause of chest pain are more likely to have acute pain, sleep disturbance due to pain and associated fever or abnormal examination findings, whereas those with non-organic chest pain are more likely to have pain for a longer duration. Chest radiograph is required in some, especially in patients with history of trauma . In children, myocardial ischemia is rare, thus routine ECG is not required on every patient. However, both pericarditis and myocarditis can present with chest pain and fever. Musculoskeletal chest pain, such as caused by costochondritis and trauma, is generally reproducible on palpation and is exaggerated by physical activity or breathing. Pneumonia with or without pleural effusion, usually presents with fever and tachypnea; chest pain may be presenting symptom sometimes. In asthmatic children bronchospasm and persistent coughing can lead to excess use of chest wall muscles and chest pain. Patients' who report acute pain and subsequent respiratory distress should raise suspicion of a spontaneous pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum. ED management includes analgesics, specific treatment directed at underlying etiology and appropriate referral.

  4. Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis. A review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasdanwala, Sarfaraz; Babyatsky, Mark

    2015-03-20

    Crohn's disease, a transmural inflammatory bowel disease, has many well-known extra-intestinal manifestations and complications. Although acute pancreatitis has a higher incidence in patients with Crohn's disease as compared to the general population, acute pancreatitis is still relatively uncommon in patients with Crohn's disease. Patients with Crohn's disease are at an approximately fourfold higher risk than the general population to develop acute pancreatitis. The risk of developing acute pancreatitis is higher in females as compared to males. Acute pancreatitis can occur at any age with higher incidence reported in patients in their 20s and between 40-50 years of age. The severity and prognosis of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease is the same as in general population. Acute pancreatitis can occur before onset of intestinal Crohn's disease, this presentation being more common in children than adults. It can also occur as the presenting symptom. However, most commonly it occurs after intestinal symptoms have manifest with a mean time interval between the initial presentation and development of acute pancreatitis being 2 years. There are several etiological factors contributing to acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease. It is not clear whether acute pancreatitis is a direct extra-intestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease; however, majority of the cases of acute pancreatitis in patients with Crohn's disease are due to GS and medications. Drugs used for the treatment of Crohn's disease that have been reported to cause acute pancreatitis include 5-ASA agents, azathioprine and 6 mercaptopurine, metornidazole and corticosteroids. Recent evidence has emerged correlating both type 1 and 2 autoimmune pancreatitis with Crohn's disease. Understanding the association between the two disease entities is key to effectively manage patients with Crohn's disease and acute pancreatitis.

  5. Cerebellar mutism in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Joy B; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Yeh, E Ann

    2010-04-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating process affecting multiple areas of the central nervous system, frequently including the cerebellum. Cerebellar insult may lead to absence of speech or cerebellar mutism. Cerebellar mutism often occurs in young children after posterior fossa tumor resection, and generally appears as part of a larger subset of neurobehavioral signs and personality changes known as posterior fossa syndrome. Information on the impact of widespread cerebellar involvement on speech production, behavior, and long-term outcomes in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is limited. We describe cases of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with predominantly cerebellar involvement, with specific attention to cerebellar mutism. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis between 2005-2009 at a pediatric multiple sclerosis and demyelinating disorders clinic. Of 19 patients diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, six (32%) manifested primary cerebellar involvement. Of these six, four (67%) exhibited acute language disturbance, with three (50%) exhibiting mutism. The three patients with cerebellar mutism experienced protracted speech and language deficits after follow-ups from 6 months to 4 years. Widespread cerebellar involvement in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may result in cerebellar mutism, in addition to persistent neurocognitive and behavioral problems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature...... is directly related to stroke severity and outcome, and fever after stroke is associated with substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Normalisation of temperature in acute stroke by antipyretics is generally recommended, although there is no direct evidence to support this treatment. Despite its...... obvious therapeutic potential, hypothermia as a form of neuroprotection for stroke has been investigated in only a few very small studies. Therapeutic hypothermia is feasible in acute stroke but owing to serious side-effects--such as hypotension, cardiac arrhythmia, and pneumonia--it is still thought...

  7. Role of antileukotrienes in acute asthma exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lorenzo Urso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute asthma exacerbations are one of the most frequent reasons to visit the emergency department or general practitioner. Although current standard treatments for acute asthma – including supplemental oxygen, short-acting β2-agonists, systemic corticosteroids and anticholinergics – are quite effective in most patients, they are inadequate for rapid and sustained improvement in a significant proportion. The antileukotrienes, a relatively new class of drugs, have a role in the treatment of chronic asthma. Their relatively rapid onset of action after endovenous or oral administration and their additive effect to β2-agonists led to the hypothesis that they might be of benefit in acute asthma. This review examines the efficacy of antileukotrienes in the treatment of acute asthma.

  8. Diagnosis and management of acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Doug; Braun, Chad

    2002-05-15

    Acute bronchitis is one of the top 10 conditions for which patients seek medical care. Physicians show considerable variability in describing the signs and symptoms necessary to its diagnosis. Because acute bronchitis most often has a viral cause, symptomatic treatment with protussives, antitussives, or bronchodilators is appropriate. However, studies indicate that many physicians treat bronchitis with antibiotics. These drugs have generally been shown to be ineffective in patients with uncomplicated acute bronchitis. Furthermore, antibiotics often have detrimental side effects, and their overuse contributes to the increasing problem of antibiotic resistance. Patient satisfaction with the treatment of acute bronchitis is related to the quality of the physician-patient interaction rather than to prescription of an antibiotic.

  9. Difusion weighted imaging characteristics differentiate acute symptomatic cerebral microbleeds from silent microbleeds: An acute pontine microhemorrhage case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Yılmaz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs on susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI have generally been considered to be silent. Recent reports indicated that, albeit it is a rarity, CMBs can cause acute focal neurological symptoms. Herein we present a patient who was admitted with cheiro-oral syndrome due to an acute izolated pontine microbleed. Combination of diffusion weighted imaging and SWI can be useful in the differentiation of acute symptomatic cerebral microbleeds from chronic ones.

  10. Acute luchtweginfecties en acute coronaire syndromen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, T. T.; Mairuhu, A. T. A.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Brandjes, D. P. M.; Peters, R. J. G.; van Gorp, E. C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological research indicates a correlation between respiratory-tract infections and acute cardiovascular events. Chronic infections have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis. As a result of chronic infections a prolonged and elevated inflammatory activity arises. Inflammation and

  11. Benefits and limitations of the Witwatersrand influenza and acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-03-25

    Mar 25, 1993 ... Benefits and limitations of the Witwatersrand influenza and acute respiratory infections surveillance programme. B.D.Schoub, S.Johnson, J.McAnerne~. N. K. Blackburn. Objective: To establish an ongoing active surveillance programme for acute respiratory infections in general, and influenza in particular.

  12. Generalizing quasinormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cossey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Quasinormal subgroups have been studied for nearly 80 years. In finite groups, questions concerning them invariably reduce to p-groups, and here they have the added interest of being invariant under projectivities, unlike normal subgroups. However, it has been shown recently that certain groups, constructed by Berger and Gross in 1982, of an important universal nature with regard to the existence of core-free quasinormal subgroups gener- ally, have remarkably few such subgroups. Therefore in order to overcome this misfortune, a generalization of the concept of quasi- normality will be defined. It could be the beginning of a lengthy undertaking. But some of the initial findings are encouraging, in particular the fact that this larger class of subgroups also remains invariant under projectivities of finite p-groups, thus connecting group and subgroup lattice structures.

  13. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Khriplovich, I. B

    2005-01-01

    This book offers an alternative to other textbooks on the subject, providing a more specific discussion of numerous general relativistic effects for readers who have knowledge of classical mechanics and electrodynamics, including special relativity. Coverage includes gravitational lensing, signal retardation in the gravitational field of the Sun, the Reissner-Nordström solution, selected spin effects, the resonance transformation of an electromagnetic wave into a gravitational one, and the entropy and temperature of black holes. The book includes numerous problems at various levels of difficulty, making it ideal also for independent study by a broad readership of advanced students and researchers. I.B. Khriplovich is Chief Researcher, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, and Chair of Theoretical Physics at Novosibirsk University. Dr. Khriplovich is a Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He has been awarded the Dirac Medal ``For the advancement of theoretical physics'' by Univ...

  14. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Case mix, outcome and activity for patients with severe acute kidney injury during the first 24 hours after admission to an adult, general critical care unit: application of predictive models from a secondary analysis of the ICNARC Case Mix Programme database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhe, Nitin V; Stevens, Paul E; Crowe, Alex V; Lipkin, Graham W; Harrison, David A

    2008-01-01

    This study pools data from the UK Intensive Care National Audit and Research Center (ICNARC) Case Mix Programme (CMP) to evaluate the case mix, outcome and activity for 17,326 patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) occurring during the first 24 hours of admission to intensive care units (ICU). Severe AKI admissions (defined as serum creatinine >/=300 mumol/l and/or urea >/=40 mmol/l during the first 24 hours) were extracted from the ICNARC CMP database of 276,326 admissions to UK ICUs from 1995 to 2004. Subgroups of oliguric and nonoliguric AKI were identified by daily urine output. Data on surgical status, survival and length of stay were also collected. Severity of illness scores and mortality prediction models were compared (UK Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II, Stuivenberg Hospital Acute Renal Failure [SHARF] T0, SHARF II0 and the Mehta model). Severe AKI occurred in 17,326 out of 276,731 admissions (6.3%). The source of admission was nonsurgical in 83.7%. Sepsis was present in 47.3% and AKI was nonoliguric in 63.9% of cases. Admission to ICU with severe AKI accounted for 9.3% of all ICU bed-days. Oliguric AKI was associated with longer length of stay for survivors and shorter length of stay for nonsurvivors compared with nonoliguric AKI. Oliguric AKI was associated with significantly greater ICU and hospital mortality (55.8% and 77.3%, respectively) compared with nonoliguric AKI (33.4% and 49.3%, respectively). Surgery during the 1 week before admission or during the first week in the CMP unit was associated with decreased odds of mortality. UK APACHE II and the Mehta scores under-predicted the number of deaths, whereas SHARF T0 and SHARF II0 over-predicted the number of deaths. Severe AKI accounts for over 9% of all bed-days in adult, general ICUs, representing a considerable drain on resources. Although nonoliguric AKI continues to confer a survival benefit, overall survival from AKI in the ICU and survival to leave hospital

  16. [Acute rhabdomyolysis during pneumococcal pneumonia: two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouina, H; Aïssa, I; Baccar, M A; Gharbi, L; Azzabi, S; Bouacha, H

    2007-04-01

    Acute rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biological syndrome generally with a toxic or traumatic cause. Only 5% of cases are infectious, and rarely in relation to a pneumococcal infection. We report two cases of acute rhabdomyolysis which developed in patients with severe Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. No other cause could be identified in these two patients aged 32 and 37 years. Rhabdomyolysis was discovered in the first patient because of acute kidney failure and elevated serum transaminase levels. The second patient presented an inflammatory edema affecting the soft tissues. Blood cultures isolated a pneumococcus in both patients. The rhabdomyolysis regressed favorably in both patients despite the transient renal failure in the first patient. Prognosis is generally poor for rhabdomyolysis during the course of pneumococcal pneumonia, with increased morbidity and mortality for these infections. Early detection of bacteriemia enables rapid and adequate treatment and prevention of renal failure.

  17. Acute renal failure associated with nonfulminant acute viral hepatitis A

    OpenAIRE

    Sarawgi, S.; Gupta, A K; Arora, D S; Jasuja, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis A runs a benign course in children, but may have atypical presentations in adults. Very rarely acute renal failure complicates nonfulminant hepatitis A. We report a patient with nonfulminant acute viral hepatitis A with multiorgan involvement. Patient had biopsy proven acute interstitial nephritis, acute pancreatitis, acute myocarditis and required hemodialysis for 6 weeks.

  18. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  19. Acute hyperventilation leading to hypocalcaemia during spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common cause of hypocalcaemia under general anaesthesia is acute mechanical hyperventilation, but hypocalcaemia during spinal anaesthesia has not been reported. This case report describes the development of hypocalcaemia due to hyperventilation in a patient undergoing appendicectomy under spinal ...

  20. Legislation hampers medical research in acute situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Informed consent in incapacitated adults is permitted in the form of proxy consent by both the patients' closest relative (next of kin, NOK) and general practitioner (GP). In research in acute situations not involving pharmaceuticals, Danish legislation allows for randomisation...

  1. Acute Idiopathic Scrotal Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál Breen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute idiopathic scrotal edema (AISE in a 4-year-old boy who presented with acute scrotal pain and erythema. The clinical features, ultrasound appearance, and natural history of this rare diagnosis are reviewed. In this report, we highlight the importance of good ultrasound technique in differentiating the etiology of the acute scrotum and demonstrate the color Doppler “Fountain Sign” that is highly suggestive of AISE.

  2. Acute recurrent polyhydramnios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Line; Bundgaard, Anne; Skibsted, Lillian

    2007-01-01

    Acute recurrent polyhydramnios is a rare occurrence characterized by a poor fetal outcome. This is a case report describing a 34-year-old woman presenting with acute recurrent polyhydramnios. Treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and therapeutic amniocenteses was initiated...... an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. As in normal pregnancies, amniotic prolactin levels decreased by 80% from highest to lowest value in this case of resolving acute recurrent polyhydramnios....

  3. Acute periodontal lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Gonzalez, David; Alonso Álvarez, Bettina; Arriba de la Fuente, Lorenzo; Santa- Cruz Astorqui, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz Alonso, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    This is a review and update on acute conditions affecting the gingival tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases, and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious process not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, muco-cutanenous disorders, and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important since it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodo...

  4. [Acute intracranial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilo Arrojo, F; Herrera Muñoz, A; Anciones, B

    2010-10-01

    Acute intracranial hypertension is a syndrome with multiple etiologies. Diagnosis and treatment must be performed urgently to save the patient's life and prevent the development of significant disabilities. The appearance of this syndrome is due to intracraincreased volumes and -in turn- the pressure of the intracranial contents, either through an increase in the physiological components (blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma), or through the appearance of a volume in the form of added mass. The underlying brain edema in this condition may be of several types: cytotoxic, vasogenic, interstitial, or hydrostatic. Increased intracranial pressure decreases cerebral perfusion pressure, creating a vicious cycle because of the resulting cerebral ischemia, which progressively increases cerebral blood volume by decreasing resistance and further increases intracranial pressure. Treatment depends on the etiology and will generally require medical and surgical care. Patient management is usually carried out in neurocritical units and involves intracranial pressure monitoring to guide treatment. Correction of all hemostasis disorders is also crucial to patient survival. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Foà

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most frequent neoplasm in children, while being relatively rare in adults. The outcome of children with ALL is far superior than that observed in adults, whose survival rates generally do not exceed 40%. A retrospective analysis recently carried out on a large series of cases enrolled in the AIEOP and GIMEMA protocols for the treatment of pediatric and adult ALL has documented specific differences among the various age cohorts examined, particularly in terms of incidence of molecular rearrangements, with the BCR/ABL rearrangement being detected in more than half of patients in the 6th decade of life. These findings highlight the importance of a precise diagnostic screening at all ages, since elderly patients might benefit more from targeted approaches, that are associated with less toxic effects. Furthermore, extended biologic approaches aimed at identifying novel therapeutic targets should be regarded as a main goal to refine our therapeutic armamentarium. Finally, the introduction of pediatric-like protocols is progressively changing the outcome of young adult patients, although an important caveat is represented by the comorbidities and toxic effects associated with more aggressive chemotherapy; therefore, patients’ fitness should always be carefully considered.

  6. [Synchronous acute cholecystolithiasis and perforated acute appendicitis. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrón-Arredondo, Guillermo; de Atocha Rosado-Montero, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis and acute cholecystitis are among the most common diagnoses that general surgeons operate on. However, it is rarely described in its synchronous form. A 43 year-old woman attending the clinic for right upper quadrant pain of 11 days duration. The patient refers to intermittent radiating pain in the right side, with positive Murphy, tachycardia, and fever. The laboratory results showed white cells 16,200/mm(3), glucose 345 mg/dl, abnormal liver function tests. Acute cholecystitis was reported with ultrasound. A Masson-type incision was made, noting an enlarged pyogenic gallbladder with thickened walls, sub-hepatic abscess of approximately 300 ml, greenish-yellow colour, and foetid. An anterograde subtotal cholecystectomy is performed due to difficulty in identifying elements of Calot triangle due to the inflammatory process, opening it and extracting stones. The right iliac fossa is reviewed, finding a plastron and a sub-serous retrocaecal appendix perforated in its middle third with free fecalith and an abscess in the pelvic cavity. An anterograde appendectomy was performed and the patient progressed satisfactorily, later being discharged due to improvement. In this patient, with a history of recurrent episodes of gallbladder pain and disseminated acute abdominal pain without peritoneal irritation, clinical suspicion was exacerbated cholecystitis with probable empyema of the gallbladder. Open surgery approach for this patient allowed access to both the appendix and gallbladder in order to perform a complete exploration of the abdominal cavity. The synchronous presentation of cholecystolithiasis and complicated appendicitis has not been reported in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute rhinosinusitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aring, Ann M; Chan, Miriam M

    2011-05-01

    Rhinosinusitis is one of the most common conditions for which patients seek medical care. Subtypes of rhinosinusitis include acute, subacute, recurrent acute, and chronic. Acute rhinosinusitis is further specified as bacterial or viral. Most cases of acute rhinosinusitis are caused by viral infections associated with the common cold. Symptomatic treatment with analgesics, decongestants, and saline nasal irrigation is appropriate in patients who present with nonsevere symptoms (e.g., mild pain, temperature less than 101°F [38.3°C]). Narrow-spectrum antibiotics, such as amoxicillin or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, are recommended in patients with symptoms or signs of acute rhinosinusitis that do not improve after seven days, or that worsen at any time. Limited evidence supports the use of intranasal corticosteroids in patients with acute rhinosinusitis. Radiographic imaging is not recommended in the evaluation of uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. Computed tomography of the sinuses should not be used for routine evaluation, although it may be used to define anatomic abnormalities and evaluate patients with suspected complications of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Rare complications of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis include orbital, intracranial, and bony involvement. If symptoms persist or progress after maximal medical therapy, and if computed tomography shows evidence of sinus disease, referral to an otolaryngologist is warranted.

  8. Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan A Alayafi; Faisal R Jahangiri; Mukki Almuntashri

    2014-01-01

      Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, or post infectious encephalomyelitis is an immunologically mediated demyelinating disorder affecting the central nervous system after infection or vaccination...

  9. Case report: Acute peritonitis from non-traumatic rupture of the bladder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous bladder rupture (SBR) is rare. This entity occurs outside of any traumatic context. A 70 years-old man was admitted for acute peritonitis, acute urinary retention and hematuria. Laparotomy and exploration showed acute generalized peritonitis related to a centimeter hole in the bladder dome. Peritoneal lavage ...

  10. A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scoring system in predicting mortality and length of stay at surgical intensive care unit.

  11. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mimicking acute meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Amirkashani, Davood; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Yaghmaei, Bahareh; Tavassoli, Alireza; Manafi, Farzad; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-12-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that usually occurs following an antecedent infection or vaccination. Children and young adults are predominantly affected, but it has low incidence in children younger than 3 years. The disease manifests with a wide range of neurological abnormalities and a variable combination of fever, headache, meningism, convulsion and cranial nerve palsies, and there are no pathognomonic clinical or laboratory findings. So, establishment of definitive diagnosis is challenging in infants. This challenge may result in delayed diagnosis and consequently delayed treatment of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, which may cause permanent neurological disability. Herein, we report an infant with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, who mimicked the symptoms of meningoencephalitis and the correct diagnosis and treatment were delayed till the development of a severe phase of the disease.

  12. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  13. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; Heurn, L.W. van; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  14. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  15. Acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Kojika, Masahiro; Sato, Hisaho; Suzuki, Keijiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Recent successive reports on acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have revealed that TTP-related microvascular damage is an aggravating factor of acute pancreatitis. Here, we report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to high alcohol consumption. The patient was unconscious as he had taken an overdose of medication, and presented with fever and renal failure due to acute pancreatitis on admission. Although the pancreatitis subsequently improved, the symptoms were still observed; on the next day, he exhibited hemoglobinuria, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, general blood examinations indicated the presence of schistocytes and reduced activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) to 47 %. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with TTP, and plasma exchange was performed. After the development of TTP, the acute pancreatitis recurred, but a severe pathogenesis was prevented by plasma exchange. Thus, ADAMTS13 activity may be useful for predicting a severe pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In ADAMTS13-deficient cases, plasma exchange may be an effective technique for preventing aggravation of acute pancreatitis.

