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Sample records for acute care surgery

  1. The price of acute care surgery.

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    Sweeting, Raeshell S; Carter, Jeffrey E; Meyer, Anthony A; Rich, Preston B

    2013-05-01

    Numerous organizations have identified access to emergency surgical care as a crisis. One barrier is the financial disincentive associated with caring for this patient population. We sought to identify contributing factors by analyzing endemic data during the development of an acute care surgery (ACS) service at an academic health care system. Financial data (receipts, payer mix, and dollar/relative value unit [RVU]) and productivity measures (OR procedures and RVUs) were obtained for a surgical division for 6-month periods before and after transition to an ACS model. Using national data, a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify salary targets required for an ACS surgeon to have equitable career reimbursement using standard financial modeling (net present value) with comparable surgical specialists. Post-ACS, operative volume increased 25%, work RVUs increased 21%, but net receipts increased only 11%. Dollar/RVU decreased primarily due to a higher proportion of uncompensated care. As a result, the dollar/RVU for ACS patients was 28% lower in comparison to non-ACS specialties. Increasing ACS salaries proportionate to the observed dollar/RVU discount realigned ACS economic value with other specialties in aggregate. A national shortage of ACS surgeons exists due to in part financial misalignment. We demonstrated that despite an increase in clinical activity, transition to an ACS model resulted in a relative reduction in payment. A rational systems-based approach to ACS development that objectively targets the RVU reimbursement disparity would reduce economic disincentives related to careers in ACS and potentially address the emergency surgical care crisis.

  2. Defining the acute care surgery curriculum.

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    Duane, Therese M; Dente, Christopher J; Fildes, John J; Davis, Kimberly A; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Meredith, J Wayne; Britt, L D

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to define the gaps in essential and desirable (E/D) case volumes that may prompt reevaluation of the acute care surgery (ACS) curriculum or restructuring of the training provided. A review of the first 2 years of ACS case log entry (July 2011 to June 2013) was performed. Individual trainee logs were evaluated to determine how often they performed each case on the E/D list. Trainees described cases using current procedural terminology codes, which had been previously mapped to the E/D list. There were 29 trainees from 15 programs (Year 1) and 30 trainees from 13 programs (Year 2) who participated in case log entry, with some overlap between the years. There were a total of 487 fellow-months of data with an average of 14.6 current procedural terminology codes per month and 175.5 per year for cases on the E/D list versus 12 and 143.5 for cases not on the E/D list, respectively. Overall, the most common essential cases were laparotomy for trauma (1,463; 705 in Year 1, 758 in Year 2), tracheostomy (665; 372 in Year 1, 293 in Year 2) and gastrostomy tubes (566; 289 in Year 1, 277 in Year 2). There are a total of 73 types of essential operations and 45 types of desirable operations in the current curriculum. There were 16 distinct codes (13.6%) never used, of which 6 overlapped with other codes. Based on body region, the 10 E/D codes never used by any fellow were as follows: one head/face, lateral canthotomy; five neck; elective neck dissections; one thoracic, vascular trauma to chest; three pediatrics, inguinal hernia repair and small bowel obstruction treatments. The current ACS trainees lack adequate head/neck and pediatric experience as defined by the ACS curriculum. Restructuring rotations at individual institutions and a focus on novel educational modalities may be needed to augment the individual institutional exposure. Reevaluation of the curriculum may be warranted.

  3. Nontrauma emergency surgery: optimal case mix for general surgery and acute care surgery training.

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    Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Miller, Barbra S; Doherty, Gerard M; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hemmila, Mark R; Park, Pauline K; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Sihler, Kristen C; Wahl, Wendy L; Wang, Stewart C; Napolitano, Lena M

    2011-11-01

    To examine the case mix and patient characteristics and outcomes of the nontrauma emergency (NTE) service in an academic Division of Acute Care Surgery. An NTE service (attending, chief resident, postgraduate year-3 and postgraduate year-2 residents, and two physician assistants) was created in July 2005 for all urgent and emergent inpatient and emergency department general surgery patient consults and admissions. An NTE database was created with prospective data collection of all NTE admissions initiated from November 1, 2007. Prospective data were collected by a dedicated trauma registrar and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-intensive care unit (ICU) coordinator daily. NTE case mix and ICU characteristics were reviewed for the 2-year time period January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2009. During the same time period, trauma operative cases and procedures were examined and compared with the NTE case mix. Thousand seven hundred eight patients were admitted to the NTE service during this time period (789 in 2008 and 910 in 2009). Surgical intervention was required in 70% of patients admitted to the NTE service. Exploratory laparotomy or laparoscopy was performed in 449 NTE patients, comprising 37% of all surgical procedures. In comparison, only 118 trauma patients (5.9% of admissions) required a major laparotomy or thoracotomy during the same time period. Acuity of illness of NTE patients was high, with a significant portion (13%) of NTE patients requiring ICU admission. NTE patients had higher admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III scores [61.2 vs. 58.8 (2008); 58.2 vs. 55.8 (2009)], increased mortality [(9.71% vs. 4.89% (2008); 6.78% vs. 5.16% (2009)], and increased readmission rates (15.5% vs. 7.4%) compared with the total surgical ICU (SICU) admissions. In an era of declining operative caseload in trauma, the NTE service provides ample opportunity for complex general surgery decision making and operative procedures for

  4. The outcomes of the elderly in acute care general surgery.

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    St-Louis, E; Sudarshan, M; Al-Habboubi, M; El-Husseini Hassan, M; Deckelbaum, D L; Razek, T S; Feldman, L S; Khwaja, K

    2016-02-01

    Elderly patients form a growing subset of the acute care surgery (ACS) population. Older age may be associated with poorer outcomes for some elective procedures, but there are few studies focusing on outcomes for the elderly ACS population. Our objective is to characterize differences in mortality and morbidity for acute care surgery patients >80 years old. A retrospective review of all ACS admissions at a large teaching hospital over 1 year was conducted. Patients were classified into non-elderly (4 days) hospital stay (p = 0.05), increased postoperative complications (p = 0.002), admission to the ICU (p = 0.002), and were more likely to receive a non-operative procedure (p = 0.003). No difference was found (p = NS) for patient flow factors such as time to consult general surgery, time to see consult by general surgery, and time to operative management and disposition. Compared to younger patients admitted to an acute care surgery service, patients over 80 years old have a higher risk of complications, are more likely to require ICU admission, and stay longer in the hospital.

  5. Innovation or rebranding, acute care surgery diffusion will continue.

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    Collins, Courtney E; Pringle, Patricia L; Santry, Heena P

    2015-08-01

    Patterns of adoption of acute care surgery (ACS) as a strategy for emergency general surgery (EGS) care are unknown. We conducted a qualitative study comprising face-to-face interviews with senior surgeons responsible for ACS at 18 teaching hospitals chosen to ensure diversity of opinions and practice environment (three practice types [community, public or charity, and university] in each of six geographic regions [Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, New England, Northeast, South, and West]). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using NVivo (QSR International, Melbourne, Australia). We applied the methods of investigator triangulation using an inductive approach to develop a final taxonomy of codes organized by themes related to respondents' views on the future of ACS as a strategy for EGS. We applied our findings to a conceptual model on diffusion of innovation. We found a paradox between ACS viewed as a health care delivery innovation versus a rebranding of comprehensive general surgery. Optimism for the future of ACS because of increased desirability for trauma and critical care careers as well as improved EGS outcomes was tempered by fear over lack of continuity, poor institutional resources, and uncertainty regarding financial viability. Our analysis suggests that the implementation of ACS, whether a true health care delivery innovation or an innovative rebranding, fits into the Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory. Despite concerns over resource allocation and the definition of the specialty, from the perspective of senior surgeons deeply entrenched in executing this care delivery model, ACS represents the new face of general surgery that will likely continue to diffuse from these early adopters. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Complications of bariatric surgery: the acute care surgeon's experience.

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    Bradley, Joel F; Ross, Samuel W; Christmas, Ashley Britton; Fischer, Peter E; Sachdev, Gaurav; Heniford, Brant Todd; Sing, Ronald F

    2015-09-01

    Complications of bariatric surgeries are common, can occur throughout the patient's lifetime, and can be life-threatening. We examined bariatric surgical complications presenting to our acute care surgery service. Records were reviewed from January 2007 to June 2013 for patients presenting with a complication after bariatric surgery. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was the most common index operation (n = 20), followed by open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 6), laparoscopic gastric band (n = 4), and vertical banded gastroplasty (n = 3). Diagnoses included internal hernia (n = 10), small bowel obstruction (n = 5), lap band restriction (n = 4), biliary disease (n = 3), upper GI bleeding or ulcer (n = 3), ischemic bowel (n = 2), marginal ulcer (n = 2), gastric outlet obstruction (n = 2), perforated ulcer (n = 2), intussusception (n = 1), and incarcerated ventral hernia (n = 1). Operations were required in 91% of the patients. Laparoscopic outcomes were similar to open; however, open cases were more emergent (23.5% vs 69.2%) and had longer hospital length of stay (4.8 ± 3.5 vs 11.0 ± 10.3 days, P complications of bariatric surgery. Internal hernias or obstructive etiologies are the most common presentations and often require emergent or urgent surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma.

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    Mandrioli, Matteo; Inaba, Kenji; Piccinini, Alice; Biscardi, Andrea; Sartelli, Massimo; Agresta, Ferdinando; Catena, Fausto; Cirocchi, Roberto; Jovine, Elio; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Di Saverio, Salomone

    2016-01-14

    The greatest advantages of laparoscopy when compared to open surgery include the faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, decreased postoperative pain, earlier return to work and resumption of normal daily activity as well as cosmetic benefits. Laparoscopy today is considered the gold standard of care in the treatment of cholecystitis and appendicitis worldwide. Laparoscopy has even been adopted in colorectal surgery with good results. The technological improvements in this surgical field along with the development of modern techniques and the acquisition of specific laparoscopic skills have allowed for its utilization in operations with fully intracorporeal anastomoses. Further progress in laparoscopy has included single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery. Nevertheless, laparoscopy for emergency surgery is still considered challenging and is usually not recommended due to the lack of adequate experience in this area. The technical difficulties of operating in the presence of diffuse peritonitis or large purulent collections and diffuse adhesions are also given as reasons. However, the potential advantages of laparoscopy, both in terms of diagnosis and therapy, are clear. Major advantages may be observed in cases with diffuse peritonitis secondary to perforated peptic ulcers, for example, where laparoscopy allows the confirmation of the diagnosis, the identification of the position of the ulcer and a laparoscopic repair with effective peritoneal washout. Laparoscopy has also revolutionized the approach to complicated diverticulitis even when intestinal perforation is present. Many other emergency conditions can be effectively managed laparoscopically, including trauma in select hemodynamically-stable patients. We have therefore reviewed the most recent scientific literature on advances in laparoscopy for acute care surgery and trauma in order to demonstrate the current indications and outcomes associated with a

  8. General surgery 2.0: the emergence of acute care surgery in Canada

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    Hameed, S. Morad; Brenneman, Frederick D.; Ball, Chad G.; Pagliarello, Joe; Razek, Tarek; Parry, Neil; Widder, Sandy; Minor, Sam; Buczkowski, Andrzej; MacPherson, Cailan; Johner, Amanda; Jenkin, Dan; Wood, Leanne; McLoughlin, Karen; Anderson, Ian; Davey, Doug; Zabolotny, Brent; Saadia, Roger; Bracken, John; Nathens, Avery; Ahmed, Najma; Panton, Ormond; Warnock, Garth L.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a groundswell of support in Canada for the development of organized, focused and multidisciplinary approaches to caring for acutely ill general surgical patients. Newly forged acute care surgery (ACS) services are beginning to provide prompt, evidence-based and goal-directed care to acutely ill general surgical patients who often present with a diverse range of complex pathologies and little or no pre- or postoperative planning. Through a team-based structure with attention to processes of care and information sharing, ACS services are well positioned to improve outcomes, while finding and developing efficiencies and reducing costs of surgical and emergency health care delivery. The ACS model also offers enhanced opportunities for surgical education for students, residents and practicing surgeons, and it will provide avenues to strengthen clinical and academic bonds between the community and academic surgical centres. In the near future, cooperation of ACS services from community and academic hospitals across the country will lead to the formation of systems of acute surgical care whose development will be informed by rigorous data collection and research and evidence-based quality-improvement initiatives. In an era of increasing subspecialization, ACS is a strong unifying force in general surgery and a platform for collective advocacy for an important patient population. PMID:20334738

  9. Acute care surgery: defining mortality in emergency general surgery in the state of Maryland.

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    Narayan, Mayur; Tesoriero, Ronald; Bruns, Brandon R; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Chen, Hegang; Diaz, Jose J

    2015-04-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is a major component of acute care surgery, however, limited data exist on mortality with respect to trauma center (TC) designation. We hypothesized that mortality would be lower for EGS patients treated at a TC vs non-TC (NTC). A retrospective review of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database from 2009 to 2013 was performed. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma EGS ICD-9 codes were used to identify EGS patients. Data collected included demographics, TC designation, emergency department admissions, and All Patients Refined Severity of Illness (APR_SOI). Trauma center designation was used as a marker of a formal acute care surgery program. Primary outcomes included in-hospital mortality. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed controlling for age. There were 817,942 EGS encounters. Mean ± SD age of patients was 60.1 ± 18.7 years, 46.5% were males; 71.1% of encounters were at NTCs; and 75.8% were emergency department admissions. Overall mortality was 4.05%. Mortality was calculated based on TC designation controlling for age across APR_SOI strata. Multivariable logistic regression analysis did not show statistically significant differences in mortality between hospital levels for minor APR_SOI. For moderate APR_SOI, mortality was significantly lower for TCs compared with NTCs (p surgery patients treated at TCs had lower mortality for moderate APR_SOI, but increased mortality for extreme APR_SOI when compared with NTCs. Additional investigation is required to better evaluate this unexpected finding. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Octogenarians' post-acute care use after cardiac valve surgery and recovery: clinical implications.

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    Edmiston, Elizabeth; Dolansky, Mary A; Zullo, Melissa; Forman, Daniel E

    2017-12-21

    Octogenarians receiving cardiac valve surgery is increasing and recovery is challenging. Post-acute care (PAC) services assist with recovery, yet services provided in facilities do not provide adequate cardiac-focused care or long-term self-management support. The purpose of the paper was to report post-acute care discharge rates in octogenarians and propose clinical implications to improve PAC services. Using a 2003 Medicare Part A database, we studied post-acute care service use in octogenarians after cardiac valve surgery. We propose expansion of the Geriatric Cardiac Care model to include broader clinical therapy dynamics. The sample (n = 10,062) included patients over 80 years discharged from acute care following valve surgery. Post-acute care services were used by 68% of octagarians following cardiac valve surgery (1% intermediate rehabilitation, 35% skilled nursing facility, 32% home health). The large percentage of octagarians using PAC point to the importance of integrating geriatric cardiac care into post-acute services to optimize recovery outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic use among older adults on an acute care general surgery service

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    Pollmann, André S.; Bailey, Jon G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Johnson, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibiotics play an important role in the treatment of many surgical diseases that affect older adults, and the potential for inappropriate use of these drugs is high. Our objective was to describe antibiotic use among older adults admitted to an acute care surgery service at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods Detailed data regarding diagnosis, comorbidities, surgery and antibiotic use were retrospectively collected for patients 70 years and older admitted to an acute care surgery service. We evaluated antibiotic use (perioperative prophylaxis and treatment) for appropriateness based on published guidelines. Results During the study period 453 patients were admitted to the acute care surgery service, and 229 underwent surgery. The most common diagnoses were small bowel obstruction (27.2%) and acute cholecystitis (11.0%). In total 251 nonelective abdominal operations were performed, and perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 49.5% of cases. The most common prophylaxis errors were incorrect timing (15.5%) and incorrect dose (12.4%). Overall 206 patients received treatment with antibiotics for their underlying disease process, and 44.2% received appropriate first-line drug therapy. The most common therapeutic errors were administration of second- or third-line antibiotics without indication (37.9%) and use of antibiotics when not indicated (12.1%). There was considerable variation in the duration of treatment for patients with the same diagnoses. Conclusion Inappropriate antibiotic use was common among older patients admitted to an acute care surgery service. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to ensure patients receive optimal care in this complex hospital environment. PMID:28930045

  12. Antibiotic use among older adults on an acute care general surgery service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, André S; Bailey, Jon G; Davis, Philip J B; Johnson, Paul M

    2017-12-01

    Antibiotics play an important role in the treatment of many surgical diseases that affect older adults, and the potential for inappropriate use of these drugs is high. Our objective was to describe antibiotic use among older adults admitted to an acute care surgery service at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Detailed data regarding diagnosis, comorbidities, surgery and antibiotic use were retrospectively collected for patients 70 years and older admitted to an acute care surgery service. We evaluated antibiotic use (perioperative prophylaxis and treatment) for appropriateness based on published guidelines. During the study period 453 patients were admitted to the acute care surgery service, and 229 underwent surgery. The most common diagnoses were small bowel obstruction (27.2%) and acute cholecystitis (11.0%). In total 251 nonelective abdominal operations were performed, and perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 49.5% of cases. The most common prophylaxis errors were incorrect timing (15.5%) and incorrect dose (12.4%). Overall 206 patients received treatment with antibiotics for their underlying disease process, and 44.2% received appropriate first-line drug therapy. The most common therapeutic errors were administration of second- or third-line antibiotics without indication (37.9%) and use of antibiotics when not indicated (12.1%). There was considerable variation in the duration of treatment for patients with the same diagnoses. Inappropriate antibiotic use was common among older patients admitted to an acute care surgery service. Quality improvement initiatives are needed to ensure patients receive optimal care in this complex hospital environment.

  13. The impact of an acute care surgery team on general surgery residency.

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    Hatch, Quinton; McVay, Derek; Johnson, Eric K; Maykel, Justin A; Champagne, Bradley J; Steele, Scott R

    2014-11-01

    Acute care surgical teams (ACSTs) have limited data in residency. We sought to determine the impact of an ACST on the depth and breadth of general surgery resident training. One year prior to and after implementation of an ACST, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs spanning multiple postgraduate year levels were compared for numbers, case types, and complexity. We identified 6,009 cases, including 2,783 after ACST implementation. ACSTs accounted for 752 cases (27%), with 39.2% performed laparoscopically. ACST cases included biliary (19.4%), skin/soft tissue (10%), hernia (9.8%), and appendix (6.5%). Second-year residents performed a lower percentage of laparoscopic cases after the creation of the ACST (20.4% vs 26.3%; P = .003), while chief residents performed a higher percentage (42.1 vs 37.4; P = .04). Case numbers and complexity following ACST development were unchanged within all year groups (P > .1). ACST in a residency program does not sacrifice resident case complexity, diversity, or volume. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The transforming power of early career acute care surgery research scholarships on academic productivity.

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    Zarzaur, Ben L; Valsangkar, Nakul; Feliciano, David F; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2016-07-01

    More than 75% of respondents to an Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma survey felt that barriers to research had increased and that acute care surgeon (ACS) academic productivity had decreased. Recent data confirm this impression and show lower academic productivity of junior ACS faculty compared with peers in other general surgical fields. The purpose of this study was to determine if early career acute care surgery research scholarships are associated with improved ACS academic productivity. Faculty data at the Top 55 National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded departments of surgery (Top 55) were obtained using SCOPUS, NIH, department, and professional society databases. Academic productivity was measured using total publications, citations, and the Hirsch index. Scholarship recipients from the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma were identified. A total of 4,101 surgical faculty (8.3% ACS) who belong to the Top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery and 85 scholarship recipients were identified. After merging, 34 scholarship recipients (40%) were current faculty at a Top 55 NIH-funded department of surgery, and 24 of those (71%) were ACS faculty. Scholarship recipients had higher median total publications compared with nonrecipients at assistant and associate ranks but not at full professor rank. For all ranks, scholarship recipients were more likely to have NIH funding compared with nonrecipients (33% vs. 11%, p Research scholarships granted by acute care surgery professional organizations remain largely among ACS faculty in Top 55 NIH-funded departments of surgery. Among junior ACS faculty, recipients are associated with increased academic productivity and NIH funding. To fill the academic productivity gap among junior ACSs, professional organizations should consider increasing research funding scholarships for promising investigators.

  15. Acute care surgery survey: opinions of surgeons about a new training paradigm.

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    Tisherman, Samuel A; Ivy, Michael E; Frangos, Spiros G; Kirton, Orlando C

    2011-01-01

    The acute care surgery (ACS) 2-year training model, incorporating surgical critical care (SCC), trauma surgery, and emergency general surgery, was developed to improve resident interest in the field. We believed that analysis of survey responses about the new training paradigm before its implementation would yield valuable information on current practice patterns and on opinions about the ACS model. Two surveys. Members of the Surgery Section of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and SCC program directors. One survey was sent to SCC program directors to define the practice patterns of trauma and SCC surgeons at their institutions, and another survey was sent to all Surgery Section of the Society of Critical Care Medicine members to solicit opinions about the ACS model. Practice patterns of trauma and SCC surgeons and opinions about the ACS model. Fifty-seven of 87 SCC program directors responded. Almost all programs are associated with level I trauma centers with as many as 15 trauma surgeons. Most of these trauma surgeons cover SCC and emergency general surgery. Sixty-six percent of surgical intensive care units are semiclosed; 89.0% have surgeons as directors. Seventy percent of the staff in surgical intensive care units are surgeons. One hundred fifty-five of approximately 1100 Surgery Section of the Society of Critical Care Medicine members who responded to the other survey did not believe that the ACS model would compromise surgical intensive care unit and trauma care or trainee education yet would allow surgeons to maintain their surgical skills. Respondents were less likely to believe that the ACS fellowship would be important financially, increase resident interest, or improve patient care. In academic medical centers, surgical intensivists already practice the ACS model but depend on many nonsurgeons. Surgical intensivists believe that ACS will not compromise care or education and will help maintain the field, although the effect on resident interest is

  16. Interest and applicability of acute care surgery among surgeons in Quebec: a provincial survey.

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    Joos, Émilie; Trottier, Vincent; Thauvette, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Acute care surgery (ACS) comprises trauma and emergency surgery. The purpose of this new specialty is to involve trauma and nontrauma surgeons in the care of acutely ill patients with a surgical pathology. In Quebec, few acute care surgery services (ACSS) exist, and the concept is still poorly understood by most general surgeons. This survey was meant to determine the opinions and interest of Quebec general surgeons in this new model. We created a bilingual electronic survey using a Web interface and sent it by email to all surgeons registered with the Association québécoise de chirurgie. A reminder was sent 2 weeks later to boost response rates. The response rate was 36.9%. Most respondents had academic practices, and 16% worked in level 1 trauma centres. Most respondents had a high operative case load, and 66% performed at least 10 urgent general surgical cases per month. Although most (88%) thought that ACS was an interesting field, only 45% were interested in participating in an ACSS. Respondents who deemed this concept least applicable to their practices were more likely to be working in nonacademic centres. Despite a strong interest in emergency general surgery, few surgeons were interested in participating in an ACSS. This finding may be explained by lack of comprehension of this new model and by comfort with traditional practice. We aim to change this paradigm by demonstrating the feasibility and benefits of the new ACSS at our centre in a follow-up study.

  17. Geographic Diffusion and Implementation of Acute Care Surgery: An Uneven Solution to the National Emergency General Surgery Crisis.

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    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Ingraham, Angela M; Daniel, Vijaya T; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2018-02-01

    Owing to lack of adequate emergency care infrastructure and decline in general surgery workforce, the United States faces a crisis in access to emergency general surgery (EGS) care. Acute care surgery (ACS), an organized system of trauma, general surgery, and critical care, is a proposed solution; however, ACS diffusion remains poorly understood. To investigate geographic diffusion of ACS models of care and characterize the communities in which ACS implementation is lagging. A national survey on EGS practices was developed, tested, and administered at all 2811 US acute care hospitals providing EGS to adults between August 2015 and October 2015. Surgeons responsible for EGS coverage at these hospitals were approached. If these surgeons failed to respond to the initial survey implementation, secondary surgeons or chief medical officers at hospitals with only 1 general surgeon were approached. Survey responses on ACS implementation were linked with geocoded hospital data and national census data to determine geographic diffusion of and access to ACS. We measured the distribution of hospitals with ACS models of care vs those without over time (diffusion) and by US counties characterized by sociodemographic characteristics of county residents (access). Survey response rate was 60% (n = 1690); 272 responding hospitals had implemented ACS by 2015, steadily increasing from 34 in 2001 to 125 in 2010. Acute care surgery implementation has not been uniform. Rural regions have limited ACS access, with hospitals in counties with greater than the 75th percentile population having 5.4 times higher odds (95% CI, 1.66-7.35) of implementing ACS than hospitals in counties with less than 25th percentile population. Communities with greater percentages of adults without a college degree also have limited ACS access (OR, 3.43; 95% CI, 1.81-6.48). However, incorporating EGS into ACS models may be a potential equalizer for poor, black, and Hispanic communities. Understanding and

  18. The opioid epidemic in acute care surgery-characteristics of overprescribing following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

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    Hanson, Kristine T; Thiels, Cornelius A; Polites, Stephanie F; Gazelka, Halena M; Ray-Zack, Mohamed D; Zielinski, Martin D; Habermann, Elizabeth B

    2018-02-17

    Postoperative prescribing following acute care surgery must be optimized to limit excess opioids in circulation as misuse and diversion are frequently preceded by a prescription for acute pain. This study aimed to identify patient characteristics associated with higher opioid prescribing following laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Among patients age ≥18 years who underwent LC at a single institution 2014-2016, opioids prescribed at discharge were converted to oral morphine equivalents (OME) and compared to developing state guidelines (max 200 OME). Preoperative opioid use was defined as any opioid prescription 1-3 months before LC or a prescription unrelated to gallbladder disease 200 OME. Top quartile prescriptions (≥300 OME) were associated with gallstone pancreatitis diagnosis, younger age, higher pain scores, and longer length of stay (all p<0.05). While median OME did not differ by emergent status (225, IQR 150-300 for both, p=0.15), emergent had more top quartile prescriptions (32% vs 25%, p=0.005). After adjusting for diagnosis, age, and sex, emergent status showed evidence of being associated with top quartile prescription (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.0-1.8). Thirty-day refill rate was 5%. Over half of opioid-naïve patients undergoing LC were prescribed opioids exceeding draft state guidelines. Variation in prescribing patterns was not fully explained by patient factors. Acute care surgeons have an opportunity to optimize prescribing practices with the ultimate goal of reducing opioid misuse. Level 3 retrospective cohort study.

  19. Predicting Postoperative Complications for Acute Care Surgery Patients Using the ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator.

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    Burgess, Jessica R; Smith, Benjamin; Britt, Rebecca; Weireter, Leonard; Polk, Travis

    2017-07-01

    The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) risk calculator has been used to assist surgeons in predicting the risk of postoperative complications. This study aims to determine if the risk calculator accurately predicts complications in acute care surgical patients undergoing laparotomy. A retrospective review was performed on all patients on the acute care surgery service at a tertiary hospital who underwent laparotomy between 2011 and 2012. The preoperative risk factors were used to calculate the estimated risks of postoperative complications in both the original ACS NSQIP calculator and updated calculator (June 2016). The predicted rate of complications was then compared with the actual rate of complications. Ninety-five patients were included. Both risk calculators accurately predicted the risk of pneumonia, cardiac complications, urinary tract infections, venous thromboembolism, renal failure, unplanned returns to operating room, discharge to nursing facility, and mortality. Both calculators underestimated serious complications (26% vs 39%), overall complications (32.4% vs 45.3%), surgical site infections (9.3% vs 20%), and length of stay (9.7 days versus 13.1 days). When patients with prolonged hospitalization were excluded, the updated calculator accurately predicted length of stay. The ACS NSQIP risk calculator underestimates the overall risk of complications, surgical infections, and length of stay. The updated calculator accurately predicts length of stay for patients calculator to predict postoperative risk in this population.

  20. Utilization of Morning Report by Acute Care Surgery Teams: Results from a Qualitative Study

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    Pringle, Patricia L.; Collins, Courtney; Santry, Heena P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The rigor of hand-offs is increasingly scrutinized in the era of shift-based patient care. Acute Care Surgery (ACS) embraced such a model of care; however, little is known about hand-offs in ACS programs. Methods We conducted 18 open-ended interviews with ACS leaders representing diverse geographic and practice settings. Two independent reviewers analyzed interviews using an inductive approach to elucidate themes regarding use of morning report (NVivo qualitative analysis software). Results 12/18 respondents reported a morning report but only 6/12 included attending-to-attending hand-offs. 1/12 incentivized attendings to participate, 2/12 included nursing staff, and 2/12 included physician extenders. Cited benefits of morning report were safe and effective information exchange (2/12), quality improvement (2/12), multidisciplinary discussion (1/12), and resident education (2/12). 3/12 respondents cited time commitment as the main limitation of morning report. Conclusions Morning report is under-utilized among ACS programs; however, if implemented strategically, it may improve patient care and resident education. PMID:24157348

  1. Inadequately marketing our brand: Medical student awareness of acute care surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephanie C; Privette, Alicia R; Ferguson, Pamela L; Mirdamadi, Meena; Fakhry, Samir M

    2015-11-01

    Despite focused national efforts to promote acute care surgery (ACS), little is known about medical student awareness of ACS as a career choice. The impending shortage of general surgeons emphasizes the need to increase interest in this comprehensive surgical specialty. The goal of this study was to determine whether students would be more likely to consider choosing ACS if they were aware of the specialty and its benefits. A survey was distributed electronically to medical students at our institution, a Level I trauma center with an active ACS service. The survey asked questions regarding specialty choice and factors that were used in making that decision. Also included were questions regarding their familiarity and affinity for ACS. The survey was returned by 518 students. Each medical school year was proportionately represented. Twenty-one percent of the students reported surgery as their career choice; however, women were half as likely to choose surgery as men. When asked to define ACS, 23% of all students gave the correct response. Only 8.9% of the students in the preclinical years correctly defined ACS. Even in the clinical years, 54% were unaware of ACS as a specialty. Students reported that the top factors that influenced their choice were controllable lifestyle, predictable schedule, and a positive medical school role model. When asked to identify what would make ACS appealing, a 50-hour work week was deemed most influential. When given the definition of ACS with approximate pay and on-call hours, 41.5% of the students and 75% of those interested in surgery would be likely to choose ACS as a career. This study highlights that awareness of ACS as a specialty is lacking. This may reflect inadequate marketing of our "brand" both locally and nationally. Focused efforts at familiarizing students with ACS and increased role modeling may increase interest in ACS.

  2. Surgery for Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Navadgi, Suresh; Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Windsor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for acute pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last 3 decades. A better understanding of the pathophysiology has contributed to this, but the greatest driver for change has been the rise of less invasive interventions in the fields of laparoscopy, endoscopy and radiology. Surgery has a very limited role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The most common indication for intervention in acute pancreatitis is for the treatment of complications and most notably the ...

  3. Development of an Acute Care Plastic Surgery Service in the Saskatoon Health Region: Effects on flexor tendon management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgenbusch, Chelsea S; Dust, Peter W; Sunderland, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    The acute care surgery model has gained favour in general surgery, but has yet to be widely adopted in other specialties. An Acute Care Plastic Surgery (ACS) Service was recently implemented in the Saskatoon Health Region in an effort to improve trauma care. To evaluate the impact of ACS on the management of flexor tendon lacerations. The authors hypothesize that ACS has resulted in more timely intervention, improved outcomes and decreased 'after hours' surgery. A retrospective review of patients treated for flexor tendon lacerations from 2007 to 2013 was performed. Patients were stratified into two groups based on whether they received treatment before (group A) or after (group B) ACS implementation. Variables included dates and times of patient referral, consultation and tendon repair; postoperative complications; and admissions. A surgeon survey was administered on the perceived impact of ACS. Group A was more likely to have surgery performed after hours (P=0.0019) and be admitted to hospital (P=0.0211) compared with group B. Time from referral to consultation and injury-to-surgery interval were slightly increased post-ACS (Group B). Surgeons were highly satisfied with the new system, citing benefits to patients and surgeons. ACS was designed to improve trauma care, while favourably impacting surgeon workload. Surprisingly, the injury-to-surgery interval was slightly increased. However, this was not clinically significant and did not lead to increased postoperative complications. This finding was likely due to a favourable change in practice patterns observed after ACS implementation. ACS has resulted in fewer hospital admissions, decreased after-hours surgeries and improved surgeon satisfaction.

  4. Acute kidney injury in bariatric surgery patients requiring intensive care admission: a state-wide, multicenter, cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David J R; Ho, Kwok M

    2015-01-01

    A multidisciplinary bariatric surgical approach is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. However, little is known about how the physiologic impact of weight reduction surgery superimposed on premorbid obesity-related co-morbidities may adversely influence perioperative renal function. This observational, multicenter study investigated all bariatric surgery patients (n = 590) admitted to any intensive care unit (ICU) in Western Australia between 2007 and 2011. Using Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria, we ascertained the incidence and contributing risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI). Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurred in 103 patients, accounting for 17.5% of all ICU admissions after bariatric surgery with 76.8% of the AKI episodes limited to AKIN stage 1. In a multivariate analysis, male gender, premorbid hypertension, higher admission APACHE II scores, and blood transfusions were all associated with AKI, while preexisting chronic kidney disease and body mass index (BMI) appeared not to influence renal decline. Both ICU (6.7 versus 2.5 d, Ppatients required hemodialysis while both ICU mortality (2.9 versus 0%, P = .005) and long-term mortality (18.2 versus 4.7 deaths per 1000 bariatric patient-yr, P = .01) were greater in patients experiencing AKI. AKI is common in bariatric patients requiring critical care support leading to increased healthcare utilization, prolonged hospitalization, and is associated with a higher mortality. BMI, a previously described risk factor, was not predictive of AKI in this cohort. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Perspectives of Post-Acute Transition of Care for Cardiac Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Stoicea

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-acute care (PAC facilities improve patient recovery, as measured by activities of daily living, rehabilitation, hospital readmission, and survival rates. Seamless transitions between discharge and PAC settings continue to be challenges that hamper patient outcomes, specifically problems with effective communication and coordination between hospitals and PAC facilities at patient discharge, patient adherence and access to cardiac rehabilitation (CR services, caregiver burden, and the financial impact of care. The objective of this review is to examine existing models of cardiac transitional care, identify major challenges and social factors that affect PAC, and analyze the impact of current transitional care efforts and strategies implemented to improve health outcomes in this patient population. We intend to discuss successful methods to address the following aspects: hospital-PAC linkages, improved discharge planning, caregiver burden, and CR access and utilization through patient-centered programs. Regular home visits by healthcare providers result in decreased hospital readmission rates for patients utilizing home healthcare while improved hospital-PAC linkages reduced hospital readmissions by 25%. We conclude that widespread adoption of improvements in transitional care will play a key role in patient recovery and decrease hospital readmission, morbidity, and mortality.

  6. Association of bariatric surgery with risk of acute care use for hypertension-related disease in obese adults: population-based self-controlled case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yuichi J; Tsugawa, Yusuke; Iso, Hiroyasu; Brown, David F M; Hasegawa, Kohei

    2017-08-23

    Hypertension carries a large societal burden. Obesity is known as a risk factor for hypertension. However, little is known as to whether weight loss interventions reduce the risk of hypertension-related adverse events, such as acute care use (emergency department [ED] visit and/or unplanned hospitalization). We used bariatric surgery as an instrument for investigating the effect of large weight reduction on the risk of acute care use for hypertension-related disease in obese adults with hypertension. We performed a self-controlled case series study of obese patients with hypertension who underwent bariatric surgery using population-based ED and inpatient databases that recorded every bariatric surgery, ED visit, and hospitalization in three states (California, Florida, and Nebraska) from 2005 to 2011. The primary outcome was acute care use for hypertension-related disease. We used conditional logistic regression to compare each patient's risk of the outcome event during sequential 12-month periods, using pre-surgery months 13-24 as the reference period. We identified 980 obese patients with hypertension who underwent bariatric surgery. The median age was 48 years (interquartile range, 40-56 years), 74% were female, and 55% were non-Hispanic white. During the reference period, 17.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.4-20.2%) had a primary outcome event. The risk remained unchanged in the subsequent 12-month pre-surgery period (18.2% [95% CI, 15.7-20.6%]; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.02 [95% CI, 0.83-1.27]; P = 0.83). In the first 12-month period after bariatric surgery, the risk significantly decreased (10.5% [8.6-12.4%]; aOR 0.58 [95% CI, 0.45-0.74]; P bariatric surgery (12.9% [95% CI, 10.8-15.0%]; aOR 0.71 [95% CI, 0.57-0.90]; P = 0.005). By contrast, there was no significant reduction in the risk among obese patients who underwent non-bariatric surgery (i.e., cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, spinal fusion, or mastectomy). In this population-based study of

  7. Patterns of severe acute renal failure in a referral center in Sudan: Excluding intensive care and major surgery patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaballo, Babikir G.; Khogali, Mohamed S.; Khalifa, Eman H.; Khalil, Eltahir A.G.; El-Hasaan, Ahmad M.; Abu-Aisha, H.

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003 to February 2004.Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites, and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerural diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16(18%) died and 14(16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated PPD poisoning. (author)

  8. Lower extremity compartment syndrome in the acute care surgery paradigm: safety lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cothren Clay C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt diagnosis and decompression of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (LECS in the multisystem injured patient is essential to avoid the devastating complications of progressive tissue necrosis and amputation. Despite collaborative trauma and orthopedic management of these difficult cases, significant delays in diagnosis and treatment occur. Periodic system review of our trauma and orthopedic data for complications of LECS led us to hypothesize that delayed diagnosis and limb loss were potentially preventable events in our trauma center. Setting Academic level 1 trauma center. Methods We performed a prospective review of our trauma registry for all cases of LECS over a 7 year period (2/98–10/2005. Variables reviewed included demographics, injury patterns, tissue necrosis, amputation and mortality. Results Eighty-three (10 female, 73 male cases were reviewed. Mean age = 33.3 years (range 1–78. Mean ISS = 19.4, GCS = 12.5. Five (6.0% had amputations; 7 (8.4% died. Fractures occurred in 68.7% (n = 57, and vascular injuries were present in 38.6% (n = 32. In 7 patients (8.4%, a delayed compartment release resulted in muscle necrosis requiring multiple debridements, subsequent wound closure problems, and long term disability. Of note, none of these patients had prior compartment pressure measurements. Furthermore, 6 patients (7% had superficial peroneal nerve transections as complications of their fasciotomy. Conclusion In the multisystem injured patient, LECS remains a major diagnostic and treatment challenge with significant risks of limb loss as well as complications from decompressive fasciotomy. These data underscore the importance of routine surveillance for LECS. In addition, a thorough knowledge of regional anatomy is essential to avoid technical morbidity.

  9. Measuring satisfaction: factors that drive hospital consumer assessment of healthcare providers and systems survey responses in a trauma and acute care surgery population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Steven A; Iannuzzi, James C; Stassen, Nicole A; Bankey, Paul E; Gestring, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Hospital quality metrics now reflect patient satisfaction and are measured by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Understanding these metrics and drivers will be integral in providing quality care as this process evolves. This study identifies factors associated with patient satisfaction as determined by HCAHPS survey responses in trauma and acute care surgery patients. HCAHPS survey responses from acute care surgery and trauma patients at a single institution between 3/11 and 10/12 were analyzed. Logistic regression determined which responses to individual HCAHPS questions predicted highest hospital score (a rating of 9-10/10). Demographic and clinical variables were also analyzed as predictors of satisfaction. Subgroup analysis for trauma patients was performed. In 70.3 per cent of 182 total survey responses, a 9-10/10 score was given. The strongest predictors of highest hospital ranking were respect from doctors (odds ratio [OR] = 24.5, confidence interval [CI]: 5.44-110.4), doctors listening (OR: 9.33, CI: 3.7-23.5), nurses' listening (OR = 8.65, CI: 3.62-20.64), doctors' explanations (OR = 8.21, CI: 3.5-19.2), and attempts to control pain (OR = 7.71, CI: 3.22-18.46). Clinical factors and outcomes (complications, intensive care unit/hospital length of stay, mechanism of injury, and having an operation) were nonsignificant variables. For trauma patients, Injury Severity Score was inversely related to score (OR = 0.93, CI: 0.87-0.98). Insurance, education, and disposition were also tied to satisfaction, whereas age, gender, and ethnicity were nonsignificant. In conclusion, patient perception of interactions with the healthcare team was most strongly associated with satisfaction. Complications did not negatively influence satisfaction. Insurance status might potentially identify patients at risk of dissatisfaction. Listening to patients, treating them with respect, and explaining the care plan are integral to a

  10. Nursing Care in Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Aydin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is caused by increased amounts of fatty tissue in the body and increasingly common serious health problem. The prevalence of obesity is increasing in all age groups throughout the world. This increase in the rate of obesity increases the incidence of obesity-related chronic diseases. In this respect, obesity is considered a risk factor for the chronic diseases. People who are more than 30 Body Mass Index called as obese and people who are over 40 called morbidly obese. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment providing in permanent weight loosing for obesity. Bariatric surgery techniques are applied as three different types. These techniques include; limit food intake, reduce nutrient absorption (malabsorption, and restricting food intake and malabsorption surgeries. In bariatric surgery, patient care is becoming increasingly important at before and after surgery due to the presence of concomitant diseases in obese patients. During this period, there are special nursing practices which include reducing the risks in the care of patients who are candidates for bariatric surgery, preventing the development of complications and supplying the recovery from illness as soon as possible. In this article nursing care of obese patients before and after surgery is to be discussed. In addition, bariatric surgery, complications and difficulties in live patients are to be examined [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(1.000: 77-82

  11. Surgeon accountability for patient safety in the Acute Care Surgery paradigm: a critical appraisal and need of having a focused knowledge of the patient and a specific subspecialty experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Catena, Fausto; Birindelli, Arianna; Coniglio, Carlo; Gordini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing evidence in the literature showing that Acute Care surgical patients, likewise patients from every other surgical subspeciality, should be best first approached and managed only by attending surgeons with approriate expertise in the field of Emergency and Trauma Surgery, as well as the occurrence of postoperative complications can be prevented or safely and appropriately treated when arising, only by those attending surgeons having a focused knowledge of the patient and specific subspeciality experience. The advantages of a consultant-led, patient-centered surgical management come along with the opportunity of maintaining the principles of continuity of care and specificity of expertise in managing surgical patients and their complications and readmissions. These principles should be particularly valid in the well-recognized subspeciality of Acute Care and Trauma Surgery; managing the challenging emergency surgical patients either in the preoperative and postoperative periods with the aim to improve the outcomes of Emergency Surgery, should only be by surgeons trained and experienced in both Acute Care Surgery and Trauma.

  12. An analysis of omitting biliary tract imaging in 668 subjects admitted to an acute care surgery service with biochemical evidence of choledocholithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggle, Andrew J; Cripps, Michael W; Liu, Laindy; Subramanian, Madhu; Nakonezny, Paul A; Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herb A

    2015-12-01

    No consensus exists for the timing and utility of biliary imaging in patients with preoperative concern for choledocholithiasis. Admissions to an acute care surgery service with evidence of choledocholithiasis undergoing same-admission cholecystectomy without preoperative or intraoperative imaging were identified. One-way analysis of variance on the log-transformed outcomes, with the Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison procedure, were used to compare means between groups. A total of 668 patients with elevated but downtrending liver enzymes underwent cholecystectomy without preoperative or intraoperative imaging. Thirty-eight patients (5.7%) had postoperative biliary imaging, of whom 22 (3.3%) had definite choledocholithiasis. One case of postoperative cholangitis occurred which required readmission and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with no long-term morbidity. Presenting liver enzymes were significantly higher in the group found to have retained stones postoperatively than those without retained stones. Patients presenting with biochemical evidence of choledocholithiasis who downtrend preoperatively can be safely managed by cholecystectomy with omission of biliary tract imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outpatient surgery for acute uncomplicated appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis is one of the main indications to abdominal surgery. When the appendicitis is not complicated, is possible to do an outpatient surgery. Objective: To describe postsurgical evolution of the patients who present uncomplicated acute appendicitis. Methods: A prospective study was carried out about the evolution of 100 patients with outpatient surgery for appendectomy by uncomplicated acute appendicitis. The study was performed in the Hospital Susana Lopez de Valencia (HSLV of Popayán, Colombia. A telephone survey was conducted during the 24 hours after surgery, to determinate potential complications like pain, nausea, vomiting and oral intolerance. Clinical histories were reviewed to determinate in case the patient has re-entered because of a possible post operative complication during 30 next days after surgical intervention. Histopathological findings were also reported. Results: During postsurgical follow up, 58% of the patients did not present any kind of pain, 95% tolerated oral route, 97% did not have vomiting and 90% did not have nausea. 3% re-entered because of type 1 infection around the surgical area, 4% because of pain. We found a histopathological concordance with the acute appendicitis diagnostic in 94% of the cases. All patients reported to be satisfied with the given attention in the postsurgery. Conclusions: Patients undergo appendectomy by uncomplicated acute appendicitis treated outpatient, has an appropriate tolerance to oral route and pain control.

  14. TIMP-2*IGFBP7 (Nephrocheck® Measurements at Intensive Care Unit Admission After Cardiac Surgery are Predictive for Acute Kidney Injury Within 48 Hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Oezkur

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute kidney injury (AKI is a postoperative complication after cardiac surgery with a high impact on mortality and morbidity. Nephrocheck® [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] determines markers of tubular stress, which occurs prior to tubular damage. It is unknown at which time-point [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] measurement should be performed to ideally predict AKI. We investigated the association of [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] at various time-points with the incidence of AKI in patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery including cardio-pulmonary bypass. Methods: In a prospective cohort study, serial blood and urine samples were collected from 150 patients: pre-operative, at ICU-admission, 24h and 48h post-surgery. AKI was defined as Serum-Creatinine rise >0.3 mg/dl within 48hrs. Urinary [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] was measured at pre-operative, ICU-admission and 24h post-surgery; medical staff was kept blinded to these results. Results: A total of 35 patients (23.5% experienced AKI, with a higher incidence in those with high [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] values at ICU admission (57.1% vs. 10.1%, p<0.001. In logistic regression [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] at ICU admission was independently associated with the occurrence of AKI (Odds Ratio 11.83; p<0.001, C-statistic= 0.74 after adjustment for EuroSCORE II and CBP-time. Conclusions: Early detection of elevated [TIMP-2*IGFBP7] at ICU admission was strongly predictive for postoperative AKI and appeared to be more precise as compared to subsequent measurements.

  15. Endoscopic Surgery for Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH is generally addressed by craniotomy under general anesthesia. We report a patient whose traumatic ASDH was treated under local anesthesia by one-burr-hole endoscopic surgery. This 87-year-old woman had undergone coil embolization for a ruptured right middle-cerebral artery aneurysm and placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus 5 years earlier. Upon admission, she manifested consciousness disturbance after suffering head trauma and right hemiplegia. Her Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (E2V2M4. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a thick, left-frontotemporal ASDH. Due to her advanced age and poor condition, we performed endoscopic surgery rather than craniotomy to evacuate the ASDH. Under local anesthesia, we made a burr hole in her left forehead and increased its size to 15 mm in diameter. After introducing a transparent sheath into the hematoma cavity with a rigid endoscope, the clot was evacuated with a suction tube. The arterial bleeding point was electrically coagulated. A postoperative CT scan confirmed the reduction of the hematoma. There was neither brain compression nor brain swelling. Her consciousness disturbance and right hemiplegia improved immediately. Endoscopic surgery may represent a viable method to address traumatic intracranial hematomas in some patients.

  16. Acute Vision Loss Following Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Byrd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female with a history of uterine cancer and Celiac and Raynaud’s Disease presented to our institution with frequent migraines and nasal congestion. She underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS and experienced acute unilateral vision loss postoperatively. Rapid recognition of the etiology and effective treatment are paramount given the permanent and irreversible vision loss that can result. Arterial vasospasm following FESS is rare. Patients with autoimmune diseases have perhaps an increased risk for vasospasm secondary to an increased vasoreactive profile. We present the first documented case of nitroglycerin sublingual therapy to successfully treat ophthalmic artery vasospasm following FESS. Nitroglycerin sublingual therapy is a promising treatment for ophthalmic vasospasm secondary to its ability to cross the blood-ocular barrier, its rapid onset of action, and its ability to promote relaxation of vascular smooth muscle.

  17. Post bariatric Surgery Acute Axonal Polyneuropathy: Doing Your Best is Not Always Enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasawy, Zakia Mohammad; Hassan, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Neurological complications are frequently recognized with weight reduction surgeries for morbid obesity. The spectrum of peripheral neuropathies complicating the weight loss surgery is wide, and among them, the acute axonal peripheral neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barre syndrome is rare and only less than a dozen cases are reported. We present three cases, which after bariatric surgery developed acute polyneuropathy that rapidly progressed over 4 weeks from the onset. All patients responded to aggressive parenteral Vitamin B1 and B12 replacement therapy. These cases highlight the fact that bariatric surgery although is a promising option to treat morbid obesity; it is certainly not devoid of potential neurological complications due to micronutrient deficiencies. Delay in the diagnosis of acute polyneuropathy may worsen its long-term sequelae. A multidisciplinary team management with careful nutritional monitoring at regular interval is crucial in all patients for early recognition and intervention to avoid these complications after bariatric surgery.

  18. Randomized multicentre feasibility trial of intermediate care versus standard ward care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Waldau, T; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    in patients who had emergency abdominal surgery. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial carried out in seven Danish hospitals. Eligible for inclusion were patients with an Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score of at least 10 who were ready to be transferred to the surgical...... ward within 24 h of emergency abdominal surgery. Participants were randomized to either intermediate care or standard surgical ward care after surgery. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In total, 286 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. The trial......BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a considerable risk of death and postoperative complications. Early detection and timely management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of intermediate care compared with standard ward care...

  19. Severe Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Staphylococcus aureus Acute Endocarditis Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravry, Céline; Fedou, Anne-Laure; Dubos, Maria; Denes, Éric; Etchecopar, Caroline; Barraud, Olivier; Vignon, Philippe; François, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis has multiple etiologies with unclear mechanisms; however, rhabdomyolysis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection is rare. A case report of severe rhabdomyolysis in a patient who presented with endocarditis caused by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and review of relevant literature. The patient had a history of cardiac surgery for tetralogy of Fallot. He was admitted to the hospital because of fever and digestive symptoms. Respiratory and hemodynamic status deteriorated rapidly, leading to admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. Laboratory tests disclosed severe rhabdomyolysis with a serum concentration of creatine kinase that peaked at 49,068 IU/L; all blood cultures grew methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. Antibiotic therapy was amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin initially and was changed subsequently to oxacillin, clindamycin, and gentamicin. Transesophageal echocardiography showed vegetation on the pulmonary valve, thus confirming the diagnosis of acute endocarditis. Viral testing and computed tomography (CT) scan ruled out any obvious alternative etiology for rhabdomyolysis. Bacterial analysis did not reveal any specificity of the staphylococcal strain. The patient improved with antibiotics and was discharged from the ICU on day 26. He underwent redux surgery for valve replacement on day 53. Staphylococcal endocarditis should be suspected in cases of severe unexplained rhabdomyolysis with acute infectious symptoms.

  20. [Complicated acute apendicitis. Open versus laparoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Piedra, Francisco; Morales García, Dieter; Bernal Marco, José Manuel; Llorca Díaz, Javier; Marton Bedia, Paula; Naranjo Gómez, Angel

    2008-06-01

    Although laparoscopy has become the standard approach in other procedures, this technique is not generally accepted for acute appendicitis, especially if it is complicated due reports on the increase in intra-abdominal abscesses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity in a group of patients diagnosed with complicated apendicitis (gangrenous or perforated) who had undergone open or laparoscopic appendectomy. We prospectively studied 107 patients who had undergone appendectomy for complicated appendicitis over a two year period. Mean operation time, mean hospital stay and morbidity, such as wound infection and intra-abdominal abscess were evaluated. In the group with gangrenous appendicitis morbidity was significantly lower in laparoscopic appendectomy group (p = 0.014). Wound infection was significantly higher in the open appendectomy group (p = 0.041), and there were no significant differences in intra-abdominal abscesses (p = 0.471). In the perforated appendicitis group overall morbidity (p = 0.046) and wound infection (p = 0.004) was significantly higher in the open appendectomy group. There were no significant differences in intra-abdominal abscesses (p = 0.612). These results suggest that laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis is a safe procedure that may prove to have significant clinical advantages over conventional surgery.

  1. Laparoscopic Surgery in Very Acute Cholecystitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Rocco; Prezzati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic cholecystectomy in empyematous or gangrenous cholecystitis. During the period from August 1998 to April 2000, we operated laparoscopically on 64 patients, without any selection, in which we established, preoperatively or intraoperatively, the diagnosis of empyematous or gangrenous cholecystitis using clinical criteria (fever, leukocytosis, persistent pain, abdominal tenderness or guarding), echographic findings and intraoperative or pathological aspects of the gallbladder. The operations were performed by experienced surgeons skillful in advanced laparoscopic procedure. We concluded successfully 59 operations. The five conversions were due to dense adhesions because of previous gastric surgery in 3 cases, to the lack of recognizing the anatomy of the biliary tree in one case and to a choledoco-duodenal fistula in the last case. No mortality and a very low morbidity with a short hospital stay, were noted in our study. We consider patients with very acute cholecystitis to be candidates for a laparoscopic approach. PMID:12113421

  2. Physical performance following acute high-risk abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Line Rokkedal; Ingelsrud, Lina Holm; Tengberg, Line Toft

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery is associated with high mortality, multiple postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay. Further development of strategies for enhanced recovery programs following AHA surgery is needed. The aim of this study was to describe physical...... are primarily fatigue and abdominal pain. Further studies investigating strategies for early mobilization and barriers to mobilization in the immediate postoperative period after AHA surgery are needed.......BACKGROUND: Acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery is associated with high mortality, multiple postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay. Further development of strategies for enhanced recovery programs following AHA surgery is needed. The aim of this study was to describe physical...... performance and barriers to independent mobilization among patients who received AHA surgery (postoperative days [POD] 1-7). METHODS: Patients undergoing AHA surgery were consecutively enrolled from a university hospital in Denmark. In the first postoperative week, all patients were evaluated daily...

  3. Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Tazuma, Susumu; Furukawa, Akira; Nishii, Osamu; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Azuhata, Takeo; Itakura, Atsuo; Kamei, Seiji; Kondo, Hiroshi; Maeda, Shigenobu; Mihara, Hiroshi; Mizooka, Masafumi; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Obara, Hideaki; Sato, Norio; Takayama, Yuichi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Miyata, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Izumi; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Since acute abdomen requires accurate diagnosis and treatment within a particular time limit to prevent mortality, the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine, in collaboration with four other medical societies, launched the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen that were the first English guidelines in the world for the management of acute abdomen. Here we provide the highlights of these guidelines (all clinical questions and recommendations were shown in supplementary information). A systematic and comprehensive evaluation of the evidence for epidemiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and primary treatment for acute abdomen was performed to develop the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015. Because many types of pathophysiological events underlie acute abdomen, these guidelines cover the primary care of adult patients with nontraumatic acute abdomen. A total of 108 questions based on nine subject areas were used to compile 113 recommendations. The subject areas included definition, epidemiology, history taking, physical examination, laboratory test, imaging studies, differential diagnosis, initial treatment, and education. Japanese medical circumstances were considered for grading the recommendations to assure useful information. The two-step methods for the initial management of acute abdomen were proposed. Early use of transfusion and analgesia, particularly intravenous acetaminophen, were recommended. The Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015 have been prepared as the first evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute abdomen. We hope that these guidelines contribute to clinical practice and improve the primary care and prognosis of patients with acute abdomen. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  4. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  5. Facial cosmetic surgery: a primary care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, B J

    1994-11-01

    Primary care providers are often the source of information regarding health matters including elective cosmetic surgery. Practitioners should know about the more common cosmetic surgical procedures to assist their clients in making informed decisions regarding these operations. This article describes facial cosmetic surgical procedures performed to modify the signs of aging, which includes rhytidectomy ("face lift"), blepharoplasty ("eyelid surgery"), chemical peels, and dermabrasion. Issues discussed include preoperative considerations, expected outcomes, length of recovery period, costs, and complications (hemorrhage, necrosis, nerve injury, psychologic sequelae). Because facial cosmetic surgery usually has a positive impact on one's self-esteem, there has been an overall increase in facial cosmetic procedures during the past decade.

  6. Patient education for alcohol cessation intervention at the time of acute fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne; Egholm, Julie Weber; Oppedal, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    , preoperative alcohol cessation interventions can reduce postoperative complications, but no studies have investigated the effect of alcohol cessation intervention at the time of acute fracture surgery. This protocol describes a randomised clinical trial that aims to evaluate the effect of a new gold standard...... will provide new knowledge about how to prevent alcohol-related postoperative complications at the time of acute fracture surgery. If effective, the results will be a benefit for the clinical course, patients and society alike. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The protocol is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (Id: NCT......BACKGROUND: Patients with hazardous alcohol intake are overrepresented in emergency departments and surgical wards. These patients have an increased risk of postoperative complications with prolonged hospital stays and admissions to intensive care unit after surgery. In elective surgery...

  7. Standard guidelines of care for vitiligo surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsad Davinder

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo surgery is an effective method of treatment for selected, resistant vitiligo patches in patients with vitiligo. Physician′s qualifications: The physician performing vitiligo surgery should have completed postgraduate training in dermatology which included training in vitiligo surgery. If the center for postgraduation does not provide education and training in cutaneous surgery, the training may be obtained at the surgical table (hands-on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced dermatosurgeon at a center that routinely performs the procedure. Training may also be obtained in dedicated workshops. In addition to the surgical techniques, training should include local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility: Vitiligo surgery can be performed safely in an outpatient day care dermatosurgical facility. The day care theater should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place, with which all nursing staff should be familiar. Vitiligo grafting for extensive areas may need general anesthesia and full operation theater facility in a hospital setting and the presence of an anesthetist is recommended in such cases. Indications for vitiligo surgery : Surgery is indicated for stable vitiligo that does not respond to medical treatment. While there is no consensus on definitive parameters for stability, the Task Force suggests the absence of progression of disease for the past one year as a definition of stability. Test grafting may be performed in doubtful cases to detect stability. Preoperative counseling and Informed consent: A detailed consent form elaborating the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The patient should be informed of the nature of the disease and that the determination of stability is only a vague guide. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure

  8. The consequences of obesity on trauma, emergency surgery, and surgical critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velmahos George C

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The era of the acute care surgeon has arrived and this "new" specialty will be expected to provide trauma care, emergency surgery, and surgical critical care to a variety of patients arriving at their institution. With the exception of practicing bariatric surgeons, many general surgeons have limited experience caring for obese patients. Obese patients manifest unique physiology and pathophysiology, which can influence a surgeon's decision-making process. Following trauma, obese patients sustain different injuries than lean patients and have worse outcomes. Emergency surgery diseases may be difficult to diagnose in the obese patient and obesity is associated with increased complications in the postoperative patient. Caring for an obese patient in the surgical ICU presents a distinctive challenge and may require alterations in care. The following review should act as an overview of the pathophysiology of obesity and how obesity modifies the care of trauma, emergency surgery, and surgical critical care patients.

  9. Acute angle closure glaucoma following ileostomy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Meirelles Lopes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Angle-closure glaucoma can be induced by drugs that may cause pupillary dilatation. We report a case of a patient that developed bilateral angle closure glaucoma after an ileostomy surgery because of systemic atropine injection. This case report highlights the importance of a fast ophthalmologic evaluation in diseases with ocular involvement in order to make accurate diagnoses and appropriate treatments.

  10. The effect of chlorzoxazone on acute pain after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R V; Fomsgaard, J S; Siegel, M H

    2016-01-01

    after spine surgery. METHODS: One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned to 500 mg oral chlorzoxazone or placebo in this blinded study of patients having spine surgery under general anaesthesia. In the 4 h trial period analgesia consisted of IV patient-controlled analgesia (morphine bolus 2...... morphine use 0-4 h: median 10 (7-21) vs. 13 (5-19) mg in the chlorzoxazone and placebo groups, respectively, P = 0.82. We found no significant difference in adverse effects. CONCLUSION: No analgesic effect of single-dose chlorzoxazone was demonstrated in patients with acute pain after spine surgery. Based...