  16. [Nonocclusive acute mesenteric ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, I; Meşină, C; Paşalega, M; Calotă, F; Vâlcea, I D

    2008-01-01

    The authors present one case of acute mesenteric ischemia appeared to the patient 70 years old, with HTA and coronary heart disease with heart arrhythmia treated with angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, anti arrhythmia agents and antithrombin therapy (trombostop). Acute mesenteric ischemia is not an isolated clinical entity, but a complex of diseases, including acute mesenteric arterial embolus and thrombus, mesenteric venous thrombus and nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia. These diseases have common clinical features caused by impaired blood perfusion of the intestine, bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Reperfusion injury is another important feature of nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia. We discuss about the nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia is the most lethal form of acute mesenteric ischemia because of the poor understanding of its pathophysiology and its nonspecific symptoms, which often delay its diagnosis. Although acute mesenteric ischemia is still lethal and in-hospital mortality rates have remained high over the last few decades, accumulated knowledge on this condition is expected to improve its prognosis.

  17. [Advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2008-10-01

    The present article reports the most recent evidence on the latest advances in the definition, diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis. The concept of acute pancreatitis and its complications is changing and the presence of persistent organ failure is essential to classify a patient as having severe disease. In this context, increased intestinal permeability is seen as an early phenomenon with important prognostic repercussions. Endoscopic ultrasonography is confirmed as the investigation of choice in patients with idiopathic acute pancreatitis or suspected acute biliary pancreatitis. Aggressive water and electrolyte replacement in the first few hours after onset is the key to a favorable clinical course. Conservative treatment and the use of endoscopic necrosectomy are replacing surgery as the treatment of choice of infected pancreatic necrosis. Lastly, the present article discusses the latest evidence on the prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) acute pancreatitis.

  18. General metabolism in patients with acute paraplegia and quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H H; Rowlands, B J; Stein, D K; Kopaniky, D R; Gildenberg, P L

    1985-03-01

    This study measured the nutritional status of eight spine-injured patients during their first 10 to 14 days in the hospital. Initial and follow-up nutritional assessment showed that their nutritional status deteriorated at least partly due to an inadequate supply of protein and calories. Infective complications and prolonged respiratory support were common and may have been caused in part by impaired nutrition. This suggests that a prospective study of aggressive nutritional support for patients with spinal cord transection should be initiated to determine whether this acquired malnutrition and its associated complications can be prevented.

  19. The role of levosimendan in acute heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieminen, Markku S; Buerke, M.; Cohen-Solal, A.

    2016-01-01

    defined as exclusion criteria in trials and registries. As a consequence, guideline recommendations are mostly driven by observational studies, even though these patients have a particularly poor prognosis compared to heart failure patients without signs of coronary artery disease. In acute heart failure......Acute heart failure and/or cardiogenic shock are frequently triggered by ischemic coronary events. Yet, there is a paucity of randomized data on the management of patients with heart failure complicating acute coronary syndrome, as acute coronary syndrome and cardiogenic shock have frequently been...... are generally less common than with other inotropic and vasoactive therapies, with the notable exception of hypotension. The decision to use levosimendan, in terms of timing and dosing, is influenced by the presence of pulmonary congestion, and blood pressure measurements. Levosimendan should be preferred over...

  20. Risk Factors for Mortality and Outcomes in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Flávia F; Troster, Eduardo J; Oliveira, Cindy S; Faria, Aline; Lucena, Michelle; João, Paulo R D; Saad, Everardo D; Foronda, Flávia A K; Delgado, Artur F; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow

    2015-09-01

    Children admitted to PICUs often present with or develop respiratory failure that requires mechanical ventilation. We prospectively identified children admitted to three general PICUs, with the goal of identifying risk factors for mortality. Prospective multicenter observational study. Three general PICUs, two in São Paulo and one in Curitiba, Brazil. Children aged between 1 month and 15 years, consecutively admitted between August 2008 and July 2010, with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome that developed at least 12 hours after invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation. None. We used logistic regression models to explore the relationship between death and independent variables. Of 3,046 patients admitted to the three PICUs, 1,658 patients underwent mechanical ventilation, and 84 fulfilled the acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Nearly 60% were boys, and the median age was 31 months. Pressure control/assist control was the initial mode of mechanical ventilation in 86% of cases, and the median durations of mechanical ventilation and PICU stay were 12 and 15 days, respectively. None of the eight patients with acute lung injury died, whereas 33 of 76 of the remaining patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome died, for an overall mortality rate of 39.3% (95% CI, 28.8-50.6%). In different multivariate logistic regression model, the number of organ dysfunctions at admission, peak inspiratory pressure, airway pressure gradient on day 1, and the mean airway pressure gradient over the first 7 days of mechanical ventilation were significantly associated with mortality. Mortality is high in pediatric acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation-associated risk factors for death among such patients are potential targets for intervention.

  1. Acute Hepatic Porphyria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, D. Montgomery; Wang, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrias comprise a set of diseases, each representing an individual defect in one of the eight enzymes mediating the pathway of heme synthesis. The diseases are genetically distinct but have in common the overproduction of heme precursors. In the case of the acute (neurologic) porphyrias, the cause of symptoms appears to be overproduction of a neurotoxic precursor. For the cutaneous porphyrias, it is photosensitizing porphyrins. Some types have both acute and cutaneous manifestations. The clinical presentation of acute porphyria consists of abdominal pain, nausea, and occasionally seizures. Only a small minority of those who carry a mutation for acute porphyria have pain attacks. The triggers for an acute attack encompass certain medications and severely decreased caloric intake. The propensity of females to acute attacks has been linked to internal changes in ovarian physiology. Symptoms are accompanied by large increases in delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen in plasma and urine. Treatment of an acute attack centers initially on pain relief and elimination of inducing factors such as medications; glucose is administered to reverse the fasting state. The only specific treatment is administration of intravenous hemin. An important goal of treatment is preventing progression of the symptoms to a neurological crisis. Patients who progress despite hemin administration have undergone liver transplantation with complete resolution of symptoms. A current issue is the unavailability of a rapid test for urine porphobilinogen in the urgent-care setting. PMID:26357631

  2. Estrategias de reperfusión usadas en pacientes con síndrome coronario agudo con elevación persistente del segmento ST en un hospital general: Reperfusion strategies in patients with acute coronary syndrome and persistent ST-segment elevation in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Borda-Velásquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conocer las estrategias de reperfusión en pacientes con síndrome coronario agudo ST elevado (SCASTE atendidos en el departamento de emergencia de un hospital general, y determinar el tiempo para realizar dichas estrategias a través de los tiempos puerta-aguja (P-A, puerta-balón (P-B, electrocardiograma (ECG y total de isquemia. Material y métodos: Estudio retrospectivo transversal en pacientes con diagnóstico de SCASTE en el Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia (HNCH desde el 1° de enero de 2011 al 31 de enero de 2013. Se registraron las características demográficas y clínicas, tiempos de reperfusión miocárdica, de síntomas, para toma de ECG. Los factores asociados fueron analizados por análisis bivariado. Resultados: Cuarenta y cinco pacientes fueron elegibles. La edad media fue 60,5 ± 10,98 años, 88,8% fueron varones. El tiempo medio de hospitalización fue 9,79 ± 10,36 días. Se encontró obesidad (IMC ≥ 30 en 61,3%; hipertensión en 40,9%: tabaquismo en 43,1%; y diabetes mellitus II (DM II en 25%. El tiempo medio P-A de 57 ± 54,1 minutos; en 28,1% se administró el agente trombolítico antes de los 30 minutos. Angioplastia fue realizada en un paciente con un tiempo P-B de 440 minutos. El tiempo total de isquemia (TTI medio fue 244 ± 143,9 minutos. Conclusiones: Las estrategias de reperfusión fueron usadas en 71,1% de pacientes, siendo trombólisis la más usada; sin embargo, el tiempo P-A se encontró fuera del rango óptimo

  3. [Inflammation and acute pharyngo-tonsillitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessey, J J

    1. Despite several studies, it has been impossible to establish a correlation between bacteriological and clinical findings in erythematous pultaceous sore throat. 2. Antibiotics should be prescribed for group A streptococcal sore throat alone. 3. In acute tonsilitis, inflammation is perfectly proportional to infection; 4. Their extremely important role in the pathogenesis of different inflammatory processes has been demonstrated in acute tonsilitis. 5. Based on the fact that no clinical argument can confirm or infirm the streptococcal cause, it is recommended to use a rapid diagnostic test in all adults or children with sore throat. 6. No data are available demonstrating the benefit of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs at antiinflammatory doses or of general corticosteroid treatment of acute sore throat. Nevertheless, in non-A hemolytic streptococcal where antibiotic treatment is not indicated, wouldn't it be useful to prescribe symptomatic antiinflammatory treatment?

  4. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  5. Acute acalculous cholecystitis complicating chemotherapy for acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a rare complication in the treatment of acute myeloblastic leukemia. Diagnosis of acute acalculous cholecystitis remains difficult during neutropenic period. We present two acute myeloblastic leukemia patients that developed acute acalculous cholecystitis during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. They suffered from fever, vomiting and acute pain in the epigastrium. Ultrasound demonstrated an acalculous gallbladder. Surgical management was required in one patient and conservative treatment was attempted in the other patient. None treatment measures were effective and two patients died. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is a serious complication in neutropenic patients. Earlier diagnosis could have expedited the management of these patients.

  6. Acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Grant W; Rossi, Jeffrey E; Cannon, Christopher P

    2017-01-14

    Acute myocardial infarction has traditionally been divided into ST elevation or non-ST elevation myocardial infarction; however, therapies are similar between the two, and the overall management of acute myocardial infarction can be reviewed for simplicity. Acute myocardial infarction remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite substantial improvements in prognosis over the past decade. The progress is a result of several major trends, including improvements in risk stratification, more widespread use of an invasive strategy, implementation of care delivery systems prioritising immediate revascularisation through percutaneous coronary intervention (or fibrinolysis), advances in antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants, and greater use of secondary prevention strategies such as statins. This seminar discusses the important topics of the pathophysiology, epidemiological trends, and modern management of acute myocardial infarction, focusing on the recent advances in reperfusion strategies and pharmacological treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute coronary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have plenty of fruits, veggies, whole grains, and lean meats. Try to limit foods high in cholesterol ... et al. 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary ...

  8. Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breath Acute kidney failure Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. [Acute dyspnea in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, P; Orliaguet, G

    2003-07-01

    Diagnosis of an acute obstructive dyspnea in children is very difficult, especially in the prehospital setting, because there are many possible causes. However, some of them may rapidly become life-threatening and therefore require a rapid prehospital management by a team staffed by a physician. The main causes of acute dyspnea in children usually include: obstructive dyspnea (acute laryngitis, foreign body aspiration, bronchiolotis, acute asthma), pulmonary infections and cardiac dyspnea, as well as dyspnea from other origins (cardiovascular collapse, hyperthermia, acidosis, intoxication, deshydratation). Following the assessment of the severity of the illness, the prehospital management should aimed at restoring an optimal oxygenation, before initiating a treatment adapted to the cause of the disease.

  10. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of radiation, such as survivors of a nuclear reactor accident, have an increased risk of developing acute ... 18, 2015. Mesa RA (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. May 30, 2015. Cook AJ. Decision ...

  11. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. Clinical manifestations and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. ... National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/types/leukemia/patient/child-all-treatment-pdq#section/all. Accessed June 5, ...

  12. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and neuroimaging findings in 84 consecutive children with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM were studied prospectively, between March 1988 and July 2000, in relation to outcome at the National Pediatric Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  13. Acute Radiation Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS): A Fact Sheet for the Public ... is called the radiation dose. People exposed to radiation will get ARS only if: The radiation dose ...

  14. Current management of acute bronchiolitis in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barben, J; Hammer, J

    2003-01-11

    Acute bronchiolitis is the most common lower respiratory tract infection in the first year of life. Current expert opinion and scientific data suggest that pharmaceutical agents have little impact on the natural course of the disease. Postal questionnaires were sent to all Swiss paediatricians to assess their current practice for treating acute bronchiolitis in children. Of a total of 937 questionnaires, 541 (58%) were returned. Of the respondents, 422 (78%) treat children with acute bronchiolitis. Up to 99% of paediatricians used bronchodilators in the outpatient and inpatient management, either routinely (up to 62%) or occasionally (37%). Steroids were used by 41% of the respondents in outpatient management and by 57% in inpatient management. The paediatric respiratory physicians tended to use bronchodilators and corticosteroids less frequently than the general paediatricians. A wide variation in the treatment of bronchiolitis was noted. Despite lack of evidence of benefit most Swiss paediatricians use pharmaceutical agents in the management of acute bronchiolitis. In particular, bronchodilators and corticosteroids were used in inpatient management in Switzerland much more frequently than recently reported for Australian paediatricians. National guidelines could be helpful in reducing the variations in the management of acute bronchiolitis in our country.

  15. Bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsura T

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Keisho Hirota1,2, Masayuki Akimoto1,3, Toshiaki Katsura21Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Medical Center, National Hospital Organization, 2Internal Medicine, Kyoto Medical Center, 3Clinical Research Center, Kyoto Medical Center, Kyoto, JapanPurpose: The report of a case of bilateral acute retinal necrosis after herpetic meningitis.Case report: A 47-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaint of persistent high fever and transient loss of consciousness. Although his general condition improved after intravenous acyclovir administration, the patient presented with visual loss in both eyes 4 days after admission. Visual acuity in his right eye was 20/200 and his left eye had light perception alone. Both eyes showed panretinal arteritis diagnosed as acute retinal necrosis. Panretinal photocoagulation was performed for both eyes. Progression of retinal detachment was prevented in both eyes; however, visual acuity of the left eye was totally lost because of neovascular glaucoma. Visual acuity of the right eye recovered to 20/20.Conclusion: Although cases of bilateral acute retinal necrosis have been reported after herpetic encephalitis, this condition is rare after herpetic meningitis. Prophylactic acyclovir therapy and early panretinal photocoagulation may prevent retinal detachment and improve the prognosis. Neurologists and ophthalmologists should be aware that not only herpetic encephalitis but also herpetic meningitis can lead to acute retinal necrosis within a very short interval.Keywords: acute retinal necrosis, herpetic meningitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster virus

  16. A Rare Sequela of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kodadhala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating disease, typically occurring in children following a febrile infection or a vaccination. Primary and secondary immune responses contribute to inflammation and subsequent demyelination, but the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is strongly suggested by temporal relationship between an infection or an immunization and the onset of neurological symptoms. Biopsy is definitive. In general, the disease is self-limiting and the prognostic outcome is favorable with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. Locked-in syndrome describes patients who are awake and conscious but have no means of producing limb, speech, or facial movements. Locked-in syndrome is a rare complication of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We present a case of incomplete locked-in syndrome occurring in a 34-year-old male secondary to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Our case is unique, as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis occurred in a 34-year-old which was poorly responsive to immunosuppression resulting in severe disability.

  17. A rare sequela of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodadhala, Vijay; Devulapalli, Saravana; Kurukumbi, Mohankumar; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating disease, typically occurring in children following a febrile infection or a vaccination. Primary and secondary immune responses contribute to inflammation and subsequent demyelination, but the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is strongly suggested by temporal relationship between an infection or an immunization and the onset of neurological symptoms. Biopsy is definitive. In general, the disease is self-limiting and the prognostic outcome is favorable with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. Locked-in syndrome describes patients who are awake and conscious but have no means of producing limb, speech, or facial movements. Locked-in syndrome is a rare complication of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We present a case of incomplete locked-in syndrome occurring in a 34-year-old male secondary to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Our case is unique, as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis occurred in a 34-year-old which was poorly responsive to immunosuppression resulting in severe disability.

  18. Acute management of stones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Helene; Osther, Palle J S

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stone management is often conservative due to a high spontaneous stone passage rate or non-symptomatic calyceal stones that do not necessarily require active treatment. However, stone disease may cause symptoms and complications requiring urgent intervention. MATERIAL AND METHODS......: In this review, we update latest research and current recommendations regarding acute management of stones, with particular focus on imaging, pain management, active stone interventions, medical expulsive therapy, and urolithiasis in pregnancy and childhood. RESULTS: Acute stone management should be planned...

  19. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Fin Stolze; Bjerring, Peter Nissen

    2011-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these.......Acute liver failure (ALF) results in a multitude of serious complications that often lead to multi-organ failure. This brief review focuses on the pathophysiological processes in ALF and how to manage these....

  20. Acute Leukemia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Vilchevska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The lecture presents current data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, observation methods and principles of treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. own clinical observation of development of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical picture in a child aged 4 years old has been described. This case is characterized by late diagnosis and inappropriate prescription of steroids in combination with antipyretic agents that led to tumor resistance to the treatment.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri Rauenzahn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Appendicitis in leukemic patients is uncommon but associated with increased mortality. Additionally, leukemic cell infiltration of the appendix is extremely rare. While appendectomy is the treatment of choice for these patients, diagnosis and management of leukemia have a greater impact on remission and survival. A 59-year-old Caucasian female was admitted to the surgical service with acute right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and anorexia. She was noted to have leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Abdominal imaging demonstrated appendicitis with retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymphadenopathy for which she underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. Peripheral smear, bone marrow biopsy, and surgical pathology of the appendix demonstrated acute myeloid leukemia (AML with nonsuppurative appendicitis. In the setting of AML, prior cases described the development of appendicitis with active chemotherapy. Of these cases, less than ten patients had leukemic infiltration of the appendix, leading to leukostasis and nonsuppurative appendicitis. Acute appendicitis with leukemic infiltration as the initial manifestation of AML has only been described in two other cases in the literature with an average associated morbidity of 32.6 days. The prompt management in this case of appendicitis and AML resulted in an overall survival of 185 days.

  2. Focus on acute diarrhoeal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Fabio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Nardone, Gerardo; Pilotto, Alberto; Zamparo, Emanuela

    2009-07-21

    Diarrhoea is an alteration of normal bowel movement characterized by an increase in the water content, volume, or frequency of stools. Diarrhoea needs to be classified according to the trends over time (acute or chronic) and to the characteristics of the stools (watery, fatty, inflammatory). Secretory diarrhoeas, mostly acute and of viral aetiology in more than 70% of cases, are by far the most important subtype of diarrhoeas in terms of frequency, incidence and mortality (over 2.5 million deaths/year in developing countries). Natural and synthetic opiates such as morphine, codeine, and loperamide which react with endogenous opiates (enkephalins, beta-endorphins, dynorphins) mainly act on intestinal motility and slow down transit. An antidiarrhoeal drug developed in recent years, racecadotril, acts as an enkephalinase inhibitor. Clinical studies have shown that it is just as effective as loperamide in resolving acute diarrhoea but with greater reduction in pain and abdominal distension. Some studies have explored the prevalence of diarrhoea in old age. An epidemiological study carried out in Italy by 133 General Practitioners on 5515 elderly outpatients reported a prevalence of diarrhoea, defined according to the Rome criteria, of 9.1%. Infectious diseases (19%) and drug use (16%) were the most common causes of diarrhoea in old age. Regardless of the cause, the treatment of elderly patients with diarrhoea must include rehydration and nutritional support. Every year, more than 50 million tourists travel from industrialized countries to places where hygiene levels are poor. At least 75% of those travelling for short periods mention health problems, and in particular traveller's diarrhoea.

  3. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the adductor muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, A.; Weir, A.; Tol, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Male athletes with acute groin pain and an MRI confirmed acute adductor muscle injury were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 7 days of injury using a standardized protocol and a reliable assessment approach. 156 athletes presented with acute groin...... pain of which 71 athletes were included, median age 27 years (range 18-37). There were 46 isolated muscle injuries and 25 athletes with multiple adductor injuries. In total, 111 acute adductor muscle injuries were recorded; 62 adductor longus, 18 adductor brevis, 17 pectineus, 9 obturator externus, 4....... At the proximal insertion, 12 of 16 injuries were complete avulsions. This study shows that acute adductor injuries generally occur in isolation from other muscle groups. Adductor longus is the most frequently injured muscle in isolation and in combination with other adductor muscle injuries. Three characteristic...

  4. Differentiating Acute Otitis Media and Acute Mastoiditis in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulajainen-Hongisto, Anu; Aarnisalo, Antti A; Jero, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Acute otitis media is a common infection in children. Most acute otitis media episodes can be treated at an outpatient setting with antimicrobials, or only expectant observation. Hospital treatment with parenteral medication, and myringotomy or tympanostomy, may be needed to treat those with severe, prolonged symptoms, or with complications. The most common intratemporal complication of acute otitis media is acute mastoiditis. If a child with acute mastoiditis does not respond to this treatment, or if complications develop, further examinations and other surgical procedures, including mastoidectomy, are considered. Since the treatment of complicated acute otitis media and complicated acute mastoiditis differs, it is important to differentiate these two conditions. This article focuses on the differential diagnostics of acute otitis media and acute mastoiditis in children.

  5. Acute cerebellar ataxia, acute cerebellitis, and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Jay; Mitchell, Wendy G

    2012-11-01

    Acute cerebellar ataxia and acute cerebellitis represent a process characterized by parainfectious, postinfectious, or postvaccination cerebellar inflammation. There is considerable overlap between these entities. The mildest cases of acute cerebellar ataxia represent a benign condition that is characterized by acute truncal and gait ataxia, variably with appendicular ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria, and hypotonia. It occurs mostly in young children, presents abruptly, and recovers over weeks. Neuroimaging is normal. Severe cases of cerebellitis represent the other end of the spectrum, presenting with acute cerebellar signs often overshadowed by alteration of consciousness, focal neurological deficits, raised intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and even herniation. Neuroimaging is abnormal and the prognosis is less favorable than in acute cerebellar ataxia. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis may be confused with acute cerebellitis when the clinical findings are predominantly cerebellar, but lesions on neuroimaging are usually widespread. Paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is often initially misdiagnosed as acute cerebellar ataxia, but has very specific features, course, and etiopathogensis.

  6. Acute pulmonary edema after intramyometrial prostodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Baduni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25 year old, 68 kg, primigravida, was taken up for emergency caesarean section for meconium stained liquor and fetal distress. She was a known case of pre eclampsia and her blood pressure was controlled on tab methyl dopa. she was administered general anaesthesia. after delivery of baby she went into postpartum hemorrhage which was controlled with intramyometrial prostodin. but immediately after its administration she went into acute pulmonary edema.

  7. ACUTE INTESTINAL INFECTION AS A DISGUISE OF ACUTE APPENDICITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Dyakonova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis and acute intestinal infections in contemporary medicine remains relevant for clinical practice of surgeons and pediatricians. Late diagnosis of appendicitis results in development of complicated forms of vermiform appendix inflammation. This prolongs operative intervention, duration of antibacterial therapy and duration of a child’s inpatient stay. The article presents clinical observation of three children treated for perforated appendix and generalized purulent peritonitis. The described cases demonstrate the need in multidisciplinary approach and complex diagnosis of patients with such complaints as abdominal pain, fever and diarrhea.

  8. The dynamics of acute inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rukmini

    The acute inflammatory response is the non-specific and immediate reaction of the body to pathogenic organisms, tissue trauma and unregulated cell growth. An imbalance in this response could lead to a condition commonly known as "shock" or "sepsis". This thesis is an attempt to elucidate the dynamics of acute inflammatory response to infection and contribute to its systemic understanding through mathematical modeling and analysis. The models of immunity discussed use Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) to model the variation of concentration in time of the various interacting species. Chapter 2 discusses three such models of increasing complexity. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 discuss smaller models that capture the core features of inflammation and offer general predictions concerning the design of the system. Phase-space and bifurcation analyses have been used to examine the behavior at various parameter regimes. Section 2.3 discusses a global physiological model that includes several equations modeling the concentration (or numbers) of cells, cytokines and other mediators. The conclusions drawn from the reduced and detailed models about the qualitative effects of the parameters are very similar and these similarities have also been discussed. In Chapter 3, the specific applications of the biologically detailed model are discussed in greater detail. These include a simulation of anthrax infection and an in silico simulation of a clinical trial. Such simulations are very useful to biologists and could prove to be invaluable tools in drug design. Finally, Chapter 4 discusses the general problem of extinction of populations modeled as continuous variables in ODES is discussed. The average time to extinction and threshold are estimated based on analyzing the equivalent stochastic processes.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals in Acute Porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Nanno; Mamedova, Ilahä; Jansman, Frank G A

    2016-10-01

    The acute porphyrias are a group of rare metabolic disorders of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Carriers of the acute porphyria gene are prone to potentially fatal acute attacks, which can be precipitated by drug exposure. It is therefore important to know whether a drug is safe for carriers of the acute porphyria gene. In this study, radiopharmaceuticals were assessed on their porphyrogenicity (ie, the potential of a drug to induce an attack). The assessment was conducted by classifying the drugs according to the Thunell model. From 41 radiopharmaceuticals assessed, I-131 norcholesterol, Tc-99m mebrofenin, Tc-99m phytate, Tc-99m sestamibi, and Tl-201 chloride were classified as possibly porphyrogenic. I-131 norcholesterol, Tc-99m mebrofenin, Tc-99m phytate, Tc-99m sestamibi, and Tl-201 chloride should not be prescribed for patients experiencing acute porphyria unless an urgent indication is present and no safer alternative is available. In such cases, potential users should seek advice from a porphyria expert. Preventive measures may also be required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute poisoning: understanding 90% of cases in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S L; Dargan, P I; Jones, A L

    2005-04-01

    The acutely poisoned patient remains a common problem facing doctors working in acute medicine in the United Kingdom and worldwide. This review examines the initial management of the acutely poisoned patient. Aspects of general management are reviewed including immediate interventions, investigations, gastrointestinal decontamination techniques, use of antidotes, methods to increase poison elimination, and psychological assessment. More common and serious poisonings caused by paracetamol, salicylates, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cocaine are discussed in detail. Specific aspects of common paediatric poisonings are reviewed.

  11. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. An Atypical Case of Paracentral Acute Middle Maculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskes, Cheryl; Santapaola, Shannon; Zinn, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    This is a case presentation of paracentral acute middle maculopathy in a 33-year-old white man with borderline hyperlipidemia. Paracentral acute middle maculopathy was originally thought to be a variant of acute macular neuroretinopathy; however, it is now generally accepted that these two conditions are separate disease entities. The etiology, evolution, and pathophysiology of acute macular neuroretinopathy and paracentral acute middle maculopathy are discussed, as well as current diagnostic techniques. A 33-year-old white man with borderline hyperlipidemia presented with an acute, small paracentral scotoma involving the left eye. Clinical examination revealed a small wedge-shaped retinal lesion that corresponded to scotoma. Spectral domain-optical coherence tomography of the lesion demonstrated irregularity in the middle retina, whereas fluorescein angiography showed subtle hypofluorescence of the lesion. Spectral domain-optical coherence tomography was facilitated in monitoring retinal changes as the patient continued to have a persistent scotoma despite resolution of the retinal lesion. Clinically, acute macular neuroretinopathy and paracentral acute middle maculopathy present in very similar fashions with localized scotomas, blurry vision, and subtle retinal lesions that can be difficult to discern funduscopically. At this time, there is no ocular treatment for either condition, but observation and patient education regarding possibly persistent scotomas are necessary. This atypical case highlights paracentral acute middle maculopathy in a relatively young man with a systemic history significant only for borderline hyperlipidemia. Eye care providers should be familiar with acute macular neuroretinopathy and paracentral acute middle maculopathy to enable them to perform appropriate diagnostic testing and to identify patients who require a systemic disease evaluation.

  13. Acute Toxicity of Vildagliptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Peter; Martin, Lori; Keselica, Michael; Gunson, Diane; Skuba, Elizabeth; Lapadula, Dan; Hayes, Michael; Bentley, Phil; Busch, Steve

    2017-01-01

    This article describes acute toxicity data in cynomolgus monkeys following oral treatment with vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor. Acute toxicity symptoms in cynomolgus monkeys include edema formation of the extremities, tails, and face associated with skeletal muscle necrosis, and elevations of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase activities in the serum; hypothermia; hypotension; tachycardia; moribundity; and death in a few isolated instances. In surviving animals, symptoms were reversible even if treatment was continued. Cynomolgus monkeys from Mauritius appear more sensitive than monkeys of Asian origin. The underlying mechanism(s) of these symptoms in cynomolgus monkeys is currently not well understood, although a vascular mechanism including initial vasoconstriction and subsequent vascular leakage in distal extremities may play a role. The monkey data are reviewed and discussed in the context of other preclinical and clinical data, and it is concluded that acute toxicity following vildagliptin treatment is a monkey-specific phenomenon without relevance for humans.

  14. ACUTE STOMATITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Drobot’ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of diseases of mucous membrane of oral cavity is one of the main ones in dentistry. Special attention in this problem should be given to the acute herpetic stomatitis. 80% of all cases of mucous membrane of oral cavity in children are herpetic stomatitis. Local immunity in children with acute stomatitis is closely related to the character of course of pathology. An administration of immunomodulatory treatment is pathogenetically grounded. Bacterial lysates mixture causes etiotropical and pathogenetical effect and increases the activity of immune system resulting in relapses prophylaxis.Key words: children, acute herpetic stomatitis, bacterial lysates mixture.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:146-149

  15. Low back pain (acute).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Greg; Hall, Hamilton

    2011-05-09

    Low back pain affects about 70% of people in resource-rich countries at some point in their lives. Acute low back pain can be self-limiting; however, 1 year after an initial episode, as many as 33% of people still have moderate-intensity pain and 15% have severe pain. Acute low back pain has a high recurrence rate; 75% of those with a first episode have a recurrence. Although acute episodes may resolve completely, they may increase in severity and duration over time. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of oral drug treatments for acute low back pain? What are the effects of local injections for acute low back pain? What are the effects of non-drug treatments for acute low back pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 49 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, advice to stay active, analgesics (paracetamol, opioids), back exercises, back schools, bed rest, behavioural therapy, electromyographic biofeedback, epidural corticosteroid injections, lumbar supports, massage, multidisciplinary treatment programmes, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), spinal manipulation, temperature treatments (short-wave diathermy, ultrasound, ice, heat), traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS).

  16. Acute pulmoner embolism mimicking acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Avcı Demir

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and electocardiographic (ECG features in pulmonary embolism (PE lack of specificity and may mimic an acute coronary syndrom (ACS. We here report a case of a 56-year-old woman presenting with chest pain secondary to pulmonary artery embolism which was initially diagnosed as ACS due to electrocardiographic changes and raised troponin. PE presenting with negative T-wave inversion can mimic ACS and misdirect the diagnostic approach. Simultaneous T-wave inversions in anterior and inferior leads are important clues suggesting PE. Most common ECG findings in PE are anteroseptal T-wave inversion/ST-elevation or depression along with complete or incomplete right bundle branch block, sinus tachycardia, low QRS-complex voltage, an S1Q3T3 pattern, and right axis deviation. The reasons for the ECG changes that seem like ischemia are sudden RV strain, hypoxemia and the release of catecholamines. So we have to be aware that PE can present as acute coronary syndrome with ECG changes preoccupy ischemia

  17. Acute Prevertebral Calcific Tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Alexander; Jeffery, Caroline C; Ansari, Khalid; Naik, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    We present a case of neck pain in a middle-aged woman, initially attributed to a retropharyngeal infection and treated with urgent intubation. With the help of computed tomography, the diagnosis was later revised to acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis, a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the longus colli muscles. It is critical to differentiate between these two disease entities due to dramatic differences in management. A discussion of acute prevertebral calcific tendinitis and its imaging findings is provided below.

  18. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Acute dental pain most often occurs in relation to inflammatory conditions in the dental pulp or in the periradicular tissues surrounding a tooth, but it is not always easy to reach a diagnose and determine what treatment to perform. The anamnesis and the clinical examination provide valuable...... dental pain, they expect that the dentist starts treatment at once and that the treatment should provide pain relief. In this situation many patients are fragile, anxious and nervous. If the dentist is able to manage emergency treatment of acute dental pain this will build confidence and trust between...

  19. Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Catherine D

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure (ALF) is a complex and rapidly progressive syndrome that results from a variety of age-dependent etiologies. It is defined by the acute onset of liver disease with no evidence of chronic liver disease. There must be biochemical or clinical evidence of severe liver dysfunction as defined by an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥2. If hepatic encephalopathy is present, INR should be ≥1.5. Unfortunately, due to the rarity of ALF in pediatric patients, there is a paucity of diagnostic and management algorithms and each patient must have an individualized approach. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(12):e433-e438.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Acute bronchiolitis and croup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L

    2009-02-01

    Croup and acute bronchiolitis are common forms of virally induced respiratory disease in infancy and early childhood. There is good evidence that corticosteroids can ameliorate disease severity and alter the natural history of symptoms in patients who have croup and that temporary symptomatic benefit can be obtained from the use of nebulized adrenaline. The principle weakness when reviewing therapeutic interventions for acute bronchiolitis is the lack of a clear diagnostic test or definition. Current evidence suggests that oxygen is the only useful pharmacologic agent for correcting hypoxia.

  1. Dual antiplatelet therapy -- management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Rohan; Markham, Ryan; Adsett, Geoffrey

    2013-10-01

    Prasugrel and ticagrelor are two new antiplatelet agents being used in the management of acute coronary syndromes. The number of patients in the community managed on these medications is growing, and thus, it is essential that general practitioners have a good understanding of these agents and their evidence-based applications. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of common and new antiplatelet agents will be reviewed, along with the evidence supporting their use. Safety and side effect profiles will be discussed, and some common general practice case scenarios presented. Aspirin is still the mainstay of therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The addition of clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor can reduce morbidity and mortality in selected patients. Patient factors including bleeding risk, renal function and time since coronary stent insertion must be reviewed before these agents are initiated and before making any changes to the medication regimen.

  2. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. Implementation of a pre-hospital decision rule in general practice. Triage of patients with suspected myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W.M. Grijseels (Els); J.W. Deckers (Jaap); A.W. Hoes (Arno); H. Boersma (Eric); J.A.M. Hartman; E. van der Does (Emiel); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To improve pre-hospital triage of patients with suspected acute cardiac disease. DESIGN: Prospective study. SUBJECTS. Patients with symptoms suggestive of acute cardiac pathology, who were seen by a general practitioner, for whom acute admission into hospital was requested,

  4. Biomarkers in acute myocardial infarction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chan, Daniel; Ng, Leong L

    2010-01-01

    .... Biomarkers have been used to assist with timely diagnosis, while an increasing number of novel markers have been identified to predict outcome following an acute myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome...

  5. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / ARDS ARDS What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  6. Management of severe acute malnutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , with ... It is important to differentiate between acute and chronic malnutrition, as the management and mortality for these ..... Therapeutic effects of oral zinc in acute and persistent diarrhea in children in developing countries: Pooled analysis of ...

  7. Emphysematous gastritis after acute pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Bloodworth, L. L.; Stevens, P E; Bury, R. F.; Arm, J P; Rainford, D J

    1987-01-01

    A case of emphysematous gastritis associated with extensive gastric infarction after acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure is described. This complication was diagnosed on a plain abdominal radiograph and confirmed endoscopically. Extensive gastric and hepatic infarction was seen at necropsy.

  8. Causes of acute bronchitis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the respiratory system that leads into the lungs. Acute bronchitis has a sudden onset and usually appears after ... and the production of thick yellow mucus. If acute bronchitis occurs because of a bacterial infection antibiotics are ...

  9. Pathology of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Habek, Mario; Žarković, Kamelija

    2011-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an acute, monophasic neurologic syndrome that occurs after vaccination against various viruses and after many viral infections and rarely occurs again in the same patient...

  10. Victims of violence and the general practitioner.

    OpenAIRE

    Mezey, G; King, M.; MacClintock, T

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Violent crime is on the increase in Britain, with 17% of the 15 million incidents of crime reported in 1991 being of a violent nature. Although there is some information on the role of accident and emergency departments for victims who sustain physical injury, little is known about the role of the general practitioner (GP) in managing the acute and longer-term sequelae of violence. AIM: To examine the links between experiencing physical of sexual assault and seeking help from GPs ...

  11. Acute Poisoning with Methadone (Dolphin (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgy A. Livanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most publications report on the use of methadone as a medication, however an increase of the illegal use of methadone has been demonstrated worldwide over the recent years, thus increasing the number of hospitalizations due to acute poisoning with this synthetic opioid. The aim of the present review was to summarize current data on the mechanisms of toxicity, selective toxicity, toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of methadone (Dolphin. The involvement of CNS, respiratory, cardiovascular and urinary systems in acute poisoning with methadone was dis- cussed. The practice of use of methadone in many countries as a medicine for the replacement therapy for opiate addicts was analyzed. In addition, it was suggested that the results of the use of naloxone antidote therapy in acute opioid poisoning do not always clearly demonstrate its sufficient efficacy. Ways to improve of the intensive therapy of severe acute poisoning by methadone were substantiated; in addition to general critical care methods, treatment with a complex metabolic antihypoxant cytoflavin should be considered. 

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Ross H

    2010-12-01

    Cough is the most common symptom bringing patients to the primary care physician's office, and acute bronchitis is usually the diagnosis in these patients. Acute bronchitis should be differentiated from other common diagnoses, such as pneumonia and asthma, because these conditions may need specific therapies not indicated for bronchitis. Symptoms of bronchitis typically last about three weeks. The presence or absence of colored (e.g., green) sputum does not reliably differentiate between bacterial and viral lower respiratory tract infections. Viruses are responsible for more than 90 percent of acute bronchitis infections. Antibiotics are generally not indicated for bronchitis, and should be used only if pertussis is suspected to reduce transmission or if the patient is at increased risk of developing pneumonia (e.g., patients 65 years or older). The typical therapies for managing acute bronchitis symptoms have been shown to be ineffective, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recommends against using cough and cold preparations in children younger than six years. The supplement pelargonium may help reduce symptom severity in adults. As patient expectations for antibiotics and therapies for symptom management differ from evidence-based recommendations, effective communication strategies are necessary to provide the safest therapies available while maintaining patient satisfaction.

  13. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine. © The Author(s) 2013.

  14. The Interdisciplinary Management of Acute Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Raphael R; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Söllner, Wolfgang; Frieling, Thomas; Müller, Christian; Christ, Michael

    2015-11-06

    Acute chest pain of non-traumatic origin is a common reason for presentation to physician's offices and emergency rooms. Coronary heart disease is the cause in up to 25% of cases. Because acute chest pain, depending on its etiology, may be associated with a high risk of death, rapid, goal-oriented management is mandatory. This review is based on pertinent articles and guidelines retrieved by a selective search in PubMed. History-taking, physical examination, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are the first steps in the differential diagnostic process and generally allow the identification of features signifying a high risk of lifethreatening illness. If the ECG reveals ST-segment elevation, cardiac catheterization is indicated. The timedependent measurement of highly sensitive troponin values is a reliable test for the diagnosis or exclusion of acute myocardial infarction. A wide variety of other potential causes (e.g., vascular, musculoskeletal, gastroenterologic, or psychosomatic) must be identified from the history if they are to be treated appropriately. Elderly patients need special attention. Acute chest pain is a major diagnostic challenge for the physician. Common errors are traceable to non-recognition of important causes and to an inadequate diagnostic work-up. Future studies should be designed to help optimize the interdisciplinary management of patients with chest pain.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Acute promyelocytic leukemia Acute promyelocytic leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Acute promyelocytic leukemia is a form of acute myeloid leukemia, a ...

  16. ACUTE INFECTIOUS DIARRHEA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Kulichenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the key principles for detection and differentiation of the acute infectious diarrhea in children. The modern guidelines for treatment of the acute gastroenteritis and gastroenterocolitis are based on the rational application of the antibacterial medications and minimization drugs administration. There are therapeutic approaches recommended by WHO and ESPGHAN.Key words: acute gastroenteritis, gastroenterocolitis, diarrhea, acute enteric infections, detection, treatment, oral rehydration, nifuroxazide, children.

  17. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  18. Clinical advances in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Jiaming

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common gastroenterological emergency. Because of the diverse prognosis in AP, it is crucial to identify severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) early and provide timely treatment. Thus, there are a number of clinical advances in this aspect. This paper reviews two advances in AP. Firstly, AP is classified into mild acute pancreatitis, moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP), and SAP according to 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification; SAP is distinguished from MS...

  19. Lymphatic Leukaemia* In Acute

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case report of a patient who developed fatal pneumo- cystis pneumonia while in remission from acute lymphatic ... Chagas and CariniY This rare and usually fatal disease occurs in young babies;" or in individuals whose ... was then a month since his illness had started. On admission to our clinic we found the following: ...