  11. Physical performance following acute high-risk abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Line Rokkedal; Ingelsrud, Lina Holm; Tengberg, Line Toft

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery is associated with high mortality, multiple postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay. Further development of strategies for enhanced recovery programs following AHA surgery is needed. The aim of this study was to describe physical...... with regards to physical performance, using the Cumulated Ambulation Score (CAS; 0-6 points) to assess basic mobility and the activePAL monitor to assess the 24-hour physical activity level. We recorded barriers to independent mobilization. RESULTS: Fifty patients undergoing AHA surgery (mean age 61.4 ± 17...... for a median of 23.4 hours daily during the first week after AHA surgery, and the main barriers to independent mobilization were fatigue and abdominal pain. CONCLUSION: Patients who receive AHA surgery have very limited physical performance in the first postoperative week. Barriers to independent mobilization...

  12. Acute Retention of Urine Following Intraocular Surgery | Nwosu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyperosmolar agents and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are used to lower the intraocular pressure and thus minimize the chances of vitreous loss during intraocular surgery. However, these agents could precipitate urinary retention. This is a report on two elderly men who had perioperative acute urinary retention following ...

  13. Acute ischemia after revision hallux valgus surgery leading to amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, W David; Kruse, Dustin; Brantigan, Charles O; Stone, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Acute arterial insufficiency after revision hallux valgus surgery is a rare complication. The identification of surgical candidates who are at risk of vascular complications is of utmost importance. The patient-reported symptoms and physical findings combined with noninvasive vascular studies are generally reliable to assess the vascular status but can fail to identify patients with atypical disease patterns. We present the case of a patient with normal pulses who underwent revision hallux valgus surgery, leading to gangrene of the hallux that required transmetatarsal amputation. We reviewed the vascular evaluation methods and causes of acute ischemia after surgery, including vasculitis. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bilateral Acute Angle-closure after Intraocular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskens, Kirsten; Pinto, Luis Abegão; Vandewalle, Evelien; Verdonk, Nancy; Stalmans, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who developed an acute bilateral angle-closure associated with choroidal effusion a day after an uneventful cataract surgery. The same patient had undergone a similarly uneventful cataract surgery two weeks before, under the same protocol, with no postoperative complication in the other eye. Medical treatment, including the use of oral sulfamide-related drugs (acetazolamide), topical beta-blockers and steroids led to a gradual decrease in intraocular pressure (IOP) and choroidal effusion. Despite initial reports suggesting a link between sulfamide-exposure and these rare forms of angle-closure, our report would suggest a more complex pathophysiology behind this intriguing phenomenon. How to cite this article: Hoskens K, Pinto LA, Vandewalle E, Verdonk N, Stalmans I. Bilateral Acute Angle-closure after Intraocular Surgery. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2014;8(3):113-114.

  15. Noninvasive mechanical ventilation for post acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, N

    2001-03-01

    The increasing use of NPPV in both acute and chronic settings has added to ventilator options in the post acute setting. Some patients start NPPV during their acute presentation and continue use during their post acute stay. Others are difficult to wean from invasive mechanical ventilation, and, if selected carefully, can be extubated and weaned using NPPV. Still others may initiate NPPV in the post acute setting with the anticipation of long-term use. In any care settings, principles of patient selection and management in monitoring practices overlap considerably. Noninvasive ventilation has been shown to reduce morbidity, mortality, and hospital stay in the acute setting for selected patients, and almost certainly prolongs survival for patients with restrictive thoracic disorders in the chronic setting. Although efficacy studies have not been performed in the post acute setting, it is reasonable to anticipate that appropriate use of NPPV will yield similar benefits. Accordingly, clinicians working in the post acute setting must acquire skill and experience in the proper application of NPPV to optimally manage the increasing number of patients treated with NPPV in this expanding arena.

  16. Disparities in access to emergency general surgery care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Shen, Connie; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2018-02-01

    As fewer surgeons take emergency general surgery call and hospitals decrease emergency services, a crisis in access looms in the United States. We examined national emergency general surgery capacity and county-level determinants of access to emergency general surgery care with special attention to disparities. To identify potential emergency general surgery hospitals, we queried the database of the American Hospital Association for "acute care general hospital," with "surgical services," and "emergency department," and ≥1 "operating room." Internet search and direct contact confirmed emergency general surgery services that covered the emergency room 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Geographic and population-level emergency general surgery access was derived from Geographic Information Systems and US Census. Of the 6,356 hospitals in the 2013 American Hospital Association database, only 2,811 were emergency general surgery hospitals. Counties with greater percentages of black, Hispanic, uninsured, and low-education individuals and rural counties disproportionately lacked access to emergency general surgery care. For example, counties above the 75th percentile of African American population (10.2%) had >80% odds of not having an emergency general surgery hospital compared with counties below the 25th percentile of African American population (0.6%). Gaps in access to emergency general surgery services exist across the United States, disproportionately affecting underserved, rural communities. Policy initiatives need to increase emergency general surgery capacity nationwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  18. Prometheus therapy for the treatment of acute liver failure in patients after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komardina, Ekaterina; Yaroustovsky, Michael; Abramyan, Marina; Plyushch, Marina

    2017-12-01

    Acute liver failure usually develops in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and significantly increases the mortality risk in patients after cardiac surgery. To assess the safety and efficacy of extracorporeal liver support in patients with acute liver failure after cardiac surgery. We studied 39 adult patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and acute liver failure as postoperative complication, treated with Prometheus therapy. Inclusion criteria comprised clinical and laboratory signs of acute liver failure. Criteria to start Prometheus therapies were: serum bilirubin above 180 µmol/l (reference values: 3-17 µmol/l), hepatocyte cytolysis syndrome (at least 2-fold increase in aspartate aminotranspherase and alanine aminotranspherase concentrations; reference values 10-40 U/l) and decrease in plasma cholinesterase (reference values 4490-13 320 U/l). Extracorporeal therapy provided stabilization of hemodynamics, decrease in serum total bilirubin and unconjugated bilirubin levels, decrease in cytolysis syndrome severity and positive effect on the synthetic function of the liver. The 28-day survival rate in the group treated with Prometheus therapy was 23%. Prometheus procedures could be recommended as a part of combined intensive care in patients with acute liver failure after cardiac and major vessel surgery. The efficiency of this method could be improved by a multi-factor evaluation of patient condition in order to determine indications for its use.

  19. Nursing Care for Patient after Surgery of Valvular Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Beranová, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the nursing care for patient after valvular defects surgery. The aim of this final paper is to ascertain the principles of specialized nursing care for patient after valvular defects surgery, analyse the condition of written standards for providing aftercare to patients who underwent valvular defects surgery, or the state of the nursing protocols in specialized nursing care. The purpose of qualitative - observational research in providing specialized nursing care is ...

  20. Multidisciplinary perioperative protocol in patients undergoing acute high-risk abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tengberg, L. T.; Bay-Nielsen, M.; Bisgaard, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery carries a very high risk of morbidity and mortality and represents a massive healthcare burden. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a standardized multidisciplinary perioperative protocol in patients undergoing AHA surgery...... = 0·004). Conclusion: The introduction of a multidisciplinary perioperative protocol was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative mortality in patients undergoing AHA surgery. NCT01899885 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).......Background: Acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery carries a very high risk of morbidity and mortality and represents a massive healthcare burden. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a standardized multidisciplinary perioperative protocol in patients undergoing AHA surgery...... after initiation of the AHA protocol as standard care. The intervention cohort was compared with a predefined, consecutive historical cohort of patients from the same department. The protocol involved continuous staff education, consultant-led attention and care, early resuscitation and high...

  1. CQI in the acute care setting: an opportunity to influence acute care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Helen F; Fallone, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is a tool and a methodology that allows nephrology nurses to monitor, evaluate, and creatively improve their working environment. Using an established, consistent, and easily understood format enables information sharing and facilitates progress toward establishing best practice guidelines and standards. Strengthening the nursing knowledge base improves the care provided to patients, which improves outcomes. Use of CQI methods can facilitate better processes, which in turn influence acute care practice. The cycle and the process never end since new knowledge is critical to provide the best care to patients. The Acute Care SIG will continue the PDCA cycle to Act in response to the changing needs of patients in the acute care setting and to our membership in the acute care arena.

  2. Chiropractic care and risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a population-based self-controlled case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié, Cesar A; Tomlinson, George A; Côté, Pierre; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Jadad, Alejandro R; Cassidy, J David

    2017-10-16

    Chiropractic care is popular for low back pain, but may increase the risk for acute lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Low back pain is a common early (prodromal) symptom of LDH and commonly precedes LDH diagnosis. Our objective was to investigate the association between chiropractic care and acute LDH with early surgical intervention, and contrast this with the association between primary care physician (PCP) care and acute LDH with early surgery. Using a self-controlled case series design and population-based healthcare databases in Ontario, Canada, we investigated all adults with acute LDH requiring emergency department (ED) visit and early surgical intervention from April 1994 to December 2004. The relative incidence of acute LDH with early surgery in exposed periods after chiropractic visits relative to unexposed periods was estimated within individuals, and compared with the relative incidence of acute LDH with early surgery following PCP visits. 195 cases of acute LDH with early surgery (within 8 weeks) were identified in a population of more than 100 million person-years. Strong positive associations were found between acute LDH and both chiropractic and PCP visits. The risk for acute LDH with early surgery associated with chiropractic visits was no higher than the risk associated with PCP visits. Both chiropractic and primary medical care were associated with an increased risk for acute LDH requiring ED visit and early surgery. Our analysis suggests that patients with prodromal back pain from a developing disc herniation likely seek healthcare from both chiropractors and PCPs before full clinical expression of acute LDH. We found no evidence of excess risk for acute LDH with early surgery associated with chiropractic compared with primary medical care.

  3. Pregabalin Effect on Acute and Chronic Pain after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aik Bouzia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pain after cardiac surgery affects long-term patient wellness. This study investigated the effect of preoperative pregabalin on acute and chronic pain after elective cardiac surgery with median sternotomy. Methods. Prospective double blind study. 93 cardiac surgery patients were randomly assigned into three groups: Group 1 received placebo, Group 2 received oral pregabalin 75 mg, and Group 3 received oral pregabalin 150 mg. Data were collected 8 hours, 24 hours, and 3 months postoperatively. Results. Patients receiving pregabalin required fewer morphine boluses (10 in controls versus 6 in Group 1 versus 4 in Group 2, p=0.000 and had lower pain scores at 8 hours (4 versus 3 versus 3, p=0.001 and 3 months (3 versus 2 versus 2, p=0.000 and lower morphine consumption at 8 hours (14 versus 13 versus 12 mg, p=0.000 and 24 hours (19.5 versus 16 versus 15 mg, p=0.000. Percentage of patients with sleep disturbances or requiring analgesics was lower in the pregabalin group and even lower with higher pregabalin dose (16/31 versus 5/31 versus 3/31, p=0.000, and 26/31 versus 16/31 versus 10/31, p=0.000, resp. 3 months after surgery. Conclusion. Preoperative oral pregabalin 75 or 150 mg reduces postoperative morphine requirements and acute and chronic pain after cardiac surgery.

  4. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...... of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...... disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiovascular care scenarios are also described....

  5. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...... of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...... disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiac care scenarios are also described....

  6. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/ critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use...... of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart...... disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiovascular care scenarios are also described....

  7. Accountable Care Units: A Disruptive Innovation in Acute Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Bryan W; Shapiro, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Accountable Care Units are a disruptive innovation that has moved care on acute care units from a traditional silo model, in which each discipline works separately from all others, to one in which multiple disciplines work together with patients and their families to move patients safely through their hospital stay. This article describes the "what," "how," and "why" of the Accountable Care Units model as it has evolved in different locations across a single health system and includes the lessons learned as different units and hospitals continue working to implement the model in their complex care environments.

  8. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hos...

  9. Bariatric surgery and implications for stoma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swash, Carolyn

    In the UK, 62% of the population are now described as being either overweight or obese. People with weight-management issues are more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease and diabetes, as well as having an increased risk of cancer, including bowel cancer. Following the initial National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance in 2006, revised in 2014, health professionals have a more proactive role in identifying people with weight-management issues and supporting them to achieve a weight that helps reduce their health risks. This includes referrals to bariatric surgeons for consideration for surgery if appropriate. One particular surgical procedure, the Roux-en-Y, is not reversible and alters the capacity of the stomach and function of the small bowel in order to achieve weight loss. Using a case study, this article will highlight the role of the stoma nurse in managing a patient, who previously had a Roux-en-Y procedure for weight loss and subsequently needed formation of a loop ileostomy after surgery for bowel cancer.

  10. Acute bacterial endophthalmitis after scleral buckling surgery with chandelier endoillumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakono, Takato; Otsuka, Hiroki; Shiihara, Hideki; Yoshihara, Naoya; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2017-12-01

    The non-contact wide-angle viewing system (WAVS) with chandelier endoillumination is being used more commonly during scleral buckling surgery for rhegmatogenous retinal detachments although its safety has not been established. We report our findings in a case of bacterial endophthalmitis that developed after scleral buckling surgery with WAVS and chandelier endoillumination. A 42-year-old man underwent scleral buckling surgery for a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in his right eye using a WAVS with chandelier endoillumination. Three days after the surgery, the patient noticed a marked decrease in his vision with ocular pain. Slit-lamp examination showed dense infiltration in the anterior chamber and vitreous body. Pars plana vitrectomy with antibiotic irrigation was done immediately, and Staphylococcus epidermidis was detected in the vitreous fluid. After vancomycin 6/day for 4 weeks, the inflammation gradually subsided, and the visual acuity recovered to 20/20 in 3 months. Acute bacterial endophthalmitis can develop after scleral buckling surgery performed with WAVS and chandelier endoillumination.

  11. Multidisciplinary acute care research organization (MACRO): if you build it, they will come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Barbara J; Huang, David T; Callaway, Clifton W; Zenati, Mazen; Angus, Derek C; Gunn, Scott R; Yealy, Donald M; Unikel, Daniel; Billiar, Timothy R; Peitzman, Andrew B; Sperry, Jason L

    2013-07-01

    Clinical research will increasingly play a core role in the evolution and growth of acute care surgery program development across the country. What constitutes an efficient and effective clinical research infrastructure in the current fiscal and academic environment remains obscure. We sought to characterize the effects of implementation of a multidisciplinary acute care research organization (MACRO) at a busy tertiary referral university setting. In 2008, to minimize redundancy and cost as well as to maximize existing resources promoting acute care research, MACRO was created, unifying clinical research infrastructure among the Departments of Critical Care Medicine, Emergency Medicine, and Surgery. During the periods 2008 to 2012, we performed a retrospective analysis and determined volume of clinical studies, patient enrollment for both observational and interventional trials, and staff growth since MACRO's origination and characterized changes over time. From 2008 to 2011, the volume of patients enrolled in clinical studies, which MACRO facilitates has significantly increased more than 300%. The percentage of interventional/observational trials has remained stable during the same period (50-60%). Staff has increased from 6 coordinators to 10, with an additional 15 research associates allowing 24/7 service. With this significant growth, MACRO has become financially self-sufficient, and additional outside departments now seek MACRO's services. Appropriate organization of acute care clinical research infrastructure minimizes redundancy and can promote sustainable, efficient growth in the current academic environment. Further studies are required to determine if similar models can be successful at other acute care surgery programs.

  12. Critical care management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplin, William M

    2012-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can have profound and devastating effects on the CNS and several other organs. Approximately 15% to 20% of patients with AIS are admitted to an intensive care unit and cared for by a multidisciplinary team. This article discusses the critical care management of patients with AIS. Patients with AIS require attention to airway, pulmonary status, blood pressure, glucose, temperature, cardiac function, and, sometimes, life-threatening cerebral edema. The lack of disease-specific data has led to numerous management approaches and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of bleeding but provide little discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in caring for patients with AIS.

  13. Mechanical ventilators in US acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinson, Lewis; Vaughn, Frances; Nelson, Steve; Giordano, Sam; Kallstrom, Tom; Buckley, Tim; Burney, Tabinda; Hupert, Nathaniel; Mutter, Ryan; Handrigan, Michael; Yeskey, Kevin; Lurie, Nicole; Branson, Richard

    2010-10-01

    The supply and distribution of mechanical ventilation capacity is of profound importance for planning for severe public health emergencies. However, the capability of US health systems to provide mechanical ventilation for children and adults remains poorly quantified. The objective of this study was to determine the quantity of adult and pediatric mechanical ventilators at US acute care hospitals. A total of 5,752 US acute care hospitals included in the 2007 American Hospital Association database were surveyed. We measured the quantities of mechanical ventilators and their features. Responding to the survey were 4305 (74.8%) hospitals, which accounted for 83.8% of US intensive care unit beds. Of the 52,118 full-feature mechanical ventilators owned by respondent hospitals, 24,204 (46.4%) are pediatric/neonatal capable. Accounting for nonrespondents, we estimate that there are 62,188 full-feature mechanical ventilators owned by US acute care hospitals. The median number of full-feature mechanical ventilators per 100,000 population for individual states is 19.7 (interquartile ratio 17.2-23.1), ranging from 11.9 to 77.6. The median number of pediatric-capable device full-feature mechanical ventilators per 100,000 population younger than 14 years old is 52.3 (interquartile ratio 43.1-63.9) and the range across states is 22.1 to 206.2. In addition, respondent hospitals reported owning 82,755 ventilators other than full-feature mechanical ventilators; we estimate that there are 98,738 devices other than full-feature ventilators at all of the US acute care hospitals. The number of mechanical ventilators per US population exceeds those reported by other developed countries, but there is wide variation across states in the population-adjusted supply. There are considerably more pediatric-capable ventilators than there are for adults only on a population-adjusted basis.

  14. The Effect of Massage on Acute Postoperative Pain in Critically and Acutely Ill Adults Post-thoracic Surgery: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitor, Madalina; Gélinas, Céline; Richard-Lalonde, Melissa; Thombs, Brett D

    Critical care practice guidelines identify a lack of clear evidence on the effectiveness of massage for pain control. To assess the effect of massage on acute pain in critically and acutely ill adults post-thoracic surgery. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases were searched. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of massage compared to attention control/sham massage or standard care alone on acute pain intensity post-thoracic surgery. Twelve RCTs were included. Of these, nine evaluated massage in addition to standard analgesia, including 2 that compared massage to attention control/sham massage in the intensive care unit (ICU), 6 that compared massage to standard analgesia alone early post-ICU discharge, and 1 that compared massage to both attention control and standard care in the ICU. Patients receiving massage with analgesia reported less pain (0-10 scale) compared to attention control/sham massage (3 RCTs; N = 462; mean difference -0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.25 to -0.35; p Massage, in addition to pharmacological analgesia, reduces acute post-cardiac surgery pain intensity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes of Intensive Care Unit admissions after elective cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M. M. E. M.; Bakhshi-Raiez, F.; Dekker, J. W. T.; de Keizer, N. F.; de Jonge, E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Postoperative care for major elective cancer surgery is frequently provided on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Objective: To analyze the characteristics and outcome of patients after ICU admission following elective surgery for different cancer diagnoses. Methods: We analyzed all ICU

  16. Who is at increased risk for acute kidney injury following noncardiac surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Abelha and colleagues evaluated the incidence and determinants of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previously normal renal function. In this retrospective study of 1,166 patients with no previous renal insufficiency, who were admitted to a postsurgical intensive care unit (ICU) over a 2-year period, the incidence of AKI was 7.5%. Multivariate analysis identified American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, Revised Cardiac Risk Index, high-risk surgery and congestive heart disease as preoperative AKI risk factors. AKI was an independent risk factor for hospital mortality (odds ratio = 3.12, 95% confidence interval = 1.41 to 6.93; P = 0.005), and was associated with higher severity of illness scores (Simplified Acute Physiology Score II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II), longer ICU length of stay, higher ICU mortality, increased hospital mortality and higher mortality at 6-month follow up. Although the study design excluded 121 patients with significant preoperative renal insufficiency by design, the relatively crude serum creatinine cut-offs used certainly permitted inclusion of numerous patients with preoperative renal impairment. Accordingly, the study design failed to quantify the impact of preoperative renal impairment on risk and outcomes of perioperative AKI in noncardiac surgery, and this should be a goal of such studies in the future. Nonetheless, the study is an important addition to the literature in an under-studied population of patients at high risk for AKI.

  17. Predictive models for acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Sevag; Schold, Jesse D; Navia, Jose; Mastracci, Tara M; Paganini, Emil P; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Bashour, Charles A

    2012-03-01

    Accurate prediction of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) would improve clinical decision making and facilitate timely diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the study was to develop predictive models for cardiac surgery-associated AKI using presurgical and combined pre- and intrasurgical variables. Prospective observational cohort. 25,898 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at Cleveland Clinic in 2000-2008. Presurgical and combined pre- and intrasurgical variables were used to develop predictive models. Dialysis therapy and a composite of doubling of serum creatinine level or dialysis therapy within 2 weeks (or discharge if sooner) after cardiac surgery. Incidences of dialysis therapy and the composite of doubling of serum creatinine level or dialysis therapy were 1.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Kidney function parameters were strong independent predictors in all 4 models. Surgical complexity reflected by type and history of previous cardiac surgery were robust predictors in models based on presurgical variables. However, the inclusion of intrasurgical variables accounted for all explained variance by procedure-related information. Models predictive of dialysis therapy showed good calibration and superb discrimination; a combined (pre- and intrasurgical) model performed better than the presurgical model alone (C statistics, 0.910 and 0.875, respectively). Models predictive of the composite end point also had excellent discrimination with both presurgical and combined (pre- and intrasurgical) variables (C statistics, 0.797 and 0.825, respectively). However, the presurgical model predictive of the composite end point showed suboptimal calibration (P predictive models in other cohorts is required before wide-scale application. We developed and internally validated 4 new models that accurately predict cardiac surgery-associated AKI. These models are based on readily available clinical information and can be used for patient counseling, clinical

  18. Paediatric acute care: Highlights from the Paediatric Acute Care-Advanced Paediatric Life Support Conference, Gold Coast, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Stephen Ss; Rao, Arjun; Acworth, Jason

    2018-04-25

    The Paediatric Acute Care Conference is an annual conference organised by APLS Australia to advance paediatric acute care topics for clinicians in pre-hospital medicine, EDs, acute paediatrics, intensive care and anaesthesia. The Conference 2017 was held at Surfers Paradise, Queensland. We provide a summary of some of the presentations. © 2018 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Acute pancreatitis following scoliosis surgery: description and clinical course in 14 adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bouyousfi, Maalik; Leveque, Christine; Miladi, Lotfi; Irtan, Sabine; Hamza, Jamil; Oualha, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a possible complication after scoliosis surgery. Although some risk factors have been documented in the literature, clinical description of pancreatitis diagnosis and ensuing course still remain very poor. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics of acute pancreatitis after scoliosis surgery. A descriptive, retrospective and single-center study of fourteen adolescents with postoperative acute pancreatitis after spine fusion surgery in scoliosis management between April 2003 and August 2012 was performed. Acute pancreatitis occurred within 9.5 days (4-51) after surgery. Abdominal pain was atypical and was expressed in only half of the children. Ileus, nausea and vomiting were the most frequent signs. None of the acute pancreatitis cases was severe. Acute pancreatitis is an early complication of scoliosis surgery. Clinical signs are atypical and non-severe and can induce misleading forms. Presence of delayed digestive problems should alert the clinician to the risk of pancreatitis in the aftermath of scoliosis surgery.

  20. Obesity is associated with increased health care charges in patients undergoing outpatient plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieffert, Michelle R; Fox, Justin P; Abbott, Lindsay E; Johnson, R Michael

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with greater rates of surgical complications. To address these complications after outpatient plastic surgery, obese patients may seek care in the emergency department and potentially require admission to the hospital, which could result in greater health care charges. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of obesity, postdischarge hospital-based acute care, and hospital charges within 30 days of outpatient plastic surgery. From state ambulatory surgery center databases in four states, all discharges for adult patients who underwent liposuction, abdominoplasty, breast reduction, and blepharoplasty were identified. Patients were grouped by the presence or absence of obesity. Multivariable regression models were used to compare the frequency of hospital-based acute care, serious adverse events, and hospital charges within 30 days between groups while controlling for confounding variables. The final sample included 47,741 discharges, with 2052 of these discharges (4.3 percent) being obese. Obese patients more frequently had a hospital-based acute care encounter [7.3 percent versus 3.9 percent; adjusted OR, 1.35 (95% CI,1.13 to 1.61)] or serious adverse event [3.2 percent versus 0.9 percent; adjusted OR, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30 to 2.29)] within 30 days of surgery. Obese patients had adjusted hospital charges that were, on average, $3917, $7412, and $7059 greater (p charges, in part attributable to more frequent adverse events and hospital-based health care within 30 days of surgery. Risk, II.

  1. Bariatric Surgery: A Brief Primer for Primary Care Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Frichtel, Christina M

    2004-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is on the rise as treatment for the increasing number of obese patients in the US population. As this procedure becomes more common, primary care physicians are assuming increased responsibility not only for preoperative selection and education of bariatric surgery candidates but also for their postoperative care and monitoring—two factors necessary for a successful surgical outcome. This article highlights some issues relevant for primary care physicians and reports an illu...

  2. A comparative study of four intensive care outcome prediction models in cardiac surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmann Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outcome prediction scoring systems are increasingly used in intensive care medicine, but most were not developed for use in cardiac surgery patients. We compared the performance of four intensive care outcome prediction scoring systems (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II], Simplified Acute Physiology Score II [SAPS II], Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], and Cardiac Surgery Score [CASUS] in patients after open heart surgery. Methods We prospectively included all consecutive adult patients who underwent open heart surgery and were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2008. Scores were calculated daily from ICU admission until discharge. The outcome measure was ICU mortality. The performance of the four scores was assessed by calibration and discrimination statistics. Derived variables (Mean- and Max- scores were also evaluated. Results During the study period, 2801 patients (29.6% female were included. Mean age was 66.9 ± 10.7 years and the ICU mortality rate was 5.2%. Calibration tests for SOFA and CASUS were reliable throughout (p-value not Conclusions CASUS and SOFA are reliable ICU mortality risk stratification models for cardiac surgery patients. SAPS II and APACHE II did not perform well in terms of calibration and discrimination statistics.

  3. Nursing Care in Patient with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Němec, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with the issue of acute myocardial infarction in context of prehospital, and hospital care. Specific clinical symptoms, diagnostic procedures, and treatment of acute myocardial infarction are described in the theoretical part. The part is also devoted to nursing care. Emphasis is put especially on prevention of cardiovascular diseases development. The goal is to evaluate nursing care of patients with acute myocardial infarction in prehospital, and later on, hospital care. Th...

  4. Essential bariatric emergencies for the acute care surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernick, B; Jansen, M; Noria, S; Stawicki, S P; El Chaar, M

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. Due to the high volume of weight loss procedures worldwide, the general surgeon will undoubtedly encounter bariatric patients in his or her practice. Liberal use of CT scans, upper endoscopy and barium swallow in this patient population is recommended. Some bariatric complications, such as marginal ulceration and dyspepsia, can be effectively treated non-operatively (e.g., proton pump inhibitors, dietary modification). Failure of conservative management is usually an indication for referral to a bariatric surgery specialist for operative re-intervention. More serious complications, such as perforated marginal ulcer, leak, or bowel obstruction, may require immediate surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion must be maintained for these complications despite "negative" radiographic studies, and diagnostic laparoscopy performed when symptoms fail to improve. Laparoscopic-assisted gastric band complications are usually approached with band deflation and referral to a bariatric surgeon. However, if acute slippage that results in gastric strangulation is suspected, the band should be removed immediately. This manuscript provides a high-level overview of all essential bariatric complications that may be encountered by the acute care surgeon.

  5. Anesthesia for day-care surgeries: Current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Day-care surgery has become a popular modality of surgical intervention throughout the globe. Numerous factors including the economic and financial issues are driving this therapeutic modality to a widespread acceptance among surgeons and anesthesiologists. Advancements in anesthesia and surgical techniques as well as availability of newer drugs are largely responsible for the progress of day-care surgeries. Numerous challenges are still faced by anesthesiologists and surgeons in carrying out day-care surgeries, especially in spite of these advancements, at resource-limited setups. The first right step in successfully delivering the day-care surgical services includes proper selection of the patients. The preanesthetic evaluation is highly essential in determining the suitability of the patient for day-care anesthesia and surgery as well as the formulation of various anesthetic plans and strategies. The current review is intended to highlight inherent challenges and probable solutions to them for this rapidly progressing anesthesia.

  6. Perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen Lundorf, Luise; Korvenius Nedergaard, Helene; Møller, Ann Merete

    2016-02-18

    Acute postoperative pain is still an issue in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Postoperative pain and side effects of analgesic treatment, in particular those of opioids, need to be minimized. Opioid-sparing analgesics, possibly including dexmedetomidine, seem a promising avenue by which to improve postoperative outcomes. Our primary aim was to determine the analgesic efficacy and opioid-sparing effect of perioperative dexmedetomidine for acute pain after abdominal surgery in adults.Secondary aims were to establish effects of dexmedetomidine on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), gastrointestinal function and mobilization, together with the side effect profile of dexmedetomidine. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Web of Science and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and reference lists of articles to May 2014. We searched the Science Citation Index, ClinicalTrials.gov and Current Controlled Trials, and we contacted pharmaceutical companies to identify unpublished and ongoing studies. We applied no language restrictions. We reran the search in May 2015 and found nine studies of interest. We will deal with the studies of interest when we update the review. We included randomized, controlled trials of perioperative dexmedetomidine versus placebo or other drug during abdominal surgery in adults. Trials included one of the following outcomes: amount of 'rescue' opioid, postoperative pain, time to 'rescue' analgesia, participants requiring 'rescue' analgesia, postoperative sedation, PONV, time to first passage of flatus and stool or time to first out-of-bed mobilization. Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts for eligibility. We retrieved full trial reports if necessary, and we extracted relevant data from the included studies using a data collection form and assessed risk of bias. We

  7. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  8. Predictors for outcome after surgery for traumatic acute subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasov Vladimir A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute traumatic subdural hematoma (ASDH is one of the most frequent conditions in neurosurgery demanding emergency surgery. The aim of the study was to identify factors influencing outcome in patients who had surgery for evacuation of ASDH. Methods: From 2005 to 2012 eighty-five patients at age above 18 years had surgery for evacuation of ASDH. Outcome was measured according GOS at discharge and was dichotomized as “favorable outcome” (GOS 4 to 5 and “unfavorable outcome” (GOS 1 to 3. These factors were evaluated with univariate and logistic regression analysis for significance with outcome. Results: The mean age of the 85 patients was 62.7 years (SD±18.5. 45.9% patients were with favorable outcome and 54.1% had unfavorable outcome. Patients with GCS score 3-8 (54.1% had 80.4% unfavorable outcome whereas 78.6% of patients with GCS score 13-15 (32.9% had favorable outcome. All patients with nonreactive pupils (bilaterally or unilaterally - 31.8% had unfavorable outcome whereas patients (36.5% with both reactive pupils (36.5% had in 80.6% favorable outcome. All patients (40% with Rotterdam CT scores 5 and 6 had unfavorable outcome. The factors determining outcome were admission GSC score, Rotterdam CT scores, and prothrombin time. Conclusion: Patients who have GSC score of 3, unresponsive pupil(s or have Rotterdam CT scores 5 and 6 have little chance of survival. Patients with coagulopathy have two times more unfavorable outcome. The patients with ASDH should have surgery as soon as possible after correction of vital parameters in order to avoid deterioration which can be very rapid and irreversible.

  9. [Continuity of care from the acute care hospital: Results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Casals, Montserrat; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Alsina-Ribas, Anna; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Oriol-Ruscalleda, Margarita; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    To describe the profile of patients treated by a Continuity of Care Manager in an acute-care center during the first six months of its activity, as well as the profile of patients treated and the resource allocation. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on patients with complex care needs requiring continuity of care liaison, and who were attended by the Continuity of Care Nurse during the period from October 2013 to March 2014. Patient characteristics, their social environment and healthcare resource allocation were registered and analyzed. A total of 1,034 cases of demand that corresponded to 907 patients (women 55.0%; age 80.57±10.1; chronic 47.8%) were analyzed, of whom 12.2% were readmitted. In the multivariate model, it was observed that the variables associated with readmission were polypharmacy (OR: 1.86; CI: 1.2-2.9) and fall history prior to admission (OR: 0.586; CI: 0.36-2-88). Patients treated by a Continuity of Care Nurse are over 80 years, with comorbidities, geriatric syndromes, complex care, and of life needs, to whom an alternative solution to hospitalization is provided, thus preventing readmissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Care Continuity in Day Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renholm, Marja; Suominen, Tarja; Puukka, Pauli; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-12-01

    The increase in day surgery has brought about a significant change in patient care and care continuity. The purpose of this study was to analyze nurses' perceptions of the realization of continuity of care in day surgery. Continuity of care is examined from the perspectives of time, flow, co-ordination flow, caring relationship flow, and information flow. Descriptive study. A questionnaire including demographics and questions about continuity of care was completed by 83 of the 120 eligible nurses (response rate, 69%) in one hospital district in Finland. According to the nurses, continuity of patient care is mostly well realized. On the day of surgery, information flow was the domain that was best realized. In the opinion of the nurses, continuity of care was least realized at home before surgery and at home during the period after surgery. Based on nurses' perceptions, continuity of care was relatively well realized. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of peri-operative care in colorectal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kornmann, V.N.N.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is an important health issue, and colorectal surgery is increasingly being performed. During the last years, quality and safety of care, new surgical techniques and attention for peri-operative risks resulted in reduction of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Despite these improvements, complications still occur. The aim of this thesis was to gain more insight in optimization of peri-operative care in colorectal surgery. Four main subjects were discussed in the presented...

  12. Primary care physician decision making regarding referral for bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Hepp, Nicola; Juhl, Anna Julie Aavild

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity. It results in significant and sustained weight loss and reduces obesity-related co-morbidities. Despite an increasing prevalence of severe obesity, the number of bariatric operations performed in Denmark has decreased...... during the past years. This is only partly explained by changes in the national guidelines for bariatric surgery. The purpose of the cross-sectional study is to investigate referral patterns and possible reservations regarding bariatric surgery among Danish primary care physicians (PCPs). Setting......: Primary care physicians in Denmark. Methods: A total of 300 Danish PCPs were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey regarding experiences with bariatric surgery, reservations about bariatric surgery, attitudes to specific patient cases, and the future treatment of severe obesity. Most questions...

  13. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type, operative time, blood loss, and drainage time were independent predictors of acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  14. RIFLE criteria for acute kidney injury in valvular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, Luca Salvatore; Romano, Gianpaolo; Galdieri, Nicola; Buonocore, Marianna; Bancone, Ciro; De Simone, Vincenzo; Della Corte, Alessandro; Nappi, Gianantonio

    2010-01-01

    The RIFLE classification, which defines three grades of increasing severity of acute kidney injury--risk (RIFLE R), injury (RIFLE I) and failure (RIFLE F), and two outcome classes (L, loss) and E (end-stage kidney disease)--represents a valuable method for evaluating acute renal failure. Risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) according to the RIFLE criteria and for operative mortality were identified in patients undergoing valvular procedures. A single-center prospective cohort study of 1424 patients who were not receiving renal replacement therapy preoperatively was conducted between January 2004 and December 2007. A total of 100 variables was collected from each patient. The main features were: mean age 61.9 +/- 12.9 years (range: 15-88 years), 47% females, 6% endocarditis, 11% redo surgery, 8% urgent/emergent surgery, 30% combined procedures, 5% complex, and 16% associated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The overall AKI prevalence was 10%, with RIFLE scores of I or F being detected in 8% and continuous veno-venous hemofiltration being required in 5%. Risk factors for AKI were age (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.14-4.15), time of extracorporeal circulation (ECC) (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.005-1.013), redo procedure (OR 2.35; 95% CI 1.42-3.8), chronic kidney disease (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.6-6.1), and blood transfusion (OR 3.8; 95% CI 2.5-6.5). The transfusion of leukodepleted blood exerted a protective effect on AKI development (OR 0.6; 95% CI 0.4-0.9). The average overall hospital mortality was 4.8%. Risk factors for operative mortality included: ECC time (OR 1; 95% CI 1.002-1.014), age (OR 1.043; 95% CI 1.01-1.07), chronic kidney disease (OR 4.8; 95% CI 2.2-10.6), blood transfusion (OR 6.43; 95% CI 2.8-14.7), surgical priority (OR 6.5; 95% CI 2.8-14.7), RIFLE class I (OR 11.9; 95% CI 5.5-25.7), and RIFLE class F (OR 30; 95% CI 8.1-111.7). Mortality increased with each RIFLE stratification (Normal 1.7%, RIFLE R = 4.1%, RR = 2.5; RIFLE I = 27.6%, RR = 16.2; and RIFLE F = 43

  15. Prognostic Implications of Acute Renal Failure after Surgery for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Fabrizio; Morgante, Alessandro; Ceresa, Fabrizio; Salamone, Giovanni; Patanè, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    "Type A" acute aortic dissection (AAAD) is the most challenging among the emergency operations in cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the role of acute renal failure (ARF) in postoperative survival of patients operated for AAAD. From February 2010 to April 2012, 37 consecutive patients were operated at our department for AAAD. We studied our population by subdividing the patients within groups according to the presence of ARF requiring continuous veno-venous hemofiltration (CVVH) and according to hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) times and degrees. The overall 30-day mortality was 27% (50% group A with ARF, 13% group B no ARF). Acute renal failure requiring CVVH was 37.8%. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant association with 30-day mortality (odds ratio 6.6 and p = 0.020). Preoperative oliguria [urine output less than 30 ml/h (odds ratio 4.7 p = 0.039)], CPB greater than 180 minutes (odds ratio 6.5 p = 0.023) and postoperative bleeding requiring a surgical reopening (odds ratio 12.2 and p = 0.021) were the variables significantly associated with acute kidney injury. The data obtained from our analysis bring out the high incidence of renal injuries after surgery for AAAD, and indicate a negative impact on renal injuries of a preoperative oliguria, longer Cardiopulmonary bypass (CBP)/HCA times, and postoperative bleeding requiring a surgical revision. Our data also suggest a better 30-day survival and better renal outcomes in case of shorter HCA and lesser degree of hypothermia. The option of lesser and shorter hypothermia may be very useful, especially for the elderly patients and octogenarians.

  16. Urinary protein profiles in ketorolac-associated acute kidney injury in patients undergoing orthopedic day surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Mariano,1 Chiara Cogno,1 Fulvia Giaretta,2,3 Ilaria Deambrosis,2,3 Simona Pozza,4 Maurizio Berardino,5 Giuseppe Massazza,6 Luigi Biancone1,3 1Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Nephrology, Dialysis and Transplantation Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 2Department of General and Specialist Medicine, Laboratory of Nephrology and Immunopathology, City of Health and Science, Molinette Hospital, Turin, 3Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, 4Department of Radiology and Radiotherapy, CTO Radiology, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 5Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care 5, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, Turin, 6Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Week Hospital Unit, City of Health and Science, CTO Hospital, and University of Turin, Turin, Italy Background: Parenteral administration of ketorolac is very effective in controlling postoperative pain for orthopedic surgery. Ketorolac can induce clinically relevant renal alterations in elderly patients, whereas its short course is considered safe for young adults with normal preoperative renal function. In this study, of a cohort of young adults undergoing elective orthopedic day surgery, we sought cases complicated by readmission due to acute kidney injury (AKI.Patients and methods: Among 1397 young adults, aged 18–32 years who were admitted to undergo orthopedic day surgery from 2013 to 2015, four patients (0.29%, three males/one female treated in postprocedure with ketorolac (from 60 to 90 mg/day for 1–2 days were readmitted for suspected severe AKI. We evaluated functional outcome, urinary protein profiles and kidney biopsy (1 patient.Results: After day surgery discharge, they experienced gastrointestinal disturbances, flank pain and fever. Readmitted on post-surgery days 3–4, they presented with oliguric AKI (creatinine range 158.4–466.4 µmol/L and

  17. The Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Tazuma, Susumu; Furukawa, Akira; Nishii, Osamu; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Azuhata, Takeo; Itakura, Atsuo; Kamei, Seiji; Kondo, Hiroshi; Maeda, Shigenobu; Mihara, Hiroshi; Mizooka, Masafumi; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Obara, Hideaki; Sato, Norio; Takayama, Yuichi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Miyata, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Izumi; Honda, Hiroshi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Since acute abdomen requires accurate diagnosis and treatment within a particular time limit to prevent mortality, the Japanese Society for Abdominal Emergency Medicine in collaboration with four other medical societies launched the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen that were the first English guidelines in the world for the management of acute abdomen. Here we provide the highlights of these guidelines [all clinical questions (CQs) and recommendations are shown in supplementary information]. A systematic and comprehensive evaluation of the evidence for epidemiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and primary treatment for acute abdomen was performed to develop the Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015. Because many types of pathophysiological events underlie acute abdomen, these guidelines cover the primary care of adult patients with nontraumatic acute abdomen. A total of 108 questions based on 9 subject areas were used to compile 113 recommendations. The subject areas included definition, epidemiology, history taking, physical examination, laboratory test, imaging studies, differential diagnosis, initial treatment, and education. Japanese medical circumstances were considered for grading the recommendations to assure useful information. The two-step methods for the initial management of acute abdomen were proposed. Early use of transfusion and analgesia, particularly intravenous acetaminophen, were recommended. The Practice Guidelines for Primary Care of Acute Abdomen 2015 have been prepared as the first evidence-based guidelines for the management of acute abdomen. We hope that these guidelines contribute to clinical practice and improve the primary care and prognosis of patients with acute abdomen.

  18. Revisiting acute normovolemic hemodilution and blood transfusion during pediatric cardiac surgery: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Roby; Ratliff, Todd; Winch, Peter D; Tumin, Dmitry; Gomez, Daniel; Tobias, Joseph; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen N

    2017-01-01

    The majority of allogeneic transfusions occur in the perioperative setting, especially during cardiac surgery. In addition to the economic implications, there is emerging evidence that blood transfusion may increase both morbidity and mortality. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) may limit the need for blood products. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the method of blood collection (syringe or bag) during the ANH process impacted the platelet count and function. The secondary objectives included the need for perioperative blood transfusions during the procedure and in the intensive care unit. In addition, we assessed these outcomes' associations with ANH parameters including the method of collection, time of storage, and volume removed. Data were collected prospectively from 50 patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass over a 6-month period. Platelet count and function were measured for the ANH blood immediately after collection and again prior to transfusing to the patient at the end of cardiopulmonary bypass. Other data collected included ANH volume, length of storage, and the quantity of all blood products given throughout the perioperative period. No change in platelet count or function was noted regardless of the length of time or collection method for the ANH blood. Twenty-three patients received blood or blood products in the operating room or the intensive care unit, while 27 patients received no blood transfusion during their entire hospitalization. Higher ANH volume (ml·kg -1 ) and longer storage time were associated with a greater need for intraoperative transfusions. Acute normovolemic hemodilution protects the platelets from the untoward effects of cardiopulmonary bypass and offers an important autologous blood product that improves hemostasis at the conclusion of surgery. Platelet count and function are preserved regardless of the method of collection or the length of storage. The volume of ANH removed

  19. Intensive Care Management of Pediatric Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfi, Riad; Abulebda, Kamal; Nitu, Mara E; Molleston, Jean P; Bozic, Molly A; Subbarao, Girish

    2017-05-01

    Pediatric acute liver failure is rare but life-threatening illness that occurs in children without preexisting liver disease. The rarity of the disease, along with its severity and heterogeneity, presents unique clinical challenges to the physicians providing care for pediatric patients with acute liver failure. In this review, practical clinical approaches to the care of critically ill children with acute liver failure are discussed with an organ system-specific approach. The underlying pathophysiological processes, major areas of uncertainty, and approaches to the critical care management of pediatric acute liver failure are also reviewed.

  20. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... postoperative intermediate care after emergency abdominal surgery, the InCare trial. DESIGN: A qualitative study with individual semi-structured interviews. METHODS: We analysed interviews using Systematic Text Condensation. RESULTS: Eighteen patients (nine intervention/nine controls) were strategically sampled...... from the InCare trial. Data analysis resulted in three distinct descriptions of intermediate care; two of standard surgical ward care. Intermediate care was described as 'luxury service' or 'a life saver.' The latter description was prevalent among patients with a perceived complicated disease course...

  1. Geriatric patient profile in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhan, Esra Akin; Hakverdioglu, Gulendam; Ozlem, Maryem; Ozlem, Maryem; Yurekli, Ismail; Gurbuz, Ali; Alp, Nilgun Akalin

    2013-11-01

    To determine hospitalization durations and mortalities of elderly in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit. The retrospective study was conducted in a Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit in Turkey and comprised patient records from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Computerized epicrisis reports of 255, who had undergone a cardiac surgery were collected. The patients were grouped according to their ages, Group I aged 65-74 and Group II aged 75 and older. European society for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation scores of the two groups were compared using SPSS 17. Overall, there were 80 (31.37%) females and 175 (68.62%) males. There were 138 (54.1%) patients in Group I and 117 (45.9%) in Group II. Regarding their hospitalization reasons, it was determined that 70 (27.5%) patients in Group I and 79 (30.9%) patients in Group II were treated with the diagnosis ofcoronary artery disease. The average hospitalization duration of patients in the intensive care unit was determined to be 11.57 +/- 0.40 days. Regarding the EuroSCORE score intervals of patients, 132 (51.8%) had 3-5 and 225 (88.2%) patients were transferred to the Cardiovascular Surgery and then all of them were discharged; 5 (4.1%) had a mortal course; and 11 (7.7%) were transferred to the anaesthesia intensive care unit. The general mortality rates are very low in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit and the patients have a good prognosis.

  2. Acute care in Tanzania: Epidemiology of acute care in a small community medical centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Little

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: Respiratory infections, malaria, and skin or soft tissue infections are leading reasons for seeking medical care at a small community medical centre in Arusha, Tanzania, highlighting the burden of infectious diseases in this type of facility. Males may be more likely to present with trauma, burns, and laceration injuries than females. Many patients required one or no procedures to determine their diagnosis, most treatments administered were inexpensive, and most patients were discharged home, suggesting that providing acute care in this setting could be accomplished with limited resources.

  3. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlene Johnson Stoklossa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain.

  4. Acute kidney injury is independently associated with higher mortality after cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandler, Kristian; Jensen, Mathias E; Nilsson, Jens C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery and its association with mortality in a patient population receiving ibuprofen and gentamicin perioperatively. DESIGN: Retrospective study with Cox regression analysis to control for possible preoperative......, intraoperative and postoperative confounders. SETTING: University hospital-based single-center study. PARTICIPANTS: All patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting ± valve surgery during 2012. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Acute surgery within 24 hours of coronary angiography.......21-4.51, p = 0.011) and 5.62 (95% CI: 2.42-13.06), psurgery developed AKI in this contemporary cohort. Furthermore, acute kidney injury was an independent...

  5. [An experience of taking care of an adolescent spinal surgery patient suffering from scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-O; Tang, Yu-Ying; Shi, Shu-Feng; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2005-12-01

    This case report describes the experience of taking care of an adolescent (nineteen year-old) girl, who needed spinal surgical treatment because of scoliosis. The author assessed the patient's condition by observation, interview, and the Gordon 11-item functional health pattern assessment guide. Because she had had no previous surgical experience, and faced changes in her bodily appearance, the adolescent had physical and psychological problems, such as acute pain, self-care deficit, anxiety, and body image disturbance. Besides applying professional knowledge and technical ability, to alleviate the discomfort caused by the young lady's surgery, the author used caring, listening and empathy to encourage and support her in learning self-care, to accept her change in body image, and to overcome the impact of the disease. Through this nursing process, the author came to understand that nurses must concern themselves with both physical problems and mental needs in order to provide holistic health care.

  6. Perioperative antibiotics for prevention of acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Emily W; Lindsley, Kristina; Tulenko, Samantha E; Nanji, Afshan A; Leyngold, Ilya; McDonnell, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Background Endophthalmitis is a severe inflammation of the anterior or posterior (or both) chambers of the eye that may be sterile or associated with infection. It is a potentially vision-threatening complication of cataract surgery. Prophylactic measures for endophthalmitis are targeted against various sources of infection. Objectives To evaluate the effects of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for endophthalmitis following cataract surgery compared with no prophylaxis or other form of prophylaxis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 12), Ovid MEDLINE, Epub Ahead of Print, In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily (January 1946 to December 2016), Embase (January 1980 to December 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (1982 to December 2016),the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We used no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 6 December 2016. We also searched for additional studies that cited any included trials using the Science Citation Index. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that enrolled adults undergoing cataract surgery (any method and incision type) for lens opacities due to any origin. We included trials that evaluated preoperative antibiotics, intraoperative (intracameral, subconjunctival or systemic), or postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for acute endophthalmitis. We excluded studies that evaluated antiseptic preoperative preparations using agents such as povidone iodine or antibiotics for treating acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently reviewed abstracts and

  7. Consensus statement on anaesthesia for day care surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of day-care surgery units is to allow for early recovery of the patients so that they can return to their familiar 'home' environment; the management hence should be focused towards achieving these ends. The benefits could include a possible reduction in the risk of thromboembolism and hospital-acquired infections. Furthermore, day-care surgery is believed to reduce the average unit cost of treatment by up to 70% as compared to inpatient surgery. With more than 20% of the world's disease burden, India only has 6% of the world's hospital beds. Hence, there is an immense opportunity for expansion in day-care surgery in India to ensure faster and safer, cost-effective patient turnover. For this to happen, there is a need of change in the mindset of all concerned clinicians, surgeons, anaesthesiologists and even the patients. A group of nine senior consultants from various parts of India, a mix of private and government anaesthesiologists, assembled in Mumbai and deliberated and discussed on the various aspects of day-care surgery. They formulated a consensus statement, the first of its kind in the Indian scenario, which can act as a guidance and tool for day-care anaesthesia in India. The statements are derived from the available published evidence in peer-reviewed literature including guidelines of several bodies such as the American Society of Anesthesiologists, British Association of Day Surgery and International Association of Ambulatory Surgery. The authors also offer interpretive comments wherever such evidence is inadequate or contradictory.

  8. Specialized care for women pregnant after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Amy A; Barger, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Growing numbers of women today will seek bariatric surgery before pregnancy. Protein-calorie malnutrition; hyperemesis; intestinal hernias; dumping syndrome; anemia; and deficiencies in calcium, folic acid, and vitamins B12, D, and K are all possible complications that can impact pregnancy. This article reviews the nutritional and pregnancy-related consequences of current surgical procedures and summarizes existing research showing positive and negative effects of weight-loss surgery on pregnancy outcomes. Practice-based clinical recommendations will help guide clinicians caring for the increasing number of women who become pregnant after having bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Intensive Care Unit

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    Juan C. Grignola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the left ventricle in ICU patients with circulatory shock has long been considered. However, acute right ventricle (RV dysfunction causes and aggravates many common critical diseases (acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and postoperative cardiac surgery. Several supportive therapies, including mechanical ventilation and fluid management, can make RV dysfunction worse, potentially exacerbating shock. We briefly review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and recommendations to guide management of acute RV dysfunction in ICU patients. Our aim is to clarify the complex effects of mechanical ventilation, fluid therapy, vasoactive drug infusions, and other therapies to resuscitate the critical patient optimally.

  10. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  11. Acute mediastinitis: multidetector computed tomography findings following cardiac surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Clarissa Aguiar de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto do Coracao (InCor)]. E-mail: clarissaaguiarm@yahoo.com.br; Baena, Marcos Eduardo da Silva [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Ultrasonography; Uezumi, Kiyomi Kato [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Computed Tomography; Castro, Claudio Campi de [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Unit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Lucarelli, Claudio Luiz [Instituto do Coracao (InCor), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Center of Diagnosis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Radiology

    2008-07-15

    Postoperative mediastinitis is defined as an infection of the organs and tissues in the mediastinal space, with an incidence ranging between 0.4% and 5% of cases. This disease severity varies from infection of superficial tissues in the chest wall to fulminant mediastinitis with sternal involvement. Diagnostic criterion for postoperative detection of acute mediastinitis at computed tomography is the presence of fluid collections and gas in the mediastinal space, which might or might not be associated with peristernal abnormalities such as edema of soft tissues, separation of sternal segments with marginal bone resorption, sclerosis and osteomyelitis. Other associated findings include lymphadenomegaly, pulmonary consolidation and pleural/ pericardial effusion. Some of these findings, such as mediastinal gas and small fluid collections can be typically found in the absence of infection, early in the period following thoracic surgery where the effectiveness of computed tomography is limited. After approximately two weeks, computed tomography achieves almost 100% sensitivity and specificity. Patients with clinical suspicion of mediastinitis should be submitted to computed tomography for investigating the presence of fluid collections to identify the extent and nature of the disease. Multidetector computed tomography allows 3D images reconstruction, contributing particularly to the evaluation of the sternum. (author)

  12. Prediction and Prevention of Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Rin Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery (CS-AKI ranges from 33% to 94% and is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The etiology is suggested to be multifactorial and related to almost all aspects of perioperative management. Numerous studies have reported the risk factors and risk scores and novel biomarkers of AKI have been investigated to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of AKI. Based on the known independent risk factors, many preventive interventions to reduce the risk of CS-AKI have been tested. However, any single preventive intervention did not show a definite and persistent benefit to reduce the incidence of CS-AKI. Goal-directed therapy has been considered to be a preventive strategy with a substantial level of efficacy. Many pharmacologic agents were tested for any benefit to treat or prevent CS-AKI but the results were conflicting and evidences are still lacking. The present review will summarize the current updated evidences about the risk factors and preventive strategies for CS-AKI.

  13. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hospital and Ranson score. There was no statistic difference between the two groups (A: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery acute pancreatitis after last surgery > 0.5 year) in pathogenetic condition and length of stay in hospital. All patients were discharged after treatment, a follow-up of 6-18 months found no recurrence of pancreatitis. There is no relevance between the treatment feature and onset interval of biliary and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. The disease is still treated meanly with symptomatic and supportive treatment, while the etiological treatment is also particularly important.

  14. Standard guidelines of care for acne surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khunger Niti

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Acne surgery is the use of various surgical procedures for the treatment of postacne scarring and also, as adjuvant treatment for active acne. Surgery is indicated both in active acne and post-acne scars. Physicians′ qualifications: Any Dermatologist can perform most acne surgery techniques as these are usually taught during postgraduation. However, certain techniques such as dermabrasion, laser resurfacing, scar revisions need specific "hands-on" training in appropriate training centers. Facility: Most acne surgery procedures can be performed in a physician′s minor procedure room. However, full-face dermabrasion and laser resurfacing need an operation theatre in a hospital setting. Active acne: Surgical treatment is only an adjunct to medical therapy, which remains the mainstay of treatment. Comedone extraction is a process of applying simple mechanical pressure with a comedone extractor, to extract the contents of the blocked pilosebaceous follicle. Superficial chemical peel is a process of applying a chemical agent to the skin, so as to cause controlled destruction of the epidermis leading to exfoliation. Glycolic acid, salicylic acid and trichloroacetic acid are commonly used peeling agents for the treatment of active acne and superficial acne scars. Cryotherapy: Cryoslush and cryopeel are used for the treatment of nodulocystic acne. Intralesional corticosteroids are indicated for the treatment of nodules, cysts and keloidal acne scars. Nonablative lasers and light therapy using Blue light, non ablative radiofrequency, Nd:YAG laser, IPL (Intense Pulsed Light, PDT (Photodynamic Therapy, pulse dye laser and light and heat energy machines have been used in recent years for the treatment of active inflammatory acne and superficial acne scars. Proper counseling is very important in the treatment of acne scars. Treatment depends on the type of acne scars; a patient may need more than one type of treatment. Subcision is a treatment to break the

  15. Effects of a surgical ward care protocol following open colon surgery as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, BoYeoul; Park, SungHee; Park, KyuJoo; Ryoo, SeungBum

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a standardised care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme on the management of patients who underwent open colon surgery at the University Hospital, South Korea. Patients who undergo open colon surgery often have concerns about their care as they prepare for hospitalisation. By shortening hospital stay lengths, enhanced recovery after surgery programmes could reduce the number of opportunities for patient education and communication with nurses. Therefore, our surgical team developed an enhanced recovery after surgery programme, applied using a care protocol for patients with colorectal cancer, that spans the entire recovery process. A retrospective, comparative study was conducted using a care protocol as part of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme. Comparisons were made before and after the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol. Records of 219 patients who underwent open colon surgery were retrospectively audited. The records were grouped according to the care protocol used (enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol or traditional care programme). The outcomes, including postoperative bowel function recovery, postoperative pain control, recovery time and postoperative complications, were compared between two categories. Patients who were managed using the programme with a care protocol had shorter hospital stays, fewer complications, such as postoperative ileus wound infections, and emergency room visits than those who were managed using the traditional care programme. The findings can be used to facilitate the implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery programme with a care protocol following open colon surgery. We present a care protocol that enables effective management using consistent and standardised education providing bedside care for patients who undergo open colon surgery. This care protocol empowers long

  16. Acute intraoperative effect of intravenous amiodarone on right ventricular function in patients undergoing valvular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denault, André Y; Beaulieu, Yanick; Couture, Pierre; Haddad, Francois; Shi, Yanfen; Pagé, Pierre; Levesque, Sylvie; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lambert, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Amiodarone is commonly used in the acute care setting. However the acute hemodynamic and echocardiographic effect of intravenous amiodarone administered intraoperatively on right ventricular (RV) systolic and diastolic function using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has not been described. The study design was a randomized controlled trial in elective cardiac surgical patients undergoing valvular surgery. Patients received an intravenous loading dose of 300 mg of either amiodarone or placebo in the operating room, followed by an infusion of 15 mg/kg for two days. Hemodynamic profiles, echocardiographic measurement of RV and left ventricular (LV) dimensions, Doppler interrogation of tricuspid and mitral valve, hepatic and pulmonary venous flow combined with tissue Doppler imaging of the tricuspid and mitral valve annulus were obtained before and after bolus. Although more patients in the placebo group had chronic obstructive lung disease (14 vs 6, p=0.05) and diabetes (14 vs 5; p=0.0244), there was no difference in terms of baseline hemodynamic, 2D and Doppler variables. After bolus, a significant increase in pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index (pAcute administration of amiodarone is associated with alteration in RV diastolic properties and has minimal negative inotropic effect on RV systolic function in cardiac surgical patients with valvular disease. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  17. Risk of Recurrent Disease and Surgery Following an Admission for Acute Diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Charlotte; Radley, Simon; Mytton, Jemma; Evison, Felicity; Ward, Stephen T

    2018-03-01

    Diverticular disease accounts for significant morbidity and mortality and may take the form of recurrent episodes of acute diverticulitis. The role of elective surgery is not clearly defined. This study aimed to define the rate of hospital admission for recurrent acute diverticulitis and risk factors associated with recurrence and surgery. This is a retrospective population-based cohort study. National Health Service hospital admissions for acute diverticulitis in England between April 2006 and March 2011 were reviewed. Hospital Episode Statistics data identified adult patients with the first episode of acute diverticulitis (index admission), and then identified recurrent admissions and elective or emergency surgery for acute diverticulitis during a minimum follow-up period of 4 years. Exclusion criteria included previous diagnoses of acute diverticulitis, colorectal cancer, or GI bleeding, and prior colectomy or surgery or death during the index admission. There were no interventions. The primary outcomes measured were recurrent admissions for acute diverticulitis and patients requiring either elective or emergency surgery during the study period. Some 65,162 patients were identified with the first episode of acute diverticulitis. The rate of hospital admission for recurrent acute diverticulitis was 11.2%. A logistic regression model examined factors associated with recurrent acute diverticulitis and surgery: patient age, female sex, smoking, obesity, comorbidity score >20, dyslipidemia, and complicated acute diverticulitis increased the risk of recurrent acute diverticulitis. There was an inverse relationship between patient age and recurrence. Similar factors were associated with elective and emergency surgery. The cases of acute diverticulitis required inpatient management and the use of Hospital Episode Statistics, relying on the accuracy of diagnostic coding. This is the largest study assessing the rates of hospital admission for recurrent acute

  18. A comparative study of four intensive care outcome prediction models in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Fabian; Badreldin, Akmal Ma; Heldwein, Matthias B; Bossert, Torsten; Richter, Markus; Lehmann, Thomas; Bayer, Ole; Hekmat, Khosro

    2011-03-01

    Outcome prediction scoring systems are increasingly used in intensive care medicine, but most were not developed for use in cardiac surgery patients. We compared the performance of four intensive care outcome prediction scoring systems (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II], Simplified Acute Physiology Score II [SAPS II], Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], and Cardiac Surgery Score [CASUS]) in patients after open heart surgery. We prospectively included all consecutive adult patients who underwent open heart surgery and were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between January 1st 2007 and December 31st 2008. Scores were calculated daily from ICU admission until discharge. The outcome measure was ICU mortality. The performance of the four scores was assessed by calibration and discrimination statistics. Derived variables (Mean- and Max- scores) were also evaluated. During the study period, 2801 patients (29.6% female) were included. Mean age was 66.9 ± 10.7 years and the ICU mortality rate was 5.2%. Calibration tests for SOFA and CASUS were reliable throughout (p-value not predicted and observed outcome for SAPS II (days 1, 2, 3 and 5) and APACHE II (days 2 and 3). CASUS, and its mean- and maximum-derivatives, discriminated better between survivors and non-survivors than the other scores throughout the study (area under curve ≥ 0.90). In order of best discrimination, CASUS was followed by SOFA, then SAPS II, and finally APACHE II. SAPS II and APACHE II derivatives had discrimination results that were superior to those of the SOFA derivatives. CASUS and SOFA are reliable ICU mortality risk stratification models for cardiac surgery patients. SAPS II and APACHE II did not perform well in terms of calibration and discrimination statistics.