  20. Acute hemiplegia in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Takehiko; Takao, Tatsuo; Itoh, Masatoshi; Konishi, Yukuo; Nakano, Shozo (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-04-01

    The results of CT in 100 patients with acute hemiplegia in childhood are reported here. The etiology was various: 2 patients had infratentorial brain tumors, 56 had cerebral vascular diseases, 3 had head injuries, 16 had intracranial infectious diseases, one had postinfectious encephalomyelitis, one had multiple sclerosis, 2 had epilepsy, and the diagnosis of 19 were unknown. Eleven patients had a normal CT and a good prognosis. As for the type of onset, there were patients of type 1 with fever and 42 with convulsions and unconsciousness; those of type 2 with convulsions and unconsciousness were 12, and those of type 3 without fever and convulsions were 46. This classification is assumed to be useful, as the type of onset is characteristic of the etiology. Six patients were diagnosed correctly by repeated examinations, although the first CT did not reveal any remarkable findings. Capsular infarction, occlusion of the posterior cerebral artery in acute hemiplegia in childhood, abnormal findings of the internal capsule, thalamus, and midbrain in a patient with postinfectious encephalomyelitis, and a diffuse low density in the CT of the unilateral hemisphere in the patients with acute encephalopathy and acute hemiplegia of an obscure origin have been found after the introduction of computerized tomography.

  1. Acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Lee, William M; Wendon, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Over the last three decades acute liver failure (ALF) has been transformed from a rare and poorly understood condition with a near universally fatal outcome, to one with a well characterized phenotype and disease course. Complex critical care protocols are now applied and emergency liver...

  2. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heart failure can be defined as a clinical syndrome in which a structural or functional cardiac abnormality impairs the capacity of the ventricle to fill or eject enough blood for the requirements of the body. Acute heart failure syndrome represents a complex, heterogeneous set of clinical conditions, all with the common.

  3. Low back pain - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache; Low back pain; Lumbar pain; Pain - back; Acute back pain; Back pain - new; Back pain - short-term; Back strain - new ... lower back supports most of your body's weight. Low back pain is the number two reason that Americans see ...

  4. Analgesia for acute pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    human right, and therefore the aim of acute pain management is adequate pain control to achieve ... the intervention causes unacceptable side-effects, it can lead to suboptimal pain relief and potentially dire outcomes. Knowledge .... it was found in a systematic review that music therapy reduces anxiety and analgesia ...

  5. Acute dental pain II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, Peter; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte; Rosen, Annika

    2016-01-01

    information, and a systematic approach is necessary. This paper will focus on diagnosis and treatment of pulpitis, pulp necrosis and apical periodontitis, periodontal abscess and endodontic-periodontal lesions, pericoronitis and post-operative problems. When the patient seeks the dentist suffering from acute...

  6. Acute severe childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and children must know exactly what to do when an acute attack occurs, and when to seek medical attention. This is very important if the child is using a home nebuliser as many parents continue to administer dose after dose of bronchodilator medication that does not provide oxygen. Failure to improve after a single dose of ...

  7. [Acute mesenteric ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurlen, M

    2015-10-01

    Acute vascular occlusion within the mesenteric circulation leads to ischemic damage of the corresponding bowel segment, which starts on the mucosal level and progresses transmurally. Report on pathogenesis, clinical picture and treatment of various forms of intestinal ischemia. Analysis of the available literature taking into consideration our own experience. Frequently, predisposing diseases and risk factors are present (e.g., cardiac diseases, hypercoagulability, status post cardiac surgery, circulatory failure, or administration of vasoconstrictive drugs). Acute small bowel ischemia-caused by either mesenteric embolism, mesenteric artery thrombosis, nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) or mesenteric venous thrombosis-represents an acute emergency. If this condition is suspected clinically, the diagnosis must be established immediately by computed tomography of the abdomen with intravenous administration of contrast medium in order to prevent irreversible damage to the small bowel. Medical treatment is supportive. If possible, occluded vessels may be re-opened either by radiologic intervention or surgically. Irreversibly damaged bowel segments must be surgically removed. Ischemic colitis has a benign course in most cases if limited to reversible mucosal damage. The diagnosis is based mainly on colonoscopy and computed tomography findings, and treatment is symptom oriented. Rarely, severe manifestations with a worse prognosis due to considerable comorbidities occur. In such cases, surgical removal of the ischemic bowel is frequently required. Even today, acute mesenteric ischemia is associated with a poor prognosis. To improve survival and to reduce long-term morbidity, a rapid and systematic diagnostic workup is mandatory.

  8. Acute pediatric rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watemberg, N; Leshner, R L; Armstrong, B A; Lerman-Sagie, T

    2000-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a relatively common condition that may occur intermittently in chronic and inflammatory myopathy, muscular dystrophy, and metabolic myopathy. Rhabdomyolysis can also present acutely in otherwise healthy individuals. The list of etiologies for acute muscle cell lysis is enormous, with new causes described yearly. Series on acute pediatric rhabdomyolysis have not yet been published. This article describes a retrospective review of children admitted to the authors' institution during an 8-year period in whom rhabdomyolysis was recognized as a complication during their hospital stay. Patients with intermittent or relapsing rhabdomyolysis were excluded. Nineteen children were identified. Trauma (five cases), nonketotic hyperosmolar coma (two cases), viral myositis (two cases), dystonia (two cases), and malignant hyperthermia-related conditions (two cases) were the most common causes of rhabdomyolysis. Acute renal failure was the most frequent complication, occurring in 42% of cases. The mean age of renal failure patients was 13.9 years, compared to 8 years for non-renal failure children. Careful assessment of the initial urinalysis would have suggested a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis in 9 of 16 patients tested.

  9. Acute Leukemia in Children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; McNally, Richard J. Q

    2015-01-01

    ... of deoxycytidine kinase and cytidine deaminase in assessing the toxicity by cytarabine in children with acute myeloid leukemia and found that this polymorphism might predict death in affected children. A. Vilchis-Ordonez et al. addressed a very interesting topic about subpopulations of leukemic cells that contribute to a proinflammatory microenvironment ...

  10. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  11. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart is accumulating irreversible damage. So time is myocardium – myocardium being the heart muscle itself,” Bolger said. At ... angina? This content was last reviewed July 2015. Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ...

  12. Acute Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic

    OpenAIRE

    Basavaraj Bhagawati; Rahul Hegde

    2003-01-01

    Acute thrombocytopenic purpura is the most common of thrombocytopenias of the childhood. Clinical Features include petechial lesions on oral mucosa, gingival bleeding and occassionally hemorrhage into tissues. Serious complications like intracranial bleeding are also reported. This paper describes a case, presenting in our dental OPD and reviews on published guidelines.

  13. acute psychiatric readmissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Psychiatry, Maudsley Hospital, London). Centre for Health Policy, University of the Witwaters- rand, Johannesburg. International trends have seen a policy shift from chronic psychi- atric institutions and long hospital admissions towards acute, short hospital stays and community-based care. Following this ...

  14. Acute periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute

  15. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  16. Acute bronchitis: Evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blush, Raymond R

    2013-10-10

    Acute bronchitis affects millions of individuals, significantly impacting patient health and the healthcare industry. Understanding evaluation and treatment guidelines for acute bronchitis allows the nurse practitioner to practice comprehensive care for patients. This article reviews evidence-based practices when caring for the patient with acute bronchitis, promoting optimization of healthy outcomes.

  17. Acute pyelonephritis in ER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Volpicelli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms and signs of acute pyelonephritis sometimes are subtle and emergency physicians attending overcrowded and busy institutions could easily miss the right diagnosis. The presence of a renal damage is decisive in the therapeutic choice. Aims of our study are: 1 to assess prevalence of renal damage in patients presenting to our ED with symptoms and signs of primary urinary tract infection (UTI; 2 to evaluate the reliability of such symptoms and signs in predicting a renal damage; 3 to assess accuracy of the contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS in the ED diagnosis of renal damage due to acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis. We studied 54 patients with suspected UTI. Each patient underwent clinical examination, routine blood and urine sampling and conventional renal ultrasound (US. 23 patients had confirmation of acute primary UTI, and performed renal magnetic resonance (MR to rule out renal parenchymal involvement. In 16 patients (69,6% one or more parenchymal lesions were visualized at MR, and diagnosis of acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis was confirmed (group A. The other 7 patients had a diagnosis of UTI without renal involvement (group B. Some of 23 patients presented with few atypical symptoms. Lumbar pain was the most frequent symptom (n = 21, without a statistically significant difference between group A and B (P 0,958; p = 0,328. No other symptom or sign has demonstrated statistically valid in predicting the renal involvement. Renal US was positive in only 3 patients of group A (18,7%. During this first part of our study, CEUS was performed in a limited number of patients (n = 8, and in 7 examinations data were concordant with MR. In conclusion, analysis of our preliminary data confirms that a distinction between patients with different extension of the UTI is not possible through the simple clinical examination and routine tests. CEUS is very promising and its routine employment in the ED could simplify the diagnostic practice in

  18. Self-Reported Mental Health Predicts Acute Respiratory Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lizzie; Barrett, Bruce; Chase, Joseph; Brown, Roger; Ewers, Tola

    2015-06-01

    Poor mental health conditions, including stress and depression, have been recognized as a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory infection. Very few studies have considered the role of general mental health in acute respiratory infection occurrence. The aim of this analysis is to determine if overall mental health, as assessed by the mental component of the Short Form 12 Health Survey, predicts incidence, duration, or severity of acute respiratory infection. Data utilized for this analysis came from the National Institute of Health-funded Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection (MEPARI) and MEPARI-2 randomized controlled trials examining the effects of meditation or exercise on acute respiratory infection among adults aged > 30 years in Madison, Wisconsin. A Kendall tau rank correlation compared the Short Form 12 mental component, completed by participants at baseline, with acute respiratory infection incidence, duration, and area-under-the-curve (global) severity, as assessed by the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey. Participants were recruited from Madison, Wis, using advertisements in local media. Short Form 12 mental health scores significantly predicted incidence (P = 0.037) of acute respiratory infection, but not duration (P = 0.077) or severity (P = 0.073). The Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) negative emotion measure significantly predicted global severity (P = 0.036), but not incidence (P = 0.081) or duration (P = 0.125). Mindful Attention Awareness Scale scores significantly predicted incidence of acute respiratory infection (P = 0.040), but not duration (P = 0.053) or severity (P = 0.70). The PHQ-9, PSS-10, and PANAS positive measures did not show significant predictive associations with any of the acute respiratory infection outcomes. Self-reported overall mental health, as measured by the mental component of Short Form 12, predicts acute respiratory infection incidence.

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures ... limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  20. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  1. Calfornia General Plans Rural

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — We undertook creating the first ever seamless statewide General Plan map for California. All county general plans and many city general plans were integrated into 1...

  2. Calfornia General Plans

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — We undertook creating the first ever seamless statewide General Plan map for California. All county general plans and many city general plans were integrated into 1...

  3. Acute Liver Injury and Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawley, Vincent

    2017-05-01

    Acute liver injury and acute liver failure are syndromes characterized by a rapid loss of functional hepatocytes in a patient with no evidence of pre-existing liver disease. A variety of inciting causes have been identified, including toxic, infectious, neoplastic, and drug-induced causes. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical approach to the acute liver injury/acute liver failure patient, with a particular emphasis on the diagnostic evaluation and care in the acute setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  5. TREATMENT FOR ACUTE INTOXICATIONS WITH VENOMS: COBRA SNAKEBITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Livanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of the clinical course of acute intoxications with venoms due to the bites of Naja (cobra naja and Naja kaouthia and those of intensive therapy in patients with the severest forms of this condition. Subjects and methods. Two clinical cases of acute intoxications with venoms due to Naja naja and Naja kaouthia bites were examined. The specific features of their clinical picture over time, changes in clinical and biochemical indicators, blood gas composition, and acidbase balance, coagulogram readings, ECG and radiological findings were studied. Results. Acute intoxication with venoms due to serious cobrabites was found to be characterized by the development of toxicohypoxic encephalopathy, toxic myopathy with skeletal and respiratory muscle paresis to develop acute respiratory and cardiovascular failure, coagulopathy, and metabolic disorders. Specific therapy (with an anti-ophidic serum in one case resulted in drastically worsening health conditions as fulminant acute respiratory distress syndrome. A package of intensive therapy measures should include actions based on general resuscitation approaches — maintenance of life support systems (breathing, blood circulation, anti-sensitizing therapy, correction of metabolic disturbances with substrate antihypoxants (cytofavin, reamberin, and antimicrobial therapy. Conclusion. In the severest acute intoxications due to cobra snakebites, specific therapy methods (with anti-ophidic serum should be used with extreme caution and particular emphasis should be laid on the general resuscitation-based principles. 

  6. Fractal generalized Pascal matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Burlachenko, E.

    2016-01-01

    Set of generalized Pascal matrices whose elements are generalized binomial coefficients is considered as an integral object. The special system of generalized Pascal matrices, based on which we are building fractal generalized Pascal matrices, is introduced. Pascal matrix (Pascal triangle) is the Hadamard product of the fractal generalized Pascal matrices. The concept of zero generalized Pascal matrices, an example of which is the Pascal triangle modulo 2, arise in connection with the system ...

  7. Treatments for Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsu Cho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR is life-threatening. It consists of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP, and generalized bullous fixed drug eruptions (GBFDE. In the past years, emerging studies have provided better understandings regarding the pathogenesis of these diseases. These diseases have unique presentations and distinct pathomechanisms. Therefore, theoretically, the options of treatments might be different among various SCARs. However, due to the rarity of these diseases, sufficient evidence is still lacking to support the best choice of treatment for patients with SCAR. Herein, we will provide a concise review with an emphasis on the characteristics and treatments of each SCAR. It may serve as a guidance based on the current best of knowledge and may shed light on the directions for further investigations.

  8. Treatments for Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yung-Tsu

    2017-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR) is life-threatening. It consists of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), and generalized bullous fixed drug eruptions (GBFDE). In the past years, emerging studies have provided better understandings regarding the pathogenesis of these diseases. These diseases have unique presentations and distinct pathomechanisms. Therefore, theoretically, the options of treatments might be different among various SCARs. However, due to the rarity of these diseases, sufficient evidence is still lacking to support the best choice of treatment for patients with SCAR. Herein, we will provide a concise review with an emphasis on the characteristics and treatments of each SCAR. It may serve as a guidance based on the current best of knowledge and may shed light on the directions for further investigations. PMID:29445753

  9. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. [Primary acute acalculous cholecystitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomata, M; Pisano, G

    1995-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is a life-threatening condition whose incidence is steadily increasing although still lower than the corresponding lithiasic forms: AAC represents around 5-10% of all cases of acute cholecystitis. The severity of the disease is due to the rapid evolution towards gallbladder necrosis and biliary peritonitis. AAC is more frequently a disease of the critically ill patient arising in postoperative courses or in stressing conditions. Not rarely, however, it may occur with no evident predisposing factors and it seems related, in such cases, to elderly ages and to atheromatous vascular conditions. The authors report two cases of idiopathic AAC in elderly patients: pathogenic and clinical features as well as therapeutic options are analyzed and discussed.

  11. Acute-phase reactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute-phase response (APR is a prominent systemic reaction of the organism to local or systemic disturbances in its homeostasis caused by infection, tissue injury, trauma or surgery, or immunological disorders. The tissue macrophage is most commonly regarded as initiating the APR through direct stimulation and secretion of various cell communicating factors. Proinflammatory cytokines and mediators are significantly elevated with gingival inflammation and during the destructive phase of periodontitis. Cytokines appear to play a major role in the clinical symptoms and tissue destruction associated with progressing periodontitis. Many of these cytokines are derived from activated macrophages and can act both locally and distally to amplify cytokine production from other cell types. The host responses to periodontal disease and cardiovascular diseases were reflected by an increase in the acute-phase proteins (serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein.

  12. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  13. Streptococcal acute pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lais Martins Moreira Anjos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute pharyngitis/tonsillitis, which is characterized by inflammation of the posterior pharynx and tonsils, is a common disease. Several viruses and bacteria can cause acute pharyngitis; however, Streptococcus pyogenes (also known as Lancefield group A β-hemolytic streptococci is the only agent that requires an etiologic diagnosis and specific treatment. S. pyogenes is of major clinical importance because it can trigger post-infection systemic complications, acute rheumatic fever, and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. Symptom onset in streptococcal infection is usually abrupt and includes intense sore throat, fever, chills, malaise, headache, tender enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and pharyngeal or tonsillar exudate. Cough, coryza, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea are uncommon, and their presence suggests a viral cause. A diagnosis of pharyngitis is supported by the patient's history and by the physical examination. Throat culture is the gold standard for diagnosing streptococcus pharyngitis. However, it has been underused in public health services because of its low availability and because of the 1- to 2-day delay in obtaining results. Rapid antigen detection tests have been used to detect S. pyogenes directly from throat swabs within minutes. Clinical scoring systems have been developed to predict the risk of S. pyogenes infection. The most commonly used scoring system is the modified Centor score. Acute S. pyogenes pharyngitis is often a self-limiting disease. Penicillins are the first-choice treatment. For patients with penicillin allergy, cephalosporins can be an acceptable alternative, although primary hypersensitivity to cephalosporins can occur. Another drug option is the macrolides. Future perspectives to prevent streptococcal pharyngitis and post-infection systemic complications include the development of an anti-Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine.

  14. Acute Infectious Disease,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-23

    intracelLular proteins such as metallothionine, hemosiderin , and ferritin.3 𔃻 6𔃼 1𔃽 5 A large variety of proteins must be produced during infection for...acute infections.50 On the other hand, iron is sequestered through its incorporation into hemosiderin .6,7,16 and ferritin in various tissue storage... hemosiderin and ferritin during infectious or inflammatory states. Concomitantly, plas1a ir. • - concentrations decline, sometimes to almost nondectable

  15. Perioperative acute renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, Padraig

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent biochemical evidence increasingly implicates inflammatory mechanisms as precipitants of acute renal failure. In this review, we detail some of these pathways together with potential new therapeutic targets. RECENT FINDINGS: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin appears to be a sensitive, specific and reliable biomarker of renal injury, which may be predictive of renal outcome in the perioperative setting. For estimation of glomerular filtration rate, cystatin C is superior to creatinine. No drug is definitively effective at preventing postoperative renal failure. Clinical trials of fenoldopam and atrial natriuretic peptide are, at best, equivocal. As with pharmacological preconditioning of the heart, volatile anaesthetic agents appear to offer a protective effect to the subsequently ischaemic kidney. SUMMARY: Although a greatly improved understanding of the pathophysiology of acute renal failure has offered even more therapeutic targets, the maintenance of intravascular euvolaemia and perfusion pressure is most effective at preventing new postoperative acute renal failure. In the future, strategies targeting renal regeneration after injury will use bone marrow-derived stem cells and growth factors such as insulin-like growth factor-1.

  16. Management of acute cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Prabhava; Sarria, Juan C; Riall, Taylor S

    2016-10-01

    Various aspects of the management of acute calculous cholecystitis, including type and timing of surgery, role of antibiotics, and nonoperative management, remain controversial. This review focuses on recently published studies addressing the timing of cholecystectomy, use of cholecystostomy tubes, and role of antibiotics in this condition. In most cases, the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis can be initially confirmed with an abdominal ultrasound. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy (within 24-72 h of symptom onset) is better than delayed surgery (>7 days) for most patients with grade I and II diseases. Percutaneous cholecystostomy and novel endoscopic gallbladder drainage interventions may be used as a temporizing measure or as definitive therapy in those who are too sick to undergo surgery. Studies are conflicting as to whether antibiotics are required for the treatment of uncomplicated cases. Cholecystectomy remains the only definitive therapy for acute cholecystitis. Current guidelines recommend treatment on the basis of disease severity at presentation. Antibiotics and a variety of minimally invasive nonsurgical interventions, although not definitive, play an adjunctive role in the management of the disease.

  17. Treatment of acute hypercalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Stafano M M; Lumachi, Franco; Nascimben, Fabiana; Luisetto, Giovanni; Camozzi, Valentina

    2012-07-01

    Acute hypercalcemia is a life-threatening rather rare condition. This condition may represent an acute decompensation of a pre-existing hypercalcemia, or may be acute at the first instance of the electrolyte disturbance. Hypercalcemic patients can present with a broad spectrum of symptoms, but most of them are mild and non-specific. Hypercalcemia affects a group of organs, which are considered together as a syndrome. The supportive care and ABC assessment are the first step to preserve vital functions. Severity index criteria should be considered at admission: severe dehydratation, mental status alteration, renal impairment, cardiac arrhythmias, ionized calcium level, nausea or vomiting, low social level. The neurological status and the main parameters (arterial blood pressure, cardiac pulses, oxygen saturation, temperature) must be monitored in all patients. Five keystones in the treatment of the hypercalcemic crisis should be considered: (1) Restore normovolemia to prevent renal impairment, (2) Restore renal function and enhance renal excretion of calcium, (3) Dialysis, (4) Inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, and (5) Reduce intestinal calcium absorption. Currently, bisphosphonates are the drugs of choice in most of the patients after adequate hydration, while non-bisphosphonates drugs, such as calcitonin, gallium nitrate and mithramycin, are now rarely used. It is pivotal to recognize and treat the disease, according to evidence-based guidelines. At the same time, a short diagnostic program should be started to focus to the appropriate treatment of the underlying disease.

  18. Diagnosis of acute rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Marchisio, Paola; Tenconi, Rossana; Tagliaferri, Laura; Albertario, Giada; Patria, Maria Francesca; Principi, Nicola

    2012-08-01

    Rhinosinusitis is almost always a complication of a viral infection involving the upper respiratory tract. A common cold is the first symptom of rhinosinusitis, but infectious processes involving the nose inevitably affect the paranasal sinuses because of their anatomical contiguity. The symptoms remain those of a common cold as long as nasal phlogosis is moderate and the ostia between the nose and sinuses are patent. If the inflammation is intense, edema may obliterate the ostia and isolate the sinuses, thus stopping the removal of the exudates. The duration of symptoms makes it possible to distinguish acute (10-30 days) from subacute (30-90 days) and chronic rhinosinusitis (>90 days). The diagnosis of rhinosinusitis should only be based on anamnestic and clinical criteria in children with serious or persistent symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection, or which appear within a short time of an apparent recovery. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of the paranasal sinuses should be reserved for children reasonably considered to be candidates for surgery. Antibiotics are recommended in cases of mild acute bacterial rhinosinusitis as a means of accelerating the resolution of symptoms. The use of antibiotics is mandatory in severe acute bacterial rhinosinusitis to cure the disease and avoid the possible onset of severe complications. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Idiopathic Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Ting Liu

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia (IAEP is a rare disease but of clinical importance because of its good prognosis if treated promptly and appropriately. The etiology remains unknown and the temporal relationship between IAEP and a history of resent onset of cigarette smoking has been described. We report a typical case of a 21-year-old male with recent onset of smoking, who presented with acute febrile hypoxemic respiratory failure. High-resolution chest computed tomography scan revealed patchy ground glass opacity and ill-defined nodules, diffuse interlobar and interlobular septal thickening, and bilateral small amount of pleural effusion, which mimicked congestive heart failure except that the heart size was within normal limits. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was performed soon after the patient was admitted and remarkable eosinophilia was noted in BAL fluid. Clinical condition and chest radiographs improved dramatically after cor-ticosteroid treatment. Because effective treatment and prompt institution of therapy can obviate unnecessary morbidity and mortality, IAEP should be kept in mind when treating patients presenting with diffuse parenchymal lung disease and acute respiratory failure. In that case, BAL is valuable and should be performed as soon as possible.

  20. Cardiorenal Syndromes : An Executive Summary from the Consensus Conference of the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronco, Claudio; McCullough, Peter A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Anand, Inder; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; Hillege, Hans; House, Andrew; Katz, Nevin M.; Maisel, Alan; Mankad, Sunil; Zanco, Pierluigi; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ronco, Federico; Shaw, Andrew; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ronco, C; Bellomo, R; McCullough, PA

    2010-01-01

    The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) is a disorder of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction of the other. The general definition has been expanded into five subtypes reflecting the primacy of organ dysfunction and the time-frame of

  1. An unusual electrocardiographic presentation of acute obstruction of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzenli, Mehmet Akif; Aygul, Nazif; Aydin, Meryem Ulku; Altunkeser, Bulent Behlul

    2008-01-01

    Acute obstruction of the left anterior descending coronary artery is generally presented electrocardiographically as isolated anterior or combined anterior and inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction. We described an isolated inferolateral ST-elevation myocardial infarction due to acute occlusion of the distal left anterior descending coronary artery.

  2. High frequency of BTG1 deletions in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children with down syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Hjorth, Lars; Behrendtz, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Previous cytogenetic studies of myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemias in children with Down syndrome (ML-DS and DS-ALL) have revealed significant differences in abnormality patterns between such cases and acute leukemias in general. Also, certain molecular genetic aberrations characterize DS...

  3. How general is general information construct?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Zarevski

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a small number of constructs in the field of differential psychology that have raised so much debate between psychologists and professionals in related disciplines as is the case of general (verbal information construct. It seemed reasonable to test the validity of this construct measured with general information test in comparison with other measures of knowledge (cultural knowledge, vocabulary, knowledge of the most recent events, foreign language knowledge, and a standard verbal type g test. A sample of 376 candidates for state services was tested in a selection situation. Three analyses were conducted to determine the position of general information test in the space of other verbal competency measures. The first analysis questioned latent structure of the space of four tests having the same format and asking about the knowledge of international terms, general culture, knowledge of most recent events, and general information. The second analysis included the g-factor intelligence test so to see how the above described structure changes when this new test is introduced. The third analysis introduced an English language test. In all of the three component analyses only one eigenvalue was larger than 1 and it explained between 52 and 64% of variance. In all analyses general information test had the highest projection on the only significant latent dimension of these cognitive spaces. In other words, it can be concluded that the construct of general information is in the center of this hyperconus. That is why we consider measurement of general information knowledge, as well as the construct itself, to be an important question in psychological diagnostics. Thus, it is important to go further with the investigation of this construct because it does not seem that it is named general information by accident.

  4. Scarlet fever: A not so typical exanthematous pharyngotonsillitis (based on 171 cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Vera, César; de Dios Javierre, Bárbara; Castán Larraz, Beatriz; Arana Navarro, Teresa; Cenarro Guerrero, Teresa; Ruiz Pastora, Rafael; Sánchez Gimeno, Javier

    2016-01-01

    To describe the age, signs and clinical symptoms of children with scarlet fever at the present time, and to check whether they are equivalent to those with traditional streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. An observational, retrospective study was conducted on the clinical records of 5500 children aged from 0 to 15 years attending a primary health care center. A record was made of the percentage of the cases in which signs and symptoms appear and the Centor score was calculated. Microbiological diagnosis of the disease was made using the rapid antigen-detection test or traditional culture. A total of 171 out of 252 scarlet fever diagnoses were microbiologically verified in 158 patients. The median age was 3.8 years (interquartile range: 2.91-4.78), with the majority (57%) under the age of 4 years. There was fever in 89% of the processes (95% CI: 84-94%), with a temperature of >38°C in 73% (95% CI: 65-80%), enlarged lymph nodes in 70% (95% CI: 58-82%), absence of cough in 73% (95% CI: 65-80%), and tonsillar exudate in only 24% (95% CI: 17-31%). The Centor score (n=105) was ≤2 points in 86% (95% CI: 79-92%). The only difference regarding age is that episodes in patients under the age of 4 years old have significantly higher fever (>38°C) than the older ones (80% versus 63%. OR 3.13; 95% CI: 1.46-6.71). Scarlet fever pharyngotonsillitis differs from the traditional streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis, and its evaluation using clinical prediction rules such as Centor or McIsaac is questionable. The main diagnostic key must certainly be rash, regardless of patient age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Screening for acute HIV infection in South Africa: finding acute and chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Ingrid V.; Chetty, Senica; Giddy, Janet; Reddy, Shabashini; Bishop, Karen; Lu, Zhigang; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The yield of screening for acute HIV infection among general medical patients in resource-scarce settings remains unclear. Our objective was to evaluate a strategy of pooled HIV plasma RNA to diagnose acute HIV infection in patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests in Durban, South Africa. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients with negative or discordant rapid HIV antibody tests from a routine HIV screening program in an outpatient department in Durban with an HIV prevalence of 48%. Study participants underwent venipuncture for pooled qualitative HIV RNA, and if positive, quantitative RNA, enzyme immunoassay and Western Blot (WB). Patients with negative or indeterminate WB and positive quantitative HIV RNA were considered acutely infected. Those with chronic infection (positive RNA and WB) despite negative or discordant rapid HIV tests were considered false negative rapid antibody tests. Results Nine hundred ninety-four participants were enrolled with either negative (N=976) or discordant (N=18) rapid test results. Eleven (1.1%, 95% CI: 0.6–2.0%) had acute HIV infection. Of the 994 patients, an additional 20 (2.0%, 95% CI: 1.3–.3.1%) had chronic HIV infection (false negative rapid test). Conclusions One percent of outpatients with negative or discordant rapid HIV tests in Durban, South Africa had acute HIV infection readily detectable through pooled serum HIV RNA screening. Pooled RNA testing also identified an additional 2% of patients with chronic HIV infection. HIV RNA screening has the potential to identify both acute and chronic HIV infections that are otherwise missed by standard HIV testing algorithms. PMID:20553336

  6. Generalized quantum entropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.P., E-mail: alysonpaulo@dfte.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica, Natal, RN 59072-970 (Brazil); Silva, R., E-mail: raimundosilva@dfte.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica, Natal, RN 59072-970 (Brazil); Universidade do Estado Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica, Mossoro, RN 59610-210 (Brazil); Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Anselmo, D.H.A.L., E-mail: doryh@dfte.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Departamento de Fisica, Natal, RN 59072-970 (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    A deduction of generalized quantum entropies within the Tsallis and Kaniadakis frameworks is derived using a generalization of the ordinary multinomial coefficient. This generalization is based on the respective deformed multiplication and division. We show that the two above entropies are consistent with ones arbitrarily assumed at other contexts. -- Highlights: → Derivation of generalized quantum entropies. → Generalized combinatorial method. → Non-Gaussian quantum statistics.

  7. Bilateral acute iris transillumination (BAIT) initially misdiagnosed as acute iridocyclitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gonul, Saban; Bozkurt, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral acute iris transillumination (BAIT) is a relatively new clinical entity characterized by bilateral acute loss of iris pigment epithelium, iris transillumination, pigment dispersion in the anterior chamber, and sphincter paralysis. We report the case of a 30-year-old male who was initially diagnosed with acute iridocyclitis in a different clinic and treated with topical and systemic corticosteroids. He was referred to our clinic to seek another opinion because his symptoms did not im...

  8. Acute Peritoneal Dialysis in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong; Lee, Yu-Ji; Kim, Sung-Rok

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, complications, and mortality rate associated with acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). A total of 75 patients who were treated at Samsung Changwon Hospital between February 2005 and March 2016 were included in the study sample. The outcomes included in-hospital survival, renal recovery, metabolic and fluid control rates, and technical success rates. Refractory heart failure was the most frequent cause of acute PD (49.3%), followed by hepatic failure (20.0%), septic shock (14.7%), acute pancreatitis (9.3%), and unknown causes (6.7%). The hospital survival of patients in the acute PD was 48.0%. Etiologies of acute kidney injury (AKI) (refractory heart failure, acute pancreatitis compared with hepatic failure, septic shock or miscellaneous causes), use of inotropes, use of a ventilator, and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II were associated with survival differences. Maintenance dialysis required after survival was high (80.1% [29/36]) due to AKI etiologies (heart or hepatic failures). Metabolic and fluid control rates were 77.3%. The technical success rate for acute PD was 93.3%. Acute PD remains a suitable treatment modality for patients with AKI in the era of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Nearly all patients who require dialysis can be dialyzed with acute PD without mechanical difficulties. This is particularly true in patients with refractory heart failure and acute pancreatitis who had a weak requirement for inotropes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  9. Acute leukemic appendicitis in a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Karachiwala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemic and lymphomatous infiltration of the appendix is a rare complication. We present the case of a 31-year-old male with acute promyelocytic leukemia who developed acute abdomen on day 11 of induction chemotherapy with idarubicin and cytarabine. After appropriate work-up, a clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis was made. Despite severe pancytopenia, he successfully underwent laparoscopic appendectomy. The final pathology revealed leukemic infiltration of the appendix. It is hypothesized that the leukemic infiltration may play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Further, this case demonstrates the need to maintain a high index of suspicion and prompt surgical intervention for surgical pathologies in neutropenic patients.

  10. Pediatricians' approach to children with acute urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Tuba; Uysal, Pinar; Arikan-Ayyildiz, Zeynep; Firinci, Fatih; Karaman, Ozkan; Uzuner, Nevin

    2016-04-01

    Acute urticaria is a common condition in childhood that concerns both patients and pediatricians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the general approach of pediatricians to children with acute urticaria. A data collection form consisting of 17 questions was created to evaluate pediatricians' general knowledge and practical approaches about urticaria. This form was distributed at the hospitals where pediatricians and pediatric residents work. The data was recorded in SPSS for Windows v.15 (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). The frequency (%) was used for descriptive data, while Pearson χ2 and Fisher's Exact tests were used for comparisons between groups. Purticaria and, therefore, often advise dietary changes. Second-generation antihistamines are preferred for treatment and are administered for about 5-7 days. Pediatric residents were found to prefer parenteral drug administration for the treatment of urticaria. A different generation antihistamine therapy was applied for treatment of patients who did not respond to the initial treatment. It was also determined that patients were referred to allergists when urticaria was accompanied by angioedema or when patients were resistant to conventional treatment. Pediatricians' knowledge regarding the diagnosis and treatment of urticaria was less extensive than expected. According to the results, there was some confusion among physicians regarding the etiological role of some foods in acute urticaria and the strategies for removal of these foods from the diet during the treatment. Participants' treatment approaches were partially correct and sufficient. In general, there were no differences observed between pediatric residents and pediatricians in terms of the management of patients with urticaria, except the route of administration.

  11. Pathogenic aspects of acute cholangitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Borisenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at the study of dynamic pathomorphological changes of choledoch and acute cholangitis development factors determined during the experiment. 36 rats of Wistar line were under trial. The main group consisted of 30 animals undergoing the open laparotomy, choledoch ligation and puncture modeling of acute cholangitis by E. coli culture in 1 х 108 CFU/ml concentration under general anesthesia. 6 healthy rats were included in the control group. Samples of general biliary duct under autopsy for pathomorphological study were taken on the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st and 30th day. In panoramic samples colored by hematoxilin and eozin the degree of dystrophic, necrobiotic, hemodynamic, inflammatory and atrophic manifestations’ changes were studied. Average depth of choledoch wall and height of its epithelial lining were morphometrically estimated. Collagen of the IV type as well as expressing receptors to CD34 were defined with the help of monoclonal antibodies in choledoch epithelial cells of basal membranes and choledoch vessels endotheliocytes. In choledoch, enhancement of edema and inflammatory infiltration by lymphoplasmocytic elements with the admixture of neutrofils with granulation tissue was detected from the 3rd up to the 30th day of the experiment. From the 14th day formation of bile clots of blood was detected in choledoch clearance, part of which was locked to its de-epitheliolized internal surface. According to morphometrical study data, choledoch wall depth increased from 261.1 ± 3.13 µm on the 3rd day to 572.5 ± 3.42 µm on the 30th day of the experiment. Mucosa membrane has lost its folding on the 14th day, epitheliocytes flattening was replaced by their destruction with fragments rejection into the duct lumen by the 30th day of the experiment. The epithelium height index decreased from 14.8 ± 0.09 µm on the 3rd day to 11.7 ± 0.15 µm on the 30 day of the experiment. Collagen of the IV type fluorescence intensity of

  12. VOLUME THERAPY IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Stošić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental management is required soon after a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis has been made and includes monitoring of the conscious state, the respiratory and cardiovascular system, the urinary output, adequate fluid replacement and pain control, blood purification therapy and nutritional support. An adequate dose of fluid replacement is essential to stabilize cardiovascular dynamics and the dose should be adjusted while assessing circulatory dynamics constantly. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend aggressive fluid resuscitation despite limited prospective data. Fluid therapy remains the mainstay of early management of patients with acute pancreatitis and severe acute pancreatitis. High-level evidence is lacking to guide protocols for fluid resuscitation in patients presenting with acute pancreatitis. In those patients with severe acute pancreatitis, the available evidence indicates that controlled fluid resuscitation with crystalloids and colloids offers the best outcome. Hematocrit remains a useful marker to guide fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis. However, the timing and ideal “cut-off” level needs to be determined.

  13. The Acute Toxicity of Major Ion Salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia: I. Influence of background water chemistry.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides concentration-response data and associated general chemistry conditions for 26 experiments consisting of 149 tests regarding the acute toxicity...

  14. Pending Laboratory Tests and the Hospital Discharge Summary in Patients Discharged To Sub-Acute Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walz, Stacy E; Smith, Maureen; Cox, Elizabeth; Sattin, Justin; Kind, Amy J. H

    2011-01-01

    ...) tests at the time of hospital discharge for general medical patients. However, the prevalence and communication of pending labs within a high-risk population, specifically those patients discharged to sub-acute care (i.e...

  15. The Acute Toxicity of Major Ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia. II. Empirical Relationships in Binary Salt Mixtures

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides concentration-response data and associated general chemistry conditions for 29 experiments consisting of 209 tests regarding the acute toxicity...

  16. Management of Acute Musculoskeletal Pain: A Review | Muthuuri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the broad principles of multimodal and multi-agent approach to acute pain management for better patient care. Data Source: The material source is from various published articles in books and journals. Data Selection/Extraction: This is a review article on general principles. No specific ...

  17. Pattern of acute abdomen in adult patients in Tikur Anbessa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Back ground: Surgical acute abdomen is one of the commonly encountered emergency in the practice of General surgery but there is no much study regarding the magnitude and its pattern in Ethiopia at large and in Tikur Anbessa Hospital (TAH) in particular. This study was aimed at assessing the magnitude, pattern and ...

  18. Acute effect of a physical exercise session on cognitive functioning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In sport, physical activity (PA) and life in general, cognitive functioning plays a very important role in decision-making and performance. This study investigated whether the relationship between acute exercise and cognitive performance was beneficial and if there was a difference in this relationship between moderately ...

  19. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    first of three that reports on a review of a local acute mental health care unit in a general ... Method: The study reviewed the existing mental health care program and activities in context of relevant policy and legislation. Results: Norms from a ... current physical facilities and structure of the unit and of the utilization of available ...

  20. Endometriosis of the appendix presenting as acute appendicitis: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endometriosis is a common disease generally, but appendiceal endometriosis causing acute appendicitis is a very uncommon clinical phenomenon and a few cases have been reported. The authors aim to highlight the rarity of such clinical entity in Nigeria. A 29 year old nulliparous woman presented with severe right iliac ...

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for acute gout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Durme, Caroline M. P. G.; Wechalekar, Mihir D.; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Schlesinger, Naomi; van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gout is an inflammatory arthritis that is characterised by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid and other tissues. The natural history of articular gout is generally characterised by three periods: asymptomatic hyperuricaemia, episodes of acute gout and chronic

  2. Computed tomography evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding and acute mesenteric ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Soo; Park, Seong Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding and acute mesenteric ischemia are conditions that generally require an urgent and accurate diagnosis. In this setting, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can play an important role. This article discusses current techniques, the findings in correlation with pathophysiology, and the proper use of MDCT in the diagnostic evaluation and management of these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Acute and Subacute Oral Toxicity of the Ethanol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicity tests of 95% ethanol extract of the root of Antidesma acidum were studied in male and female rats. The oral acute toxicity test at 5,000 mg/kg revealed that the ethanol extract did not produce toxic effects on signs, general behavious, mortality and gross appearance of internal organs of rats. Furthermore, the oral ...

  4. Benefits and limitations of the Witwatersrand influenza and acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To establish an ongoing active surveillance programme for acute respiratory infections in general, and influenza in particular. Design: A network of 16 sentinel primary health care providers furnished morbidity information and clinical specimens for virus characterisation supplemented by school absenteeism and ...

  5. Legislation hampers medical research in acute situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig; Hassager, Christian; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Informed consent in incapacitated adults is permitted in the form of proxy consent by both the patients' closest relative (next of kin, NOK) and general practitioner (GP). In research in acute situations not involving pharmaceuticals, Danish legislation allows for randomisation...... out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients were randomised to targeted temperature management. Patients were randomised before NOK could be informed, and proxy consent was obtained as soon as possible. Written consent from NOK and GP were our study data. RESULTS: We obtained all legally required...

  6. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects. Here...... signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query-based gene...