  19. Curative effect of surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Luo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage can improve neural nutritional status and reduce nerve injury degree, and it is beneficial to the recovery of neural function.

  20. Focus assessed transthoracic echocardiography for preoperative assessment in patients scheduled for acute surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Frederiksen, C.A.; Lauridsen Vang, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    of cardiopulmonary function by visualisation of the heart and pleura. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of unexpected cardio-pulmonary pathology by FATE in unselected patients scheduled for acute surgery. Patients and methods: Patients scheduled for acute orthopaedic or abdominal surgery...... were recorded. After the routine preoperative assessment these were reported to the anaesthetist responsible for the anaesthesia.Whether or not this led to changes in the perioperative management was registered. Results: 112 patients scheduled for acute surgery were included. Mean age was 62 years (57......% of the patients with unexpected pathology. All findings that lead to a change in management occurred in patients above the age of 60 and/or in ASA group 3. Conclusion: In an unselected population of patients scheduled for acute surgery, we found a high number of patients with unexpected pathology by FATE leading...

  1. Two acute kidney injury risk scores for critically ill cancer patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xue-Zhong; Wang, Hai-Jun; Huang, Chu-Lin; Yang, Quan-Hui; Qu, Shi-Ning; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Gao, Yong; Xiao, Qing-Ling; Sun, Ke-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Several risk scoures have been used in predicting acute kidney injury (AKI) of patients undergoing general or specific operations such as cardiac surgery. This study aimed to evaluate the use of two AKI risk scores in patients who underwent non-cardiac surgery but required intensive care. The clinical data of patients who had been admitted to ICU during the first 24 hours of ICU stay between September 2009 and August 2010 at the Cancer Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College were retrospectively collected and analyzed. AKI was diagnosed based on the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria. Two AKI risk scores were calculated: Kheterpal and Abelha factors. The incidence of AKI was 10.3%. Patients who developed AKI had a increased ICU mortality of 10.9% vs. 1.0% and an in-hospital mortality of 13.0 vs. 1.5%, compared with those without AKI. There was a significant difference between the classification of Kheterpal's AKI risk scores and the occurrence of AKI (PAbelha's AKI risk scores and the occurrence of AKI (P=0.499). Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.655±0.043 (P=0.001, 95% confidence interval: 0.571-0.739) for Kheterpal's AKI risk score and 0.507±0.044 (P=0.879, 95% confidence interval: 0.422-0.592) for Abelha's AKI risk score. Kheterpal's AKI risk scores are more accurate than Abelha's AKI risk scores in predicting the occurrence of AKI in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery with moderate predictive capability.

  2. Understanding the bereavement care roles of nurses within acute care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Anita; Lee, Susan F; Bloomer, Melissa J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate nurses' roles and responsibilities in providing bereavement care during the care of dying patients within acute care hospitals. Bereavement within acute care hospitals is often sudden, unexpected and managed by nurses who may have limited access to experts. Nurses' roles and experience in the provision of bereavement care can have a significant influence on the subsequent bereavement process for families. Identifying the roles and responsibilities, nurses have in bereavement care will enhance bereavement supports within acute care environments. Mixed-methods systematic review. The review was conducted using the databases Cumulative Index Nursing and Allied Health Literature Plus, Embase, Ovid MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CareSearch and Google Scholar. Included studies published between 2006-2015, identified nurse participants, and the studies were conducted in acute care hospitals. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and the research results were extracted and subjected to thematic synthesis. Nurses' role in bereavement care included patient-centred care, family-centred care, advocacy and professional development. Concerns about bereavement roles included competing clinical workload demands, limitations of physical environments in acute care hospitals and the need for further education in bereavement care. Further research is needed to enable more detailed clarification of the roles nurse undertake in bereavement care in acute care hospitals. There is also a need to evaluate the effectiveness of these nursing roles and how these provisions impact on the bereavement process of patients and families. The care provided by acute care nurses to patients and families during end-of-life care is crucial to bereavement. The bereavement roles nurses undertake are not well understood with limited evidence of how these roles are measured. Further education in bereavement care is needed for acute care nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Generational differences in acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widger, Kimberley; Pye, Christine; Cranley, Lisa; Wilson-Keates, Barbara; Squires, Mae; Tourangeau, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Generational differences in values, expectations and perceptions of work have been proposed as one basis for problems and solutions in recruitment and retention of nurses. This study used a descriptive design. A sample of 8207 registered nurses and registered practical nurses working in Ontario, Canada, acute care hospitals who responded to the Ontario Nurse Survey in 2003 were included in this study. Respondents were categorized as Baby Boomers, Generation X or Generation Y based on their birth year. Differences in responses among these three generations to questions about their own characteristics, employment circumstances, work environment and responses to the work environment were explored. There were statistically significant differences among the generations. Baby Boomers primarily worked full-time day shifts. Gen Y tended to be employed in teaching hospitals; Boomers worked more commonly in community hospitals. Baby Boomers were generally more satisfied with their jobs than Gen X or Gen Y nurses. Gen Y had the largest proportion of nurses with high levels of burnout in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Baby Boomers had the largest proportion of nurses with low levels of burnout. Nurse managers may be able to capitalize on differences in generational values and needs in designing appropriate interventions to enhance recruitment and retention of nurses.

  4. Integrating technical and non-technical skills coaching in an acute trauma surgery team training: Is it too much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alken, Alexander; Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Weenk, Mariska; Yauw, Simon; Fluit, Cornelia; van Goor, Harry

    2017-08-25

    Research on effective integration of technical and non-technical skills in surgery team training is sparse. In a previous study we found that surgical teachers predominantly coached on technical and hardly on non-technical skills during the Definitive Surgical and Anesthetic Trauma Care (DSATC) integrated acute trauma surgery team training. This study aims to investigate whether the priming of teachers could increase the amount of non-technical skills coaching during such a training. Coaching activities of 12 surgical teachers were recorded on audio and video. Six teachers were primed on non-technical skills coaching prior to the training. Six others received no priming and served as controls. Blind observers reviewed the recordings of 2 training scenario's and scored whether the observed behaviors were directed on technical or non-technical skills. We compared the frequency of the non-technical skills coaching between the primed and the non-primed teachers and analyzed for differences according to the trainees' level of experience. Surgical teachers coached trainees during the highly realistic DSATC integrated acute trauma surgery team training. Trainees performed damage control surgery in operating teams on anesthetized porcine models during 6 training scenario's. Twelve experienced surgical teachers participated in this study. Coaching on non-technical skills was limited to about 5%. The primed teachers did not coach more often on non-technical skills than the non-primed teachers. We found no differences in the frequency of non-technical skills coaching based on the trainees' level of experience. Priming experienced surgical teachers does not increase the coaching on non-technical skills. The current DSATC acute trauma surgery team training seems too complex for integrating training on technical and non-technical skills. Patient care, Practice based learning and improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Psychopathology after cardiac surgery and intensive care treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis, the occurrence of stress-related psychopathology after cardiac surgery and intensive care treatment is assessed. We primarily focused on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptomatology, but the effects of benzodiazepine administration, delirium, anxiety, and

  6. Take Care of Yourself After an Amputation or Other Surgery

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This podcast provides health information for amputees on how to take care of yourself after an amputation or other surgery.  Created: 2/18/2010 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disability, Disability and Health Program.   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  7. Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni

    2018-01-01

    , the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region....../area. This update emphasises cardiologist training, referring to the recently updated Acute Cardiovascular Care Association core curriculum on acute cardiovascular care. The training of nurses in acute cardiovascular care is additionally addressed. Intensive cardiovascular care unit expertise is not limited......Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper...

  8. Geriatric patient profile in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korha, E.A.; Hakverdioglu, G.; Ozlem, M.; Yurekli, I.; Gurbuz, A.; Alp, N.A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine hospitalization durations and mortalities of elderly in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted in a Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit in Turkey and comprised patient records from January 1 to December 31, 2011. Computerized epicrisis reports of 255, who had undergone a cardiac surgery were collected. The patients were grouped according to their ages, Group I aged 65-74 and Group II aged 75 and older. European society for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation scores of the two groups were compared using SPSS 17. Results: Overall, there were 80 (31.37%) females and 175 (68.62%) males. There were 138 (54.1%) patients in Group I and 117 (45.9%) in Group II. Regarding their hospitalization reasons, it was determined that 70 (27.5%) patients in Group I and 79 (30.9%) patients in Group II were treated with the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The average hospitalization duration of patients in the intensive care unit was determined to be 11.57+-10.40 days. Regarding the EuroSCORE score intervals of patients, 132 (51.8%)had 3-5 and 225 (88.2%) patients were transferred to the Cardiovascular Surgery and then all of them were discharged; 5 (4.1%) had a mortal course; and 11 (7.7%) were transferred to the anaesthesia intensive care unit Conclusions: The general mortality rates are very low in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit and the patients have a good prognosis. (author)

  9. Early Experience of Day Care Surgery in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR Singh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The day care laparoscopic cholecystectomy (DCLC is found to be safe and effective in developed countries. However, it has not been well accepted in our part of the world probably because of lack of infrastructures,established norms and published reports. We have analyzed the safety and feasibility of the procedure in the recently established first dedicated day care surgery centre of the country. METHODS: All the patients with American society of anaesthesiologist (ASA score I and II admitted for laparoscopic cholecystectomy are included. Operation are performed in the morning and closely observed till evening. Patients found to be medically fit to discharge; having a responsible person at home and who can make their own arrangements in case of problems were advised for discharge. Follow up was done by telephone call from next morning. RESULTS: Total 35 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Age range was between 16-65 years and most of them were females (88%. Only 30 patients were operated in early morning and were eligible for day care surgery. 25 (83% Patients were advised for discharge but only 10 (33% could make arrangement. Other 15 patients could not go home mainly due to different psychosocial reasons. Only one patient needed readmission and Complications observed were minor and relatively few. CONCLUSIONS: Day care laparoscopic cholecystectomy is safe and feasible in our set up. Acceptance of the procedure is expected to increase once it is regularly practiced and awareness in improved. Keywords: day care, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, surgery, Nepal.

  10. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based

  11. Medicare Post-Acute Care Episodes and Payment Bundling

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Published in Volume 4, Issue 1, of Medicare and Medicaid Research Review, this paper provides an overview of results examining alternative Medicare post-acute care...

  12. Improving access to oral surgery services in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Nick

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the innovative use of National Health Service (NHS) dental commissioning powers to develop specialist primary care based oral surgery services. The outcomes, after one full year of the scheme, have been substantial improvement in access and reduced waiting times for patients, further development of NHS primary care dental services through commissioning processes, increased use and engagement of oral surgery specialists outside of a hospital setting, and considerable ongoing savings to the NHS. Collaborative working between hospital consultants and managers, Primary Care Trust dental commissioners, general dental practice providers, specialist oral surgeons and a dental public health consultant has resulted in sustainable benefits to patients and the NHS within the World Class Commissioning framework.

  13. Attitudes of patients and care providers to enhanced recovery after surgery programs after major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Coolsen, Marielle M E; Aahlin, Eirik K; Harrison, Ewen M; McNally, Stephen J; Dejong, C H C; Lassen, Kristoffer; Wigmore, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) is a well-established pathway of perioperative care in surgery in an increasing number of specialties. To implement protocols and maintain high levels of compliance, continued support from care providers and patients is vital. This survey aimed to assess the perceptions of care providers and patients of the relevance and importance of the ERAS targets and strategies. Pre- and post-operative surveys were completed by patients who underwent major hepatic, colorectal, or oesophagogastric surgery in three major centers in Scotland, Norway, and The Netherlands. Anonymous web-based and article surveys were also sent to surgeons, anesthetists, and nurses experienced in delivering enhanced recovery protocols. Each questionnaire asked the responder to rate a selection of enhanced recovery targets and strategies in terms of perceived importance. One hundred nine patients and 57 care providers completed the preoperative survey. Overall, both patients and care providers rated the majority of items as important and supported ERAS principles. Freedom from nausea (median, 10; interquartile range [IQR], 8-10) and pain at rest (median, 10; IQR, 8-10) were the care components rated the highest by both patients and care providers. Early return of bowel function (median, 7; IQR, 5-8) and avoiding preanesthetic sedation (median, 6; IQR, 3.75-8) were scored the lowest by care providers. ERAS principles are supported by both patients and care providers. This is important when attempting to implement and maintain an ERAS program. Controversies still remain regarding the relative importance of individual ERAS components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Acute cholecystitis in cholelithiasis: importance of early surgery (a comparative study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, K; Meiser, G; Schwaiger, E

    1989-01-20

    The results of early surgery (ES) for acute calculous cholecystitis obtained in 74 patients operated on between 3/78 and 12/87 were compared with relevant data obtained in 74 sex- and age-matched patients with a history of acute cholecystitis operated on for biliary colic or jaundice during the same period. Operative procedures, incidence of jaundice and common bile duct calculi, duration of operation, number of patients requiring blood transfusions, surgical and general complications and mortality showed no significant difference. Only operative blood loss was significantly higher in the ES group, but this was of no practical relevance. ES precludes the sequelae of emergency surgery in the delayed surgery group not infrequently necessary for failure of conservative treatment of acute cholecystitis, which necessarily precedes planned delayed surgery, and thus renders a significant reduction of over-all risk. This forms the rationale for ES as treatment concept.

  15. Acute systemic inflammatory response after cardiac surgery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... pandemic, there have been various concerns about the operative risks, infections and benefits of cardiac surgery in patients infected with HIV, as they are known to al- ready have a compromised immune system, chronic in- flammation and reduced survival.1,2 This led to cardiac surgery departments setting ...

  16. Determining level of care appropriateness in the patient journey from acute care to rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashford Guy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The selection of patients for rehabilitation, and the timing of transfer from acute care, are important clinical decisions that impact on care quality and patient flow. This paper reports utilization review data on inpatients in acute care with stroke, hip fracture or elective joint replacement, and other inpatients referred for rehabilitation. It examines reasons why acute level of care criteria are not met and explores differences in decision making between acute care and rehabilitation teams around patient appropriateness and readiness for transfer. Methods Cohort study of patients in a large acute referral hospital in Australia followed with the InterQual utilization review tool, modified to also include reasons why utilization criteria are not met. Additional data on team decision making about appropriateness for rehabilitation, and readiness for transfer, were collected on a subset of patients. Results There were 696 episodes of care (7189 bed days. Days meeting acute level of care criteria were 56% (stroke, hip fracture and joint replacement patients and 33% (other patients, from the time of referral. Most inappropriate days in acute care were due to delays in processes/scheduling (45% or being more appropriate for rehabilitation or lower level of care (30%. On the subset of patients, the acute care team and the utilization review tool deemed patients ready for rehabilitation transfer earlier than the rehabilitation team (means of 1.4, 1.3 and 4.0 days from the date of referral, respectively. From when deemed medically stable for transfer by the acute care team, 28% of patients became unstable. From when deemed stable by the rehabilitation team or utilization review, 9% and 11%, respectively, became unstable. Conclusions A high proportion of patient days did not meet acute level of care criteria, due predominantly to inefficiencies in care processes, or to patients being more appropriate for an alternative level of

  17. Minimally invasive surgery in the era of step-up approach for treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morató, Olga; Poves, Ignasi; Ilzarbe, Lucas; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Vázquez-Sánchez, Antonia; Sánchez-Parrilla, Juan; Burdío, Fernando; Grande, Luís

    2018-03-01

    To assess the minimally invasive surgery into the step-up approach procedures as a standard treatment for severe acute pancreatitis and comparing its results with those obtained by classical management. Retrospective cohort study comparative with two groups treated over two consecutive, equal periods of time were defined: group A, classic management with open necrosectomy from January 2006 to June 2010; and group B, management with the step-up approach with minimally invasive surgery from July 2010 to December 2014. In group A, 83 patients with severe acute pancreatitis were treated, of whom 19 underwent at least one laparotomy, and in 5 any minimally invasive surgery. In group B, 81 patients were treated: minimally invasive surgery was necessary in 17 cases and laparotomy in 3. Among operated patients, the time from admission to first interventional procedures was significantly longer in group B (9 days vs. 18.5 days; p = 0.042). There were no significant differences in Intensive Care Unit stay or overall stay: 9.5 and 27 days (group A) vs. 8.5 and 21 days (group B). Mortality in operated patients and mortality overall were 50% and 18.1% in group A vs 0% and 6.2% in group B (p < 0.001 and p = 0.030). The combination of the step-up approach and minimally invasive surgery algorithm is feasible and could be considered as the standard of treatment for severe acute pancreatitis. The mortality rate deliberately descends when it is used. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric obesity in acute and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Andrea M

    2008-01-01

    Pediatric obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Significant obesity-related comorbidities are being noted at earlier ages and often have implications for the acute and critically ill child. This article will review the latest in epidemiologic trends of pediatric obesity and examine how it affects multisystem body organs. The latest data evaluating the specific effects of obesity on acute and critically ill children will be reviewed. Available nonpharmacologic, pharmacologic, and surgical strategies to combat pediatric obesity will be discussed.

  19. 78 FR 62506 - TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... nonadjunctive dental care or cosmetic surgery) but only if, the later complication represents a separate medical... TRICARE; Coverage of Care Related to Non-Covered Initial Surgery or Treatment AGENCY: Office of the...-covered surgery or treatment was necessary to assure adequate availability of health care to the Active...

  20. Building Care Bridges between Acute and Long-Term Care with Nursing Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carol A.

    The increasing age of the American population and the current emphasis on cost containment in health care make the 1980s an ideal time for building bridges to span the health care needs of elderly persons in acute care and long-term care. While hospitals often discharge patients to nursing homes as an intermediate step between hospitalization and…

  1. Implementation of an acute care emergency surgical service: a cost analysis from the surgeon’s perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha, Ram Venkatesh; Parry, Neil; Vogt, Kelly; Jain, Vipan; Crawford, Silvie; Leslie, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute care surgical services provide comprehensive emergency general surgical care while potentially using health care resources more efficiently. We assessed the volume and distribution of emergency general surgery (EGS) procedures before and after the implementation of the Acute Care and Emergency Surgery Service (ACCESS) at a Canadian tertiary care hospital and its effect on surgeon billings. Methods This single-centre retrospective case–control study compared adult patients who underwent EGS procedures between July and December 2009 (pre-ACCESS), to those who had surgery between July and December 2010 (post-ACCESS). Case distribution was compared between day (7 am to 3 pm), evening (3 pm to 11 pm) and night (11 pm to 7 am). Frequencies were compared using the χ2 test. Results Pre-ACCESS, 366 EGS procedures were performed: 24% during the day, 55% in the evening and 21% at night. Post-ACCESS, 463 operations were performed: 55% during the day, 36% in the evening and 9% at night. Reductions in night-time and evening EGS were 57% and 36% respectively (p laparotomies and cholecystectomies all declined by $67 190, $125 215, $66 362, and $84 913, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion Acute care surgical services have dramatically shifted EGS from nighttime to daytime. Cost-modelling analysis demonstrates that these services have cost-savings potential for the health care system without reducing overall surgeon billing. PMID:24666462

  2. Need for Intensive Nutrition Care After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétry, Cécile; Disse, Emmanuel; Chambrier, Cécile; Barnoud, Didier; Gelas, Patrick; Baubet, Sandrine; Laville, Martine; Pelascini, Elise; Robert, Maud

    2017-02-01

    Severe nutrition complications after bariatric surgery remain poorly described. The aim of this case series was to identify specific factors associated with nutrition complications after bariatric surgery and to characterize their nutrition disorders. We retrospectively reviewed all people referred to the clinical nutrition intensive care unit of our university hospital after bariatric surgery from January 2013 to June 2015. Twelve persons who required artificial nutrition supplies (ie, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition) were identified. Seven persons underwent a "one-anastomosis gastric bypass" (OAGB) or "mini gastric bypass," 2 underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 2 had a sleeve gastrectomy, and 1 had an adjustable gastric band. This case series suggests that OAGB could overexpose subjects to severe nutrition complications requiring intensive nutrition care and therefore cannot be considered a "mini" bariatric surgery. Even if OAGB is often considered a simplified surgical technique, it obviously requires as the other standard bariatric procedures a close follow-up by experimented teams aware of its specific complications.

  3. Assessment of emergency general surgery care based on formally developed quality indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Angela; Nathens, Avery; Peitzman, Andrew; Bode, Allison; Dorlac, Gina; Dorlac, Warren; Miller, Preston; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Wasserman, Deena D; Bilimoria, Karl

    2017-08-01

    Emergency general surgery outcomes vary widely across the United States. The utilization of quality indicators can reduce variation and assist providers in administering care aligned with established recommendations. Previous quality indicators have not focused on emergency general surgery patients. We identified indicators of high-quality emergency general surgery care and assessed patient- and hospital-level compliance with these indicators. We utilized a modified Delphi technique (RAND Appropriateness Methodology) to develop quality indicators. Through 2 rankings, an expert panel ranked potential quality indicators for validity. We then examined historic compliance with select quality indicators after 4 nonelective procedures (cholecystectomy, appendectomy, colectomy, small bowel resection) at 4 academic centers. Of 25 indicators rated as valid, 13 addressed patient-level quality and 12 addressed hospital-level quality. Adherence with 18 indicators was assessed. Compliance with performing a cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis within 72 hours of symptom onset ranged from 45% to 76%. Compliance with surgery start times within 3 hours from the decision to operate for uncontained perforated viscus ranged from 20% to 100%. Compliance with exploration of patients with small bowel obstructions with ischemia/impending perforation within 3 hours of the decision to operate was 0% to 88%. For 3 quality indicators (auditing 30-day unplanned readmissions/operations for patients previously managed nonoperatively, monitoring time to source control for intra-abdominal infections, and having protocols for bypass/transfer), none of the hospitals were compliant. Developing indicators for providers to assess their performance provides a foundation for specific initiatives. Adherence to quality indicators may improve the quality of emergency general surgery care provided for which current outcomes are potentially modifiable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  5. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the first of three reports on a follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). In this first part, qualitative and quantitative descriptions were made of the services and of demographic and clinical data on acute mental health care users managed at HJH, in a retrospective review of ...

  6. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. To assess the use of space requires the review of activities performed and functions executed. The assessment of the use and structuring of space for acute mental health care necessitates the review of all operational areas and related activities incorporated in the care program. At the same time appropriate ...

  7. The knowledge of Polish primary care physicians about bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Major

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The general practitioner (GP can play a key role in this multi-disciplinary team, coordinating care provided by dietitians and surgeons, maximizing the potential benefits of surgery. Therefore, it seems important to verify changes in GPs’ knowledge about surgical treatment of obesity. Aim : To reassess knowledge of obesity surgical treatment among Polish primary care physicians and their willingness to improve it in the future. Material and methods: To assess the knowledge of Polish primary care physicians about surgical treatment of obesity, a prospective study, which included an anonymous online questionnaire, was conducted in the years 2015–2016. Results : Two hundred and six physicians answered the invitation. One hundred and sixty-six (81.8% respondents were familiar with the indications for bariatric operation. The great majority of respondents, 198 (96.6%, were aware that bariatric surgery is efficient in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome. The study revealed a disproportion between the number of patients who would be potential candidates for bariatric treatment, who are currently under care of participating physicians, and the number of patients who are referred to a bariatric surgeon. Conclusions : Our study demonstrates that nowadays bariatric surgery is a recognized method of treatment, but physicians remain reluctant to refer their patients for surgical treatment of obesity. It was found that there is a large disproportion between the number of patients who are referred to a bariatric surgeon and the number of patients who require this treatment. It may be a result of lack of knowledge in the field of bariatric surgery.

  8. Providing quality nutrition care in acute care hospitals: perspectives of nutrition care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H H; Vesnaver, E; Davidson, B; Allard, J; Laporte, M; Bernier, P; Payette, H; Jeejeebhoy, K; Duerksen, D; Gramlich, L

    2014-04-01

    Malnutrition is common in acute care hospitals worldwide and nutritional status can deteriorate during hospitalisation. The aim of the present qualitative study was to identify enablers and challenges and, specifically, the activities, processes and resources, from the perspective of nutrition care personnel, required to provide quality nutrition care. Eight hospitals participating in the Nutrition Care in Canadian Hospitals study provided focus group data (n = 8 focus groups; 91 participants; dietitians, dietetic interns, diet technicians and menu clerks), which were analysed thematically. Five themes emerged from the data: (i) developing a nutrition culture, where nutrition practice is considered important to recovery of patients and teams work together to achieve nutrition goals; (ii) using effective tools, such as screening, evidence-based protocols, quality, timely and accurate patient information, and appropriate and quality food; (iii) creating effective systems to support delivery of care, such as communications, food production and delivery; (iv) being responsive to care needs, via flexible food systems, appropriate menus and meal supplements, up to date clinical care and including patient and family in the care processes; and (v) uniting the right person with the right task, by delineating roles, training staff, providing sufficient time to undertake these important tasks and holding staff accountable for their care. The findings of the present study are consistent with other work and provide guidance towards improving the nutrition culture in hospitals. Further empirical work on how to support successful implementation of nutrition care processes is needed. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  9. Acute Osteomyelitis of the Symphysis Pubis after Inguinal Hernia Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Tekin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of pubic symphysis is infectious inflammatory condition of the symphysis pubis and rare complication of surgery around inguinal and groin region. It should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lower pelvic pain and should be sought in cases of pelvic insufficiency fractures. Herein, we present a case of a 55-year-old man with osteomyelitis of the symphysis pubis following inguinal hernia surgery for diagnosis and management of this rare condition.

  10. Outcome and quality of life of patients with acute kidney injury after major surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, F J; Botelho, M; Fernandes, V; Barros, H

    2009-01-01

    In postoperative critically-ill patients who develop Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) it is important to focus on survival and quality of life beyond hospital discharge. The aim of the study was to evaluate outcome and quality of life in patients that develop AKI after major surgery. This retrospective study was carried out in a Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit with five intensive care beds during 2 years. Patients were followed for the development of AKI. Preoperative characteristics, intra-operative management and outcome were evaluated. Six months after discharge, these patients were contacted to complete a Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36) and to have their dependency in ADL evaluated. Chi-square or Fischer's exact test were used to compare proportions between groups. A "t test" and a paired "t test" for independent groups was used for comparisons. Of 1584 patients admitted to the PACU, 1200 patients met the inclusion criteria. One hundred-fourteen patients (9.6%) met AKI criteria. Patients with AKI were more severely ill, stayed longer at the PACU. Among 71 hospital survivors at 6 months follow-up, 50 completed the questionnaires. Fifty-two percent of patients reported that their general level of health was better on the day they answered the questionnaire than 12 months earlier. Patients that met AKI criteria after surgery had worse SF-36 scores for physical function, role physical and role emotional domains. Six months after PACU discharge, patients that met AKI criteria were more dependent in I-ADL but not in P-ADL. Patients that develop AKI improved self-perception of quality of life despite having high rate of dependency in ADL tasks. For physical function and role physical domains they had worse scores than PACU patients that did not develop AKI.

  11. INDEPENDENT NON-ACUTE CARE – INDISPENSABLE PART IN COMPLETE NURSING HEALTH CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Peternelj

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available First experience with organisation and operation of nurse-led intermediate care department in Slovenia is presented. Organisation of independent non-acute care department led to 5% shortening in average length of stay in acute care and 16% decrease in rehospitalization rate. Majority (61.9% of the patients admitted to the intermediate care department were discharged to their homes, 10.9% to homes for aged people, 7% to other institutional care facilities or departments for long term care, and 9.6% died. After discharge 43% of the patients were independent, 23% managed with some help, and 34% were totaly dependent from help by others. By adaptive programmes of training a success was made by involving next kins and guardians in care for the patients at home. Better economy was achieved by lowering over-head and diagnostic costs (23% of average acutecare department diagnostic cost.

  12. Guidelines for perioperative care in elective colonic surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS®) Society recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, U O; Scott, M J; Schwenk, W; Demartines, N; Roulin, D; Francis, N; McNaught, C E; MacFie, J; Liberman, A S; Soop, M; Hill, A; Kennedy, R H; Lobo, D N; Fearon, K; Ljungqvist, O

    2012-12-01

    This review aims to present a consensus for optimal perioperative care in colonic surgery and to provide graded recommendations for items for an evidenced-based enhanced perioperative protocol. Studies were selected with particular attention paid to meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials and large prospective cohorts. For each item of the perioperative treatment pathway, available English-language literature was examined, reviewed and graded. A consensus recommendation was reached after critical appraisal of the literature by the group. For most of the protocol items, recommendations are based on good-quality trials or meta-analyses of good-quality trials (quality of evidence and recommendations according to the GRADE system). Based on the evidence available for each item of the multimodal perioperative-care pathway, the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society, International Association for Surgical Metabolism and Nutrition (IASMEN) and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) present a comprehensive evidence-based consensus review of perioperative care for colonic surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  13. Embryonal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery treating severe acute pancreatitis complicated by abdominal compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huiming; Liao, Xiumin; Guo, Shaoqing; Xuong, Gaofei; Jiang, Di; Liu, Yujie

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to estimate the value of embryonal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (ENOTES) as a treatment for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The patients who were randomized into ENOTES group and surgery group underwent ENOTES and laparotomy, respectively. The Efficacy and complications of these two treatments were compared. Enterocinesia was observed earlier in patients of ENOTES group than that of surgery group. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score of patients in ENOTES group was superior to that of surgery group on the 1st, 3rd and 5th day after treatment (P complications and mortality were observed between two groups (P complications.

  14. Acute Ankle Sprains in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOf all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, 25% are acute lateral ankle sprains.1 In the USA and the UK there are about 23,000 and 5000 ankle sprains, respectively, each day. In the Netherlands approximately 600,000 people sustain an ankle injury each year, of those 120,000 occur

  15. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial: study protocol, rationale and feasibility of a randomised multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vester-Andersen Morten

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients. Methods and design The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure is all-cause 30-day mortality. We aim to enrol 400 patients in seven Danish hospitals. The sample size allows us to detect or refute a 34% relative risk reduction of mortality with 80% power. Discussion This trial evaluates the benefits and possible harm of intermediate care. The results may potentially influence the survival of many high-risk surgical patients. As a pioneer trial in the area, it will provide important data on the feasibility of future large-scale randomised clinical trials evaluating different levels of postoperative care. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01209663

  16. Serum levels of macrophage colony stimulating factor and other acute phase reactants after open heart surgery

    OpenAIRE

    近清, 裕一

    1996-01-01

    To clarify the phathophysiological role of macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the healing processes of inflammation, we studied chronological changes in serum concentrations of M-CSF and other reactants during the acute phase of inflammation in patients who underwent open heart surgery, since these patients showed a precise point of tissue damage. The number of neutrophilic leukocytes increased in the very early postoperative stage, reached a peak 48 h after surgery and declined ...

  17. Hospital Factors Associated With Care Discontinuity Following Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Joaquim M; Olufajo, Olubode A; Tsai, Thomas C; Jiang, Wei; Columbus, Alexandra B; Nitzschke, Stephanie L; Cooper, Zara; Salim, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Although there is evidence that changes in clinicians during the continuum of care (care discontinuity) are associated with higher mortality and complications among surgical patients, little is known regarding the drivers of care discontinuity among emergency general surgery (EGS) patients. To identify hospital factors associated with care discontinuity among EGS patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the 100% Medicare inpatient claims file, from January 1, 2008, to November 30, 2011, and matched patient details to hospital information in the 2011 American Hospital Association Annual Survey database. We selected patients aged 65 years and older who had the most common procedures associated with the previously defined American Association for the Surgery of Trauma EGS diagnosis categories and survived to hospital discharge across the United States. The current analysis was conducted from February 1, 2016, to March 24, 2016. Care discontinuity defined as readmission within 30 days to nonindex hospitals. There were 109 443 EGS patients readmitted within 30 days of discharge and 20 396 (18.6%) were readmitted to nonindex hospitals. Of the readmitted patients, 61 340 (56%) were female. Care discontinuity was higher among patients who were male (19.5% vs 18.0%), those younger than 85 years old (19.0% vs 16.6%), and those who lived 12.8 km (8 miles) or more away from the index hospitals (23.7% vs 14.8%) (all P < .001). Care discontinuity was independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08-1.25). Hospital factors associated with care discontinuity included bed size of 200 or more (aOR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.36-1.54), safety-net status (aOR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.27-1.43), and teaching status (aOR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.28). Care discontinuity was significantly lower among designated trauma centers (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.94) and highest among hospitals in the Midwest (aOR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.26). Nearly 1 in 5 older EGS

  18. Acute phase response to surgery of varying intensity in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Nielsen, Jon Vedding; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postoperative inflammatory response of horses to elective surgery of varying intensity. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study. ANIMALS: Horses referred to 2 hospitals for either arthroscopic removal of a unilateral osteochondritic lesion in the tibiotarsal joint...... (WBC) counts and concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, and iron were assessed in blood samples obtained before, and 1-3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 days after surgery. Differences in levels of the inflammatory markers between the 3 surgical groups were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA...

  19. Evaluating the Association Between Acute and Chronic Pain After Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilron, Ian; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth; Katz, Joel

    2017-01-01

    AIM/OBJECTIVES/BACKGROUND: There is a need to predict chronic (Z3mo) postsurgical pain (CPSP). Acute (pain is a predictor, that is, more severe pain is associated with higher CPSP risk. However, reported associations vary widely. METHODS: Using a systematic search, we examined associations...... between 2 acute pain measures (pain at rest [PAR] and movement-evoked pain [MEP]) and CPSP outcomes (considering severity vs. any "nonzero" pain only) in 22 studies. RESULTS: Seven studies reported the relationship between CPSP and both PAR and MEP. Of these, 2/7 reported no association, 3/7 reported...... significant associations for both PAR and MEP, 1/7 reported an association for PAR only, and 1/7 reported an association for MEP only. Six of another 7 studies reporting only the association for MEP found a significant relationship. Three of the 5 studies that did not specify whether acute pain outcomes were...

  20. Urban Telemedicine Enables Equity in Access to Acute Illness Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronis, Sarah D; McConnochie, Kenneth M; Wang, Hongyue; Wood, Nancy E

    2017-02-01

    Children with care for acute illness available through the Health-e-Access telemedicine model at childcare and schools were previously found to have 22% less emergency department (ED) use than counterparts without this service, but they also had 24% greater acute care use overall. We assessed the hypothesis that increased utilization reflected improved access among impoverished inner-city children to a level experienced by more affluent suburban children. This observational study compared utilization among children without and with telemedicine access, beginning in 1993, ending in 2007, and based on 84,287 child-months of billing claims-based observation. Health-e-Access Telemedicine was initiated in stepwise manner over 187 study-months among 74 access sites (childcare, schools, community centers), beginning in month 105. Children dwelled in inner city, rest-of-city Rochester, NY, or in surrounding suburbs. Rate of total acute care visits (office, ED, telemedicine) was measured as visits per 100 child-years. Observed utilization rates were adjusted in multivariate analysis for age, sex, insurance type, and season of year. When both suburban and inner-city children lacked telemedicine access, overall acute illness visits were 75% greater among suburban than inner-city children (suburban:inner-city rate ratio 1.75, p Health-e-Access Telemedicine redressed socioeconomic disparities in acute care access in the Rochester area, thus contributing to a more equitable community.

  1. Acute metabolic changes in critical care and cardiac care : Role of potassium, glucose and lactate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the relation of potassium, glucose and lactate with outcome in critical care and cardiac care and computer-assisted regulation of glucose and potassium in the intensive care. In patient with acute myocardial infarction it is important to identify those who have the highest risk

  2. Attenuation of acute systemic inflammatory response after valve surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najah R. Hadi

    2017-09-01

    Keywords montelukast, mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery, ischemia reperfusion injury, interleukin-6, cardiac troponin 1, tumor necrotic factor-alpha, alpha 2 macroglobulin/creatinine, ejection fraction, forced vital capacity (FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio

  3. Disease-Specific Care: Spine Surgery Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Katie; Franker, Lauren; Douglas, Barbara; Medero, Edgardo; Bromeland, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Minimal literature exists describing the process for development of a Joint Commission comprehensive spine surgery program within a community hospital health system. Components of a comprehensive program include structured communication across care settings, preoperative education, quality outcomes tracking, and patient follow-up. Organizations obtaining disease-specific certification must have clear knowledge of the planning, time, and overall commitment, essential to developing a successful program. Health systems benefit from disease-specific certification because of their commitment to a higher standard of service. Certification standards establish a framework for organizational structure and management and provide institutions a competitive edge in the marketplace. A framework for the development of a spine surgery program is described to help guide organizations seeking disease-specific certification. In developing a comprehensive program, it is critical to define the program's mission and vision, identify key stakeholders, implement clinical practice guidelines, and evaluate program outcomes.

  4. Guidelines for Perioperative Care in Bariatric Surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorell, A; MacCormick, A D; Awad, S; Reynolds, N; Roulin, D; Demartines, N; Vignaud, M; Alvarez, A; Singh, P M; Lobo, D N

    2016-09-01

    During the last two decades, an increasing number of bariatric surgical procedures have been performed worldwide. There is no consensus regarding optimal perioperative care in bariatric surgery. This review aims to present such a consensus and to provide graded recommendations for elements in an evidence-based "enhanced" perioperative protocol. The English-language literature between January 1966 and January 2015 was searched, with particular attention paid to meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials and large prospective cohort studies. Selected studies were examined, reviewed and graded. After critical appraisal of these studies, the group of authors reached a consensus recommendation. Although for some elements, recommendations are extrapolated from non-bariatric settings (mainly colorectal), most recommendations are based on good-quality trials or meta-analyses of good-quality trials. A comprehensive evidence-based consensus was reached and is presented in this review by the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) Society. The guidelines were endorsed by the International Association for Surgical Metabolism and Nutrition (IASMEN) and based on the evidence available in the literature for each of the elements of the multimodal perioperative care pathway for patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

  5. Urinary apolipoprotein M as a biomarker of acute kidney injury in children undergoing heart surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarrer, Eva Martha Madsen; Andersen, Henrik Ørbæk; Helvind, Morten

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether apoM is excreted in urine of children undergoing heart surgery and the potential of apoM as early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI). MATERIALS & METHODS: Urine was collected in children undergoing heart surgery. ApoM was measured with ELISA. U-apoM was characterized.......018). Sensitivity was 0.71 and specificity was 0.68 at a cutoff level at 1.45 nmol/l. CONCLUSION: ApoM is excreted in the urine of children after cardiac surgery. Its potential as biomarker of AKI deserves exploration....

  6. [Acute acalculous gangrenous cholecystitis in postoperative period after orthopedic surgery: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikhrouhou, Hichem; Jmal, Karim; Kharrat, Amine; Keskes, Meriem; Karoui, Abdelhamid

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative acalculous gangrenous cholecystitis is a serious and severe complication, especially in patients hospitalized in the Department of Reanimation. It occurs most often during vascular surgery or major digestive surgery, a polytrauma, in a context septic or in a context of shock. We report the case of a 74 year man who underwent surgery for femoral neck fracture. On the sixth postoperative day, he developed acute cholecystitis. Radiological examinations confirmed acalculous cholecystitis. After emergency cholecystectomy, anatomo-pathologic study confirmed the diagnosis of acalculous gangrenous cholecystitis.

  7. Children with Acute Abdomen Requiring Surgery at Muhimbili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions and Recommendations: Acute surgical abdomen predominantly occurred in boys and intestinal obstruction was the main cause. Children who presented late to hospital (MNH) had higher morbidity and mortality. Peritonitis was substantially associated with high mortality and misdiagnosis at the initial health ...

  8. The impact of acute high-risk abdominal surgery on quality of life in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tengberg, Line Toft; Foss, Nicolai Bang; Lauritsen, Morten Laksafoss

    2017-01-01

    surgery. METHODS: From 1 November 2014 to 30 April 2015, consecutive patients (≥ 75 years) undergoing AHA surgery were included for follow-up after six months. The patients included answered a health-related quality-of-life questionnaire and a supplemental questionnaire regarding residential status...... and they were willing to undergo surgery again, if necessary. All study participants were admitted from their own home, and 95% had no change in residential status after six months. CONCLUSIONS: The self-reported quality of life in elderly survivors six months after AHA surgery was surprisingly good in a small......INTRODUCTION: Undergoing acute high-risk abdominal (AHA) surgery is associated with reduced survival and a great risk of an adverse outcome, especially in the elderly. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the residential status and quality of life in elderly patients undergoing AHA...

  9. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care: Recommendations of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    OpenAIRE

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor; Cosyns, Bernard; Neskovic, Aleksandar N.; Dulgheru, Raluca; Flachskampf, Frank A.; Hassager, Christian; Pasquet, Agnes; Gargani, Luna; Galderisi, Maurizio; Cardim, Nuno; Haugaa, Kristina H.; Ancion, Arnaud; Zamorano, Jose-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain,...

  10. Which Aged Care inpatients are potentially suitable for community-based acute care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robyn M; Ogle, Susan J; Finnegan, Terence P; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2012-03-01

    To identify Aged Care inpatients potentially suitable for Acute/Post-Acute Care (APAC)-Aged Care, a new service offering community-based acute care as an alternative to hospital admission for frail older people. Criteria were developed to identify suitable patients for APAC-Aged Care and applied to consecutive Aged Care inpatient admissions at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, through retrospective chart review. Only 5/90 reviewed patients were potentially suitable for APAC-Aged Care. All five were from Residential Aged Care Facilities. The median age of the 90 patients was 86 years; 30% lived in Residential Aged Care Facilities; 53% of patients were medically stable on presentation; 70% required investigations beyond a standard baseline set; 27% had either no new functional decline on presentation or adequate community support to manage this; 91% had allied health input and 41% had medical/surgical consultation. APAC-Aged Care is a potentially suitable alternative to acute inpatient hospitalisation in a select minority of Aged Care patients. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2011 ACOTA.

  11. [Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery: risk factors and outcomes. Proposal for a predictive model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bárbara; Laranjo, Sérgio; Gomes, Inês; Freitas, Isabel; Trigo, Conceição; Fragata, Isabel; Fragata, José; Pinto, Fátima

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the epidemiology and risk factors for acute kidney injury (AKI) after pediatric cardiac surgery in our center, to determine its association with poor short-term outcomes, and to develop a logistic regression model that will predict the risk of AKI for the study population. This single-center, retrospective study included consecutive pediatric patients with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2010 and December 2012. Exclusion criteria were a history of renal disease, dialysis or renal transplantation. Of the 325 patients included, median age three years (1 day-18 years), AKI occurred in 40 (12.3%) on the first postoperative day. Overall mortality was 13 (4%), nine of whom were in the AKI group. AKI was significantly associated with length of intensive care unit stay, length of mechanical ventilation and in-hospital death (p<0.01). Patients' age and postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were included in the logistic regression model as predictor variables. The model accurately predicted AKI in this population, with a maximum combined sensitivity of 82.1% and specificity of 75.4%. AKI is common and is associated with poor short-term outcomes in this setting. Younger age and higher postoperative serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and lactate levels were powerful predictors of renal injury in this population. The proposed model could be a useful tool for risk stratification of these patients. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased incidence of acute kidney injury with aprotinin use during cardiac surgery detected with urinary NGAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagener, G.; Gubitosa, G.; Wang, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of aprotinin has been associated with acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a novel, very sensitive marker for renal injury. Urinary NGAL may be able to detect renal injury caused by aprotinin. This study determined if the ...

  13. Outcome of burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young-Soo; Hironaka, Yasuhiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Asai, Hideki; Watanabe, Tomoo; Nishio, Kenji; Nakase, Hiroyuki; Okuchi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    We have performed burr hole surgery in the emergency room for severe acute subdural hematoma from April 2007 in twenty five patients. All patients were deep comatose and showed cerebral herniation sign with bilateral pupillary abnormalities. Burr hole surgeries were performed as soon as possible after CT evaluation. Continually decomporresive craiectomies were followed if clinical improvements were achieved and mild baribiturate-moderate hypothermia combined (MB-MH) therapy was induced postoperatively in some cases. The mean average was 65.6 years (range 16-93). The causes of head injuries were traffic accident in 9, fall down in 13 and unknown in 3. The mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) on admission was 4.4 (range 3-9). The mean time interval from arrival to burr hole surgery was 33.5 minutes (range 21-50 minutes). Decompressive craniectomy was indicated in 14 cases and MB-MH therapy was induced in 13 cases. The overall clinical outcome consisted of good recovery in 3, moderate disability in 2, severe disability in 3, persistent vegetative state in 3 and death in 14. Favorable results can be expected even in patients with serious acute subdural hematoma. Emergent burr hole surgery was effective to decrease intracranial pressure rapidly and to save time. So active burr hole surgery in the emergency room is strongly recommended to all cases of severe acute subdural hematoma. (author)

  14. Impact of Experiencing Acute Coronary Syndrome Prior to Open Heart Surgery on Psychiatric Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Yüksel

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The incidence of depression and anxiety is higher in patients with acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this study is to determine whether experiencing acute coronary syndrome prior to open heart surgery affects patients in terms of depression, hopelessness, anxiety, fear of death and quality of life. Methods: The study included 63 patients who underwent coronary bypass surgery between January 2015 and January 2016. The patients were divided into two groups: those diagnosed after acute coronary syndrome (Group 1 and those diagnosed without acute coronary syndrome (Group 2. Beck depression scale, Beck hopelessness scale, Templer death anxiety scale and death depression scale, State-Trait anxiety inventory and WHOQOL-Bref quality of life scale were applied. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the total score obtained from Beck depression scale, Beck hopelessness scale - future-related emotions, loss of motivation, future-related expectations subgroups, death anxiety scale, the death depression scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - social and environmental subgroups. The mental quality of life sub-scores of group 2 were significantly higher. The patients in both groups were found to be depressed and hopeless about the future. Anxiety levels were found to be significantly higher in all of the patients in both groups. Conclusion: Acute coronary syndrome before coronary artery bypass surgery impairs more the quality of life in mental terms. But unexpectedly there are no differences in terms of depression, hopelessness, anxiety and fear of death.

  15. Indications for surgery in acute pancreatitis on the basis of abdominal CT in the early stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Keishoku; Nakasaku, Osamu; Kim, Jung-hyo; Hatakeyama, Gen

    1986-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis clinically manifests various degrees of severity. In the present study, we performed a retrospective study on 39 cases of acute pancreatitis and examined the indications for surgery and infection as an aggravating factor in acute pancreatitis on the basis of CT in the early stage (about 48 hours after onset). CT in the early stage of acute pancreatitis permits objective determination of the extent of lesion enlargement. The cases could be classified into three grades: severe (CT score ≥ 6; surgical therapy), moderate (CT score = 5, 4; medical therapy possible), and mild (CT score ≤ 3; medical therapy) as determined by CT. Emergency surgery was performed in seven of 10 patients in whom pancreatitis was judged to be severe on the basis of CT and clinical findings. Of the seven, four had infection in the early stage (within 48 hours after onset). Three of the four had MOF complications and died. Two of the three patients without infection were relieved. The extent of inflammatory lesions of severe pancreatitis was severe by CT, and the CT scores were especially high in cases with infection. Infection in the early stage of acute pancreatitis was thus thought to be an serious aggravating factor. It was concluded, therefore, that, in the early stage, CT was very useful as a helpful guide to early judgement and an indicator for emergency surgery. (author)

  16. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD) age of 79.4 (8.3) years) were included between June and December 2012. INTERVENTION: A daily (on weekdays) program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using......IMPORTANCE: Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility...... of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility. DESIGN, SETTING AND PATIENTS: A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive...

  17. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Outcomes of Patients With Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Somashekar G; Behzadi, Jennifer; Hinton, Alice; El-Dika, Samer; Groce, Jeffery R; Hussan, Hisham; Hart, Phil A; Conwell, Darwin L

    2016-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity and number of patients undergoing bariatric surgery are increasing. Obesity has adverse effects in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). We investigated whether bariatric surgery affects outcomes of patients with AP. We performed a retrospective study, collecting data from the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2007-2011) on all adult inpatients (≥18 years) with a principal diagnosis of AP (n = 1,342,681). We compared primary clinical outcomes (mortality, acute kidney injury, and respiratory failure) and secondary outcomes related to healthcare resources (hospital stay and charges) among patient groups using univariate and multivariate analyses. We performed a propensity score-matched analysis to compare outcomes of patients with versus without bariatric surgery. Of patients admitted to the hospital with a principal diagnosis of AP, 14,332 (1.07%) had undergone bariatric surgery. The number of patients that underwent bariatric surgery doubled, from 1801 in 2007 to 3928 in 2011 (P < .001). AP in patients that had undergone bariatric surgery was most frequently associated with gallstones. Multivariate analysis associated prior bariatric surgery with decreased mortality (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.92), shorter duration of hospitalization (0.65 days shorter; P < .001), and lower hospital charges ($3558 lower) than in patients with AP not receiving bariatric surgery (P < .001). A propensity score-matched cohort analysis found that mortality and odds of acute kidney injury were similar between patients with versus without history of bariatric surgery, whereas respiratory failure was less frequent in patients who received bariatric surgery (1.34% vs 4.42%; P < .001). Prior bariatric surgery in patients hospitalized with AP is not adversely associated with in-hospital mortality, development of organ failure, or healthcare resource use. Bariatric surgery may mitigate the obesity-associated adverse prognostication in AP

  18. Acute care nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care: an exploratory study in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Brendan Wk; Tiew, Lay Hwa; Creedy, Debra K

    2016-09-01

    To investigate acute care nurses' perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care and relationships with nurses' personal and professional characteristics. Spirituality and spiritual care are often neglected or absent in daily nursing practice. Nurses' perceptions of spirituality can be influenced by personal, professional and social factors and affect the provision of spiritual care. A cross-sectional, exploratory, nonexperimental design was used. All nursing staff (n = 1008) from a large acute care hospital in Singapore were invited to participate. Participants completed a demographic form and the Spiritual Care-Giving Scale. Completed surveys were received from 767 staff yielding a response rate of 76%. Descriptive statistics and General Linear Modelling were used to analyse data. Acute care nurses reported positive perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Religion, area of clinical practice and view of self as spiritual were associated with nurses' reported perspectives of spirituality and spiritual care. Nurses working in this acute care hospital in Singapore reported positive perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. Respondents tended to equate religion with spirituality and were often unclear about what constituted spiritual care. They reported a sense of readiness to apply an interprofessional approach to spiritual care. However, positive perceptions of spirituality may not necessarily translate into practice. Spiritual care can improve health outcomes. Nurses' understanding of spirituality is essential for best practice. Interprofessional collaboration with clinicians, administrators, educators, chaplains, clergy and spiritual leaders can contribute to the development of practice guidelines and foster spiritual care by nurses. Further research is needed on the practical applications of spiritual care in nursing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute mental health care according to recent mental health legislation. Part II. Activity-based costing. ABR Janse van Rensburg1, W Jassat2. 1Division of Psychiatry, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. 2School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. Abstract.

  20. Clinical course of Crohn's disease first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, G; Cocco, A; Angelucci, E; Viscido, A; Bacci, S; Necozione, S; Caprilli, R

    2009-04-01

    The severity of clinical activity of Crohn's disease is high during the first year after diagnosis and decreases thereafter. Approximately 50% of patients require steroids and immunosuppressants and 75% need surgery during their lifetime. The clinical course of patients with Crohn's disease first diagnosed at surgery has never been investigated. To assess the clinical course of Crohn's disease first diagnosed at surgery for acute abdomen and to evaluate the need for medical and surgical treatment in this subset of patients. Hospital clinical records of 490 consecutive Crohn's disease patients were reviewed. Patients were classified according to the Vienna criteria. Sex, extraintestinal manifestations, family history of inflammatory bowel diseases, appendectomy, smoking habit and medical/surgical treatments performed during the follow-up period were assessed. Kaplan-Meier survival method and Cox proportional hazards regression model. Of the 490 Crohn's disease patients, 115 had diagnosis of Crohn's disease at surgery for acute abdomen (Group A) and 375 by conventional clinical, radiological, endoscopic and histologic criteria (Group B). Patients in Group A showed a low risk of further surgery (Log Rank test pacute abdomen showed a low risk for reintervention and less use of steroids and immunosuppressants during follow-up than those not operated upon at diagnosis. Early surgery may represent a valid approach in the initial management of patients with Crohn's disease, at least in the subset of patients with ileal and complicated disease.

  1. Lidocaine 5% Patch for Treatment of Acute Pain After Robotic Cardiac Surgery and Prevention of Persistent Incisional Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrooman, Bruce; Kapural, Leonardo; Sarwar, Sheryar; Mascha, Edward J; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Gillinov, Marc; Qavi, Shahbaz; Sessler, Daniel I

    2015-08-01

    To test the hypotheses that lidocaine 5% patches decrease the severity of acute pain and incidence of persistent incisional pain after robotic cardiac valve surgery. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Tertiary care academic medical center. Patients having robotic cardiac valve surgery. Patients having robotic cardiac valve surgery were randomly assigned to 5% lidocaine patches or identical-appearing placebo patches. Patches were applied around each incision 12 hours/day until pain resolved, or for 6 months. Supplemental opioid was provided by patient-controlled analgesia or orally. Pain was initially evaluated with a Visual Analog Scale, and subsequently by telephone with a Verbal Response Scale and the Pain Disability Index (our primary outcome) after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. Global Perceived Effect, a measure of patient satisfaction, was simultaneously recorded. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and generalized estimating equations were our primary statistical tools. Acute pain scores and opioid use were low, as was the incidence of persistent pain. Lidocaine 5% patches did not influence any measure of acute or persistent incisional pain. Estimated difference (95% CI) in mean Pain Disability Index for Lidocaine patch minus placebo was -2.5 (95% CI -7.1, 2.1), P = 0.28. Lidocaine 5% patches did not reduce acute or persistent pain in patients having robotic thoracic surgery, though pain scores were low in both treatment groups. Clinicians should choose alternative analgesic approaches in these patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. [Acute care of patients with bacterial meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetefeld, H R; Dohmen, C

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening emergency that is still associated with high mortality and poor outcome. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of clinical presentation, diagnostic procedure, therapy, and prognosis in bacterial meningitis. Prognostic factors which could be influenced positively are identified and a focused procedure in the emergency setting and for the treatment of complications are provided. This work is based on a literature search (PubMed, guidelines) and personal experience (standard operating procedures, SOP). Despite improved health care, bacterial meningitis is still associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome, which has remained largely unaltered during recent decades. Diagnosis and, more importantly, effective therapy of bacterial meningitis are often delayed, having an immediate negative influence on clinical outcome. Neurological and nonneurological complications often necessitate intensive care and may occur rapidly or in the further course of the disease. Immediate initiation of effective therapy is crucial to positively influence mortality and neurological outcome. Antibiotics should be administered within 30 min after admission. To achieve this, a focused and well-organized procedure in the emergency setting is necessary. Because of intra- and extracranial complications, patients need to be treated on intensive care units including neurological expertise and interdisciplinary support.

  3. Cholecystostomy as Bridge to Surgery and as Definitive Treatment or Acute Cholecystectomy in Patients with Acute Cholecystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Popowicz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Percutaneous cholecystostomy (PC has increasingly been used as bridge to surgery as well as sole treatment for patients with acute cholecystitis (AC. The aim of the study was to assess the outcome after PC compared to acute cholecystectomy in patients with AC. Methods. A review of medical records was performed on all patients residing in Stockholm County treated for AC in the years 2003 and 2008. Results. In 2003 and 2008 altogether 799 and 833 patients were admitted for AC. The number of patients treated with PC was 21/799 (2.6% in 2003 and 50/833 (6.0% in 2008. The complication rate (Clavien-Dindo ≥ 2 was 4/71 (5.6% after PC and 135/736 (18.3% after acute cholecystectomy. Mean (standard deviation hospital stay was 11.4 (10.5 days for patients treated with PC and 5.1 (4.3 days for patients undergoing acute cholecystectomy. After adjusting for age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index, and degree of cholecystitis, the hospital stay was significantly longer for patients treated with PC than for those undergoing acute cholecystectomy (P<0.001 but the risk for intervention-related complications was found to be significantly lower (P=0.001 in the PC group. Conclusion. PC can be performed with few serious complications, albeit with a longer hospital stay.

  4. Emergent management of postpartum hemorrhage for the general and acute care surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blankenship Charles L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postpartum hemorrhage is one of the rare occasions when a general or acute care surgeon may be emergently called to labor and delivery, a situation in which time is limited and the stakes high. Unfortunately, there is generally a paucity of exposure and information available to surgeons regarding this topic: obstetric training is rarely found in contemporary surgical residency curricula and is omitted nearly completely from general and acute care surgery literature and continuing medical education. Methods The purpose of this manuscript is to serve as a topic specific review for surgeons and to present a surgeon oriented management algorithm. Medline and Ovid databases were utilized in a comprehensive literature review regarding the management of postpartum hemorrhage and a management algorithm for surgeons developed based upon a collaborative panel of general, acute care, trauma and obstetrical surgeons' review of the literature and expert opinion. Results A stepwise approach for surgeons of the medical and surgical interventions utilized to manage and treat postpartum hemorrhage is presented and organized into a basic algorithm. Conclusion The manuscript should promote and facilitate a more educated, systematic and effective surgeon response and participation in the management of postpartum hemorrhage.

  5. The effects of acute and elective cardiac surgery on the anxiety traits of patients with Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Kálmán; Ágg, Bence; Pólos, Miklós; Sayour, Alex Ali; Radovits, Tamás; Bartha, Elektra; Nagy, Péter; Rákóczi, Balázs; Koller, Ákos; Szokolai, Viola; Hedberg, Julianna; Merkely, Béla; Nagy, Zsolt B; Szabolcs, Zoltán

    2017-07-17

    Marfan syndrome is a genetic disease, presenting with dysfunction of connective tissues leading to lesions in the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle system. Within these symptoms, the most typical is weakness of the connective tissue in the aorta, manifesting as aortic dilatation (aneurysm). This could, in turn, become annuloaortic ectasia, or life-threatening dissection. As a result, life-saving and preventative cardiac surgical interventions are frequent among Marfan syndrome patients. Aortic aneurysm could turn into annuloaortic ectasia or life-threatening dissection, thus life-saving and preventive cardiac surgical interventions are frequent among patients with Marfan syndrome. We hypothesized that patients with Marfan syndrome have different level of anxiety, depression and satisfaction with life compared to that of the non-clinical patient population. Patients diagnosed with Marfan syndrome were divided into 3 groups: those scheduled for prophylactic surgery, those needing acute surgery, and those without need for surgery (n = 9, 19, 17, respectively). To examine the psychological features of the patients, Spielberger's anxiety (STAI) test, Beck's Depression questionnaire (BDI), the Berne Questionnaire of Subjective Well-being, and the Satisfaction with Life scale were applied. A significant difference was found in trait anxiety between healthy individuals and patients with Marfan syndrome after acute life-saving surgery (p Marfan syndrome patients was 48.56 (standard deviation (SD): 5.8) as compared to the STAI population mean score of 43.72 (SD: 8.53). No difference was found between groups on the BDI (p > 0.1). Finally, a significant, medium size effect was found between patient groups on the Joy in Living scale (F (2.39) = 3.51, p = 0.040, η 2  = 0.15). Involving psychiatric and mental-health care, in addition to existing surgical treatment interventions, is essential for more successful recovery of patients with Marfan syndrome.