  7. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    Summary Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is an aggressive cancer of the bone marrow, affecting formation of blood cells during haematopoiesis. This thesis presents investigation of AML using mRNA gene expression profiles (GEP) of samples extracted from the bone marrow of healthy and diseased subjects...... genes and genetic signatures and for reducing dimensionally of gene expression data. Next, we have used machine-learning methods to predict survival and to assess important predictors based on these results. General application of a number of these methods has been implemented into two public query...

  8. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an ‘aged’ population. As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department, intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Yöntem, Ahmet; Bayram, İbrahim

    2018-01-01

    Acute leukemia is basically divided intoacute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. About 15-20% ofchildhood leukemia is caused by acute myeloid leukemia.AML is classified according to morphological, cytochemical and immunophenotypiccharacteristics. AML patients may present with various clinical signsand symptoms due to leukemic cell infiltration. Age, gender, race, structuralfeatures of the patient and cytogenetic abnormalities are important factorsaffecting prognosis in AML. Th...

  10. Acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Lester

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 21-year-old female with no past medical history presented to the ED after multiple tonic-clonic seizures over the previous 12 hours, the longest lasting 20 seconds. She returned to baseline after each seizure, had no obvious signs of trauma, and did not exhibit any focal neurologic deficits. She denied illicit drugs or new medications. A family member noted that she had fallen from her bed (approximately 3 feet high 2 days ago. Significant findings: Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT of the Head showed a dense extra-axial collection along the left frontal and parietal regions, extending superior to the vertex with mild mass effect, but no midline shift. Discussion: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is a term to describe any abnormal bleeding within the bony confines of the skull. Most commonly, subdural hemorrhages (SDH result from injury to the bridging veins that lead to bleeding between the dura and arachnoid maters. However, in 20%-30% of cases an arterial source of bleeding can be found.1 For adults, motor vehicle collisions and other unintentional head trauma are typically the provoking factors in developing SDH. Falls in the elderly are a common cause of SDH since diffuse cerebral atrophy leads to increased shear forces upon vasculature structures during the fall. The risk of SDH increases with the use of anti-thrombotic agents.2 Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic to coma (in 50 percent of acute SDH. Chronic SDH may present with headaches, light-headedness, cognitive impairment, and seizures.1 The risk of posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS is higher in acute SDH. Risk factors for acute SDH PTS include low Glasgow Coma Score and craniotomy, whereas risk factors for PTS in chronic SDH include alcohol abuse, change in mental status, previous stroke, and hematoma density on CT.3 CT is the most widely used imaging modality for identifying ICH. Acute SDH (within 1-2 days are visualized as hyperdense

  12. Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Yang, Jun J; Hunger, Stephen P

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To review the impact of collaborative studies on advances in the biology and treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children and adolescents. METHODS: A review of English literature on childhood ALL focusing on collaborative studies was performed. The resulting article...... determinants of drug resistance and toxicities have been identified to help develop targeted therapy. Several genetic polymorphisms have been recognized that show susceptibility to developing ALL and that help explain the racial/ethnic differences in the incidence of ALL. CONCLUSION: The information gained...

  13. Acute appendicitis in pregnancy: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Henriques de Franca Neto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: suspected appendicitis is the most common indication for surgery in non-obstetric conditions during pregnancy and occurs in about one in 500 to one in 635 pregnancies per year. This occurs more often in the second trimester of pregnancy. Acute appendicitis is the most common general surgical problem encountered during pregnancy. Methods: a literature review on research of scientific articles, under the terms “acute appendicitis” and “pregnancy”, in PubMed, Lilacs/SciELO, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Uptodate databases. Results: the clinical manifestations of appendicitis are similar to non-pregnant women, however, without a classic presentation, which often occurs, diagnosis is difficult and must be supported by imaging. Discussion: clinical diagnosis should be strongly suspected in pregnant women with classic findings such as abdominal pain that migrates to the right lower quadrant. The main purpose of imaging is to reduce delays in surgical intervention due to diagnostic uncertainty. A secondary objective is to reduce, but not eliminate, the negative appendectomy rate. Differential diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis usually includes pathologies considered in non-pregnant people. Conclusion: the imaging study of choice is ultrasound, MRI may be used when the former is not conclusive and, as a last resort, a CT scan can be performed. The treatment remains appendectomy by laparotomy, since the feasibility of video- assisted surgery in these cases remains controversial.

  14. Implementation of a competency assessment tool for agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennerby, Cathy

    2012-02-01

    AIM: This paper reports on the implementation of a competency assessment tool for registered general agency nurses working in an acute paediatric setting, using a change management framework. BACKGROUND: The increased number of registered general agency nurses working in an acute children\\'s hospital alerted concerns around their competency in working with children. These concerns were initially raised via informal complaints about \\'near misses\\

  15. Generalized convexity, generalized monotonicity recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Legaz, Juan-Enrique; Volle, Michel

    1998-01-01

    A function is convex if its epigraph is convex. This geometrical structure has very strong implications in terms of continuity and differentiability. Separation theorems lead to optimality conditions and duality for convex problems. A function is quasiconvex if its lower level sets are convex. Here again, the geo­ metrical structure of the level sets implies some continuity and differentiability properties for quasiconvex functions. Optimality conditions and duality can be derived for optimization problems involving such functions as well. Over a period of about fifty years, quasiconvex and other generalized convex functions have been considered in a variety of fields including economies, man­ agement science, engineering, probability and applied sciences in accordance with the need of particular applications. During the last twenty-five years, an increase of research activities in this field has been witnessed. More recently generalized monotonicity of maps has been studied. It relates to generalized conve...

  16. Academy of General Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Examine Oral Systemic Health Nov 14, 2017 General Dentistry and American Family Physician Collaborate to Examine Oral ... Oral Health Oct 23, 2017 Academy of General Dentistry Foundation Celebrates 45 Years Raising Awareness for Oral ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures of the inside of the body using ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, ... top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ...

  20. Delphi General Ledger -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Delphi general ledger contains the following data elements, but is not limited to the United States Standard General Ledger (USSGL) chart of accounts, stores actual,...

  1. Feasting as Acute

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    general surgeons arrived, the gynecologists had explored the left broad ligament hematoma creating the impression of, intraperitoneal bleeding. The general surgeons therefore entertained the possibility of spontaneous rupture of the spleen and extended the abdominal incision to a cape to coast incision. The spleen was.

  2. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Ayse; Tanir, Gonul; Ozkan, Mehpare; Oguz, Melek; Yıldız, Yasemin Tasci

    2013-03-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an acute demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, which principally affects the brain and spinal cord. It usually follows a benign infection or vaccination in children. Although a number of infectious agents have been implicated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been described previously in children. Acquired T. gondii infection presents with lymphadenopathy and fever and usually spontaneously resolves in immunocompetent patients. We describe a previously healthy 10-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection, the symptoms of which initially began with nuchal stiffness, difficulty in walking, and urinary and stool incontinence; he later had development of motor and sensory impairment in both lower extremities and classical magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of the disease. The patient recovered completely after the specific therapy for acquired T. gondii infection and pulse prednisolone. Although acute acquired Toxoplasma gondii infection has not been reported previously in association with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, clinicians should keep in mind this uncommon cause of a common disease when evaluating a patient with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis: What is new in diagnosis and therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk J. Gouma

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with acute calculous cholecystitis has changed during recent years. The etiology of acute cholecystitis is still not fully understood. Infection of bile is relatively unimportant since bile and gallbladder wall cultures are sterile in many patients with acute cholecystitis. Ultrasonography is first choice for diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and cholescintigraphy is second best. Percutaneous puncture of the gallbladder that can be used for therapeutic drainage has also diagnostic qualities. Early cholecystectomy under antibiotic prophylaxis is the treatment of choice, and has been shown to be superior to delayed surgery in several prospective trials. Mortality can be as low as 0.5% in patients younger than 70–80 years of age, but a high mortality has been reported in octogenerians. Selective intraoperative cholangiography is now generally accepted and no advantage of routine cholangiography was shown in clinical trials. Percutaneous cholecystostomy can be successfully performed under ultrasound guidance and has a place in the treatment of severely ill patients with acute cholecystitis. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can be done safely in patients with acute cholecystitis, but extensive experience with this technique is necessary. Endoscopic retrograde drainage of the gallbladder by introduction of a catheter in the cystic duct is feasible but data are still scarce.

  4. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  5. Generalized Fourier transforms classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend; Møller, Steen

    2002-01-01

    The Fourier class of integral transforms with kernels $B(\\omega r)$ has by definition inverse transforms with kernel $B(-\\omega r)$. The space of such transforms is explicitly constructed. A slightly more general class of generalized Fourier transforms are introduced. From the general theory...

  6. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  7. Generalized quantum entropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. P.; Silva, R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.

    2011-08-01

    A deduction of generalized quantum entropies within the Tsallis and Kaniadakis frameworks is derived using a generalization of the ordinary multinomial coefficient. This generalization is based on the respective deformed multiplication and division. We show that the two above entropies are consistent with ones arbitrarily assumed at other contexts.

  8. Unsupervised Learning and Generalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    The concept of generalization is defined for a general class of unsupervised learning machines. The generalization error is a straightforward extension of the corresponding concept for supervised learning, and may be estimated empirically using a test set or by statistical means-in close analogy...

  9. Acute compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco; Spoliti, Marco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is one of the few true emergencies in orthopedics and traumatology. It is a painful condition caused by the increase interstitial pressure (intracompart-mental pressure - ICP) within a closed osteofascial compartment which impair local circulation. It occurs most often in the legs, but it can affects also the arms, hands, feet, and buttocks. It usually develops after a severe injury such as fractures or crush injury, but it can also occurs after a relatively minor injury and it may be iatrogenic. Uncommon causes of ACS have been also described, that suggest surgeons to pay great attention to this serious complication. Diagnosing ACS is difficult in clinical practice, even among expert surgeons. Currently, the diagnosis is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated ICP measures. ICP higher than 30 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure is significant of compartment syndrome. Once diagnosis is made, fasciotomy to release the affected compartment should be performed as early as possible because delayed decompression would lead to irreversible ischemic damage to muscles and peripheral nerves. acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency. There is still little consensus among authors about diagnosis and treatment of these serious condition, in particular about the ICP at which fasciotomy is absolutely indicated and the timing of wound closure. New investigations are needed in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of ACS.

  10. Acute compartment syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Alessio Giai; Oliva, Francesco; Spoliti, Marco; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: acute compartment syndrome (ACS) is one of the few true emergencies in orthopedics and traumatology. It is a painful condition caused by the increase interstitial pressure (intracompart-mental pressure – ICP) within a closed osteofascial compartment which impair local circulation. It occurs most often in the legs, but it can affects also the arms, hands, feet, and buttocks. It usually develops after a severe injury such as fractures or crush injury, but it can also occurs after a relatively minor injury and it may be iatrogenic. Uncommon causes of ACS have been also described, that suggest surgeons to pay great attention to this serious complication. Diagnosing ACS is difficult in clinical practice, even among expert surgeons. Currently, the diagnosis is made on the basis of physical examination and repeated ICP measures. ICP higher than 30 mmHg of diastolic blood pressure is significant of compartment syndrome. Once diagnosis is made, fasciotomy to release the affected compartment should be performed as early as possible because delayed decompression would lead to irreversible ischemic damage to muscles and peripheral nerves. Conclusion: acute compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency. There is still little consensus among authors about diagnosis and treatment of these serious condition, in particular about the ICP at which fasciotomy is absolutely indicated and the timing of wound closure. New investigations are needed in order to improve diagnosis and treatment of ACS. PMID:25878982

  11. Acute unilateral isolated ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Jennifer Helen; Janicek, David

    2015-01-05

    A 64-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of acute onset painless left ptosis. He had no other symptoms; importantly pupils were equal and reactive and eye movements were full. There was no palpable mass or swelling. He was systemically well with no headache, other focal neurological signs, or symptoms of fatigue. CT imaging showed swelling of the levator palpebrae superioris suggestive of myositis. After showing no improvement over 5 days the patient started oral prednisolone 30 mg reducing over 12 weeks. The ptosis resolved quickly and the patient remains symptom free at 6 months follow-up. Acute ptosis may indicate serious pathology. Differential diagnoses include a posterior communicating artery aneurysm causing a partial or complete third nerve palsy, Horner's syndrome, and myasthenia gravis. A careful history and examination must be taken. Orbital myositis typically involves the extraocular muscles causing pain and diplopia. Isolated levator myositis is rare. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Acute pancreatitis complicating acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Rokaya; El-Karaksy, Hanaa

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicating acute hepatitis A is very rare especially in children. We report here an 11 year old female patient with picture of acute hepatitis proved to be caused by hepatitis A. One week later patient's condition worsened, she was jaundiced, with persistent vomiting and looked acutely ill and uncomfortable with severe steady abdominal pain mainly in the epigastrium and upper quadrants. Acute pancreatitis was suspected and proved by a clinical picture associated with elevated serum amylase and serum lipase and by MRCP. The patient was managed conservatively with gradual clinical and laboratory improvement, and she was discharged after one week in a good clinical condition. Copyright © 2012 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute care teaching in the undergraduate nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughey, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    To incorporate basic aspects of acute care into the undergraduate nursing programme by providing an opportunity for the development of knowledge and skills in the early recognition and assessment of deteriorating patients on general hospital wards. Acute care initiatives implemented in the hospital setting to improve the identification and management of 'at risk' patients have focused on the provision of education for trained or qualified staff. However, to ensure student nurses are 'fit to practice' at the point of registration, it has been recommended that acute care theory and skills are incorporated into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. PRACTICE DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE: An 'Integrated Nursing Care' module was incorporated into year 3 of the undergraduate nursing programme to introduce students to acute care theory and practice. Module content focuses on the early detection and management of acute deterioration in patients with respiratory, cardiac, neurological or renal insufficiencies. We used a competency-based framework to ensure the application of theory to practice through the use of group seminars. High-fidelity patient-simulated clinical scenarios were a key feature. The United Kingdom Resuscitation Council Intermediate Life Support course is also an important component of the module. Incorporating the Integrated Nursing Care module into the undergraduate nursing curriculum provides pre-registration students the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills in acute care. The provision of undergraduate education in care of the acutely ill patient in hospital is essential to improve nurses' competence and confidence in assessing and managing deteriorating patients in general wards at the point of registration.

  14. Acute intermittent porphyria in the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute intermittent porphyria emerges as a result of partial defect of porphobilinogen deaminase and is manifested by repeated episodes of somatic, psychiatric and neurological disorders. The disease is conducted via the autosomaldominant gene of variable penetration, so most of the carriers never experience seizures. Timely making of diagnosis, screening of blood relatives of the patient and education of patients on avoidance of provoking factors are the key to adequate treatment. Case Outline. A 23-year-old patient having born the third child was hospitalized due to pains in the abdomen and convulsive seizures nine days after the vaginal delivery. At admittance, she suffered a generalized convulsive seizure of clonic-tonic type. The patient immediately underwent a complete clinical, laboratory, bacteriological and ultrasound examination. Bearing in mind the fact that the patient had several convulsive seizures even after the given neurological therapy, haem-arginate was introduced into therapy during four days. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The patient was treated by a team of doctors, in the intensive care ward, with the use of medicaments, which are allowed in the case of acute porphyria. Sixteen days after the admittance, with clean neurological status and gynaecological and ultra-sound findings, she was released for ambulatory treatment. Conclusion. The presented case exhibits the gravity of making a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria in puerperium and the necessity of multi-disciplinary approach in treating this disease. Acute intermittent porphyria should be considered in cases of ambiguous abdominal pain, as well as in patients having abdominal pains followed by neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  15. Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas E. Kman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of Present Illness: A 34-year-old HIV positive female presented to the emergency department with a three-week history of swollen, painful gums. She had difficulty eating and chewing, along with aches and general malaise. The patient was an everyday smoker and was not taking any antiretroviral medication. Significant findings: Physical examination revealed inflamed gingiva, ulceration, and soft tissue necrosis (Image 1 along with mandibular lymphadenopathy (not shown. Given her symptoms, poor oral care, and her immunocompromised state, she was given a diagnosis of Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG or Vincent’s Angina. Discussion: Acute Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (ANUG, Vincent’s Angina, or Trench Mouth is the only periodontal disease in which bacteria invade non-necrotic tissue. The etiology is usually secondary to fusobacteria and spirochete overgrowth of bacteria which is normally present in the oral cavity. HIV infection, previous necrotizing gingivitis, poor oral hygiene, malnutrition, smoking, and stress are predisposing factors. Antibiotics and improved nutrition have significantly decreased the incidence of ANUG. The prevalence of ANUG among HIV infected patients varies from 4.3% to 16.0%. ANUG is 20.8 times more likely to be seen in AIDS patients with CD4 counts less than 200 cells/mm3. In developing countries, like those in Sub-Saharan Africa, incidence of ANUG is increasing among children with a prevalence as high as 23% in children under 10 years of age.1 Treatment for ANUG is multifactorial. Patients need good debridement under anesthesia so dental referral is imperative. Pain control with Ibuprofen or low dose opioids is indicated. Oral hygiene instructions include Chlorhexidine 0.12% twice daily, proper nutrition, appropriate fluid intake, and smoking cessation. For signs of systemic involvement, the recommended antibiotics are Amoxicillin and Metronidazole.2 If left untreated, ANUG may lead to rapid

  16. [Implementation Plan for Two Clinical Practice Guides (CPGs) Contained in the Integral Care Guides (ICGs) of the General System of Social Health Care in Colombia: A) "Early Detection of Depressive Episode and Recurrent Depressive Disorder in Adults. Integral Attention of Adults with Diagnosis of Depressive Episode or Recurrent Depressive Disorder (CPG-Depression)". B) "Early Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of the Acute Intoxication Phase In 18-Years-Old Patients with Alcohol Abuse or Dependence (CPG-Alcohol)"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Natalia Sánchez; Osorio, Andrés Duarte

    2012-12-01

    Clinical practice guides (CPGs) are systematically recommended, with the best clinical evidence available, to help physicians and patients in decision-making concerning the most adequate sanitary care as well as the selection of the best diagnostic and therapeutic options when facing a health problem or a clinical condition. After obtaining these recommendations, it is crucial to adopt them in daily clinical practice; the process through which this change is sought is known as implementation. This document contains recommendations for implementing CPGs in two psychiatric pathologies: 1) depressive episode and recurrent depressive disorder in adults, and 2) acute intoxication phase in cases of alcohol abuse or dependence. The recommended implementation process is described; besides, barriers and facilitators found in the two guides, together with the list of management indicators and clinical outcomes, are identified for their monitoring within the General Health Social Security System of Colombia. CPGs contain recommendations with the best clinical evidence available. The challenge is achieving the adoption of such tool by users, being therefore necessary to follow the diffusion, dissemination and implementation plan, overcoming barriers and resorting to intrinsic and extrinsic facilitators for CPGs as well as performing monitoring with indicators described for measuring the implementation process (management indicators) and the effect of CPGs in clinical practice (indicators of clinical outcome.). Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between hyposalivation and acute respiratory infection in dental outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Hiroshi; Fujibayashi, Takashi; Yamane, Gen-yuki; Imai, Hirohisa; Nakao, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Hyposalivation may affect respiratory disease because the mouth serves as the entrance to the respiratory apparatus, as well as to the digestive tract. Patients with acute respiratory infection generally have a favorable prognosis and a short natural course. However, in cases in which the host has lowered resistance, such as in elderly patients, the infection may develop into pneumonia. A prospective study was performed to examine the relationship between hyposalivation, which is common in elderly patients, and acute respiratory infection, which tends to become severe in elderly patients. The subjects were 323 male and female patients ≥40 years old who lived in Utsunomiya City and surrounding areas and regularly visited the Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Tochigi National Hospital. A 6-month follow-up survey was performed to examine development of acute respiratory infection. Age, sex, and known risk factors were also investigated. Hyposalivation was defined as a saliva production (saliva secretion rate) of ≤0.6 ml/min. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex was performed to examine potential risk factors associated with the development of acute respiratory infection. Data were analyzed for 278 subjects who completed the follow-up survey. The incidence of acute respiratory infection was 60.4%, while hyposalivation was present in 96 subjects (35.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that the incidence of acute respiratory infection was higher in subjects with hyposalivation than in those without hyposalivation (adjusted odds ratio 1.761, p = 0.048). The results of this study suggest that hyposalivation may be a risk factor for acute respiratory infection. This also suggests that improvement of hyposalivation might prevent acute respiratory infection. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Generalized Riemann derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Radulescu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by Marshall Ash in 1966, the study of generalized Riemann derivative draw significant attention of the mathematical community and numerous studies where carried out since then. One of the major areas that benefits from these developments is the numerical analysis, as the use of generalized Riemann derivatives leads to solving a wider class of problems that are not solvable with the classical tools. This article studies the generalized Riemann derivative and its properties and establishes relationships between Riemann generalized derivative and the classical one. The existence of classical derivative implies the existence of the Riemann generalized derivative, and we study conditions necessary for the generalized Riemann derivative to imply the existence of the classical derivative. Furthermore, we provide conditions on the generalized Riemann derivative that are sufficient for the existence of the classical derivative.