  6. Acute axonal polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involvement: an uncommon neurological complication of bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Flavia Costa Nunes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery is frequently indicated in the treatment of morbid obesity. Previously unreported complications have been associated to this surgery; among them, neurological complications have gained attention. We report the case of a 25-year-old man submitted to gastric surgery for treatment of morbid obesity who developed, two months after surgery, acute proximal weakness in lower limbs. The electroneuromyography revealed axonal peripheral polyneuropathy with predominant proximal involvement. After treatment with immunoglobulin and vitamin supplementation, rapid clinical and neurophysiologic recovery was observed. We describe the clinical and electroneuromyographic features of this case, stressing the difficulty of initial diagnosis, particularly in the differential diagnosis with Guillain-Barré syndrome. We discuss the importance of nutritional follow-up and the eventual indication of routine vitamin supplementation in these patients.

  7. Day-care versus inpatient pediatric surgery: a comparison of costs incurred by parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Stanwick, R S; Horne, J M; Peabody, D M; Postuma, R

    1987-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness for parents of day-care pediatric surgery was assessed by comparing time and financial costs associated with two surgical procedures, one (squint repair) performed exclusively as a day-care procedure, the other (adenoidectomy) performed exclusively as an inpatient procedure. All but 1 of 165 eligible families participated. The children underwent surgery between February and July 1981. The day-care surgery group (59 families) incurred average total time costs of 16.1 hou...

  8. Paediatric community home nursing: a model of acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze May; Mariguddi, Shyam; Coward, Shirley; Middleton, Holly

    The aim of this pilot service development was to determine if the community children's nursing outreach team(CCNOT) service, as a model of care, was effective and efficient in its delivery of reducing unscheduled care and admissions to hospital, and improving patient satisfaction. CCNOT was developed to manage acutely ill children at home and to reduce the demand for unscheduled care. This is a pilot prospective study within a dual-site integrated care organisation. The CCNOT service was developed with the aim of determining the effectiveness of the CCNOT model of care and service delivery inthe following outcomes: 1) reducing length of hospital stay (LOS)2) reducing A&E admissions 3) reducing non-elective admissions 4) reducing readmissions and 5) improving patient satisfaction. Data were obtained from hospital episode statistics (HES) and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The data indicate that, after the implementation of the CCNOT service, A&E attendances fell by 5%per month, non-elective admissions by 15.8% and readmissions by 17.3%. Overall, LOS rose by 2.3%-0.88 days compared with 0.9 days-but the difference was not significant. The results of the patient satisfaction survey show high overall satisfaction with the service. A paediatric CCNOT as a model of service delivery in acute paediatric care is effective in reducing hospital admissions. It also increases patient and carer satisfaction with care provision for sick children in the home environment.

  9. The use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care: recommendations of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Price, Susanna; Edvardsen, Thor; Cosyns, Bernard; Neskovic, Aleksandar N; Dulgheru, Raluca; Flachskampf, Frank A; Hassager, Christian; Pasquet, Agnes; Gargani, Luna; Galderisi, Maurizio; Cardim, Nuno; Haugaa, Kristina H; Ancion, Arnaud; Zamorano, Jose-Luis; Donal, Erwan; Bueno, Héctor; Habib, Gilbert

    2015-02-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most powerful diagnostic and monitoring tools available to the modern emergency/critical care practitioner. Currently, there is a lack of specific European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging/Acute Cardiovascular Care Association recommendations for the use of echocardiography in acute cardiovascular care. In this document, we describe the practical applications of echocardiography in patients with acute cardiac conditions, in particular with acute chest pain, acute heart failure, suspected cardiac tamponade, complications of myocardial infarction, acute valvular heart disease including endocarditis, acute disease of the ascending aorta and post-intervention complications. Specific issues regarding echocardiography in other acute cardiac care scenarios are also described. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  10. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a biomarker for acute kidney injury in children after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meta Herdiana Hanindita

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Acute kidney injury (AKI is still diagnosed by measuring the estimated creatinine clearance (eCCl, despite the fact that it may not change until 50% or more of kidney function has been lost. AKI after cardiac surgery is related to prolonged intensive care, decreased quality of life, and increased long term mortality. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL represents an early biomarker of AKI, which may be useful for assessing AKI in cardiac patients. Objective To determine the validity of urinary and plasma NGAL as biomarkers for AKI in children after cardiac surgery. Methods Subjects were children who underwent cardiac surgery in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, Surabaya, Indonesia from August 2013 to January 2014. Serial urine and blood samples were analyzed for NGAL before surgery, as well as at 2h, 4h, 12h, and 24h after surgery. The AKI was established based on pRIFLE criteria. Estimated creatinine clearance (eCCl was calculated from the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, according to age by the traditional Schwartz formula. Serum creatinine was assayed by the Jaffe method before surgery, as well as at 12h, 24h, 48h, and 72h after surgery. Results Of 20 subjects, 5 developed AKI. Urinary and plasma NGAL increased markedly at 2h postoperatively, as compared to eGFR which showed a rise at 12-48 h after cardiac surgery. Analysis of 2h post-operative urinary NGAL at a cut off value of 11.270ng/mL yielded an area under the curve (AUC of 1.00 (95%CI 2.63 to 12.13, with sensitivity and specificity of 100% each for AKI. In addition, 2h post-operative plasma NGAL at a cut off value of 8.385 ng/mL yielded an AUC of 1.00 (95%CI 3.71 to 12.15 with sensitivity and specificity of 100% each for AKI. Conclusion Urinary and plasma NGAL are valid as early biomarkers for AKI in children after cardiac surgery.

  11. Improving performance management for delivering appropriate care for patients no longer needing acute hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Christine; Henry, Effie

    2008-01-01

    The public, providers and policy-makers are interested in a service continuum where care is provided in the appropriate place. Alternate level of care is used to define patients who no longer need acute care but remain in an acute care bed. Our aims were to determine how subacute care and convalescent care should be defined in British Columbia (BC); how these care levels should be aligned with existing legislation to provide more consistent service standards to patients and what reporting requirements were needed for system planning and performance management. A literature review was conducted to understand the international trends in performance management, care delivery models and change management. A Canada-wide survey was carried out to determine the directions of other provinces on the defined issues and a BC survey provided a current state analysis of programming within the five regional health authorities (HAs). A provincial policy framework for subacute and convalescent care has been developed to begin to address the concerns raised and provide a base for performance measurement. The policy has been approved and disseminated to BC HAs for implementation. An implementation plan has been developed and implementation activities have been integrated into the work of existing provincial committees. Evaluation will occur through performance measurement. The benefits anticipated include: clear policy guidance for programme development; improved comparability of performance information for system monitoring, planning and integrity of the national acute care Discharge Abstracting Database; improved efficiency in acute care bed use; and improved equity of access, insurability and quality for patients requiring subacute and convalescent care. While a national reporting system exists for acute care in Canada, this project raises questions about the implications for this system, given the shifting definition of acute care as other care levels emerge. Questions are also

  12. Hospital medicine (Part 2): what would improve acute hospital care?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kellett, John

    2009-09-01

    There are so many obvious delays and inefficiencies in our traditional system of acute hospital care; it is clear that if outcomes are to be improved prompt accurate assessment immediately followed by competent and efficient treatment is essential. Early warning scores (EWS) help detect acutely ill patients who are seriously ill and likely to deteriorate. However, it is not known if any EWS has universal applicability to all patient populations. The benefit of Rapid Response Systems (RRS) such as Medical Emergency Teams has yet to be proven, possibly because doctors and nurses are reluctant to call the RRS for help. Reconfiguration of care delivery in an Acute Medical Assessment Unit has been suggested as a "proactive" alternative to the "reactive" approach of RRS. This method ensures every patient is in an appropriate and safe environment from the moment of first contact with the hospital. Further research is needed into what interventions are most effective in preventing the deterioration and\\/or resuscitating seriously ill patients. Although physicians expert in hospital care decrease the cost and length of hospitalization without compromising outcomes hospital care will continue to be both expensive and potentially dangerous.

  13. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14-0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1-0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19-0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22-0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033-0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15-0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32-0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs ( P >0.05). Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality, at no higher cost.

  14. Effect of the acute postoperative pancreatitis at the postoperative period in the abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko К.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aims the influence of development of the acute postoperative pancreatitis at the early postoperative period; determine its influence at the frequency and spectrum of complications after abdominal surgery. Material and methods. The work is based on the results of the complex examination and surgical treatment of 1934 patients with various disorders of the digestive system (complicated duodenal ulcer and gastric ulcer, gastric cancer, the proximal and distal pancreatic cancer, colon cancer and postgastrectomy syndromes. The dependence of the overall incidence of postoperative complications, the number of complications per patient, and the number of infectious and inflammatory complications per patient, hospital mortality and length of postoperative hospital days for the development of acute postoperative pancreatitis were studied. Results. Acute postoperative pancreatitis is a leading cause of morbidity postoperative intra-abdominal operations. 97,8% of the cases of complicated early postoperative period of the operations on the organs of the abdominal cavity caused by the development of acute postoperative pancreatitis. Specific complications for the acute postoperative pancreatitis (satellite complications were identified. Satellite complication had a clearly defined correlation with the development of the acute postoperative pancreatitis. The negative effect of acute postoperative pancreatitis on the severity of the postoperative period, on the morbidity, on the number of complications per patient, on the number of the infectious and inflammatory complications per patient, hospital mortality and on the duration of the postoperative hospital stay were found.

  15. A STUDY OF AETIOLOGY, CLINICAL FEATURES AND MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute pancreatitis is a common condition involving the pancreas. The estimated incidence is about 3% of cases presenting with pain abdomen in the UK. The hospital admission rate for acute pancreatitis is 9.8/100,000 per year in UK and annual incidence may range from 5-50/100,000 worldwide. Gall stone disease and alcohol account for greater than 80% of all patients with acute pancreatitis, with biliary disease accounting for 45% and alcohol found in 35% of patients. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualised. Patients with mild acute pancreatitis generally can be managed with resuscitation and supportive care. Aetiological factors are sought and treated, if possible, but operative therapy essentially has no role in the care of these patients. Those with severe and necrotising pancreatitis require intensive therapy, which may include wide operative debridement of the infected pancreas or surgical management of local complications of the disease. AIM OF THE STUDY 1. To study the age and sex prevalence of acute pancreatitis. 2. To study the various aetiological factors of acute pancreatitis. 3. To study the clinical presentation and management of acute pancreatitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients admitted to the Department of General Surgery at M.K.C.G Medical College and Hospital, Berhampur were taken up for the study. Totally, 49 patients with 53 episodes of acute pancreatitis were studied from September 2013 to August 2015. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS Acute pancreatitis is a common cause of acute abdomen in patients presenting to the surgical emergency department. Alcohol being the most common cause of acute pancreatitis in this part of the country, it has a male preponderance and most commonly presents in the 4th decade of life. It is mainly a clinical diagnosis supplanted with biochemical and radiological findings. The management is mainly conservative, with surgery

  16. CARE-PACT: a new paradigm of care for acutely unwell residents 
in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Ellen; Scott, Ian

    2015-04-01

    Ageing population trends create a strong imperative for healthcare systems to develop models of care that reduce dependence on hospital services. People living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) currently have high rates of presentation to emergency departments. The care provided in these environments may not optimally satisfy the needs of frail older persons from RACFs. To describe the Comprehensive Aged Residents Emergency and Partners in Assessment, Care and Treatment 
(CARE-PACT) program: a hospital substitutive care and demand management project that aims to improve, in a fiscally efficient manner, the quality of care received by residents of aged care facilities when their acute healthcare needs exceed the scope of the aged care facility staff and general practitioners to manage independently of the hospital system. The project delivers high-quality gerontic nursing and emergency specialist assessment, collaborative care planning, skills sharing across the care continuum and an individualised, resident-focused approach.

  17. Quality indicators for acute myocardial infarction: A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Francois; Gale, Chris P; Bonnefoy, Eric; Capuano, Frederic; Claeys, Marc J; Danchin, Nicolas; Fox, Keith Aa; Huber, Kurt; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Lettino, Maddalena; Quinn, Tom; Rubini Gimenez, Maria; Bøtker, Hans E; Swahn, Eva; Timmis, Adam; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zeymer, Uwe; Bueno, Hector

    2017-02-01

    Evaluation of quality of care is an integral part of modern healthcare, and has become an indispensable tool for health authorities, the public, the press and patients. However, measuring quality of care is difficult, because it is a multifactorial and multidimensional concept that cannot be estimated solely on the basis of patients' clinical outcomes. Thus, measuring the process of care through quality indicators (QIs) has become a widely used practice in this context. Other professional societies have published QIs for the evaluation of quality of care in the context of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but no such indicators exist in Europe. In this context, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) has reflected on the measurement of quality of care in the context of AMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)) and created a set of QIs, with a view to developing programmes to improve quality of care for the management of AMI across Europe. We present here the list of QIs defined by the ACCA, with explanations of the methodology used, scientific justification and reasons for the choice for each measure.

  18. Planning for subacute care: predicting demand using acute activity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janette P; McNamee, Jennifer P; Kobel, Conrad; Seraji, Md Habibur R; Lawrence, Suanne J

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop a robust model that uses the concept of 'rehabilitation-sensitive' Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs) in predicting demand for rehabilitation and geriatric evaluation and management (GEM) care following acute in-patient episodes provided in Australian hospitals. Methods The model was developed using statistical analyses of national datasets, informed by a panel of expert clinicians and jurisdictional advice. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken using acute in-patient data, published national hospital statistics and data from the Australasian Rehabilitation Outcomes Centre. Results The predictive model comprises tables of probabilities that patients will require rehabilitation or GEM care after an acute episode, with columns defined by age group and rows defined by grouped Australian Refined (AR)-DRGs. Conclusions The existing concept of rehabilitation-sensitive DRGs was revised and extended. When applied to national data, the model provided a conservative estimate of 83% of the activity actually provided. An example demonstrates the application of the model for service planning. What is known about the topic? Health service planning is core business for jurisdictions and local areas. With populations ageing and an acknowledgement of the underservicing of subacute care, it is timely to find improved methods of estimating demand for this type of care. Traditionally, age-sex standardised utilisation rates for individual DRGs have been applied to Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) population projections to predict the future need for subacute services. Improved predictions became possible when some AR-DRGs were designated 'rehabilitation-sensitive'. This improved methodology has been used in several Australian jurisdictions. What does this paper add? This paper presents a new tool, or model, to predict demand for rehabilitation and GEM services based on in-patient acute activity. In this model, the

  19. Quality of primary care guidelines for acute low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tulder, Maurits W.; Tuut, Mariska; Pennick, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review of clinical guidelines. OBJECTIVES: To assess the methodologic quality of existing guidelines for the management of acute low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Guidelines are playing an increasingly important role in evidence-based practice. After publication...... of the Quebec Task Force in Canada in 1987 and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines in the United States in 1994, guidelines for acute low back pain were developed in many other countries. However, little is known about the methodologic quality of these guidelines. METHODS: Guidelines were...... selected by electronically searching MEDLINE and the Internet and through personal communication with experts in the field of low back pain research in primary care. The methodologic quality of the guidelines was assessed by two authors independently using the AGREE instrument. RESULTS: A total of 17...

  20. Effects of implementation of an urgent surgical care service on subspecialty general surgery training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Leanne; Buczkowski, Andrzej; Panton, Ormond M.N.; Sidhu, Ravi S.; Hameed, S. Morad

    2010-01-01

    Background In July 2007, a large Canadian teaching hospital realigned its general surgery services into elective general surgery subspecialty-based services (SUBS) and a new urgent surgical care (USC) service (also know in the literature as an acute care surgery service). The residents on SUBS had their number of on-call days reduced to enable them to focus on activities related to SUBS. Our aim was to examine the effect of the creation of the USC service on the educational experiences of SUBS residents. Methods We enrolled residents who were on SUBS for the 6 months before and after the introduction of the USC service. We collected data by use of a survey, WEB eVAL and recorded attendance at academic half days. Our 2 primary outcomes were residents’ attendance at ambulatory clinics and compliance with the reduction in the number of on-call days. Our secondary outcomes included residents’ time for independent study, attendance at academic half days, operative experience, attendance at multidisciplinary rounds and overall satisfaction with SUBS. Results Residents on SUBS had a decrease in the mean number of on-call days per resident per month from 6.28 to 1.84 (p = 0.006), an increase in mean attendance at academic half days from 65% to 87% (p = 0.028), at multidisciplinary rounds (p = 0.002) and at ambulatory clinics and an increase in independent reading time (p = 0.015), and they reported an improvement in their work environment. There was no change in the amount of time residents spent in the operating room or in their overall satisfaction with SUBS. Conclusion Residents’ education in the SUBS structure was positively affected by the creation of a USC service. Compliance with the readjustment of on-call duties was high and was identified as the single most significant factor in enabling residents to take full advantage of the unique educational opportunities available only while on SUBS. PMID:20334744

  1. Effect of smoking cessation intervention on results of acute fracture surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåsell, Hans; Adami, Johanna; Samnegård, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a major health and economic concern and is also known to have a significant negative effect on surgical outcomes. The benefits of a smoking cessation intervention prior to elective orthopaedic surgery have been evaluated previously. Our aim was to assess whether a smoking...... cessation program, initiated during the acute hospitalization period and carried out for six weeks, could reduce the number of complications following emergency surgical treatment of fractures....

  2. Delegation: what it means to acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Theresa S; Anthony, Mary K

    2008-02-01

    As health care costs rise, nurses are increasingly delegating tasks to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP). The purpose of this phenomenologic study was to describe delegation from the perspective of the acute care nurse. We analyzed interviews with staff nurses, and a description of the meaning of delegation was developed using Donabedian's structure, process, outcome model to organize the findings. The process of delegation centered on communication and on nurse-UAP relationship and was shaped by the structural themes. The outcomes of delegation included nursing and patient outcomes. An enhanced content on communication and interpersonal relations is needed in nursing education.

  3. Preventing Heel Pressure Ulcers: Sustained Quality Improvement Initiative in a Canadian Acute Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna-Bull, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    The setting for this quality improvement initiative designed to reduce the prevalence of facility-acquired heel pressure ulcers was a regional, acute-care, 490-bed facility in Ontario, Canada, responsible for dialysis, vascular, and orthopedic surgery. An interdisciplinary skin and wound care team designed an evidence-based quality improvement initiative based on a systematic literature review and standardization of heel offloading methods. The prevalence of heel pressure ulcers was measured at baseline (immediately prior to implementation of initiative) and at 1 and 4 years following implementation. The prevalence of facility-acquired heel pressure ulcers was 5.8% when measured before project implementation. It was 4.2% at 1 year following implementation and 1.6% when measured at the end of the 4-year initiative. Outcomes demonstrate that the initiative resulted in a continuous and sustained reduction in facility-acquired heel pressure ulcer incidence over a 4-year period.

  4. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure following prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnane Guella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Operative positions commonly used in urogenital surgeries when perineal exposure is required include the lithotomy and the exaggerated lithotomy positions (LPs, which expose patients to the risk of rhabdomyolysis. We report a patient with bladder outflow obstruction, benign prostatic hypertrophy and a very large bladder stone, which was removed with cystoscopy and cystolitholapaxy in the LP. The procedure was complicated by posterior bladder perforation and abdominal distention leading to prolonged surgery duration (5.5 h. The patient developed rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure (ARF without compartmental syndrome. On the other hand, there was a potential role of glycine solution, used for bladder irrigation, in the appearance of ARF. Overall, our case shows that rhabdomyolysis and ARF can develop in operative positions, and duration of surgery is the most important risk factor for such complications.

  5. Effects of ultrasound-guided stellate ganglion block on acute pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Mi; Kim, Eun Mi; Chung, Mi Hwa; Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Hyo Keun; Choi, Young Rong; Lee, Mihyeon

    2015-01-01

    Apart from a few case reports, the effectiveness of stellate ganglion block (SGB) as a monotherapy in acute nociceptive pain has not been determined. We aimed to assess the effects of SGB on postoperative pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Randomized, blind, controlled, clinical trial University Hospital outpatient Forty-six patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery were assigned randomly to 2 groups: group S included patients who underwent SGB prior to surgery and group C did not. In group S, subfascial ultrasound-guided SGB was conducted with 4 mL of 0.375% levobupivacaine. For the first postoperative 48 hours, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) and analgesic requirements were compared. The results of 40 patients were included in the study. There was no difference between groups with regards to analgesics requirement for the first postoperative 48 hours and no difference in VAS score (P > 0.05). Small number of patients in study. Preoperative ultrasound-guided SGB did not reduce postoperative acute pain in arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  6. Acute cholecystitis – early laparoskopic surgery versus antibiotic therapy and delayed elective cholecystectomy: ACDC-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büchler Markus W

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute cholecystitis occurs frequently in the elderly and in patients with gall stones. Most cases of severe or recurrent cholecystitis eventually require surgery, usually laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the Western World. It is unclear whether an initial, conservative approach with antibiotic and symptomatic therapy followed by delayed elective surgery would result in better morbidity and outcome than immediate surgery. At present, treatment is generally determined by whether the patient first sees a surgeon or a gastroenterologist. We wish to investigate whether both approaches are equivalent. The primary endpoint is the morbidity until day 75 after inclusion into the study. Design A multicenter, prospective, randomized non-blinded study to compare treatment outcome, complications and 75-day morbidity in patients with acute cholecystitis randomized to laparoscopic cholecystectomy within 24 hours of symptom onset or antibiotic treatment with moxifloxacin and subsequent elective cholecystectomy. For consistency in both arms moxifloxacin, a fluorquinolone with broad spectrum of activity and high bile concentration is used as antibiotic. Duration: October 2006 – November 2008 Organisation/Responsibility The trial was planned and is being conducted and analysed by the Departments of Gastroenterology and General Surgery at the University Hospital of Heidelberg according to the ethical, regulatory and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989 and the Good Clinical Practice guideline (GCP. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00447304

  7. Acute hospital dementia care: results from a national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Suzanne; O'Shea, Emma; O'Neill, Desmond; Gallagher, Paul; de Siún, Anna; McArdle, Denise; Gibbons, Patricia; Kennelly, Sean

    2016-05-31

    Admission to an acute hospital can be distressing and disorientating for a person with dementia, and is associated with decline in cognitive and functional ability. The objective of this audit was to assess the quality of dementia care in acute hospitals in the Republic of Ireland. Across all 35 acute public hospitals, data was collected on care from admission through discharge using a retrospective chart review (n = 660), hospital organisation interview with senior management (n = 35), and ward level organisation interview with ward managers (n = 76). Inclusion criteria included a diagnosis of dementia, and a length of stay greater than 5 days. Most patients received physical assessments, including mobility (89 %), continence (84 %) and pressure sore risk (87 %); however assessment of pain (75 %), and particularly functioning (36 %) was poor. Assessment for cognition (43 %) and delirium (30 %) was inadequate. Most wards have access at least 5 days per week to Liaison Psychiatry (93 %), Geriatric Medicine (84 %), Occupational Therapy (79 %), Speech & Language (81 %), Physiotherapy (99 %), and Palliative Care (89 %) Access to Psychology (9 %), Social Work (53 %), and Continence services (34 %) is limited. Dementia awareness training is provided on induction in only 2 hospitals, and almost half of hospitals did not offer dementia training to doctors (45 %) or nurses (48 %) in the previous 12 months. Staff cover could not be provided on 62 % of wards for attending dementia training. Most wards (84 %) had no dementia champion to guide best practice in care. Discharge planning was not initiated within 24 h of admission in 72 % of cases, less than 40 % had a single plan for discharge recorded, and 33 % of carers received no needs assessment prior to discharge. Length of stay was significantly greater for new discharges to residential care (p < .001). Dementia care relating to assessment, access to certain specialist services

  8. Surgical outcome of video-assisted thoracic surgery for acute thoracic empyema using pulsed lavage irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hiroshige; Taniguchi, Yuji; Miwa, Ken; Adachi, Yoshin; Fujioka, Shinji; Haruki, Tomohiro

    2010-03-01

    The essential points of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for acute thoracic empyema are the decortication of thickened pleura, resection of necrotic tissues and fibrin blocks, and drainage. Pulsed lavage irrigation, which is commonly used in orthopedic surgery as a method of sufficiently performing the technique, was used under a thoracoscope to study the efficacy of the treatment for acute thoracic empyema. The subjects comprised 31 patients who had undergone VATS for acute thoracic empyema. There were 26 men and 5 women with an average age of 60.5 years. For the surgical technique, the thickened pus-producing pleura were decorticated under a thoracoscope. The pulsed lavage irrigation system was used after the intrathoracic space had become a single cavity. Using the tip for an intraspinal space, lavage and suctioning were repeated with 5-10 l of a pressurized warm saline solution. Fibrin blocks and necrotic tissues were easily removed by spray washing with pressurized fluid. The operating time was 150.8 min; the amount of bleeding, including suctioned pleural effusion, was 478.5 g; and the postoperative duration of drainage was 10.7 days. During the postoperative course, the addition of open window thoracotomy due to the relapse of empyema due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was observed in only one patient (3.2%). All of the other patients improved despite their concomitant diseases. The use of pulsed lavage irrigation under a thoracoscope for acute thoracic empyema provides simple, efficient débridement or drainage.

  9. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal pressure is the pressure's state of balance within the abdominal cavity when a patient is at rest. This pressure may vary during mechanical ventilation or spontaneous breathing. The objective was to establish the intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain. From April to December, 2013, it was carried out a nested case-control study on patients with acute abdominal pain in the emergency room of a second level hospital. Thirty-seven patients fit the inclusion criteria; they all underwent surgery with a previous measurement of the intra-abdominal pressure. Based on the results of the anatomopathological study, we divided the patients into two groups: those with evidence of acute abdominal inflammatory process (n=28) (case group), and patients without evidence of acute abdominal inflammatory process (n=9) (control group). In the case group, 100 % of patients shown high intra-abdominal pressure with a p=0.01 (OR=5 [95 % CI=2.578-9.699]. In the case group, the mean intra-abdominal pressure was 11.46, and in the control group 9.2 (p=0.183). Abdominal pain requiring surgical intervention is directly related to intra-abdominal pressure>5 mmHg.

  10. Successful treatment of 54 patients with acute renal failure after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei CHEN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To evaluate the result of treatment of acute renal failure (ARF in patients after cardiac surgery. Methods The clinical data of 54 cases admitted to the hospital from Jan. 2004 to Jan. 2014 and suffered from ARF after cardiac surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Among 54 cases, there were 35 males and 19 females, aged from one month to 79 years with a median of 52 years. The surgical procedures included coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, 10 cases, valve surgery (22 cases, combined CABG and valve surgery (4 cases, operation on aorta (14 case, and radical correction of Fallot tetralogy (4 cases. After the operations mentioned above, 50 patients received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT, and 4 patients received peritoneal dialysis. Results Nine patients died, the mortality rate was 16.7%. Exploratory hemostasis by thoracotomy was performed in 8 patients, and extubation failure occurred in 4 cases. Of the 9 non-survivors, 6 died from multiple organ failure (MOF, 2 died from cerebral hemorrhage, and one died from acute respiratory failure. Serum creatinine (SCr and blood urea nitrogen (BUN levels declined obviously after CRRT and peritoneal dialysis (P<0.05, and all the patients were shown to have stable hemodynamics in the course of treatment, and no hemorrhage or embolism occurred. Conclusions ARF after cardiac surgery should be detected early and treated in time. CRRT and peritoneal dialysis are safe, convenient and effective procedures, and may decrease the mortality rate in patients with ARF after cardiac surgery. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0557-7402.2015.04.13

  11. Hemoadsorption treatment of patients with acute infective endocarditis during surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träger, Karl; Skrabal, Christian; Fischer, Guenther; Datzmann, Thomas; Schroeder, Janpeter; Fritzler, Daniel; Hartmann, Jan; Liebold, Andreas; Reinelt, Helmut

    2017-05-29

    Infective endocarditis is a serious disease condition. Depending on the causative microorganism and clinical symptoms, cardiac surgery and valve replacement may be needed, posing additional risks to patients who may simultaneously suffer from septic shock. The combination of surgery bacterial spreadout and artificial cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surfaces results in a release of key inflammatory mediators leading to an overshooting systemic hyperinflammatory state frequently associated with compromised hemodynamic and organ function. Hemoadsorption might represent a potential approach to control the hyperinflammatory systemic reaction associated with the procedure itself and subsequent clinical conditions by reducing a broad range of immuno-regulatory mediators. We describe 39 cardiac surgery patients with proven acute infective endocarditis obtaining valve replacement during CPB surgery in combination with intraoperative CytoSorb hemoadsorption. In comparison, we evaluated a historical group of 28 patients with infective endocarditis undergoing CPB surgery without intraoperative hemoadsorption. CytoSorb treatment was associated with a mitigated postoperative response of key cytokines and clinical metabolic parameters. Moreover, patients showed hemodynamic stability during and after the operation while the need for vasopressors was less pronounced within hours after completion of the procedure, which possibly could be attributed to the additional CytoSorb treatment. Intraoperative hemoperfusion treatment was well tolerated and safe without the occurrence of any CytoSorb device-related adverse event. Thus, this interventional approach may open up potentially promising therapeutic options for critically-ill patients with acute infective endocarditis during and after cardiac surgery, with cytokine reduction, improved hemodynamic stability and organ function as seen in our patients.

  12. Do acute care surgeons need bariatric surgical training to ensure optimal outcomes in obese patients with nonbariatric emergencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Andrea; Skinner, Ruby

    2018-03-01

    Acute care surgeons care for the entire breadth of the American adult population, including obese patients. As the population gets heavier, more patients will present to acute case surgeons with nonbariatric surgical emergencies. Do these surgeons need bariatric training to properly care for obese population? To evaluate our experience in obese population requiring acute surgery and compare outcomes based on surgeon expertise in bariatric surgery. Community teaching hospital, United States. Retrospective review of obese patients requiring acute surgical intervention. Surgeons were classified as bariatric surgeons (B, n = 2) versus nonbariatric surgeons (NB, n = 4). Demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, and outcomes based on surgeon training were compared. Two hundred three patients comprised the cohort. The mean body mass index was 37 ±6 kg/m 2 . The majority of procedures were laparoscopic (cholecystectomies n = 75, appendectomies n = 45). The remaining nonroutine laparoscopic cases were intestinal obstructions (n = 9), incarcerated hernias (n = 17), traumatic injuries (n = 48), and intestinal ischemia or perforation (n = 9). Bariatric surgeons performed 35% of cases, and risk profiles were similar between groups. Operative times were similar for cholecystectomies and appendectomies. Bariatric surgeons performed more nonroutine cases laparoscopically (7% B versus 2% NB, P = .001). Surgical site infections were low (2% B versus 4% NB, P = .4). Hospital length of stay was higher in the NB group at 9 ± 9 days versus 5 ± 4 days for B (P = .05). Mortality was 5%. Acute surgical procedures were performed in obese patients. Bariatric expertise favorably affected length of stay and the application of laparoscopy. Bariatric expertise may improve outcomes in nonbariatric emergencies, but further study is warranted. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute renal failure and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of orthotopic liver transplant patients versus nonelective abdominal surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, E; Cavazzuti, I; Busani, S; Trevisan, D; Zavatti, L; Ferrari, E; Girardis, M; Massimo, G

    2011-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) often complicates the postoperative period of patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT); it is habitually associated with high mortality rates. Similarly, patients undergoing major nonelective abdominal surgery are prone to ARF because of their frequent preexistent morbidities, abdominal sepsis, and needed for extended surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of ARF and use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) among OLT versus nonelective abdominal surgery patients and associations with clinical outcomes. We studied all the patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) from January 2008 to December 2009 after OLT or nonelective abdominal surgery. The inclusion criteria were an ICU stay of at least 48 hours and without prior end-stage renal failure. OLT patients (n=84) were younger and less severly ill than surgery patients (n=60). ARF occurrence was lower among the OLT (29%) than the surgery group (47%) requiring RRT in 71% and 53% of patients due to ARF, respectively. The ICU mortality of ARF patients in both groups (29% OLT and 51% surgery) were greater than among subjects without ARF (2% and 6%). The occurrence of ARF is common among these two patient groups, and associated with increased risk of death among in surgery (+45%) versus in OLT (+27%) patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekerstad N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Niklas Ekerstad,1,2 Björn W Karlson,3 Synneve Dahlin Ivanoff,4 Sten Landahl,5 David Andersson,6 Emelie Heintz,7 Magnus Husberg,2 Jenny Alwin2 1Department of Cardiology, NU (NÄL-Uddevalla Hospital Group, Trollhattan, 2Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, 4Centre for Ageing and Health, AGECAP, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, 5Department of Geriatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 6Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, 7Health Outcomes and Economic Evaluation Research Group, Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design: This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting: This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants: The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206 or control group (n=202. Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention: This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3. Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results: After adjustment by

  15. [Detection of palliative care needs in an acute care hospital unit. Pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Calero, Miguel Ángel; Julià-Mora, Joana María; Prieto-Alomar, Araceli

    2016-01-01

    Previous to wider prevalence studies, we designed the present pilot study to assess concordance and time invested in patient evaluations using a palliative care needs assessment tool. We also sought to estimate the prevalence of palliative care needs in an acute care hospital unit. A cross-sectional study was carried out, 4 researchers (2 doctors and 2 nurses) independently assessed all inpatients in an acute care hospital unit in Manacor Hospital, Mallorca (Spain), using the validated tool NECPAL CCOMS-ICO©, measuring time invested in every case. Another researcher revised clinical recordings to analise the sample profile. Every researcher assessed 29 patients, 15 men and 14 women, mean age 74,03 ± 10.25 years. 4-observer concordance was moderate (Kappa 0,5043), tuning out to be higher between nurses. Mean time per patient evaluation was 1.9 to 7.72 minutes, depending on researcher. Prevalence of palliative care needs was 23,28%. Moderate concordance lean us towards multidisciplinary shared assessments as a method for future research. Avarage of time invested in evaluations was less than 8 minutes, no previous publications were identified regarding this variable. More than 20% of inpatients of the acute care unit were in need of palliative care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety Perceptions of Health Care Leaders in 2 Canadian Academic Acute Care Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David H; Nyce, James M; Van Den Kerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2017-06-01

    An estimated 7.4% of patients admitted to acute care facilities in Canada experience injury or death due to health care mishaps, and 38% of these events are deemed preventable. Commitment of executive leaders to a culture of safety is important for the reduction of risk to Canadian patients. The purpose of this study was to examine the safety climate from a leader's perspective in 2 Canadian acute care settings, with attention paid to high reliability organization (HRO) principles. The Patient Safety Culture in Healthcare Organizations questionnaire was administered to leaders in 2 acute care hospitals in Ontario between June and January 2009. The primary outcome measures were senior leadership support for safety and supervisory leadership support for safety. Misalignment between the safety climate and HRO principles was defined as greater than 10% of respondents reporting problematic or neutral leadership support for safety. Of the 142 respondents (67% response rate), both medical/nursing leaders and tertiary care clinical leaders were significantly more likely than board/administrative leaders to report problematic/neutral responses. Overall, executive leadership perceptions of the safety climate were not aligned with HRO principles. The significant differences in response between board/administrative leaders and those involved in frontline patient care suggest that a weak safety culture exists in these 2 health care organizations. The cultivation of a stronger organizational safety culture, in alignment with HRO principles, could lead to lower rates of preventable mishaps and support risk identification and mitigation in perioperative settings.

  17. Management of ramsay hunt syndrome in an acute palliative care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrenik Ostwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by combination of herpes infection and lower motor neuron type of facial nerve palsy. The disease is caused by a reactivation of Varicella Zoster virus and can be unrepresentative since the herpetic lesions may not be always be present (zoster sine herpete and might mimic other severe neurological illnesses. Case Report: A 63-year-old man known case of carcinoma of gall bladder with liver metastases, post surgery and chemotherapy with no scope for further disease modifying treatment, was referred to palliative care unit for best supportive care. He was on regular analgesics and other supportive treatment. He presented to Palliative Medicine outpatient with 3 days history of ipsilateral facial pain of neuropathic character, otalgia, diffuse vesciculo-papular rash over ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of left trigeminal nerve distribution of face and ear, and was associated with secondary bacterial infection and unilateral facial edema. He was clinically diagnosed to have Herpes Zoster with superadded bacterial infection. He was treated with tablet Valacyclovir 500 mg four times a day, Acyclovir cream for local application, Acyclovir eye ointment for prophylactic treatment of Herpetic Keratitis, low dose of Prednisolone, oral Amoxicillin and Clindamycin for 7 days, and Pregabalin 150 mg per day. After 7 days of treatment, the rash and vesicles had completely resolved and good improvement of pain and other symptoms were noted. Conclusion: Management of acute infections and its associated complications in an acute palliative care setting improves both quality and length of life.

  18. Severity of acute pain after breast surgery is associated with the likelihood of subsequently developing persistent pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2010-09-01

    Persistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) after surgery for breast cancer has a prevalence of 20% to 52%. Neuroplastic changes may play a role in the aetiology of this pain. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between acute pain after surgery for breast cancer and the likelihood of subsequently developing PPSP.

  19. Preoperative antihypertensive medication intake and acute kidney injury after major vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duceppe, Emmanuelle; Lussier, Anne-Renee; Beaulieu-Dore, Roxane; LeManach, Yannick; Laskine, Mikhael; Fafard, Josee; Durand, Madeleine

    2018-01-27

    Postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent after major vascular surgery and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It remains unclear whether the administration of combined oral antihypertensive medications on the day of surgery can increase the risk of postoperative AKI. We performed a retrospective cohort study of hypertensive patients undergoing elective major vascular surgery to determine the association between the number of antihypertensive medications continued on the morning of surgery and AKI at 48 hours postoperatively. A total of 406 patients who had undergone suprainguinal vascular surgery were included, and 10.3% suffered postoperative AKI. In multivariable analysis, the number of antihypertensive medications taken on the morning of surgery was independently associated with AKI (P = .026). Compared with patients who took no medication, taking one medication (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-3.75) and taking two or more medications (aOR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.13-6.44) were associated with a 1.6-fold and 2.7-fold increased risk of postoperative AKI, respectively. Other predictors of AKI were suprarenal surgery (aOR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.53-7.44), age (aOR, 2.29 per 10 years; 95% CI, 1.40-3.74), length of surgery (aOR, 1.40 per 1 hour; 95% CI, 1.10-1.76), hemoglobin drop (aOR, 1.37 per 10 g/L; 95% CI, 1.10-1.74), and history of coronary artery disease (aOR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.08-5.00). In patients undergoing major vascular surgery who are treated with chronic antihypertensive therapy, the administration of antihypertensive drugs on the morning of surgery is independently associated with an increased risk of postoperative AKI. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. General surgery resident rotations in surgical critical care, trauma, and burns: what is optimal for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Lena M; Biester, Thomas W; Jurkovich, Gregory J; Buyske, Jo; Malangoni, Mark A; Lewis, Frank R

    2016-10-01

    There are no specific Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education General Surgery Residency Program Requirements for rotations in surgical critical care (SCC), trauma, and burn. We sought to determine the experience of general surgery residents in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. Data analysis of surgical rotations of American Board of Surgery general surgery resident applicants (n = 7,299) for the last 8 years (2006 to 2013, inclusive) was performed through electronic applications to the American Board of Surgery Qualifying Examination. Duration (months) spent in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations, and postgraduate year (PGY) level were examined. The total months in SCC, trauma and burn rotations was mean 10.2 and median 10.0 (SD 3.9 months), representing approximately 16.7% (10 of 60 months) of a general surgery resident's training. However, there was great variability (range 0 to 29 months). SCC rotation duration was mean 3.1 and median 3.0 months (SD 2, min to max: 0 to 15), trauma rotation duration was mean 6.3 and median 6.0 months (SD 3.5, min to max: 0 to 24), and burn rotation duration was mean 0.8 and median 1.0 months (SD 1.0, min to max: 0 to 6). Of the total mean 10.2 months duration, the longest exposure was 2 months as PGY-1, 3.4 months as PGY-2, 1.9 months as PGY-3, 2.2 months as PGY-4 and 1.1 months as PGY-5. PGY-5 residents spent a mean of 1 month in SCC, trauma, and burn rotations. PGY-4/5 residents spent the majority of this total time in trauma rotations, whereas junior residents (PGY-1 to 3) in SCC and trauma rotations. There is significant variability in total duration of SCC, trauma, and burn rotations and PGY level in US general surgery residency programs, which may result in significant variability in the fund of knowledge and clinical experience of the trainee completing general surgery residency training. As acute care surgery programs have begun to integrate emergency general surgery with SCC, trauma, and burn rotations

  1. Prevalence of acute neuropathic pain after cancer surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P N Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Acute neuropathic pain (ANP is an under-recognised and under-diagnosed condition and often difficult to treat. If left untreated, it may further transform into persistent post-operative chronic pain leading to a disability. Aims: This prospective study was undertaken on 300 patients to identify the prevalence of ANP in the post-operative period by using a neuropathic pain detection questionnaire tool. Methods: This is an open-label study in which patients with six different types of cancer surgeries (Thoracic, gastro-intestinal, gynae/urology, bone/soft-tissue, head and neck and breast subgroups-50 each were included for painDETECT questionnaire tool on the 2 nd and 7 th day surgery. Results: This study found a 10% point prevalence of ANP. Analysis showed that 25 patients had ′possible′ ANP, the maximum from urological cancer surgery (6 followed by thoracic surgery (5. Five patients were found to have ′positive′ ANP including 2 groin node dissection, 2 hemipelvectomy and 1 oesophagectomy. Conclusion: Significant relationship between severity of post-operative pain was found with the occurrence of ANP in the post-operative period requiring a special attention to neuropathic pain assessment. Larger studies are required with longer follow-up to identify accurately the true prevalence and causative factors of ANP after surgery.

  2. Implementation of knowledge-based palliative care in acute care settings : obstacles, opportunities and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Background and aim: Quality improvement is continuously ongoing at different levels in our healthcare system. In Sweden, as in other countries, guidelines are important for quality improvement in healthcare, since they summarize the best available evidence. Improved living conditions and enhanced treatments for a variety of diseases have resulted in increased longevity and the need for palliative care has therefore also increased. A high proportion of deaths occur in acute care...

  3. Enhancing systems to improve the management of acute, unscheduled care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Sabina A; Pines, Jesse M; Asplin, Brent R; Epstein, Stephen K

    2011-06-01

    For acutely ill patients, health care services are available in many different settings, including hospital-based emergency departments (EDs), retail clinics, federally qualified health centers, and outpatient clinics. Certain conditions are the sole domain of particular settings: stabilization of critically ill patients can typically only be provided in EDs. By contrast, many conditions that do not require hospital resources, such as advanced radiography, admission, and same-day consultation can often be managed in clinic settings. Because clinics are generally not open nights, and often not on weekends or holidays, the ED remains the only option for face-to-face medical care during these times. For patients who can be managed in either setting, there are many open research questions about which is the best setting, because these venues differ in terms of access, costs of care, and potentially, quality. Consideration of these patients must be risk-adjusted, as patients may self-select a venue for care based upon perceived acuity. We present a research agenda for acute, unscheduled care in the United States developed in conjunction with an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality-funded conference hosted by the American College of Emergency Physicians in October 2009, titled "Improving the Quality and Efficiency of Emergency Care Across the Continuum: A Systems Approach." Given the possible increase in ED utilization over the next several years as more people become insured, understanding differences in cost, quality, and access for conditions that may be treated in EDs or clinic settings will be vital in guiding national health policy. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Long-term acute care hospitals and Georgia Medicaid: Utilization, outcomes, and cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S. Cole

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Because most research on long-term acute care hospitals has focused on Medicare, the objective of this research is to describe the Georgia Medicaid population who received care at a long-term acute care hospital, the type and volume of services provided by these long-term acute care hospitals, and the costs and outcomes of these services. For those with select respiratory conditions, we descriptively compare costs and outcomes to those of patients who received care for the same services in acute care hospitals. Methods: We describe Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to a long-term acute care hospital between 2011 and 2012. We compare them to a population of Georgia Medicaid recipients admitted to an acute care hospital for one of five respiratory diagnosis-related groups. Measurements used include patient descriptive information, admissions, diagnosis-related groups, length of stay, place of discharge, 90-day episode costs, readmissions, and patient risk scores. Results: We found that long-term acute care hospital admissions for Medicaid patients were fairly low (470 90-day episodes and restricted to complex cases. We also found that the majority of long-term acute care hospital patients were blind or disabled (71.2%. Compared to patients who stayed at an acute care hospital, long-term acute care hospital patients had higher average risk scores (13.1 versus 9.0, lengths of stay (61 versus 38 days, costs (US$143,898 versus US$115,056, but fewer discharges to the community (28.4% versus 51.8%. Conclusion: We found that the Medicaid population seeking care at long-term acute care hospitals is markedly different than the Medicare populations described in other long-term acute care hospital studies. In addition, our study revealed that Medicaid patients receiving select respiratory care at a long-term acute care hospital were distinct from Medicaid patients receiving similar care at an acute care hospital. Our findings suggest that

  5. Percutaneous cholecystostomy to treat acute cholecystitis in patients with high risk for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortázar García, R; Sánchez Rodríguez, P; Ramos García, M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the results of percutaneous cholecystostomy for urgent treatment of acute cholecystitis, with the aim of identifying factors that predict survival. To analyze the recurrence of cholecystitis after catheter withdrawal in patients considered unsuitable candidates for delayed surgery, with the aim of identifying factors that predict recurrence. We reviewed 40 patients who underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy in a two-year period. We analyzed survival during hospitalization in relation with fever, abdominal pain, leukocytosis, and C-reactive protein before and after the procedure. We analyzed the recurrence of cholecystitis after catheter withdrawal in patients considered unsuitable candidates for delayed surgery, as well as the influence of obstruction seen on cholangiography, age, sex, and comorbidities on the recurrence rate. During the hospital stay, 4 (10%) patients died of septic shock. Cholecystostomy improved fever, leukocytosis, and abdominal pain within five days of the procedure, but these improvements did not have a statistically significant effect on survival and were not therefore considered useful prognostic factors. Among the 15 patients considered unsuitable candidates for delayed surgery, 6 (40%) had recurrences of cholecystitis during a mean follow-up period of 6.7 months after catheter withdrawal. We found no association between recurrence and any of the parameters analyzed. Outcomes in our series of patients with high risk for surgery who underwent cholecystostomy for urgent treatment of acute cholecystitis were similar to those reported in other series. Withdrawing the catheter in patients considered unsuitable candidates for delayed surgery is not recommended due to the high risk of recurrence of cholecystitis in comparison with other series. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-rated worry in acute care telephone triage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Huibers, Linda; Pedersen, Kristoffer

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Telephone triage is used to assess acute illness or injury. Clinical decision making is often assisted by triage tools that lack callers' perspectives. This study analysed callers' perception of urgency, defined as degree of worry in acute care telephone calls. AIM: To explore...... the caller's ability to quantify their degree of worry, the association between degree of worry and variables related to the caller, the effect of degree of worry on triage outcome, and the thematic content of the caller's worry. DESIGN AND SETTING: A mixed-methods study with simultaneous convergent design...... combining descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of 180 calls to a Danish out-of-hours service. METHOD: The following quantitative data were measured: age of caller, sex, reason for encounter, symptom duration, triage outcome, and degree of worry (rated from 1 = minimally worried to 5 = extremely...

  7. Casuistry of physiotherapy care of patient after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery of knee

    OpenAIRE

    Škráčková, Barbora

    2017-01-01

    Title: Casuistry of physiotherapy care of patient after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery of knee Objectives: The purpose of the theoretical part of the thesis is to introduce the issue of soft tissue injury of the knee joint, especially anterior cruciate ligament. Acquaintance with conservative and surgical treatment, physical therapy and physiotherapeutical care after ligament reconstruction surgery. The special part of the thesis presents casuistry of physiotherapy care of ...

  8. Post-operative analgesia for major abdominal surgery and its effectiveness in a tertiary care hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Aliya; Latif, Naveed; Khan, Robyna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Post-operative pain is often inadequately treated. Optimal utilization of the available resources is essential for improving pain management. Aims: The aim of our study was to determine pain management strategies employed after major abdominal surgeries at our institute and their efficacy and safety. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgeries were included. Post-operative analgesic strategy, co-analgesics used, pain and sedation scores, motor block, nausea and vomiting were recorded and patient satisfaction was determined. Results: Data was collected on 100 patients. Epidural analgesia was used in 61, patient controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA) in 25 and opioid infusion in 14 patients. Multimodal analgesia was employed in 98 patients. The level of epidural was between L1-L3 in 31, T10-L1 in 20 and T8-T10 in 10 patients. Pethidine was used in 80% of patients receiving PCIA. Patients with epidurals at T8-T10 had lower pain scores. Fifteen patients had motor block, 73% of which were with epidural at L1-L3. Fourteen patients complained of nausea. Ninety nine out of 100 patients were satisfied with their analgesia. Conclusion: Epidural, PCIA and opioid infusions are used for pain relief after major abdominal surgeries at our hospital. Although there is limited drug availability, regular assessments and appropriate dose adjustments by acute pain management service (APMS) and use of multimodal analgesia led to a high level of patient satisfaction. We recommend that feedback to the primary anesthesiologists by APMS is of utmost importance to enable improvement in practice. PMID:24249983

  9. Acute postoperative neurological deterioration associated with surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm: incidence, predictors, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, Kelly B; Todd, Michael M; Bayman, Emine O; Torner, James C

    2012-06-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant morbidity and mortality, even among patients who reach medical attention in good neurological condition. Many patients have neurological decline in the perioperative period, which contributes to long-term outcomes. The focus of this study is to characterize the incidence of, characteristics predictive of, and outcomes associated with acute postoperative neurological deterioration in patients undergoing surgery for ruptured intracranial aneurysm. The Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysm Surgery Trial (IHAST) was a multicenter randomized clinical trial that enrolled 1001 patients and assesssed the efficacy of hypothermia as neuroprotection during surgery to secure a ruptured intracranial aneurysm. All patients had a radiographically confirmed SAH, were classified as World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) Grade I-III immediately prior to surgery, and underwent surgery to secure the ruptured aneurysm within 14 days of SAH. Neurological assessment with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) was performed preoperatively, at 24 and 72 hours postoperatively, and at time of discharge. The primary outcome variable was a dichotomized scoring based on an IHAST version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) in which a score of 1 represents a good outcome and a score > 1 a poor outcome, as assessed at 90-days' follow-up. Data from IHAST were analyzed for occurrence of a postoperative neurological deterioration. Preoperative and intraoperative variables were assessed for associations with occurrence of postoperative neurological deterioration. Differences in baseline, intraoperative, and postoperative variables and in outcomes between patients with and without postoperative neurological deterioration were compared with Fisher exact tests. The Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare variables reported as means. Multiple logistic regression was used to adjust for covariates associated with occurrence

  10. Improving Prevention, Early Recognition and Management of Acute Kidney Injury after Major Surgery: Results of a Planning Meeting with Multidisciplinary Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T James

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of review: Acute kidney injury (AKI is common after major surgery, and is associated with morbidity, mortality, increased length of hospital stay, and high health care costs. Although recent guidelines for AKI provide recommendations for identification of patients at risk, monitoring, diagnosis, and management of AKI, there is lack of understanding to guide successful implementation of these recommendations into clinical practice. Sources of information: We held a planning meeting with multidisciplinary stakeholders to identify barriers, facilitators, and strategies to implement recommendations for prevention, early identification, and management of AKI after major surgery. Barriers and facilitators to knowledge use for peri-operative AKI prevention and care were discussed. Findings: Stakeholders identified barriers in knowledge (how to identify high-risk patients, what criteria to use for diagnosis of AKI, attitudes (self-efficacy in preventive care and management of AKI, and behaviors (common use of diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, withholding of intravenous fluids, and competing time demands in peri-operative care. Educational, informatics, and organizational interventions were identified by stakeholders as potentially useful elements for future interventions for peri-operative AKI. Limitation: Meeting participants were from a single centre. Implications: The information and recommendations obtained from this stakeholder's meeting will be useful to design interventions to improve prevention and early care for AKI after major surgery.

  11. The bulldozer and the ballet dancer: aspects of nurses' caring approaches in acute psychiatric intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkdahl, A; Palmstierna, T; Hansebo, G

    2010-08-01

    Demanding conditions in acute psychiatric wards inhibit provision of safe, therapeutic care and leave nurses torn between humanistic ideals and the harsh reality of their daily work. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' caring approaches within this context. Data were collected from interviews with nurses working in acute psychiatric intensive care. Data were analysed using qualitative analysis, based on interpretive description. Results revealed a caring-approach continuum on which two approaches formed the main themes: the bulldozer and the ballet dancer. The bulldozer approach functioned as a shield of power that protected the ward from chaos. The ballet dancer approach functioned as a means of initiating relationships with patients. When examining the data from a theoretical perspective of caring and uncaring encounters in nursing, the ballet dancer approach was consistent with a caring approach, while the bulldozer approach was more complex and somewhat aligned with uncaring approaches. Conclusions drawn from the study are that although the bulldozer approach involves a risk for uncaring and harming actions, it also brings a potential for caring. This potential needs to be further explored and nurses should be encouraged to reflect on how they integrate paternalistic nursing styles with person-centred care.

  12. Insufficiency of Medical Care for Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Dats

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research: to analyze insufficiency of medical care for patients with acute respiratory failure in the ICU.Materials and methods. It was a retrospective study of 160 patients' medical records (age from 15 to 84 years with acute respiratory failure (ARF hospitalized in the ICUs of 24 regional and municipal hospitals of the Irkutsk Oblast. Medical records were provided by the Territorial Fund of Compulsory Medical Insurance of citizens of Irkutsk region.The results. The basic defects in conducting mechanical ventilation were associated with improper lung function evaluation, microbiological tests of sputum and radiology. ARF was not diagnosed in 32 of 160 ICU patients (20%. In 23% of cases the causes of ARF were not diagnosed. The greatest part of the defects in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure was found during the treatment of hypoxemia: no recovery of the respiratory tract patency, no prescription of oxygen for hypoxemia, no mechanical ventilation for persistent hypoxemia on the background of maximum oxygen supply and late switching to mechanical ventilation at the stage of hypoxic cardiac arrest.Conclusions. The use of pulse oximetry alone in the absence of arterial blood gas analysis in 98% of patients with acute respiratory failure and failure to perform the lung X-ray and/or MSCT imaging in 21% of patients were accompanied by a high level of undiagnosed acute respiratory distress syndrome (78%, lung contusion (60%, pulmonary embolism (40%, cardiogenic pulmonary edema (33%, and nosocomial pneumonia (28%. Defects of treatment of patients with ARF in 46% of cases were caused by inadequate management of hypoxemia associated with the recovery of the respiratory tract patency, prescription of oxygen, and mechanical ventilation. 

  13. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Morten; Waldau, Tina; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality...... influence the survival of many high-risk surgical patients. As a pioneer trial in the area, it will provide important data on the feasibility of future large-scale randomised clinical trials evaluating different levels of postoperative care.Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01209663....

  14. Bundling Post-Acute Care Services into MS-DRG Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A bundled hospital payment system that encompasses both acute and post-acute care has been proposed as a means of creating financial incentives in the Medicare...

  15. Examining financial performance indicators for acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jeffrey H; Wheeler, John R C

    2013-01-01

    Measuring financial performance in acute care hospitals is a challenge for those who work daily with financial information. Because of the many ways to measure financial performance, financial managers and researchers must decide which measures are most appropriate. The difficulty is compounded for the non-finance person. The purpose of this article is to clarify key financial concepts and describe the most common measures of financial performance so that researchers and managers alike may understand what is being measured by various financial ratios.

  16. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: clinical recognition and preventive management in chiropractic acute care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtz, T A

    2001-09-01

    To present clinical information relevant to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and its appearance in chiropractic acute care practice. The National Library of Medicine MEDLINE database was used, along with the bibliographies of selected articles and textbooks commonly found in chiropractic college libraries and bookstores. Clinical studies from the English literature were selected if they pertained to incidence, clinical relevancy, or the association of ARDS with commonly-seen diagnoses in chiropractic neuromusculoskeletal or orthopedic practice. All relevant studies identified by the search were evaluated based on information pertinent to chiropractic management of acute care patients. ARDS is a pulmonary distress syndrome with a high mortality rate. Recognizable indications for the possible development of ARDS include chest pain, head injury, and thoracic spine pain with or without trauma. Clinical evaluation, radiographic findings, and laboratory findings are presented to assist practitioners in identifying this disease process of multiple etiology. A study of the basic pathophysiologic processes that occur in the formation of ARDS is presented to help practitioners gain clinical appreciation. Strategies for preventing respiratory distress in chiropractic patients are also presented and include use of the postural position and the clinical maxim of "slow, deep breathing despite pain" to lessen incident rates of subjects at risk. Although ARDS may not be prevalent in chiropractic practice, it is important for physicians to be aware of the clinical basics (including its pathophysiology), its medical significance, and the preventive strategies that may be used to minimize its occurrence. This basic understanding will further advance knowledge of this disease complex.

  17. Aggregation of Marginal Gains in Cardiac Surgery: Feasibility of a Perioperative Care Bundle for Enhanced Recovery in Cardiac Surgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ian O; Garratt, Claire; Guha, Ranj; Desai, Jatin; Chaubey, Sanjay; Wang, Yanzhong; Leonard, Sara; Kunst, Gudrun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of a perioperative care bundle for enhanced recovery after cardiac surgery (ERACS). A prospective, observational study. A major urban teaching and university hospital and tertiary referral center. The study included 53 patients undergoing cardiac surgery before implementation of an ERACS protocol (pre-ERACS group) and 52 patients undergoing cardiac surgery after implementation of an ERACS protocol (ERACS group). Based on recommendations from a consensus review in colorectal surgery, the following enhanced recovery perioperative care bundle was applied: detailed preoperative information, avoidance of prolonged fasting periods preoperatively, preoperative carbohydrate beverages, optimization of analgesia with avoidance of long-acting opioids, prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting, early enteral nutrition postoperatively, and early mobilization. The authors hypothesized that length of hospital stay would be reduced with ERACS. Secondary outcome variables included a composite of postoperative complications and pain scores. Whereas the length of stay in the group of patients receiving the bundle of enhanced recovery interventions remained unchanged compared with the non-ERACS group, there was a statistically significant reduction in the number of patients in the ERACS group presenting with one or more postoperative complications (including hospital-acquired infections, acute kidney injury, atrial fibrillation, respiratory failure, postoperative myocardial infarction, and death). In addition, postoperative pain scores were improved significantly in the ERACS group. This pilot study demonstrated that ERACS is feasible and has the potential for improved postoperative morbidity after cardiac surgery. A larger multicenter quality improvement study implementing perioperative care bundles would be the next step to further assess outcomes in ERACS patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  18. Ketamine in adult cardiac surgery and the cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit: An evidence-based clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mazzeffi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a unique anesthetic drug that provides analgesia, hypnosis, and amnesia with minimal respiratory and cardiovascular depression. Because of its sympathomimetic properties it would seem to be an excellent choice for patients with depressed ventricular function in cardiac surgery. However, its use has not gained widespread acceptance in adult cardiac surgery patients, perhaps due to its perceived negative psychotropic effects. Despite this limitation, it is receiving renewed interest in the United States as a sedative and analgesic drug for critically ill-patients. In this manuscript, the authors provide an evidence-based clinical review of ketamine use in cardiac surgery patients for intensive care physicians, cardio-thoracic anesthesiologists, and cardio-thoracic surgeons. All MEDLINE indexed clinical trials performed during the last 20 years in adult cardiac surgery patients were included in the review.