  19. Antibiotic prescription patterns of South African general medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Antibiotic resistance is a significant public health problem. Prudent use of antibiotics is crucial in reducing this resistance. Acute bronchitis is a common reason for consultations with general medical practitioners, and antibiotics are often prescribed even though guidelines recommend not prescribing them for ...

  20. Cardiovascular morbidity in COPD: A study of the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Møgelvang, Rasmus; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2010-01-01

    Although there are a number of studies on the coexistence of heart disease and COPD among patients acutely admitted to hospital, this relationship has not been accurately described in the general population. Especially data on the prevalence of both reduced lung function and impaired left ventric...

  1. Treatment options for acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.; Issa, Y.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Schepers, N.J.; Bruno, M.J.; Boermeester, M.A.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2014-01-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. The Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis has been revised, proposing several new terms and abandoning some of the old and confusing terminology. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the

  2. Neck Pain and Acute Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, João; Romão, José; Cunha, Anita; Paiva, Sofia; Miguéis, António

    2017-02-01

    The acute tendinitis of the longus colli muscle is an unusual diagnosis in the cases of acute dysphagia with cervical pain. Is a self-limiting condition caused by abnormal calcium hydroxyapatite deposition in the prevertebral space and can cause pharyngeal swelling with impaired swallow. It is absolutely critical to make the differential diagnosis with deep cervical infections in order to avoid invasive treatments.

  3. Optimal treatment of acute cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loozen, C.S.

    2017-01-01

    The studies presented in this thesis focus on two main issues: treatment strategies for acute calculous cholecystitis (Part I), and the management of acute calculous cholecystitis in high-risk patients in particular (Part II). The last chapter focuses on the surgical treatment of common bile duct

  4. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Cerebral vasospasm in acute porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, P; Van Melkebeke, D; Honoré, P-J; Defreyne, L; Hemelsoet, D

    2017-09-01

    Porphyrias are a group of inherited metabolic disorders resulting from a specific deficiency along the pathway of haem biosynthesis. A clinical classification distinguishes acute from non-acute porphyrias considering the occurrence of life-threatening neurovisceral attacks, presenting with abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric disturbance and neuropathy. Vasospasm is a very rare complication that can occur in all major types of acute porphyria. We describe a porphyric crisis with vasospasm in a woman with previously undiagnosed acute porphyria. Furthermore we performed a systematic review by searching the electronic database Pubmed/MEDLINE for additional data in published studies of vasospasm in acute porphyria. Overall, 9 case reports reporting on 11 patients who suffered vasospasm during an exacerbation of acute porphyria were identified. All of the reported patients were women and the mean age was 29.4 years. When brain MRI was performed, T2-hyperintense lesions, consistent with ischaemic changes, were observed in most patients (10/11, 91%). Although the genetic pathogenesis of the disease is well understood, the precise mechanisms to explain neurologic involvement in acute porphyria remain unclear. Acute porphyria is an unusual and rare cause of vasospasm. However, considering porphyria in patients with unexplained cerebral vasospasm, especially in women of childbearing age, is crucial given the severity of possible complications and the available treatment options. © 2017 EAN.

  6. Clinical advances in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QIAN Jiaming

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a common gastroenterological emergency. Because of the diverse prognosis in AP, it is crucial to identify severe acute pancreatitis (SAP early and provide timely treatment. Thus, there are a number of clinical advances in this aspect. This paper reviews two advances in AP. Firstly, AP is classified into mild acute pancreatitis, moderately severe acute pancreatitis (MSAP, and SAP according to 2012 revision of the Atlanta Classification; SAP is distinguished from MSAP by the presence of persistent organ failure, that is, organ failure >48 h. Secondly, bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis, a new scoring system, has confirmed value in predicting the severity and prognosis of AP both in China and abroad. These advances show more insight into AP and may help to improve the prognosis in AP patients.

  7. [Mixed myelocytic and lymphocytic acute leukemia. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, E R; Cabrera, M E; Klaasen, R; Tapia, P; Yáñez, V

    1992-09-01

    A patient with acute mixed myelocytic and lymphocytic leukemia is reported. The patient showed two populations of malignant myeloid and lymphoid cells with predominance of myeloid lineage. According to the present knowledge, it is hypothesized that its origin is at a pluripotent transformed stem cell which has the capability of differentiating through myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Its maturation is arrested at certain level, thus raising two monoclonal populations simultaneously in the same patient. The treatment should be combined with drugs used in acute myeloblastic and lymphoblastic leukemia. The response to chemotherapy is generally poor.

  8. A pig model of acute Staphylococcus aureus induced pyemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. L.; Iburg, T.; Aalbæk, B.

    2009-01-01

    was a consequence of both the intravenous route of inoculation and the presence of pulmonary intravascular macrophages. Inoculation of bacteria induced formation of acute microabscesses in the lungs, spleen and liver, but not in the kidneys or bones. No generalized inflammatory response was recorded, i.e. IL-6...... was not detected in the blood and C-reactive protein did not increase, probably because of the short time course of the study. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the successful induction of acute pyemia (microabscesses), and forms a basis for future experiments that should include inoculation with strains of S...

  9. A Rare Acute Abdomen Reason: Perforated Jejunal Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Karakose

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jejunal diverticulosis is a rare case that is diagnosed incidental. Although it is generally asymptomatic, it can cause non-spesific symptoms like stomachache, nausea, diarrhoea, malabsorption, bleeding, obstruction and / or perforation. Perforated jejunal diverticulitis is a very rare acute abdomen cause. The acute complications of jejunal diverticulosis can be cause of significant morbidity and mortality especially in old patients. In this text, we report a 81 year old woman case that was operated emergently because of perforated jejunal diverticulitis and was lost in postoperation term because of multiple organ failure.

  10. An unusual initial manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawai, Sonali R; Binesh, V G; Betsy, Ambooken; Jisha, K T

    2017-03-01

    Leukemia cutis is seen in around 20% of acute monocytic leukemia. They usually present as papules or nodules or infiltrated plaques but ulceration is uncommon. A 28-year-old female presented with multiple painless indurated genital ulcers of three weeks' duration with low-grade fever, gum hyperplasia, and generalized lymphadenopathy. Tissue smear from the edge of the ulcer showed atypical monocytes suggestive of leukemic infiltrate which was further confirmed by peripheral smear and bone marrow aspirate. Herein, we report a case of acute monocytic leukemia (AML) with leukemia cutis presenting initially with genital ulcers simulating chancre.

  11. Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Khédri; Ueland, T; Gullestad, L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. Jensen JK, Ueland T, Atar D, Gullestad L, Mickley H, Aukrust P, Januzzi JL (Odense University Hospital, Denmark; Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Massachusetts General Hospital, USA). Osteoprotegerin concentrations and prognosis in acute ischaemic stroke. J Intern Med 2009; doi: 10.1111/j.......1365-2796.2009.02163.x.Aim. Concentrations of osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been associated with the presence of vascular and cardiovascular diseases, but the knowledge of this marker in the setting of ischaemic stroke is limited. Methods and results. In 244 patients with acute ischaemic stroke (age: 69...

  12. Acute myocardial infarction and renal failure following naphtha ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, R J; Crippen, D R; Jayadevappa, D; Kosek, T L

    2001-10-01

    We present a case of a non-Q wave myocardial infarction and acute renal failure following an ingestion of naphtha, a petroleum distillate composed primarily of hydrocarbons. The patient's renal, metabolic, and cardiac status improved over several days with aggressive volume replacement and bicarbonate therapy. Acute cardiotoxic effects of hydrocarbon exposure generally manifest as dysrhythmias, secondary to myocardial sensitization to circulating catecholamines, or, possibly, coronary vasospasm. Ischemia from associated hypotension or direct myocardial toxicity are other potential causes of naphtha-related cardiac injury.

  13. Measuring impact of telephone triage in Acute Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Huma; Shinwari, Shah Khalid; Cooksley, Tim; Duckitt, Roger; Le Jeune, Ivan; Subbe, Christian P

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Acute Medicine's Benchmarking Audit (SAMBA) was undertaken for the 5th time in June 2016. For the first time, data on telephone triage calls prior to admission to Acute Medical Units were collected: 1238 patients were referred from Emergency Departments, 925 from General Practitioners (GPs), 52 from clinics and 147 from other sources. Calls from Emergency Departments rarely resulted in admission avoidance. Calls from Primary Care resulted in avoidance of an admission in 115 (12%) patients; the percentage of avoided admissions was highest if the call was taken by a Consultant. Consultant triage might result in admission avoidance but the impact of local context on the effectiveness is not clear.

  14. Treatment of acute gout in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan CW

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Case ScenarioMr. L, aged 63 years, was recently diagnosed to have with acute gouty arthritis. He had an acute gout flare last month and was given diclofenac injection by a private general practitioner. He comes to you for advice whether he should take the injection if he has another flare. Mr. L has been on treatment for his chronic essential hypertension and dyslipidaemia for the past 10 years. He also had two previous episodes of myocardial infarction in year 2005 and 2010, and he had angioplasty done twice. He stopped smoking and consuming alcohol three months ago.

  15. Management of an acute asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Amanda

    2005-07-01

    Despite a more proactive approach to asthma management, which includes an increased range of drugs, wide dissemination of guidelines, and the use of asthma action plans, an acute severe asthma attack is one of the most common emergencies a general practitioner will encounter. This article discusses the management of an acute asthma attack in the general practice setting. Assessment of severity is vital and can be ascertained quite quickly with a brief history and rapid physical examination. It is important to remember that wheeze is an unreliable indicator of the severity of attack and may be absent in severe asthma. The cornerstones of treatment are oxygen and inhaled beta 2 agonists. Beta 2 agonists can be given continuously in severe life threatening asthma. Early administration of systemic steroids is important. Patients discharged to home after treatment of an asthma attack require close follow up including beta 2 agonists for symptom control, review of medications including a consideration of a short course of oral steroids, a written asthma action plan and detailed advice about what to do in case of deterioration in the next 24 hours. They should be reviewed in 24-48 hours.

  16. Attitudes of acutely ill patients towards euthanasia in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R C S; Chien, Wai-Tong

    2007-01-01

    The global euthanasia debate by health care professionals has raised important ethical issues concerning the professional duties and responsibilities of nurses caring for terminal patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of acutely ill patients towards the practice of euthanasia in Hong Kong. A modified form of the 23-item Questionnaire for General Household Survey scale was used. This cross-sectional survey study was conducted with a stratified sample of in-patients recruited from a wide variety of departments in a regional, acute general hospital. Seventy-seven out of 129 patients responded (59.7%) and a high proportion of patients agreed with the use of euthanasia in the following circumstances: 'where they were a third party', if 'someone they loved' was affected, or if 'they themselves were the patient'. Of the 77 patients, 54 agreed with active euthanasia (70.1%) and 65 with passive (84.4%). The results also indicated that a few socio-demographic characteristics (such as age, gender and household income) statistically significantly correlated with patients' attitudes towards euthanasia. These findings highlight that Chinese patients with acute illness generally accept the use of euthanasia. Further research on the attitudes and perceptions of patients towards the use of euthanasia is recommended, particularly in diverse groups of Chinese and Asian patients with acute or terminal illness.

  17. Acute coagulopathy of trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R

    2010-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma predicts a poor clinical outcome. Tissue trauma activates the sympathoadrenal system resulting in high circulating levels of catecholamines that influence hemostasis dose-dependently through immediate effects on the two major compartments of hemostasis, i.......e., the circulating blood and the vascular endothelium. There appears to be a dose-dependency with regards to injury severity and the hemostatic response to trauma evaluated in whole blood by viscoelastic assays like thrombelastography (TEG), changing from normal to hypercoagulable, to hypocoagulable and finally......, is an evolutionary developed response that counterbalances the injury and catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage. Given this, the rise in circulating catecholamines in trauma patients may favor a switch from hyper- to hypocoagulability in the blood to keep the progressively more procoagulant...

  18. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Encephalitis, acute renal failure, and acute hepatitis triggered by a viral infection in an immunocompetent young adult: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattab Mahmoud

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cytomegalovirus generally causes self-limited, mild and asymptomatic infections in immunocompetent patients. An aggressive course in immunocompetent healthy patients is unusual. Case presentation We report the case of an immunocompetent 16-year-old Egyptian boy with encephalitis, acute renal failure, and acute hepatitis triggered by viral infection with a complete recovery following antiviral treatment. Conclusion We believe that this case adds to the understanding of the molecular biology, clinical presentation and increasing index of suspicion of many viral infections.

  20. Acute pancreatitis and acute renal failure following multiple hornet stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sharma

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera is a class of insects that sting in order to subdue their prey. Humans coming into accidental contact with these insects results in stings that may cause from mild local reaction like weal formation around the sting site to severe systemic reactions such as intravascular hemolysis, acute renal failure, pulmonary edema, cerebral edema, and rarely pancreatitis. We report here the clinical course of a patient who developed concurrent acute pancreatitis and pigment-induced acute renal failure after multiple hornet stings.

  1. Acute appendicitis mistaken as acute rejection in renal transplant recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talwalkar N

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Case histories of 2 renal transplant recipients are reported who had presenting features of fever, leukocytosis and pain/tenderness over right iliac fossa and were diagnosed to be due to acute appendicitis rather than more commonly suspected acute rejection episode which has very similar features. Diagnosis of acute appendicitis was suspected on the basis of rectal examination and later confirmed by laparotomy. The purpose of this communication is to emphasize the need for proper diagnosis in patient with such presentation; otherwise wrong treatment may be received.

  2. Stabilities of generalized entropies

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Kaniadakis, G.; Scarfone, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The generalized entropic measure, which is optimized by a given arbitrary distribution under the constraints on normalization of the distribution and the finite ordinary expectation value of a physical random quantity, is considered and its Lesche stability property (that is different from thermodynamic stability) is examined. A general condition, under which the generalized entropy becomes stable, is derived. Examples known in the literature, including the entropy for the stretched-exponenti...

  3. Unsupervised Learning and Generalization

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    The concept of generalization is defined for a general class of unsupervised learning machines. The generalization error is a straightforward extension of the corresponding concept for supervised learning, and may be estimated empirically using a test set or by statistical means-in close analogy with supervised learning. The empirical and analytical estimates are compared for principal component analysis and for K-means clustering based density estimation

  4. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, M.A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  5. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis in a Child Following Plasmodium vivax Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkait, Radheshyam; Mukherji, Aritra; Sinhamahapatra, Tapankumar; Bhadra, Ramchandra

    2015-07-01

    Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a multifocal, monophasic, acute demyelinating disease of the brain and spinal cord, which is commonly preceded by viral infections and occasionally bacterial infections or immunizations. Its occurrence following malarial infection, especially Plasmodium vivax Malaria is very uncommon. We report an 11-year girl who presented with clinical features of encephalopathy and generalized convulsions, 10 days following complete recovery from the Plasmodium vivax Malaria. Diagnosis of ADEM as a complication of Plasmodium vivax Malaria was made based on acute onset of neurological events, characteristic findings on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of brain and prompt response to corticosteroid therapy. Follow-up MRI, 6 months after discharge, showed complete resolution of change found on the initial MRI. To the best of our knowledge, only two such cases have been reported in the English literature till date.

  8. Refractory acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with anti-galactocerebroside antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samukawa, Makoto; Hirano, Makito; Tsugawa, Jun; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Tabata, Emi; Takada, Kazuo; Kuwahara, Motoi; Suzuki, Seiko; Kitada, Mari; Yamada, Tatsuo; Hara, Hideo; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2012-12-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis causes multifocal demyelination in the central nerve system. Although this disease generally responds well to steroid therapy, it is occasionally steroid-resistant, leading to poor outcomes. Serological markers of prognosis are currently unavailable. We measured anti-glycolipid antibodies in 25 consecutive patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and found that four patients were positive for anti-galactocerebroside antibodies. All four patients had a poor response to steroids. We summarize clinical information on these four patients and three similar patients reported previously. This is the first report to describe concomitant involvement of the central nerve system and peripheral nervous system in anti-galactocerebroside antibody-associated acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, consistent with the location of galactocerebroside, and to document a dramatic response to repeated intravenous immunoglobulin therapy after unsuccessful steroid treatment in one patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Pulmonary Embolism Mimics Acute Coronary Syndrome in Older Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chieh Liu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary embolism is a fatal disease and an often missed diagnosis. There are no specific symptoms or signs. Accurate diagnosis followed by effective therapy can reduce mortality. We report on a 67-year-old man who underwent lumbar laminectomy and developed an acute anterior compressive-like chest pain and jaw numbness rather than dyspnea on the fifth postoperative day. Owing to refractory chest pain with suspicious posterior myocardial infarction or unstable angina on surface electrocardiogram, the patient received emergency coronary catheterization, which demonstrated normal coronary arteries. Further investigation provided a final diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism. Acute pulmonary embolism with simultaneous recent neuro-surgery was a therapeutic dilemma because of the risk of postoperative hemorrhage threatening neurologic function. After treatment with enoxaparin and close monitoring of his neurologic condition, his symptoms were eliminated. Clinicians must keep in mind a differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in a postoperative high-risk patient.

  10. Acute phase protein response during acute ruminal acidosis in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danscher, A. M.; Thoefner, M. B.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2011-01-01

    acids. In humans, inflammation has been linked to metabolic diseases. In cattle, studies into the possible links between acid-base changes, inflammation/innate immunity and metabolic disease are warranted as this might improve our understanding of the production disease complexes occurring in particular......The aim of the study was to describe the acute phase protein and leukocyte responses in dairy heifers during acute, oligofructose-induced ruminal acidosis. The study included 2 trials involving oral oligofructose overload (17g/kg BW) to nonpregnant Danish Holstein heifers. Trial 1 included 12...... than control heifers at 18 and 24h after overload (max. 13.7±4.3 billions/L). Feeding had no effect on plasma fibrinogen concentrations or WBC in Trial 1.Acute ruminal and systemic acidosis caused by oligofructose overload resulted in distinct acute phase protein and leukocyte responses in dairy...

  11. Forces in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-07-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced by an observer in general coordinates. The general force is then applied to the local co-moving coordinate system of a uniformly accelerating observer, leading to an expression of the inertial force experienced by the observer. Next, applying the general force in Schwarzschild coordinates is shown to lead to familiar expressions of the gravitational force. As a more complex demonstration, the general force is applied to an observer in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates near a rotating, Kerr black hole. It is then shown that when the angular momentum of the black hole goes to zero, the force on the observer reduces to the force on an observer held stationary in Schwarzschild coordinates. As a final consideration, the force on an observer moving in rotating coordinates is derived. Expressing the force in terms of Christoffel symbols in rotating coordinates leads to familiar expressions of the centrifugal and Coriolis forces on the observer. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate level students, as well as those undergraduate students having experience with general relativity and tensor analysis.

  12. [Apprenticeship in general medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, B; Frećhelin, E; Pilet, F

    2007-11-28

    Residency in general practice/family medicine in Switzerland is ridden with structural difficulties, and suffers from low prestige among trainees and hospital-based trainers. A more attractive postgraduate training is sought by a group of practitioners, through a common initiative with local governments, general practice associations and training sites.

  13. Generalizing: The descriptive struggle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D.; Hon Ph.D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The literature is not kind to the use of descriptive generalizations. Authors struggle and struggle to find and rationalize a way to use them and then fail in spite of trying a myriad of work-arounds. And then we have Lincoln and Guba’s famous statement: “The only generalization is: there is no generalization” in referring to qualitative research. (op cit, p. 110 They are referring to routine QDA yielding extensive descriptions, but which tacitly include conceptual generalizations without any real thought of knowledge about them. In this chapter I wish to explore this struggle for the purpose of explaining that the various contra arguments to using descriptive generalizations DO NOT apply to the ease of using conceptual generalizations yielded in SGT and especially FGT. I will not argue for the use of descriptive generalization. I agree with Lincoln and Guba with respect to QDA, “the only generalization is: there is no generalization.” It is up to the QDA methodologists, of whom there are many; to continue the struggle and I wish them well.