  19. Evaluation of The Products of Ambulatory Care and Products of Ambulatory Surgery Classification System For the Military Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-14

    Care 54500 54505 Biopsy, Testis (Open) 58340 74741 Hysterosalpingogram 58993 89300 Post Coital Test 59001 59000 Amniocentesis, Genetic 59002 59000...Degeneration 3716 37160 Keratoconus 3720 37200 Conjunctivitis, Acute 3721 37210 Conjunctivitis, Chronic 3722 37220 Blepharoconjuctivitis 3724 37240

  20. Veterans Affairs general surgery service: the last bastion of integrated specialty care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteet, Stephen; Tarpley, Margaret; Tarpley, John L; Pearson, A Scott

    2011-11-01

    In a time of increasing specialization, academic training institutions provide a compartmentalized learning environment that often does not reflect the broad clinical experience of general surgery practice. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of the Veterans Affairs (VA) general surgery surgical experience to both index Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements and as a unique integrated model in which residents provide concurrent care of multiple specialty patients. Institutional review board approval was obtained for retrospective analysis of electronic medical records involving all surgical cases performed by the general surgery service from 2005 to 2009 at the Nashville VA. Over a 5-year span general surgery residents spent an average of 5 months on the VA general surgery service, which includes a postgraduate year (PGY)-5, PGY-3, and 2 PGY-1 residents. Surgeries involved the following specialties: surgical oncology, endocrine, colorectal, hepatobiliary, transplant, gastrointestinal laparoscopy, and elective and emergency general surgery. The surgeries were categorized according to ACGME index requirements. A total of 2,956 surgeries were performed during the 5-year period from 2005 through 2009. Residents participated in an average of 246 surgeries during their experience at the VA; approximately 50 cases are completed during the chief year. On the VA surgery service alone, 100% of the ACGME requirement was met for the following categories: endocrine (8 cases); skin, soft tissue, and breast (33 cases); alimentary tract (78 cases); and abdominal (88 cases). Approximately 50% of the ACGME requirement was met for liver, pancreas, and basic laparoscopic categories. The VA hospital provides an authentic, broad-based, general surgery training experience that integrates complex surgical patients simultaneously. Opportunities for this level of comprehensive care are decreasing or absent in many general surgery training

  1. Effect of smoking cessation intervention on results of acute fracture surgery: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåsell, Hans; Adami, Johanna; Samnegård, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a major health and economic concern and is also known to have a significant negative effect on surgical outcomes. The benefits of a smoking cessation intervention prior to elective orthopaedic surgery have been evaluated previously. Our aim was to assess whether a smoking cessa...... cessation program, initiated during the acute hospitalization period and carried out for six weeks, could reduce the number of complications following emergency surgical treatment of fractures.......Tobacco smoking is a major health and economic concern and is also known to have a significant negative effect on surgical outcomes. The benefits of a smoking cessation intervention prior to elective orthopaedic surgery have been evaluated previously. Our aim was to assess whether a smoking...

  2. Inpatient Dialysis Unit Project Development: Redesigning Acute Hemodialysis Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Executive leaders of an acute care hospital performed a market and financial analysis, and created a business plan to establish an inpatient hemodialysis unit operated by the hospital to provide safe, high-quality, evidence-based care to the population of individuals experiencing end stage renal disease (ESRD) within the community. The business plan included a SWOT (Strengths - Weaknesses - Opportunities - Threats) analysis to assess advantages of the hospital providing inpatient hemodialysis services versus outsourcing the services with a contracted agency. The results of the project were a newly constructed tandem hemodialysis room and an operational plan with clearly defined key performance indicators, process improvement initiatives, and financial goals. This article provides an overview of essential components of a business plan to guide the establishment of an inpatient hemodialysis unit. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  3. Treatment of acute infectious endophthalmitis by vitrectomy surgery with silicon oil tamponade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe theclinical effect of acute infectious endophthalmitis by vitrectomy surgery with silicon oil tamponade.METHODS:The clinical data of 23 patients(23 eyesdiagnosed with acute endophthalmitis in our hospital from January, 2008 to February, 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, excluding the patients with intraocular foreign body. All the patients were undergone routine closed three-channel vitrectomy with silicon oil, including 6 eyes(complicated with traumatic cataractwith Ⅰ lensectomy and Ⅰ intraocular lens(IOLimplantation, 3 eyes(complicated with traumatic cataractwith Ⅰ lensectomy and Ⅱ IOL implantation, 4 eyes(complicated with cataract during silicon oil tamponadewith Ⅱ lensectomy and Ⅱ IOL implantation, 5 eyes(4 eyes with traumatic endophthalmitis and 1 eye with entophthalmia caused by glaucoma filtering bleb leakingreserved lens, 1 eye(post-cataract surgery entophthalmiawith Ⅰ IOL explantation and Ⅱ IOL implantation, and 4 eyes(post-cataract surgery entophthalmiareserved lens. RESULTS:Within follow-up 6~24mo, inflammation after vitrectomy surgery with silicon oil tamponade was controlled in all the 23 patients(23 eyes. Final visual acuity was improved in 21 eyes(91%. The intraocular pressure(IOPof 2 eyes were over 30mmHg. IOP of 1 eye was controlled after silicon oil removed, and IOP of the other eye after silcon oil extraction was still high and needed to be controlled by IOP lowering drugs. CONCLUSION: The patients of acuteinfectious endophthalmitis should undergo vitrectomy with silicon oil tamponade as early as possible, which can effectively controli endophthalmitis and improve visual acuity.

  4. suPAR is associated with risk of future acute surgery and post-operative mortality in acutely admitted medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Jeppe; Alstrup, Morten; Rasmussen, Line J H

    2018-01-01

    with available suPAR was defined as the index admission, and patients were followed via national registries until 1 January 2016. The risk of acute surgery during the entire follow-up period as well as the 90-day post-operative mortality risk was modeled by Cox regression analyses adjusted for sex, age, C......, which is associated with higher mortality than elective surgery, and if it predicts post-operative mortality. METHODS: A retrospective registry-based cohort study of 17,312 patients admitted to an acute medical unit in Denmark, from 18 November 2013 until 30 September 2015. The first admission...... elective- or no surgery (p 0.0001). The hazard ratio (HR) for acute surgery was 1.50 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.42-1.59) for every doubling of the suPAR level in the adjusted Cox regression analysis. Death within 90 days occurred in 439 (18.3%) patients receiving acute surgery, and the adjusted HR...

  5. Critical care admission following elective surgery was not associated with survival benefit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahan, Brennan C; Koulenti, Desponia; Arvaniti, Kostoula

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: As global initiatives increase patient access to surgical treatments, there is a need to define optimal levels of perioperative care. Our aim was to describe the relationship between the provision and use of critical care resources and postoperative mortality. METHODS: Planned analysis...... of data collected during an international 7-day cohort study of adults undergoing elective in-patient surgery. We used risk-adjusted mixed-effects logistic regression models to evaluate the association between admission to critical care immediately after surgery and in-hospital mortality. We evaluated...... hospital-level associations between mortality and critical care admission immediately after surgery, critical care admission to treat life-threatening complications, and hospital provision of critical care beds. We evaluated the effect of national income using interaction tests. RESULTS: 44,814 patients...

  6. Opioid doses and acute care utilization outcomes for adults with sickle cell disease: ED versus acute care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokie, Robert E; Montminy, Chariz; Dionisio, Corissa; Farooqui, Muhammad Ahmen; Gowhari, Michel; Yao, Yingwei; Suarez, Marie L; Ezenwa, Miriam O; Schlaeger, Judith M; Wang, Zaijie J; Wilkie, Diana J

    2018-01-01

    Acute care units (ACUs) with focused sickle cell disease (SCD) care have been shown to effectively address pain and limit hospitalizations compared to emergency departments (ED), the reason for differences in admission rates is understudied. Our aim was compare effects of usual care for adult SCD pain in ACU and ED on opioid doses and discharge pain ratings, hospital admission rates and lengths of stay. In a retrospective, comparative cohort, single academic tertiary center study, 148 adults with sickle cell pain received care in the ED, ACU or both. From the medical records we documented opioid doses, unit discharge pain ratings, hospital admission rates, and lengths of stay. Pain on admission to the ED averaged 8.7±1.5 and to the ACU averaged 8.0±1.6. The average pain on discharge from the ED was 6.4±3.0 and for the ACU was 4.5±2.5. 70% of the 144 ED visits resulted in hospital admissions as compared to 37% of the 73 ACU visits. Admissions from the ED or ACU had similar inpatient lengths of stay. Significant differences between ED and ACU in first opioid dose and hourly opioid dose were noted. Applying guidelines for higher dosing of opioids for acute painful episodes in adults with SCD in ACU was associated with improved pain outcomes and decreased hospitalizations, compared to ED. Adoption of this approach for SCD pain in ED may result in improved outcomes, including a decrease in hospital admissions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Fluid resuscitation practices in cardiac surgery patients in the USA: a survey of health care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Aronson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluid resuscitation during cardiac surgery is common with significant variability in clinical practice. Our goal was to investigate current practice patterns of fluid volume expansion in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries in the USA. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 124 cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiovascular anesthesiologists, and perfusionists. Survey questions were designed to assess clinical decision-making patterns of intravenous (IV fluid utilization in cardiovascular surgery for five types of patients who need volume expansion: (1 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB without bleeding, (2 patients undergoing CPB with bleeding, (3 patients undergoing acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH, (4 patients requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO or use of a ventricular assist device (VAD, and (5 patients undergoing either off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG surgery or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. First-choice fluid used in fluid boluses for these five patient types was requested. Descriptive statistics were performed using Kruskal-Wallis test and follow-up tests, including t tests, to evaluate differences among respondent groups. Results The most commonly preferred indicators of volume status were blood pressure, urine output, cardiac output, central venous pressure, and heart rate. The first choice of fluid for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding was crystalloids, whereas 5% albumin was the most preferred first choice of fluid for bleeding patients. For volume expansion during ECMO or VAD, the respondents were equally likely to prefer 5% albumin or crystalloids as a first choice of IV fluid, with 5% albumin being the most frequently used adjunct fluid to crystalloids. Surgeons, as a group, more often chose starches as an adjunct fluid to crystalloids for patients needing volume expansion during CPB without bleeding. Surgeons

  8. Follow-up analysis of federal process of care data reported from three acute care hospitals in rural Appalachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills ES

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available E Scott Sills,1,2 Liubomir Chiriac,3 Denis Vaughan,4 Christopher A Jones,5 Shala A Salem11Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Pacific Reproductive Center, Irvine, CA, USA; 2Graduate School of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK; 3Department of Mathematics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA; 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland; 5Global Health Economics Unit and Department of Surgery, Center for Clinical and Translational Science, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, USABackground: This investigation evaluated standardized process of care data collected on selected hospitals serving a remote rural section of westernmost North Carolina.Methods: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data were analyzed retrospectively for multiple clinical parameters at Fannin Regional Hospital, Murphy Medical Center, and Union General Hospital. Data were analyzed by paired t-test for individual comparisons among the three study hospitals to compare the three facilities with each other, as well as with state and national average for each parameter.Results: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services “Hospital Compare” data from 2011 showed Fannin Regional Hospital to have significantly higher composite scores on standardized clinical process of care measures relative to the national average, compared with Murphy Medical Center (P = 0.01 and Union General Hospital (P = 0.01. This difference was noted to persist when Fannin Regional Hospital was compared with Union General Hospital using common state reference data (P = 0.02. When compared with national averages, mean process of care scores reported from Murphy Medical Center and Union General Hospital were both lower but not significantly different (−3.44 versus −6.07, respectively, P = 0.54.Conclusion: The range of process of care scores submitted by acute care

  9. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  10. Feasibility of progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward after hip fracture surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lise Kronborg

    Full Text Available Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown.To examine the feasibility of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility.A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD age of 79.4 (8.3 years were included between June and December 2012.A daily (on weekdays program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using ankle weight cuffs in 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum loadings.The primary outcome was the change in training load (kg during the knee-extension strength training. The secondary outcomes were changes in hip fracture-related pain and maximal isometric knee-extension strength.The strength training was commenced at a mean of 2.4 (0.7 days after surgery. The training loads (kilograms lifted increased from 1.6 (0.8 to 4.3 (1.7 kg over 4.3 (2.2 training sessions (P<.001. The maximal isometric knee-extension strength of the fractured limb increased from 0.37 (0.2 to 0.61 (0.3 Nm/kg (P<.001, while the average strength deficit in the fractured limb decreased from 50% to 32% (% non-fractured, P<.001. Only 3 of 212 sessions were not performed because of severe hip fracture-related pain.Progressive knee-extension strength training of the fractured limb commenced in the acute ward seems feasible, and may reduce strength asymmetry between limbs without hip pain interfering. The clinical efficacy needs confirmation in a randomized controlled design.ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01616030.

  11. Access to specialized surgical care | Saidi | Annals of African Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 13, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Management of acute complicated mastoiditis at an urban, tertiary care pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadersohi, Saied; Young, Nancy M; Smith-Bronstein, Virginia; Hoff, Stephen; Billings, Kathleen R

    2017-10-01

    To describe the presentation and management of acute complicated mastoiditis in children. Retrospective case series. An analysis of pediatric patients with acute complicated mastoiditis treated at an urban, tertiary care children's hospital from 2007 to 2014 was performed. Forty-eight patients presented with a total of 67 complications of acute mastoiditis. Mean age at presentation was 4.8 years (range = 0.1-15.3 years). The most common complications were subperiosteal abscess (n = 22, 45.8%), epidural abscess (n = 16, 33.3%), and sigmoid sinus thrombosis (n = 14, 29.2%). The most common pathogens isolated included Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 14, 29.2%) and group A streptococcus (n = 10, 20.8%). Multidrug resistance was not associated with complication type. Surgical management included myringotomy ± tympanostomy tube placement in 46 (95.8%) patients (the only surgery in 10), drainage of subperiosteal abscess without mastoidectomy in 18 (37.5%) patients, and mastoidectomy in 21 (43.8%) total patients. Patients presenting with intracranial complications were the most likely to undergo a mastoidectomy. Anticoagulation was used in the management of nine of 14 (64.3%) patients presenting with sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Neurosurgical interventions (n = 7, 14.6% patients) were primarily performed to manage increased intracranial pressure. Subperiosteal abscess was the most common complication of acute mastoiditis, and when occurring as the sole complication was successfully managed with antibiotics and surgical intervention that did not include mastoidectomy. Epidural abscess and sigmoid sinus thrombosis were more prevalent than reported in prior series and were managed more aggressively. These patients were more likely to need neurosurgical interventions. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2321-2327, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Activity in GEriatric acute CARe (AGECAR: rationale, design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleck Steven J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Activity in GEriatric acute CARe (AGECAR is a randomised control trial to assess the effectiveness of an intrahospital strength and walk program during short hospital stays for improving functional capacity of patients aged 75 years or older. Methods/Design Patients aged 75 years or older admitted for a short hospital stay (≤14 days will be randomly assigned to either a usual care (control group or an intervention (training group. Participants allocated in the usual care group will receive normal hospital care and participants allocated in the intervention group will perform multiple sessions per day of lower limb strength training (standing from a seated position and walking (10 min bouts while hospitalized. The primary outcome to be assessed pre and post of the hospital stay will be functional capacity, using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, and time to walk 10 meters. Besides length of hospitalization, the secondary outcomes that will also be assessed at hospital admission and discharge will be pulmonary ventilation (forced expiratory volume in one second, FEV1 and peripheral oxygen saturation. The secondary outcomes that will be assessed by telephone interview three months after discharge will be mortality, number of falls since discharge, and ability to cope with activities of daily living (ADLs, using the Katz ADL score and Barthel ADL index. Discussion Results will help to better understand the potential of regular physical activity during a short hospital stay for improving functional capacity in old patients. The increase in life expectancy has resulted in a large segment of the population being over 75 years of age and an increase in hospitalization of this same age group. This calls attention to health care systems and public health policymakers to focus on promoting methods to improve the functional capacity of this population. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01374893.

  14. The use of oral nutritional supplements in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2016-06-23

    Oral nutritional supplements offer support to patients in acute care who are undernourished or at risk of malnutrition. Yet doubts remain over cost and compliance. Omorogieva Ojo, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care at University of Greenwich weighs up the evidence.

  15. The use of oral nutritional supplements in the acute care setting

    OpenAIRE

    Ojo, Omorogieva

    2016-01-01

    Oral nutritional supplements offer support to patients in acute care who are undernourished or at risk of malnutrition. Yet doubts remain over cost and compliance. Omorogieva Ojo, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care at University of Greenwich weighs up the evidence.

  16. Variations in the risk of acute kidney injury across intraabdominal surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjae; Brady, Joanne E; Li, Guohua

    2014-11-01

    The literature on perioperative acute kidney injury (AKI) focuses mainly on cardiac and major vascular surgery. Among noncardiac general surgery procedures, intraabdominal general surgery has been identified as high risk for developing AKI, but variations in AKI risk and its impact on 30-day mortality among different types of abdominal surgeries are not well characterized. We used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005-2010) to identify patients in 15 intraabdominal general surgery procedure categories (n = 457,656). AKI was defined as an increase in the creatinine level of >2 mg/dL above baseline and/or dialysis. Relative risk regression modeling was used to assess the relative risks of AKI across the procedures. The relationships among surgical procedure, AKI, and 30-day mortality stratified by procedure type were assessed using relative risk regression. The overall incidence of AKI among intraabdominal surgery patients was 1.1%, which varied from 0.2% in appendectomy and 0.3% in gastric bypass patients to 2.6% in small bowel resection and 3.5% in exploratory laparotomy patients. Of the patients who developed AKI, 31.3% died within 30 days, compared with 1.9% of those who did not develop AKI. After adjusting for comorbidities and operative factors, AKI was associated with a 3.5-fold increase in the risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted risk ratio, 3.51, 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.29-3.74). Among individual procedures, the estimated adjusted risk ratio of 30-day mortality associated with AKI ranged from 1.87 (95% CI, 1.62-2.17) in exploratory laparotomy to 31.6 (95% CI, 17.9-55.9) in gastric bypass. The incidence of AKI and the impact of AKI on 30-day mortality vary markedly across procedures within intraabdominal general surgery. This highlights the importance of preoperative risk stratification and identifies procedure type as a significant risk factor for AKI and 30-day mortality.

  17. Acute Mesenteric Ischemia after Cardiac Surgery: An Analysis of 52 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuneyt Eris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI is a rare but serious complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence, outcome, and perioperative risk factors of AMI in the patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods. From January 2005 to May 2013, all patients who underwent cardiac surgery were screened for participation, and patients with registered gastrointestinal complications were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed. Results. The study included 6013 patients, of which 52 (0.86% patients suffered from AMI, 35 (67% of whom died. The control group (150 patients was randomly chosen from among cases undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Preoperative parameters including age (, renal insufficiency (, peripheral vascular disease (, preoperative inotropic support (, poor left ventricular ejection fraction (, cardiogenic shock (, and preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP support ( revealed significantly higher levels in the AMI group. Among intra- and postoperative parameters, CPB time (, dialysis (, inotropic support (, prolonged ventilator time (, and IABP support ( appeared significantly higher in the AMI group than the control group. Conclusions. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment should be initiated as early as possible in any patient suspected of AMI, leading to dramatic reduction in the mortality rate.

  18. Guidelines for Perioperative Care for Liver Surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloul, Emmanuel; Hübner, Martin; Scott, Michael; Snowden, Chris; Prentis, James; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Garden, O James; Farges, Olivier; Kokudo, Norihiro; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Demartines, Nicolas

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) is a multimodal pathway developed to overcome the deleterious effect of perioperative stress after major surgery. In colorectal surgery, ERAS pathways reduced perioperative morbidity, hospital stay and costs. Similar concept should be applied for liver surgery. This study presents the specific ERAS Society recommendations for liver surgery based on the best available evidence and on expert consensus. A systematic review was performed on ERAS for liver surgery by searching EMBASE and Medline. Five independent reviewers selected relevant articles. Quality of randomized trials was assessed according to the Jadad score and CONSORT statement. The level of evidence for each item was determined using the GRADE system. The Delphi method was used to validate the final recommendations. A total of 157 full texts were screened. Thirty-seven articles were included in the systematic review, and 16 of the 23 standard ERAS items were studied specifically for liver surgery. Consensus was reached among experts after 3 rounds. Prophylactic nasogastric intubation and prophylactic abdominal drainage should be omitted. The use of postoperative oral laxatives and minimally invasive surgery results in a quicker bowel recovery and shorter hospital stay. Goal-directed fluid therapy with maintenance of a low intraoperative central venous pressure induces faster recovery. Early oral intake and mobilization are recommended. There is no evidence to prefer epidural to other types of analgesia. The current ERAS recommendations were elaborated based on the best available evidence and endorsed by the Delphi method. Nevertheless, prospective studies need to confirm the clinical use of the suggested protocol.

  19. Predicting discharge to a long-term acute care hospital after admission to an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szubski, Caleb R; Tellez, Alejandra; Klika, Alison K; Xu, Meng; Kattan, Michael W; Guzman, Jorge A; Barsoum, Wael K

    2014-07-01

    Long-term acute care hospitals are an option for patients in intensive care units who require prolonged care after an acute illness. Predicting use of these facilities may help hospitals improve resource management, expenditures, and quality of care delivered in intensive care. To develop a predictive tool for early identification of intensive care patients with increased probability of transfer to such a hospital. Data on 1967 adults admitted to intensive care at a tertiary care hospital between January 2009 and June 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The prediction model was developed by using multiple ordinal logistic regression. The model was internally validated via the bootstrapping technique and externally validated with a control cohort of 950 intensive care patients. Among the study group, 146 patients (7.4%) were discharged to long-term acute care hospitals and 1582 (80.4%) to home or other care facilities; 239 (12.2%) died in the intensive care unit. The final prediction algorithm showed good accuracy (bias-corrected concordance index, 0.825; 95% CI, 0.803-0.845), excellent calibration, and external validation (concordance index, 0.789; 95% CI, 0.754-0.824). Hypoalbuminemia was the greatest potential driver of increased likelihood of discharge to a long-term acute care hospital. Other important predictors were intensive care unit category, older age, extended hospital stay before admission to intensive care, severe pressure ulcers, admission source, and dependency on mechanical ventilation. This new predictive tool can help estimate on the first day of admission to intensive care the likelihood of a patient's discharge to a long-term acute care hospital. ©2014 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. [Management of avoidable acute transfers from an intermediate care geriatric facility to acute hospitals: critical aspects of an intervention protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colprim, Daniel; Casco, Mónica; Malumbres, Jennifer; Rodríguez, Ginés; Inzitari, Marco

    The unplanned transfers (UT) from post-acute intermediate care facilities, are associated with adverse outcomes for patients, and a significant cost to the system. We present a practical protocol and the design of an intervention study aimed at reducing avoidable UT from a geriatric post-acute rehabilitation setting to acute care hospitals. A quasi-experimental non randomized study. The intervention consists in: 1) protocol for early detection of symptoms in order to conduct a pro-active management of decompensation; 2) an advanced care planning structured protocol for the acute decompensations. We will compare the intervention group with a parallel and a historical cohort for demographic, functional, cognitive, comorbidity and social variables. number of UT to acute care hospitals. This is a quasi-experimental study, focused on everyday care practice that intends to assess the impact of multi-disciplinary and multi-factorial intervention to reduce UT from a post-acute rehabilitation unit. We expect that the project results will be useful for future randomized and controlled studies. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Demographic diversity, value congruence, and workplace outcomes in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Michael G; Mark, Barbara A

    2012-06-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Demographic Diversity, Value Congruence, and Workplace Outcomes in Acute Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Michael G.; Mark, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing scholars and healthcare administrators often assume that a more diverse nursing workforce will lead to better patient and nurse outcomes, but this assumption has not been subject to rigorous empirical testing. In a study of nursing units in acute care hospitals, the influence of age, gender, education, race/ethnicity, and perceived value diversity on nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, and patient satisfaction were examined. Support was found for a negative relationship between perceived value diversity and all outcomes and for a negative relationship between education diversity and intent to stay. Additionally, positive relationships were found between race/ethnicity diversity and nurse job satisfaction as well as between age diversity and intent to stay. From a practice perspective, the findings suggest that implementing retention, recruitment, and management practices that foster a strong shared value system among nurses may lead to better workplace outcomes. PMID:22377771

  3. Assessment of quality of care in acute postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutinović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Managing of acute postoperative pain should be of great interest for all hospital institutions, as one of the key components of patients satisfaction, which indicates quality, as well as the outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of nursing care in managing acute postoperative pain and to establish factors which influence patients assessment of the same. Method. The investigation was conducted on the sample of 135 patients hospitalized in surgical clinics of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study, by interviewing patients during the second postoperative day and collecting sociodemographic variables, type of surgical procedure and applied analgesic therapy which were taken from their medical documentation. The modified questionnaire of the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP was used as the instrument of the investigation. The data were processed with suitable mathematical statistics methods such as multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA, discriminative and other parametric procedures and methods. Roy's test, Pearson's coefficient contingency (χ, multiple correlation coefficient (R were conducted amongst other invariant procedures. Results. The mean score for the individual items of SCQIPP questionnaire was between 2.0 and 4.7 (scale range 1-5 and the percentage of patients answers 'strongly agree' ranged from 4.4 to 77%. The smallest number of positive answers were given by the patients for the item 'In order to assess pain intensity, some of the staff asked me at least once in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening to show the number from 0-10'. Most of the patients (57% evaluated severe pain during the previous 24 hours, as moderate pain, which represents significantly greater number of patients which complain of severe pain and mild pain (p < 0.001. The analysis of patients evaluation (MANOVA p

  4. Vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury in pediatric cardiac intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Brady S; Hilvers, Pamela S; Dinh, Kimberly; Arikan, Ayse A; Checchia, Paul; Bronicki, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a significant source of morbidity among critically ill pediatric patients, including those that have undergone cardiac surgery. Vancomycin may contribute to AKI in pediatric patients admitted to a cardiac intensive care unit. Patients admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit at Texas Children's Hospital and received vancomycin over a 4-year period were included in a case-control study. Patients were excluded if they underwent renal replacement therapy during vancomycin therapy. Patient demographic and disease state variables, vancomycin therapy variables, and use of other nephrotoxic medications were collected. The overall incidence of AKI was calculated based on doubling of serum creatinine during or within 72 hours of vancomycin therapy (vancomycin-associated AKI [vAKI]). Patients who developed vAKI were matched with three patients who did not develop vAKI, and conditional logistic regression was used to determine independent risk factors for vAKI. A total of 418 patients met study criteria (males 57.8%) and infants (31 days to 2 years) were the most populous age group (48.6%). Vancomycin-associated AKI occurred in 30 patients (7.2%), which resulted in a total of 120 patients (30 cases; 90 controls). No significant differences were noted in vancomycin dosing between groups. Vancomycin-associated AKI patients were less likely to have undergone cardiac surgery (P Vancomycin-associated AKI occurs infrequently in the pediatric cardiac intensive care population and is strongly associated with patient critical illness. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Admission, management and outcomes of acute pancreatitis in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Peter S; Mittal, Anhubav; Brown, Lisa; McArthur, Colin; Phillips, Anthony J R; Petrov, Max; Windsor, John A

    2017-12-01

    A review of the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) at a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) in Auckland, New Zealand, was published in 2004. This paper aims to update this series and identify changes in admission criteria, management and outcomes. A retrospective review of patients admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, with AP from 2003 to 2014 was undertaken and data compared with the previous study (1988-2001). Eighty-four patients (male 53, mean ± SD age = 56.9 ± 15 years) with 85 admissions to ICU from 2003 to 2014 were compared with 112 patients in the previous study. Maori were over-represented. Median duration of symptoms prior to admission to ICU decreased from 7 to 3 days. The proportion of total AP patients admitted to ICU halved and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score on admission decreased from mean 19.9 ± 8.2 SD to 15.4 ± 7.3 (P < 0.001). Two thirds of patients had persistent organ failure. The use of enteral feeding doubled from 46/112 (41%) to 71/85 (84%) (P < 0.001). The use of primary percutaneous drainage increased from 14/112 (13%) to 24/85 (28%) (P = 0.007). Rate of necrosectomy was similar (36/112 (32%) versus 20/85 (24%), P = 0.205), although minimally invasive necrosectomy was introduced. Overall hospital mortality decreased by 29% (P = 0.198). There have been changes to the admission criteria and management in line with evolving guidelines and, overall, outcomes have improved. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Mortality and postoperative care pathways after emergency gastrointestinal surgery in 2904 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Møller, M H

    2014-01-01

    in emergency GI surgical patients. We aimed to present mortality data and evaluate the postoperative care pathways used after emergency GI surgery. METHODS: A population-based cohort study with prospectively collected data from six Capital Region hospitals in Denmark. We included 2904 patients undergoing major...... surgery' were independently associated with 30 day mortality; odds ratio 5.45 (95% CI: 3.48-8.56) and 3.27 (95% CI: 2.45-4.36), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality in emergency major GI surgical patients remains high. Failure to allocate patients to the appropriate level of care immediately after surgery......BACKGROUND: Emergency major gastrointestinal (GI) surgery carries a considerable risk of mortality and postoperative complications. Effective management of complications and appropriate organization of postoperative care may improve outcome. The importance of the latter is poorly described...

  7. Acute kidney injury in neonatal intensive care: Medicines involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safina, A I; Daminova, M A; Abdullina, G A

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates in the intensive care units and neonatal intensive care (NICU) according Plotz et al. ranges from 8% to 22% [3]. According to Andreoli, neonatal death due to AKI in NICU amounts up to 10-61% [1]. It should be in the reasons of AKI emphasize.The role of certain drugs, which are widely used in modern neonatology: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), antibiotics (aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, carbapenems, 3rd generation cephalosporins), furosemide, enalapril, in contributing to AKI should be emphasized [2]. To identify risk factors for acute kidney injury in neonates in intensive care units and intensive care. We performed a prospective observational case-control study of full-term newborns who were treated in the intensive care unit and neonatal intensive care of the "Children's city hospital №1" Kazan and NICU №3 "Children's Republican Clinical Hospital" in 2011-2014 years.The study included 86 term infants in critical condition, who were hospitalized to the NICU on the first days of life, - the main group. The main criterion of AKI in neonates according to neonatal AKIN classification (2011) is a serum creatinine concentration ≥1.5 mg/dL. We subdivided the main group into two subgroups:subgroup I, AKI+ consisted of 12 term infants in critical condition with the serum creatinine level ≥ 1,5 mg/dL at the age of not younger than 48 hours after birth, which was 14% of all full-term newborns who were at the NICU;subgroup II, AKI- consisted of 74 term infants in critical condition with the serum creatinine level arithmetic means (M) with, standard deviation (σ) and standard error of the mean (m) according to standard formulas. All children were admitted to primary and emergency care with subsequent transfer to the NICU at 1-2 days of life and further treatment in the department of pathology of newborns (DPN). The duration of hospitalization of infants at the NICU for the main group averaged 5,9

  8. Mortality and readmission of outcomes after discharge from the surgical intensive care unit to long-term, acute-care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michelle C; Strosberg, David S; Jones, Teresa S; Bhakta, Ankur; Jones, Edward L; Lyaker, Michael R; Byrd, Cindy A; Sobol, Carly; Eiferman, Daniel S

    2017-05-01

    Patients with prolonged hospitalizations in the surgical intensive care unit often have ongoing medical needs that require further care at long-term, acute-care hospitals upon discharge. Setting expectations for patients and families after protracted operative intensive care unit hospitalization is challenging, and there are limited data to guide these conversations. The purpose of this study was to determine patient survival and readmission rates after discharge from the surgical intensive care unit directly to a long-term, acute-care hospital. All patients who were admitted to the surgical intensive care unit at an academic, tertiary care medical center from 2009-2014 and discharged directly to long-term, acute-care hospitals were retrospectively reviewed. Patients represented all surgical subspecialties excluding cardiac and vascular surgery patients. Primary outcomes included 30-day readmission, and 1- and 3-year mortality rates following discharge. In total, 296 patients were discharged directly from the surgical intensive care unit to a long-term, acute-care hospital during the study period. There were 190 men (64%) and mean age was 61 ± 16 years. Mean duration of stay in the surgical intensive care unit was 27 ± 17 days. The most frequent complication was prolonged mechanical ventilation (277, 94%) followed by pneumonia (139, 47%), sepsis (78, 26%), and acute renal failure (32, 11%); 93% of patients required tracheostomy and enteral feeding access prior to discharge, and 19 patients (6%) were newly dependent on hemodialysis. The readmission rate was 20%. There were 86 deaths within 1 year from discharge (29%) with an overall 3-year mortality of 32%. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, a history of end-stage renal disease had a greater odds of readmission (odds ratio 6.07, P = .028). Patients with history of cancer had greater odds of 1- and 3-year mortality (odds ratio = 2.99, P = .028 and odds ratio 2.56, P = .053, respectively

  9. Method for Assigning Priority Levels in Acute Care (MAPLe-AC predicts outcomes of acute hospital care of older persons - a cross-national validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljunggren Gunnar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although numerous risk factors for adverse outcomes for older persons after an acute hospital stay have been identified, a decision making tool combining all available information in a clinically meaningful way would be helpful for daily hospital practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Method for Assigning Priority Levels for Acute Care (MAPLe-AC to predict adverse outcomes in acute care for older people and to assess its usability as a decision making tool for discharge planning. Methods Data from a prospective multicenter study in five Nordic acute care hospitals with information from admission to a one year follow-up of older acute care patients were compared with a prospective study of acute care patients from admission to discharge in eight hospitals in Canada. The interRAI Acute Care assessment instrument (v1.1 was used for data collection. Data were collected during the first 24 hours in hospital, including pre-morbid and admission information, and at day 7 or at discharge, whichever came first. Based on this information a crosswalk was developed from the original MAPLe algorithm for home care settings to acute care (MAPLe-AC. The sample included persons 75 years or older who were admitted to acute internal medical services in one hospital in each of the five Nordic countries (n = 763 or to acute hospital care either internal medical or combined medical-surgical services in eight hospitals in Ontario, Canada (n = 393. The outcome measures considered were discharge to home, discharge to institution or death. Outcomes in a 1-year follow-up in the Nordic hospitals were: living at home, living in an institution or death, and survival. Logistic regression with ROC curves and Cox regression analyses were used in the analyses. Results Low and mild priority levels of MAPLe-AC predicted discharge home and high and very high priority levels predicted adverse outcome at discharge both in the Nordic

  10. Initial experience using a femtosecond laser cataract surgery system at a UK National Health Service cataract surgery day care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Alexander C; Dhallu, Sandeep K; Maurino, Vincenzo; Wilkins, Mark R

    2016-07-27

    To describe the initial outcomes following installation of a cataract surgery laser system. National Health Service cataract surgery day care unit in North London, UK. 158 eyes of 150 patients undergoing laser-assisted cataract surgery. Laser cataract surgery using the AMO Catalys femtosecond laser platform. intraoperative complications including anterior and posterior capsule tears. docking to the laser platform, successful treatment delivery, postoperative visual acuities. Mean case age was 67.7±10.8 years (range 29-88 years). Docking was successful in 94% (148/158 cases), and in 4% (6/148 cases) of these, the laser delivery was aborted part way during delivery due to patient movement. A total of 32 surgeons, of grades from junior trainee to consultant, performed the surgeries. Median case number per surgeon was 3 (range from 1-20). The anterior capsulotomy was complete in 99.3% of cases, there were no anterior capsule tears (0%). There were 3 cases with posterior capsule rupture requiring anterior vitrectomy, and 1 with zonular dialysis requiring anterior vitrectomy (4/148 eyes, 2.7%). These 4 cases were performed by trainee surgeons, and were either their first laser cataract surgery (2 surgeons) or their first and second laser cataract surgeries (1 surgeon). Despite the learning curve, docking and laser delivery were successfully performed in almost all cases, and surgical complication rates and visual outcomes were similar to those expected based on national data. Complications were predominately confined to trainee surgeons, and with the exception of intraoperative pupil constriction appeared unrelated to the laser-performed steps. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Postoperative rescue closure of patent foramen ovale in the clinical setting of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure and stroke following coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L Díaz-Gómez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of intraoperative diagnosis and successful deferred percutaneous closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO in the clinical setting of acute refractory hypoxemic respiratory failure and new-onset ischemic stroke in an elderly patient after coronary artery bypass graft. Perioperative morbidity (i.e. severe hypoxemia, worsening right ventricular dysfunction, and embolic stroke that is potentially related to intraoperatively diagnosed PFO during cardiac surgery can complicate management in the Intensive Care Unit and perhaps affect the patient′s outcome. Although the PFO closure can be challenging in the clinical setting of hypoxemic respiratory failure and stroke following cardiac surgery, it can be a reasonable perioperative option.

  12. The Experience of Witnessing Patients' Trauma and Suffering among Acute Care Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary E.; Buchanan, Marla J.

    2011-01-01

    A large body of research provides evidence of workplace injuries to those in the nursing profession. Research on workplace stress and burnout among medical professionals is also well known; however, the profession of acute care nursing has not been examined with regards to work-related stress. This qualitative study focused on acute care nurses'…

  13. Applying lean Six Sigma to reduce linen loss in an acute care hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying lean Six Sigma to reduce linen loss in an acute care hospital. ... International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... This paper describes a case study in an acute care hospital that formed a cross-functional team to apply the Lean Six Sigma problem solving methodology and tools to improve the linen ...

  14. Comparison between laparoscopic surgery and laparotomy for the treatment of acute ruptured ectopic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the stress reaction after laparoscopic surgery and laparotomy for the treatment of acute ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Methods: 68 patients with acute ruptured ectopic pregnancy who received emergency surgical treatment in Pangang Group General Hospital between July 2013 and September 2016 were selected and analyzed retrospectively, including 29 patients with laparoscopic surgery and 39 patients with laparotomy who were included in the laparoscopy group and laparotomy group respectively. Before operation as well as 1d and 3d after operation, serum was collected to detect biochemical indexes and stress hormones. Results: 1d and 3d after operation, serum Alb, AST, ALT, BUN, Scr and UA levels were not significantly different between laparoscopy group and laparotomy group (P>0.05; serum NE (149.65±17.58 vs. 186.61±23.52, 162.32±20.15 vs. 295.86±28.97 pg/ml, E (135.28±19.85 vs. 179.55±22.52, 152.11±18.52 vs. 231.38±29.58 pg/ml, ACTH (3.88±0.49 vs. 5.12±0.82, 4.39±0.52 vs. 6.58±0.92 pmol/L, Cor (177.64±20.12 vs. 224.59±35.55, 185.21±22.12 vs. 289.45±41.28 ng/ml, Ins (12.21±1.86 vs. 17.58±2.52, 18.95±2.68 vs. 27.61±4.12 IU/ mL, PRA (1.65±0.25 vs. 2.18±0.35, 1.73±0.21 vs. 2.55±0.47ng/ml, AngII (44.12±7.64 vs. 59.63±7.92, 52.27±7.95 vs. 76.12±9.35 pg/ml and ALD (155.22±19.76 vs. 205.62±24.52, 189.10±22.58 vs. 316.85±42.85 pg/ml levels of laparoscopy group were significantly lower than those of laparotomy group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgery for acute ruptured ectopic pregnancy causes less adrenal stress reaction and RAAS system stress reaction, and the overall level of trauma is lower than that of laparotomy.

  15. Guidelines for perioperative care in elective rectal/pelvic surgery: Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS®) Society recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, J; Thacker, J; Carli, F; Fearon, K C H; Norderval, S; Lobo, D N; Ljungqvist, O; Soop, M; Ramirez, J

    2012-12-01

    This review aims to present a consensus for optimal perioperative care in rectal/pelvic surgery, and to provide graded recommendations for items for an evidenced-based enhanced recovery protocol. Studies were selected with particular attention paid to meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials and large prospective cohorts. For each item of the perioperative treatment pathway, available English-language literature was examined, reviewed and graded. A consensus recommendation was reached after critical appraisal of the literature by the group. For most of the protocol items, recommendations are based on good-quality trials or meta-analyses of good-quality trials (evidence grade: high or moderate). Based on the evidence available for each item of the multimodal perioperative care pathway, the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Society, European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) and International Association for Surgical Metabolism and Nutrition (IASMEN) present a comprehensive evidence-based consensus review of perioperative care for rectal surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  16. Recovery at the post anaesthetic care unit after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gärtner, Rune; Callesen, Torben; Kroman, Niels Thorndahl

    2010-01-01

    Extant literature shows that women having undergone breast cancer surgery have substantial problems at the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU). Based on nursing reports and elements of the discharge scoring system recommended by The Danish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine...

  17. Perspectives on the value of biomarkers in acute cardiac care and implications for strategic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaify, Antoine; Garcia, Annie; Succar, Sami; Ibrahim, Antoine; Moussallem, Nicolas; Kossaify, Mikhael; Grollier, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers in acute cardiac care are gaining increasing interest given their clinical benefits. This study is a review of the major conditions in acute cardiac care, with a focus on biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic assessment. Through a PubMed search, 110 relevant articles were selected. The most commonly used cardiac biomarkers (cardiac troponin, natriuretic peptides, and C-reactive protein) are presented first, followed by a description of variable acute cardiac conditions with their relevant biomarkers. In addition to the conventional use of natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, and C-reactive protein, other biomarkers are outlined in variable critical conditions that may be related to acute cardiac illness. These include ST2 and chromogranin A in acute dyspnea and acute heart failure, matrix metalloproteinase in acute chest pain, heart-type fatty acid binding protein in acute coronary syndrome, CD40 ligand and interleukin-6 in acute myocardial infarction, blood ammonia and lactate in cardiac arrest, as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atrial fibrillation. Endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in the physiopathology of most cardiac diseases, whether acute or chronic. In summary, natriuretic peptides, cardiac troponin, C-reactive protein are currently the most relevant biomarkers in acute cardiac care. Point-of-care testing and multi-markers use are essential for prompt diagnostic approach and tailored strategic management.

  18. Sex, race, and consideration of bariatric surgery among primary care patients with moderate to severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Christina C; Huskey, Karen W; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Colten, Mary Ellen; Davis, Roger B; Hamel, Marybeth

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is one of few obesity treatments to produce substantial weight loss but only a small proportion of medically-eligible patients, especially men and racial minorities, undergo bariatric surgery. To describe primary care patients' consideration of bariatric surgery, potential variation by sex and race, and factors that underlie any variation. Telephone interview of 337 patients with a body mass index or BMI > 35 kg/m(2) seen at four diverse primary care practices in Greater-Boston. Patients' consideration of bariatric surgery. Of 325 patients who had heard of bariatric surgery, 34 % had seriously considered surgery. Men were less likely than women and African Americans were less likely than Caucasian patients to have considered surgery after adjustment for sociodemographics and BMI. Comorbid conditions did not explain sex and racial differences but racial differences dissipated after adjustment for quality of life (QOL), which tended to be higher among African American than Caucasian patients. Physician recommendation of bariatric surgery was independently associated with serious consideration for surgery [OR 4.95 (95 % CI 2.81-8.70)], but did not explain variation in consideration of surgery across sex and race. However, if recommended by their doctor, men were as willing and African American and Hispanic patients were more willing to consider bariatric surgery than their respective counterparts after adjustment. Nevertheless, only 20 % of patients reported being recommended bariatric surgery by their doctor and African Americans and men were less likely to receive this recommendation; racial differences in being recommended surgery were also largely explained by differences in QOL. High perceived risk to bariatric surgery was the most commonly cited barrier; financial concerns were uncommonly cited. Single geographic region; examined consideration and not who eventually proceeded with bariatric surgery. African Americans and men were less likely to

  19. Interprofessional communication failures in acute care chains: How can we identify the causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leijen-Zeelenberg, Janneke E; van Raak, Arno J A; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Kroese, Mariëlle E A L; Brink, Peter R G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2015-01-01

    Although communication failures between professionals in acute care delivery occur, explanations for these failures remain unclear. We aim to gain a deeper understanding of interprofessional communication failures by assessing two different explanations for them. A multiple case study containing six cases (i.e. acute care chains) was carried out in which semi-structured interviews, physical artifacts and archival records were used for data collection. Data were entered into matrices and the pattern-matching technique was used to examine the two complementary propositions. Based on the level of standardization and integration present in the acute care chains, the six acute care chains could be divided into two categories of care processes, with the care chains equally distributed among the categories. Failures in communication occurred in both groups. Communication routines were embedded within organizations and descriptions of communication routines in the entire acute care chain could not be found. Based on the results, failures in communication could not exclusively be explained by literature on process typology. Literature on organizational routines was useful to explain the occurrence of communication failures in the acute care chains. Organizational routines can be seen as repetitive action patterns and play an important role in organizations, as most processes are carried out by means of routines. The results of this study imply that it is useful to further explore the role of organizational routines on interprofessional communication in acute care chains to develop a solution for failures in handover practices.

  20. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. [Campylobacter and Salmonella acute gastroenteritis: epidemiology and health care utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala Farré, Maria Rosa; Osorio Sánchez, Dimelza; Arias Varela, Cesar; Simó Sanahuja, Maria; Recasens Recasens, Assumpta; Pérez Jové, Josefa

    2015-10-05

    In Catalonia the current surveillance systems do not allow to know the true incidence or the health care utilization of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) caused by Campylobacter and Salmonella infections. The aim of this study is to analyze these characteristics. Descriptive study of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections reported in 2002 and 2012 in Catalonia, Spain. We included cases isolated and reported by the laboratory to a regional Surveillance Unit. The estimated incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter AGE decreased by almost 50% and 20% respectively in 2012. Children between one and 4 years old were the most affected in both years. Significant differences in the clinical characteristics and disease duration were observed between Campylobacter and Salmonella. Visits to the Emergency Department and hospitalization rates were 63.7% and 15%, being more frequent among salmonellosis cases. The estimated incidence of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections has decreased, however rates are still important, as well as it is the health care utilization in both diseases. Current surveillance systems need appropriateness improvements to reach a better control of these infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy. A Spanish retrospective case-cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Fernandez Nuria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute kidney injury is among the most serious complications after cardiac surgery and is associated with an impaired outcome. Multiple factors may concur in the development of this disease. Moreover, severe renal failure requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT presents a high mortality rate. Consequently, we studied a Spanish cohort of patients to assess the risk factors for RRT in cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI. Methods A retrospective case-cohort study in 24 Spanish hospitals. All cases of RRT after cardiac surgery in 2007 were matched in a crude ratio of 1:4 consecutive patients based on age, sex, treated in the same year, at the same hospital and by the same group of surgeons. Results We analyzed the data from 864 patients enrolled in 2007. In multivariate analysis, severe acute kidney injury requiring postoperative RRT was significantly associated with the following variables: lower glomerular filtration rates, less basal haemoglobin, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, diabetes, prior diuretic treatment, urgent surgery, longer aortic cross clamp times, intraoperative administration of aprotinin, and increased number of packed red blood cells (PRBC transfused. When we conducted a propensity analysis using best-matched of 137 available pairs of patients, prior diuretic treatment, longer aortic cross clamp times and number of PRBC transfused were significantly associated with CSA-AKI. Patients requiring RRT needed longer hospital stays, and suffered higher mortality rates. Conclusion Cardiac-surgery associated acute kidney injury requiring RRT is associated with worse outcomes. For this reason, modifiable risk factors should be optimised and higher risk patients for acute kidney injury should be identified before undertaking cardiac surgery.

  3. Surgery in fish research: common procedures and postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Craig A

    2005-01-01

    As the use of fish models in biomedical research increases, so too does the need for individuals working in laboratory animal science to be familiar with surgical procedures in these animals. The author presents a primer on fish surgery with an emphasis on research applications.

  4. Acute exacerbated COPD: room for improvement in key elements of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markun S

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Markun,1,* Daniel P Franzen,2,* Kaba Dalla Lana,1 Swantje Beyer,3 Stephan Wieser,4 Thomas Hess,3 Malcolm Kohler,2 Thomas Rosemann,1 Oliver Senn,1 Claudia Steurer-Stey1,5 1Institute of Primary Care, 2Department of Pneumology, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Zurich, 3Department of Pneumology, Cantonal Hospital of Winterthur, Winterthur, 4Department of Pneumology, City Hospital Waid, 5MediX Group Practice Ltd, Zurich, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Introduction: Hospitalizations because of acute exacerbated COPD (AECOPD are a major burden to patients and the health care system. Interventions during acute and post-acute hospital care exist not only to improve short-term outcomes but also to prevent future exacerbations and disease progression. We aimed at measuring the implementation rates of acute and post-acute hospital care interventions for AECOPD.Methods: We performed 24 months (January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013 retrospective medical chart review of consecutive cases hospitalized to one of three public hospitals in the canton of Zurich due to AECOPD. Implementation rates of five acute care and seven post-acute care interventions were assessed.Results: Data from 263 hospitalizations (61% male, mean age 68.5 years, 47% active smokers were analyzed. The median length of stay was 9 days (interquartile range [IQR] 6–12 days. In all, 32% of hospitalizations were caused by individuals with previous hospitalizations because of AECOPD. Implementation rates of four acute care interventions were >75% (lowest was appropriate antibiotic therapy with 56%. Compared to this, implementation rates of five post-acute care interventions were <25% (lowest was patient education and self-management advice with 2%.Conclusion: The results of this audit revealed room for improvement mainly in post-acute care interventions for AECOPD. Keywords: audit, COPD, exacerbation, guideline adherence, hospital

  5. The Patterns of Graded Psychological Nursing Care for Patients after Cardiothoracic Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jingbo; Wang, Xiaochun

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the interventional efficacy and clinical significance of graded psychological nursing care for patients who have undergone cardiothoracic surgery by providing graded psychological nursing care for these patients according to the results of their psychological evaluation. In this interventional study, 110 patients who had undergone cardiothoracic surgery between 2014 and 2015 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China, were enrolled. We divided them into two groups of 55 patients each, namely, a control group and a treatment group. For patients in the control group, we applied regular psychological nursing care; those in the treatment group were further divided into three different psychological grades after being assessed using Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); patients at each grade were treated by graded psychological nursing care in addition to regular psychological nursing care. Significant decreases, with statistically significant differences ( P psychological nursing care according to their varying psychological conditions, showed better improvement in their post-surgery emotional state and sleep quality than those in the control group, thus indicating the great significance of graded psychological nursing care in clinical practices. Applying graded psychological nursing care in post-operation cardiothoracic patients improved nursing care efficiency and alleviated patients' negative feelings. Therefore, this type of nursing care should be further promoted and utilized in clinical practice for effective rehabilitation of patients.

  6. Acute gastric incarceration from thoracic herniation in pregnancy following laparoscopic antireflux surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Fristrup, Claus Wilki; Severin Gråe Harbo, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication in pregnancy which due to misdiagnosis or management delays may be life-threatening. We report a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who presented with sudden onset of severe epigastric and thoracic pain radiating to the back. Earlier...... in the index pregnancy, she had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery (ARS) for a hiatus hernia because of severe gastro-oesophageal reflux. Owing to increasing epigastric pain a CT scan was carried out which diagnosed wrap disruption with gastric herniation into the thoracic cavity and threatened...... incarceration. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of severe adverse outcome after ARS during pregnancy, with acute intrathoracic gastric herniation. We recommend the avoidance of ARS in pregnancy, and the need to advise women undergoing ARS of the postoperative risks if pregnancy occurs within a few...

  7. Health care utilization and end-of-life care for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jawahri, Areej R; Abel, Gregory A; Steensma, David P; LeBlanc, Thomas W; Fathi, Amir T; Graubert, Timothy A; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Wadleigh, Martha; Ballen, Karen K; Foster, Julia E; Attar, Eyal C; Amrein, Philip C; Brunner, Andrew M; Stone, Richard M; Temel, Jennifer S

    2015-08-15

    Health care utilization in older adults (age ≥60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been well studied. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 330 consecutive older patients who were diagnosed with AML between May 1, 2005 and December 23, 2011, at 2 hospitals in Boston to examine their health care utilization and end-of-life care. Using multivariable logistic and linear regression models adjusting for covariates, we also compared health care utilization between patients who received intensive induction chemotherapy (n = 197; cytarabine/ anthracycline combination) versus nonintensive chemotherapy (n = 133; single-agent therapy). The median number of hospitalizations for the entire cohort was 4.2 (range, 1-18 hospitalizations). Patients who died spent a mean of 28.3% of their life after diagnosis in the hospital and 13.8% of their life attending outpatient clinic appointments. Although the majority of patients (87.9%) died during the 2-year follow-up period, a minority received palliative care (16.2%) or hospice (23.1%) services. Within 30 days of death, 84.5% of patients were hospitalized, and 61% died in the hospital. Among the patients who died, those who received intensive induction therapy (vs nonintensive therapy) spent 30% more of their life after diagnosis in the hospital (P < .0001) and were less likely to receive hospice services (odds ratio, 0.45; P = .05). The current findings highlight the intensity of health care utilization among older patients with AML, regardless of treatment modality. Despite the poor prognosis, palliative care and hospice services are rarely used. Future work should study novel health care delivery models to optimize care throughout the course of illness and at the end of life. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  8. Primary care physician decision making regarding referral for bariatric surgery: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Hepp, Nicola; Juhl, Anna Julie Aavild; B C, Deepti; Juhl, Claus B

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity. It results in significant and sustained weight loss and reduces obesity-related co-morbidities. Despite an increasing prevalence of severe obesity, the number of bariatric operations performed in Denmark has decreased during the past years. This is only partly explained by changes in the national guidelines for bariatric surgery. The purpose of the cross-sectional study is to investigate referral patterns and possible reservations regarding bariatric surgery among Danish primary care physicians (PCPs). Primary care physicians in Denmark METHODS: A total of 300 Danish PCPs were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey regarding experiences with bariatric surgery, reservations about bariatric surgery, attitudes to specific patient cases, and the future treatment of severe obesity. Most questions required a response on a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree, disagree, neither agree nor disagree, agree, and strongly agree) and frequency distributions were calculated. 133 completed questionnaires (44%) were returned. Most physicians found that they had good knowledge about the national referral criteria for bariatric surgery. With respect to the specific patient cases, a remarkably smaller part of physicians would refer patients on their own initiative, compared with the patient's initiative. Fear of postoperative surgical complications and medical complications both influenced markedly the decision to refer patients for surgery. Only 9% of the respondents indicated that bariatric surgery should be the primary treatment option for severe obesity in the future. Danish PCPs express severe concerns about surgical and medical complications following bariatric surgery. This might, in part, result in a low rate of referral to bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    al-Ayoubi Fawzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Methods Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. Results There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1% were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures 276 (60.9% were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4% required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%. Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3–17 and 6 (1–22. Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0–11 and 8 (1–39. Conclusion There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient

  10. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Ayoubi, Fawzi; Eriksson, Helen; Myrelid, Pär; Wallon, Conny; Andersson, Peter

    2012-09-17

    Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1%) were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures) 276 (60.9%) were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4%) required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%). Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range) number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3-17) and 6 (1-22). Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0-11) and 8 (1-39). There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient with trauma. Further centralization of trauma care, long

  11. A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, Leanne; Sorensen, Jens C; Pedersen, Preben U

    2010-01-01

    A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care......A critical review of the literature on early rehabilitation of patients with post-traumatic amnesia in acute care...

  12. Establishment and assessment of cataract surgery in Day-care Unit at northwest of China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiu-Li Zhang; Xing Yang; Juan-Juan Yang; Bao-Jian Yan; Jing-Ming Li; Cheng Pei; Li Qin

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To describe the protocol and economic cost of the Day-care Unit cataract surgery procedure in northwest of China.METHODS: Patients who received phacoemulcification and intraocular lens implantation in both Day-care Unit and regular Unit were recruited from January 2016 to December 2016. The baseline data and average cost were recorded and analyzed. Furthermore, satisfaction questionnaire of patients were collected.RESULTS: Patients with Day-care Unit showed shorter registration duration,...

  13. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Brizuela, Matias; Gianinetto, Hernan; Gomez, Pablo E.; Cerrato, Valeria I.; Bezzi, Marco G.; Borello, Silvina A.; Loiacono, Flavia A.; Fernandez, Adriana M.; Knowles, Serena; Reynolds, Claire; Inskip, Deborah M.; Miller, Jennene J.; Kong, Jing; Whitehead, Christina; Bihari, Shailesh; Seven, Aylin; Krstevski, Amanda; Rodgers, Helen J.; Millar, Rebecca T.; Mckenna, Toni E.; Bailey, Irene M.; Hanlon, Gabrielle C.; Aneman, Anders; Lynch, Joan M.; Azad, Raman; Neal, John; Woods, Paul W.; Roberts, Brigit L.; Kol, Mark R.; Wong, Helen S.; Riss, Katharina C.; Staudinger, Thomas; Wittebole, Xavier; Berghe, Caroline; Bulpa, Pierre A.; Dive, Alain M.; Verstraete, Rik; Lebbinck, Herve; Depuydt, Pieter; Vermassen, Joris; Meersseman, Philippe; Ceunen, Helga; Rosa, Jonas I.; Beraldo, Daniel O.; Piras, Claudio; Rampinelli, Adenilton M.; Nassar, Antonio P.; Mataloun, Sergio; Moock, Marcelo; Thompson, Marlus M.; Gonçalves, Claudio H.; Antônio, Ana Carolina P.; Ascoli, Aline; Biondi, Rodrigo S.; Fontenele, Danielle C.; Nobrega, Danielle; Sales, Vanessa M.; Shindhe, Suresh; Ismail, Dk Maizatul Aiman B. Pg Hj; Laffey, John; Beloncle, Francois; Davies, Kyle G.; Cirone, Rob; Manoharan, Venika; Ismail, Mehvish; Goligher, Ewan C.; Jassal, Mandeep; Ferguson, Niall D.; Nishikawa, Erin; Javeed, Areej; Curley, Gerard; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Parotto, Matteo; Mehta, Sangeeta; Knoll, Jenny; Pronovost, Antoine; Canestrini, Sergio; Bruhn, Alejandro R.; Garcia, Patricio H.; Aliaga, Felipe A.; Farías, Pamela A.; Yumha, Jacob S.; Ortiz, Claudia A.; Salas, Javier E.; Saez, Alejandro A.; Vega, Luis D.; Labarca, Eduardo F.; Martinez, Felipe T.; Carreño, Nicolás G.; Lora, Pilar; Liu, Haitao; Qiu, Haibo; Liu, Ling; Tang, Rui; Luo, Xiaoming; An, Youzhong; Zhao, Huiying; Gao, Yan; Zhai, Zhe; Ye, Zheng L.; Wang, Wei; Li, Wenwen; Li, Qingdong; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Yu, Wenkui; Shen, Juanhong; Li, Xinyu; Yu, Tao; Lu, Weihua; Wu, Ya Q.; Huang, Xiao B.; He, Zhenyang; Lu, Yuanhua; Han, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Sun, Renhua; Wang, Hua X.; Qin, Shu H.; Zhu, Bao H.; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Jian; Li, Bin; Liu, Jing L.; Zhou, Fa C.; Li, Qiong J.; Zhang, Xing Y.; Li-Xin, Zhou; Xin-Hua, Qiang; Jiang, Liangyan; Gao, Yuan N.; Zhao, Xian Y.; Li, Yuan Y.; Li, Xiao L.; Wang, Chunting; Yao, Qingchun; Yu, Rongguo; Chen, Kai; Shao, Huanzhang; Qin, Bingyu; Huang, Qing Q.; Zhu, Wei H.; Hang, Ai Y.; Hua, Ma X.; Li, Yimin; Xu, Yonghao; Di, Yu D.; Ling, Long L.; Qin, Tie H.; Wang, Shou H.; Qin, Junping; Han, Yi; Zhou, Suming; Vargas, Monica P.; Jimenez, Juan I. Silesky; Rojas, Manuel A. González; Solis-Quesada, Jaime E.; Ramirez-Alfaro, Christian M.; Máca, Jan; Sklienka, Peter; Gjedsted, Jakob; Christiansen, Aage; Nielsen, Jonas; Villamagua, Boris G.; Llano, Miguel; Burtin, Philippe; Buzancais, Gautier; Beuret, Pascal; Pelletier, Nicolas; Mortaza, Satar; Mercat, Alain; Chelly, Jonathan; Jochmans, Sébastien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cédric; Carteaux, Guillaume; de Prost, Nicolas; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Daviaud, Fabrice; Fartoukh, Muriel; Barberet, Guillaume; Biehler, Jerome; Dellamonica, Jean; Doyen, Denis; Arnal, Jean-Michel; Briquet, Anais; Klasen, Fanny; Papazian, Laurent; Follin, Arnaud; Roux, Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Kalaitzis, Evangelos; Dangers, Laurence; Combes, Alain; Au, Siu-Ming; Béduneau, Gaetan; Carpentier, Dorothée; Zogheib, Elie H.; Dupont, Herve; Ricome, Sylvie; Santoli, Francesco L.; Besset, Sebastien L.; Michel, Philippe; Gelée, Bruno; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Goubaux, Bernard; Crova, Philippe J.; Phan, Nga T.; Berkelmans, Frantz; Badie, Julio C.; Tapponnier, Romain; Gally, Josette; Khebbeb, Samy; Herbrecht, Jean-Etienne; Schneider, Francis; Declercq, Pierre-Louis M.; Rigaud, Jean-Philippe; Duranteau, Jacques; Harrois, Anatole; Chabanne, Russell; Marin, Julien; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Thibault, Sandrine; Ghazi, Mohammed; Boukhazna, Messabi; Zein, Salem Ould; Richecoeur, Jack R.; Combaux, Daniele M.; Grelon, Fabien; Le Moal, Charlene; Sauvadet, Elise P.; Robine, Adrien; Lemiale, Virginie; Reuter, Danielle; Dres, Martin; Demoule, Alexandre; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Baboi, Loredana; Guérin, Claude; Lohner, Ralph; Kraßler, Jens; Schäfer, Susanne; Zacharowski, Kai D.; Meybohm, Patrick; Reske, Andreas W.; Simon, Philipp; Hopf, Hans-Bernd F.; Schuetz, Michael; Baltus, Thomas; Papanikolaou, Metaxia N.; Papavasilopoulou, Theonymfi G.; Zacharas, Giannis A.; Ourailogloy, Vasilis; Mouloudi, Eleni K.; Massa, Eleni V.; Nagy, Eva O.; Stamou, Electra E.; Kiourtzieva, Ellada V.; Oikonomou, Marina A.; Avila, Luis E.; Cortez, Cesar A.; Citalán, Johanna E.; Jog, Sameer A.; Sable, Safal D.; Shah, Bhagyesh; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.; Memon, Mohammedfaruk; Muthuchellappan, Radhakrishnan; Ramesh, Venkatapura J.; Shenoy, Anitha; Unnikrishnan, Ramesh; Dixit, Subhal B.; Rhayakar, Rachana V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan; Bhardwaj, Vallish K.; Mahto, Heera L.; Sagar, Sudha V.; Palaniswamy, Vijayanand; Ganesan, Deeban; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Heidari, Farshad; Meaney, Edel A.; Nichol, Alistair; Knapman, Karl M.; O'Croinin, Donall; Dunne, Eimhin S.; Breen, Dorothy M.; Clarkson, Kevin P.; Jaafar, Rola F.; Dwyer, Rory; Amir, Fahd; Ajetunmobi, Olaitan O.; O'Muircheartaigh, Aogan C.; Black, Colin S.; Treanor, Nuala; Collins, Daniel V.; Altaf, Wahid; Zani, Gianluca; Fusari, Maurizio; Spadaro, Savino; Volta, Carlo A.; Graziani, Romano; Brunettini, Barbara; Palmese, Salvatore; Formenti, Paolo; Umbrello, Michele; Lombardo, Andrea; Pecci, Elisabetta; Botteri, Marco; Savioli, Monica; Protti, Alessandro; Mattei, Alessia; Schiavoni, Lorenzo; Tinnirello, Andrea; Todeschini, Manuel; Giarratano, Antonino; Cortegiani, Andrea; Sher, Sara; Rossi, Anna; Antonelli, Massimo M.; Montini, Luca M.; Casalena, Paolo; Scafetti, Sergio; Panarello, Giovanna; Occhipinti, Giovanna; Patroniti, Nicolò; Pozzi, Matteo; Biscione, Roberto R.; Poli, Michela M.; Raimondi, Ferdinando; Albiero, Daniela; Crapelli, Giulia; Beck, Eduardo; Pota, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Molin, Alexandre; Tarantino, Fabio; Monti, Giacomo; Frati, Elena; Mirabella, Lucia; Cinnella, Gilda; Fossali, Tommaso; Colombo, Riccardo; Pattarino, Pierpaolo Terragni Ilaria; Mojoli, Francesco; Braschi, Antonio; Borotto, Erika E.; Cracchiolo, Andrea N.; Palma, Daniela M.; Raponi, Francesco; Foti, Giuseppe; Vascotto, Ettore R.; Coppadoro, Andrea; Brazzi, Luca; Floris, Leda; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Venti, Aaron; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Takagi, Shunsuke; Maeyama, Hiroki N.; Watanabe, Eizo; Yamaji, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazuyoshi; Shiozaki, Kyoko; Futami, Satoru; Ryosuke, Sekine; Saito, Koji; Kameyama, Yoshinobu; Ueno, Keiko; Izawa, Masayo; Okuda, Nao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Harasawa, Tomofumi; Nasu, Michitaka; Takada, Tadaaki; Ito, Fumihito; Nunomiya, Shin; Koyama, Kansuke; Abe, Toshikazu; Andoh, Kohkichi; Kusumoto, Kohei; Hirata, Akira; Takaba, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Higashijima, Ushio; Honda, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Nobumasa; Imai, Hiroshi; Ogino, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Ichiko; Ichikado, Kazuya; Nitta, Kenichi; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Hashida, Tomoaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Niimi, Daisuke; Ueda, Takeshi; Kashiwa, Yozo; Uchiyama, Akinori; Sabelnikovs, Olegs; Oss, Peteris; Haddad, Youssef; Liew, Kong Y.; Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A.; Jarquin-Badiola, Yves D.; Sanchez-Hurtado, Luis A.; Gomez-Flores, Saira S.; Marin, Maria C.; Villagomez, Asisclo J.; Lemus, Jordana S.; Fierro, Jonathan M.; Cervantes, Mavy Ramirez; Mejia, Francisco Javier Flores; Dector, Dulce; Dector, Dulce M.; Gonzalez, Daniel R.; Estrella, Claudia R.; Sanchez-Medina, Jorge R.; Ramirez-Gutierrez, Alvaro; George, Fernando G.; Aguirre, Janet S.; Buensuseso, Juan A.; Poblano, Manuel; Dendane, Tarek; Zeggwagh, Amine Ali; Balkhi, Hicham; Elkhayari, Mina; Samkaoui, Nacer; Ezzouine, Hanane; Benslama, Abdellatif; Amor, Mourad; Maazouzi, Wajdi; Cimic, Nedim; Beck, Oliver; Bruns, Monique M.; Schouten, Jeroen A.; Rinia, Myra; Raaijmakers, Monique; Heunks, Leo M.; van Wezel, Hellen M.; Heines, Serge J.; Strauch, Ulrich; Buise, Marc P.; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Goodson, Jennifer C.; Browne, Troy S.; Navarra, Leanlove; Hunt, Anna; Hutchison, Robyn A.; Bailey, Mathew B.; Newby, Lynette; Mcarthur, Colin; Kalkoff, Michael; Mcleod, Alex; Casement, Jonathan; Hacking, Danielle J.; Andersen, Finn H.; Dolva, Merete S.; Laake, Jon H.; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Noremark, Kim Andre L.; Søreide, Eldar; Sjøbø, Brit Å; Guttormsen, Anne B.; Yoshido, Hector H. Leon; Aguilar, Ronald Zumaran; Oscanoa, Fredy A. Montes; Alisasis, Alain U.; Robles, Joanne B.; Pasanting-Lim, Rossini Abbie B.; Tan, Beatriz C.; Andruszkiewicz, Pawel; Jakubowska, Karina; Coxo, Cristina M.; Alvarez, António M.; Oliveira, Bruno S.; Montanha, Gustavo M.; Barros, Nelson C.; Pereira, Carlos S.; Messias, António M.; Monteiro, Jorge M.; Araujo, Ana M.; Catorze, Nuno T.; Marum, Susan M.; Bouw, Maria J.; Gomes, Rui M.; Brito, Vania A.; Castro, Silvia; Estilita, Joana M.; Barros, Filipa M.; Serra, Isabel M.; Martinho, Aurelia M.; Tomescu, Dana R.; Marcu, Alexandra; Bedreag, Ovidiu H.; Papurica, Marius; Corneci, Dan E.; Negoita, Silvius Ioan; Grigoriev, Evgeny; Gritsan, Alexey I.; Gazenkampf, Andrey A.; Almekhlafi, Ghaleb; Albarrak, Mohamad M.; Mustafa, Ghanem M.; Maghrabi, Khalid A.; Salahuddin, Nawal; Aisa, Tharwat M.; Al Jabbary, Ahmed S.; Tabhan, Edgardo; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Trinidad, Olivia A.; Al Dorzi, Hasan M.; Tabhan, Edgardo E.; Bolon, Stefan; Smith, Oliver; Mancebo, Jordi; Aguirre-Bermeo, Hernan; Lopez-Delgado, Juan C.; Esteve, Francisco; Rialp, Gemma; Forteza, Catalina; de Haro, Candelaria; Artigas, Antonio; Albaiceta, Guillermo M.; de Cima-Iglesias, Sara; Seoane-Quiroga, Leticia; Ceniceros-Barros, Alexandra; Ruiz-Aguilar, Antonio L.; Claraco-Vega, Luis M.; Soler, Juan Alfonso; Lorente, Maria del Carmen; Hermosa, Cecilia; Gordo, Federico; Prieto-González, Miryam; López-Messa, Juan B.; Perez, Manuel P.; Perez, Cesar P.; Allue, Raquel Montoiro; Roche-Campo, Ferran; Ibañez-Santacruz, Marcos; Temprano, Susana; Pintado, Maria C.; de Pablo, Raul; Gómez, Pilar Ricart Aroa; Ruiz, Silvia Rodriguez; Moles, Silvia Iglesias; Jurado, Ma Teresa; Arizmendi, Alfons; Piacentini, Enrique A.; Franco, Nieves; Honrubia, Teresa; Cheng, Meisy Perez; Losada, Elena Perez; Blanco, Javier; Yuste, Luis J.; Carbayo-Gorriz, Cecilia; Cazorla-Barranquero, Francisca G.; Alonso, Javier G.; Alda, Rosa S.; Algaba, Ángela; Navarro, Gonzalo; Cereijo, Enrique; Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Marcos, Diego Pastor; Montero, Laura Alvarez; Para, Luis Herrera; Sanchez, Roberto Jimenez; Navalpotro, Miguel Angel Blasco; Abad, Ricardo Diaz; González, Raquel Montiel; Toribio, Dácil Parrilla; Castro, Alejandro G.; Artiga, Maria Jose D.; Penuelas, Oscar; Roser, Tomas P.; Olga, Moreno F.; Curto, Elena Gallego; Sánchez, Rocío Manzano; Imma, Vallverdu P.; Elisabet, Garcia M.; Claverias, Laura; Magret, Monica; Pellicer, Ana M.; Rodriguez, Lucia L.; Sánchez-Ballesteros, Jesús; González-Salamanca, Ángela; Jimenez, Antonio G.; Huerta, Francisco P.; Diaz, Juan Carlos J. Sotillo; Lopez, Esther Bermejo; Moya, David D. Llinares; Alfonso, Alec A. Tallet; Luis, Palazon Sanchez Eugenio; Cesar, Palazon Sanchez; Rafael, Sánchez I.; Virgilio, Corcoles G.; Recio, Noelia N.; Adamsson, Richard O.; Rylander, Christian C.; Holzgraefe, Bernhard; Broman, Lars M.; Wessbergh, Joanna; Persson, Linnea; Schiöler, Fredrik; Kedelv, Hans; Tibblin, Anna Oscarsson; Appelberg, Henrik; Hedlund, Lars; Helleberg, Johan; Eriksson, Karin E.; Glietsch, Rita; Larsson, Niklas; Nygren, Ingela; Nunes, Silvia L.; Morin, Anna-Karin; Kander, Thomas; Adolfsson, Anne; Piquilloud, Lise; Zender, Hervé O.; Leemann-Refondini, Corinne; Elatrous, Souheil; Bouchoucha, Slaheddine; Chouchene, Imed; Ouanes, Islem; Ben Souissi, Asma; Kamoun, Salma; Demirkiran, Oktay; Aker, Mustafa; Erbabacan, Emre; Ceylan, Ilkay; Girgin, Nermin Kelebek; Ozcelik, Menekse; Ünal, Necmettin; Meco, Basak Ceyda; Akyol, Onat O.; Derman, Suleyman S.; Kennedy, Barry; Parhar, Ken; Srinivasa, Latha; McNamee, Lia; McAuley, Danny; Steinberg, Jack; Hopkins, Phil; Mellis, Clare; Kakar, Vivek; Hadfield, Dan; Vercueil, Andre; Bhowmick, Kaushik; Humphreys, Sally K.; Ferguson, Andrew; Mckee, Raymond; Raj, Ashok S.; Fawkes, Danielle A.; Watt, Philip; Twohey, Linda; Jha, Rajeev R.; Thomas, Matthew; Morton, Alex; Kadaba, Varsha; Smith, Mark J.; Hormis, Anil P.; Kannan, Santhana G.; Namih, Miriam; Reschreiter, Henrik; Camsooksai, Julie; Kumar, Alek; Rugonfalvi, Szabolcs; Nutt, Christopher; Oneill, Orla; Seasman, Colette; Dempsey, Ged; Scott, Christopher J.; Ellis, Helen E.; McKechnie, Stuart; Hutton, Paula J.; Di Tomasso, Nora N.; Vitale, Michela N.; Griffin, Ruth O.; Dean, Michael N.; Cranshaw, Julius H.; Willett, Emma L.; Ioannou, Nicholas; Gillis, Sarah; Csabi, Peter; Macfadyen, Rosaleen; Dawson, Heidi; Preez, Pieter D.; Williams, Alexandra J.; Boyd, Owen; de Gordoa, Laura Ortiz-Ruiz; Bramall, Jon; Symmonds, Sophie; Chau, Simon K.; Wenham, Tim; Szakmany, Tamas; Toth-Tarsoly, Piroska; Mccalman, Katie H.; Alexander, Peter; Stephenson, Lorraine; Collyer, Thomas; Chapman, Rhiannon; Cooper, Raphael; Allan, Russell M.; Sim, Malcolm; Wrathall, David W.; Irvine, Donald A.; Zantua, Kim S.; Adams, John C.; Burtenshaw, Andrew J.; Sellors, Gareth P.; Welters, Ingeborg D.; Williams, Karen E.; Hessell, Robert J.; Oldroyd, Matthew G.; Battle, Ceri E.; Pillai, Suresh; Kajtor, Istvan; Sivashanmugavel, Mageswaran; Okane, Sinead C.; Donnelly, Adrian; Frigyik, Aniko D.; Careless, Jon P.; May, Martin M.; Stewart, Richard; Trinder, T. John; Hagan, Samantha J.; Wise, Matt P.; Cole, Jade M.; MacFie, Caroline C.; Dowling, Anna T.; Hurtado, Javier; Nin, Nicolás; Nuñez, Edgardo; Pittini, Gustavo; Rodriguez, Ruben; Imperio, María C.; Santos, Cristina; França, Ana G.; Ebeid, Alejandro; Deicas, Alberto; Serra, Carolina; Uppalapati, Aditya; Kamel, Ghassan; Banner-Goodspeed, Valerie M.; Beitler, Jeremy R.; Mukkera, Satyanarayana Reddy; Kulkarni, Shreedhar; Lee, Jarone; Mesar, Tomaz; Shinn, John O.; Gomaa, Dina; Tainter, Christopher; Yeatts, Dale J.; Warren, Jessica; Lanspa, Michael J.; Miller, Russel R.; Grissom, Colin K.; Brown, Samuel M.; Bauer, Philippe R.; Gosselin, Ryan J.; Kitch, Barrett T.; Cohen, Jason E.; Beegle, Scott H.; Stoger, John H.; Gueret, Renaud M.; Tulaimat, Aiman; Choudry, Shazia; Stigler, William; Batra, Hitesh; Huff, Nidhi G.; Lamb, Keith D.; Oetting, Trevor W.; Mohr, Nicholas M.; Judy, Claine; Saito, Shigeki; Kheir, Fayez M.; Kheir, Fayez; Schlichting, Adam B.; Delsing, Angela; Crouch, Daniel R.; Elmasri, Mary; Ismail, Dina; Dreyer, Kyle R.; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Baron, Rebecca M.; Grijalba, Carolina Quintana; Hou, Peter C.; Seethala, Raghu; Aisiku, Imo; Henderson, Galen; Frendl, Gyorgy; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Owens, Robert L.; Schomer, Ashley; Bumbasirevic, Vesna; Jovanovic, Bojan; Surbatovic, Maja; Veljovic, Milic

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  14. [Retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). Technical complement for cases of acute lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amón, J H; Cepeda, M; Conde, C; Alonso, D; González, V; Martínez-Sagarra, J M

    2011-02-01

    Washing the renal cavities using minipercutaneous surgery shaft is an ideal technical procedure for retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) when lithiasic fragmentation is significant or if the anatomy of the renal cavities may obstruct the spontaneous elimination of fragments. we performed 37 RIRS on 35 patients with renal lithiasis (14 men, 21 women) with a mean age of 56 (range 33-72) years, divided into two groups in accordance with the size of their kidney stones. Group A, 23 patients with lithiasis lithiasis >1.5 cm. 28 patients had a single kidney stone and 7 had multiple stones. Flexible uretrorenoscopy, 7.5 Fr (Flex-X(®, Karl Storz) by means of a ureteral access sheath. Holmium laser lithotripsy (Calculase®, Karl Storz) using 200 and 365 micrometer fibres. Fragment extraction with 1.7 Fr nitinol baskets (N-gage, Cook). In cases of significant fragmented stone burden, the renal cavities were washed with low-pressure fluid irrigation using a ureteral access sheath, which was collected together with the stone fragments carried by the "mini-perc" sheath (Ultrax-x® 18Fr, Cook; Rusch, 14 Fr) placed under radiologic and endoscopic control at the level of the calyx-papilla selected for fragment drainage. the mean diameter for group A was 9.13 (range 5-13) mm and 20.25 (range 16-28) mm for group B. The overall mean operating time was 81 (range 30-160) min. Group A required 66.43±35.18 min. and group B 107.5±46.73 min. (p=0.006). The rate of absence of stones immediately after surgery was 83.2%, 93.1% at 3 months (95.6% for A and 83.3% for B; p=0.217). In no case was ureteral stenosis observed as a result of the use of ureteral access sheaths. In 7 group B patients (58.3%) with acute lithiasis and/or alteration in their pyelocaliceal anatomy, we performed active lavage of the renal cavities applying the aforementioned percutaneous technique. The mean post-surgery hospital stay was 2.1 (range 1-4) days. There were post-surgery complications (Clavien 1) in 7

  15. Early serum creatinine accurately predicts acute kidney injury post cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, Keren; Polkinghorne, Kevan R; Ford, Sharon; Stenning, Fiona; Lew, Thomas E; Barrett, Jonathan A; Summers, Shaun A

    2017-03-16

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a well recognized complication of cardiac surgery. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aims of our study are twofold; 1. To define the incidence of AKI post cardiac surgery. 2. To identify pre-morbid and operative risk factors for developing AKI and to determine if immediate post operative serum creatinine (IPOsCr) accurately predicts the development of AKI. We prospectively studied 196 consecutive patients undergoing elective (on-pump) cardiac surgery. Baseline patient characteristics, including medical co-morbidities, proteinuria, procedural data and kidney function (serum creatinine (sCr) were collected. Internationally standardised criteria for AKI were used (sCr >1.5 times baseline, elevation in sCr >26.4 μmmol/L (0.3 mg/dl). Measurements were collected pre-operatively, within 2 h of surgical completion (IPOsCr) and daily for two days. Logistic regression was used to assess predictive factors for AKI including IPOsCr. Model discrimination was assessed using ROC AUC curves. Forty (20.4%) patients developed AKI postoperatively. Hypertension (OR 2.64, p = 0.02), diabetes (OR 2.25, p = 0.04), proteinuria (OR 2.48, p = 0.02) and a lower baseline eGFR (OR 0.74, p = 0.002) were associated with AKI in univariate analysis. A multivariate logistic model with preoperative and surgical factors (age, gender, eGFR, proteinuria, hypertension, diabetes and type of cardiac surgery) demonstrated moderate discrimination for AKI (ROC AUC 0.76). The addition of IPOsCr improved model discrimination for AKI (AUC 0.82, p = 0.07 versus baseline AUC) and was independently associated with AKI (OR 7.17; 95% CI 1.27-40.32; p = 0.025). One in 5 patients developed AKI post cardiac surgery. These patients have significantly increased morbidity and mortality. IPOsCr is significantly associated with the development of AKI, providing a cheap readily available prognostic marker.

  16. Recurrent acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery due to trachea malacia and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sankatsing, S. U. C.; Hanselaar, W. E. J. J.; van Steenwijk, R. P.; Van der Sloot, J. A. P.; Broekhuis, E.; Kok, W. E. M.

    2008-01-01

    In this report we describe a patient with recurrent episodes of acute pulmonary oedema after aortic and mitral valve surgery. The first episode of pulmonary oedema was caused by mitral valve dysfunction. The second episode of pulmonary oedema was not clearly associated with a mitral valve problem,

  17. Angiopoietin/Tie2 Dysbalance Is Associated with Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery Assisted by Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongman, Rianne M.; van Klarenbosch, Jan; Molema, Grietje; Zijlstra, Jan G.; de Vries, Adrianus J.; van Meurs, Matijs

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is not completely understood. Recent evidence suggests a pivotal role for the endothelium in AKI. In experimental models of AKI, the endothelial specific receptor Tie2 with its ligands Angiopoietin (Ang) 1 and Ang2

  18. Use of music therapy and other ITNIs in acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagner-Tjellesen, D; Yurkovich, E E; Gragert, M

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine the clinical use of music therapy as an independent therapeutic nursing intervention (ITNI) in acute inpatient settings. This study identified the frequency, rationale, and perceived effectiveness of its use as an ITNI. In addition, barriers and facilitators to nurses' use of music therapy were identified. Frequency of use of other ITNIs also were investigated. An author-designed questionnaire, based on the literature and reviewed by a panel of experts, was used to survey a convenience sample (N = 321) of RNs at an acute inpatient facility with more than 50 beds, located in the midwestern United States. One hundred thirty-five RNs (42%) participated in the study. Findings indicated that 85.2% (n = 115) of respondents knew of music therapy, with 69.6% (n = 94) of them reporting using it in practice. Of the other listed ITNIs, deep breathing was used most frequently, followed by therapeutic touch and massage. Music therapy was used most commonly to reduce anxiety and was ranked as the ITNI used most often to enhance sleep and decrease distraction, agitation, aggression, and depression. Psychiatry/chemical dependency and intensive care units had the highest incidence of use of music therapy. The ranking of barriers and facilitators identified the strongest barrier as not having time to help patients with music therapy, whereas the strongest facilitator was nurses' comfort with the idea of using music therapy. This research begins to fill an information gap about the frequency, purpose, and perceived effectiveness of use of ITNIs. The use of ITNIs can increase patient comfort and facilitate conservation of energy, which aids healing processes, as described in Levine's Conservation Model. Use of ITNIs also can empower nurses and facilitate their control over nursing practice. This study indicates that nurses need further education on the use of music therapy and other ITNIs.

  19. Preoperative dehydration increases risk of postoperative acute renal failure in colon and rectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Phelan, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    There is limited data regarding the effects of preoperative dehydration on postoperative renal function. We sought to identify associations between hydration status before operation and postoperative acute renal failure (ARF) in patients undergoing colorectal resection. The NSQIP database was used to examine the data of patients undergoing colorectal resection from 2005 to 2011. We used preoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN)/creatinine ratio >20 as a marker of relative dehydration. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed to quantify the association of BUN/Cr ratio with ARF. We sampled 27,860 patients who underwent colorectal resection. Patients with dehydration had higher risk of ARF compared to patients with BUN/Cr Dehydration was associated with an increase in mortality of the affected patients (AOR, 2.19; P dehydrated patients. Open colorectal procedures (AOR, 2.67; P = 0.01) and total colectomy procedure (AOR, 1.62; P Dehydration before operation is a common condition in colorectal surgery (incidence of 27.7 %). Preoperative dehydration is associated with increased rates of postoperative ARF, MI, and cardiac arrest. Hydrotherapy of patients with dehydration may decrease postoperative complications in colorectal surgery.

  20. Acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hun; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk; Son, Dong Wuk; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun-Sung; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2015-03-01

    Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (≤1 week) after back surgery. We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.67 (-1.04 to -0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.23 (-0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required. © 2014 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  1. Colonic stenting as bridge to surgery versus emergency surgery for management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction: a multicenter randomized trial (Stent-in 2 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholten Pieter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute left-sided colonic obstruction is most often caused by malignancy and the surgical treatment is associated with a high mortality and morbidity rate. Moreover, these operated patients end up with a temporary or permanent stoma. Initial insertion of an enteral stent to decompress the obstructed colon, allowing for surgery to be performed electively, is gaining popularity. In uncontrolled studies stent placement before elective surgery has been suggested to decrease mortality, morbidity and number of colostomies. However stent perforation can lead to peritoneal tumor spill, changing a potentially curable disease in an incurable one. Therefore it is of paramount importance to compare the outcomes of colonic stenting followed by elective surgery with emergency surgery for the management of acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction in a randomized multicenter fashion. Methods/design Patients with acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction eligible for this study will be randomized to either emergency surgery (current standard treatment or colonic stenting as bridge to elective surgery. Outcome measurements are effectiveness and costs of both strategies. Effectiveness will be evaluated in terms of quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Quality of life will be measured with standardized questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-CR38, EQ-5D and EQ-VAS. Morbidity is defined as every event leading to hospital admission or prolonging hospital stay. Mortality will be analyzed as total mortality as well as procedure-related mortality. The total costs of treatment will be evaluated by counting volumes and calculating unit prices. Including 120 patients on a 1:1 basis will have 80% power to detect an effect size of 0.5 on the EORTC QLQ-C30 global health scale, using a two group t-test with a 0.05 two-sided significance level. Differences in quality of life and morbidity will be analyzed using mixed-models repeated measures

  2. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Stoklossa, Carlene; Atwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews ...

  3. Nutritional variables predict chances of returning home and activities of daily living in post-acute geriatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeda K

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Keisuke Maeda,1,2 Takayuki Koga,3 Junji Akagi4 1Palliative Care Center, Aichi Medical University, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Nutrition and Dysphagia Rehabilitation, Tamana Regional Health Medical Center, Kumamoto, Japan; 3Department of Swallowing and Nutritional Therapy, Tamana Regional Health Medical Center, Kumamoto, Japan; 4Department of Surgery, Tamana Regional Health Medical Center, Kumamoto, Japan Background: Little is known about the association between malnutrition and the chances of returning home from post-acute facilities in older adult patients. This study aimed to understand whether malnutrition and malnutrition-related factors would be determinants for returning home and activities of daily living (ADL at discharge after post-acute care.Methods: Patients aged ≥65 years living at home before the onset of an acute disease and admitted to a post-acute ward were enrolled (n=207 in this prospective observational study. Malnutrition was defined based on the criteria of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Nutritional parameters included the nutritional intake at the time of admission and oral conditions evaluated by the Oral Health Assessment Tool (OHAT. The Barthel Index was used to assess daily activities. A Cox regression analysis of the length of stay was performed. Multivariable linear regression analyses to determine associations between malnutrition, returning home, and ADL at discharge were performed, after adjusting the variables of acute care setting.Results: The mean patient age was 84.7±6.7 years; 38% were men. European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism-defined malnutrition was observed in 129 (62.3% patients, and 118 (57.0% of all patients returned home. Multivariable regression analyses showed that malnutrition was a negative predictor of returning home (hazard ratio: 0.517 [0.351–0.761], p=0.001, and an increase in the nutritional intake (kcal/kg/d was a positive predictor of the

  4. Contemporary management and outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection: An analysis of the STS adult cardiac surgery database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Teng C; Kon, Zachary; Cheema, Faisal H; Grau-Sepulveda, Maria V; Englum, Brian; Kim, Sunghee; Chaudhuri, Paramita S; Thourani, Vinod H; Ailawadi, Gorav; Hughes, G Chad; Williams, Matthew L; Brennan, J Matthew; Svensson, Lars; Gammie, James S

    2018-01-01

    Management of acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) is challenging and operative strategies are varied. We used the STS Adult Cardiac Surgery Database (STS ACSD) to describe contemporary surgical strategies and outcomes for AAAD. Between July 2011 and September 2012, 2982 patients with AAAD underwent operations at 640 centers in North America. In this cohort, median age was 60 years old, 66% were male, and 80% had hypertension. The most common arterial cannulation strategies included femoral (36%), axillary (27%), and direct aortic (19%). The median perfusion and cross-clamp times were 181 and 102 min, respectively. The lowest temperature on bypass showed significant variation. Hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) was used in 78% of cases. Among those undergoing HCA, brain protection strategies included antegrade cerebral perfusion (31%), retrograde cerebral perfusion (25%), both (4%), and none (40%). Median HCA plus cerebral perfusion time was 40 min. Major complications included prolonged ventilation (53%), reoperation (19%), renal failure (18%), permanent stroke (11%), and paralysis (3%). Operative mortality was 17%. The median intensive care unit and hospital length of stays were 4.7 and 9.0 days, respectively. Among 640 centers, the median number of cases performed during the study period was three. Resuscitation, unresponsive state, cardiogenic shock, inotrope use, age >70, diabetes, and female sex were found to be independent predictors of mortality. These data describe contemporary patient characteristics, operative strategies, and outcomes for AAAD in North America. Mortality and morbidity for AAAD remain high. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Gallbladder Malignant Lymphoma Diagnosed after Surgery for Acute Cholecystitis - A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Yuna; Takagawa, Ryo; Kohagura, Kaori; Hashimoto, Itaru; Yokoi, Hideto; Sugawara, Yuko; Arisaka, Hayaka; Segami, Kenki; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Shimada, Kazuhiro; Murakami, Hitoshi; Hirakawa, Shohei; Hasegawa, Seiji; Fukushima, Tadao; Ike, Hideyuki; Imada, Toshio

    2018-01-01

    An 84-year-old man visited our hospital with epigastralgia.Levels of hepatic and biliary enzymes and CRP were elevated, as detected by a blood test.On a CT scan, a swollen gallbladder with stones was detected.The patient was admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of Grade I acute cholecystitis.Conservative treatment was continued with antibiotic administration and the patient was discharged from the hospital with improvement on day 6 after admission.Three months later, the patient underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy.In the gallbladder, a 45×45 mm tumor was found.Upon pathological examination, diffuse proliferation of lymphocyte-like heterotypic cells and subserosal invasion were observed.Immunohistochemistry results were negative for MUM1 and positive for CD10 and Bcl6 markers.A malignant diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was diagnosed.We experienced a case of malignant lymphoma of the gallbladder diagnosed after surgery for acute cholecystitis, which we herein report with literature consideration.

  6. Task shifting: Meeting the human resources needs for acute and emergency care in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Terry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The enormous shortage of health workers in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA is a major contributor to the unacceptably high rates of morbidity and mortality in the region. This is especially true for patients whose illnesses and injuries require time-sensitive interventions. To address the crisis, a number of countries have utilized “task-shifting” in various health disciplines where they call upon other cadres, often nurses, to assume new roles and responsibilities that are not traditionally within their scope of practice. This practice has been shown to increase access, to be cost-effective and of high-quality. A literature review was undertaken to better understand the implications of task-shifting on emergency medical care in Africa. This review demonstrates that, while task-shifting has been used effectively for specific emergency procedures in specialty fields such as obstetrics and surgery, to date there are no studies on the use of task-shifting to treat the acute, undifferentiated patient in SSA. Task shifting is a potential solution to help address the very limited access to emergency care across SSA, but requires further study to ensure effective implementation.

  7. Postoperative acute kidney injury in high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Stefano; Zagli, Giovanni; Tuccinardi, Germana; Tofani, Lorenzo; Chelazzi, Cosimo; Villa, Gianluca; Cianchi, Fabio; Coratti, Andrea; De Gaudio, Angelo Raffaele; Ricci, Zaccaria

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication in high-risk patients undergoing major surgery and is associated with longer hospital stay, increased risk for nosocomial infection and significantly higher costs. A prospective observational study exploring the incidence of AKI (AKIN classification at any stage) in high-risk patients within 48 hours after major abdominal surgery was conducted. Patients' preoperative characteristics, intraoperative management, and outcome were evaluated for associations with AKI using a logistic regression model. Data from 258 patients were analyzed. Thirty-one patients (12%) developed AKI, reaching the AKIN stage 1. No patient reached an AKIN stage higher than 1. AKI patients were older (75.2 vs 70.2 years; P = 0.0113) and had a higher body mass index (26.5 vs 25.1 kg/m(2)). In addition, AKI patients had a significantly longer ICU length of stay (3.4 vs 2.4 days; P= .0017). Creatinine levels of AKI patients increased significantly compared to the preoperative levels at 24 (P= .0486), 48 (P= .0011) and 72 hours (P= .0055), while after 72 hours it showed a downwards trend. At ICU discharge, 28 out of 31 patients (90.3%) recovered preoperative levels. Multivariate analysis identified age (OR 1.088; P= .002) and BMI (OR 1.124; P= .022) as risk factors for AKI development. Moreover, AKI development was an independent risk factor for ICU stays longer than 48 hours (OR 2.561; P= .019). Mild AKI is a not rare complication in high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Although in almost the totality of cases, the indicators of renal function recovered to preoperative levels, post-operative AKI represents a primary risk factor for a prolonged ICU stay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Association Between Handover of Anesthesia Care and Adverse Postoperative Outcomes Among Patients Undergoing Major Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip M; Cherry, Richard A; Allen, Britney N; Jenkyn, Krista M Bray; Shariff, Salimah Z; Flier, Suzanne; Vogt, Kelly N; Wijeysundera, Duminda N

    2018-01-09

    Handing over the care of a patient from one anesthesiologist to another occurs during some surgeries and might increase the risk of adverse outcomes. To assess whether complete handover of intraoperative anesthesia care is associated with higher likelihood of mortality or major complications compared with no handover of care. A retrospective population-based cohort study (April 1, 2009-March 31, 2015 set in the Canadian province of Ontario) of adult patients aged 18 years and older undergoing major surgeries expected to last at least 2 hours and requiring a hospital stay of at least 1 night. Complete intraoperative handover of anesthesia care from one physician anesthesiologist to another compared with no handover of anesthesia care. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause death, hospital readmission, or major postoperative complications, all within 30 postoperative days. Secondary outcomes were the individual components of the primary outcome. Inverse probability of exposure weighting based on the propensity score was used to estimate adjusted exposure effects. Of the 313 066 patients in the cohort, 56% were women; the mean (SD) age was 60 (16) years; 49% of surgeries were performed in academic centers; 72% of surgeries were elective; and the median duration of surgery was 182 minutes (interquartile [IQR] range, 124-255). A total of 5941 (1.9%) patients underwent surgery with complete handover of anesthesia care. The percentage of patients undergoing surgery with a handover of anesthesiology care progressively increased each year of the study, reaching 2.9% in 2015. In the unweighted sample, the primary outcome occurred in 44% of the complete handover group compared with 29% of the no handover group. After adjustment, complete handovers were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of the primary outcome (adjusted risk difference [aRD], 6.8% [95% CI, 4.5% to 9.1%]; P < .001), all-cause death (aRD, 1.2% [95% CI, 0.5% to 2%]; P

  9. Unconscious race and social class bias among acute care surgical clinicians and clinical treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Sriram, N; Dossick, Deborah S; Scott, Valerie K; Swoboda, Sandra M; Losonczy, Lia; Haut, Elliott R; Efron, David T; Pronovost, Peter J; Lipsett, Pamela A; Cornwell, Edward E; MacKenzie, Ellen J; Cooper, Lisa A; Freischlag, Julie A

    2015-05-01

    Significant health inequities persist among minority and socially disadvantaged patients. Better understanding of how unconscious biases affect clinical decision making may help to illuminate clinicians' roles in propagating disparities. To determine whether clinicians' unconscious race and/or social class biases correlate with patient management decisions. We conducted a web-based survey among 230 physicians from surgery and related specialties at an academic, level I trauma center from December 1, 2011, through January 31, 2012. We administered clinical vignettes, each with 3 management questions. Eight vignettes assessed the relationship between unconscious bias and clinical decision making. We performed ordered logistic regression analysis on the Implicit Association Test (IAT) scores and used multivariable analysis to determine whether implicit bias was associated with the vignette responses. Differential response times (D scores) on the IAT as a surrogate for unconscious bias. Patient management vignettes varied by patient race or social class. Resulting D scores were calculated for each management decision. In total, 215 clinicians were included and consisted of 74 attending surgeons, 32 fellows, 86 residents, 19 interns, and 4 physicians with an undetermined level of education. Specialties included surgery (32.1%), anesthesia (18.1%), emergency medicine (18.1%), orthopedics (7.9%), otolaryngology (7.0%), neurosurgery (7.0%), critical care (6.0%), and urology (2.8%); 1.9% did not report a departmental affiliation. Implicit race and social class biases were present in most respondents. Among all clinicians, mean IAT D scores for race and social class were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.37-0.48) and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.78), respectively. Race and class scores were similar across departments (general surgery, orthopedics, urology, etc), race, or age. Women demonstrated less bias concerning race (mean IAT D score, 0.39 [95% CI, 0.29-0.49]) and social class (mean IAT D score

  10. Pregnancy after diabetes obesity surgery (PADOS): Qualitative study of pre-pregnancy care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawe, J; Cooke, D; Hart, K; McGowan, B M; Pring, C; Subramanian, D; Whyte, M

    2014-07-01

    Half of all bariatric surgical procedures are in women of childbearing age. Surgery may improve fertility yet exacerbate nutritional deficiencies, that may be disadvantageous to the fetus. A frequently encountered subgroup of obese women have type 2 diabetes. The health risks, to both mother and child, of diabetes in pregnancy are well described including 4.7× risk of stillbirth and 2× risk of congenital abnormality. What is not clear is whether bariatric surgery mitigates or complicates the health consequences of women with obesity and diabetes in pregnancy. In addition the influence of the type of surgery, the optimal interval between surgery and conception and evidence based preconception recommendations are unknown. This study complements wider research aiming to inform optimal management of this patient population. Obese diabetic women require clear guidance regarding pregnancy planning after surgery. This study will develop an understanding of the barriers and facilitators (psychological, behavioural, attitudinal and nutritional) to achieving effective pre-pregnancy health and care in women with type 2 diabetes who have undergone metabolic surgery. Currently women's perception of fertility issues and risks after bariatric surgery is unknown and thus a qualitative interpretive paradigm was chosen. Interviews with the target population will explore decision-making processes; experience regarding metabolic surgery and perceived pregnancy risk. Interviews with a broad range of health professionals involved in bariatric care will include rationale for selected surgical procedure and post surgery referral processes e.g. contraceptive care. This will advance understanding of how to provide targeted support and monitoring. Copyright © 2014.

  11. Post-operative analgesia for major abdominal surgery and its effectiveness in a tertiary care hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Aliya; Latif, Naveed; Khan, Robyna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Post-operative pain is often inadequately treated. Optimal utilization of the available resources is essential for improving pain management. Aims: The aim of our study was to determine pain management strategies employed after major abdominal surgeries at our institute and their efficacy and safety. Settings and Design: Prospective observational study conducted at a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgeries w...

  12. Creating learning momentum through overt teaching interactions during real acute care episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquette, Dominique; Moulton, Carol-Anne; LeBlanc, Vicki R

    2015-10-01

    Clinical supervisors fulfill a dual responsibility towards patient care and learning during clinical activities. Assuming such roles in today's clinical environments may be challenging. Acute care environments present unique learning opportunities for medical trainees, as well as specific challenges. The goal of this paper was to better understand the specific contexts in which overt teaching interactions occurred in acute care environments. We conducted a naturalistic observational study based on constructivist grounded theory methodology. Using participant observation, we collected data on the teaching interactions occurring between clinical supervisors and medical trainees during 74 acute care episodes in the critical care unit of two academic centers, in Toronto, Canada. Three themes contributed to a better understanding of the conditions in which overt teaching interactions among trainees and clinical supervisors occurred during acute care episodes: seizing emergent learning opportunities, coming up against challenging conditions, and creating learning momentum. Our findings illustrate how overt learning opportunities emerged from certain clinical situations and how clinical supervisors and trainees could purposefully modify unfavorable learning conditions. None of the acute care episodes encountered in the critical care environment represented ideal conditions for learning. Yet, clinical supervisors and trainees succeeded in engaging in overt teaching interactions during many episodes. The educational value of these overt teaching interactions should be further explored, as well as the impact of interventions aimed at increasing their use in acute care environments.

  13. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Fukuda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods: This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs. The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results: In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions: The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted.

  14. Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery is associated with mid-term but not long-term mortality: A cohort-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Ferreiro

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI in cardiac surgery is associated with complications, early and late mortality and increased health care expenditures. The overall dynamic comorbidity-adjusted contributions of an episode of AKI on mortality during long-term follow-up have not been fully explored. A longitudinal cohort of 7075 adult patients admitted for cardiac surgery were enrolled in the study. Follow-up data were obtained through telephonic survey after 1, 5, 10, and 15 years or from the National Mortality Registry. All-cause mortality was assessed at five time intervals: I 30 days after surgery to 1 year; II 1 to 3 years; III 3 to 5 years; IV 5 to 10 years; and V 10 to 15 years. For the adjustment of mortality for comorbidity and pre-, intra- and postoperative variables, Cox proportional hazard regression models were conducted within each period. The overall incidence of AKI was 36.1%. AKI was an independent predictor of death only during the first five years after surgery (30 days to 1 year: HR 1.834, 95% CI 1.459 to 2.306; 1 to 3 years: HR 1.285, 95% CI 1.023 to 1.610; and 3 to five years: HR 1.330, 95% CI 1.123 to 1.750. Only age, diabetes mellitus and CHF were associated with increased risk of death over the entire follow-up period. Our study demonstrates a transient association of AKI with long-term mortality that progressively decreases and vanishes five years after surgery. The knowledge of this dynamic is crucial to understanding this complex association, planning health care and allocating resources.

  15. Kinin B1 receptors contributes to acute pain following minor surgery in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Jaime S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinins play an important role in regulation of pain and hyperalgesia after tissue injury and inflammation by activating two types of G-protein-coupled receptors, the kinin B1 and B2 receptors. It is generally accepted that the B2 receptor is constitutively expressed, whereas the B1 receptor is induced in response to inflammation. However, little is known about the regulatory effects of kinin receptors on the onset of acute inflammation and inflammatory pain in humans. The present study investigated the changes in gene expression of kinin receptors and the levels of their endogenous ligands at an early time point following tissue injury and their relation to clinical pain, as well as the effect of COX-inhibition on their expression levels. Results Tissue injury resulted in a significant up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors at 3 hours post-surgery, the onset of acute inflammatory pain. Interestingly, the up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors was positively correlated to pain intensity only after ketorolac treatment, signifying an interaction between prostaglandins and kinins in the inflammatory pain process. Further, the gene expression of both B1 and B2 receptors were correlated. Following tissue injury, B1 ligands des-Arg9-BK and des-Arg10-KD were significantly lower at the third hour compared to the first 2 hours in both the placebo and the ketorolac treatment groups but did not differ significantly between groups. Tissue injury also resulted in the down-regulation of TRPV1 gene expression at 3 hours post-surgery with no significant effect by ketorolac treatment. Interestingly, the change in gene expression of TRPV1 was correlated to the change in gene expression of B1 receptor but not B2 receptor. Conclusions These results provide evidence at the transcriptional level in a clinical model of tissue injury that up-regulation of kinin receptors are involved in the development of the

  16. Resident continuity of care experience in a Canadian general surgery training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravindar S.; Walker, G. Ross

    Objectives To provide baseline data on resident continuity of care experience, to describe the effect of ambulatory centre surgery on continuity of care, to analyse continuity of care by level of resident training and to assess a resident-run preadmission clinic’s effect on continuity of care. Design Data were prospectively collected for 4 weeks. All patients who underwent a general surgical procedure were included if a resident was present at operation. Setting The Division of General Surgery, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ont. Outcome measures Preoperative, operative and inhospital postoperative involvement of each resident with each case was recorded. Results Residents assessed preoperatively (before entering the operating room) 52% of patients overall, 20% of patients at the ambulatory centre and 83% of patients who required emergency surgery. Of patients assessed by the chief resident, 94% were assessed preoperatively compared with 32% of patients assessed by other residents ( p 0.1). Conclusions This study serves as a reference for the continuity of care experience in Canadian surgical programs. Residents assessed only 52% of patients preoperatively, and only 40% of patients had complete continuity of care. Factors such as ambulatory surgery and junior level of training negatively affected continuity experience. Such factors must be taken into account in planning surgical education. PMID:10526519

  17. The impact of care management information technology model on quality of care after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: "Bridging the Divides".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, William S; Elliott, Daniel; Fanari, Zaher; Ostertag-Stretch, Jennifer; Muther, Ann; Lynahan, Margaret; Kerzner, Roger; Salam, Tabassum; Scherrer, Herbert; Anderson, Sharon; Russo, Carla A; Kolm, Paul; Steinberg, Terri H

    Reducing readmissions and improving metrics of care are a national priority. Supplementing traditional care with care management may improve outcomes. The Bridges program was an initial evaluation of a care management platform (CareLinkHub), supported by information technology (IT) developed to improve the quality and transition of care from hospital to home after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery (CABG) and reduce readmissions. CareLink is comprised of care managers, patient navigators, pharmacists and physicians. Information to guide care management is guided by a middleware layer to gather information, PLR (ColdLight Solutions, LLC) and presented to CareLink staff on a care management platform, Aerial™ (Medecision). In addition there is an analytic engine to help evaluate and guide care, Neuron™ (Coldlight Solutions, LLC). The "Bridges" program enrolled a total of 716 CABG patients with 850 admissions from April 2013 through March 2015. The data of the program was compared with those of 1111 CABG patients with 1203 admissions in the 3years prior to the program. No impact was seen with respect to readmissions, Blood Pressure or LDL control. There was no significant improvement in patients' reported outcomes using either the CTM-3 or any of the SAQ-7 scores. Patient follow-up with physicians within 1week of discharge improved during the Bridges years. The CareLink hub platform was successfully implemented. Little or no impact on outcome metrics was seen in the short follow-up time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Contribution of Perioperative Oral Health Care and Management for Patients who Underwent General Thoracic Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Due to the recent advances in radiological diagnostic technology, the role of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in thoracic disease has expanded, surgical indication extended to the elderly patients. Cancer patients receiving surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy may encounter complications in conjunction with the oral cavity such as aspiration pneumonia, surgical site infection and various type of infection. Recently, it is recognized that oral health care management is effective to prevent the postoperative infectious complications, especially pneumonia. Therefore, oral management should be scheduled before start of therapy to prevent these complications as supportive therapy of the cancer treatment. In this background, perioperative oral function management is highlighted in the remuneration for dental treatment revision of 2012,and the importance of oral care has been recognized in generally. In this manuscript, we introduce the several opinions and evidence based on the recent previous reports about the perioperative oral health care and management on thoracic surgery.

  19. Establishment and assessment of cataract surgery in Day-care Unit at northwest of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Li Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To describe the protocol and economic cost of the Day-care Unit cataract surgery procedure in northwest of China.METHODS: Patients who received phacoemulcification and intraocular lens implantation in both Day-care Unit and regular Unit were recruited from January 2016 to December 2016. The baseline data and average cost were recorded and analyzed. Furthermore, satisfaction questionnaire of patients were collected.RESULTS: Patients with Day-care Unit showed shorter registration duration, less cost including housing and nursing charge as well as higher rate of patient satisfaction. Meanwhile, Day-care Unit shorten the time the doctors and nurses spending on filling the medical charts.CONCLUSION:Day-care Unit cataract surgery procedure could benefit both patients and medical staffs and is worthy to generalize.

  20. Implementation of national palliative care guidelines in Swedish acute care hospitals: A qualitative content analysis of stakeholders' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, S; Wallin, L; Brytting, T; Fürst, C J; Sandberg, J

    2017-11-01

    In high-income countries a large proportion of all deaths occur in hospitals. A common way to translate knowledge into clinical practice is developing guidelines for different levels of health care organisations. During 2012, national clinical guidelines for palliative care were published in Sweden. Later, guidance for palliative care was issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare. The aim of this study was two-fold: to investigate perceptions regarding these guidelines and identify obstacles and opportunities for implementation of them in acute care hospitals. Interviews were conducted with local politicians, chief medical officers and health professionals at acute care hospitals. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research was used in a directed content analysis approach. The results showed little knowledge of the two documents at all levels of the health care organisation. Palliative care was primarily described as end of life care and only few of the participants talked about the opportunity to integrate palliative care early in a disease trajectory. The environment and culture at hospitals, characterised by quick decisions and actions, were perceived as obstacles to implementation. Health professionals' expressed need for palliative care training is an opportunity for implementation of clinical guidelines. There is a need for further implementation of palliative care in hospitals. One option for further research is to evaluate implementation strategies tailored to acute care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Critical care in the ED: potentially fatal asthma and acute lung injury syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodder R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rick Hodder*Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Ottawa and The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada, *Dr Rick Hodder passed away on Tuesday April 17,2012. Please see the Dedication for more information on Dr Hodder.Abstract: Emergency department clinicians are frequently called upon to assess, diagnose, and stabilize patients who present with acute respiratory failure. This review describes a rapid initial approach to acute respiratory failure in adults, illustrated by two common examples: (1 an airway disease – acute potentially fatal asthma, and (2 a pulmonary parenchymal disease – acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. As such patients are usually admitted to hospital, discussion will be focused on those initial management aspects most relevant to the emergency department clinician.Keywords: acute asthma, acute lung injury, ARDS, acute respiratory failure

  2. Impact of Transient and Persistent Acute Kidney Injury on Chronic Kidney Disease Progression and Mortality after Gastric Surgery for Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Seong Kim

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is common after gastric surgery for gastric cancer and associated with adverse outcomes. However, the impact of transient or persistent AKI on clinical outcomes after gastric surgery for gastric cancer has not been described. We performed a retrospective study of 4,886 patients with normal renal function who underwent partial or total gastrectomy for gastric cancer between June 2002 and December 2012. AKI patients were classified as transient and persistent AKI based on the return of serum creatinine to the level indicating no AKI within 7 days. Our outcomes included occurrence of new-onset chronic kidney disease (CKD and mortality 1 year after gastric surgery. AKI occurred in 638 (13.1% after gastric surgery. Transient AKI was documented in 574 (90%. Use of diuretics and contrast agents was a common risk factor for persistent and transient AKI. Length of intensive care unit (ICU and hospital stay, and ICU admission rate were higher in patients with transient AKI than in those without AKI. Although patients with persistent AKI had a higher new-onset CKD 1 year after gastric surgery after adjusting for multiple covariates, transient AKI was not associated with new-onset CKD. The 1-year mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with transient and persistent AKI. Not only persistent AKI but transient AKI is associated with increased risk of hospital complications and a significantly higher risk of long-term mortality than patients without AKI after gastric surgery. Moreover, persistent AKI, but not transient AKI, is associated with CKD progression at 1 year.

  3. New insights into the mechanisms of acute kidney injury in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glodowski, Seth D; Wagener, Gebhard

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent complication in the intensive care unit that is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Traditional models consider reductions of global renal blood flow as the cause of acute kidney injury. However, a complex interplay between ischemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation may lead to intrarenal hypoperfusion and acute kidney injury. The role of changes of global renal blood flow as a cause for acute kidney injury remains controversial, especially in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental cleaning resources and activities in Canadian acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutman, Dick E; Ford, B Douglas; Sopha, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Environmental cleaning interventions have increased cleaning effectiveness and reduced antibiotic-resistant organisms in hospitals. This study examined cleaning in Canadian acute care hospitals with the goal of developing strategies to improve cleaning and reduce antibiotic-resistant organism rates. Managers most responsible for environmental services (EVS) completed an extensive online survey that assessed EVS resources and cleaning practices. The response rate was 50.5%; 96 surveys were completed, representing 103 of 204 hospitals. Whereas 86.3% (82/95) of managers responsible for EVS reported their staff was adequately trained and 76.0% (73/96) that supplies and equipment budgets were sufficient, only 46.9% (45/96) reported that EVS had enough personnel to satisfactorily clean their hospital. A substantial minority (36.8%, 35/95) of EVS departments did not audit the cleaning of medical surgical patient rooms on at least a monthly basis. Cleaning audits of medical surgical patient rooms frequently included environmental marking methods in only one third (33.3%, 31/93) of hospitals and frequently included the measurement of residual bioburden in only 13.8% (13/94). There was a general need for increased and improved auditing of environmental cleaning in Canadian hospitals, and there were perceived EVS staffing deficits in the majority of hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Provider-to-Provider Communication during Transitions of Care from Outpatient to Acute Care: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pitts, Samantha; Petty, Brent; Sawyer, Melinda D; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Boonyasai, Romsai Tony; Maruthur, Nisa M

    2016-04-01

    Most research on transitions of care has focused on the transition from acute to outpatient care. Little is known about the transition from outpatient to acute care. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the transition from outpatient to acute care, focusing on provider-to-provider communication and its impact on quality of care. We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases for English-language articles describing direct communication between outpatient providers and acute care providers around patients presenting to the emergency department or admitted to the hospital. We conducted double, independent review of titles, abstracts, and full text articles. Conflicts were resolved by consensus. Included articles were abstracted using standardized forms. We maintained search results via Refworks (ProQuest, Bethesda, MD). Risk of bias was assessed using a modified version of the Downs' and Black's tool. Of 4009 citations, twenty articles evaluated direct provider-to-provider communication around the outpatient to acute care transition. Most studies were cross-sectional (65%), conducted in the US (55%), and studied communication between primary care and inpatient providers (62%). Of three studies reporting on the association between communication and 30-day readmissions, none found a significant association; of these studies, only one reported a measure of association (adjusted OR for communication vs. no communication, 1.08; 95% CI 0.92-1.26). The literature on provider-to-provider communication at the transition from outpatient to acute care is sparse and heterogeneous. Given the known importance of communication for other transitions of care, future studies are needed on provider-to-provider communication during this transition. Studies evaluating ideal methods for communication to reduce medical errors, utilization, and optimize patient satisfaction at this transition are especially needed.

  6. Nursing sabbatical in the acute care hospital setting: a cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaar, Gina L; Swenty, Constance F; Phillips, Lori A; Embree, Jennifer L; McCool, Isabella A; Shirey, Maria R

    2012-06-01

    Practice-based acute care nurses experience a high incidence of burnout and dissatisfaction impacting retention and innovation and ultimately burdening the financial infrastructure of a hospital. Business, industry, and academia have successfully implemented professional sabbaticals to retain and revitalize valuable employees; however, the use is infrequent among acute care hospitals. This article expands upon the synthesis of evidence supporting nursing sabbaticals and suggests this option as a fiscally sound approach for nurses practicing in the acute care hospital setting. A cost-benefit analysis and human capital management strategies supporting nursing sabbaticals are identified.

  7. Validation of Three Postoperative Risk Prediction Models for Intensive Care Unit Mortality after Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Samuel Henry; Caiado, Camila; McCollum, Charles; Goldstein, Michael; Malagon, Ignacio; Venkateswaran, Rajamiyer; Grant, Stuart William

    2018-01-09

     Several cardiac surgery risk prediction models based on postoperative data have been developed. However, unlike preoperative cardiac surgery risk prediction models, postoperative models are rarely externally validated or utilized by clinicians. The objective of this study was to externally validate three postoperative risk prediction models for intensive care unit (ICU) mortality after cardiac surgery.  The logistic Cardiac Surgery Scores (logCASUS), Rapid Clinical Evaluation (RACE), and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores were calculated over the first 7 postoperative days for consecutive adult cardiac surgery patients between January 2013 and May 2015. Model discrimination was assessed using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. Calibration was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test, calibration plots, and observed to expected ratios. Recalibration of the models was performed.  A total of 2255 patients were included with an ICU mortality rate of 1.8%. Discrimination for all three models on each postoperative day was good with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of >0.8. Generally, RACE and logCASUS had better discrimination than SOFA. Calibration of the RACE score was better than logCASUS, but ratios of observed to expected mortality for both were generally prediction after cardiac surgery. If appropriately calibrated, postoperative cardiac surgery risk prediction models have the potential to be useful tools after cardiac surgery. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Post-operative analgesia for major abdominal surgery and its effectiveness in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Epidural, PCIA and opioid infusions are used for pain relief after major abdominal surgeries at our hospital. Although there is limited drug availability, regular assessments and appropriate dose adjustments by acute pain management service (APMS and use of multimodal analgesia led to a high level of patient satisfaction. We recommend that feedback to the primary anesthesiologists by APMS is of utmost importance to enable improvement in practice.

  9. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review" found on pages 19-28, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 29, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Discuss problematic barriers during care transitions

  10. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system as a bridge to reparative surgery in ventricular septal defect complicating acute inferoposterior myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozado, Jose; Pascual, Isaac; Avanzas, Pablo; Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Alvarez, Ruben; Díaz, Rocio; Díaz, Beatriz; Martín, María; Carro, Amelia; Muñiz, Guillermo; Silva, Jacobo; Moris, Cesar

    2017-09-01

    Post-infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a rare but potentially lethal complication of acute myocardial infarction. Medical management is usually futile, so definitive surgery remains the treatment of choice but the risk surgery is very high and the optimal timing for surgery is still under debate. A 55-year-old man with no previous medical history attended the emergency-room for 12 h evolution of oppressive chest pain and strong anginal pain 7 days ago. On physical examination, blood pressure was 96/70 mmHg, pansystolic murmur over left sternal border without pulmonary crackles. An electrocardiogram revealed sinus rhythm 110 bpm, elevation ST and Q in inferior-posterior leads. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed inferoposterior akinesia, posterior-basal septal rupture (2 cm × 2 cm) with left-right shunt. Suspecting VSD in inferior-posterior acute myocardial infarction evolved, we performed emergency coronarography with 3-vessels disease and complete subacute occlusion of the mid segment of the right coronary artery. Left ventriculography demonstrated shunting of contrast from the left ventricule to the right ventricule. He was rejected for heart transplantation because of his age. Considering the high surgical risk to early surgery and his hemodynamic and clinical stability, delayed surgical treatment is decided, and 4 days after admission the patient suffered hemodynamic instability so venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system (ECMO) is implanted as a bridge to reparative surgery. The 9th day after admission double bypass, interventricular defect repair with pericardial two-patch exclusion technique, and ECMO decannulation were performed. The patient's postoperative course was free of complications and was discharged 10 days post VSD repair surgery. Follow-up 3-month later revealed the patient to be in good functional status and good image outcome with intact interventricular septal patch without shunt. ECMO as a bridge to reparative

  11. The cost-utility of point-of-care troponin testing to diagnose acute coronary syndrome in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Michelle M.A.; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Moesker, Marco J.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Kusters, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Background: The added value of using a point-of-care (POC) troponin test in primary care to rule out acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is debated because test sensitivity is inadequate early after symptom onset. This study investigates the potential cost-utility of diagnosing ACS by a general

  12. Association between quality of care and complications after abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Simon; Deban, Melina; Martelli, Vanessa; Monette, Michèle; Sourial, Nadia; Hamadani, Fadi; Teasdale, Debby; Holcroft, Christina; Zakrzewski, Helena; Fraser, Shannon

    2014-09-01

    Measuring the quality of surgical care is essential to identifying areas of weakness in the delivery of effective surgical care and to improving patient outcomes. Our objectives were to (1) assess the quality of surgical care delivered to adult patients; and (2) determine the association between quality of surgical care and postoperative complications. This retrospective, pilot, cohort study was conducted at a single university-affiliated institution. Using the institution's National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (2009-2010), 273 consecutive patients ≥18 years of age who underwent elective major abdominal operations were selected. Adherence to 10 process-based quality indicators (QIs) was measured and quantified by calculating a patient quality score (no. of QIs passed/no. of QIs eligible). A pass rate for each individual QI was also calculated. The association between quality of surgical care and postoperative complications was assessed using an incidence rate ratio, which was estimated from a Poisson regression. The mean overall patient quality score was 67.2 ± 14.4% (range, 25-100%). The mean QI pass rate was 65.9 ± 26.1%, which varied widely from 9.6% (oral intake documentation) to 95.6% (prophylactic antibiotics). Poisson regression revealed that as the quality score increased, the incidence of postoperative complications decreased (incidence rate ratio, 0.19; P = .011). A sensitivity analysis revealed that this association was likely driven by the postoperative ambulation QI. Higher quality scores, mainly driven by early ambulation, were associated with fewer postoperative complications. QIs with unacceptably low adherence were identified as targets for future quality improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dignity and patient-centred care for people with palliative care needs in the acute hospital setting: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Jan; Johnston, Bridget; Buchanan, Deans

    2015-09-01

    A core concept behind patient-centred approaches is the need to treat people with, and preserve, dignity in care settings. People receiving palliative care are one group who may have particularly sensitive needs in terms of their condition, symptoms and life expectancy. Dignity is more likely to be violated in hospital settings. Given the high percentage of people with palliative care needs who are admitted to hospital during their last year of life, the provision of dignity enhancing and preserving care in that setting is of vital importance. To examine international evidence relating to dignity and person-centred care for people with palliative care needs in the acute hospital setting. A systematic literature review was conducted, incorporating data extraction, analysis and quality appraisal of included papers. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA, EMBASE, Cochrane Database and Web of Science. Inclusion dates: 1 January 2000-1 April 2014. Adult palliative care, acute care setting, dignity or person-centred care. In all, 33 papers met the inclusion criteria for the review. Papers highlighted the many and varied potential threats to dignity for people with palliative care needs in acute settings, including symptom control and existential distress, approaches and models in care provision and healthcare settings and design. Acute hospital staff require adequate training, including symptom control, and the correct environment in which to deliver dignified and person-centred end-of-life care. Specific models/approaches to care can be beneficial, if adequate training regarding implementation is given. The needs of family members also require consideration, particularly following bereavement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Boundary work and the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners in healthcare teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise; Doran, Diane

    2012-07-01

    This article is a report of a study of boundary work following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role in healthcare teams. Acute care nurse practitioners enacting their roles in healthcare teams have faced a number of challenges including a mix of positive and negative views of the acute care nurse practitioner role from healthcare team members and acute care nurse practitioner roles crossing the boundaries between the medical and nursing professions. Understanding the process by which the boundaries between professions changed following the introduction of an acute care nurse practitioner role was important since this could affect scope of practice and the team's ability to give patient care. The study was conducted in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. Data were collected from March to May 2009. Participants (N = 59) described boundary work as a process that included: (1) creating space; (2) loss of a valued function; (3) trust; (4) interpersonal dynamics; and (5) time. The development of trust among team members was essential. The co-location of team members working on common projects, and medical and nursing leadership facilitated boundary work. The micro-level processes of boundary work in healthcare teams have important implications for the development of full scope of practice for acute care nurse practitioners, effective inter-professional teamwork and the integration of new roles in healthcare systems. Future research needs to be undertaken in different contexts, and with patients and families. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Praxis and the role development of the acute care nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2008-06-01

    Acute care nurse practitioner roles have been introduced in many countries. The acute care nurse practitioner provides nursing and medical care to meet the complex needs of patients and their families using a holistic, health-centred approach. There are many pressures to adopt a performance framework and execute activities and tasks. Little time may be left to explore domains of advanced practice nursing and develop other forms of knowledge. The primary objective of praxis is to integrate theory, practice and art, and facilitate the recognition and valuing of different types of knowledge through reflection. With this framework, the acute care nurse practitioner assumes the role of clinician and researcher. Praxis can be used to develop the acute care nurse practitioner role as an advanced practice nursing role. A praxis framework permeates all aspects of the acute care nurse practitioner's practice. Praxis influences how relationships are structured with patients, families and colleagues in the work setting. Decision-makers at different levels need to recognize the contribution of praxis in the full development of the acute care nurse practitioner role. Different strategies can be used by educators to assist students and practitioners to develop a praxis framework.

  16. Revision of Immediate Post-Open Heart Surgery Education for Critical Care RNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowry, Marianne J; Gabel, Mollie A

    2015-11-01

    Responding to the complex nature of critical care is imperative, as extensive clinical judgment is required during those vital moments when patients are experiencing complications related to open heart surgery, post-vessel bypass, or valve replacement. Critical care registered nurses must rely on evidence-based foundational knowledge and skills particular to cardiovascular pathophysiology, hemodynamic monitoring, and medications. This article reports on the critical care educator's revision of the immediate post-open heart surgery curriculum. Mixed educational methods within the plan were foundational to develop clinicians for competent care of these complex patients (within the first 8 hours). The revision included experiential learning and learner centeredness to bolster the learner's confidence, reduce the time to competence, and, most important, ensure positive patient outcomes. Kirkpatrick's classic four-level model provided the framework for evaluation. Lessons learned were discussed following the program initiation. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Urinary biomarkers may provide prognostic information for subclinical acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Christian; Albert, Annemarie; Kube, Johanna; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Wettersten, Nicholas; Kuppe, Hermann; Westphal, Sabine; Haase, Michael; Haase-Fielitz, Anja

    2017-12-22

    This study aimed to determine the biomarker-specific outcome patterns and short-and long-term prognosis of cardiac surgery-asoociated acute kidney injury (AKI) identified by standard criteria and/or urinary kidney biomarkers. Patients enrolled (N = 200), originated a German multicenter study (NCT00672334). Standard risk injury, failure, loss, and end-stage renal disease classification (RIFLE) criteria (including serum creatinine and urine output) and urinary kidney biomarker test result (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, midkine, interleukin 6, and proteinuria) were used for diagnosis of postoperative AKI. Primary end point was acute renal replacement therapy or in-hospital mortality. Long-term end points among others included 5-year mortality. Patients with single-biomarker-positive subclinical AKI (RIFLE negative) were identified. We controlled for systemic inflammation using C-reactive protein test. Urinary biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, midkine, and interleukin 6) were identified as independent predictors of the primary end point. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, midkine, or interleukin 6 positivity or de novo/worsening proteinuria identified 21.1%, 16.9%, 30.5%, and 48.0% more cases, respectively, with likely subclinical AKI (biomarker positive/RIFLE negative) additionally to cases with RIFLE positivity alone. Patients with likely subclinical AKI (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin or interleukin 6 positive) had increased risk of primary end point (adjusted hazard ratio, 7.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-33.93 [P = .013] and hazard ratio, 6.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-35.21 [P = .037]), respectively. Compared with biomarker-negative/RIFLE-positive patients, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin positive/RIFLE-positive or midkine-positive/RIFLE-positive patients had increased risk of primary end point (odds ratio, 9.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-67.3 [P = .033] and odds ratio, 14

  18. Urinary biomarkers TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 early predict acute kidney injury after major surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gocze

    Full Text Available To assess the ability of the urinary biomarkers IGFBP7 (insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 and TIMP-2 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 to early predict acute kidney injury (AKI in high-risk surgical patients.Postoperative AKI is associated with an increase in short and long-term mortality. Using IGFBP7 and TIMP-2 for early detection of cellular kidney injury, thus allowing the early initiation of renal protection measures, may represent a new concept of evaluating renal function.In this prospective study, urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] was measured in surgical patients at high risk for AKI. A predefined cut-off value of [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] >0.3 was used for assessing diagnostic accuracy. Perioperative characteristics were evaluated, and ROC analyses as well as logistic regression models of risk assessment were calculated with and without a [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test.107 patients were included in the study, of whom 45 (42% developed AKI. The highest median values of biomarker were detected in septic, transplant and patients after hepatic surgery (1.24 vs 0.45 vs 0.47 ng/l²/1000. The area under receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC for the risk of any AKI was 0.85, for early use of RRT 0.83 and for 28-day mortality 0.77. In a multivariable model with established perioperative risk factors, the [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test was the strongest predictor of AKI and significantly improved the risk assessment (p<0.001.Urinary [TIMP-2]×[IGFBP7] test sufficiently detect patients with risk of AKI after major non-cardiac surgery. Due to its rapid responsiveness it extends the time frame for intervention to prevent development of AKI.

  19. Renal ultrasound provides low utility in evaluating cardiac surgery associated acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allen; Crawford, Todd; Pierre, Alejandro Suarez; Trent Magruder, J; Fraser, Charles; Conte, John; Whitman, Glenn; Sciortino, Christopher

    2017-09-02

    Renal ultrasonography is part of the algorithm in assessing acute kidney injury (AKI). The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical utility of renal US in postoperative cardiac patients who develop AKI. We conducted a retrospective study of 90 postoperative cardiac surgery patients at a single institution from 1/19/2010 to 3/19/2016 who underwent renal US for AKI. We reviewed provider documentation to determine whether renal US changed management. We defined change as: administration of crystalloid or colloid, addition of inotropic or vasopressor, or procedural interventions on the renal system. Mean age of study patients was 68 ± 13 years. 48/90 patients (53.3%) had pre-existing chronic kidney disease of varying severity. 48 patients (53.3%) had normal renal US with incidental findings and 31 patients (34.4%) had US evidence of medical kidney disease. 10 patients (11.1%) had limited US results due to poor visualization and 1 patient (1.1%) had mild right-sided hydronephrosis. No patients were found to have obstructive uropathy or renal artery stenosis. Clinical management was altered in only 4/90 patients (4.4%), which included 3 patients that received a fluid bolus and 1 patient that received a fluid bolus and inotropes. No vascular or urologic procedures resulted from US findings. Although renal ultrasound is often utilized in the work-up of AKI, our study shows that renal US provides little benefit in managing postoperative cardiac patients. This diagnostic modality should be scrutinized rather than viewed as a universal measure in the cardiac surgery population.

  20. Primary care physician decision making regarding severe obesity treatment and bariatric surgery: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke M; Jolles, Sally A; Greenberg, Caprice C; Schwarze, Margaret L; Safdar, Nasia; McVay, Megan A; Whittle, Jeffrey C; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Voils, Corrine I

    2016-05-01

    Less than 1% of severely obese US adults undergo bariatric surgery annually. It is critical to understand the factors that contribute to its utilization. To understand how primary care physicians (PCPs) make decisions regarding severe obesity treatment and bariatric surgery referral. Focus groups with PCPs practicing in small, medium, and large cities in Wisconsin. PCPs were asked to discuss prioritization of treatment for a severely obese patient with multiple co-morbidities and considerations regarding bariatric surgery referral. Focus group sessions were analyzed by using a directed approach to content analysis. A taxonomy of consensus codes was developed. Code summaries were created and representative quotes identified. Sixteen PCPs participated in 3 focus groups. Four treatment prioritization approaches were identified: (1) treat the disease that is easiest to address; (2) treat the disease that is perceived as the most dangerous; (3) let the patient set the agenda; and (4) address obesity first because it is the common denominator underlying other co-morbid conditions. Only the latter approach placed emphasis on obesity treatment. Five factors made PCPs hesitate to refer patients for bariatric surgery: (1) wanting to "do no harm"; (2) questioning the long-term effectiveness of bariatric surgery; (3) limited knowledge about bariatric surgery; (4) not wanting to recommend bariatric surgery too early; and (5) not knowing if insurance would cover bariatric surgery. Decision making by PCPs for severely obese patients seems to underprioritize obesity treatment and overestimate bariatric surgery risks. This could be addressed with PCP education and improvements in communication between PCPs and bariatric surgeons. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  1. In-Person Communication Between Radiologists and Acute Care Surgeons Leads to Significant Alterations in Surgical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Elliot C; Alam, Hasan B; Brown, Richard K J; Stojanovska, Jadranka; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if direct in-person communication between an acute care surgical team and radiologists alters surgical decision making. Informed consent was waived for this institutional review board-exempt, HIPAA-compliant, prospective quality improvement study. From January 29, 2015 to December 10, 2015, semiweekly rounds lasting approximately 60 min were held between the on-call acute care surgery team (attending surgeon, chief resident, and residents) and one of three expert abdominal radiologists. A comprehensive imaging review was performed of recent and comparison examinations for cases selected by the surgeons in which medical and/or surgical decision making was pending. All reviewed examinations had available finalized reports known to the surgical team. RADPEER interradiologist concordance scores were assigned to all reviewed examinations. The impression and plan of the attending surgeon were recorded before and after each in-person review. One hundred patients were reviewed with 11 attending surgeons. The in-person meetings led to changes in surgeons' diagnostic impressions in 43% (43 of 100) and changes in medical and/or surgical planning in 43% (43 of 100; 20 acute changes, 23 nonacute changes, 19 changes in operative management) of cases. There were major discrepancies (RADPEER score ≥3) between the impression of the reviewing radiologist and the written report in 11% of cases (11 of 100). Targeted in-person collaboration between radiologists and acute care surgeons is associated with substantial and frequent changes in patient management, even when the original written report contains all necessary data. The primary mechanism seems to be promotion of a shared mental model that facilitates the exchange of complex information. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of acute kidney injury and protection of renal function in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joannidis, Michael; Druml, Wilfred; Forni, Lui G.; Groeneveld, A. B. Johan; Honore, Patrick; Oudemans-van Straaten, Heleen M.; Ronco, Claudio; Schetz, Marie R. C.; Woittiez, Arend Jan

    Acute renal failure on the intensive care unit is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. To determine recommendations for the prevention of acute kidney injury (AKI), focusing on the role of potential preventative maneuvers including volume expansion, diuretics, use of inotropes,

  3. Forced fluid removal in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, R E; Perner, A; Jensen, A K

    2018-01-01

    with acute kidney injury and fluid accumulation of more than 10% ideal bodyweight. METHODS: The FFAKI-trial was a pilot trial of forced fluid removal vs standard care in adult ICU patients with moderate to high risk acute kidney injury and 10% fluid accumulation. Fluid removal was done with furosemide and...

  4. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... Interventional and Therapeutic Neuroradiology BBA Balanced Budget Act of 1997, Public Law 105-33 BBRA Medicare... Ultrasound (IVUS) III. Changes to the Hospital Wage Index for Acute Care Hospitals A. Background B. Wage...

  5. The impact of self-care education on life expectancy in acute coronary syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshid Choobdari

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Hospitalized acute coronary syndrome patients have a lower levels of life expectancy. Their life expectancy can increase through providing them with self-care education, which will lead to their independence promotion and self-esteem.

  6. Developing a framework to guide the de-adoption of low-value clinical practices in acute care medicine: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons Leigh, Jeanna; Niven, Daniel J; Boyd, Jamie M; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-01-19

    Healthcare systems have difficulty incorporating scientific evidence into clinical practice, especially when science suggests that existing clinical practices are of low-value (e.g. ineffective or harmful to patients). While a number of lists outlining low-value practices in acute care medicine currently exist, less is known about how best to initiate and sustain the removal of low-value clinical practices (i.e. de-adoption). This study will develop a comprehensive list of barriers and facilitators to the de-adoption of low-value clinical practices in acute care facilities to inform the development of a framework to guide the de-adoption process. The proposed project is a multi-stage mixed methods study to develop a framework to guide the de-adoption of low-value clinical practices in acute care medicine that will be tested in a representative sample of acute care settings in Alberta, Canada. Specifically, we will: 1) conduct a systematic review of the de-adoption literature to identify published barriers and facilitators to the de-adoption of low-value clinical practices in acute care medicine and any associated interventions proposed (Phase one); 2) conduct focus groups with acute care stakeholders to identify important themes not published in the literature and obtain a comprehensive appreciation of stakeholder perspectives (Phase two); 3) extend the generalizability of focus group findings by conducting individual stakeholder surveys with a representative sample of acute care providers throughout the province to determine which barriers and facilitators identified in Phases one and two are most relevant in their clinical setting (Phase three). Identified barriers and facilitators will be catalogued and integrated with targeted interventions in a framework to guide the process of de-adoption in each of four targeted areas of acute care medicine (Emergency Medicine, Cardiovascular Health and Stroke, Surgery and Critical Care Medicine). Analyses will be

  7. Editor's Choice : acute cardiovascular care association position paper on intensive cardiovascular care units : an update on their definition, structure, organisation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni; De Maria, Elia; Fitzsimons, Donna; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hassager, Christian; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Magdy, Ahmed; Marandi, Toomas; Mimoso, Jorge; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susana; Rokyta, Richard; Roubille, Francois

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions ...

  8. Quality of provided care in vascular surgery : outcome assessment & improvement strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flu, Hans Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the quality of care in vascular surgery in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD): intermittent claudication (IC) and critical lower limb ischaemia (CLI) patients. Therefore firstly it focused on the improvement of the

  9. Medical tourism in plastic surgery: ethical guidelines and practice standards for perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Matthew L; Verma, Kapil; Ashktorab, Samaneh; Davison, Steven P

    2014-06-01

    The goal of this review was to identify the safety and medical care issues that surround the management of patients who had previously undergone medical care through tourism medicine. Medical tourism in plastic surgery occurs via three main referral patterns: macrotourism, in which a patient receives treatments abroad; microtourism, in which a patient undergoes a procedure by a distant plastic surgeon but requires postoperative and/or long-term management by a local plastic surgeon; and specialty tourism, in which a patient receives plastic surgery from a non-plastic surgeon. The ethical practice guidelines of the American Medical Association, International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and American Board of Plastic Surgeons were reviewed with respect to patient care and the practice of medical tourism. Safe and responsible care should start prior to surgery, with communication and postoperative planning between the treating physician and the accepting physician. Complications can arise at any time; however, it is the duty and ethical responsibility of plastic surgeons to prevent unnecessary complications following tourism medicine by adequately counseling patients, defining perioperative treatment protocols, and reporting complications to regional and specialty-specific governing bodies. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  10. Prediction Models for Prolonged Intensive Care Unit Stay after Cardiac Surgery: Systematic Review and Validation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linda Peelen; Karel Moons; Cor Kalkman; Prof. Dr. Marieke J. Schuurmans; Roelof G.A. Ettema; Arno Nierich

    2010-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac surgery. However, no extensive quantitative validation of these models has yet been conducted. This study sought to identify and validate existing prediction models for prolonged ICU length of

  11. Embryonic natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis complicated by abdominal compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui-Ming; Guo, Shao-Qing; Liao, Xiu-Min; Zhang, Li; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to estimate the value of embryonal natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (ENOTES) in treating severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated with abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The patients, who were randomized into an ENOTES group and an operative group, underwent ENOTES and laparotomy, respectively. The results and complications of the two groups were compared. Enterocinesia was observed earlier in the ENOTES group than in the operative group. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score of patients in the ENOTES group was lower than that of the operative group on the 1st, 3rd and 5th post-operative day (Pcomplications and mortality between the two groups (Pcomplications.

  12. Intensive care admission and hospital mortality in the elderly after non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nadal, M; Pérez-Hoyos, S; Montejo-González, J C; Pearse, R; Aldecoa, C

    2018-03-01

    To assess whether patient age is independently associated to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission after non-cardiac surgery. An observational cohort study of the Spanish subset of the European Surgical Outcome Study (EuSOS) was carried out. Hospitals of the public National Health Care System and private hospitals in Spain. None. All patients over 16 years of age undergoing inpatient non-cardiac surgery in the participating hospitals during a 7-day period in the month of April 2011 were consecutively included. ICU admission rate, factors associated with ICU admission and hospital mortality were assessed using logistic regression analysis and fractional polynomial regression. Out of 5412 patients, 677 (12.5%) were admitted to the ICU after surgery. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) for ICU admission was 1.1 (0.8-1.4) for patients aged 65-74 years, 0.7 (0.5-1) for patients aged 75-85 years, and 0.4 (0.2-0.8) for patients over 85 years, respectively. Age, ASA score, grade of surgery (minor, intermediate, major), urgent surgery, surgical specialty, laparoscopic surgery and metastatic disease were independent factors for ICU admission. Global risk-adjusted mortality was 1.4 (95% CI 0.9-2.2). The ASA score, urgent surgery, surgical specialty and diabetes were predictors of hospital mortality. Elderly patients (over 80 years) appear less likely to be admitted to ICU after non-cardiac surgery in Spanish hospitals. There was no significant association between age and postoperative mortality in this cohort. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  13. Improvement of nutritional care after colon surgery: the impact of early oral nutrition in the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grode, Louise Bang; Søgaard, Anette

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of implementing early oral nutritional supplements in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) after colon surgery. A randomized controlled intervention study. Patients admitted for elective colon surgery were randomly assigned to either a group receiving early oral nutritional supplements (n=24) or traditional treatment with water or lemonade (n=22) in the PACU. On the second postoperative day, patients in the early nutritional supplement group had a higher cumulative intake of energy (P=.019) and protein (P=.015) compared with the traditional treatment. Postoperative nausea and vomiting, pain, length of stay in the PACU, and need of a nasogastric tube did not differ significantly between the groups. The nutritional course for patients undergoing colon surgery can be improved by implementing early oral nutritional supplements in the PACU. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. General surgery residents improve efficiency but not outcome of trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Patrick J; Hawkes, Allison; Madayag, Robert; Seale, Fred; Maines, Charles

    2003-07-01

    Current American College of Surgeons Level I trauma center verification requires the presence of a residency program in which trauma care is an integral part of the training. The rationale for this requirement remains unclear, with no scientific evidence that resident participation improves the quality of trauma care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether quality or efficiency of trauma care is influenced by general surgery residents. Our urban Level I trauma center has traditionally used 24-hour in-house postgraduate year-4 general surgery residents in conjunction with at-home trauma attending backup to provide trauma care. As of July 1, 2000, general surgery residents no longer participated in trauma patient care, leaving sole responsibility to an in-house trauma attending. Data regarding patient outcome and resource use with and without surgery resident participation were tabulated and analyzed. Continuous data were compared using Student's t test if normally distributed and the Mann-Whitney U test if nonparametric. Categorical data were compared using chi2 analysis or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. During the 5-month period with resident participation, 555 trauma patients were admitted. In the identical time period without residents, 516 trauma patients were admitted. During the period without housestaff, patients were older and more severely injured. Mechanism was not different during the two time periods. Mortality was not affected; however, time in the emergency department and hospital lengths of stay were significantly shorter with residents. Multiple regression confirmed these findings while controlling for age, mechanism, and Injury Severity Score. Although resident participation in trauma care at a Level I trauma center does not affect outcome, it does significantly improve the efficiency of trauma care delivery.

  15. N-acetylcysteine versus Dopamine to Prevent Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery in Patients with Preexisting Moderate Renal Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savluk, Omer Faruk; Guzelmeric, Fusun; Yavuz, Yasemin; Cevirme, Deniz; Gurcu, Emre; Ogus, Halide; Orki, Tulay; Kocak, Tuncer

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery is associated with mortality and morbidity. Therefore, strategies to prevent acute kidney injury are very important. The aim of this placebo-controlled randomized double-blind study was to compare the prophylactic efficacy of N-Acetylcysteine and dopamine administration in patients with pre-existing moderate renal insufficiency who were undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass. This study included 135 patients with pre-existing moderate renal insufficiency who were scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Serum creatinine and GFR were recorded preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. On the first and second postoperative days, the drugs used showed statistically significant differences among the creatinine groups (Prenal function, whereas the application of renal dose dopamine did not have a protective effect in patients with pre-existing moderate renal failure.

  16. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sterile gloves. Before the surgery begins, a time out is held during which the surgical team confirms ... the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version What Participants Need to Know About Clinical ...

  17. Functional Measures for Fall Risk in the Acute Care Setting: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Alaina M; Siu, Ka-Chun; Honaker, Julie A

    2017-04-01

    This review explores the evidence pertaining to the use of functional ability measures for fall risk in the acute care setting. We included studies from six bibliographic databases that investigated fall risk functional ability measures in hospitalized older adults (≥55 years). We utilized the following search terms: acute care, subacute care, critical care, inpatient, fall, and fall prevention. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Timed "Up and Go" (TUG) was identified as a feasible fall risk functional ability measure for clinicians; it demonstrated clinical performance of fair sensitivity (56%-68%) and good specificity (74%-80%). Clinical performance of other measures (Berg Balance Scale and Functional Reach test) was not as favorable as the TUG. Functional ability measures are underutilized in the acute care setting, potentially due to limited knowledge and training on administration. Combining functional measures with subjective screening tools may optimize performance and accuracy of identifying fall risk identification.

  18. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  19. Clinical librarian attendance at general surgery quality of care rounds (Morbidity and Mortality Conference).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Elisa; Englesakis, Marina; Faulkner, Amy; Trojan, Boguslawa; Rotstein, Lorne E; Urbach, David R

    2009-09-01

    Quality of Care rounds, also known as Mortality and Morbidity conferences, are an important and time-honored forum for quality audit in clinical surgery services. The authors created a modification to their hospital's Quality of Care rounds by incorporating a clinical librarian, who assisted residents in conducting literature reviews related to clinical topics discussed during the rounds. The objective of this article is to describe the authors' experience with this intervention. The clinical librarian program has greatly improved the Quality of Care rounds by aiding in literature searches and quality of up-to-date, evidence-based presentations.

  20. Management of acute malignant colorectal obstruction with a novel self-expanding metallic stent as a bridge to surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongdong; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Minghua; Fan Youben; Chen Niwei; Wang Yu; Zhao Jungong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the safety and clinical efficacy of a newly designed self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) in the treatment of patients with acute malignant colorectal obstruction. Methods: Between April 2001 and October 2007, 52 patients with acute malignant colorectal obstruction were treated with a new designed SEMS as an investigational bridge to surgery. Patients were prospectively followed and relevant data collection was collected, including details regarding technique, clinical symptoms, complications, need for elective surgery, and overall survival. Results: Stent placement was technically successful in all but two patients (due to complete obstruction) with no procedure-related complications. Complications included stent migration (n = 4), anal pain (n = 2) and stool impaction (n = 1). Clinical success was achieved in 49 (98%) of 50 patients with resolution of bowel obstruction within 2 days of stent placement. In one patient with stool impaction 2 days after stent placement, endoscopic disimpaction was successfully performed. An elective one-stage surgical procedure was performed in all 50 patients who successfully received a SEMS as a bridge to surgery within a mean of 8 ± 2 days (range: 4-11 days) after stent placement. Mean follow-up time was 36 ± 12 months (range 3-70 months), and all patients remained alive at the time of this report. Conclusion: The newly designed SEMS placement as a bridge to surgery was a safe and effective intervention for colonic decompression in patients with acute malignant colorectal obstruction and allowed a high proportion of patients to be successfully proceeded to elective surgery.

  1. Outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving intensive care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Shannon L; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Fisher, Brian T; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Torp, Kari; Seif, Alix E; Kavcic, Marko; Walker, Dana M; Leckerman, Kateri H; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Rheingold, Susan R; Sung, Lillian; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Thomas, Neal J; Aplenc, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Children with acute myeloid leukemia are at risk for sepsis and organ failure. Outcomes associated with intensive care support have not been studied in a large pediatric acute myeloid leukemia population. Our objective was to determine hospital mortality of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients requiring intensive care. Retrospective cohort study of children hospitalized between 1999 and 2010. Use of intensive care was defined by utilization of specific procedures and resources. The primary endpoint was hospital mortality. Forty-three children's hospitals contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information System database. Patients who are newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and who are 28 days through 18 years old (n = 1,673) hospitalized any time from initial diagnosis through 9 months following diagnosis or until stem cell transplant. A reference cohort of all nononcology pediatric admissions using the same intensive care resources in the same time period (n = 242,192 admissions) was also studied. None. One-third of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (553 of 1,673) required intensive care during a hospitalization within 9 months of diagnosis. Among intensive care admissions, mortality was higher in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort compared with the nononcology cohort (18.6% vs 6.5%; odds ratio, 3.23; 95% CI, 2.64-3.94). However, when sepsis was present, mortality was not significantly different between cohorts (21.9% vs 19.5%; odds ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.89-1.53). Mortality was consistently higher for each type of organ failure in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort versus the nononcology cohort; however, mortality did not exceed 40% unless there were four or more organ failures in the admission. Mortality for admissions requiring intensive care decreased over time for both cohorts (23.7% in 1999-2003 vs 16.4% in 2004-2010 in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort, p = 0.0367; and 7.5% in 1999-2003 vs 6.5% in 2004-2010 in the nononcology

  2. Are Surrogate Assumptions and Use of Diuretics Associated with Diagnosis and Staging of Acute Kidney Injury after Cardiac Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hayder K.; Prabhu, Mahesh; Kanagasundaram, N. Suren

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives This study measured the association between the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) diagnostic and staging criteria and surrogates for baseline serum creatinine (SCr) and body weight, compared urine output (UO) with SCr criteria, and assessed the relationships between use of diuretics and calibration between criteria and prediction of outcomes. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This was a retrospective cohort study using prospective measurements of SCr, hourly UO, body weight, and drug administration records from 5701 patients admitted, after cardiac surgery, to a cardiac intensive care unit between 1995 and 2006. Results More patients (n=2424, 42.5%) met SCr diagnostic criteria with calculated SCr assuming a baseline estimated GFR of 75 ml/min per 1.73 m2 than with known baseline SCr (n=1043, 18.3%). Fewer patients (n=484, 8.5%) met UO diagnostic criteria with assumed body weight (70 kg) than with known weight (n=624, 10.9%). Agreement between SCr and UO criteria was fair (κ=0.28; 95% confidence interval 0.25–0.31). UO diagnostic criteria were specific (0.95; 0.94–0.95) but insensitive (0.36; 0.33–0.39) compared with SCr. Intravenous diuretics were associated with higher probability of falling below the UO diagnostic threshold compared with SCr, higher 30-day mortality (relative risk, 2.27; 1.08–4.76), and the need for renal support (4.35; 1.82–10.4) compared with no diuretics. Conclusions Common surrogates for baseline estimated GFR and body weight were associated with misclassification of AKIN stage. UO criteria were insensitive compared with SCr. Intravenous diuretic use further reduced agreement and confounded association between AKIN stage and 30-day mortality or need for renal support. PMID:22246280

  3. Hemoglobin A1c Levels Predicts Acute Kidney Injury after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in Non-Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevdet Ugur Kocogulları

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Elevated hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with diabetes mellitus have been known as a risk factor for acute kidney injury after coronary artery bypass grafting. However, the relationship between hemoglobin A1c levels in non-diabetics and acute kidney injury is under debate. We aimed to investigate the association of preoperative hemoglobin A1c levels with acute kidney injury in non-diabetic patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS: 202 non-diabetic patients with normal renal function (serum creatinine <1.4 mg/dl who underwent isolated coronary bypass were analyzed. Hemoglobin A1c level was measured at the baseline examination. Patients were separated into two groups according to preoperative Hemoglobin A1c level. Group 1 consisted of patients with preoperative HbA1c levels of < 5.6% and Group 2 consisted of patients with preoperative HbA1c levels of ≥ 5.6%. Acute kidney injury diagnosis was made by comparing baseline and postoperative serum creatinine to determine the presence of predefined significant change based on the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO definition. RESULTS: Acute kidney injury occurred in 19 (10.5% patients after surgery. The incidence of acute kidney injury was 3.6% in Group 1 and 16.7% in Group 2. Elevated baseline hemoglobin A1c level was found to be associated with acute kidney injury (P=0.0001. None of the patients became hemodialysis dependent. The cut off value for acute kidney injury in our group of patients was 5.75%. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that, in non-diabetics, elevated preoperative hemoglobin A1c level may be associated with acute kidney injury in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Prospective randomized studies in larger groups are needed to confirm these results.

  4. Provision of acute and elective general surgical care at a tertiary facility in the era of subspecialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, J H; Rayamajhi, S; Venter, J J; De Villiers, D J; Almgla, N; Kloppers, J C

    2017-10-31

    The need for an acute care and general surgical unit (ACGSU) to provide care for patients previously managed on an ad hoc basis by subspecialist units was recognised by the provincial government of the Western Cape Province, South Africa, the management of Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) and the Department of Surgery. To describe the resulting ACGSU and its functioning. Data available from administrative records, patient files and operating room forms were collected in spreadsheet form for the period July 2013 - November 2016 inclusive. The ACGSU comprised a medical care team of four consultants and four to five trainees. A total of 7 571 patients were seen during the study period, the majority (66.1%) referred from the GSH Emergency Centre. Skin and soft-tissue infections formed the major disease complex. A total of 3 144 operative records were available. The most common procedures were wound debridement and inguinal hernia repairs. Trainees acted as primary surgeon in most cases. Complications (Clavien-Dindo grades I - V) were noted in 25.0% of patients. The ACGSU provides patient management that would otherwise complicate care in the subspecialist surgical units. It serves as a training ground for registrars and stands as a model for other institutions. Further research into the effect on patient care is planned.

  5. Acute Kidney Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Kes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI is a common clinical syndrome with a broad aetiological profile. It complicates about 5% of hospital admissions and 30% of admissions to intensive care units (ICU. During last 20 years has been a significant change in the spectrum of severe AKI such that it is no longer mostly a single organ phenomenon but rather a complex multisystem clinical problem. Despite great advances in renal replacement technique (RRT, mortality from AKI, when part of MOF, remains over 50%. The changing nature of AKI requires a new approach using the new advanced technology. Clinicians can provide therapies tailored to time constraints (intermittent, continuous, or extended intermittent, haemodynamic, and metabolic requirements and aimed at molecules of variable molecular weight. Peritoneal dialysis (PD is technically the simplest form of RRT and is still commonly used worldwide. The problems include difficulty in maintaining dialysate flow, peritoneal infection, leakage, protein losses, and restricted ability to clear fluid and uraemic wastes. PD is the preferred treatment modality for AKI in pediatric practice. Patients that are hemodynamically stable can be managed with intermittent hemodyalisis (IHD, whereby relatively short (3 to 4 h dialysis sessions may be performed every day or every other day. Patients who are haemodynamically unstable are best managed using continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT, which allow for continuous fine-tuning of intravascular volume, easier correction of hypervolemia, better solute removal, more accurately correction of metabolic acidosis, and offers possibilities for unlimited energy support. Recently, “hybrid” or sustained low-efficiency dialysis (SLED was introduced as a method which combines the advantages of IHD with those of CRRT. In this technique, classic dialysis hardware is used at low blood and dialysate flow rates, for prolonged period of time (6 to 12 h/day. SLED offers more haemodynamic

  6. Multidisciplinary diabetes care with and without bariatric surgery in overweight people: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, John M; Playfair, Julie; Laurie, Cheryl; Ritchie, Matthew E; Brown, Wendy A; Burton, Paul; Shaw, Jonathan E; O'Brien, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    Bariatric surgery improves glycaemia in obese people with type 2 diabetes, but its effects are uncertain in overweight people with this disease. We aimed to identify whether laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery can improve glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes who were overweight but not obese. We did an open-label, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial between Nov 1, 2009, and June 30, 2013, at one centre in Melbourne, Australia. Patients aged 18-65 years with type 2 diabetes and a BMI between 25 and 30 kg/m2 were randomly assigned (1:1), by computer-generated random sequence, to receive either multidisciplinary diabetes care plus laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery or multidisciplinary diabetes care alone. The primary outcome was diabetes remission 2 years after randomisation, defined as glucose concentrations of less than 7.0 mmol/L when fasting and less than 11.1 mmol/L 2 h after 75 g oral glucose, at least two days after stopping glucose-lowering drugs. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12609000286246. 51 patients were randomised to the multidisciplinary care plus gastric band group (n=25) or the multidisciplinary care only group (n=26), of whom 23 participants and 25 participants, respectively, completed follow-up to 2 years. 12 (52%) participants in the multidisciplinary care plus gastric band group and two (8%) participants in the multidisciplinary care only group achieved diabetes remission (difference in proportions 0.44, 95% CI 0.17-0.71; p=0.0012). One (4%) participant in the gastric band group needed revisional surgery and four others (17%) had a total of five episodes of food intolerance due to excessive adjustment of the band. When added to multidisciplinary care, laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery for overweight people with type 2 diabetes improves glycaemic control with an acceptable adverse event profile

  7. Acute Respiratory Failure in Renal Transplant Recipients: A Single Intensive Care Unit Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulas, Aydin; Kaplan, Serife; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Torgay, Adnan; Pirat, Arash; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Frequency of pulmonary complications after renal transplant has been reported to range from 3% to 17%. The objective of this study was to evaluate renal transplant recipients admitted to an intensive care unit to identify incidence and cause of acute respiratory failure in the postoperative period and compare clinical features and outcomes between those with and without acute respiratory failure. We retrospectively screened the data of 540 consecutive adult renal transplant recipients who received their grafts at a single transplant center and included those patients admitted to an intensive care unit during this period for this study. Acute respiratory failure was defined as severe dyspnea, respiratory distress, decreased oxygen saturation, hypoxemia or hypercapnia on room air, or requirement of noninvasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 540 adult renal transplant recipients, 55 (10.7%) were admitted to an intensive care unit, including 26 (47.3%) admitted for acute respiratory failure. Median time from transplant to intensive care unit admission was 10 months (range, 0-67 mo). The leading causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia (56%) and cardiogenic pulmonary edema (44%). Mean partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fractional inspired oxygen ratio was 174 ± 59, invasive mechanical ventilation was used in 13 patients (50%), and noninvasive mechanical ventilation was used in 8 patients (31%). The overall mortality was 16.4%. Acute respiratory failure was the reason for intensive care unit admission in almost half of our renal transplant recipients. Main causes of acute respiratory failure were bacterial pneumonia and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Mortality of patients admitted for acute respiratory failure was similar to those without acute respiratory failure.

  8. The direct cost of acute hip fracture care in care home residents in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahota, O; Morgan, N; Moran, C G

    2012-03-01

    Data on the true acute care costs of hip fractures for patients admitted from care homes are limited. Detailed costing analysis was undertaken for 100 patients. Median cost was £9,429 [10,896], increasing to £14,435 [16,681], for those requiring an upgrade from residential to nursing home care. Seventy-six percent of costs were attributable to hospital bed days, and therefore, interventions targeted at reducing hospital stay may be cost effective. Previous studies have estimated the costs associated with hip fracture, although these vary widely, and for patients admitted from care homes, who represent a significant fracture burden, there are limited data. The primary aim of this study was to perform a detailed assessment of the direct medical costs incurred and secondly compare this to the actual remuneration received by the hospital. One hundred patients presenting from a care home in 2006 were randomly selected and a detailed case-note costing analysis was undertaken. This cost was then compared to the actual remuneration received by the hospital. Median cost per patient episode was £9,429 [10,896] (all patients) range £4,292-162,324 [4,960-187,582] (subdivided into hospital bed day costs £7,129 [8,238], operative costs £1,323 [1,529] and investigation costs £977 [1,129]). Twenty-two percent of the patients admitted from a residential home required upgrading to a nursing home. In this group, the median length of stay was 31 days (mean 38, range 10-88) median cost £14,435 [16,681]. Average remuneration received equated to £6,222 [7,190] per patient. This represents a mean loss in income, compared to actual calculated costs of £3,207 [3,706] per patient. The median cost was £9,429 [10,896], increasing to £14,435 [16,681], for those requiring an upgrade from residential to nursing home care at discharge. Significant cost differences were seen comparing the actual cost to remuneration received. Interventions targeted at reducing length of stay may be cost

  9. Health Care Utilization and Costs Associated With Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, Vaibhav; Patwardhan, Soumil; Garg, Sushil K; Jobanputra, Yash; Lopez, Rocio; Sanaka, Madhusudhan R

    2017-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common inpatient diagnosis among gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of inpatient admissions, costs, and mortality rates associated with acute pancreatitis in the United States. We analyzed the National Inpatient Sample for all patients in which acute pancreatitis (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code: 577.0) was the principal discharge diagnosis during the period 1997-2012. The statistical significance of the difference in the hospital discharges, length of stay, and costs over the study period was determined by utilization of regression analysis. In 1997, there were 164,776 admissions with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute pancreatitis as compared with 275,170 in 2012 (P acute pancreatitis decreased from 6.4 days in 1997 to 4.7 days in 2012 (P acute pancreatitis and associated costs have increased markedly over the last 16 years in the United States. However, the lengths of stay and mortality rates have decreased significantly.

  10. Enhanced recovery after elective colorectal surgery: now the standard of care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2011-09-01

    Enhanced recovery programmes have been studied in randomised trials with evidence of quicker recovery of gut function, reduced morbidity, mortality and hospital stay and improved physiological and nutritional outcomes. They aim to reduce the physiological and psychological stress of surgery and consequently the uncontrolled stress response. The key elements, reduced pre-operative fasting, intravenous fluid restriction and early feeding after surgery, are in conflict with traditional management plans but are supported by strong clinical evidence. Given the strength of the current data enhanced recovery should now be the standard of care.

  11. Day-care hypospadias surgery: Single surgeon experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekharam V.V.S.S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the results of the early discharge of children after hypospadias repair with an indwelling catheter. Materials and Methods: To facilitate early the discharge of children after hypospadias repair, the author adopted the technique of draining the indwelling urinary catheter into diapers in children undergoing this operation. Home catheter care was taught to the mother; the dressings and catheters were subsequently managed in the outpatient clinic. Results: Over a 2-year period, 43 children were managed by this technique and were sent home within 24-48 h after the operation with an indwelling catheter. Minor problems requiring outpatient visits to the surgeon occurred in nine (20% children after discharge from the hospital. All the nine children were successfully managed as outpatients and no child required rehospitalisation. The catheter remained in position for 5 days in all the children. The overall results were satisfactory with an acceptable (7% fistula rate. Conclusions: It is possible to reduce the duration of the hospital stay of children after hypospadias repair without compromising on the final results.

  12. Continuity of care for acutely unwell older adults from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crilly, Julia; Chaboyer, Wendy; Wallis, Marianne

    2006-06-01

    Continuity of care (COC) for acutely unwell older adults, particularly those who are nursing home residents, who present to hospital, is complicated by the presence of co-morbid conditions, long waiting times, both for the ambulance and in the department, and poor after-hours general practitioner access. To present a critical review of the literature on COC for older adults from nursing homes who present to hospital and who are acutely unwell. The review will answer the following questions: (i) What is the contemporary meaning of the construct continuity of care? (ii) What is the relevance of continuity of care to the population of older adults who reside in nursing homes and present to hospital? and (iii) What models exist for promoting continuity of care to older adults who present to hospital? Guided by the conceptual analysis process a database search of CINAHL and MEDLINE was carried out utilizing the search terms 'continuity of care', 'older adults', 'nursing homes', 'emergency department' and 'acute illness'. A hand-search of additional references was also conducted. Retrieved articles were critically reviewed if they focused on older adult patients, the acute care/community settings and COC. The contemporary meaning of the COC is that it incorporates care of an individual patient over time by bridging discrete elements in the care pathway. Four distinct models of COC were identified. These were Primary Health Care; General Practice and Primary Medical Care; Consumers; and Health Policy and Systems. All are based on the proviso that the individual is sufficiently independent to be able to coordinate their own care and to take overall responsibility. The connection between COC and acutely unwell older adults who present to hospital is a prolific area for further research. In particular, the effectiveness of programmes aimed at enhancing the advanced nursing practice role and the COC process for older adults, needs investigation.

  13. Provision of acute and elective general surgical care at a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The need for an acute care and general surgical unit (ACGSU) to provide care for patients previously managed on an ad hoc basis by subspecialist units was recognised by the provincial government of the Western Cape Province, South Africa, the management of Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) and the ...

  14. Variations in levels of care within a hospital provided to acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations in levels of care within a hospital provided to acute trauma patients. WWD Stewart, Z Farina, DL Clarke. Abstract. Introduction. Caring for trauma patients is a dynamic process, and it is often necessary to move the trauma patient around the hospital to different locations. This study attempted to document the quality ...

  15. Ascertainment of acute liver injury in two European primary care databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigómez, A.; Brauer, R.; Rodríguez, L. A García; Huerta, C.; Requena, G.; Gil, M.; de Abajo, Francisco; Downey, G.; Bate, A.; Tepie, M. Feudjo; de Groot, M.C.H.; Schlienger, R.; Reynolds, R.; Klungel, O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to ascertain acute liver injury (ALI) in primary care databases using different computer algorithms. The aim of this investigation was to study and compare the incidence of ALI in different primary care databases and using different definitions of ALI. Methods

  16. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ..., Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing--Program Administration... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...

  17. The positioning of palliative care in acute care: A multiperspective qualitative study in the context of metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jennifer; Windsor, Carol; Connell, Shirley; Yates, Patsy

    2016-06-01

    The positioning and meaning of palliative care within the healthcare system lacks clarity which adds a level of complexity to the process of transition to palliative care. This study explores the transition to the palliative care process in the acute care context of metastatic melanoma. A theoretical framework drawing on interpretive and critical traditions informs this research. The pragmatism of symbolic interactionism and the critical theory of Habermas brought a broad orientation to the research. Integration of the theoretical framework and grounded-theory methods facilitated data generation and analysis of 29 interviews with patients, family carers, and healthcare professionals. The key analytical findings depict a scope of palliative care that was uncertain for users of the system and for those working within the system. Becoming "palliative" is not a defined event; nor is there unanimity around referral to a palliative care service. As such, ambiguity and tension contribute to the difficulties involved in negotiating the transition to palliative care. Our findings point to uncertainty around the scopes of practice in the transition to palliative care. The challenge in the transition process lies in achieving greater coherency of care within an increasingly specialized healthcare system. The findings may not only inform those within a metastatic melanoma context but may contribute more broadly to palliative practices within the acute care setting.

  18. Staff perceptions of end-of-life care in the acute care setting: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheward, Karen; Clark, Jean; Marshall, Bridget; Allan, Simon

    2011-05-01

    Understanding current end of life (EOL) care delivery in acute care is an important prerequisite to positively influencing practice, and published New Zealand (NZ) and international data are limited. Therefore, staff perceptions of EOL care in the hospital setting were investigated via survey. This article presents key findings. A total of 610 staff members in a 194-bed regional hospital were surveyed regarding their perceptions of EOL care, which yielded a response rate of 29% with 179 surveys returned. Respondents were from medical, nursing, and allied health staff working in medical, surgical, elder health, and a regional cancer treatment service. Responses to Likert scale statements regarding the Care of the dying, Communication, Teamwork, Documentation, Attitudes to death and dying in the workplace, and Barriers to the care of patients, their whānau (a NZ Māori word that refers to extended family or family group), and families frequently contrasted with additional and explanatory comments. The thematic analysis of written text identified five themes: The reality of care, The team dynamic, The direction of care, Knowledge and education, and Environmental and organizational factors. The quality and timeliness of EOL care was significantly influenced by the elements informing the themes and the pervasive nature and importance of communication. Meeting the needs of dying patients in acute care was complex but a significant priority for staff.

  19. Surgery in Brazilian Health Care: funding and physician distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Nivaldo; Massenburg, Benjamin B; Galli, Rafael; Sobrado, Lucas; Birolini, Dario

    2017-01-01

    to analyze demographic Brazilian medical data from the national public healthcare system (SUS), which provides free universal health coverage for the entire population, and discuss the problems revealed, with particular focus on surgical care. data was obtained from public healthcare databases including the Medical Demography, the Brazilian Federal Council of Medicine, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and the National Database of Healthcare Establishments. Density and distribution of the medical workforce and healthcare facilities were calculated, and the geographic regions were analyzed using the public private inequality index. Brazil has an average of two physicians for every 1,000 inhabitants, who are unequally distributed throughout the country. There are 22,276 board certified general surgeons in Brazil (11.49 for every 100,000 people). The country currently has 257 medical schools, with 25,159 vacancies for medical students each year, with only around 13,500 vacancies for residency. The public private inequality index is 3.90 for the country, and ranges from 1.63 in the Rio de Janeiro up to 12.06 in Bahia. A significant part of the local population still faces many difficulties in accessing surgical care, particularly in the north and northeast of the country, where there are fewer hospitals and surgeons. Physicians and surgeons are particularly scarce in the public health system nationwide, and better incentives are needed to ensure an equal public and private workforce. analisar dados demográficos do Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS) brasileiro, que promove cobertura de saúde universal a toda população, e discutir os problemas revelados, com particular ênfase nos cuidados cirúrgicos. os dados foram obtidos a partir dos bancos de dados de saúde pública da Demografia Médica, do Conselho Federal de Medicina, do Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística e do Cadastro Nacional dos Estabelecimentos de Saúde. A densidade e a

  20. [Care of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pardo Martínez, M; de Torres Aured, M L; Díaz Gómez, J

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of problems are caused by obesity, since patients are affected not only physically, but also psychologically, socially and in their working life, with major socio-economic consequences. The application of technical surgical has opened a new field in the treatment of this complex illness, long term treatment being the only effective kind for morbid obesity. With most surgical techniques, the patient should control food intake for life and maintain some adapted habits of physical activity. For this reason it is necessary for professionals in different areas to help patients to develop strategies to persevere with their programs. Evaluation of the patient's physical and psychological needs should be carried out prior to the planning of appropriate measures. Outpatient follow-up must focus on educating, motivating, training and advising the patient nutritionally, so that he or she is able to modify his or her eating habits and maintain a healthy lifestyle during the pre- and postoperative phases. Evaluation using Patterns serves as a tool to analyze disorders in the patient. Once the situation has been evaluated, we can proceed to the nursing diagnoses (NIC) on which we will base the interventions and pertinent activities which, in combination with those carried out by other members of the multidisciplinary team, will achieve optimum results. With all the information obtained, properly organized and discussed by the team, it is possible to personalize the Planning of Care with food registration, food choice, elaboration of a weekly diet, and the general dietary recommendations. Each of the results obtained (NOC) is evaluated in terms of the possible indicators, on the corresponding scale of measurement. In addition to patient motivation, effective instructions about changes in lifestyle and the need to accept treatment and follow-up are the key to positive collaboration with the multi-professional team in the application of strategies.

  1. Post-Acute Care Facility as a Discharge Destination for Patients in Need of Palliative Care in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme L; Japiassu, André M; Gomes, Lucia C; Pereira, Rogéria

    2018-02-01

    Patients with complex palliative care needs can experience delayed discharge, which causes an inappropriate occupancy of hospital beds. Post-acute care facilities (PACFs) have emerged as an alternative discharge destination for some of these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of admissions and characteristics of palliative care patients discharged from hospitals to a PACF. We conducted a retrospective analysis of PACF admissions between 2014 and 2016 that were linked to hospital discharge reports and electronic health records, to gather information about hospital-to-PACF transitions. In total, 205 consecutive patients were discharged from 6 different hospitals to our PACF. Palliative care patients were involved in 32% (n = 67) of these discharges. The most common conditions were terminal cancer (n = 42, 63%), advanced dementia (n = 17, 25%), and stroke (n = 5, 8%). During acute hospital stays, patients with cancer had significant shorter lengths of stay (13 vs 99 days, P = .004), a lower use of intensive care services (2% vs 64%, P care. Further studies are necessary to understand the trajectory of posthospitalized patients with life-limiting illnesses and what factors influence their decision to choose a PACF as a discharge destination and place of death. We advocate that palliative care should be integrated into the portfolio of post-acute services.

  2. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy: a geriatric experience in the acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, F; Zuccalà, G; Bernabei, R; Cocchi, A; Manigrasso, L; Tafani, A; De Angelis, G; Carbonin, P U

    1997-01-01

    The continuously growing segment of the geriatric population with the high incidence and prevalence of comorbidity and disability suggests that enhanced preventive and rehabilitative programs will be mandatory. The early arrangement of comprehensive assessment and rehabilitation services is extremely important not only in preventing the decline of patients in the acute care settings and successive prolonged care before discharge, but also in improving functional status at discharge. We have considered the effectiveness of a rehabilitation program in acute medical care of the elderly. This article discusses a pilot project being carried out at Catholic University Hospital "A. Gemelli" of Rome.

  3. Acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture: An international perspective (Part 2)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2012-10-23

    The second part of this paper provides those who care for orthopaedic patients with evidence-supported international perspectives about acute nursing care of the older adult with fragility hip fracture. Developed by an international group of nurse experts and guided by a range of information from research and clinical practice, it focuses on nurse sensitive quality indicators during the acute hospitalisation for fragility hip fracture. Optimal care for the patient who has experienced such a fracture is the focus. This includes (in the first, earlier, part):\\r\

  4. Satisfied patients are also vulnerable patients--narratives from an acute care ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørlie, Venke; Torjuul, Kirsti; Ross, Anita; Kihlgren, Mona

    2006-10-01

    To illuminate the experience of being a patient and cared for in an acute care ward. Patients may be the best source of information for assessing the quality of care in acute care wards. Studies often show that patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay is interpreted by managers and care providers as a measure for quality of care. Ten patients were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation by four researchers into the narratives of five enrolled nurses (study No. 1--published in Nursing Ethics 2004), five Registered Nurses (study No. 2 published in Nursing Ethics 2005) and 10 patients (study No. 3) about their experiences from an acute care ward at one university hospital in Sweden. A phenomenological hermeneutical method (inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur) was conducted in all three studies. The patients are very satisfied with their treatment and care. They also tell about factors that they do not consider as optimal, but which they explain as compromises, which must be accepted as a necessary part of their stay in the ward. This study demonstrates a close connection between patient satisfaction and vulnerability. It is important for all health care providers not to be complacent and satisfied when patients express their satisfaction with their treatment and care. This can result in losing the focus on the patients' vulnerability and existential thoughts and reflections which are difficult for them, and which need to be addressed. The findings can be seen as a challenge for the health care providers as well as the organization to provide quality of care to patients in acute care ward. When listening to the patients' voice it makes it easier to be aware of the content of their vulnerability.

  5. Acute care inpatients with long-term delayed-discharge: evidence from a Canadian health region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Andrew P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute hospital discharge delays are a pressing concern for many health care administrators. In Canada, a delayed discharge is defined by the alternate level of care (ALC construct and has been the target of many provincial health care strategies. Little is known on the patient characteristics that influence acute ALC length of stay. This study examines which characteristics drive acute ALC length of stay for those awaiting nursing home admission. Methods Population-level administrative and assessment data were used to examine 17,111 acute hospital admissions designated as alternate level of care (ALC from a large Canadian health region. Case level hospital records were linked to home care administrative and assessment records to identify and characterize those ALC patients that account for the greatest proportion of acute hospital ALC days. Results ALC patients waiting for nursing home admission accounted for 41.5% of acute hospital ALC bed days while only accounting for 8.8% of acute hospital ALC patients. Characteristics that were significantly associated with greater ALC lengths of stay were morbid obesity (27 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±14.6, psychiatric diagnosis (13 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±6.2, abusive behaviours (12 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±10.7, and stroke (7 day mean deviation, 99% CI = ±5.0. Overall, persons with morbid obesity, a psychiatric diagnosis, abusive behaviours, or stroke accounted for 4.3% of all ALC patients and 23% of all acute hospital ALC days between April 1st 2009 and April 1st, 2011. ALC patients with the identified characteristics had unique clinical profiles. Conclusions A small number of patients with non-medical days waiting for nursing home admission contribute to a substantial proportion of total non-medical days in acute hospitals. Increases in nursing home capacity or changes to existing funding arrangements should target the sub

  6. Acute kidney injury induces high-sensitivity troponin measurement changes after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Amr S; Mahmoud, Khaled; Hanoura, Samy; Osman, Hany; Sivadasan, Praveen; Sudarsanan, Suraj; Shouman, Yasser; Singh, Rajvir; AlKhulaifi, Abdulaziz

    2017-01-31

    The value of cardiac troponin as a risk assessment tool for cardiac disease in the setting of end-stage renal diseases (ESRD) is not equivalent to its value in those with normal renal function. This consideration had not been studied in settings of acute kidney injury (AKI). We aim to explore the diagnostic value of high sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) in the settings of cardiac surgery-induced AKI. Single center observational retrospective study. Based on the AKI Network, patients divided into 2 groups, group I without AKI (259 patients) and group II with AKI (100 patients) where serial testing of hsTnT and creatine kinase (CK)-MB were followed in both groups. Patients with (ESRD) were excluded. The mean age in our study was 55.1 ± 10.2 years. High association of AKI (27.8%) was found in our patients. Both groups were matched regarding the age, gender, body mass index, the association of diabetes or hypertension, and Euro score. AKI group had significantly higher mortality 5% vs group I 1.1% (p = 0.03). The hsTnt showed a significant sustained rise in the AKI group as compared to the non-AKI group, however CK-MB changes were significant initially but not sustained. The AKI group was more associated with heart failure 17.9% vs 4.9% (p = 0.001); and post-operative atrial fibrillation, 12.4% vs 2.9% (p = 0.005). Lengths of ventilation, stays in ICU and in hospital were significantly higher in the AKI group. Unlike the CK-MB profile, the hsTnT showed significant changes between both groups all over the course denoting possible delayed clearance in patients with AKI.

  7. Current End-of-Life Care Needs and Care Practices in Acute Care Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J. Thurston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive-comparative study was undertaken to examine current end-of-life care needs and practices in hospital. A chart review for all 1,018 persons who died from August 1, 2008 through July 31, 2009 in two full-service Canadian hospitals was conducted. Most decedents were elderly (73.8% and urbanite (79.5%, and cancer was the most common diagnosis (36.2%. Only 13.8% had CPR performed at some point during this hospitalization and 8.8% had CPR immediately preceding death, with 87.5% having a DNR order and 30.8% providing an advance directive. Most (97.3% had one or more life-sustaining technologies in use at the time of death. These figures indicate, when compared to those in a similar mid-1990s Canadian study, that impending death is more often openly recognized and addressed. Technologies continue to be routinely but controversially used. The increased rate of end-stage CPR from 2.9% to 8.8% could reflect a 1994+ shift of expected deaths out of hospital.

  8. Patients' age as a determinant of care received following acute stroke: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt Julie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based care should improve acute stroke outcomes with the same magnitude of effect for stroke patients of all ages. However, there is evidence to suggest that, in some instances, older stroke patients may receive poorer quality care than younger patients. Our aim was to systematically review evidence of the quality of care provided to patients with acute stroke related to their age. Quality of care was determined by compliance with recommended care processes. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, ISI Web of Knowledge, Ageline and the Cochrane Library databases to identify publications (1995-2009 that reported data on acute stroke care process indicators by patient age. Data extracted included patient demographics and process indicator compliance. Included publications were critically appraised by two independent reviewers using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool, and a comparison was made of the risk of bias according to studies' findings. The evidence base for reported process indicators was determined, and meta-analysis was undertaken for studies with sufficient similarity. Results Nine from 163 potential studies met the inclusion criteria. Of the 56 process indicators reported, eleven indicators were evidence-based. Seven of these indicators (64% showed significantly poorer care for older patients compared to younger ones, while younger patients received comparatively inferior care for only antihypertensive therapy at discharge. Our findings are limited by the variable methodological quality of included studies. Conclusion Patients' age may be a factor in the care they receive after an acute stroke. However, the possible influence of patients' age on clinicians' decision-making must be considered in terms of the many complex issues that surround the provision of optimal care for older patients with acute stroke.

  9. Evidence, lack of evidence, controversy, and debate in the provision and performance of the surgery of acute type A aortic dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonser, Robert S; Ranasinghe, Aaron M; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a lethal condition requiring emergency surgery. It has diverse presentations, and the diagnosis can be missed or delayed. Once diagnosed, decisions with regard to initial management, transfer, appropriateness of surgery, timing of operation, and intervention for ...

  10. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery has several common causes, including the following: Infections at the operative site Lung problems such as pneumonia or collapsed lung ... the trauma of an operation. The risk of infections at the operative site, DVTs, and UTIs can be decreased by meticulous ...

  11. Factors affecting refractive outcome after cataract surgery in patients with a history of acute primary angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo Seok; Park, Jung Won; Park, Sang Woo

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of preoperative or intraoperative factors on the refractive outcome after cataract surgery in patients with a history of acute primary angle closure (APAC). Eyes were divided into two groups: those with stable refractive outcome and those with unstable refractive outcome at 8 weeks after uneventful cataract surgery. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to investigate factors associated with the postoperative refractive outcome. Fifty-three eyes of 53 patients with a history of APAC (21 eyes with stable refractive outcome, 32 eyes with unstable refractive outcome) were enrolled. In the univariate regression analysis, longer duration of APAC [odds ratio (OR) 1.328; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.137-1.552; P = 0.001] and poor preoperative best corrected visual acuity (OR 4.648; 95 % CI 1.071-20.168; P = 0.040) were associated with unstable refractive outcome after cataract surgery in patients with a history of APAC. In the multivariate regression analysis, the duration of APAC was the only independent factor predicting refractive outcome after cataract surgery in patients with a history of APAC (OR 1.317; 95 % CI 1.113-1.558; P = 0.001). Normalization of elevated intraocular pressure as soon as possible after APAC onset is recommended to obtain a stable refractive outcome after cataract surgery in patients with a history of APAC.

  12. Hospital-Level Care at Home for Acutely Ill Adults: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David M; Ouchi, Kei; Blanchfield, Bonnie; Diamond, Keren; Licurse, Adam; Pu, Charles T; Schnipper, Jeffrey L

    2018-05-01

    Hospitals are standard of care for acute illness, but hospitals can be unsafe, uncomfortable, and expensive. Providing substitutive hospital-level care in a patient's home potentially reduces cost while maintaining or improving quality, safety, and patient experience, although evidence from randomized controlled trials in the US is lacking. Determine if home hospital care reduces cost while maintaining quality, safety, and patient experience. Randomized controlled trial. Adults admitted via the emergency department with any infection or exacerbation of heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or asthma. Home hospital care, including nurse and physician home visits, intravenous medications, continuous monitoring, video communication, and point-of-care testing. Primary outcome was direct cost of the acute care episode. Secondary outcomes included utilization, 30-day cost, physical activity, and patient experience. Nine patients were randomized to home, 11 to usual care. Median direct cost of the acute care episode for home patients was 52% (IQR, 28%; p = 0.05) lower than for control patients. During the care episode, home patients had fewer laboratory orders (median per admission: 6 vs. 19; p Home patients were more physically active (median minutes, 209 vs. 78; p home patients, one occurred in control patients. Median direct cost for the acute care plus 30-day post-discharge period for home patients was 67% (IQR, 77%; p home-care services (22% vs. 55%; p = 0.08) and fewer readmissions (11% vs. 36%; p = 0.32). Patient experience was similar in both groups. The use of substitutive home-hospitalization compared to in-hospital usual care reduced cost and utilization and improved physical activity. No significant differences in quality, safety, and patient experience were noted, with more definitive results awaiting a larger trial. Trial Registration NCT02864420.

  13. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    OpenAIRE

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to  patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient de...

  14. Oral hygiene and mouth care for older people in acute hospitals: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Ben J

    2017-10-31

    The oral health of older people in acute hospitals has rarely been studied. Hospital admission provides a prime opportunity for identification and rectification of problems, and oral health promotion. This two-part article explores oral hygiene and mouth care provision for older adults in acute hospitals. The first article presents the findings of a literature review exploring oral and dental disease in older adults, the importance of good oral health and mouth care, and the current situation. Searches of electronic databases and the websites of relevant professional health service bodies in the UK were undertaken to identify articles and guidelines. The literature shows a high prevalence of oro-dental disease in this population, with many known detrimental effects, combined with suboptimal oral hygiene and mouth care provision in acute hospitals. Several guidelines exist, although the emphasis on oral health is weaker than other aspects of hospital care. Older adults admitted to acute hospitals have a high burden of oro-dental disease and oral and mouth care needs, but care provision tends to be suboptimal. The literature is growing, but this area is still relatively neglected. Great potential exists to develop oral and mouth care in this context. The second part of this article explores clinical recommendations. ©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  15. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR.

  16. Persistent Super-Utilization of Acute Care Services Among Subgroups of Veterans Experiencing Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymkowiak, Dorota; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Johnson, Erin E; Manning, Todd; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2017-10-01

    Acute health care utilization often occurs among persons experiencing homelessness. However, knowing which individuals will be persistent super-utilizers of acute care is less well understood. The objective of the study was to identify those more likely to be persistent super-utilizers of acute care services. We conducted a latent class analysis of secondary data from the Veterans Health Administration Corporate Data Warehouse, and Homeless Operations Management and Evaluation System. The study sample included 16,912 veterans who experienced homelessness and met super-utilizer criteria in any quarter between July 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015. The latent class analysis included veterans' diagnoses and acute care utilization. Medical, mental health, and substance use morbidity rates were high. More than half of the sample utilized Veterans Health Administration Homeless Programs concurrently with their super-utilization of acute care. There were 7 subgroups of super-utilizers, which varied considerably on the degree to which their super-utilization persisted over time. Approximately a third of the sample met super-utilizer criteria for ≥3 quarters; this group was older and disproportionately male, non-Hispanic white, and unmarried, with lower rates of post-9/11 service and higher rates of rural residence and service-connected disability. They were much more likely to be currently homeless with more medical, mental health, and substance use morbidity. Only a subset of homeless veterans were persistent super-utilizers, suggesting the need for more targeted interventions.

  17. Face-to-face handoff: improving transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergales, Jeffrey; Addison, Nancy; Vendittelli, Analise; Nicholson, Evelyn; Carver, D Jeannean; Stemland, Christopher; Hoke, Tracey; Gangemi, James

    2015-01-01

    The goal was to develop and implement a comprehensive, primarily face-to-face handoff process that begins in the operating room and concludes at the bedside in the intensive care unit (ICU) for pediatric patients undergoing congenital heart surgery. Involving all stakeholders in the planning phase, the framework of the handoff system encompassed a combination of a formalized handoff tool, focused process steps that occurred prior to patient arrival in the ICU, and an emphasis on face-to-face communication at the conclusion of the handoff. The final process was evaluated by the use of observer checklists to examine quality metrics and timing for all patients admitted to the ICU following cardiac surgery. The process was found to improve how various providers view the efficiency of handoff, the ease of asking questions at each step, and the overall capability to improve patient care regardless of overall surgical complexity. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  18. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all psurgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p surgery and general surgery, whereas transplant had fewer. Emergency general surgery patients have increased ICU needs in terms of length of stay, ventilator usage, and continuous renal replacement therapy usage compared with other services, perhaps due to the higher percentage of transfers and emergent surgery required. These patients represent a distinct population. Understanding their resource needs

  19. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal compartment syndrome in acute general surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sugrue, Michael

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is a harbinger of intra-abdominal mischief, and its measurement is cheap, simple to perform, and reproducible. Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH), especially grades 3 and 4 (IAP > 18 mmHg), occurs in over a third of patients and is associated with an increase in intra-abdominal sepsis, bleeding, renal failure, and death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Increased IAP reading may provide an objective bedside stimulus for surgeons to expedite diagnostic and therapeutic work-up of critically ill patients. One of the greatest challenges surgeons and intensivists face worldwide is lack of recognition of the known association between IAH, ACS, and intra-abdominal sepsis. This lack of awareness of IAH and its progression to ACS may delay timely intervention and contribute to excessive patient resuscitation. CONCLUSIONS: All patients entering the intensive care unit (ICU) after emergency general surgery or massive fluid resuscitation should have an IAP measurement performed every 6 h. Each ICU should have guidelines relating to techniques of IAP measurement and an algorithm for management of IAH.

  20. Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Randomized to a Restrictive Versus Liberal Approach to Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Cardiac Surgery: A Substudy Protocol of the Transfusion Requirements in Cardiac Surgery III Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit X; Shehata, Nadine; McGuinness, Shay; Whitlock, Richard; Fergusson, Dean; Wald, Ron; Parikh, Chirag; Bagshaw, Sean M; Khanykin, Boris; Gregory, Alex; Syed, Summer; Hare, Gregory M T; Cuerden, Meaghan S; Thorpe, Kevin E; Hall, Judith; Verma, Subodh; Roshanov, Pavel S; Sontrop, Jessica M; Mazer, C David

    2018-01-01

    When safe to do so, avoiding blood transfusions in cardiac surgery can avoid the risk of transfusion-related infections and other complications while protecting a scarce resource and reducing costs. This protocol describes a kidney substudy of the Transfusion Requirements in Cardiac Surgery III (TRICS-III) trial, a multinational noninferiority randomized controlled trial to determine whether the risk of major clinical outcomes in patients undergoing planned cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is no greater with a restrictive versus liberal approach to red blood cell transfusion. The objective of this substudy is to determine whether the risk of acute kidney injury is no greater with a restrictive versus liberal approach to red blood cell transfusion, and whether this holds true in patients with and without preexisting chronic kidney disease. Multinational noninferiority randomized controlled trial conducted in 73 centers in 19 countries (2014-2017). Patients (~4800) undergoing planned cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. The primary outcome of this substudy is perioperative acute kidney injury, defined as an acute rise in serum creatinine from the preoperative value (obtained in the 30-day period before surgery), where an acute rise is defined as ≥26.5 μmol/L in the first 48 hours after surgery or ≥50% in the first 7 days after surgery. We will report the absolute risk difference in acute kidney injury and the 95% confidence interval. We will repeat the primary analysis using alternative definitions of acute kidney injury, including staging definitions, and will examine effect modification by preexisting chronic kidney disease (defined as a preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] red blood cell transfusion in the presence of anemia during cardiac surgery done with cardiopulmonary bypass. www.clinicaltrials.gov; clinical trial registration number NCT 02042898.

  1. Association between child-care and acute diarrhea: a study in Portuguese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the influence of the type of child-care on the occurrence of acute diarrhea with special emphasis on the effect of children grouping during care. METHODS: From October 1998 to January 1999 292 children, aged 24 to 36 months, recruited using a previously assembled cohort of newborns, were evaluated. Information on the type of care and occurrence of diarrhea in the previous year was obtained from parents by telephone interview. The X² and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare proportions and quantitative variables, respectively. The risk of diarrhea was estimated through the calculation of incident odds ratios (OR and their respective 95% confidence intervals (95% CI, crude and adjusted by unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Using as reference category children cared individually at home, the adjusted ORs for diarrhea occurrence were 3.18, 95% CI [1.49, 6.77] for children cared in group at home, 2.28, 95% CI [0.92, 5.67] for children cared in group in day-care homes and 2.54, 95% CI [1.21, 5.33] for children cared in day-care centers. Children that changed from any other type of child-care setting to child-care centers in the year preceding the study showed a risk even higher (OR 7.65, 95% CI [3.25, 18.02]. CONCLUSIONS: Group care increases the risk of acute diarrhea whatsoever the specific setting.

  2. Multi-factor analysis of failure of renal replacement therapy in acute renal failure developed after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Pawel; Szwedo, Ireneusz; Tyc, Joanna; Hawrysz, Anna; Janiak, Kamila; Cichoń, Romuald

    2015-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare (2-15%), but severe complication of cardiac surgery with overall mortality reaching 40-80%. In order to save patients' lives they are treated with renal replacement therapy (RRT). The aim of our study was to assess the impact of different perioperative factors on mortality among patients treated with RRT because of acute renal failure, which occurred as a complication of a heart surgery. Retrospective analysis included 45 patients, operated in the years 2009-2013, who underwent renal replacement therapy in order to treat postoperative ARF. The perioperative factors were analysed in two groups: group 1 - patients who died before discharge; and group 2 - those who survived until hospital discharge. Forty-five of 3509 cardiac surgical patients (1.25%) required RRT after the surgery. A total of 23 (51.11%) died before discharge (group 1). Patients in group 1 were characterised by older age (70.21 vs. 67 years), higher mean EuroSCORE value (9.28 vs. 7.15) (p < 0.05), higher percentage of concomitant surgery (63.63% vs. 28.57%) (p < 0.05) and of admission of catecholamines in the postoperative period (100% vs. 68.42%) (p < 0.005), and higher mean urea blood level prior to RRT initiation (156.65 vs. 102.54 mg/dl) (p < 0.05). The statistically relevant death predictors proved to be: high EuroSCORE, concomitant surgery, and high urea level at RRT initiation and admission of catecholamines in the postoperative period. After conformation in further studies, those factors may prove useful in stratification of death risk among surgical patients requiring RRT.

  3. Self-care predictors for success post-bariatric surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykowski, Karen; Krouse, Helene J

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States has more than doubled from 1980 to 2008. Obesity leads to a multitude of comorbidities, most notably diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, resulting in more than $147 billion annually in healthcare costs. Bariatric surgery is becoming a common weight loss option for morbidly obese individuals. Studies in this review examine patients who have undergone laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Patients initially lose large amounts of weight postoperatively; unfortunately, around 30% of these individuals begin to regain weight 18-24 months after surgery. The purpose of this article is to analyze the current literature to ascertain which self-care variables are predictors of successful long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery. The studies analyzed in this review found that patients who undergo a surgical weight loss intervention lose more weight faster than patients who do not have a surgical weight loss intervention. However, patients reported feeling unprepared for the extreme psychosocial and lifestyle changes after bariatric surgery. Findings from these studies point to the need for future research in the area of postsurgical psychosocial support for successful long-term weight loss maintenance.

  4. Quality of primary care guidelines for acute low back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tulder, Maurits W.; Tuut, Mariska; Pennick, Victoria; Bombardier, Claire; Assendelft, Willem J J

    2004-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review of clinical guidelines. OBJECTIVES: To assess the methodologic quality of existing guidelines for the management of acute low back pain. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Guidelines are playing an increasingly important role in evidence-based practice. After publication of

  5. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principles for spatial design of acute facilities include that: - spaces should communicate clear individual identity; - space should be segregated into zones according to user functionality and privacy; - communal leisure spaces should open into safe contained outdoor spaces; - circulation routes should preferably be circular; ...

  6. DayAND#8211;Care Surgery for Pilonidal Sinus Using Sinotomy Technique and Fibrin Glue Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Sozen

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: An ideal surgical procedure for a pilonidal sinus should be one aiming at reducing hospital stay, minimizing tissue assault, promoting early work resumption, and preventing recurrence. The method described in this paper was found to be simple, safe, and feasible as day-care surgery. The technique of sinotomy with a good wound and surrounding skin care is an ideal approach with a high chance of cure. The patients returned to their routine within a short duration of time. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(3.000: 138-141

  7. How do nurse practitioners in acute care affect perceptions of team effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2013-09-01

    To describe how acute care nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. Acute care nurse practitioners provide safe and effective care to patients. There is limited evidence of the effects of acute care nurse practitioner roles on healthcare teams, and many of the findings are contradictory. Research is lacking to describe how nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. A descriptive multiple-case study undertaken in two university-affiliated teaching hospitals in Canada. Data were collected from March-May 2009. Data sources included interviews (n = 59), time and motion study, non-participant observations, documents and field notes. Interviews were conducted individually or in groups using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed within and across the cases to identify similarities and differences in perceptions of team effectiveness. Team members believed the nurse practitioners improved the team's effectiveness. They identified six team processes they believed were improved by the addition of the nurse practitioners to the teams. The processes included decision-making, communication, cohesion, care coordination, problem-solving and focus on patients and families. The study contributes to our understanding of how nurse practitioners affect perceptions of team effectiveness. Improved team communication and care coordination were believed to be particularly important. Nurse practitioner can facilitate patient- and family-centred care in healthcare teams. Nurse practitioners improve perceptions of team effectiveness. Further work is needed in different contexts and with patients and families to determine their perceptions of team effectiveness. The nurse practitioner role was believed to be particularly important to improve team communication and care coordination. This constitutes an added value of acute care nurse practitioners roles in healthcare teams. Nurse practitioner roles contribute to patient-centred care

  8. Effects of Early Acute Care on Autonomic Outcomes in SCI: Bedside to Bench and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    early treatment and management of SCI has not been established in clinical practice, nor in animal models. Guidelines for management of BP in acute...functional outcomes, and 2)spontaneous hypotensive epi- sodes in the perioperative period of experimental SCI in rats will result in worse outcomes...Both clinical data and experimental modeling studies address these specific hypotheses. Spinal cord injury, blood pressure, acute care 109 Table of

  9. The acute pulmonary oedema in the intensive-care ward. Das akute Lungenoedem auf der Intensivstation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciniak, R.; Aronski, A. (Akademia Medyczna, Wroclaw (Poland))

    1989-07-01

    760 patients suffering from acute pulmonary oedema were treated between 1980 and 1986 at the Institute of Anaesthesiology of the Medical Academy in Wroclaw. The radiological image of the pulmonary oedema was subdivided into three forms (hilar, hilar and perihilar, and hilar with massive plane-shaped infiltrates). In the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema in the intensive-care ward a thorough diagnostic programme is mandatory after the immediately necessary measures have been taken. (orig.).

  10. Is Satisfaction with the Acute-Care Experience Higher amongst Consumers Treated in the Private Sector? A Survey of Public and Private Sector Arthroplasty Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Justine M; Descallar, Joseph; Grootemaat, Mechteld; Badge, Helen; Harris, Ian A; Simpson, Grahame; Jenkin, Deanne

    2016-01-01

    Consumer satisfaction with the acute-care experience could reasonably be expected to be higher amongst those treated in the private sector compared to those treated in the public sector given the former relies on high-level satisfaction of its consumers and their subsequent recommendations to thrive. The primary aims of this study were to determine, in a knee or hip arthroplasty cohort, if surgery in the private sector predicts greater overall satisfaction with the acute-care experience and greater likelihood to recommend the same hospital. A secondary aim was to determine whether satisfaction across a range of service domains is also higher in the private sector. A telephone survey was conducted 35 days post-surgery. The hospital cohort comprised eight public and seven private high-volume arthroplasty providers. Consumers rated overall satisfaction with care out of 100 and likeliness to recommend their hospital on a 5-point Likert scale. Additional Likert-style questions were asked covering specific service domains. Generalized estimating equation models were used to analyse overall satisfaction (dichotomised as ≥ 90 or hospital. The only care domains where the private out-performed the public sector were hospitality (46.7 vs 35.6%, p hospital provider. Rather, avoidance of complications in either sector appears to result in improved satisfaction as well as a greater likelihood that patients would recommend their hospital provider.

  11. Postoperative hypoxia and length of intensive care unit stay after cardiac surgery: the underweight paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, Marco; Ballotta, Andrea; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Castelvecchio, Serenella

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass can be associated with postoperative lung dysfunction. The present study investigates the incidence of postoperative hypoxia after cardiac surgery, its relationship with the length of intensive care unit stay, and the role of body mass index in determining postoperative hypoxia and intensive care unit length of stay. Single-center, retrospective study. University Hospital. Patients. Adult patients (N = 5,023) who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB. None. According to the body mass index, patients were attributed to six classes, and obesity was defined as a body mass index >30. POH was defined as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio intensive care unit. Postoperative hypoxia was detected in 1,536 patients (30.6%). Obesity was an independent risk factor for postoperative hypoxia (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 2.05-2.78, P = 0.001) and postoperative hypoxia was a determinant of intensive care unit length of stay. There is a significant inverse correlation between body mass index and PaO2/FiO2 ratio, with the risk of postoperative hypoxia increasing by 1.7 folds per each incremental body mass index class. The relationship between body mass index and intensive care unit length of stay is U-shaped, with longer intensive care unit stay in underweight patients and moderate-morbid obese patients. Obese patients are at higher risk for postoperative hypoxia, but this leads to a prolonged intensive care unit stay only for moderate-morbid obese patients. Obese patients are partially protected against the deleterious effects of hemodilution and transfusions. Underweight patients present the "paradox" of a better lung gas exchange but a longer intensive care unit stay. This is probably due to a higher severity of their cardiac disease.

  12. Outcomes of cancer patients admitted to Brazilian intensive care units with severe acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Márcio; Lobo, Suzana Margarete Ajeje; Torelly, André Peretti; Mello, Patricia Veiga de Carvalho; Silva, Ulisses; Teles, José Mário Meira; Silva, Eliézer; Caruso, Pedro; Friedman, Gilberto; Souza, Paulo César Pereira de; Réa-Neto, Alvaro; Vianna, Arthur Oswaldo; Azevedo, José Raimundo; Vale, Erico; Rezegue, Leila; Godoy, Michele; Maia, Marcelo Oliveira; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2010-09-01

    Critically ill cancer patients are at increased risk for acute kidney injury, but studies on these patients are scarce and were all single centered conducted in specialized intensive care units. The objective was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes in a prospective cohort of cancer patients admitted to several intensive care units with acute kidney injury. Prospective multicenter cohort study conducted in intensive care units from 28 hospitals in Brazil over a two-month period. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to identify factors associated with hospital mortality. Out of all 717 intensive care unit admissions, 87 (12%) had acute kidney injury and 36% of them received renal replacement therapy. Kidney injury developed more frequently in patients with hematological malignancies than in patients with solid tumors (26% vs. 11%, P=0.003). Ischemia/shock (76%) and sepsis (67%) were the main contributing factor for and kidney injury was multifactorial in 79% of the patients. Hospital mortality was 71%. General and renal-specific severity-of-illness scores were inaccurate in predicting outcomes for these patients. In a multivariate analysis, length of hospital stay prior to intensive care unit, acute organ dysfunctions, need for mechanical ventilation and a poor performance status were associated with increased mortality. Moreover, cancer-related characteristics were not associated with outcomes. The present study demonstrates that intensive care units admission and advanced life-support should be considered in selected critically ill cancer patients with kidney injury.

  13. Acute mental health care and South African mental health legislation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Reliable data is necessary to facilitate the effective planning, management and restructuring of mental health care facilities. Access to accurate information on clinical conditions, treatment outcomes and expenditure is essential to ensure accountability, quality and cost-effective mental health care. This article is ...

  14. Can Ambulatory Emergency Care have a positive impact on acute services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, N; Gulliford, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Ambulatory Emergency Care is a key component of the service for many Acute Medical units across the United Kingdom. A well-functioning ambulatory care unit facilitiates early senior review by a consultant and may reduce the need for hospital admission by managing patients along alternative safe clinical pathways. In this article, we present 12 months of data (January 2014-January 2015) from our Ambulatory Unit at Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust (WWL NHSFT), which demonstrates how many different conditions can be safely managed along ambulatory care pathways and how this can significantly contribute to postive patient satisfaction survey results and meeting the A&E 4 hour target for a medium-sized Acute Trust such as WWL NHSFT. We also emphasise that the key factors of co-location of ambulatory care with the Emergency Department along with dedicated medical and nursing staff are essential to the success of this model of care.

  15. Nursing care of catheter-directed thrombolysis therapy for acute arterial embolism of lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan; Ge Jingping; Gu Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical effect of nursing intervention for interventional catheter-directed thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute arterial embolism of lower extremities. Methods: The experience of nursing care for 48 cases with acute arterial embolism of lower extremities which was treated with interventional catheter-directed thrombolysis was retrospectively analyzed. Results: With the help of active nursing care and rational treatment the occluded arteries were completely reopened in 40 cases and partially reopened in 8 cases. Complete relief from the clinical symptoms was obtained in 42 cases and partial remission was seen in 6 cases. Conclusion: For getting a complete recovery and improving living quality after catheter-directed thrombolysis in patients with acute arterial embolism of lower extremities, the key points are sufficient preoperative preparation, perioperative painstaking nursing care as well as postoperative correct guidance of exercise program. (authors)

  16. Critical care admission following elective surgery was not associated with survival benefit: prospective analysis of data from 27 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Brennan C; Koulenti, Desponia; Arvaniti, Kostoula; Beavis, Vanessa; Campbell, Douglas; Chan, Matthew; Moreno, Rui; Pearse, Rupert M

    2017-07-01

    As global initiatives increase patient access to surgical treatments, there is a need to define optimal levels of perioperative care. Our aim was to describe the relationship between the provision and use of critical care resources and postoperative mortality. Planned analysis of data collected during an international 7-day cohort study of adults undergoing elective in-patient surgery. We used risk-adjusted mixed-effects logistic regression models to evaluate the association between admission to critical care immediately after surgery and in-hospital mortality. We evaluated hospital-level associations between mortality and critical care admission immediately after surgery, critical care admission to treat life-threatening complications, and hospital provision of critical care beds. We evaluated the effect of national income using interaction tests. 44,814 patients from 474 hospitals in 27 countries were available for analysis. Death was more frequent amongst patients admitted directly to critical care after surgery (critical care: 103/4317 patients [2%], standard ward: 99/39,566 patients [0.3%]; adjusted OR 3.01 [2.10-5.21]; p analysis including only high-risk patients yielded similar findings. We did not identify any survival benefit from critical care admission following surgery.

  17. Off-Hours Admission and Acute Stroke Care Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Nina Sahlertz; Mainz, Jan; Nørgård, Bente Mertz

    2014-01-01

    chance of compliance with 8 out of 10 performance measures; however, these differences diminished over time. Unadjusted odds ratio for 30 days case-fatality, for patients admitted off-hours compared with patients admitted on-hours, was 1.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.21). Adjusting for patient...... characteristics (in particular, stroke severity) decreased the odds ratio to 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-1.10). Additional adjustment for hospital characteristics and compliance with performance measures had no effect on the odds ratio. Conclusion-Patients admitted off-hours received a poorer quality......Background and Purpose-Studies have reported higher risks of death and other adverse outcomes in acute stroke patients admitted off-hours; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. According to time of admission, our aim was to examine compliance with performance measures for acute...

  18. Sustainability of protocolized handover of pediatric cardiac surgery patients to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenault, Kristin; Moga, Michael-Alice; Shin, Minah; Petersen, Emily; Backer, Carl; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Suresh, Santhanam

    2016-05-01

    Transfer of patient care among clinicians (handovers) is a common source of medical errors. While the immediate efficacy of these initiatives is well documented, sustainability of practice changes that results in better processes of care is largely understudied. The objective of the current investigation was to evaluate the sustainability of a protocolized handover process in pediatric patients from the operating room after cardiac surgery to the intensive care unit. This was a prospective study with direct observation assessment of handover performance conducted in the cardiac ICU (CICU) of a free-standing, tertiary care children's hospital in the United States. Patient transitions from the operating room to the CICU, including the verbal handoff, were directly observed by a single independent observer in all phases of the study. A checklist of key elements identified errors classified as: (1) technical, (2) information omissions, and (3) realized errors. Total number of errors was compared across the different times of the study (preintervention, postintervention, and the current sustainability phase). A total of 119 handovers were studied: 41 preintervention, 38 postintervention, and 40 in the current sustainability phase. The median [Interquartile range (IQR)] number of technical errors was significantly reduced in the sustainability phase compared to the preintervention and postintervention phase, 2 (1-3), 6 (5-7), and 2.5 (2-4), respectively P = 0.0001. Similarly, the median (IQR) number of verbal information omissions was also significantly reduced in the sustainability phase compared to the preintervention and postintervention phases, 1 (1-1), 4 (3-5) and 2 (1-3), respectively. We demonstrate sustainability of an improved handover process using a checklist in children being transferred to the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery. Standardized handover processes can be a sustainable strategy to improve patient safety after pediatric cardiac surgery.

  19. Early elective versus delayed elective surgery in acute recurrent diverticulitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao Muhammad Asaf; Hajibandeh, Shahin; Hajibandeh, Shahab

    2017-10-01

    To investigate outcomes of early versus delayed surgery in patients with acute recurrent diverticulitis. We performed a systematic review in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement standards. We conducted a search of electronic information sources, including MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry; ClinicalTrials.gov; and ISRCTN Register, and bibliographic reference lists to identify all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies investigating outcomes of early versus delayed surgery in patients with acute recurrent diverticulitis. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa scale to assess the risk of bias of included studies. Random-effects models were applied to calculate pooled outcome data. We identified three retrospective and one prospective cohort studies enrolling a total of 1046 patients. The included patients were comparable in terms of age, ASA score and Hinchey classifications (Hinchey I and II). The results of our analyses suggested that there was no difference between two groups in surgical site infection [Odds ratio (OR) 1.61, 95% CI 0.79-3.27, P = 0.19], intra-abdominal abscess (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.21-4.00, P = 0.91), anastomotic leak (OR1.27, 95% CI 0.50-3.25, P = 0.61), 30-day mortality [Risk difference (RD) 0.00 95% CI -0.01-0.01, P = 0.80], postoperative ileus (OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.50-3.66, P = 0.55), postoperative bleeding (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.32-2.69, P = 0.89), ureteric injury (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.08-5.07, P = 0.65), and overall morbidity (OR 1.42 95% CI 0.76-2.66, P = 0.27). The early surgery was associated with longer operative time [Mean Difference (MD) 12.8, 95% CI 5.08-20.53, P = 0.001] and length of stay (MD 4.41, 95% CI -0.34-8.53, P = 0.03). Among those undergoing laparoscopic surgery, conversion to open surgery was higher in the early surgery group (OR

  20. Robotic Gastric Bypass Surgery in the Swiss Health Care System: Analysis of Hospital Costs and Reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Monika E; Rohner, Peter; Jung, Minoa K; Amirghasemi, Nicolas; Buchs, Nicolas C; Fakhro, Jassim; Buehler, Leo; Morel, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    Robotic technology shows some promising early outcomes indicating potentially improved outcomes particularly for challenging bariatric procedures. Still, health care providers face significant clinical and economic challenges when introducing innovations. Prospectively derived administrative cost data of patients who were coded with a primary diagnosis of obesity (ICD-10 code E.66.X), a procedure of gastric bypass surgery (CHOP code 44.3), and a robotic identifier (CHOP codes 00.90.50 or 00.39) during the years 2012 to 2015 was analyzed and compared to the triggered reimbursement for this patient cohort. A total of 348 patients were identified. The mean number of diagnoses was 2.7 and the mean length of stay was 5.9 days. The overall mean cost per patients was Swiss Francs (CHF) from 2012 to 2014 that was 21,527, with a mean reimbursement of CHF 24,917. Cost of the surgery in 2015 was comparable to the previous years with CHF 22,550.0 (p = 0.6618), but reimbursement decreased significantly to CHF 20,499.0 (0.0001). The average cost for robotic gastric bypass surgery fell well below the average reimbursement within the Swiss DRG system between 2012 and 2014, and this robotic procedure was a DRG winner for that period. However, the Swiss DRG system has matured over the years with a significant decrease resulting in a deficit for robotic gastric bypass surgery in 2015. This stipulates a discussion as to how health care providers should continue offering robotic gastric bypass surgery, particularly in the light of developing clinical evidence.

  1. The Peri-operative Bariatric Surgery Care in the Middle East Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Al Hadad, Mohammed; Khoursheed, Mousa; Maasher, Ahmed; Al Qahtani, Aayed; Al Shaban, Talat; Fawal, Hayssam; Safadi, Bassem; Alderazi, Amer; Abdalla, Emad; Bashir, Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    Bariatric surgery is common in the Middle East region. However, regional accreditation bodies and guidelines are lacking. We present the current peri-operative practice of bariatric surgery in the Middle East region. Public and private practice in the Middle East region. A questionnaire was designed to study trends of peri-operative care in bariatric surgery. It was sent to members of the Pan Arab Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (PASMBS). Ninety-three surgeons (88.6%) responded, 63.4% were in private practice, 68.5% have been in practice for more than 5 years, and 61.1% performed more than 125 cases per year. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) was the commonest procedure performed, then laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), one anastomosis gastric bypass/mini gastric bypass (OAGB/MGB), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Pre-operatively as a routine, 65% referred patients for dietitian and (78.3%) for smoking cessation. In contrast as a routine, 22.6% referred patients to a psychologist, 30% screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and when they did, they did not use a questionnaire. For patients 50 years of age, 22% performed a screening colonoscopy and 33.7% referred patients to a cardiologist. Intra-operatively as a routine, 25.3% placed a drain and 42.2% placed urinary catheters. In contrast, 77.1% performed a leak test (82.7% as a methylene blue leak test). Post-operatively, 79.5% used chemoprophylaxis for venous thromboembolism and 89% required patients to take vitamins. In contrast, 25% prescribed ursodeoxycholic acid. The wide variation in the peri-operative care of bariatric surgery in the Middle East region highlights the need for regional guidelines based on international guidelines.

  2. Effect of intensive care unit environment on in-hospital delirium after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenson, Benjamin G; MacDonald, Lindsey A; Grocott, Hilary P; Hiebert, Brett M; Arora, Rakesh C

    2013-07-01

    The etiology of postcardiac surgery delirium is complex. Our primary objective was to determine the effect of the postoperative environment on the prevalence of delirium by examining the in-hospital delirium rates in 2 postoperative intensive care units with differing physical infrastructure. We further sought to identify other risk factors associated with in-hospital delirium. The rates of postoperative delirium were retrospectively examined in consecutive cardiac surgery patients during 2 separate 6-month periods. Environment 1 was characterized by a lack of physical barriers between bed spaces and was windowless, and environment 2 consisted of private rooms with physical barriers for each patient and with wall-to-wall exterior windows. Univariate and multivariate analyses to determine the risk factors associated with in-hospital delirium, including the effect of environment, were undertaken. Of the 1010 patients studied, 148 (14.7%) experienced in-hospital delirium after cardiac surgery. The prevalence of delirium was not significantly different between environments 1 and 2 (16.1% vs 13.5%; P = .25). However, in patients younger than 65 years, the proportion of intensive care unit days on which delirium occurred was greater in environment 1 than in environment 2 (5.4% vs 1.7%; P = .006). Postoperative stroke or transient ischemic attack, mechanical ventilation longer than 24 hours, age 65 years or older, concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery, prehospital admission benzodiazepine use, a requirement for any postoperative blood product transfusion, and postoperative renal insufficiency were identified as risk factors. The intensive care unit environment did not have a significant effect on the overall prevalence of delirium. However, that does not preclude the possibility that the intensive care unit environment might interact with other factors, such as age, in a complex manner. Attempts to reduce delirium by adjusting the intensive

  3. Analgesic effect of bupivacaine eluting porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) in ferrets undergoing acute abdominal hernia defect surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brenda M; Ko, Jeff C; Hall, Paul J; Saunders, Alan T; Lantz, Gary C

    2011-05-15

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is used as a biological implant for abdominal wall hernia repair to facilitate wound healing and augment local tissue strength. This prospective, randomized, blinded study evaluated local pain control provided by bupivacaine adsorbed to SIS for repair of acutely created abdominal wall full thickness muscle/fascial defects in ferrets. Eighteen healthy ferrets were randomly and equally assigned to three groups: (1) SIS with bupivacaine subjected to surgery, (2) SIS with no bupivacaine subjected to surgery, and (3) anesthesia only control group. Ferrets in groups 1 and 2 were anesthetized with butorphanol and sevoflurane for the surgery. Control ferrets were anesthetized in the same fashion for the same duration without surgery. Behavior and pain were evaluated in all ferrets by behavioral observation, algometer, and palpometer measurements, and heart and respiratory rates each obtained before surgery and at various intervals for 96 h after surgery. When pain reached a predetermined threshold, buprenorphine was used as a rescue analgesic. The serum and combined tissue concentrations of bupivacaine were analyzed. Overall, the palpometer testing was better tolerated in the bupivacaine treated SIS group than by the untreated SIS group (P = 0.04). There was an observed physiologically significant difference in algometer and other palpometer readings as well as heart and respiratory rates. All ferrets in the untreated SIS group were rescued while 33% of the SIS-bupivacaine groups were rescued (P pain relief over 2-4 days with no clinical adverse effects observed in the ferrets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The therapeutic use of music as experienced by cardiac surgery patients of an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varshika M. Bhana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients perceive the intensive care unit (ICU as being a stressful and anxiety-provoking environment. The physiological effects of stress and anxiety are found to be harmful and therefore should be avoided in cardiac surgery patients. The aim of the study on which this article is based was to describe cardiac surgery patients’ experiences of music as a therapeutic intervention in the ICU of a public hospital. The objectives of this article were to introduce and then expose the cardiac patients to music as part of their routine postoperative care and to explore and describe their experiences of the music intervention. The findings of the research are to be the basis for making recommendations for the inclusion of music as part of the routine postoperative care received by cardiac surgery patients in the ICU. A qualitative research methodology, using a contextual, explorative and descriptive research design, was adopted. The population of the study was cardiac surgery patients admitted to the ICU of a public hospital. An unstructured interview was conducted with each participant and content analysis and coding procedures were used to analyse the data. Four main themes were identified in the results, namely practical and operational aspects of the music sessions; participants’ experiences; discomfort due to therapeutic apparatus and the ICU environment; and the role of music and recommendations for music as a therapeutic intervention. Participants’ experiences were mainly positive. Results focused on experiences of the music and also on the participants’ experiences of the operational aspects of the therapy, as well as factors within and around the participants.

  5. Hospice Utilization and Its Effect on Acute Care Needs at the End of Life in Medicare Beneficiaries With Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoff, Hanna K; Chang, YunKyung; Reimers, Melissa; Lund, Jennifer L

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a poor-prognosis cancer with a high symptom burden. Multidisciplinary HCC care is complex and unique in cancer medicine. We sought to determine whether the distinct process affects hospice use and how hospice affects end-of-life acute care utilization. Patients dying after HCC diagnosed from 2004 to 2011 were identified within SEER-Medicare. Hospice use and associated factors were described using logistic regression. Coarse exact and propensity score matching created groups of hospice and nonhospice comparators balanced on clinical characteristics. Health care use from first hospice claim to death and the matched duration in the nonhospice group were compared. Of 7,992 decedent patients with HCC, 63% used hospice before death, with a median duration of 18 days (interquartile range, 5-51 days). Initial treatment with surgery and ablation (odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.74) or chemoembolization/radioembolization (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.80) was associated with decreased odds of subsequent hospice use compared with untreated patients. Hospice use was more likely in those consulting hematology/oncology (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.56) but not in those consulting gastroenterology (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.95). Hospice patients had lower rates of hospitalization (7.9% v 47.8%; risk ratio [RR], 0.16; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.19), intensive care unit stay (2.8% v 25.3%; RR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.14), and in-hospital death (3.5% v 58.4%; RR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.07). Processes of care influence which patients with HCC are referred to hospice. Hospice use has a marked effect on acute care use at the end of life in patients with HCC. Efforts to incorporate cancer-focused palliative care might improve the quality of end-of-life care in HCC.

  6. Exploring real-time patient decision-making for acute care: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Adam L; Chang, Tammy; Cobb, Enesha; Gossa, Weyinshet; Rowe, Zachary; Kohatsu, Lauren; Heisler, Michele

    2014-09-01

    Research has described emergency department (ED) use patterns in detail. However, evidence is lacking on how, at the time a decision is made, patients decide if healthcare is required or where to seek care. Using community-based participatory research methods, we conducted a mixed-methods descriptive pilot study. Due to the exploratory, hypothesis-generating nature of this research, we did not perform power calculations, and financial constraints only allowed for 20 participants. Hypothetical vignettes for the 10 most common low acuity primary care complaints (cough, sore throat, back pain, etc.) were texted to patients twice daily over six weeks, none designed to influence the patient's decision to seek care. We conducted focus groups to gain contextual information about participant decision-making. Descriptive statistics summarized responses to texts for each scenario. Qualitative analysis of open-ended text message responses and focus group discussions identified themes associated with decision-making for acute care needs. We received text survey responses from 18/20 recruited participants who responded to 72% (1092/1512) of the texted vignettes. In 48% of the vignettes, participants reported they would do nothing, for 34% of the vignettes participants reported they would seek care with a primary care provider, and 18% of responses reported they would seek ED care. Participants were not more likely to visit an ED during "off-hours." Our qualitative findings showed: 1) patients don't understand when care is needed; 2) patients don't understand where they should seek care. Participants were unclear when or where to seek care for common acute health problems, suggesting a need for patient education. Similar research is necessary in different populations and regarding the role of urgent care in acute care delivery.

  7. Health care quality from the perspective of health care providers and patients during and shortly after acute care restructuring in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Deborah; Way, Christine; Barrett, Brendan; Parfrey, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    To monitor changes in providers' perceptions of health care quality and the importance of health reform, and in patients' satisfaction with services during and two years after restructuring, comparing the region of the province that was restructured (St John's) with those regions in which hospitals were not aggregated. The Employee Attitude Survey questionnaire was sent to acute care providers (n = 5353) to assess personal characteristics and perceptions of the impact of reform on workplace conditions, work-related attitudes and turnover intentions. The response rate for 2000 and 2002 was 42% (n = 1222 and 1034, respectively). Only respondents in both surveys (n = 589) were used in the analysis because study results were the same for both the repeat sample and total samples. A Patient Satisfaction Survey questionnaire was administered to patients discharged from acute care facilities in 2000 (n = 1741) and 2002 (n = 704). Response rates were 82.5% and 90.2%, respectively. Most providers felt, at both time periods, that restructuring of the health care system was a positive step, but felt that health care quality was low. In the St John's region, perceptions of quality and standards of care improved over time. Patients were extremely satisfied with the admission process and hospital stay at both time periods in St John's. However, satisfaction declined in 2002 in regions outside St John's. Aggregation of acute care hospitals is possible without adverse effects on providers' perceptions of health care quality or on patient satisfaction.

  8. Point-of-care ultrasound detection of acute scaphoid fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessaro, Mark O; McGovern, Terrance R; Dickman, Eitan; Haines, Lawrence E

    2015-03-01

    In cases of traumatic wrist pain, emergency physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for scaphoid fractures due to their potential for serious complications. A growing body of literature supports the use of point-of-care ultrasonography by emergency physicians in the evaluation of potential fractures. We report a case of a pediatric scaphoid fracture that was initially not visualized on x-ray and was subsequently detected using point-of-care ultrasound in the ED.

  9. A survey of interprofessional activity of acute and long-term care employed nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; van Soeren, Mary; MacMillan, Kathleen; Sidani, Souraya; Collins, Laura; Harbman, Patti; Donald, Faith; Reeves, Scott

    2015-09-01

    To describe activities of interprofessional (IP) care, a key aspect of high-quality care, performed by nurse practitioners (NPs) employed in acute and long-term care institutions. We developed and tested a new theory-driven process tool to quantify NP everyday activities of IP care. We then invited NPs in acute and long-term care to complete the IP self-assessment tool (IPSAT). The IPSAT is a validated tool shown to be reliable for use with NPs. Testing with other healthcare professionals is suggested. More than 50% of NPs engage in all activities of IP care. Many engage in shared decision making, professional relationship, communication, and partnership or collaboration activities on most work days. Less-common activities were interdependence and collective problem solving including efforts to create role clarity. It is important to evaluate the everyday use of activities that enhance high-quality care. Awareness and enhanced knowledge of IP care activities such as promoting interdependence, collective problem solving, and ensuring role clarity will improve care quality. The tool results are valuable for practicing NPs and their educators to reflect on practice and advance knowledge to influence purposeful engagement in interprofessional care. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Evaluation of Bluetooth as a replacement for cables in intensive care and surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Mats K E B; Wajntraub, Samson

    2004-03-01

    In today's intensive care and surgery, a great number of cables are attached to patients. These cables can make the care and nursing of the patient difficult. Replacing them with wireless communications technology would facilitate patient care. Bluetooth is a modern radio technology developed specifically to replace cables between different pieces of communications equipment. In this study we sought to determine whether Bluetooth is a suitable replacement for cables in intensive care and during surgery with respect to electromagnetic compatibility. The following questions were addressed: Does Bluetooth interfere with medical equipment? And does the medical equipment decrease the quality of the Bluetooth communication? A Bluetooth link, simulating a patient monitoring system, was constructed with two laptops. The prototype was then used in laboratory and clinical tests according to American standards at the Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm. The tests, which included 44 different pieces of medical equipment, indicated that Bluetooth does not cause any interference. The tests also showed that the hospital environment does not affect the Bluetooth communication negatively. Bluetooth, a new radio technology transmitting at 2.4 GHz, was tested in a clinical setting. The study showed that a single Bluetooth link was robust and electromagnetically compatible with the tested electronic medical devices.

  11. Editor's Choice - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association Position Paper on Intensive Cardiovascular Care Units: An update on their definition, structure, organisation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Eric; Bueno, Hector; Casella, Gianni; De Maria, Elia; Fitzsimons, Donna; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Hassager, Christian; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Magdy, Ahmed; Marandi, Toomas; Mimoso, Jorge; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susana; Rokyta, Richard; Roubille, Francois; Serpytis, Pranas; Shimony, Avi; Stepinska, Janina; Tint, Diana; Trendafilova, Elina; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zima, Endre; Zukermann, Robert; Lettino, Maddalena

    2018-02-01

    Acute cardiovascular care has progressed considerably since the last position paper was published 10 years ago. It is now a well-defined, complex field with demanding multidisciplinary teamworking. The Acute Cardiovascular Care Association has provided this update of the 2005 position paper on acute cardiovascular care organisation, using a multinational working group. The patient population has changed, and intensive cardiovascular care units now manage a large range of conditions from those simply requiring specialised monitoring, to critical cardiovascular diseases with associated multi-organ failure. To describe better intensive cardiovascular care units case mix, acuity of care has been divided into three levels, and then defining intensive cardiovascular care unit functional organisation. For each level of intensive cardiovascular care unit, this document presents the aims of the units, the recommended management structure, the optimal number of staff, the need for specially trained cardiologists and cardiovascular nurses, the desired equipment and architecture, and the interaction with other departments in the hospital and other intensive cardiovascular care units in the region/area. This update emphasises cardiologist training, referring to the recently updated Acute Cardiovascular Care Association core curriculum on acute cardiovascular care. The training of nurses in acute cardiovascular care is additionally addressed. Intensive cardiovascular care unit expertise is not limited to within the unit's geographical boundaries, extending to different specialties and subspecialties of cardiology and other specialties in order to optimally manage the wide scope of acute cardiovascular conditions in frequently highly complex patients. This position paper therefore addresses the need for the inclusion of acute cardiac care and intensive cardiovascular care units within a hospital network, linking university medical centres, large community hospitals, and smaller

  12. The acute care nurse practitioner in collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, L

    1996-01-01

    Nurse-physician relationships remain, for the most part, hierarchical in nature. A hierarchical structure allows the person at the top, most notably the physician, the highest level of authority and power for decision making. Other health care providers are delegated various tasks related to the medical plan of care. One role of nonmedical health care providers, including nurses, is to support the medical plan of care and increase the productivity of physicians. Medical centers have house staff, usually interns and residents, who work collaboratively with the attending physicians in care delivery. At one medical center, a shortage of medical house staff for internal medicine prompted the development and evaluation of an alternative service. The alternative service utilized master prepared, certified nurse practitioners on a nonteaching service to provide care for selected types of medical patients. Physicians consulted with nurse practitioners, but retained decision-making authority concerning patient admission to the service. This paper describes the development and evaluation of an alternative service based on a collaborative practice model and the role of nurse practitioners working under such a model. Discussion includes suggestions for process guideline development for organizations that want to improve collaborative practice relationships between unit nursing staff, nurse practitioners, and physicians.

  13. Acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagino Tetsuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spinal anesthesia is a widely used general purpose anesthesia. However, serious complications, such as intracranial subdural hemorrhage, can rarely occur. Case presentation We report the case of a 73-year-old Japanese woman who had acute onset of intracranial subdural hemorrhage five days after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopic surgery. Conclusion This case highlights the need to pay attention to acute intracranial subdural hemorrhage as a complication after spinal anesthesia. If the headache persists even in a supine position or nausea occurs abruptly, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be conducted. An intracranial subdural hematoma may have a serious outcome and is an important differential diagnosis for headache after spinal anesthesia.

  14. Implication of the recent positive endovascular intervention trials for organizing acute stroke care: European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Turgut

    2015-06-01

    Timely recanalization leads to improved patient outcomes in acute ischemic stroke. Recent trial results demonstrated a strong benefit for endovascular therapies over standard medical care in patients with acute ischemic stroke and a major intracranial artery occlusion≤6 hours or even beyond from symptom onset and independent of patients' age. Previous studies have shown the benefit of intravenous thrombolysis that had gradually, albeit slowly, reshaped acute stroke care worldwide. Now, given the superior benefits of endovascular intervention, the whole structure of acute stroke care needs to be reorganized to meet patient needs and to deliver evidence-based treatments effectively. However, a blueprint for success with novel stroke treatments should be composed of numerous elements and requires efforts from various parties. Regarding the endovascular therapies, the strengths of Europe include highly organized democratic society structures, high rate of urbanization, well-developed revenue-based healthcare systems, and high income levels, whereas the obstacles include the east-west disparity in wealth, the ongoing economic crisis hindering spread of fairly costly new treatments, and the quickly aging population putting more demands on health care in general. Regional and national plans for covering whole population with 24/7 adequate acute stroke care are necessary in close cooperation of professionals and decision-makers. Europe-wide new training programs for expert physicians in stroke care should be initiated shortly. European Stroke Organisation has a unique role in providing expertise, consultation, guidelines, and versatile training in meeting new demands in stroke care. This article discusses the current situation, prospects, and challenges in Europe offering personal views on potential solutions. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Knowledge translation: An interprofessional approach to integrating a pain consult team within an acute care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kira; Berall, Anna; Karuza, Jurgis; Senderovich, Helen; Perri, Giulia-Anna; Grossman, Daphna

    2016-11-01

    Management of pain in the frail elderly presents many challenges in both assessment and treatment, due to the presence of multiple co-morbidities, polypharmacy, and cognitive impairment. At Baycrest Health Sciences, a geriatric care centre, pain in its acute care unit had been managed through consultations with the pain team on a case-by-case basis. In an intervention informed by knowledge translation (KT), the pain specialists integrated within the social network of the acute care team for 6 months to disseminate their expertise. A survey was administered to staff on the unit before and after the intervention of the pain team to understand staff perceptions of pain management. Pre- and post-comparisons of the survey responses were analysed by using t-tests. This study provided some evidence for the success of this interprofessional education initiative through changes in staff confidence with respect to pain management. It also showed that embedding the pain team into the acute care team supported the KT process as an effective method of interprofessional team building. Incorporating the pain team into the acute care unit to provide training and ongoing decision support was a feasible strategy for KT and could be replicated in other clinical settings.

  16. Meta-Analysis of Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy for Prevention of Cardiac Surgery-Associated Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Ahn, Hyeong sik; Ahn, Il Min; Choe, Won Joo; Lim, Choon-Hak

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether or not perioperative administration of sodium bicarbonate had a preventive effect on cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) as shown in randomized controlled trials. The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis using MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and KoreaMed. The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and KoreaMed without language and date restrictions. They used both MeSH and free-text terms to identify relevant studies. Electronic searches were undertaken on July 31, 2014. Five randomized controlled studies included in this review. There were no differences in the development of CSA-AKI among patients in the sodium bicarbonate group compared with those in the control group (5 trials, 1,092 patients; n = 233 of 547 in sodium bicarbonate (SB) group versus 225 of 545 in control group (SC); risk ratio (RR), 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74-1.22. Also, there were no statistical differences in in-hospital mortality (3 trials, 573 patients; n = 21 of 288 in SB versus 14 of 285 in SC; RR, 1.44; 95% CI, 0.76-2.72), need for renal replacement therapy (4 trials, 1,000 patients; n = 21 of 503 in SB versus 23 of 497 in SC; RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.50-1.60), length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) (hours) (4 trials, n = 969 patients, weighted men difference (WMD), 2.17; 95% CI, -1.15-5.49), and length of ventilation (hours) (4 trials, 969 patients; WMD, 0.34; 95% CI,-0.80-1.48). Perioperative administration of sodium bicarbonate did not reduce the rate of CSA-AKI in randomized controlled trials. Therefore, use of perioperative administration of sodium bicarbonate for the prevention of CSA-AKI is questionable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Point-of-care ultrasonography changes patient management following open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Lærke Kamstrup; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz; Juhl-Olsen, Peter; Jakobsen, Carl-Johan; Sloth, Erik

    2013-12-01

    Although pericardial effusions (PE) and pleural effusions (PLE) may lead to life-threatening respiratory and circulatory deterioration following open heart surgery the postoperative frequency is not fully recognized. The diagnosis is typically based on ultrasonography, X-ray or computer tomography and often disclosed when circulatory collapse is evident. Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography protocols constitute a noninvasive evaluation of the cardiopulmonary status. We hypothesized that POC ultrasonography could diagnose unknown PE and PLE. Patients scheduled for open heart surgery were eligible for inclusion. Baseline evaluation including POC examination and dyspnea score was performed one day prior to surgery and repeated on the 4th and 30th postoperative day. Eighty patients were included and complete follow-up was 80%. Thirteen patients (19%) had PE on the 4th day postsurgery and 19 patients (30%) had PE on the 30th day. Ultrasonography facilitated change in management in one patient with PE requiring drainage. Forty-nine patients (70%) had PLE on the 4th day following surgery and 19 patients (30%) had PLE on the 30th postoperative day. Ultrasonography facilitated a change in management in seven patients with PLE requiring drainage. POC ultrasonography detected pathology, otherwise undisclosed, and was responsible for a change in management in a considerable number of cases.

  18. The impact of adverse events on health care costs for older adults undergoing nonelective abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jonathan G; Davis, Philip J B; Levy, Adrian R; Molinari, Michele; Johnson, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative complications have been identified as an important and potentially preventable cause of increased hospital costs. While older adults are at increased risk of experiencing complications and other adverse events, very little research has specifically examined how these events impact inpatient costs. We sought to examine the association between postoperative complications, hospital mortality and loss of independence and direct inpatient health care costs in patients 70 years or older who underwent nonelective abdominal surgery. We prospectively enrolled consecutive patients 70 years or older who underwent nonelective abdominal surgery between July 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2012. Detailed patient-level data were collected regarding demographics, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes. Patient-level resource tracking was used to calculate direct hospital costs (2012 $CDN). We examined the association between complications, hospital mortality and loss of independence cost using multiple linear regression. During the study period 212 patients underwent surgery. Overall, 51.9% of patients experienced a nonfatal complication (32.5% minor and 19.4% major), 6.6% died in hospital and 22.6% experienced a loss of independence. On multivariate analysis nonfatal complications (p abdominal surgery in older adults and accounted for 44% of overall costs. This represents a substantial opportunity for better patient outcomes and cost savings with quality improvement strategies tailored to the needs of this high-risk surgical population.

  19. Duty hours, quality of care, and patient safety: general surgery resident perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Karen R; Jones, Andrew T; Shea, Judy A

    2012-07-01

    The balance between patient treatment risks and training residents to proficiency is confounded by duty-hour limits. Stricter limits have been recommended to enhance quality and safety, although supporting data are scarce. A previously piloted survey was delivered with the 2010 American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE). First postgraduate year (PGY1) and PGY2 trainees took the Junior examination (IJE); PGY3 and above took the Senior examination (ISE). Residency type, size, and location were linked to examinees using program codes. Five survey items queried all residents about the impact of further hour limits on care quality; online test residents answered 7 more items probing medical error sources. Data were analyzed using factorial ANOVA for association with sex, PGY level, and program demographics. There were 6,161 categorical surgery residents who took the ABSITE: 60% men, 60% ISE, and two-thirds in university programs. Paper (n = 5,079) and online (n = 1,082) examinees were similar. Item response rates ranged from 91% to 98%. Few (surgery residents do not perceive that reduced duty hours will noticeably improve quality of care. Resident perceptions of causes of medical errors suggest that system changes are more likely to enhance patient safety than further hour limits. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulation as an educational tool in acute nursing care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mona

    2017-01-01

    satisfying. The purpose of the study was to investigate if theory based lessons in combination with simulation-based lectures (FAM Camp) were superior to theory based lessons alone on above mentioned variables. Method: This was a controlled intervention study among nursing students at University College...... lessons. Conclusion: Different skills are required to practice as an acute nurse. Believe in own abilities is one of them (self-efficacy) and this skill was trained best in simulation-based lessons in an authentic setting. Contrary, it is uncertain whether simulation training improves fundamental...

  1. OC05 - Tokenism or true partnership - parental involvement in a child's acute pain care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Jackie; Smith, Joanna; Kirshbaum, Marilynne; Chirema, Kathleen

    2016-05-09

    Theme: Parenting/parenthood. Family-centred care (FCC) is widely acknowledged as underpinning children's nursing. Delivering FCC requires nurses to advocate for family involvement, particularly in areas where evidence suggest the child's needs are not being met, such as pain care. To explore parental involvement in their child's acute pain care. A qualitative ethnographical approach was adopted, with non-participant observation and follow-up interviews. The framework approach underpinned data analysis. Partnership between nurses and parents is not overtly evident in relation to pain care. Involvement is often 'unspoken', indicating that neither the nurse nor parent are clear about the extent to which parents can, or are, involved in care. Parents want greater involvement in their child's pain care and often initiate involvement by advocating for their child, with or without support from nurses. The 'Pillars of Partnership in Pain Care' model offers an alternative approach to involving parents.

  2. Aortography delays surgery of CT proven acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A.; Moreno, R.; Martin, V.; Iniguez, A.; Alvarez, J. (Hospital Universitario de San Carlos, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Radiodiagnostico, Servicio de Cirurgia Vascular, Servicio de Exploracion Cardiopulmonar, and Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos)

    1991-09-01

    A case of acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta was diagnosed by dynamic CT. Angiographic confirmation was required, delaying surgical repair and contribution to the fatal outcome. If reliable findings of acute traumatic rupture of the thoracic aorta are shown by CT, we question the usefulness of angiographic confirmation in such cases. (orig.).

  3. Acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures in the athlete: the role of surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    High-level athletes have significantly greater load and demand on their ankle joints than the average population. Therefore, treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament ruptures in the high-demanding athlete is a challenge. This article reviews the treatment of acute lateral ankle ruptures in

  4. Acute care patients discuss the patient role in patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Cheryl; Huddleston, Nicole; Pak, Youngju

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety has been a highly researched topic in health care since the year 2000. One strategy for improving patient safety has been to encourage patients to take an active role in their safety during their health care experiences. However, little research has shed light on how patients view their roles. This study attempted to address this deficit by inductively exploring the results of a qualitative study in which patients reported their ideas about what they believe their roles should be. Patients with an overnight stay in the previous 90 days at one of three hospitals were surveyed using a mailing methodology. Of 1,040 respondents, 491 provided an open-ended response regarding what they believe the patient role should be. Qualitative analysis found several prominent themes. The largest proportion of responses (23%) suggested that patients should follow instructions given by care providers. Other prominent themes were that patients should ask questions and become informed about their conditions and treatments, and many implied that they should expect competent care. Our results suggest that patients believe they should be able to trust that they are being provided competent care, as opposed to assuming a leadership role in their safety. Our results suggest that engaging patients in safety efforts may be complex, requiring a variety of strategies. Managers must provide environments conducive to staff and patient interactions to support patients in this effort. Different types of patients may require different engagement strategies.

  5. Outlier management. Influencing the highest resource-consuming areas in acute and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, T

    1999-03-01

    Outliers account for a large amount of technology utilization and resources consumed in acute care, despite accounting for only a small portion of the total patient population. Most current efforts to reduce costs, such as re-engineering and downsizing, are nonspecific methods of controlling costs. Focusing efforts in high-cost areas, such as outlier management, is much more likely to improve patient care and improve the use of technology while achieving real advances in cost control. Most hospitals will have to build an infrastructure to support outlier management, which includes developing clinical staff. These processes will take time and careful planning, but they are essential for the effective management of technology utilization and outliers. The failure to employ focused efforts like outlier management will result in the superficial treatment of high costs in acute care. The benefit to employing these methods leads to the best use of technology and the improved management of a difficult patient population.

  6. Re-orienting a remote acute care model towards a primary health care approach: key enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Vicki; Reeve, Carole A; Humphreys, John S; Wakerman, John; Carter, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the key enablers of change in re-orienting a remote acute care model to comprehensive primary healthcare delivery. The setting of the study was a 12-bed hospital in Fitzroy Crossing, Western Australia. Individual key informant, in-depth interviews were completed with five of six identified senior leaders involved in the development of the Fitzroy Valley Health Partnership. Interviews were recorded and transcripts were thematically analysed by two investigators for shared views about the enabling factors strengthening primary healthcare delivery in a remote region of Australia. Participants described theestablishment of a culturally relevant primary healthcare service, using a community-driven, 'bottom up' approach characterised by extensive community participation. The formal partnership across the government and community controlled health services was essential, both to enable change to occur and to provide sustainability in the longer term. A hierarchy of major themes emerged. These included community participation, community readiness and desire for self-determination; linkages in the form of a government community controlled health service partnership; leadership; adequate infrastructure; enhanced workforce supply; supportive policy; and primary healthcare funding. The strong united leadership shown by the community and the health service enabled barriers to be overcome and it maximised the opportunities provided by government policy changes. The concurrent alignment around a common vision enabled implementation of change. The key principle learnt from this study is the importance of community and health service relationships and local leadership around a shared vision for the re-orientation of community health services.

  7. Acute renal failure in children in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malobika Bhattacharya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this retrospective study, records of all patients aged one month to 12 years who presented with acute renal failure (ARF between May 2005 and August 2010 were retrieved. Clinical details, biochemistry, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT, cause of ARF and outcome at discharge were recorded. During this period, 230 children presented with ARF; their median age at presentation was 30 months (range: five-144 months; 120 (52.2% were males. The causes of ARF were acute tubular necrosis (ATN in 121 (52.6%, glomerular disorders in 5.7%, structural anomalies of the urinary tract in 9.6% and hemolytic uremic syndrome in 27 (11.7%. The mean duration of hospital stay was 17.8 ± 7.6 days. RRT was required for 54 patients (23.6%; peritoneal dialysis in 49 and hemodialysis in five patients. Complete recovery was noted in 99 study patients (43.2% and sequelae remained in 84 patients (36.7%. Forty-six patients (20.1% with ARF died. ATN secondary to septicemia was the most common cause of ARF in our study.

  8. Meeting ethical challenges in acute care work as narrated by enrolled nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørlie, Venke; Kihlgren, Annica Larsson; Kihlgren, Mona

    2004-03-01

    Five enrolled nurses (ENs) were interviewed as part of a comprehensive investigation into the narratives of registered nurses, ENs and patients about their experiences in an acute care ward. The ward opened in 1997 and provides patient care for a period of up to three days, during which time a decision has to be made regarding further care elsewhere or a return home. The ENs were interviewed concerning their experience of being in ethically difficult care situations and of acute care work. The method of phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was used. The most prominent feature was the focus on relationships, as expressed in concern for society's and administrators' responsibility for health care and the care of older people. Other themes focus on how nurse managers respond to the ENs' work as well as their relationships with fellow ENs, in both work situations and shared social and sports activities. Their reflections seem to show an expectation of care as expressed in their lived experiences and their desire for a particular level and quality of care for their own family members. A lack of time could lead to a bad conscience over the 'little bit extra' being omitted. This lack of time could also lead to tiredness and even burnout, but the system did not allow for more time.

  9. Acute ventilatory failure complicating obesity hypoventilation: update on a 'critical care syndrome'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BaHammam, Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Obesity can result in serious complications, including obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). OHS patients may present with acute-on-chronic ventilatory failure, necessitating acute care management. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent literature on acute ventilatory failure in OHS patients. Obese persons can develop acute hypercapnic respiratory failure and sleep hypoventilation due to disorders in lung mechanics, ventilatory drive, and neurohormonal and neuromodulators of breathing. Although there are no clearly defined predictors for OHS patients who are