  14. Projective simulation with generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Alexey A; Makmal, Adi; Dunjko, Vedran; Briegel, Hans J

    2017-10-31

    The ability to generalize is an important feature of any intelligent agent. Not only because it may allow the agent to cope with large amounts of data, but also because in some environments, an agent with no generalization capabilities cannot learn. In this work we outline several criteria for generalization, and present a dynamic and autonomous machinery that enables projective simulation agents to meaningfully generalize. Projective simulation, a novel, physical approach to artificial intelligence, was recently shown to perform well in standard reinforcement learning problems, with applications in advanced robotics as well as quantum experiments. Both the basic projective simulation model and the presented generalization machinery are based on very simple principles. This allows us to provide a full analytical analysis of the agent's performance and to illustrate the benefit the agent gains by generalizing. Specifically, we show that already in basic (but extreme) environments, learning without generalization may be impossible, and demonstrate how the presented generalization machinery enables the projective simulation agent to learn.

  15. Generalizing smooth transition autoregressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chini, Emilio Zanetti

    We introduce a variant of the smooth transition autoregression - the GSTAR model - capable to parametrize the asymmetry in the tails of the transition equation by using a particular generalization of the logistic function. A General-to-Specific modelling strategy is discussed in detail...

  16. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  17. Cerebrogenic tachyarrhythmia in acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Praveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiac abnormalities following acute stroke are frequent and seen in both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. The changes seen in electrocardiogram (ECG consist of repolarization abnormalities such as ST elevation, ST depression, negative T waves, and QT prolongation. Among tachyarrhythmias, atrial fibrillation is the most common and occurrence of focal atrial tachycardia is very rare though any cardiac arrhythmias can follow acute stroke. We report a case of focal atrial tachycardia following acute ischemic stroke in 50-year-old female without structural heart disease, and their mechanisms and clinical implications.

  18. Bacteriotherapy of acute radiation sickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mal' tsev, V.N.; Korshunov, V.M.; Strel' nikov, V.A.; Ikonnikova, T.B.; Kissina, E.V.; Lyannaya, A.M.; Goncharova, G.I.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1979-04-01

    Acute sickness is associated with intestinal dysbacteriosis; there is a radical decrease in number of microorganisms of lactic fermentation (bifidobacterium, lactobacillus) and an increase in E. coli proteus, enterococcus, and clostridium. Extensive use is made of live microorganisms in the treatment of various diseases associated with intestinal dysbacteriosis; in the case of acute radiation sickness, yeast, colibacterin, and E. coli have been used. In a number of cases, such therapy increased survival and life expectancy of irradiated animals. In this study, microorganisms of lactic fermentation (lactobacillus, bifidobacterium) and colibacterin were used for treatment of acute radiation sickness.

  19. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis with Measles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishrat Jahan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an inflammatory demyelinating illness usually associated with infections or antecedent immunization. Due to control of most vaccine preventable diseases in developed countries, most cases of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis occur in developing countries and are seen secondary to nonspecific upper respiratory tract infections. We report a case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with measles in a 2½-year-old male child despite having measles vaccination in infancy. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings and CT scan of brain. The patient was managed with high dose corticosteroids along with supportive measures. He recovered completely and follow-up for six months revealed no neurological deterioration.

  20. [Oral manifestations of acute leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinheinz, J; Meyer, U; Büchner, T; Kösters, G; Weingart, D; Joos, U

    1997-02-01

    It is well known that non-specific mucosal alterations can occur during diseases of the leukopoetic system. In most cases they are an early sign and therefore provide the opportunity for timely diagnosis of the disease. In this clinical study type and frequency of oral lesions, gingival and periodontal indices, and hematologic status were examined at the time of diagnosis of the different types of acute leukemia. The results showed a significant difference in the frequency of oral lesions between acute myelogenous and acute lymphoblastic forms, irrespective of age and sex of the patient. There was no correlation between type and frequency of lesions and hematologic status.

  1. Generalized connectivity of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xueliang

    2016-01-01

    Noteworthy results, proof techniques, open problems and conjectures in generalized (edge-) connectivity are discussed in this book. Both theoretical and practical analyses for generalized (edge-) connectivity of graphs are provided. Topics covered in this book include: generalized (edge-) connectivity of graph classes, algorithms, computational complexity, sharp bounds, Nordhaus-Gaddum-type results, maximum generalized local connectivity, extremal problems, random graphs, multigraphs, relations with the Steiner tree packing problem and generalizations of connectivity. This book enables graduate students to understand and master a segment of graph theory and combinatorial optimization. Researchers in graph theory, combinatorics, combinatorial optimization, probability, computer science, discrete algorithms, complexity analysis, network design, and the information transferring models will find this book useful in their studies.

  2. [Acute myeloid Leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braess, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been genetically characterized extensively and can now be subdivided into 9 to 11 pathogenetically different subtypes according to their profile of driver mutations. In clinical practice karyotyping and molecular analysis of NPM1, cEBPa and FLT3-ITD are required for treatment stratification and potentially genotype specific treatment. Some markers such as NPM1 not only offer prognostic information but can also serve as markers of minimal residual disease and thus have the potential to guide therapy in the future.The basis of curative treatment is intensive combination chemotherapy comprizing cytarabine and an anthracycline ("7 + 3" regimen). The prolonged duration of aplasia can be reduced significantly by accelerated therapy ("S-HAM" regimen). Following achievement of a complete remission patients with a low risk of relapse - based on genetic and clinical features - receive chemotherapy based consolidation therapy whereas high risk patients - and potentially also those with an intermediate risk - receive an allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Whereas adding the rather unspecific tyrosinekinase inhibitor sorafenib to standard treatment in unselected AML patients has not improved overall survival (OS), the addition of midostaurin to standard therapy in the selected group FLT3 mutated patients has resulted in a moderate but significant OS benefit.Real world data show that in patients below 50 years a cure rate of ca. 50 % can be achieved. However less than 10 % of patients above the age of 70 will be alive after five years even after intensive treatment. Therefore when curative and intensive treatment is deemed impossible the therapeutic standard in elderly and unfit patients used to be low-dose cytarabine with an average OS of 4 months. This has now been replaced by a new standard of care of hypomethylating agents - azacytidine and decitabine - which both achieve higher remission rates and show strong trends towards a prolonged OS

  3. Medical emergencies facing general practitioners: Drugs for the doctor's bag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General practitioners are frequently facing medical emergencies. In order to react properly and administer therapy on time, a general practitioner needs to prepare and keep with himself the appropriate set of drugs which could be effectively used for treatment of the emergencies. The following drugs should find their place in the doctor's bag: acetaminophen (for mild and moderate pain, and for fever, morphine (for severe pain, naloxone (for heroin poisoning, ceftriaxone (for meningococcal meningitis, albuterol (for bronchial asthma attack, hydrocortisone (for bronchial asthma attack, glucagon (for severe hypoglycemia, dextrose (for mild to moderate hypoglycemia, diazepam (for febrile convulsions or epileptic status, epinephrine (for anaphylaxis and cardiac arrest, atropine (for symptomatic bradicardia, chloropyramine (for acute allergy, aspirin (for acute myocardial infarction, nitroglycerine (for acute coronary syndrome, metoclopramide (for nausea and vomiting, haloperidol (for delirium, methylergometrine (for control of bleeding after delivery or abortion, furosemide (for acute pulmonary edema and flumazenil (for benzodiazepine poisoning. For each of the listed drugs a physician should well know the recommended doses, indications, contraindications and warnings. All of the listed drugs are either registered in Serbia or available through special import, so general practitioners may fill their bags with all necessary drugs and effectively and safely treat medical emergencies.

  4. Acute cholecystitis: risk factors for conversion to an open procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippey, Megan; Grzybowski, Marysia; Manwaring, Mark L; Kasten, Kevin R; Chapman, William H; Pofahl, Walter E; Pories, Walter J; Spaniolas, Konstantinos

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is one of the most common general surgical procedures performed. Conversion to an open procedure (CTO) is associated with increased morbidity and length of stay. Patients presenting with acute cholecystitis are at higher risk for CTO. Studies have attempted to examine risk factors for CTO in patients who undergo laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis but are limited by small sample size. The aim of this study was to identify preoperative variables that predict higher risk for CTO in patients presenting with acute cholecystitis. Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis from 2005-2011 were identified from the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use File. Patients who underwent successful laparoscopic surgery were compared with those who required CTO. Demographics, comorbidities, and 30-d outcomes were analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression was used for variables with P value acute cholecystitis. CTO was reported in 436 patients (6.0%). Those who required conversion were older (60.7 ± 16.2 versus 51.6 ± 18.0, P = 0.0001) and mean body mass index was greater (30.8 ± 7.6 versus 30.0 ± 7.3, P = 0.033) compared with those whose procedure was completed laparoscopically. Vascular, cardiac, renal, pulmonary, neurologic, hepatic disease, diabetes, and bleeding disorders were more prevalent in CTO patients. Mortality (2.3% versus 0.7%, P acute cholecystitis remains low but not clinically negligible. The identified risk factors can potentially guide management and patient selection for delayed intervention for acute cholecystitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Experience with Ivy Leaf Extract in the Treatment of Acute Obstructive Bronchitis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.V. Marushko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, when analyzing the structure of the causes of visi­ting to the pediatrician or general practitioner — family doctor, about 70 % of cases occur in acute respiratory infections (ARI. Among the child population, their frequency per a child is on average 6–10 cases per year, making ARI one of the most common infectious disease in the pediatric population of the world. Among the acute respiratory diseases in children acute bronchitis and acute obstructive bronchitis are among the most common diseases. The aim of our work was to study the effectiveness of ivy leaf extract in the treatment of acute obstructive bronchitis in children. Research materials. We observed 33 children aged from 4 to 8 years old who were treated for the diagnosis of acute respiratory viral infection, acute obstructive bronchitis. All patients received Pektolvan Ivy in a complex therapy. Results of the study. Complex treatment of acute obstructive bronchitis in children with the inclusion of the Pektolvan Ivy leads to softening of bronchial secretions and facilitating its discharge of on average already on the 3rd day of therapy, that manifested with decreased cough intensity, reduced its productivity and the change of dry wheezing rales into moist rales. Pektolvan Ivy has a satisfactory safety profile for the children. Conclusions. Stu­dies of using Pektolvan Ivy for the treatment of acute obstructive bronchitis showed its effectiveness. The drug can be recommended for wide use in pediatric.

  6. OPTIMIZATION OF SECRETOLYTIC TREATMENT OF ACUTE SINUSITIS

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Makarevich

    2008-01-01

    Efficiency of sinupret in children with acute sinusitis as a drug with serolytic action, is studied. it is established that secretolytic therapy in case of acute sinusitis, aimed at the improvement of drainage and ventilation function of paranasal sinuses, is one of the potentially productive directions of nonbinvasive methods of treatment of acute sinusitis.Key words: children, acute sinusitis, secretolytic treatment.

  7. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  8. Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, J.; Luijckx, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decennium, thrombolytic therapy has changed the management of acute ischemic stroke. Randomized clinical studies have demonstrated that intravenous thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator improves functional outcomes. Recently the time window for intravenous thrombolysis has been

  9. Acute Diacetylmorphine (Heroin Intoxication (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Loladze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents current data on the mechanism of action, selective toxicity, toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of diacetylmorphine (heroin. Acute diacetylmorphine poisoning is considered under taking into account the developing a critical state, in which the poisoning severity is determined by severe metabolic disorders associated with the progression of hypoxia. The main lifethreatening complications of acute diacetyl morphine poisoning are described including those associated with the nervous system, respiratory, circulatory and urinary systems. Since hypoxia is the principal damaging factor, the the mechanisms of oxygen transport disorders and the pathogenesis of activation of free radical oxidation in acute diacetylmorphine poisoning are discussed. The improvement of intensive care strategy for severe forms of acute diacetylmorphine poisoning by the inclusion of a substrate antihypoxant Reamberin into the list of routine critical care prescriptions is emphesized.

  10. Acute stroke imaging research roadmap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermark, Max; Albers, Gregory W.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Bammer, Roland; Baron, Jean-Claude; Davis, Stephen; Demaerschalk, Bart M.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Eastwood, James D.; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Fisher, Marc; Furie, Karen L.; Goldmakher, Gregory V.; Hacke, Werner; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Kloska, Stephan P.; Koehrmann, Martin; Koroshetz, Walter; Lee, Ting-Yim; Lees, Kennedy R.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Ostergaard, Leif; Powers, William J.; Provenzale, James; Schellinger, Peter; Silbergleit, Robert; Sorensen, Alma Gregory; Wardlaw, Joanna; Warach, Steven

    The recent "Advanced Neuroimaging for Acute Stroke Treatment" meeting on September 7 and 8, 2007 in Washington DC, brought together stroke neurologists, neuroradiologists, emergency physicians, neuroimaging research scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  11. [Acute calculous cholecystitis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmas, H; Picaud, R; Anfossi, G; Giudicelli, C

    1979-03-01

    The authors studied 333 acute cholecystitis out of 2,200 operated on for lithiasis of the gall-bladder, 186 bacteriological tests were carried out on the vesicular liquid and wall. They insist on the main anatomo-pathological characteristic: early, partial or total destruction of the mucous together with acute inflammatory lesions of the wall and even sometimes necrosis. This irreversible lesion is due to the acute obstruction of the gall-bladder by blockage of a calculus. Acute cholecystitis are practically always aseptic at the beginning. Sepsis is a secondary complication. These anatomo-pathological and bacteriological elements have two therapeutic corollaries: 1. The patient has to be operated very early at the aseptic stage. 2. Preliminary antibiotherapy becomes useless. Under these conditions there is practically no death before the age of 65. Mortality concern old people, operated late and suffering from other disease.

  12. Acute bacterial prostatitis with osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nargund, V H; Stewart, P A Hamilton

    1995-01-01

    This short case presentation concerns the simultaneous occurrence of acute bacterial prostatitis and osteomyelitis due to staphylococcal bacteraemia hitherto unrecorded in the literature. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:7629772

  13. Polyhydramnios and acute renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, D. V.; Kelly, Moira B.; Pryor, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Acute renal failure secondary to ureteric obstruction is described in a primigravida with twin gestation and polyhydramnios. Relief of the obstruction occurred on drainage of the liquor and return to normal renal function following delivery.

  14. Acute Theophylline Intoxication: Case Report

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    Zehra Baykal Tutal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theophylline is an efficient bronchodilatator, which is used in the treatment of the disease such like Chronic Obstructive Pulmoner Disease (COPD neonatal apnea, bradycardial syndrome. Blood levels of theophylline above 15 ug/ml have risk of intoxication. Acute and chronic intoxication can be seen. Nausea, vomitin, agitation, palpitation and metabolic abnormalities such as, hyperglisemia, hypokalemia, impairment in acid base equilibrium and leukocytosis can be seen in acute theophylline intoxication. Acute theophylline intoxications can result life threatening situations such as convulsions, ventricular arrhythmias and death. Theophylline intoxications are often iatrogenic. In this case, the clinical course of a patient with COPD who took theophylline with the intention of suicide attempt is to mentioned and discussion of diagnosis, treatment and clinical course of acute theophylline intoxication was to aimed.

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

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    Marco Confalonieri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its first description, the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS has been acknowledged to be a major clinical problem in respiratory medicine. From July 2015 to July 2016 almost 300 indexed articles were published on ARDS. This review summarises only eight of them as an arbitrary overview of clinical relevance: definition and epidemiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment. A strict application of definition criteria is crucial, but the diverse resource-setting scenarios foster geographic variability and contrasting outcome data. A large international multicentre prospective cohort study including 50 countries across five continents reported that ARDS is underdiagnosed, and there is potential for improvement in its management. Furthermore, epidemiological data from low-income countries suggest that a revision of the current definition of ARDS is needed in order to improve its recognition and global clinical outcome. In addition to the well-known risk-factors for ARDS, exposure to high ozone levels and low vitamin D plasma concentrations were found to be predisposing circumstances. Drug-based preventive strategies remain a major challenge, since two recent trials on aspirin and statins failed to reduce the incidence in at-risk patients. A new disease-modifying therapy is awaited: some recent studies promised to improve the prognosis of ARDS, but mortality and disabling complications are still high in survivors in intensive care.

  16. Acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, R S; Keller, S; Gietzen, D; Dufner, J; Rebentisch, M; Feusner, J; Eilender, D

    1995-08-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the diagnosis, treatment, and long-term outcome of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The purpose of this review is to describe the molecular genetics of this disease, the use of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in clinical trials of APL, and the clinical and basic research questions for future investigation. Findings of clinical studies in mainland China using ATRA as induction therapy for patients with APL concurrent with laboratory characterization of the molecular changes in APL have led to worldwide clinical trials of ATRA in the treatment of patients with APL. Major advances in understanding the molecular biology and genetics of APL have occurred over the past 5 years. These findings have been translated into novel treatment strategies using all-trans retinoic acid as a differentiation agent in the induction phase of therapy resulting in improved long-term outcome, reduced morbidity, and lower costs for patients with APL. Advanced molecular techniques are being employed for diagnosis and for monitoring of patient response to treatment.

  17. Neonate acute kidney injury.

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    Yang, Huandan; Zhu, Bingbing; Zhang, Ruifeng

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by the abrupt inability of the kidneys to adequately excrete waste products and regulate fluid and electrolyte homeostasis appropriately. This results in an at least partially reversible increase in the blood concentration of creatinine and nitrogenous waste products. Moreover, medication eliminated via renal routes will accumulate that in turn result in a "second hit" to the already injured kidneys. Furthermore, fluid management and nutrition will be hampered by oliguria. Neonatal AKI is a frequent complication in children admitted to an ICU and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Moreover, in newborns the diagnosis of AKI is more difficult since at birth serum creatinine (SCr) predominantly reflects maternal renal function. Furthermore, neonates are especially susceptible to hypovolemic kidney injury due to an inadequate renal auto regulation Thus, accurate assessment of renal function in children is important in numerous clinical situations including screening and/or monitoring of renal disease. The present narrative review article will deal with the latest innovations in diagnostic as well as management options available for AKI in children.

  18. Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selewski, David T; Charlton, Jennifer R; Jetton, Jennifer G; Guillet, Ronnie; Mhanna, Maroun J; Askenazi, David J; Kent, Alison L

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, there have been significant advancements in our understanding of acute kidney injury (AKI) and its impact on outcomes across medicine. Research based on single-center cohorts suggests that neonatal AKI is very common and associated with poor outcomes. In this state-of-the-art review on neonatal AKI, we highlight the unique aspects of neonatal renal physiology, definition, risk factors, epidemiology, outcomes, evaluation, and management of AKI in neonates. The changes in renal function with gestational and chronologic age are described. We put forth and describe the neonatal modified Kidney Diseases: Improving Global Outcomes AKI criteria and provide the rationale for its use as the standardized definition of neonatal AKI. We discuss risk factors for neonatal AKI and suggest which patient populations may warrant closer surveillance, including neonates neonates with AKI to identify those children who will go on to develop chronic kidney disease. This review highlights the deficits in our understanding of neonatal AKI that require further investigation. In an effort to begin to address these needs, the Neonatal Kidney Collaborative was formed in 2014 with the goal of better understanding neonatal AKI, beginning to answer critical questions, and improving outcomes in these vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Nutrition and acute schistosomiasis

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    Eridan M. Coutinho

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In northeast Brazil, nutritional deficiency diseases and schistosomiasis mansoni overlap. An experimental model, wich reproduces the marasmatic clinical form of protein-energy malnutrition, was developed in this laboratory to study these interactions. Albino Swiss mice were fed with a food association ingested usually by human populations in northeast Brazil. This diet (Regional Basic Diet - RBD has negative effects on the growth, food intake and protein utilization in infected mice (acute phase of murine schistosomiasis. Nitrogen balance studies have also shown that infection with Schistosoma mansoni has apparently no effect on protein intestinal absorption in well nourished mice. However, the lowest absorption ratios have been detected among RBD - fed infected animals, suggesting that suprerimposed schistosome infection aggravated the nutritional status of the undernourished host. The serum proteins electrophoretic pattern, as far as albumins are concerned, is quite similar for non-infected undernourished and infected well-fed animals. So, the significance of albumins as a biochemical indicator of the nutritional status of human populations residing in endemic foci of Manson's schistosomiasis, is discussable.

  20. Acute diarrhea in children

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    Radlović Nedeljko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute diarrhea (AD is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child’s treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea. The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD.