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Sample records for acute canine model

  1. Power Doppler Imaging in Acute Renal Vein Occlusion and Recanalization: a Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, So-Young; Kim, In-One; Kim, Young-Il; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Min Woo; Youn, Byung Jae; Kim, Woo Sun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    2008-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the dynamic changes of the power Doppler (PD) in acute renal vein occlusion and recanalization in a canine model. Materials and Methods : We performed a PD of the kidney during graded renal vein occlusion and recanalization induced by balloon inflation and deflation in nine dogs. The PD images were transferred to a personal computer, and the PD signals were quantified. Result : We observed the temporal change of the PD signal during renal vein occlusion and recanalization, with a decrease in the PD signal during occlusion and an increase during recanalization. The mean PD signal decreased gradually as the renal vein was occluded, and conversely increased gradually with sequential relief of occlusion. The sequential change of the mean value of the PD signal was statistically significant. Conclusion : The PD can detect a change in renal blood flow during acute renal vein occlusion and recanalization in a canine model. The PD may be used as a helpful tool for the early detection of acute renal vein thrombosis and the monitoring of renal perfusion

  2. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  3. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng Jin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP. AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF. The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP.

  4. Beneficial hemodynamic effects of nicorandil in a canine model of acute congestive heart failure: comparison with nitroglycerin and cromakalim.

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    Noguchi, K; Matsuzaki, T; Ojiri, Y; Koyama, T; Nakasone, J; Sakanashi, M

    1998-01-01

    Comparative hemodynamic effects of nicorandil (NCR), nitroglycerin (NTG) and cromakalim (CRM) were examined in a canine model of acute congestive heart failure (CHF). CHF was produced by injections of saponin into coronary arteries of anesthetized dogs followed by volume loading and continuous i.v. infusion of methoxamine. After the treatment, aortic blood flow (AoF), left ventricular dP/dt and myocardial segment shortening (SS) markedly decreased, while the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), the right atrial pressure (RAP) and the systemic vascular resistance (SVR) increased. NCR (n = 6), NTG (n = 6) and CRM (n = 8), which were administered i.v. after production of CHF, caused a comparable reduction in LVEDP. NCR and CRM profoundly increased AoF and SS but NTG did only slightly. On the other hand, NTG and NCR but not CRM significantly reduced RAP. Intracoronary NCR (n = 8) exerted no or similar effects on SS as well as systemic hemodynamic indices to those observed with i.v. NCR despite distinct coronary vasodilation. These results indicate that NCR may exert beneficial hemodynamic effects in an experimental CHF mainly due to lessening both afterload and preload rather than the coronary vasodilating effect.

  5. Role of canine circovirus in dogs with acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea.

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    Anderson, A; Hartmann, K; Leutenegger, C M; Proksch, A L; Mueller, R S; Unterer, S

    2017-06-03

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) has been detected in some dogs with severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea, but its pathogenic role is unclear. This study evaluated a suspected association between the presence of CanineCV and acute haemorrhagic diarrhoea syndrome (AHDS) in dogs. The prevalence of CanineCV in dogs with AHDS was compared with that in healthy dogs and those infected with canine parvovirus (CPV). Additionally, time to recovery and mortality rate were compared between CanineCV-positive and CanineCV-negative dogs. Faecal samples of dogs with AHDS (n=55), healthy dogs (n=66) and dogs infected with CPV (n=54) were examined by two real-time TaqMan PCR assays targeting the replicase and capsid genes of CanineCV. CanineCV was detected in faecal samples of two dogs with AHDS, three healthy controls and seven dogs infected with CPV. Among the three groups, there was no significant difference in prevalence of CanineCV. CPV-infected animals that were coinfected with CanineCV had a significantly higher mortality rate compared with those negative for CanineCV. CanineCV does not appear to be the primary causative agent of AHDS in dogs, but might play a role as a negative co-factor in disease outcome in dogs with CPV infection. British Veterinary Association.

  6. Stimulation of ganglionated plexus attenuates cardiac neural remodeling and heart failure progression in a canine model of acute heart failure post-myocardial infarction.

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    Luo, Da; Hu, Huihui; Qin, Zhiliang; Liu, Shan; Yu, Xiaomei; Ma, Ruisong; He, Wenbo; Xie, Jing; Lu, Zhibing; He, Bo; Jiang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with autonomic dysfunction. Vagus nerve stimulation has been shown to improve cardiac function both in HF patients and animal models of HF. The purpose of this present study is to investigate the effects of ganglionated plexus stimulation (GPS) on HF progression and autonomic remodeling in a canine model of acute HF post-myocardial infarction. Eighteen adult mongrel male dogs were randomized into the control (n=8) and GPS (n=10) groups. All dogs underwent left anterior descending artery ligation followed by 6-hour high-rate (180-220bpm) ventricular pacing to induce acute HF. Transthoracic 2-dimensional echocardiography was performed at different time points. The plasma levels of norepinephrine, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and Ang-II were measured using ELISA kits. C-fos and nerve growth factor (NGF) proteins expressed in the left stellate ganglion as well as GAP43 and TH proteins expressed in the peri-infarct zone were measured using western blot. After 6h of GPS, the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and ejection fraction showed no significant differences between the 2 groups, but the interventricular septal thickness at end-systole in the GPS group was significantly higher than that in the control group. The plasma levels of norepinephrine, BNP, Ang-II were increased 1h after myocardial infarction while the increase was attenuated by GPS. The expression of c-fos and NGF proteins in the left stellate ganglion as well as GAP43 and TH proteins in cardiac peri-infarct zone in GPS group were significantly lower than that in control group. GPS inhibits cardiac sympathetic remodeling and attenuates HF progression in canines with acute HF induced by myocardial infarction and ventricular pacing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Randomized comparison of intra-arterial and intravenous thrombolysis in a canine model of acute basilar artery thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.I.; Yahia, A.M.; Boulos, A.S.; Hanel, R.A.; Suri, M.F.K.; Hopkins, L.N.; Alberico, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the rates of recanalization cerebral infarct and hemorrhage between intra-arterial (IA) reteplase and intravenous (IV) alteplase thrombolysis in a canine model of basilar artery thrombosis. Thrombosis was induced by injecting a clot in the basilar artery of 13 anesthetized dogs via superselective catheterization. The animals were randomized in a blinded fashion, 2 h after clot injection and verification of arterial occlusion, to receive IV alteplase 0.9 mg/kg over 60 min and IA placebo, or IA reteplase 0.09 units/kg over 20 min, equivalent to one-half the alteplase dose, and IV placebo. Recanalization was studied for 6 h after treatment with serial angiography; the images were later graded in a blinded fashion. Blinded interpretation of postmortem MRI was performed to assess the presence of brain infarcts and/or hemorrhage. At 3 h after initiation of treatment, partial or complete recanalization was observed in one of six dogs in the IV alteplase group and in five of seven in the IA reteplase group (P = 0.08). At 6 h, no significant difference in partial or complete recanalization was observed between the groups (two of six vs. five of seven; P = 0.20). Postmortem MRI revealed infarcts in four of six animals treated with IV alteplase and three of seven treated with IA reteplase (P = 0.4). Intracerebral hemorrhage was more common in the IV alteplase group (four of six vs. none of seven; P = 0.02). This study thus suggests that IA thrombolysis affords a recanalization rate similar to that of IV thrombolysis, but with a lower rate of intracerebral hemorrhage. (orig.)

  8. Evaluating coronary reperfusion during acute myocardial infarction in a canine model by gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

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    Tanabe, Kazuaki; Ishibashi, Yutaka; Shimada, Toshio (Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-05-01

    In previous studies, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using contrast agents was found to be useful in distinguishing reperfused infarcts from nonreperfused infarcts. However, there have been only a few detailed studies using consecutive MR images for the assessment of myocardial reperfusion during an acute infarction and also no studies have been performed using a percutaneous transluminal coronary occlusion model (closed chest model). We induced acute myocardial infarction in dogs by occluding and then reperfusing the coronary artery with a balloon catheter. ECG-gated MR images were taken using the spin-echo technique before and after Gd-DTPA injection during both coronary artery occlusion and after reperfusion. We defined the intensity ratio (IR) as the signal intensity at the ischemic area divided by that at the nonischemic area on MR images and compared each image by the IR. Without Gd-DTPA, there was no difference between infarcted and normally perfused myocardium. Infarcted myocardium had a low signal intensity (IR=0.68[+-]0.14) soon after Gd-DTPA injection. This difference diminished with time. After reperfusion the infarcted myocardium had a high signal intensity (IR: 1.76[+-]0.34). We conclude that Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI can distinguish reperfused from nonreperfused infarcts soon after Gd-DTPA administration. (author).

  9. Acute pancreatitis : a newly recognised potential complication of canine babesiosis

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    A.J. Möhr

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study describes 4 cases of canine babesiosis with histologically confirmed acute pancreatitis. In addition, 16 dogs with babesiosis are reported with serum amylase (>3500 U/l and/or lipase (>650 U/l activity elevations of a magnitude that would support a diagnosis of probable acute pancreatitis, although extra-pancreatic sources of the enzymes could not be excluded in these cases. Median time of pancreatitis diagnosis was 2.5 days post-admission, with primarily young (median age 3 years, sexually intact dogs affected. The development of pancreatitis was unrelated to the degree of anaemia at time of admission. In addition to pancreatitis, 80 % of cases suffered from other babesial complications, namely icterus (13, acute respiratory distress syndrome (6, immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (6, renal failure (3, haemoconcentration (2 and cerebral syndrome (2. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal failure and cerebral syndrome were associated with a poor prognosis, with 4 of the 5 dogs included in the overall 26 % mortality rate having at least 1 of these complications. Haemolytic anaemia with ischaemia-reperfusion injury to the pancreas is proposed as a possible primary pathophysiological mechanism in babesial pancreatitis. Hypotensive shock, immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia, haemoconcentration and possibly altered lipid metabolism in babesiosis may also be involved. The previously postulated pro-inflammatory cytokine milieu of complicated babesiosis may underlie the progression, if not the primary initiation, of pancreatic pathology. Acute pancreatitis may represent the previously reported 'gut' form of babesiosis.

  10. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in the canine model.

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    Price, D T; Chari, R S; Neighbors, J D; Eubanks, S; Schuessler, W W; Preminger, G M

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of performing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model. Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy was performed on six adult male canines. A new endoscopic needle driver was used to construct a secure vesicourethral anastomosis. Average operative time required to complete the procedure was 304 min (range 270-345 min). Dissection of the prostate gland took an average of 67 min (range 35-90 min), and construction of the vesicourethral anastomosis took 154 min (rage 80-240 min). There were no intraoperative complications and only one postoperative complication (anastomotic leak). Five of the six animals recovered uneventfully from the procedure, and their foley catheters were removed 10-14 days postoperatively after a retrograde cystourethrogram demonstrated an intact vesicourethral anastomosis. Four (80%) of the surviving animals were clinically continent within 10 days after catheter removal. Post mortem examination confirmed that the vesicourethral anastomosis was intact with no evidence of urine extravasation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic radical prostatectomy in a canine model, and suggest that additional work with this technique should be continued to develop its potential clinical application.

  11. A molecular survey for selected viral enteropathogens revealed a limited role of Canine circovirus in the development of canine acute gastroenteritis.

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    Dowgier, Giulia; Lorusso, Eleonora; Decaro, Nicola; Desario, Costantina; Mari, Viviana; Lucente, Maria Stella; Lanave, Gianvito; Buonavoglia, Canio; Elia, Gabriella

    2017-05-01

    Canine circovirus (CanineCV) is a canine virus, whose pathogenetic role is still uncertain. Based on recent data suggesting its role as entheropathogen, a case-control study was conducted between 2013 and 2016 to investigate the association of CanineCV with gastroenteritis in dogs, alone or in combination with other viral pathogens, including canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCoV) and canine distemper virus (CDV). A total of 219 dogs suffering from acute gastroenteritis disorders and 67 controls randomly recruited among healthy dogs or patients presenting without enteric signs were screened by a panel of real-time (RT-)PCR assays for CanineCV, CPV, CCoV and CDV. A high prevalence of viral infections was detected in dogs with gastroenteritis (77.16%), with CPV representing the most frequently detected enteropathogen, followed by CanineCV and CCoV. While CPV and CCoV infections displayed a strong association with occurrence of acute gastroenteritis (pgastroenteritis (p<0.00001). This study supports the role of CanineCV as a co-pathogen in the development of gastrointestinal disease, mainly acting in synergism with other enteric viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

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    Xiaoyan Wu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurological impairments. A lack in genotype-phenotype correlation in Wilson disease points toward the influence of environmental factors or modifying genes. In a number of Non-Wilsonian forms of copper metabolism, the underlying genetic defects remain elusive. Several pure bred dog populations are affected with copper-associated hepatitis showing similarities to human copper metabolism disorders. Gene-mapping studies in these populations offer the opportunity to discover new genes involved in copper metabolism. Furthermore, due to the relatively large body size and long life-span of dogs they are excellent models for development of new treatment strategies. One example is the recent use of canine organoids for disease modeling and gene therapy of copper storage disease. This review addresses the opportunities offered by canine genetics for discovery of genes involved in copper metabolism disorders. Further, possibilities for the use of dogs in development of new treatment modalities for copper storage disorders, including gene repair in patient-derived hepatic organoids, are highlighted.

  13. A reproducible canine model of esophageal varices.

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    Jensen, D M; Machicado, G A; Tapia, J I; Kauffman, G; Franco, P; Beilin, D

    1983-03-01

    One of the most promising nonoperative techniques for control of variceal hemorrhage is sclerosis via the fiberoptic endoscope. Many questions remain, however, about sclerosing agents, guidelines for effective use, and limitations of endoscopic techniques. A reproducible large animal model of esophageal varices would facilitate the critical evaluation of techniques for variceal hemostasis or sclerosis. Our purpose was to develop a large animal model of esophageal varices. Studies in pigs and dogs are described which led to the development of a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices. For the final model, mongrel dogs had laparotomy, side-to-side portacaval shunt, inferior vena cava ligation, placement of an ameroid constrictor around the portal vein, and liver biopsy. The mean (+/- SE) pre- and postshunt portal pressure increased significantly from 12 +/- 0.4 to 23 +/- 1 cm saline. Weekly endoscopies were performed to grade the varix size. Two-thirds of animals developed medium or large sized esophageal varices after the first operation. Three to six weeks later, a second laparotomy with complete ligation of the portal vein and liver biopsy were performed in animals with varices (one-third of the animals). All dogs developed esophageal varices and abdominal wall collateral veins of variable size 3-6 wk after the first operation. After the second operation, the varices became larger. Shunting of blood through esophageal varices via splenic and gastric veins was demonstrated by angiography. Sequential liver biopsies were normal. There was no morbidity or mortality. Ascites, encephalopathy, or spontaneous variceal bleeding did not occur. We have documented the lack of size change and the persistence of medium to large esophageal varices and abdominal collateral veins in all animals followed for more than 6 mo. Variceal bleeding could be induced by venipuncture for testing endoscopic hemostatic and sclerosis methods. We suggest other potential uses of this

  14. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

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    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates.

  15. Uncommon acute neurologic presentation of canine distemper in 4 adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Alba; Gamito, Araceli; Carletti, Beatrice E; Guisado, Alicia; de las Mulas, Juana Martín; Pérez, José; Martín, Eva M

    2014-04-01

    Four uncommon cases of canine distemper (CD) were diagnosed in vaccinated adult dogs. All dogs had acute onset of neurologic signs, including seizures, abnormal mentation, ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits. Polymerase chain reaction for CD virus was positive on cerebrospinal fluid in 2 cases. Due to rapid deterioration the dogs were euthanized and CD was confirmed by postmortem examination.

  16. Evaluation of Canine Pancreas-Specific Lipase Activity, Lipase Activity, and Trypsin-Like Immunoreactivity in an Experimental Model of Acute Kidney Injury in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsebosch, S E; Palm, C A; Segev, G; Cowgill, L D; Kass, P H; Marks, S L

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs is complicated by extrapancreatic disorders that can alter the results of laboratory tests. Extrapancreatic disorders can also affect the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). The effects of acute kidney injury (AKI) on pancreas-specific lipase activity (Spec cPL(®) Test), serum lipase activity and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) in dogs have not been evaluated. Serum Spec cPL, lipase activity, and TLI concentrations will increase secondary to decreased kidney function. Five purpose-bred dogs. Experimental prospective study. Gentamicin was used to induce AKI in 5 purpose-bred dogs. Serum samples were collected for measurement of creatinine, Spec cPL, lipase activity and TLI over 60 days, during both induction of, and recovery from, AKI. All dogs developed and recovered from AKI. Six of 52 (12%) serum Spec cPL concentrations were increased (2 in the equivocal zone and 4 consistent with pancreatitis) in 2 of 5 (40%) dogs. Two of 51 (4%) serum lipase activity values were increased in 2 of 5 dogs. Serum TLI was increased above the reference range in 17 of 50 (34%) samples in 3 of 5 dogs. For all biomarkers, there was no consistent correlation with increases in serum creatinine concentration. Decreased renal excretion during experimental AKI did not cause consistent and correlated increases in serum Spec cPL, lipase activity, or TLI in this cohort of dogs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  17. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL as a biomarker for acute canine kidney injury

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    Lee Ya-Jane

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarkers for the early prediction of canine acute kidney injury (AKI are clinically important. Recently, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL was found to be a sensitive biomarker for the prediction of human AKI at a very early stage and the development of AKI after surgery. However, NGAL has not yet been studied with respect to dog kidney diseases. The application of NGAL canine AKI was investigated in this study. Results The canine NGAL gene was successfully cloned and expressed. Polyclonal antibodies against canine NGAL were generated and used to develop an ELISA for measuring NGAL protein in serum and urine samples that were collected from 39 dogs at different time points after surgery. AKI was defined by the standard method, namely a serum creatinine increase of greater than or equal to 26.5 μmol/L from baseline within 48 h. At 12 h after surgery, compared to the group without AKI (12 dogs, the NGAL level in the urine of seven dogs with AKI was significantly increased (median 178.4 pg/mL vs. 88.0 pg/mL, and this difference was sustained to 72 h. Conclusion As the increase in NGAL occurred much earlier than the increase in serum creatinine, urine NGAL seems to be able to serve as a sensitive and specific biomarker for the prediction of AKI in dogs.

  18. Controversial results of therapy with mesenchymal stem cells in the acute phase of canine distemper disease.

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    Pinheiro, A O; Cardoso, M T; Vidane, A S; Casals, J B; Passarelli, D; Alencar, A L F; Sousa, R L M; Fantinato-Neto, P; Oliveira, V C; Lara, V M; Ambrósio, C E

    2016-05-23

    Distemper disease is an infectious disease reported in several species of domestic and wild carnivores. The high mortality rate of animals infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) treated with currently available therapies has driven the study of new efficacious treatments. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising therapeutic option for many degenerative, hereditary, and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterize stem cells derived from the canine fetal olfactory epithelium and to assess the systemic response of animals infected with CDV to symptomatic therapy and treatment with MSCs. Eight domestic mongrel dogs (N = 8) were divided into two groups: support group (SG) (N = 5) and support group + cell therapy (SGCT) (N = 3), which were monitored over 15 days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 6, 9, 12, and 15 to assess blood count and serum biochemistry (urea, creatinine, alanine transferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total protein, albumin, and globulin), and urine samples were obtained on days 0 and 15 for urinary evaluation (urine I). The results showed a high mortality rate (SG = 4 and SGCT = 2), providing inadequate data on the clinical course of CDV infection. MSC therapy resulted in no significant improvement when administered during the acute phase of canine distemper disease, and a prevalence of animals with high mortality rate was found in both groups due to the severity of symptoms.

  19. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

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    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model.

  1. Ex vivo pathomechanics of the canine Pond-Nuki model.

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    Antonio Pozzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transection of the canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL is a well-established osteoarthritis (OA model. The effect of CCL loss on contact pressure and joint alignment has not been quantified for stifle loading in standing. The purposes of the study were to measure femorotibial contact areas and stresses and joint alignment following transection of the CCL in an ex vivo model. We hypothesized that transection of the CCL would lead to abnormal kinematics, as well as alterations in contact mechanics of the femorotibial joint. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eight canine hindlimbs were tested in a servo-hydraulic materials testing machine using a custom made femoral jig. Contact area and pressure measurements, and femorotibial rotations and translations were measured in the normal and the CCL-deficient stifle in both standing and deep flexion angles. We found that at standing angle, transection of the CCL caused cranial translation and internal rotation of the tibia with a concurrent caudal shift of the contact area, an increase in peak pressure and a decrease in contact area. These changes were not noted in deep flexion. At standing, loss of CCL caused a redistribution of the joint pressure, with the caudal region of the compartment being overloaded and the rest of the joint being underloaded. CONCLUSION: In the Pond-Nuki model alterations in joint alignment are correlated with shifting of the contact points to infrequently loaded areas of the tibial plateau. The results of this study suggest that this cadaveric Pond-Nuki model simulates the biomechanical changes previously reported in the in-vivo Pond-Nuki model.

  2. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

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    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B.; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.; Correia, Catherine E.; Mah, Cathryn S.; Weinstein, David A.; Conlon, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases. PMID:21318173

  3. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  4. Design and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Printed Flexible Canine Otoscopy Teaching Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Pereira, Mary Mauldin; Sithole, Fortune; Orchard, Paul A.D.; Bauman, Eric B.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A teaching model was sought to improve canine otoscopy skill and reduce use of teaching dogs. Methods An otoscopy teaching model was printed in a flexible medium on a desktop three-dimensional printer from a magnetic resonance image of a canine external ear canal. The model was mounted in a polyvinyl dog mannequin. Validation of the teaching model was sought from student, faculty, and dog perspective. Student perception of prelaboratory training was assessed using a survey regard...

  5. Bone compaction enhances implant fixation in a canine gap model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kold, Søren Vedding; Rahbek, Ole; Toft, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    A new bone preparation technique, compaction, has increased fixation of implants inserted with exact-fit or press-fit to bone. Furthermore, a demonstrated spring-back effect of compacted bone might be of potential value in reducing the initial gaps that often exist between clinical inserted...... implants and bone. However, it is unknown whether the compression and breakage of trabeculae during the compaction procedure results in impaired gap-healing of compacted bone. Therefore, we compared compaction with conventional drilling in a canine gap model. Grit-blasted titanium implants (diameter 6 mm......) were bilaterally inserted into cavities initially expanded to 8 mm diameters in the proximal humeri. Each dog served as its own control; thus, one humerus had the implant cavity prepared with compaction, the other with drilling. Eight dogs were euthanized after 2 weeks, and 7 dogs after 4 weeks. Humeri...

  6. The canine 'groove' model, compared with the ACLT model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, A.C.A.; Roermund, P.M. van; TeKoppele, J.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The frequently used anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis (OA) in the dog, makes use of a permanent trigger (joint instability) for inducing degenerative changes. The present study evaluates a canine model of degenerative cartilage damage, mimicking OA,

  7. Wound healing modulators in a tracheoplasty canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Zúñiga, J Raúl; Hernández-Jiménez, Claudia; Díaz-Martínez, Emmanuel; Jasso-Victoria, Rogelio; Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, Miguel O; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Baltazares-Lipp, Matilde; Santillán-Doherty, Patricio; Santibáñez-Salgado, J Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    Postsurgical tracheal stenosis results from fibrosis formation due to ischemia. There are healing modulators, hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen polyvinylpyrrolidone (CPVP), which reduce collagen fibers formation. Thus we can hypothesize that the topical application of one of these modulators can diminish postsurgical tracheal scarring and stenosis. The aim of this work was to evaluate the macroscopic, microscopic, and biochemical changes of tracheal healing after the application of HA or CPVP in a canine tracheoplasty model. The study design was prospective experimental investigation in a canine model. Eighteen mongrel dogs underwent three cervical tracheal rings resection and end-to-end anastomosis. They were randomized into three groups according to treatment: group I (control group) (n = 6), topical application of saline solution on tracheal anastomosis; group II (n = 6), topical application of 15 microg HA on tracheal anastomosis; and group III (n = 6), topical application of 2.5 mg CPVP on tracheal anastomosis. They were evaluated clinical, radiological and tracheoscopically during 4 weeks. They were euthanized at the end of the study time. Macroscopic, microscopic, and biochemical changes of tracheal anastomosis healing were analyzed. Collagen formation was quantified by the Woessner method. All the animals survived the surgical procedure and study period. Macroscopic, radiologic, and endoscopic studies showed that animals in group I developed tracheal stenosis, inflammation, and firm fibrous tissue formation, and histological studies also showed severe inflammatory reaction and fibrosis formation. Groups II (HA) and III (CPVP) showed well-organized thin collagen fibers with minimal inflammatory response. Biochemical evaluation revealed a higher collagen concentration in group I animals (analysis of variance [ANOVA] p anastomosis diminished the degree of stenosis and inflammatory reaction. Both modulators improved tracheal healing.

  8. Canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis by regulating T cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Woo-Jin; Li, Qiang; Han, Sei-Myoung; Jeon, Kee-Ok; Park, Sang-Chul; Ryu, Min-Ok; Chae, Hyung-Kyu; Kyeong, Kweon; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-12-30

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with systemic complications and high mortality rate in dogs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in several inflammation models. In the present study, the effects of canine adipose tissue-derived (cAT)-MSCs in a rat model of SAP induced by retrograde injection of 3% sodium taurocholate solution into the pancreatic duct were investigated. cAT-MSCs labeled with dioctadecyl-3,3,3'-tetramethylindo-carbocyanine perchlorate (1 × 10⁷ cells/kg) were systemically administered to rats and pancreatic tissue was collected three days later for histopathological, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical analyses. Greater numbers of infused cAT-MSCs were detected in the pancreas of SAP relative to sham-operated rats. cAT-MSC infusion reduced pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, and decreased pancreatic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -12, -17, and -23 and interferon-γ, while stimulating expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in SAP rats. Moreover, cAT-MSCs decreased the number of clusters of differentiation 3-positive T cells and increased that of forkhead box P3-positive T cells in the injured pancreas. These results indicate that cAT-MSCs can be effective as a cell-based therapeutic strategy for treatment of SAP in dogs.

  9. Canine as a biomedical research model: immunological, hematological, and oncological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifrine, M.; Wilson, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    The canine has been used as a biomedical research model in radiation studies by a number of laboratories supported primarily by the US Department of Energy and its predecessors. These studies were unique in that they covered the life spans of the canines and permitted the collection of data from birth to death under controlled conditions. Since these were multiparametric studies, an extensive data base has been established, not the least of which are normative values covering all biologic systems, including immunohematology. The canine model has also been extensively used by other groups, such as transplantation biologists. The virtues of the canine as a model in these and many other endeavors are becoming increasingly more apparent with the passing of time. One of the primary goals of this volume was to compile the knowledge and experience of researchers using the canine model and to focus their expertise on furthering the use of the canine for studies in immunology, hematology, and oncology. We have attempted to present some of the contemporary, diverse uses of the canine in biomedical research, emphasizing immunologic endpoints, and also to present in detail some of the latest technology used in such studies

  10. A cell kinetic model of granulopoiesis under radiation exposure: Extension from rodents to canines and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    As significant ionising radiation exposure will occur during prolonged space travel in future, it is essential to understand their adverse effects on the radiosensitive organ systems that are important for immediate survival of humans, e.g. the haematopoietic system. In this paper, a bio-mathematical model of granulopoiesis is used to analyse the granulocyte changes seen in the blood of mammalians under acute and continuous radiation exposure. This is one of a set of haematopoietic models that have been successfully utilised to simulate and interpret the experimental data of acute and chronic radiation on rodents. Extension to canine and human systems indicates that the results of the model are consistent with the cumulative experimental and empirical data from various sources, implying the potential to integrate them into one united model system to monitor the haematopoietic response of various species under irradiation. The suppression of granulocytes' level of a space traveller under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation as well as the granulopoietic response when encountering a historically large solar particle event is also discussed. (authors)

  11. Lymphotropism and host responses during acute wild-type canine distemper virus infections in a highly susceptible natural host

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Jensen, Trine Hammer

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the in vivo virulence of immunosuppressive wild-type Morbillivirus infections are still not fully understood. To investigate lymphotropism and host responses we have selected the natural host model of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in mink. This model displays...

  12. Lateral Cricoarytenoid Release: Development of a Novel Surgical Treatment Option for Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia in a Canine Laryngeal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Andrea M; Paniello, Randal C

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of a novel adductor muscle-releasing technique designed to decrease the force of vocal fold adduction, as a potential surgical therapy for patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Experimental animal study. A canine laryngeal model was used to assess the acute and sustained efficacy of a lateral cricoarytenoid (LCA) muscle release. A total of 34 canine hemilaryngeal preparations were divided among 7 experimental groups. The LCA muscle was separated from its cricoid cartilage origin via an open, anterior, submucosal approach. The laryngeal adductory pressures (LAP) were assessed pre- and post-muscle release via direct recurrent laryngeal nerve stimulation. Measurements were repeated at 1.5, 3, or 6 months postoperatively. Another study evaluated release of the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle from its thyroid cartilage origin. Releasing the LCA muscle demonstrated a significant decrease in LAP acutely and was maintained at all 3 time points with the aid of a barrier (P < .05). Without the barrier, the LCA muscle reattached to the cricoid. Acute release of the TA muscle did not significantly decrease the LAP. The proposed LCA release procedure may provide patients with a permanent treatment option for ADSD. However, longer-term studies and human trials are needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. A New Coated Nitinol Occluder for Transcatheter Closure of Ventricular Septal Defects in a Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This study evaluated feasibility and safety of implanting the polyester-coated nitinol ventricular septal defect occluder (pcVSDO in the canine model. Methods and Results. VSD models were successfully established by transseptal ventricular septal puncture via the right jugular vein in 15 out of 18 canines. Two types of VSDOs were implanted, either with pcVSDOs (n=8 as the new type occluder group or with the commercial ventricular septal defect occluders (VSDOs, n=7, Shanghai Sharp Memory Alloy Co. Ltd. as the control group. Sheath size was 10 French (10 Fr in two groups. Then the general state of the canines was observed after implantation. ECG and TTE were performed, respectively, at 7, 30, 90 days of follow-up. The canines were sacrificed at these time points for pathological and scanning electron microscopy examination. The devices were successfully implanted in all 15 canines and were retrievable and repositionable. There was no thrombus formation on the device or occurrence of complete heart block. The pcVSDO surface implanted at day 7 was already covered with neotissue by gross examination, and it completed endothelialization at day 30, while the commercial VSDO was covered with the neotissue in 30th day and the complete endothelialization in 90th day. Conclusion. The study shows that pcVSDO is feasible and safe to close canine VSD model and has good biocompatibility and shorter time of endothelialization.

  14. Exenatide Treatment Alone Improves β-Cell Function in a Canine Model of Pre-Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Ionut

    Full Text Available Exenatide's effects on glucose metabolism have been studied extensively in diabetes but not in pre-diabetes.We examined the chronic effects of exenatide alone on glucose metabolism in pre-diabetic canines.After 10 weeks of high-fat diet (HFD, adult dogs received one injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 18.5 mg/kg. After induction of pre-diabetes, while maintained on HFD, animals were randomized to receive either exenatide (n = 7 or placebo (n = 7 for 12 weeks. β-Cell function was calculated from the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT, expressed as the acute insulin response, AIRG, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, insulinogenic index and the graded-hyperglycemic clamp (clamp insulinogenic index. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed by the IVGTT. At the end of the study, pancreatic islets were isolated to assess β-cell function in vitro.OGTT: STZ caused an increase in glycemia at 120 min by 22.0% (interquartile range, IQR, 31.5% (P = 0.011. IVGTT: This protocol also showed a reduction in glucose tolerance by 48.8% (IQR, 36.9% (P = 0.002. AIRG decreased by 54.0% (IQR, 40.7% (P = 0.010, leading to mild fasting hyperglycemia (P = 0.039. Exenatide, compared with placebo, decreased body weight (P<0.001 without altering food intake, fasting glycemia, insulinemia, glycated hemoglobin A1c, or glucose tolerance. Exenatide, compared with placebo, increased both OGTT- (P = 0.040 and clamp-based insulinogenic indexes (P = 0.016, improved insulin secretion in vitro (P = 0.041, but had no noticeable effect on insulin sensitivity (P = 0.405.In pre-diabetic canines, 12-week exenatide treatment improved β-cell function but not glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity. These findings demonstrate partial beneficial metabolic effects of exenatide alone on an animal model of pre-diabetes.

  15. Intrathoracic airway obstruction and gastroesophageal reflux: a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, R; Pagala, M; Vaynblat, M; Marcus, M; Kazachkov, M

    2012-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common in children with airway disorders. Previous studies have shown an association between upper airway obstruction and GER in experimental animal models. However, the cause and effect relationship between intrathoracic airway obstruction (IAO) and GER is obscure. The goal of this study is to investigate the association between IAO and GER using the canine model. In sedated dogs, a telemetric implant was placed subcutaneously (with one pressure sensor tip each in intrapleural space and abdomen) to monitor intrapleural pressure (IPP) and intrabdominal pressure (IAP). The IPP and the IAP were monitored intraoperatively and in conscious dogs on the 7th to 10th postoperative days. GER was assessed by determining the reflux index (RI), based on the intraesophageal pH recording performed continuously for a 24 hr period using a pH probe. After 2-3 weeks following placement of the telemetric implant, IAO was surgically created in the dog. After maintaining IAO for 2 weeks, the IPP, IAP, and pH measurements were monitored again following the same protocol as before IAO. After the creation of IAO, there was no significant change observed in the mean RI either in the distal (P = 0.716) or proximal (P = 0.962) esophageal lumens. The IPP became significantly more negative (P = 0.006) and the IAP turned significantly negative (P < 0.001) from being positive compared to the respective values before IAO. However, transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) did not change significantly (P = 0.08). We conclude that moderate IAO does not cause GER in our animal model. It can be explained by the absence of significant change in Pdi after creation of IAO. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Establishing experimental model of human internal carotid artery siphon segment in canine common carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xuee; Li Minghua; Wang Yongli; Cheng Yingsheng; Li Wenbin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility of establishing experimental model of human internal carotid artery siphon segment in canine common carotid artery (CCA) by end-to-end anastomoses of one side common carotid artery segment with the other side common carotid artery. Methods: Surgical techniques were used to make siphon model in 8 canines. One side CCA was taken as the parent artery and anastomosing with the cut off contra-lateral CCA segment which has passed through within the S-shaped glass tube. Two weeks after the creation of models angiography showed the model siphons were patent. Results: Experimental models of human internal carotid artery siphon segment were successfully made in all 8 dogs. Conclusions: It is practically feasible to establish experimental canine common carotid artery models of siphon segment simulating human internal carotid artery. (authors)

  17. Bestrophin gene mutations cause canine multifocal retinopathy: a novel animal model for best disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziewicz, Karina E; Zangerl, Barbara; Lindauer, Sarah J; Mullins, Robert F; Sandmeyer, Lynne S; Grahn, Bruce H; Stone, Edwin M; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2007-05-01

    Canine multifocal retinopathy (cmr) is an autosomal recessive disorder of multiple dog breeds. The disease shares a number of clinical and pathologic similarities with Best macular dystrophy (BMD), and cmr is proposed as a new large animal model for Best disease. cmr was characterized by ophthalmoscopy and histopathology and compared with BMD-affected patients. BEST1 (alias VMD2), the bestrophin gene causally associated with BMD, was evaluated in the dog. Canine ortholog cDNA sequence was cloned and verified using RPE/choroid 5'- and 3'-RACE. Expression of the canine gene transcripts and protein was analyzed by Northern and Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. All exons and the flanking splice junctions were screened by direct sequencing. The clinical phenotype and pathology of cmr closely resemble lesions of BMD. Canine VMD2 spans 13.7 kb of genomic DNA on CFA18 and shows a high level of conservation among eukaryotes. The transcript is predominantly expressed in RPE/choroid and encodes bestrophin, a 580-amino acid protein of 66 kDa. Immunocytochemistry of normal canine retina demonstrated specific localization of protein to the RPE basolateral plasma membranes. Two disease-specific sequence alterations were identified in the canine VMD2 gene: a C(73)T stop mutation in cmr1 and a G(482)A missense mutation in cmr2. The authors propose these two spontaneous mutations in the canine VMD2 gene, which cause cmr, as the first naturally occurring animal model of BMD. Further development of the cmr models will permit elucidation of the complex molecular mechanism of these retinopathies and the development of potential therapies.

  18. Clinical benefits of probiotic canine-derived Bifidobacterium animalis strain AHC7 in dogs with acute idiopathic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, R L; Minikhiem, Debbie; Kiely, Barry; O'Mahony, Liam; O'Sullivan, David; Boileau, Tom; Park, Jean Soon

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of supplementation with canine-derived probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis strain AHC7 (lams Prostora, Procter & Gamble Pet Care) on the resolution rate of acute idiopathic diarrhea in dogs randomly assigned to receive a placebo (n=18) or the probiotic (n=13). Nutritional management with the probiotic fed at 2 x 10(10) CFU/day significantly reduced the time to resolution (3.9 +/- 2.3 versus 6.6 +/- 2.7 days; P dogs that were administered metronidazole (38.5% versus 50.0%) compared with placebo. Probiotic B. animalis AHC7 may provide veterinarians another tool for management of acute diarrhea in dogs.

  19. Does loading influence the severity of cartilage degeneration in the canine groove-model of OA?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.; Intema, F.; El, B. van; Groot, J. de; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.; Mastbergen, S.

    2009-01-01

    Many animal models are used to study osteoarthritis (OA). In these models the role of joint loading in the development of OA is not fully understood. We studied the effect of loading on the development of OA in the canine Groove-model. In ten female beagle dogs OA was induced in one knee according

  20. Canine respiratory viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Buonavoglia , Canio; Martella , Vito

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Acute contagious respiratory disease (kennel cough) is commonly described in dogs worldwide. The disease appears to be multifactorial and a number of viral and bacterial pathogens have been reported as potential aetiological agents, including canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus and Bordetella bronchiseptica, as well as mycoplasmas, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, canine herpesvirus and reovirus-1,-2 and -3. Enhancement of pathogenicity by multiple in...

  1. A study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in dogs as a disease model for canine necrotizing encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Jung, Hae-Won; Lee, Hee-Chun; Jeon, Joon-Hyeok; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Ha, Jeongim

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the use of dogs with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a disease model for necrotizing encephalitis (NE) was assessed. Twelve healthy dogs were included in this study. Canine forebrain tissues (8 g), including white and grey matter, were homogenized with 4 mL of phosphate-buffered saline for 5 min in an ice bath. The suspension was emulsified with the same volume of Freund's complete adjuvant containing 1 mg/mL of killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Under sedation, each dog was injected subcutaneously with canine brain homogenate at four sites: two in the inguinal and two in the axillary regions. A second injection (booster) was administered to all the dogs using the same procedure 7 days after the first injection. Clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, necropsies, and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed for the dogs with EAE. Out of the 12 animals, seven (58%) developed clinically manifest EAE at various times after immunization. Characteristics of canine EAE models were very similar to canine NE, suggesting that canine EAE can be a disease model for NE in dogs. PMID:25269720

  2. A study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in dogs as a disease model for canine necrotizing encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Jung, Hae-Won; Lee, Hee-Chun; Jeon, Joon-Hyeok; Kim, Na-Hyun; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Ha, Jeongim; Jung, Dong-In

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the use of dogs with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a disease model for necrotizing encephalitis (NE) was assessed. Twelve healthy dogs were included in this study. Canine forebrain tissues (8 g), including white and grey matter, were homogenized with 4 mL of phosphate-buffered saline for 5 min in an ice bath. The suspension was emulsified with the same volume of Freund's complete adjuvant containing 1 mg/mL of killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Under sedation, each dog was injected subcutaneously with canine brain homogenate at four sites: two in the inguinal and two in the axillary regions. A second injection (booster) was administered to all the dogs using the same procedure 7 days after the first injection. Clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid analyses, necropsies, and histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed for the dogs with EAE. Out of the 12 animals, seven (58%) developed clinically manifest EAE at various times after immunization. Characteristics of canine EAE models were very similar to canine NE, suggesting that canine EAE can be a disease model for NE in dogs.

  3. Evaluation of prostatic optical properties and tissue response to photodynamic therapy in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sugandh D.; Chen, Qun; Schultz, Daniel; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Hetzel, Fred W.; Cerny, Joseph C.

    1994-03-01

    A new modality of interstitial therapy to treat prostate cancer using photodynamic principles has been studied in a canine model. The effect of interstitial application of monochromatic light from an argon pumped dye laser at 630 nm was studied in a canine model. No significant hyperthermia was seen during the treatment. A concentric zone around the treatment fiber was seen during the treatment. A concentric zone around the treatment fiber was seen in PDT treated dogs and the maximum size was 18 mm. The data suggests that PDT may be clinically applicable in achieving tissue necrosis using interstitial light application in a solid organ like prostate.

  4. Experimental basis of shockwave-induced renal trauma in the model of the canine kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, J; Köhrmann, K U; Back, W; Fröhner, S; Raab, M; Weber, A; Kahmann, F; Marlinghaus, E; Jünemann, K P; Alken, P

    1993-01-01

    Using the new electromagnetic shockwave source of the Modulith SL 20 shockwave-induced renal trauma was evaluated by acute and chronic studies in the the canine kidney model. In a further study the electromagnetic shockwave source of the Lithostar Plus Overhead module was tested. Overall, 92 kidneys were exposed to shock waves coupled either by water bath (Modulith lab type) or by water cushion (Modulith prototype, Lithostar Overhead) under ultrasound localization. The generator voltage ranged between 11 and 21 kV, the number of impulses between 25 and 2500. After application of 1500/2500 shocks the extent of the renal lesion depended strictly on the applied generator voltage and was classified into 4 grades: Grade 0, no macroscopic trauma detectable (at 11-12 kV); grade 1, petechial medullary bleeding (at 13 kV); grade 2, cortical hematoma (at 14-16 kV); and grade 3, perirenal hematoma (17-20 kV). Whereas at low and medium energy levels the number of shocks played only a minor role, at maximal generator voltage (20 kV) even 25 impulses induced a grade 2 and 600 shocks a grade 3 lesion, emphasizing the importance of shockwave limitation in the upper energy range. In shockwave-induced renal trauma a vascular lesion was predominant and cellular necrosis was secondary. Coupling with a water cushion resulted in a 15%-20% decrease in the disintegrative and traumatic effect, which was compensated for by increasing the generator voltage by 2 kV. Long-term studies showed complete restitution following grade 1 and 2 trauma, whereas after a grade 3 lesion a small segmental and capsular fibrosis without hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus was observed. Based on the characteristic ultrasound pattern found in the first study, the threshold for induction of grade 1 lesion was investigated. With both lithotripters a wide range for induction of a grade 1 lesion (Modulith 234-411, Lithostar Plus 220-740) and also a significant overlapping with grade 0 and 2 lesions was

  5. Hypercapnic Acidosis Preserves Gastric Mucosal Microvascular Oxygen Saturation in a Canine Model of Hemorrhage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartges, Ingo; Picker, Olaf; Beck, Christopher; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Schwarte, Lothar A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors aimed to clarify the effects of hypercapnic acidosis and its timing on gastric mucosal oxygenation in a canine model of hemorrhage. This was designed as a prospective, controlled, randomized animal study set in a university research laboratory. Five chronically instrumented dogs were

  6. Full-genome analysis of a canine pneumovirus causing acute respiratory disease in dogs, Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Decaro

    Full Text Available An outbreak of canine infectious respiratory disease (CIRD associated to canine pneumovirus (CnPnV infection is reported. The outbreak occurred in a shelter of the Apulia region and involved 37 out of 350 dogs that displayed cough and/or nasal discharge with no evidence of fever. The full-genomic characterisation showed that the causative agent (strain Bari/100-12 was closely related to CnPnVs that have been recently isolated in the USA, as well as to murine pneumovirus, which is responsible for respiratory disease in mice. The present study represents a useful contribution to the knowledge of the pathogenic potential of CnPnV and its association with CIRD in dogs. Further studies will elucidate the pathogenicity and epidemiology of this novel pneumovirus, thus addressing the eventual need for specific vaccines.

  7. Design and Validation of a Three-Dimensional Printed Flexible Canine Otoscopy Teaching Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibblett, Belle Marie D; Pereira, Mary Mauldin; Sithole, Fortune; Orchard, Paul A D; Bauman, Eric B

    2017-04-01

    A teaching model was sought to improve canine otoscopy skill and reduce use of teaching dogs. An otoscopy teaching model was printed in a flexible medium on a desktop three-dimensional printer from a magnetic resonance image of a canine external ear canal. The model was mounted in a polyvinyl dog mannequin. Validation of the teaching model was sought from student, faculty, and dog perspective. Student perception of prelaboratory training was assessed using a survey regarding their experience. Otoscopy skill was assessed by faculty grading the ear anatomy visualized as well as the time required to prepare for and perform otoscopy and the time to the dog's first sign of aversion. The time data were used to assess whether there was a reduction in use of teaching dogs. Data from students exposed to the otoscopy model as part of their prelaboratory training (n = 20) were compared with those that were not exposed to the model (n = 19). The students found prelaboratory training with the model significantly more helpful than prelaboratory training without the model in all aspects of otoscopy (P dog use. The students found the model helpful, but the best that can be said is the model did not negatively impact their otoscopy skill acquisition. Although the outcome of the study did not indicate a reduction in teaching dog use, the model has replaced live dog otoscopy in the institute's teaching program for initial canine otoscopy exposure.

  8. The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2 During Myocardial Dysfunction in a Canine Model of Endotoxin Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Su, Longxiang; Yang, Rongli

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) during myocardial dysfunction in a canine model of endotoxin shock, 26 mongrel canines were randomly divided into the following four groups: A (control group; n = 6), B2 (shock after 2 h; n = 7), B4 (shock after 4 h; n = 7), and B6 (shock after 6 h; n = 6). Escherichia coli endotoxin was injected into the canines via the central vein, and hemodynamics were monitored. Energy metabolism, UCP2 mRNA and protein expression, and UCP2 localization were analyzed, and the correlation between energy metabolism changes, and UCP2 expression was determined. After the canine endotoxin shock model was successfully established, the expression of UCP2 mRNA and protein was found to increase, with later time points showing significant increases (P shock (P shock, and UCP2 may play an important role in this process. The negative correlation between UCP2 expression and energy metabolism requires further study, as the results might contribute to the treatment of sepsis with heart failure.

  9. Targeting VEGF in canine oxygen-induced retinopathy - a model for human retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLeod DS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available D Scott McLeod, Gerard A Lutty Department of Ophthalmology, Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Development of the dog superficial retinal vasculature is similar to the mechanism of human retinal vasculature development; they both develop by vasculogenesis, differentiation, and assembly of vascular precursors called angioblasts. Canine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR was first developed by Arnall Patz in an effort to experimentally determine the effects of hyperoxia on the development of the retinal vasculature. The canine OIR model has many characteristics in common with human retinopathy of prematurity. Exposure of 1-day-old dogs to hyperoxia for 4 days causes a vaso-obliteration throughout the retina. Vasoproliferation, after the animals have returned to room air, is robust. The initial small preretinal neovascular formations anastomose to form large preretinal membranes that eventually cause tractional retinal folds. The end-stage pathology of the canine model is similar to stage IV human retinopathy of prematurity. Therefore, canine OIR is an excellent forum to evaluate the response to drugs targeting VEGF and its receptors. Evaluation of an antibody to VEGF-R2 and the VEGF-Trap demonstrated that doses should be titered down so that preretinal neovascularization is inhibited but retinal revascularization is able to proceed, vascularizing peripheral retina and preventing it from being a source of VEGF. Keywords: angioblasts, blood vessels, endothelial cells, oxygen, retinopathy, retina, vascular endothelial cell growth factor

  10. Preliminayr Study on Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging for a Canine Model of Cartilage Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehleman,C.; Li, J.; Zhong, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the ability of a novel radiographic technique, Diffraction Enhanced Radiographic Imaging (DEI), to render high contrast images of canine knee joints for identification of cartilage lesions in situ. Methods: DEI was carried out at the X-15A beamline at Brookhaven National Laboratory on intact canine knee joints with varying levels of cartilage damage. Two independent observers graded the DE images for lesions and these grades were correlated to the gross morphological grade. Results: The correlation of gross visual grades with DEI grades for the 18 canine knee joints as determined by observer 1 (r2=0.8856, P=0.001) and observer 2 (r2=0.8818, P=0.001) was high. The overall weighted ? value for inter-observer agreement was 0.93, thus considered high agreement. Conclusion: The present study is the first study for the efficacy of DEI for cartilage lesions in an animal joint, from very early signs through erosion down to subchondral bone, representing the spectrum of cartilage changes occurring in human osteoarthritis (OA). Here we show that DEI allows the visualization of cartilage lesions in intact canine knee joints with good accuracy. Hence, DEI may be applicable for following joint degeneration in animal models of OA.

  11. Development of an Arthroscopic Joint Capsule Injury Model in the Canine Shoulder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kovacevic

    Full Text Available The natural history of rotator cuff tears can be unfavorable as patients develop fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy that is often associated with a loss of muscle strength and shoulder function. To facilitate study of possible biologic mechanisms involved in early degenerative changes to rotator cuff muscle and tendon tissues, the objective of this study was to develop a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder using arthroscopy.Arthroscopic surgical methods for performing a posterior joint capsulectomy in the canine shoulder were first defined in cadavers. Subsequently, one canine subject underwent bilateral shoulder joint capsulectomy using arthroscopy, arthroscopic surveillance at 2, 4 and 8 weeks, and gross and histologic examination of the joint at 10 weeks.The canine subject was weight-bearing within eight hours after index and follow-up surgeries and had no significant soft tissue swelling of the shoulder girdle or gross lameness. Chronic synovitis and macroscopic and microscopic evidence of pathologic changes to the rotator cuff bony insertions, tendons, myotendinous junctions and muscles were observed.This study demonstrates feasibility and proof-of-concept for a joint capsule injury model in the canine shoulder. Future work is needed to define the observed pathologic changes and their role in the progression of rotator cuff disease. Ultimately, better understanding of the biologic mechanisms of early progression of rotator cuff disease may lead to clinical interventions to halt or slow this process and avoid the more advanced and often irreversible conditions of large tendon tears with muscle fatty atrophy.

  12. Characterisation of the canine faecal virome in healthy dogs and dogs with acute diarrhoea using shotgun metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Paloma S; Wagner, Josef; Mansfield, Caroline S; Stevens, Matthew; Gilkerson, James R; Kirkwood, Carl D

    2017-01-01

    The virome has been increasingly investigated in numerous animal species and in different sites of the body, facilitating the identification and discovery of a variety of viruses. In spite of this, the faecal virome of healthy dogs has not been investigated. In this study we describe the faecal virome of healthy dogs and dogs with acute diarrhoea in Australia, using a shotgun metagenomic approach. Viral sequences from a range of different virus families, including both RNA and DNA families, and known pathogens implicated in enteric disease were documented. Twelve viral families were identified, of which four were bacteriophages. Eight eukaryotic viral families were detected: Astroviridae, Coronaviridae, Reoviridae, Picornaviridae, Caliciviridae, Parvoviridae, Adenoviridae and Papillomaviridae. Families Astroviridae, Picornaviridae and Caliciviridae were found only in dogs with acute diarrhoea, with Astroviridae being the most common family identified in this group. Due to its prevalence, characterisation the complete genome of a canine astrovirus was performed. These studies indicate that metagenomic analyses are useful for the investigation of viral populations in the faeces of dogs. Further studies to elucidate the epidemiological and biological relevance of these findings are warranted.

  13. Canine intrahepatic vasculature: is a functional anatomic model relevant to the dog?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jon L; Mannion, Paddy; Ladlow, Jane F

    2015-01-01

    To clarify canine intrahepatic portal and hepatic venous system anatomy using corrosion casting and advanced imaging and to devise a novel functional anatomic model of the canine liver to investigate whether this could help guide the planning and surgical procedure of partial hepatic lobectomy and interventional radiological procedures. Prospective experimental study. Adult Greyhound cadavers (n = 8). Portal and hepatic vein corrosion casts of healthy livers were assessed using computed tomography (CT). The hepatic lobes have a consistent hilar hepatic and portal vein supply with some variation in the number of intrahepatic branches. For all specimens, 3 surgically resectable areas were identified in the left lateral lobe and 2 surgically resectable areas were identified in the right medial lobe as defined by a functional anatomic model. CT of detailed acrylic casts allowed complex intrahepatic vascular relationships to be investigated and compared with previous studies. Improving understanding of the intrahepatic vascular supply facilitates interpretation of advanced images in clinical patients, the planning and performance of surgical procedures, and may facilitate interventional vascular procedures, such as intravenous embolization of portosystemic shunts. Functional division of the canine liver similar to human models is possible. The left lateral and right medial lobes can be consistently divided into surgically resectable functional areas and partial lobectomies can be performed following a functional model; further study in clinically affected animals would be required to investigate the relevance of this functional model in the dog. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Protein Quality Control Systems in the Aged Canine Brain as a Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Romanucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aged dogs are considered the most suitable spontaneous animal model for studying normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Elderly canines naturally develop cognitive dysfunction and neuropathological hallmarks similar to those seen in humans, especially Alzheimer’s disease-like pathology. Pet dogs also share similar living conditions and diets to humans. Oxidative damage accumulates in the canine brain during aging, making dogs a valid model for translational antioxidant treatment/prevention studies. Evidence suggests the presence of detective protein quality control systems, involving ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs, in the aged canine brain. Further studies on the canine model are needed to clarify the role of age-related changes in UPS activity and HSP expression in neurodegeneration in order to design novel treatment strategies, such as HSP-based therapies, aimed at improving chaperone defences against proteotoxic stress affecting brain during aging.

  15. Oxidative Stress and Protein Quality Control Systems in the Aged Canine Brain as a Model for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanucci, Mariarita; Della Salda, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Aged dogs are considered the most suitable spontaneous animal model for studying normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Elderly canines naturally develop cognitive dysfunction and neuropathological hallmarks similar to those seen in humans, especially Alzheimer's disease-like pathology. Pet dogs also share similar living conditions and diets to humans. Oxidative damage accumulates in the canine brain during aging, making dogs a valid model for translational antioxidant treatment/prevention studies. Evidence suggests the presence of detective protein quality control systems, involving ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs), in the aged canine brain. Further studies on the canine model are needed to clarify the role of age-related changes in UPS activity and HSP expression in neurodegeneration in order to design novel treatment strategies, such as HSP-based therapies, aimed at improving chaperone defences against proteotoxic stress affecting brain during aging.

  16. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

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    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease pathways, the dog is considered the best model for human liver disease. Here we report the establishment of a long-term canine hepatic organoid culture allowing undifferentiated expansion of progenitor cells that can be differentiated toward functional hepatocytes. We show that cultures can be initiated from fresh and frozen liver tissues using Tru-Cut or fine-needle biopsies. The use of Wnt agonists proved important for canine organoid proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that successful gene supplementation in hepatic organoids of COMMD1-deficient dogs restores function and can be an effective means to cure copper storage disease.

  17. Refinement of Canine Pancreatitis Model: Inducing Pancreatitis by Using Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    OpenAIRE

    Ruben, Dawn S; Scorpio, Diana G; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2009-01-01

    The causes and treatments of pancreatitis have been studied in diverse species, but the canine pancreatitis model has been used most often due to its similarities to the condition in humans. Although pancreatitis in dogs can be induced readily by numerous methods, managing these dogs can be difficult because they often develop severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inappetance, and lethargy. In an effort to study pancreatitis, we performed a pilot study to determine whether an endoscopic pancreatic...

  18. Canine pyometra: a model for the analysis of serum CXCL8 in inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    HAAS, Melanie; KAUP, Franz-Josef; NEUMANN, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8) is a highly selective pro-inflammatory chemokine, that is elevated in sera of humans and animals with various inflammatory diseases. CXCL8 is possibly involved in uncontrolled inflammation and the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Nevertheless, its behavior and precise properties in the course of inflammation are not fully understood. Thus, we used naturally occurring canine pyometra as a model of inflammation, in order t...

  19. A novel canine model of immune thrombocytopenia: Has ITP gone to the dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Dana N; Birkenheuer, Adam J; Brooks, Marjory B; Nordone, Shila K; Bellinger, Dwight A; Jones, Sam L; Fischer, Thomas H; Oglesbee, Stephen E; Frey, Kahlina; Brinson, Nicole S; Peters, Allison Pazandak; Marr, Henry S; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Bussel, James B; Key, Nigel S

    2014-01-01

    Summary Canine immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is analogous to human ITP, with similar platelet counts and heterogeneity in bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. With a goal of ultimately investigating this bleeding heterogeneity, a canine model of antibody-mediated ITP was developed. Infusion of healthy dogs with 2F9, a murine IgG2a monoclonal antibody to the canine platelet glycoprotein GPIIb (a common target of autoantibodies in ITP) resulted in profound, dose-dependent thrombocytopenia. Model dogs developed variable bleeding phenotypes, e.g. petechiae and haematuria, despite similar degrees of thrombocytopenia. 2F9 infusion was not associated with systemic inflammation, consumptive coagulopathy, or impairment of platelet function. Unexpectedly however, evaluation of cytokine profiles led to the identification of platelets as a potential source of serum interleukin-8 (IL8) in dogs. This finding was confirmed in humans with ITP, suggesting that platelet IL8 may be a previously unrecognized modulator of platelet-neutrophil crosstalk. The utility of this model will allow future study of bleeding phenotypic heterogeneity including the role of neutrophils and endothelial cells in ITP. PMID:25039744

  20. Prevention approaches in a preclinical canine model of Alzheimer’s disease: Benefits and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina R. Davis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aged dogs spontaneously develop many features of human aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD including cognitive decline and neuropathology. In this review, we discuss age-dependent learning tasks, memory tasks, and functional measures that can be used in aged dogs for sensitive treatment outcome measures. Neuropathology that is linked to cognitive decline is described along with examples of treatment studies that show reduced neuropathology in aging dogs (dietary manipulations, behavioral enrichment, immunotherapy, and statins. Studies in canine show that multi-targeted approaches may be more beneficial than single pathway manipulations (e.g. antioxidants combined with behavioral enrichment. Aging canine studies show good predictive validity for human clinical trials outcomes (e.g. immunotherapy and several interventions tested in dogs strongly support a prevention approach (e.g. immunotherapy and statins. Further, dogs are ideally suited for prevention studies as they the age because onset of cognitive decline and neuropathology strongly support longitudinal interventions that can be completed within a 3-5 year period. Disadvantages to using the canine model are that they lengthy, use labor-intensive comprehensive cognitive testing, and involve costly housing (almost as high as that of nonhuman primates. However overall, using the dog as a preclinical model for testing preventive approaches for AD may complement work in rodents and nonhuman primates.

  1. Gerbil model of acute neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Sheela; Sriranganathan, N; Lindsay, David S

    2005-01-20

    Experimental infections with the NC-1 strain of Neospora caninum were conducted in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) to determine their acute responses to experimental intraperitoneal infection. Five groups of five female gerbils were used and they were intraperitoneally infected with 1x10(6), 2x10(6), 3x10(6), 4x10(6) or 5x10(6) tachyzoites. Gerbils in all groups developed clinical signs of neosporosis which consisted of inactivity 4-5 days post-inoculation. Morbidity and mortality were observed in all groups. Grossly there was a clear fibrinous exudate in the abdominal cavity and adhesions of the spleen and pancreas to the stomach in gerbils suffering from acute neosporosis. The LD50 was calculated as 9.3x10(5) tachyzoites per gerbil. The results indicate that gerbils can be used as a suitable model of acute neosporosis. This model can be used to screen candidate treatments and to test the efficacy of vaccines for neosporosis without the need to use histology or PCR to demonstrate treatment efficacy.

  2. A canine-specific probiotic product in treating acute or intermittent diarrhea in dogs: A double-blind placebo-controlled efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gallego, Carlos; Junnila, Jouni; Männikkö, Sofia; Hämeenoja, Pirkko; Valtonen, Elisa; Salminen, Seppo; Beasley, Shea

    2016-12-25

    A double-blind placebo-controlled intervention study on 60 dogs recruited from a pool of canine patients visiting a veterinary practice and diagnosed with acute diarrhea was conducted. The dogs received in randomized manner either a sour-milk product containing three canine-derived Lactobacillus sp. probiotics in combination of Lactobacillus fermentum VET 9A, L. rhamnosus VET 16A, and L. plantarum VET 14A (2×10 9 cfu/ml), or placebo. Stool consistency, general well-being, and the numbers of specific pathogens in stool samples were analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the treatment with the study sour-milk product had a normalizing effect on canine stool consistency. The treatment also enhanced the well-being of the pet by maintaining appetite and may reduce vomiting. In addition, the concentrations of Clostridium perfringens and Enterococcus faecium, which typically increase during diarrhea episodes in dogs, were decreased in probiotic group feces when compared with the placebo group. Taken together, the sour-milk with the specific probiotic combination had a normalizing effect on acute diarrhea in dogs which was associated with decreased numbers of potential pathogens in the feces of probiotic-treated dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulation of abdominal and upper thoracic muscles with surface electrodes for respiration and cough: acute studies in adult canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, James S; Posluszny, Joseph; Dieter, Raymond; Dieter, Robert S; Sayers, Scott; Iamsakul, Kiratipath; Staunton, Christine; Thomas, Donald; Rabbat, Mark; Singh, Sanjay

    2017-06-14

    To optimize maximal respiratory responses with surface stimulation over abdominal and upper thorax muscles and using a 12-Channel Neuroprosthetic Platform. Following instrumentation, six anesthetized adult canines were hyperventilated sufficiently to produce respiratory apnea. Six abdominal tests optimized electrode arrangements and stimulation parameters using bipolar sets of 4.5 cm square electrodes. Tests in the upper thorax optimized electrode locations, and forelimb moment was limited to slight-to-moderate. During combined muscle stimulation tests, the upper thoracic was followed immediately by abdominal stimulation. Finally, a model of glottal closure for cough was conducted with the goal of increased peak expiratory flow. Optimized stimulation of abdominal muscles included three sets of bilateral surface electrodes located 4.5 cm dorsal to the lateral line and from the 8 th intercostal space to caudal to the 13 th rib, 80 or 100 mA current, and 50 Hz stimulation frequency. The maximal expired volume was 343 ± 23 ml (n=3). Optimized upper thorax stimulation included a single bilateral set of electrodes located over the 2 nd interspace, 60 to 80 mA, and 50 Hz. The maximal inspired volume was 304 ± 54 ml (n=4). Sequential stimulation of the two muscles increased the volume to 600 ± 152 ml (n=2), and the glottal closure maneuver increased the flow. Studies in an adult canine model identified optimal surface stimulation methods for upper thorax and abdominal muscles to induce sufficient volumes for ventilation and cough. Further study with this neuroprosthetic platform is warranted.

  4. Use of the Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator Decreases Carotid and Cranial Embolic Events in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anna N; Deal, Dwight; Green, James; Houle, Timothy; Brown, William; Thore, Clara; Stump, David; Webb, Lawrence X

    2016-04-20

    Approximately 2 million patients in the United States annually undergo total joint arthroplasty with reaming and placement of intramedullary nails, resulting in extravasation of bone marrow and fat into the circulatory system and potentially causing fat embolism syndrome. Acute and chronic changes in mental status documented after these procedures may be related to embolic events. The Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator (RIA) device has been shown to decrease intramedullary pressure during reaming. We hypothesized that the use of the RIA in a canine model would reduce the number of microemboli detected in the carotid artery and brain compared with nailing either with or without reaming. Twenty-four large canines underwent unreamed nailing (UR), sequentially reamed nailing (SR), or RIA-reamed nailing (RIA) of bilateral femora (eight dogs per group). During reaming and nailing, the number and size of microemboli transiting the carotid artery were recorded. After euthanasia, the brain was harvested for immunostaining and measurement of microinfarction volumes. Total embolic load passing through the carotid artery was 0.049 cc (UR), 0.045 cc (SR), and 0.013 cc (RIA). The number and size of microemboli in the UR and SR groups were similar; however, the RIA group had significantly fewer larger-sized (>200-μm) emboli (p = 0.03). Pathologic examination of the brain confirmed particulate emboli, and histologic analyses demonstrated upregulation of stress-related proteins in all groups, with fewer emboli and less evidence of stress for RIA reaming. RIA reaming decreased microemboli compared with traditional reaming and unreamed nailing, suggesting that intramedullary pressure and heat are important variables. The documented embolic events and brain stress may help to explain subtle neurobehavioral symptoms commonly seen in patients after undergoing long-bone reaming procedures. RIA reaming decreased cranial embolic events and may have an ameliorating effect on postoperative

  5. Acute pancreatitis attributed to dietary indiscretion in a female mixed breed canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Angelie

    2010-02-01

    A female, mixed-breed dog was presented with signs of abdominal discomfort and vomiting of 24 h duration following an episode of dietary indiscretion. Clinical signs, previous medical history, and diagnostic tests supported a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Specific and supportive treatment was instituted, and clinical signs resolved 10 d after presentation.

  6. MR diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of neural progenitor cells transplantation to acute injured canine spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoying; Tan Ke; Ni Shilei; Bao Shengde; Jiang Xuexiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of transplantation of telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells to acute injured canine spinal cord by using MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: Telomerase immortalized human neural progenitor cells with expression of green fluorescent protein were prepared for transplantation. Eight adult canines with left spinal cord hemisection at the level of T13 were examined by MR diffusion tensor imaging four times sequentially: prior to injury, one week after injury, one week after transplantation (two weeks after injury), and four weeks after transplantation. Results: The ADC values of the injured spinal cord were (1.00 ± 0.15) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.65 ± 0.45) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.44 ± 0.48) xl0 -3 mm 2 /s, and (1.43 ± 0.26) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively. There was statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F= 6.038, P=0.005). The FA values of the injured spinal cord were 0.59±0.11, 0.30±0.17, 0.36±0.25, and 0.34±0.11, respectively. There was also statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=5.221, P=0.009). The ADC values of the intact spinal cord were (1.01±0.17) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.32±0.06) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, (1.10±0.24) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, and (1.14±0.22) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=1.303, P=0.306). The FA values of the intact spinal cord were 0.60 ± 0.09, 0.38 ± 0.25, 0.46 ± 0.15, and 0.50 ± 0.21, respectively. There was also no statistically significant difference between the data obtained at different times (F=2.797, P=0.072). Conclusion: DTI can provide useful information for spinal cord injury and regeneration in experimental spinal cord injury. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of 3D Additively Manufactured Canine Brain Models for Teaching Veterinary Neuroanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Horn, Timothy J; Scheviak, Tyler A; Royal, Kenneth D; Hudson, Lola C

    Physical specimens are essential to the teaching of veterinary anatomy. While fresh and fixed cadavers have long been the medium of choice, plastinated specimens have gained widespread acceptance as adjuncts to dissection materials. Even though the plastination process increases the durability of specimens, these are still derived from animal tissues and require periodic replacement if used by students on a regular basis. This study investigated the use of three-dimensional additively manufactured (3D AM) models (colloquially referred to as 3D-printed models) of the canine brain as a replacement for plastinated or formalin-fixed brains. The models investigated were built based on a micro-MRI of a single canine brain and have numerous practical advantages, such as durability, lower cost over time, and reduction of animal use. The effectiveness of the models was assessed by comparing performance among students who were instructed using either plastinated brains or 3D AM models. This study used propensity score matching to generate similar pairs of students. Pairings were based on gender and initial anatomy performance across two consecutive classes of first-year veterinary students. Students' performance on a practical neuroanatomy exam was compared, and no significant differences were found in scores based on the type of material (3D AM models or plastinated specimens) used for instruction. Students in both groups were equally able to identify neuroanatomical structures on cadaveric material, as well as respond to questions involving application of neuroanatomy knowledge. Therefore, we postulate that 3D AM canine brain models are an acceptable alternative to plastinated specimens in teaching veterinary neuroanatomy.

  8. Refinement of canine pancreatitis model: inducing pancreatitis by using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Dawn S; Scorpio, Diana G; Gabrielson, K L; Simon, B W; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2009-02-01

    The causes and treatments of pancreatitis have been studied in diverse species, but the canine pancreatitis model has been used most often due to its similarities to the condition in humans. Although pancreatitis in dogs can be induced readily by numerous methods, managing these dogs can be difficult because they often develop severe abdominal pain, vomiting, inappetance, and lethargy. In an effort to study pancreatitis, we performed a pilot study to determine whether an endoscopic pancreatic procedure would be possible in a dog and whether, through various manipulations, a new method of inducing pancreatitis could be developed. The model uses endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a common procedure in human gastroenterology that has been associated with postprocedural pancreatitis. Although all 8 dogs used in developing the ERCP model had both biochemical and histologic changes consistent with pancreatitis, 7 of the 8 dogs remained free of classic clinical signs of the disease. This method is presented as a refinement of a canine model and presents an alternative method of inducing pancreatitis, with decreased risk of developing associated clinical signs.

  9. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxi Ji

    Full Text Available The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB canine model for rotator cuff repair research.First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1 Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2 Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2 polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3 Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks.In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05. In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure.Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair.

  10. Vascularized bone grafting in a canine carpal avascular necrosis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Wouter F.; Alberton, Gregory M.; Bishop, Allen T.; Kremer, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Limited experimental research has been performed on the treatment of avascular necrosis (AVN) by vascularized bone grafting. A new model simulating carpal AVN was created to investigate surgical revascularization of necrotic bone. In seven mongrel dogs, AVN was induced by removal of the radial

  11. Deliberate practice in dogs: a canine model of expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, William S

    2007-04-01

    The acquisition of expertise is an area of controversy between those who lean more toward learning and those who lean more toward talent. Because the genetics and early life experiences of humans are not open to direct manipulation, human studies are of limited use in this debate. Studies using nonhumans as expert models may prove useful in resolving this dispute. For nonhumans to be considered proper models of human experts, there must be evidence supporting a shared acquisition mechanism. A candidate mechanism is deliberate practice. The author tested the deliberate practice theory of expertise acquisition on dogs competing in the sport of agility. The author examined the relationships between amounts of accumulated deliberate practice and agility performance measures. The author found there was a statistically significant relationship between the amount of deliberate practice and measured performance in agility dogs, even when controlling for sex, breed group, age, and height.

  12. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie K Harrington

    Full Text Available Acalabrutinib (ACP-196 is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR was 25% (5/20 with a median progression free survival (PFS of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20 of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL.

  13. The Development of a Canine Anorectal Autotransplantation Model Based on Blood Supply: A Preliminary Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuo; Sato, Tomoyuki; Naito, Munekazu; Fujii, Satoshi; Mihara, Makoto; Koshima, Isao

    2012-01-01

    Colostomy is conventionally the only treatment for anal dysfunction. Recently, a few trials of anorectal transplantation in animals have been published; however, further development of this technique is required. Moreover, it is crucial to perform this research in dogs, which resemble humans in anorectal anatomy and biology. We designed a canine anorectal transplantation model, wherein anorectal autotransplantation was performed by anastomoses of the rectum, inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and vein, and pudendal nerves. Resting pressure in the anal canal and anal canal pressure fluctuation were measured before and after surgery. Graft pathology was examined three days after surgery. The anal blood supply was compared with that in three beagles using indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence angiography. The anorectal graft had sufficient arterial blood supply from the IMA; however, the graft’s distal end was congested and necrotized. Functional examination demonstrated reduced resting pressure and the appearance of an irregular anal canal pressure wave after surgery. ICG angiography showed that the pudendal arteries provided more blood flow than the IMA to the anal segment. This is the first canine model of preliminary anorectal autotransplantation, and it demonstrates the possibility of establishing a transplantation model in dogs using appropriate vascular anastomoses, thus contributing to the progress of anorectal transplantation. PMID:22970198

  14. Toward immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan F; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L; Wilson-Robles, Heather M; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising antitumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells, we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells, we targeted HER2(+) OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2(+) canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR, we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy before conducting studies in humans.

  15. Canine Distemper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although this brochure provides basic information about canine distemper, your veterinarian is always your best source of ... Consult your veterinarian for more information about canine distemper and its prevention. And Now A Note On ...

  16. Micro-computed tomography (CT) based assessment of dental regenerative therapy in the canine mandible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khobragade, P.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Andreana, S.; Dziak, R.; Sunkara, S. K.; Sunkara, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution 3D bone-tissue structure measurements may provide information critical to the understanding of the bone regeneration processes and to the bone strength assessment. Tissue engineering studies rely on such nondestructive measurements to monitor bone graft regeneration area. In this study, we measured bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness through micro-CT slices for different grafts and controls. Eight canines underwent surgery to remove a bone volume (defect) in the canine's jaw at a total of 44 different locations. We kept 11 defects empty for control and filled the remaining ones with three regenerative materials; NanoGen (NG), a FDA-approved material (n=11), a novel NanoCalcium Sulfate (NCS) material (n=11) and NCS alginate (NCS+alg) material (n=11). After a minimum of four and eight weeks, the canines were sacrificed and the jaw samples were extracted. We used a custombuilt micro-CT system to acquire the data volume and developed software to measure the bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness. The software used a segmentation algorithm based on histograms derived from volumes of interest indicated by the operator. Using bone yield and fractal dimension as indices we are able to differentiate between the control and regenerative material (p<0.005). Regenerative material NCS showed an average 63.15% bone yield improvement over the control sample, NCS+alg showed 55.55% and NanoGen showed 37.5%. The bone regeneration process and quality of bone were dependent upon the position of defect and time period of healing. This study presents one of the first quantitative comparisons using non-destructive Micro-CT analysis for bone regenerative material in a large animal with a critical defect model. Our results indicate that Micro-CT measurement could be used to monitor invivo bone regeneration studies for greater regenerative process understanding.

  17. EGFR, HER-2 and KRAS in canine gastric epithelial tumors: a potential human model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Terragni

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER-1 and its analog c-erbB-2 (HER-2 are protein tyrosine kinases correlated with prognosis and response to therapy in a variety of human cancers. KRAS mediates the transduction of signals between EGFR and the nucleus, and its mutation has been identified as a predictor of resistance to anti-EGFR drugs. In human oncology, the importance of the EGFR/HER-2/KRAS signalling pathway in gastric cancer is well established, and HER-2 testing is required before initiating therapy. Conversely, this pathway has never been investigated in canine gastric tumours. A total of 19 canine gastric epithelial neoplasms (5 adenomas and 14 carcinomas were retrospectively evaluated for EGFR/HER-2 immunohistochemical expression and KRAS mutational status. Five (35.7% carcinomas were classified as intestinal-type and 9 (64.3% as diffuse-type. EGFR was overexpressed (≥ 1+ in 8 (42.1% cases and HER-2 (3+ in 11 (57.9% cases, regardless of tumour location or biological behaviour. The percentage of EGFR-positive tumours was significantly higher in the intestinal-type (80% than in the diffuse-type (11.1%, p = 0.023. KRAS gene was wild type in 18 cases, whereas one mucinous carcinoma harboured a point mutation at codon 12 (G12R. EGFR and HER-2 may be promising prognostic and therapeutic targets in canine gastric epithelial neoplasms. The potential presence of KRAS mutation should be taken into account as a possible mechanism of drug resistance. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of dog as a model for human gastric cancer.

  18. A canine model of Cohen syndrome: Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearman Jeremy R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome (TNS is a common autosomal recessive neutropenia in Border collie dogs. Results We used a candidate gene approach and linkage analysis to show that the causative gene for TNS is VPS13B. We chose VPS13B as a candidate because of similarities in clinical signs between TNS and Cohen syndrome, in human, such as neutropenia and a typical facial dysmorphism. Linkage analysis using microsatellites close to VPS13B showed positive linkage of the region to TNS. We sequenced each of the 63 exons of VPS13B in affected and control dogs and found that the causative mutation in Border collies is a 4 bp deletion in exon 19 of the largest transcript that results in premature truncation of the protein. Cohen syndrome patients present with mental retardation in 99% of cases, but learning disabilities featured in less than half of TNS affected dogs. It has been implied that loss of the alternate transcript of VPS13B in the human brain utilising an alternate exon, 28, may cause mental retardation. Mice cannot be used to test this hypothesis as they do not express the alternate exon. We show that dogs do express alternate transcripts in the brain utilising an alternate exon homologous to human exon 28. Conclusion Dogs can be used as a model organism to explore the function of the alternately spliced transcript of VPS13B in the brain. TNS in Border collies is the first animal model for Cohen syndrome and can be used to study the disease aetiology.

  19. A canine model of Cohen syndrome: Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, Jeremy R; Wilton, Alan N

    2011-05-23

    Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome (TNS) is a common autosomal recessive neutropenia in Border collie dogs. We used a candidate gene approach and linkage analysis to show that the causative gene for TNS is VPS13B. We chose VPS13B as a candidate because of similarities in clinical signs between TNS and Cohen syndrome, in human, such as neutropenia and a typical facial dysmorphism. Linkage analysis using microsatellites close to VPS13B showed positive linkage of the region to TNS. We sequenced each of the 63 exons of VPS13B in affected and control dogs and found that the causative mutation in Border collies is a 4 bp deletion in exon 19 of the largest transcript that results in premature truncation of the protein. Cohen syndrome patients present with mental retardation in 99% of cases, but learning disabilities featured in less than half of TNS affected dogs. It has been implied that loss of the alternate transcript of VPS13B in the human brain utilising an alternate exon, 28, may cause mental retardation. Mice cannot be used to test this hypothesis as they do not express the alternate exon. We show that dogs do express alternate transcripts in the brain utilising an alternate exon homologous to human exon 28. Dogs can be used as a model organism to explore the function of the alternately spliced transcript of VPS13B in the brain. TNS in Border collies is the first animal model for Cohen syndrome and can be used to study the disease aetiology.

  20. Polydioxanone biodegradable stent placement in a canine urethral model: analysis of inflammatory reaction and biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Jun, Eun Jung; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Soo Hwan; Park, Jihong

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the inflammatory reaction and perform quantitative analysis of biodegradation after placement of a polydioxanone (PDO) biodegradable stent in a canine urethral model. PDO biodegradable stents were placed in the proximal and distal urethra of nine male mongrel dogs. The dogs were euthanized 4 weeks (group A; n = 3), 8 weeks (group B; n = 3), or 12 weeks (group C; n = 3) after stent placement. The luminal diameter of the stent-implanted urethra was assessed by follow-up retrograde urethrography, and histologic findings were obtained after the dogs were killed. Stents were removed after euthanasia, and their surface morphology and molecular weight were evaluated. Hematologic examination was performed to evaluate inflammatory reaction. Stent placement was technically successful in all dogs. The average luminal diameter gradually decreased. The average number of epithelial layers (2.93 vs 4.42; P stents were completely decomposed. An experimental study in a canine urethral model has demonstrated acceptable inflammatory reaction with gradually increasing granulation tissue but no luminal obstruction within 12 weeks. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Animal-Assisted Therapy for persons with disabilities based on canine tail language interpretation via fuzzy emotional behavior model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanwanich, Warangkhana; Kumdee, Orrawan; Ritthipravat, Panrasee; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2011-01-01

    Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) is the science that employs the merit of human-animal interaction to alleviate mental and physical problems of persons with disabilities. However, to achieve the goal of AAT for persons with severe disabilities (e.g. spinal cord injury and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), real-time animal language interpretation is needed. Since canine behaviors can be visually distinguished from its tail, this paper proposes the automatic real-time interpretation of canine tail language for human-canine interaction in the case of persons with severe disabilities. Canine tail language is captured via two 3-axis accelerometers. Directions and frequency are selected as our features of interests. New fuzzy rules and center of gravity (COG)-based defuzzification method are proposed in order to interpret the features into three canine emotional behaviors, i.e., agitate, happy, and scare as well as its blended emotional behaviors. The emotional behavior model is performed in the simulated dog. The average recognition rate in real dog is 93.75% accuracy.

  2. A new experimental carotid siphon aneurysm model in canine based on the MR angiography and rapid prototyping technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jian; Li Minghua; Tan Huaqiao; Zhu Yueqi; Hu Dingjun; Qiao Ruihua; Fan Chunhua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the experiment is to make an intracranial aneurysm model in canine. Methods: A digital tube was made based on raw magnetic resonance images of the human intracranial carotid artery. Then 6 tubes were made in the 3D rapid prototyping machine and coated with silicone. Finally we isolated the common carotid arteries of 6 canines and made them go through the tubes and anastomosed them end-to-side to get the aneurysm model. Six stents were implanted after one week. Results: Six aneurysm models were successfully made in canines. The parent artery had similar geometry of the human carotid siphon. All the aneurysms and parent arteries were patent in one week's follow-up. One canine died of excessive anesthesia after stenting. Two vascular models kept patent in one month without stenosis. The other 3 had some stenosis on the bends of the vessel. Conclusions: The aneurysm model in the experiment has high flexibility and reliability. The model provides an effective tool for research and testing neurovascular devices. It's also a useful device to train the neuroradiologists and interventional physicians. (authors)

  3. [Comparison between the Range of Movement Canine Real Cervical Spine and Numerical Simulation - Computer Model Validation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srnec, R; Horák, Z; Sedláček, R; Sedlinská, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In developing new or modifying the existing surgical treatment methods of spine conditions an integral part of ex vivo experiments is the assessment of mechanical, kinematic and dynamic properties of created constructions. The aim of the study is to create an appropriately validated numerical model of canine cervical spine in order to obtain a tool for basic research to be applied in cervical spine surgeries. For this purpose, canine is a suitable model due to the occurrence of similar cervical spine conditions in some breeds of dogs and in humans. The obtained model can also be used in research and in clinical veterinary practice. MATERIAL AND METHODS In order to create a 3D spine model, the LightSpeed 16 (GE, Milwaukee, USA) multidetector computed tomography was used to scan the cervical spine of Doberman Pinscher. The data were transmitted to Mimics 12 software (Materialise HQ, Belgium), in which the individual vertebrae were segmented on CT scans by thresholding. The vertebral geometry was exported to Rhinoceros software (McNeel North America, USA) for modelling, and subsequently the specialised software Abaqus (Dassault Systemes, France) was used to analyse the response of the physiological spine model to external load by the finite element method (FEM). All the FEM based numerical simulations were considered as nonlinear contact statistic tasks. In FEM analyses, angles between individual spinal segments were monitored in dependence on ventroflexion/ /dorziflexion. The data were validated using the latero-lateral radiographs of cervical spine of large breed dogs with no evident clinical signs of cervical spine conditions. The radiographs within the cervical spine range of motion were taken at three different positions: in neutral position, in maximal ventroflexion and in maximal dorziflexion. On X-rays, vertebral inclination angles in monitored spine positions were measured and compared with the results obtain0ed from FEM analyses of the

  4. Canine pyometra: a model for the analysis of serum CXCL8 in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Melanie; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Neumann, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8) is a highly selective pro-inflammatory chemokine, that is elevated in sera of humans and animals with various inflammatory diseases. CXCL8 is possibly involved in uncontrolled inflammation and the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis. Nevertheless, its behavior and precise properties in the course of inflammation are not fully understood. Thus, we used naturally occurring canine pyometra as a model of inflammation, in order to examine the behavior of serum CXCL8 in relation to the disease intensity and commonly analyzed inflammatory mediators. Using a commercially available canine ELISA kit, a significant increase of CXCL8 was determined in the serum of 23 dogs with pyometra compared with 35 healthy dogs. Interestingly, serum CXCL8 did not increase in severely diseased patients and behaved contrary to white blood cells (WBC), neutrophils and C-reactive protein (CRP). The measurement of serum CXCL8 may provide valuable information about the extent of ongoing lesions and could be a useful complement for existing laboratory tests.

  5. The effects of implant composition on extensor tenosynovitis in a canine distal radius fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicropi, Stefano M; Su, Brian W; Raia, Frank J; Parisien, May; Strauch, Robert J; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2005-03-01

    Dorsal plating of distal radius fractures with titanium plates has resulted in clinically observed tenosynovitis and tendon rupture. The goal of this study was to investigate whether titanium-based implants result in more extensor tendon inflammation than matched stainless-steel implants in a canine fracture model. An osteotomy was created in the distal radius of 18 beagles and fixed with 2.7-mm 4-hole plates composed of commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-Al6-V4), or 316L stainless steel. Animals were killed at an average of 4 months. Tendon gliding was assessed by applying a force at the extensor musculotendinous junction and noting gliding. Histologic grading (mild, moderate, severe) was based on cellular hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and leukocytic infiltration. Tendons glided freely in 100% stainless-steel specimens, 75% of titanium alloy, and 43% of commercially pure titanium groups. A severe inflammatory reaction was identified in 60% of the titanium alloy (Ti-A16-V4) group, 57% of the pure titanium group, and 0% of the stainless-steel group. Dorsal plating of the canine radius with commercially pure titanium or titanium alloy implants produced a greater inflammatory peritendinous response than matched stainless-steel implants.

  6. Naturally Occurring Canine Melanoma as a Predictive Comparative Oncology Model for Human Mucosal and Other Triple Wild-Type Melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belen Hernandez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma remains mostly an untreatable fatal disease despite advances in decoding cancer genomics and developing new therapeutic modalities. Progress in patient care would benefit from additional predictive models germane for human disease mechanisms, tumor heterogeneity, and therapeutic responses. Toward this aim, this review documents comparative aspects of human and naturally occurring canine melanomas. Clinical presentation, pathology, therapies, and genetic alterations are highlighted in the context of current basic and translational research in comparative oncology. Somewhat distinct from sun exposure-related human cutaneous melanomas, there is growing evidence that a variety of gene copy number alterations and protein structure/function mutations play roles in canine melanomas, in circumstances more analogous to human mucosal melanomas and to some extent other melanomas with murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF, Neuroblastoma RAS Viral (V-Ras Oncogene Homolog (NRAS, and neurofibromin 1 tumor suppressor NF1 triple wild-type genotype. Gaps in canine genome annotation, as well as an insufficient number and depth of sequences covered, remain considerable barriers to progress and should be collectively addressed. Preclinical approaches can be designed to include canine clinical trials addressing immune modulation as well as combined-targeted inhibition of Rat Sarcoma Superfamily/Mitogen-activated protein kinase (RAS/MAPK and/or Phosphatidylinositol-3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B/Mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR signal transduction, pathways frequently activated in both human and canine melanomas. Future investment should be aimed towards improving understanding of canine melanoma as a predictive preclinical surrogate for human melanoma and for mutually benefiting these uniquely co-dependent species.

  7. IL-31-induced pruritus in dogs: a novel experimental model to evaluate anti-pruritic effects of canine therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Andrea J; Fleck, Timothy J; Humphrey, William R; Galvan, Betsy A; Aleo, Michelle M; Mahabir, Sean P; Tena, Jezaniah-Kira; Greenwood, Karen G; McCall, Robert B

    2016-02-01

    Pruritus is a characteristic clinical sign of allergic skin conditions including atopic dermatitis (AD) in the dog. IL-31 is a cytokine found in the serum of some dogs with AD and can induce pruritic behaviours in laboratory beagle dogs. The objectives were to characterize an IL-31-induced pruritus model by evaluating the efficacy of prednisolone, dexamethasone and oclacitinib, and to compare the speed of anti-pruritic effects of oclacitinib against those of prednisolone and dexamethasone. Purpose-bred beagle dogs were used in all studies. Randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled studies were designed to evaluate and compare the anti-pruritic properties of prednisolone, dexamethasone and oclacitinib following a single intravenous injection of recombinant canine IL-31. Video surveillance was used to monitor and score pruritic behaviours in study animals. Prednisolone [0.5 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)] reduced IL-31-induced pruritus when given 10 h prior to observation. When the time interval between drug treatment and observation was shortened to 1 h, dexamethasone (0.2 mg/kg, intramuscular) but not prednisolone (0.25 or 0.5 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced IL-31-induced pruritus. Oclacitinib (0.4 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced pruritus when given 1, 6, 11 and 16 h prior to the observation period, and the anti-pruritic activity of oclacitinib was greater when compared to prednisolone and dexamethasone at all time points assessed. The efficacy of prednisolone, dexamethasone and oclacitinib in the IL-31-induced pruritus model gives confidence that this may be a relevant model for acute pruritus associated with allergic dermatitis including AD and can be used to evaluate novel compounds or formulations. © 2015 Zoetis Inc. Veterinary Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of ESVD and ACVD.

  8. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milcah C. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2 for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of

  9. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millis, D.L.; Wilkens, B.E.; Daniel, G.B.; Hubner, K.; Mathews, A.; Buonomo, F.C.; Patell, K.R.; Weigel, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  10. Morbillivirus Experimental Animal Models: Measles Virus Pathogenesis Insights from Canine Distemper Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-10-11

    Morbilliviruses share considerable structural and functional similarities. Even though disease severity varies among the respective host species, the underlying pathogenesis and the clinical signs are comparable. Thus, insights gained with one morbillivirus often apply to the other members of the genus. Since the Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes severe and often lethal disease in dogs and ferrets, it is an attractive model to characterize morbillivirus pathogenesis mechanisms and to evaluate the efficacy of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. This review compares the cellular tropism, pathogenesis, mechanisms of persistence and immunosuppression of the Measles virus (MeV) and CDV. It then summarizes the contributions made by studies on the CDV in dogs and ferrets to our understanding of MeV pathogenesis and to vaccine and drugs development.

  11. Gene therapy studies in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsburg, Peter J; De Ravin, Suk See; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P; Burtner, Christopher; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Since the occurrence of T cell leukemias in the original human γ-retroviral gene therapy trials for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID), considerable effort has been devoted to developing safer vectors. This review summarizes gene therapy studies performed in a canine model of XSCID to evaluate the efficacy of γ-retroviral, lentiviral, and foamy viral vectors for treating XSCID and a novel method of vector delivery. These studies demonstrate that durable T cell reconstitution and thymopoiesis with no evidence of any serious adverse events and, in contrast to the human XSCID patients, sustained marking in myeloid cells and B cells with reconstitution of normal humoral immune function can be achieved for up to 5 years without any pretreatment conditioning. The presence of sustained levels of gene-marked T cells, B cells, and more importantly myeloid cells for almost 5 years is highly suggestive of transduction of either multipotent hematopoietic stem cells or very primitive committed progenitors.

  12. Morbillivirus Experimental Animal Models: Measles Virus Pathogenesis Insights from Canine Distemper Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata da Fontoura Budaszewski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Morbilliviruses share considerable structural and functional similarities. Even though disease severity varies among the respective host species, the underlying pathogenesis and the clinical signs are comparable. Thus, insights gained with one morbillivirus often apply to the other members of the genus. Since the Canine distemper virus (CDV causes severe and often lethal disease in dogs and ferrets, it is an attractive model to characterize morbillivirus pathogenesis mechanisms and to evaluate the efficacy of new prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. This review compares the cellular tropism, pathogenesis, mechanisms of persistence and immunosuppression of the Measles virus (MeV and CDV. It then summarizes the contributions made by studies on the CDV in dogs and ferrets to our understanding of MeV pathogenesis and to vaccine and drugs development.

  13. Effects of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 on Vertical Bone Augmentation in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Ting; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; O'Valle, Francisco; Al-Rasheed, Abdulaziz; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2017-09-01

    Vertical bone augmentation (VBA) remains unpredictable and challenging for most clinicians. This study aims to compare hard tissue outcomes of VBA, with and without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2, under space-making titanium mesh in a canine model. Eleven male beagle dogs were used in the study. Experimental ridge defects were created to form atrophic ridges. VBA was performed via guided bone regeneration using titanium mesh and allografts. In experimental hemimandibles, rhBMP-2/absorbable collagen sponge was well mixed with allografts prior to procedures, whereas a control buffer was applied within controls. Dogs were euthanized after a 4-month healing period. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed to assess ridge dimensional changes. In addition, specimens were used for microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) assessment and histologic analysis. Membrane exposure was found on five of 11 (45.5%) rhBMP-2-treated sites, whereas it was found on nine of 11 (81.8%) non-rhBMP-2-treated sites. Within 4 months of healing, rhBMP-2-treated sites showed better radiographic bone density, greater defect fill, and significantly more bone gain in ridge height (P 0.05). Under light microscope, predominant lamellar patterns were found in the specimen obtained from rhBMP-2 sites. With inherent limitations of the canine model and the concern of such a demanding surgical technique, current findings suggest that the presence of rhBMP-2 in a composite graft allows an increase of vertical gain, with formation of ectopic bone over the titanium mesh in comparison with non-rhBMP-2 sites.

  14. Image guided interstitial laser thermotherapy: a canine model evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muacevic, A; Peller, M; Ruprecht, L; Berg, D; Fend, L; Sroka, R; Reulen, H J; Reiser, M; Tonn, J Ch; Kreth, F W

    2005-02-01

    To determine the applicability and safety of a new canine model suitable for correlative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and morphological/pathophysiological examination over time after interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT) in brain tissue. A laser fibre (Diode Laser 830 nm) with an integrated temperature feedback system was inserted into the right frontal white matter in 18 dogs using frameless navigation technique. MRI thermometry (phase mapping i.e. chemical shift of the proton resonance frequency) during interstitial heating was compared to simultaneously recorded interstitial fiberoptic temperature readings on the border of the lesion. To study brain capillary function in response to ILTT over time quantitative autoradiography was performed investigating the unidirectional blood-to-tissue transport of carbon-14-labelled alpha amino-isobutyric acid (transfer constant K of AIB) 12, 36 hours, 7, 14 days, 4 weeks and 3 months after ILTT. All laser procedures were well tolerated, laser and temperature fibres could be adequately placed in the right frontal lobe in all animals. In 5 animals MRI-based temperature quantification correlated strongly to invasive temperature measurements. In the remaining animals the temperature fibre was located in the area of susceptibility artifacts, therefore, no temperature correlation was possible. The laser lesions consisted of a central area of calcified necrosis which was surrounded by an area of reactive brain tissue with increased permeability. Quantitative autoradiography indicated a thin and spherical blood brain barrier lesion. The magnitude of K of AIB increased from 12 hours to 14 days after ILTT and decreased thereafter. The mean value of K of AIB was 19 times (2 times) that of normal white matter (cortex), respectively. ILTT causes transient, highly localised areas of increased capillary permeability surrounding the laser lesion. Phase contrast imaging for MRI thermomonitoring can currently not be used for

  15. Peri-Implant Bone Regeneration Using rhPDGF-BB, BMSCs, and β-TCP in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling; Zhang, Wenjie; Lv, Kaige; Yu, Weiqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Fuqiang

    2016-04-01

    The presence of insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem for dental implant placement to restore oral function. Tissue engineering provides a promising approach for inducing bone regeneration and enhancing osseointegration in dental implants. The tissue-engineered bone consisting of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor (rhPDGF-BB), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) particles was validated for the first time in a preclinical large animal canine model in terms of its ability to promote new bone formation around the implants, as well as osseointegration between the tissue-engineered bone and dental implants. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of canine BMSCs treated with rhPDGF-BB were evaluated with an MTT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Alizarin Red staining, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of osteogenic genes. The therapeutic potential of tissue-engineered bone consisting of rhPDGF-BB/BMSCs/β-TCP in bone repair was evaluated in mesial-implant defects of immediate postextraction implants in the canine mandible. rhPDGF-BB treatment significantly increased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of canine BMSCs. Furthermore, the tissue-engineered bone consisting of rhPDGF-BB/BMSCs/β-TCP significantly enhanced bone formation and osseointegration. This study provides important evidence that supports the potential application of rhPDGF-BB/BMSCs/β-TCP tissue-engineered bone in immediate implantation for oral function restoration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Atsushi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki; Matsuura, Satoko; Murakami, Mami; Murai, Atsuko; Mori, Takashi; Maruo, Kouji; Kimura, Tohru; Masegi, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA) tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF), flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A), FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using canine-specific primer sets. Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF) was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the other tumors. We established 6 xenograft canine HSA

  17. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruo Kouji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF, flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A, FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the

  18. Establishment of canine hemangiosarcoma xenograft models expressing endothelial growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenesis-associated homeobox genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Human hemangiosarcoma (HSA) tends to have a poor prognosis; its tumorigenesis has not been elucidated, as there is a dearth of HSA clinical specimens and no experimental model for HSA. However, the incidence of spontaneous HSA is relatively high in canines; therefore, canine HSA has been useful in the study of human HSA. Recently, the production of angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in human and canine HSA has been reported. Moreover, the growth-factor environment of HSA is very similar to that of pathophysiological angiogenesis, which some homeobox genes regulate in the transcription of angiogenic molecules. In the present study, we established 6 xenograft canine HSA tumors and detected the expression of growth factors, their receptors, and angiogenic homeobox genes. Methods Six primary canine HSAs were xenografted to nude mice subcutaneously and serially transplanted. Subsequently, the expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF), flt-1 and flk-1 (receptors of VEGF-A), FGFR-1, and angiogenic homeobox genes HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 were investigated in original and xenograft tumors by histopathology, immunostaining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), using canine-specific primer sets. Results Histopathologically, xenograft tumors comprised a proliferation of neoplastic cells that were varied in shape, from spindle-shaped and polygonal to ovoid; some vascular-like structures and vascular clefts of channels were observed, similar to those in the original tumors. The expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF) was detected in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Moreover, the expression of VEGF-A, bFGF, flt-1, flk-1, FGFR-1, HoxA9, HoxB3, HoxB7, HoxD3, Pbx1, and Meis1 was detected in xenograft tumors. Interestingly, expressions of bFGF tended to be higher in 3 of the xenograft HSA tumors than in the other tumors. Conclusion We

  19. Evaluation of type II thyroplasty on phonatory physiology in an excised canine larynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Erin E; Hoffman, Matthew R; McCulloch, Timothy M; Jiang, Jack J

    2017-02-01

    Type II thyroplasty is an alternative treatment for spasmodic dysphonia, addressing hyperadduction by incising and lateralizing the thyroid cartilage. We quantified the effect of lateralization width on phonatory physiology using excised canine larynges. Normal closure, hyperadduction, and type II thyroplasty (lateralized up to 5 mm at 1-mm increments with hyperadducted arytenoids) were simulated in excised larynges (N = 7). Aerodynamic, acoustic, and videokymographic data were recorded at three subglottal pressures relative to phonation threshold pressure (PTP). One-way repeated measures analysis of variance assessed effect of condition on aerodynamic parameters. Random intercepts linear mixed effects models assessed effects of condition and subglottal pressure on acoustic and videokymographic parameters. PTP differed across conditions (P < .001). Condition affected percent shimmer (P < .005) but not percent jitter. Both pressure (P < .03) and condition (P < .001) affected fundamental frequency. Pressure affected vibratory amplitude (P < .05) and intrafold phase difference (P < .05). Condition affected phase difference between the vocal folds (P < .001). Hyperadduction increased PTP and worsened perturbation compared to normal, with near normal physiology restored with 1-mm lateralization. Further lateralization deteriorated voice quality and increased PTP. Acoustic and videokymographic results indicate that normal physiologic relationships between subglottal pressure and vibration are preserved at optimal lateralization width, but then degrade with further lateralization. The 1-mm optimal width observed here is due to the small canine larynx size. Future human trials would likely demonstrate a greater optimal width, with patient-specific value potentially determined based on larynx size and symptom severity. NA Laryngoscope, 2016 127:396-404, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Metoprolol Inhibits Cardiac Apoptosis and Fibrosis in a Canine Model of Chronic Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpeng Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Emerging evidence suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA was independently associated with the development of heart failure. In this study, we explored the influence of chronic OSA on left ventricular structural remodeling in canines, and the potential therapeutical role of metoprolol. Methods: Chronic OSA model was established by stopping the ventilator and closing the airway for 4 h/day apnea-ventilation cycles every other day for 12 weeks while metoprolol (5 mg· kg-1· day-1 were administered continuously. Norepinephrine concentration was measured by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Transmission electron microscopy, Hematoxylin and eosin, TUNEL and Masson trichrome staining were employed to detect the morphology, apoptosis and fibrosis of cardiomyocytes. Protein expression of apoptosis and fibrosis-related factors including apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF, caspase 3, Bcl-2, Bax, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK were examined by Western blotting. Results: Norepinephrine concentration was markedly increased in chronic OSA dogs and reduced by metoprolol. Both the apoptotic ratio and collagen volume fraction were significantly increased in left ventricular myocytes of chronic OSA dogs, and was reversed by metoprolol. Moreover, chronic OSA-induced upregulation of AIF, cleaved caspase 3, Bax, α-SMA, and TGF-β1 as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 was markedly recovered by metoprolol, which was mediated by p38 MAPK. Conclusion: Metoprolol protects against chronic OSA-induced cardiac apoptosis and fibrosis in left ventricular myocytes of canines, which may provide new potential strategy for drug therapy of OSA.

  1. Simple canine model of arterial thrombosis with endothelial injury suitable for investigation of thrombolytic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badylak, S.F.; Poehlman, E.; Williams, C.; Klabunde, R.E.; Turek, J.; Schoenlein, W.

    1988-01-01

    Three separate studies were done to evaluate a new canine model of arterial thrombosis with endothelial injury. Endothelial injury was produced by exposing the luminal surface of a 2-cm segment of femoral artery to 100 degrees C saline for 5 min. There was no disruption of proximal or distal blood flow with this model, and thrombolysis was continuously monitored by measuring 125 I-labelled fibrin gamma emissions from the thrombus. Study No. 1 showed that complete endothelial denudation was achieved with this model. Study No. 2 demonstrated 1) adherence of the experimentally induced thrombus to subendothelial connective tissue, and 2) endogenous thrombolysis of approximately 9% during the initial 2 h after thrombus formation. Study No. 3 tested the usefulness of the model for evaluating the thrombolytic efficacy of urokinase. Urokinase (30,000 U/Kg, bolus IV injection) caused 38 +/- 5.4% thrombolysis within 90 min of drug administration versus 5.9 +/- 2.4% for a saline-treated control group. We conclude that this model provides a technically simple and reproducible method for the laboratory investigation of thrombosis and thrombolysis in arteries with endothelial injury

  2. Diagnostic investigations of canine prostatitis incidence together with benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate malignancies, and biochemical recurrence in high-risk prostate cancer as a model for human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Radmehr; Shariat, Alireza; Khalili, Soheil; Malayeri, Hamed Zamankhan; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Anissian, Ali; Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza Hafezi; Hosseini, Ehsan; Naderafif, Mostafa; Mohsenzadeh, Siamak; Rasoulian, Mohammad Hosein; Rezapour, Reza; Pourzaer, Maryam

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of acute and chronic inflammation, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and cancer of the prostate glands in the canine as a human model in prostate disorders. The study was carried out on 12 cases of different male dogs of terrier (50%), German shepherd (25%) breeds, and Greden (25%), and the age of the dogs ranged from 6 to 13 years (average age 7.8 ± 3.6). The bodyweight ranged from 3.6 to 7.9 kg. Signalment, clinical signs, and diagnostic tools such as ultrasonography, urinary cytology, and histopathology are presented. Dysuria was the most common clinical sign in this study and occurred in 10/12 canine (83.3%) included. Other clinical signs included lameness (5/12 canine, 41.6%) and constipation (3/12 canine, 25%). The range of duration of clinical signs was 5 days to 7 months. Moreover, in the present study, the urinary biochemical markers of different prostate lesions include blood, protein, and glucose and were detected in 11/12 cases (91.6%), 5/12 cases (41.6%), and 2/12 cases (16.6%), respectively. Taken together, sonographic data were classified into four groups based on histological diagnosis. In 7/12 cases (58.4%), the prostate appeared to have BPH lesions, and the remaining lesions included inflammation (3/12 cases, 25%), abscess (1 case, 8.3%), and adenocarcinoma (1 case, 8/3%) on ultrasound. In all cases, prostate tissue had an irregular echotexture. None of the dogs had sonographic evidence of sublumbar lymph node enlargement. Histopathologically, we looked at the prevalence of inflammation (33.3% chronic and 8.3% acute) and BPH (58.4%) in dogs of different ages and breeds, and also, we observed chronic inflammation in >20% of dogs, which was about 25% in 3 cases of the 12 cases referred. More chronic inflammation was associated with more BPH. The majority of the asymptomatic inflammation that is detected in the prostate is classified as chronic inflammation (i.e., as evidenced by the

  3. Atrial Heterogeneity Generates Re-entrant Substrate during Atrial Fibrillation and Anti-arrhythmic Drug Action: Mechanistic Insights from Canine Atrial Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Marta; Hancox, Jules C.; Aslanidi, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-arrhythmic drug therapy is a frontline treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF), but its success rates are highly variable. This is due to incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action of specific drugs on the atrial substrate at different stages of AF progression. We aimed to elucidate the role of cellular, tissue and organ level atrial heterogeneities in the generation of a re-entrant substrate during AF progression, and their modulation by the acute action of selected anti-arrhythmic drugs. To explore the complex cell-to-organ mechanisms, a detailed biophysical models of the entire 3D canine atria was developed. The model incorporated atrial geometry and fibre orientation from high-resolution micro-computed tomography, region-specific atrial cell electrophysiology and the effects of progressive AF-induced remodelling. The actions of multi-channel class III anti-arrhythmic agents vernakalant and amiodarone were introduced in the model by inhibiting appropriate ionic channel currents according to experimentally reported concentration-response relationships. AF was initiated by applied ectopic pacing in the pulmonary veins, which led to the generation of localized sustained re-entrant waves (rotors), followed by progressive wave breakdown and rotor multiplication in both atria. The simulated AF scenarios were in agreement with observations in canine models and patients. The 3D atrial simulations revealed that a re-entrant substrate was typically provided by tissue regions of high heterogeneity of action potential duration (APD). Amiodarone increased atrial APD and reduced APD heterogeneity and was more effective in terminating AF than vernakalant, which increased both APD and APD dispersion. In summary, the initiation and sustenance of rotors in AF is linked to atrial APD heterogeneity and APD reduction due to progressive remodelling. Our results suggest that anti-arrhythmic strategies that increase atrial APD without increasing its dispersion are

  4. Neonatal tolerance induction enables accurate evaluation of gene therapy for MPS I in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Christian; Bell, Peter; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Katz, Nathan; Zhu, Yanqing; Lin, Gloria; Choa, Ruth; Bagel, Jessica; O'Donnell, Patricia; Fitzgerald, Caitlin A; Langan, Therese; Wang, Ping; Casal, Margret L; Haskins, Mark E; Wilson, James M

    2016-09-01

    High fidelity animal models of human disease are essential for preclinical evaluation of novel gene and protein therapeutics. However, these studies can be complicated by exaggerated immune responses against the human transgene. Here we demonstrate that dogs with a genetic deficiency of the enzyme α-l-iduronidase (IDUA), a model of the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), can be rendered immunologically tolerant to human IDUA through neonatal exposure to the enzyme. Using MPS I dogs tolerized to human IDUA as neonates, we evaluated intrathecal delivery of an adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector expressing human IDUA as a therapy for the central nervous system manifestations of MPS I. These studies established the efficacy of the human vector in the canine model, and allowed for estimation of the minimum effective dose, providing key information for the design of first-in-human trials. This approach can facilitate evaluation of human therapeutics in relevant animal models, and may also have clinical applications for the prevention of immune responses to gene and protein replacement therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel therapeutic approach for pulmonary emphysema using gelatin microspheres releasing basic fibroblast growth factor in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung Soo; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Matsuura, Natsumi; Gotoh, Masashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-08-01

    The prognosis of patients with emphysema is poor as there is no truly effective treatment. Our previous study showed that the alveolar space was smaller and the microvessel density was higher in a canine emphysema model after the intrapulmonary arterial administration of gelatin microspheres slowly releasing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF-GMS). In the present study, we evaluated the functional effect of injecting bFGF-GMS via the pulmonary artery in this canine pulmonary emphysema model. Using the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-induced total emphysema model, we approximated the value of lung compliance with a Power Lab System, and performed blood gas analysis in a control group, a total emphysema group, and a bFGF group in which bFGF-GMS were injected toward the whole pulmonary artery via the femoral vein. Each group comprised five dogs. Lung compliance was higher in the total emphysema group than in the control group (p = 0.031), and the bFGF group showed no significant improvement of lung compliance vs. the total emphysema group (p = 0.112). PaO2 (partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood) was improved by administering bFGF-GMS in the total emphysema model (p = 0.027). In the canine total emphysema model, blood gas parameters were improved by the whole pulmonary arterial administration of bFGF-GMS. This method has the potential to be an effective novel therapy for pulmonary emphysema.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of the SNAP and Spec canine pancreatic lipase tests for pancreatitis in dogs presenting with clinical signs of acute abdominal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Mark D; Hosgood, Giselle; Swindells, Katrin L; Mansfield, Caroline S

    2014-01-01

    To (i) assess the clinical diagnostic accuracy of SNAP canine pancreatic lipase (cPL) and specific canine pancreatic lipase (Spec cPL) and (ii) assess the agreement of an abnormal test result between SNAP cPL and Spec cPL in dogs presenting with acute abdominal disease. Prospective observational cohort study. University teaching hospital emergency center. Thirty-eight client-owned dogs that presented with acute abdominal disease, with a known final diagnosis between March 2009 and April 2010. Dogs were retrospectively assigned into 2 groups, dogs with acute pancreatitis (AP) (Group 1) and dogs without AP (Group 2). Paired serum samples obtained within 24 hours of presentation were analyzed using the SNAP cPL test and Spec cPL assay. SNAP cPL clinical sensitivity and specificity was 82% (9/11 dogs of group 1) and 59% (16/27 dogs of group 2), respectively. Spec cPL clinical sensitivity and specificity was 70% (7/10 dogs of group 1) and 77% (20/26 dogs of group 2), respectively. Accuracy of the SNAP and Spec cPL for a clinical diagnosis of pancreatitis was found to be 66% and 75%, respectively. Agreement between a positive SNAP (cPL ≥ 200 μg/L) and a clinical diagnosis pancreatitis resulted in κ = 0.33. Agreement between an increased Spec (cPL ≥ 400 μg/L) and a clinical diagnosis of pancreatitis resulted in a κ = 0.43. The agreement between SNAP and Spec cPL (cPL ≥ 200 μg/L) for the entire cohort resulted in κ = 0.78. SNAP cPL and Spec cPL results may provide a "false positive" diagnosis of pancreatitis in up to 40% of dogs presenting with acute abdominal disease. There is good overall agreement between SNAP cPL and Spec cPL; however, there were 4/38 dogs with positive SNAP cPL and "normal" Spec cPL. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  7. Application of a canine 238Pu dosimetry model to human bioassay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, Jr., A. W. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Associated with the use of 2238Pu in thermoelectric power sources for space probes and power supplies for cardiac devices is the potential for human exposure to 238Pu, primarily by inhalation. In the event of human internal exposure, a means is needed for assessing the level of intake and calculating radiation doses. Several bioassay/dosimetry models have been developed for 239Pu. However, results from studies with laboratory animals have indicated that the biokinetics, and therefore the descriptive models, of 238Pu are significantly different from those for 239Pu. A canine model accounting for these differences has been applied in this work to urinary excretion data from seven humans occupationally exposed to low levels of an insoluble 238Pu compound. The modified model provides a good description of the urinary excretion kinetics observed in the exposed humans. The modified model was also used to provide estimates of the initial intakes of 238Pu for the seven individuals; these estimates ranged from 4.5 nCi (170 Bq) to 87 nCi (3200 Bq). Autopsy data on the amount and distribution of 238Pu retained in the organs may be used in the future to validate or refute both these estimates and the assumptions used to formulate the human model. Modification of the human model to simulate an injection exposure to 239Pu gave patterns of retention in the organs and urinary excretion comparable to those seen previously in humans; further modification of the model using fecal data (unavailable for the subjects of this study) is indicated.

  8. Animal model of naturally occurring bladder cancer: Characterization of four new canine transitional cell carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Kusum; Cekanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Development and further characterization of animal models for human cancers is important for the improvement of cancer detection and therapy. Canine bladder cancer closely resembles human bladder cancer in many aspects. In this study, we isolated and characterized four primary transitional cell carcinoma (K9TCC) cell lines to be used for future in vitro validation of novel therapeutic agents for bladder cancer. Methods Four K9TCC cell lines were established from naturally-occurring...

  9. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-10-22

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning.

  10. Regression models to assess the risk factors of canine gastrointestinal parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symeonidou, I; Gelasakis, A Ι; Arsenopoulos, K V; Schaper, R; Papadopoulos, E

    2017-12-15

    Gastrointestinal parasites, protozoa and helminths, remain a common important finding in dogs presented to veterinary medical practices. Moreover, dogs may play an active role in the transmission of enteric parasites to humans, given their cohabitation, making canine gastrointestinal parasitism an issue of major concern for public health. To get an overview of the current state of canine gastrointestinal parasites' prevalence in Greece, a total of 1036 faecal samples were collected from dogs either presented in veterinary clinics or in animal shelters. Samples were examined by a combined sedimentation-flotation technique. Possible risk factors (age, ownership status, co-existence with other animals, coinfection with other parasites) were assessed using binary regression models for each one of the most prevalent parasites. The overall gastrointestinal parasite prevalence in dogs' faecal samples was 39%. A total of 11 intestinal parasitic species were detected and up to five different parasites were isolated in the same faecal sample. Toxocara canis was the most prevalent parasite in the studied population, followed by Isospora spp., Giardia spp., Uncinaria spp., Trichuris vulpis, Ancylostoma spp., Toxascaris leonina, and Dipylidium caninum. Additionally, other genera (Taenia, Capillaria and Angiostrongylus) were also detected in very low percentages. Young, stray, living without other dogs, coinfected with T. vulpis or T. canis and free of Isospora spp. dogs were more likely to be infected by Giardia spp. Likewise, young, stray, coinfected with T. vulpis or T. canis but free of Giardia spp. dogs were more likely to be infected by Isospora spp. T. canis infections were more common in dogs coinfected with Isospora spp., Giardia spp., D. caninum, Τaenia spp., T. vulpis and T. leonina Finally, T. vulpis more often infected older dogs and dogs coinfected with Isospora spp., Giardia spp. and T. canis Consequently, the prevalence of parasitized dogs was high and the

  11. Reproduction of a model of lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation in canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce a canine model of subacute lung injury induced by depleted uranium inhalation.Methods Twenty-six dogs were randomized into the control group(CG,n=6,low-dose group(LG,n=10.and high-dose group(HG,n=10.All of them underwent tracheal intubation.In control group,0.2ml/kg of normal saline was intratracheally given.In low dosage group,10mg/kg of depleted uranium(LG,and in high dose group 100mg/ml of depleted uranium(HG was introduced.The survival time of animals was observed in one month after intratracheal introduction of various agents,and chest CT scan was performed in the survived animals.They were sacrificed for pathological examination of lung tissues on the 31st day post of them intratracheal introduction of various agents.Results During the observation period,no animal died in CG,one dog in LG died on the 22nd day and 9 of them survived longer than 30 days.All the animals in HG group died within 30 days with a mean survival time of 11.2±8.9 days(median=12d.In comparison with the HG,significant difference on survival time was found between LG and CG,while no significant difference was found between the latter 2 groups(P=0.439.Pathologically,changes were noted in lung tissue of LG,such as escape of inflammatory cells into alveoli,hemorrhage and hyaline membrane formation in alveolar space,dilatation and congestion of alveolar capillaries,and infiltration of inflammatory cells in interstitial tissue.CT scanning revealed patchy effusion and solid consolidation in the left lung.Conclusion The canine model of subacute lung injury induced by a dose of 2mg/kg depleted uranium introduced through tracheal intubation is suitable for the study of subacute toxicity induced by depleted uranium.

  12. Turkey model for flexor tendon research: in vitro comparison of human, canine, turkey, and chicken tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Assaf; Thoreson, Andrew R; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Amadio, Peter C; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2017-08-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are one of the most common hand injuries and remain clinically challenging for functional restoration. Canine and chicken have been the most commonly used animal models for flexor tendon-related research but possess several disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential turkey model for flexor tendon research. The third digit from human cadaveric hands, canine forepaws, turkey foot, and chicken foot were used for this study. Six digits in each of four species were studied in detail, comparing anatomy of the flexor apparatus, joint range of motioņ tendon excursion, tendon cross-sectional area, work of flexion, gliding resistance at the level of the A2 pulley, modulus of elasticity, suture retention strength, and histology across species. Anatomically, the third digit in the four species displayed structural similarities; however, the tendon cross-sectional area of the turkey and human were similar and larger than canine and chicken. Furthermore, the turkey digit resembles the human's finger with the lack of webbing between digits, similar vascularization, tendon excursion, work of flexion, gliding resistance, mechanical properties, and suture holding strength. More importantly, human and turkey tendons were most similar in histological appearance. Turkey flexor tendons have many properties that are comparable to human flexor tendons which would provide a clinically relevant, economical, nonhuman companion large animal model for flexor tendon research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A random model for mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci in a structured pedigree: an implication for mapping canine hip dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Todhunter, Rory J; Wu, Song; Hou, Wei; Mateescu, Raluca; Zhang, Zhiwu; Burton-Wurster, Nancy I; Acland, Gregory M; Lust, George; Wu, Rongling

    2007-08-01

    Genetic imprinting may have played a more notable role in shaping embryonic development of plants, animals, and humans than previously appreciated. Quantitative trait loci that are imprinted (iQTL) exert monoallelic effects, depending on the parent of origin, which is an exception to the laws of Mendelian genetics. In this article, we present a modified random effect-based mapping model to use in a genome-wide scan for the distribution of iQTL that contribute to genetic variance for a complex trait in a structured pedigree. This model, implemented with the maximum likelihood method, capitalizes on a network of relatedness for maternally and paternally derived alleles through identical-by-descent sharing, thus allowing for the discrimination of the genetic variances due to alleles derived from maternal and paternal parents. The model was employed to map iQTL responsible for canine hip dysplasia in a multihierarchical canine pedigree, founded with seven greyhounds and six Labrador retrievers. Of eight significant QTL detected, three, located on CFA1, CFA8, and CF28, were found to trigger significant parent-of-origin effects on the age of femoral capital ossification measured at the left and right hips of a canine. The detected iQTL provide important candidate regions for fine-mapping of imprinted genes and for studying their structure and function in the control of complex traits.

  14. DSA-guided embolization in establishing different canine spinal cord ischemia models and relevant diffusion-weighted imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingsong; Sun Lijun; Huan Yi; He Hongde; Zhang Xuexin; Zhao Haitao; Zhang Jing; Zhang Xijing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate DSA-guided embolization in establishing different spinal cord ischemia models of canine and relevant diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) application. Methods: Nine canines were randomly divided into three groups with different matching of lipiodol and diatrizoate meglumine which were injected into bilateral intercostal arteries at 9-11 level guided by DSA monitor. Then observe the changes of motor function and pathologic findings, especially perform routine MRI and DWI by a 1.5 T MR system. Results: Except one case, 8 embolization models were established successfully. Among three groups, slight-group got slight injury and muscle power was about 3-5 grade and range of injury was about two vertebra distance; medium-group presented obvious paraplegia and muscle power was 0-1 grade and range of injury was between 3-4 vertebra distance; severe-group showed greater severity and larger range of injury. All lesions presented high signals at routine MRI and DWI. Conclusion: Using different matching of lipiodol and diatrizoate meglumine can establish different spinal cord ischemia models of canine by DSA- guided embolization and DWI can be performed successfully by 1.5 T MR system, which may be a good method for advanced study of spinal cord ischemia. (authors)

  15. Establishing an in vivo model of canine prostate carcinoma using the new cell line CT1258

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fork, Melani AM; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Nolte, Ingo; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Soller, Jan T; Sterenczak, Katharina A; Willenbrock, Saskia; Winkler, Susanne; Dorsch, Martina; Reimann-Berg, Nicola; Hedrich, Hans J

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a frequent finding in man. In dogs, malignant disease of the prostate is also of clinical relevance, although it is a less common diagnosis. Even though there are numerous differences in origin and development of the disease, man and dog share many similarities in the pathological presentation. For this reason, the dog might be a useful animal model for prostate malignancies in man. Although prostate cancer is of great importance in veterinary medicine as well as in comparative medicine, there are only few cell lines available. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine whether the formerly established prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258 is a suitable tool for in vivo testing, and to distinguish the growth pattern of the induced tumours. For characterisation of the in vivo behaviour of the in vitro established canine prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258, cells were inoculated in 19 NOD.CB17-Prkdc Scid /J (in the following: NOD-Scid) mice, either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. After sacrifice, the obtained specimens were examined histologically and compared to the pattern of the original tumour in the donor. Cytogenetic investigation was performed. The cell line CT 1258 not only showed to be highly tumourigenic after subcutaneous as well as intraperitoneal inoculation, but also mimicked the behaviour of the original tumour. Tumours induced by inoculation of the cell line CT1258 resemble the situation in naturally occurring prostate carcinoma in the dog, and thus could be used as in vivo model for future studies

  16. Establishment of a canine model of human type 2 diabetes mellitus by overexpressing phosphoenolypyruvate carboxykinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon Woo; Lee, Geun-Shik; Kim, Joung Joo; Park, Sun Woo; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Kang, Mina; Kim, Yu Kyung; Jung, Eui-Man; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2012-08-01

    Dogs are useful models for studying human metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus due to similarities in physiology, anatomy and life styles with humans. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) facilitates the production of transgenic dogs. In this study, we generated transgenic dogs expressing the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) gene, which is closely involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, we assessed the cloning efficiency associated with adult or fetal (cloned or natural mating) fibroblasts as a nuclear source. Cloning efficiency was determined by the fusion, pregnancy and cloning rates. The fusion rates were significantly high for fibroblasts from cloned fetuses, but the pregnancy and cloning rates were relatively high for cells from normal fetuses. Based on these data, fetal fibroblasts were selected as the nuclear donor for SCNT and genetically engineered to overexpress the PEPCK gene and dual selection marker genes controlled by the PEPCK promoter. The transgenic cells were introduced into oocytes and transferred into five recipient dogs, resulting in two pregnancies. Finally, three puppies were born and confirmed by microsatellite analysis to be genetically identical to the donor. One puppy successfully overexpressed PEPCK mRNA and protein in the liver. This canine disease model may be useful for studying the pathogenesis and/or therapeutic targets of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Caceres

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106 IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors.

  18. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model

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    Nasim Akhtar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy.

  19. Interleukin-12 Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Novel Angiogenesis Canine Hemangiosarcoma Xenograft Model1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Erin B; Steinberg, Howard; Breen, Matthew; Auerbach, Robert; Helfand, Stuart C

    2004-01-01

    Abstract We established a canine hemangiosarcoma cell line derived from malignant endothelial cells comprising a spontaneous tumor in a dog to provide a renewable source of endothelial cells for studies of angiogenesis in malignancy. Pieces of the hemangiosarcoma biopsy were engrafted subcutaneously in a bg/nu/XID mouse allowing the tumor cells to expand in vivo. A cell line, SB-HSA, was derived from the xenograft. SB-HSA cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2, CD31, CD146, and αvβ3 integrin, and produced several growth factors and cytokines, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and interleukin (IL)-8 that are stimulatory to endothelial cell growth. These results indicated that the cells recapitulated features of mitotically activated endothelia. In vivo, SB-HSA cells stimulated robust angiogenic responses in mice and formed tumor masses composed of aberrant vascular channels in immunocompromised mice providing novel opportunities for investigating the effectiveness of antiangiogenic agents. Using this model, we determined that IL-12, a cytokine with both immunostimulatory and antiangiogenic effects, suppressed angiogenesis induced by, and tumor growth of, SB-HSA cells. The endothelial cell model we have described offers unique opportunities to pursue further investigations with IL-12, as well as other antiangiogenic approaches in cancer therapy. PMID:15140399

  20. Ossicular bone modeling in acute otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Rasmus Lysholdt; Hermansson, Ann; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2010-01-01

    A number of middle ear diseases are associated with pathologic bone modeling, either formative or resorptive. As such, the pathogenesis of a sclerotic mastoid has been controversial for decades. Experimental studies on acute middle ear infection have shown progressive osteoneogenesis in the bone ...... structures surrounding the middle ear cavity, and a few studies have reported acute changes of the ossicular chain. However, detailed qualitative and quantitative information on ossicular bone modeling dynamics has not been accounted for and is thus the purpose of this study....

  1. Mechanism of Deletion Removing All Dystrophin Exons in a Canine Model for DMD Implicates Concerted Evolution of X Chromosome Pseudogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBelzen, D Jake; Malik, Alock S; Henthorn, Paula S; Kornegay, Joe N; Stedman, Hansell H

    2017-03-17

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the large, 2.4-Mb dystrophin gene. The majority of DMD-causing mutations are sporadic, multi-exon, frameshifting deletions, with the potential for variable immunological tolerance to the dystrophin protein from patient to patient. While systemic gene therapy holds promise in the treatment of DMD, immune responses to vectors and transgenes must first be rigorously evaluated in informative preclinical models to ensure patient safety. A widely used canine model for DMD, golden retriever muscular dystrophy, expresses detectable amounts of near full-length dystrophin due to alternative splicing around an intronic point mutation, thereby confounding the interpretation of immune responses to dystrophin-derived gene therapies. Here we characterize a naturally occurring deletion in a dystrophin-null canine, the German shorthaired pointer. The deletion spans 5.6 Mb of the X chromosome and encompasses all coding exons of the DMD and TMEM47 genes. The sequences surrounding the deletion breakpoints are virtually identical, suggesting that the deletion occurred through a homologous recombination event. Interestingly, the deletion breakpoints are within loci that are syntenically conserved among mammals, yet the high homology among this subset of ferritin-like loci is unique to the canine genome, suggesting lineage-specific concerted evolution of these atypical sequence elements.

  2. Acute changes in canine small bowel muscle prostaglandin synthesis and function after x-irradiation with 9.38 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R.W.; Loven, D.P.; Flatt, A.; Prihoda, M.

    1984-01-01

    Abdominal radiotherapy is often limited by radiation-induced enteritis. Prostaglandin (PG) synthesis may play a role in the altered function of small bowel (SB) muscle and mucosa. Therefore, the authors have investigated the effects of X-radiation on PG synthesis, and other aspects of canine SB smooth muscle function. Canine SB received 9.38 Gy of 250 kVp X-radiation in situ. Electrodes were used to monitor spike burst and propagation of electrical activity in the SB muscle pre- and post-exposure. Animals were sacrificed prior to irradiation and at 1 and 4 days post-irradiation. Serum PG levels were assayed from mesenteric artery and vein samples, and SB muscle was removed for analysis of PG synthesis. SB muscle myoelectric activity decreased after irradiation until sacrifice (day 4). The PG synthesis in irradiated SB muscle at days 1 and 4 increased in PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2/α and in thromboxane A/sub 2/ metabolite, while the PGI/sub 2/ metabolite decreased. PG levels in venous blood indicate similar changes after passage through the intestine. Although causality is not established, radiation does induce changes in PG synthesis which correlate with changes in myoelectric activity (motility)

  3. Canine hip dysplasia: A natural animal model for human developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Guilak, Farshid; Rai, M Farooq; Harris, Michael D; Lopez, Mandi J; Todhunter, Rory J; Clohisy, John C

    2017-12-11

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in humans is a common condition that is associated with hip pain, functional limitations, and secondary osteoarthritis (OA). Surgical treatment of DDH has improved in the last decade, allowing excellent outcomes at short- and mid-term follow-up. Still, the etiology, mechanobiology, and pathology underlying this disease are not well understood. A pre-clinical animal model of DDH could help advance the field with a deeper understanding of specific pathways that initiate hip joint degeneration secondary to abnormal biomechanics. An animal model would also facilitate different interventional treatments that could be tested in a rigorous and controlled environment. The dog model exhibits several important characteristics that make it valuable as a pre-clinical animal model for human DDH. Dogs are naturally prone to develop canine hip dysplasia (CHD), which is treated in a similar manner as in humans. Comparable to human DDH, CHD is considered a pre-OA disease; if left untreated it will progress to OA. However, progression to OA is significantly faster in dogs than humans, with progression to OA within 1-2 years of age, associated with their shorter life span compared to humans. Animal studies could potentially reveal the underlying biochemical pathway(s), which can inform refined treatment modalities and provide opportunities for new treatment and prevention targets. Herein, we review the similarities and differences between the two species and outline the argument supporting CHD as an appropriate pre-clinical model of human DDH. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Urinary metals in a spontaneous canine model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Furrow

    Full Text Available Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is a common and painful condition in people. The pathogenesis of this disease is complex and poorly understood. Laboratory animal and in vitro studies have demonstrated an effect of multiple trace metals in the crystallization process, and studies in humans have reported relationships between urinary metal concentrations and stone risk. Dogs are a spontaneous model of calcium oxalate urolithiasis, and the metal content of canine calcium oxalate stones mirrors that of human stones. The aim of this study was to test for a relationship between urinary metals and calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs. We hypothesized that urinary metals would differ between dogs with and without calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Urine from 122 dogs (71 cases and 51 stone-free controls was analyzed for calcium and 12 other metals. The cases had higher urinary calcium, copper, iron, and vanadium and lower urinary cobalt. Higher urinary vanadium in the cases was associated with being fed a therapeutic stone-prevention diet. Urinary calcium had a strong positive correlation with strontium and moderate positive correlations with chromium, nickel, and zinc. The results of this study complement the findings of similar human studies and suggest a potential role of trace metals in calcium oxalate urolithiasis. Further investigation into how trace metals may affect stone formation is warranted.

  5. Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Induce Severe Hepatic Insulin Resistance in a Canine Model.

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    Stella P Kim

    Full Text Available Anesthesia induces insulin resistance, which may contribute to elevated blood glucose and adverse post-operative outcomes in critically ill patients, and impair glycemic control in surgical patients with diabetes. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which anesthesia impairs insulin sensitivity. Here we investigate the effects of anesthesia on insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues.Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in 32 lean (control diet; n = 16 conscious versus n = 16 anesthetized and 24 fat-fed (6 weeks fat-feeding; n = 16 conscious versus n = 8 anesthetized adult male mongrel dogs in conjunction with tracer methodology to differentiate hepatic versus peripheral insulin sensitivity. Propofol was administered as an intravenous bolus (3mg/kg to initiate anesthesia, which was then maintained with inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane (2-3% for the duration of the procedure.Anesthesia reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity by approximately 50% in both lean and fat-fed animals as compared to conscious animals, and insulin action at the liver was almost completely suppressed during anesthesia such that hepatic insulin sensitivity was decreased by 75.5% and; 116.2% in lean and fat-fed groups, respectively.Inhaled anesthesia induces severe hepatic insulin resistance in a canine model. Countermeasures that preserve hepatic insulin sensitivity may represent a therapeutic target that could improve surgical outcomes in both diabetic and healthy patients.

  6. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of osseous integration of PVD-silver-coated hip prostheses in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Gregor; Hardes, Jendrik; Gosheger, Georg; Stoeppeler, Sandra; Ahrens, Helmut; Blaske, Franziska; Wehe, Christoph; Karst, Uwe; Höll, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Infection associated with biomaterials used for orthopedic prostheses remains a serious complication in orthopedics, especially tumor surgery. Silver-coating of orthopedic (mega)prostheses proved its efficiency in reducing infections but has been limited to surface areas exposed to soft tissues due to concerns of silver inhibiting osseous integration of cementless stems. To close this gap in the bactericidal capacity of silver-coated orthopedic prostheses extension of the silver-coating on surface areas intended for osseous integration seems to be inevitable. Our study reports about a PVD- (physical-vapor-deposition-) silver-coated cementless stem in a canine model for the first time and showed osseous integration of a silver-coated titanium surface in vivo. Radiological, histological, and biomechanical analysis revealed a stable osseous integration of four of nine stems implanted. Silver trace elemental concentrations in serum did not exceed 1.82 parts per billion (ppb) and can be considered as nontoxic. Changes in liver and kidney functions associated with the silver-coating could be excluded by blood chemistry analysis. This was in accordance with very limited metal displacement from coated surfaces observed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) 12 months after implantation. In conclusion our results represent a step towards complete bactericidal silver-coating of orthopedic prostheses.

  8. Modelling canine leishmaniasis spread to non-endemic areas of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, L A; Costard, S; Zagmutt, F J

    2015-07-01

    Expansion of sandflies and increasing pet travel have raised concerns about canine leishmaniasis (CanL) spread to new areas of Europe. This study aimed to estimate the probability of CanL introduction and persistence following movements of infected dogs. Stochastic modelling was used to estimate the probabilities of (1) CanL infection during travels or imports of infected dogs (P inf and P infCA, respectively), (2) CanL persistence in a dog network with sandflies after introduction of an infected dog (P per), and (3) persistence in a CanL-free region (P per region) for N dogs moving between endemic and free regions. Different mitigation measures (MMs) were assessed. P inf [7.8%, 95% predictive interval (PI) 2.6-16.4] and P per (72.0%, 95% PI 67.8-76.0) were reduced by use of repellent, vaccine, prophylactic medication, and insecticide, in decreasing order of effectiveness. Testing and exclusion of positive dogs was most effective in reducing P per region for a small N. The spread of CanL to CanL-free areas with sandflies is thus likely, but can be reduced by MMs.

  9. Initial evaluation of nighttime restlessness in a naturally occurring canine model of osteoarthritis pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Knazovicky

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain due to osteoarthritis (OA can lead to significant disruption of sleep and increased restlessness. Our objective was to assess whether naturally occurring canine OA is associated with nighttime restlessness and so has potential as a model of OA-associated sleep disturbance. The study was designed as a two-part prospective masked, placebo-controlled study using client-owned dogs (Part A n = 60; Part B n = 19. Inclusion criteria consisted of OA-associated joint pain and mobility impairment. The primary outcome measure for both parts was nighttime accelerometry. In Part B, quality of sleep was assessed using a clinical metrology instrument (Sleep and Night Time Restlessness Evaluation Score, SNoRE. Part A included dogs receiving two weeks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID preceded with two weeks of no treatment. Part B was a crossover study, with NSAID/placebo administered for two weeks followed by a washout period of one week and another two weeks of NSAID/placebo. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess differences between baseline and treatment. There were no significant changes in accelerometry-measured nighttime activity as a result of NSAID administration. SNoRE measures indicated significant improvements in aspects of the quality of nighttime sleep that did not involve obvious movement. These results reflect the few similar studies in human OA patients. Although accelerometry does not appear to be useful, this model has potential to model the human pain-related nighttime sleep disturbance, and other outcome measures should be explored in this model.

  10. Ossicular bone modeling in acute otitis media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Rasmus Lysholdt; Hermansson, Ann; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2010-01-01

    A number of middle ear diseases are associated with pathologic bone modeling, either formative or resorptive. As such, the pathogenesis of a sclerotic mastoid has been controversial for decades. Experimental studies on acute middle ear infection have shown progressive osteoneogenesis in the bone ...

  11. Anti-tumour efficacy of etoposide alone and in combination with piroxicam against canine osteosarcoma in a xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, S M; Saeki, K; Kok, M K; Tanaka, Y; Choisunirachon, N; Yoshitake, R; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2017-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) in dogs is locally invasive and highly malignant. Distant metastasis is the most common cause of death. To date, the survival rate in dogs with OSA remains poor. The cytotoxic effects of etoposide against canine OSA cell lines, either alone or in combination with piroxicam, have been previously demonstrated in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-tumour effect of etoposide alone and in combination with piroxicam on canine OSA using murine models. Etoposide single agent treatment significantly delayed tumour progression with a marked reduction in Ki-67 immunoreactivity in tumour tissue. Concomitant treatment with piroxicam did not enhance the anti-tumour efficacy of etoposide. Etoposide single agent treatment and combination treatment with piroxicam down-regulated survivin expression, but was not followed by increased apoptotic activity. These findings indicate that etoposide might be a promising novel therapeutic for canine OSA. Further investigations into its potential for clinical application in veterinary oncology are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental infection of dogs with Leishmania and saliva as a model to study Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirceu Joaquim Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL is a zoonotic disease caused by Leishmania infantum, transmitted by the bite of Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies. Dogs are the main domestic reservoir of the parasite. The establishment of an experimental model that partially reproduces natural infection in dogs is very important to test vaccine candidates, mainly regarding those that use salivary proteins from the vector and new therapeutical approaches. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we describe an experimental infection in dogs, using intradermal injection of Leishmania infantum plus salivary gland homogenate (SGH of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Thirty-five dogs were infected with 1×10(7 parasites combined with five pairs of Lutzomyia longipalpis salivary glands and followed for 450 days after infection and clinical, immunological and parasitological parameters were evaluated. Two hundred and ten days after infection we observed that 31,4% of dogs did not display detectable levels of anti-Leishmania antibodies but all presented different numbers of parasites in the lymph nodes. Animals with a positive xenodiagnosis had at least 3,35×10(5 parasites in their lymph nodes. An increase of IFN-γ and IL-10 levels was detected during infection. Twenty two percent of dogs developed symptoms of CVL during infection. CONCLUSION: The infection model described here shows some degree of similarity when compared with naturally infected dogs opening new perspectives for the study of CVL using an experimental model that employs the combination of parasites and sand fly saliva both present during natural transmission.

  13. Transcutaneous glomerular filtration rate measurement in a canine animal model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondritzki, Thomas; Steinbach, Sarah M L; Boehme, Philip; Hoffmann, Jessica; Kullmann, Maximilian; Schock-Kusch, Daniel; Vogel, Julia; Kolkhof, Peter; Sandner, Peter; Bischoff, Erwin; Hüser, Jörg; Dinh, Wilfried; Truebel, Hubert

    Quantitative assessment of renal function by measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is an important part of safety and efficacy evaluation in preclinical drug development. Existing methods are often time consuming, imprecise and associated with animal burden. Here we describe the comparison between GFR determinations with sinistrin (PS-GFR) and fluorescence-labelled sinistrin-application and its transcutaneous detection (TD-GFR) in a large animal model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). TD-GFR measurements compared to a standard method using i.v. sinistrin were performed in a canine model. Animals were treated with one-sided renal wrapping (RW) followed by renal artery occlusion (RO). Biomarker and remote hemodynamic measurements were performed. Plasma sinistrin in comparison to transcutaneous derived GFR data were determined during healthy conditions, after RW and RW+RO. RW alone did not led to any significant changes in renal function, neither with PS-GFR nor TD-GFR. Additional RO showed a rise in blood pressure (+68.0mmHg), plasma urea (+28.8mmol/l), creatinine (+224,4μmol/l) and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA™; +12.6μg/dl). Plasma sinistrin derived data confirmed the expected drop (-44.7%, p<0.0001) in GFR. The calculated transcutaneous determined Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC)-sinistrin GFR showed no differences to plasma sinistrin GFR at all times. Both methods were equaly sensitive to diagnose renal dysfunction in the affected animals. Renal function assessment using TD-GFR is a valid method to improve preclinical drug discovery and development. Furthermore, TD-GFR method offers advantages in terms of reduced need for blood sampling and thus decreasing animal burden compared to standard procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishing an in vivo model of canine prostate carcinoma using the new cell line CT1258

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkler Susanne

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a frequent finding in man. In dogs, malignant disease of the prostate is also of clinical relevance, although it is a less common diagnosis. Even though there are numerous differences in origin and development of the disease, man and dog share many similarities in the pathological presentation. For this reason, the dog might be a useful animal model for prostate malignancies in man. Although prostate cancer is of great importance in veterinary medicine as well as in comparative medicine, there are only few cell lines available. Thus, it was the aim of the present study to determine whether the formerly established prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258 is a suitable tool for in vivo testing, and to distinguish the growth pattern of the induced tumours. Methods For characterisation of the in vivo behaviour of the in vitro established canine prostate carcinoma cell line CT1258, cells were inoculated in 19 NOD.CB17-PrkdcScid/J (in the following: NOD-Scid mice, either subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. After sacrifice, the obtained specimens were examined histologically and compared to the pattern of the original tumour in the donor. Cytogenetic investigation was performed. Results The cell line CT 1258 not only showed to be highly tumourigenic after subcutaneous as well as intraperitoneal inoculation, but also mimicked the behaviour of the original tumour. Conclusion Tumours induced by inoculation of the cell line CT1258 resemble the situation in naturally occurring prostate carcinoma in the dog, and thus could be used as in vivo model for future studies.

  15. Construction of functional tissue-engineered bone using cell sheet technology in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Wang, Yanhui; Bu, Lingxue; Li, Ningyi

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct functional tissue-engineered bone with cell sheet technology and compare the efficacy of this method with that of traditional bone tissue engineering techniques. Canine bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were isolated using density gradient centrifugation and then cultured. The BMSCs were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and cultured in temperature-responsive culture dishes. The BMSCs detached automatically from the temperature-responsive culture dishes when the temperature was reduced to 20°C, forming an intact cell sheet. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were prepared and used to construct a DBM/PRP/BMSC cell sheet/BMSC complex, which was implanted under the left latissimus dorsi muscle in a dog model. A DBM/PRP/BMSC complex was used as a control and implanted under the right latissimus dorsi muscle in the dog model. Immunoblot assays were performed to detect the levels of growth factors. Osteogenesis was observed to be induced significantly more effectively in the DBM/PRP/BMSC cell sheet/BMSC implants than in the DBM/PRP/BMSC implants. Immunoblot assay results indicated that the levels of the growth factors platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the experimental group were 3.2- and 2.5-fold higher compared with those in the control group, respectively. These results indicated that the BMSC cell sheets were functional and more effective than the control cell complex. Therefore, cell sheet technology may be used for the effective construction of functional tissue-engineered bone with ideal properties.

  16. A Combination Cocktail Improves Spatial Attention in a Canine Model of Human Aging and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Murphey, Heather L.; Dowling, Amy L.S.; McCarty, Katie L.; Bethel, Samuel R.; Nitz, Jonathan A.; Pleiss, Melanie; Vanrooyen, Jenna; Grossheim, Mike; Smiley, Jeffery R.; Murphy, M. Paul; Beckett, Tina L.; Pagani, Dieter; Bresch, Frederick; Hendrix, Curt

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves multiple pathological processes in the brain, including increased inflammation and oxidative damage, as well as the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques. We hypothesized that a combinatorial therapeutic approach to target these multiple pathways may provide cognitive and neuropathological benefits for AD patients. To test this hypothesis, we used a canine model of human aging and AD. Aged dogs naturally develop learning and memory impairments, human-type Aβ deposits and oxidative damage in the brain. Thus, 9 aged beagles (98-115 months) were treated with a medical food cocktail containing (1) an extract of turmeric containing 95% curcuminoids; (2) an extract of green tea containing 50% epigallocatechingallate; (3) N-acetyl cysteine; (4) R-alpha lipoic acid; and (5) an extract of black pepper containing 95% piperine. Nine similarly aged dogs served as placebo-treated controls. After 3 months of treatment, 13 dogs completed a variable distance landmark task used as a measure of spatial attention. As compared to placebo-treated animals, dogs receiving the medical food cocktail had significantly lower error scores (t(11)=4.3, p=0.001) and were more accurate across all distances (F(1,9)=20.7, p=0.001), suggesting an overall improvement in spatial attention. Measures of visual discrimination learning, executive function and spatial memory, and levels of brain and CSF Aβ were unaffected by the cocktail. Our results indicate that this medical food cocktail may be beneficial for improving spatial attention and motivation deficits associated with impaired cognition in aging and AD. PMID:22886019

  17. Paclitaxel Drug-eluting Tracheal Stent Could Reduce Granulation Tissue Formation in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Juan; Pei, Ying-Hua; Qiu, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Yu-Ling

    2016-11-20

    Currently available silicone and metallic stents for tracheal stenosis are associated with many problems. Granulation proliferation is one of the main complications. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of paclitaxel drug-eluting tracheal stent in reducing granulation tissue formation in a canine model, as well as the pharmacokinetic features and safety profiles of the coated drug. Eight beagles were randomly divided into a control group (bare-metal stent group, n = 4) and an experimental group (paclitaxel-eluting stent group, n = 4). The observation period was 5 months. One beagle in both groups was sacrificed at the end of the 1st and 3rd months, respectively. The last two beagles in both groups were sacrificed at the end of 5th month. The proliferation of granulation tissue and changes in tracheal mucosa were compared between the two groups. Blood routine and liver and kidney function were monitored to evaluate the safety of the paclitaxel-eluting stent. The elution method and high-performance liquid chromatography were used to characterize the rate of in vivo release of paclitaxel from the stent. Compared with the control group, the proliferation of granulation tissue in the experimental group was significantly reduced. The drug release of paclitaxel-eluting stent was the fastest in the 1st month after implantation (up to 70.9%). Then, the release slowed down gradually. By the 5th month, the release reached up to 98.5%. During the observation period, a high concentration of the drug in the trachea (in the stented and adjacent unstented areas) and lung tissue was not noted, and the blood test showed no side effect. The paclitaxel-eluting stent could safely reduce the granulation tissue formation after stent implantation in vivo, suggesting that the paclitaxel-eluting tracheal stent might be considered for potential use in humans in the future.

  18. MRI-based quantification of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Kornegay, Joe N.; Styner, Martin A.

    2011-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential to provide non-invasive and objective biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic effect in DMD. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated scheme to quantify MRI features of golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), a canine model of DMD. Our method was applied to a natural history data set and a hydrodynamic limb perfusion data set. The scheme is composed of three modules: pre-processing, muscle segmentation, and feature analysis. The pre-processing module includes: calculation of T2 maps, spatial registration of T2 weighted (T2WI) images, T2 weighted fat suppressed (T2FS) images, and T2 maps, and intensity calibration of T2WI and T2FS images. We then manually segment six pelvic limb muscles. For each of the segmented muscles, we finally automatically measure volume and intensity statistics of the T2FS images and T2 maps. For the natural history study, our results showed that four of six muscles in affected dogs had smaller volumes and all had higher mean intensities in T2 maps as compared to normal dogs. For the perfusion study, the muscle volumes and mean intensities in T2FS were increased in the post-perfusion MRI scans as compared to pre-perfusion MRI scans, as predicted. We conclude that our scheme successfully performs quantitative analysis of muscle MRI features of GRMD.

  19. Human models of acute lung injury

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    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  20. Antifibrillatory effects of renal denervation on ventricular fibrillation in a canine model of pacing-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qingzhi; Jin, Qi; Zhang, Ning; Huang, Shangwei; Han, Yanxin; Lin, Changjian; Ling, Tianyou; Chen, Kang; Pan, Wenqi; Wu, Liqun

    2018-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? In the present study, we investigated the effects of renal denervation on the vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation and the ventricular electrical properties in a rapid pacing-induced heart failure canine model. What is the main finding and its importance? Renal denervation significantly attenuated the process of heart failure and improved left ventricular systolic dysfunction, stabilized ventricular electrophysiological properties and decreased the vulnerability of the heart to ventricular fibrillation during heart failure. Thus, renal denervation can attenuate ventricular electrical remodelling and exert a potential antifibrillatory action in a pacing-induced heart failure canine model. In this study, we investigated the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on the vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation (VF) and the ventricular electrical properties in a canine model of pacing-induced heart failure (HF). Eighteen beagles were divided into the following three groups: control (n = 6), HF (n = 6) and HF+RDN (n = 6). Heart failure was induced by rapid right ventricular pacing. Renal denervation was performed simultaneously with the pacemaker implantation in the HF+RDN group. A 64-unipolar basket catheter was used to perform global endocardial mapping of the left ventricle. The restitution properties and dispersion of refractoriness were estimated from the activation recovery intervals (ARIs) by a pacing protocol. The VF threshold (VFT) was defined as the maximal pacing cycle length required to induce VF using a specific pacing protocol. The defibrillation threshold (DFT) was measured by an up-down algorithm. Renal denervation partly restored left ventricular systolic function and attenuated the process of HF. Compared with the control group, the VFT in the HF group was decreased by 27% (106 ± 8.0 versus 135 ± 10 ms, P Renal denervation significantly flattened the ventricular ARI restitution curve by 15% (1

  1. Comparison of blood biochemics between acute myocardial infarction models with blood stasis and simple acute myocardial infarction models in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Shaochun; Yu Xiaofeng; Wang Jia; Zhou Jinying; Xie Haolin; Sui Dayun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To construct the acute myocardial infarction models in rats with blood stasis and study the difference on blood biochemics between the acute myocardial infarction models with blood stasis and the simple acute myocardial infarction models. Methods: Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, acute blood stasis model group, acute myocardial infarction sham operation group, acute myocardial infarction model group and of acute myocardial infarction model with blood stasis group. The acute myocardial infarction models under the status of the acute blood stasis in rats were set up. The serum malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), free fatty acid (FFA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were detected, the activities of serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and the levels of prostacycline (PGI2), thromboxane A 2 (TXA 2 ) and endothelin (ET) in plasma were determined. Results: There were not obvious differences in MDA, SOD, GSH-Px and FFA between the acute myocardial infarction models with blood stasis in rats and the simple acute myocardial infarction models (P 2 and NO, and the increase extents of TXA 2 , ET and TNF-α in the acute myocardial infarction models in rats with blood stasis were higher than those in the simple acute myocardial infarction models (P 2 and NO, are significant when the acute myocardial infarction models in rats with blood stasis and the simple acute myocardial infarction models are compared. The results show that it is defective to evaluate pharmacodynamics of traditional Chinese drug with only simple acute myocardial infarction models. (authors)

  2. Dual AAV Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy with a 7-kb Mini-Dystrophin Gene in the Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodippili, Kasun; Hakim, Chady H; Pan, Xiufang; Yang, Hsiao T; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Yadong; Shin, Jin-Hong; Yang, N Nora; Duan, Dongsheng

    2018-03-01

    Dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) technology was developed in 2000 to double the packaging capacity of the AAV vector. The proof of principle has been demonstrated in various mouse models. Yet, pivotal evidence is lacking in large animal models of human diseases. Here we report expression of a 7-kb canine ΔH2-R15 mini-dystrophin gene using a pair of dual AAV vectors in the canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The ΔH2-R15 minigene is by far the most potent synthetic dystrophin gene engineered for DMD gene therapy. We packaged minigene dual vectors in Y731F tyrosine-modified AAV-9 and delivered to the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle of a 12-month-old affected dog at the dose of 2 × 10 13 viral genome particles/vector/muscle. Widespread mini-dystrophin expression was observed 2 months after gene transfer. The missing dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex was restored. Treatment also reduced muscle degeneration and fibrosis and improved myofiber size distribution. Importantly, dual AAV therapy greatly protected the muscle from eccentric contraction-induced force loss. Our data provide the first clear evidence that dual AAV therapy can be translated to a diseased large mammal. Further development of dual AAV technology may lead to effective therapies for DMD and many other diseases in human patients.

  3. Prognostic modeling in pediatric acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vandana; Dhawan, Anil

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the only proven treatment for pediatric acute liver failure (PALF). However, over a period of time, spontaneous native liver survival is increasingly reported, making us wonder if we are overtransplanting children with acute liver failure (ALF). An effective prognostic model for PALF would help direct appropriate organ allocation. Only patients who would die would undergo LT, and those who would spontaneously recover would avoid unnecessary LT. Deriving and validating such a model for PALF, however, encompasses numerous challenges. In particular, the heterogeneity of age and etiology in PALF, as well as a lack of understanding of the natural history of the disease, contributed by the availability of LT has led to difficulties in prognostic model development. Several prognostic laboratory variables have been identified, and the incorporation of these variables into scoring systems has been attempted. A reliable targeted prognostic model for ALF in Wilson's disease has been established and externally validated. The roles of physiological, immunological, and metabolomic parameters in prognosis are being investigated. This review discusses the challenges with prognostic modeling in PALF and describes predictive methods that are currently available and in development for the future. Liver Transplantation 22 1418-1430 2016 AASLD. © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. Canine Parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finally, do not let your puppy or adult dog to come into contact with the fecal waste of other dogs while walking or playing outdoors. Prompt and proper ... advisable as a way to limit spread of canine parvovirus infection as well as other diseases that ...

  5. A predictive model for canine dilated cardiomyopathy—a meta-analysis of Doberman Pinscher data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Simpson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy is a prevalent and often fatal disease in humans and dogs. Indeed dilated cardiomyopathy is the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans, reported to affect approximately 36 individuals per 100,000 individuals. In dogs, dilated cardiomyopathy is the second most common cardiac disease and is most prevalent in the Irish Wolfhound, Doberman Pinscher and Newfoundland breeds. Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterised by ventricular chamber enlargement and systolic dysfunction which often leads to congestive heart failure. Although multiple human loci have been implicated in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy, the identified variants are typically associated with rare monogenic forms of dilated cardiomyopathy. The potential for multigenic interactions contributing to human dilated cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood. Consistent with this, several known human dilated cardiomyopathy loci have been excluded as common causes of canine dilated cardiomyopathy, although canine dilated cardiomyopathy resembles the human disease functionally. This suggests additional genetic factors contribute to the dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype.This study represents a meta-analysis of available canine dilated cardiomyopathy genetic datasets with the goal of determining potential multigenic interactions relating the sex chromosome genotype (XX vs. XY with known dilated cardiomyopathy associated loci on chromosome 5 and the PDK4 gene in the incidence and progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. The results show an interaction between known canine dilated cardiomyopathy loci and an unknown X-linked locus. Our study is the first to test a multigenic contribution to dilated cardiomyopathy and suggest a genetic basis for the known sex-disparity in dilated cardiomyopathy outcomes.

  6. A Naturally Occurring Canine Model of Autosomal Recessive Congenital Stationary Night Blindness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineo Kondo

    . Interestingly, RGS11 showed no labeling in the affected retina. Our results indicate involvement of a yet unknown gene in this canine model of complete CSNB.

  7. Storage and allogeneic transplantation of peripheral nerve using a green tea polyphenol solution in a canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Takashi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study, allogeneic-transplanted peripheral nerve segments preserved for one month in a polyphenol solution at 4°C could regenerate nerves in rodents demonstrated the same extent of nerve regeneration as isogeneic fresh nerve grafts. The present study investigated whether the same results could be obtained in a canine model. Methods A sciatic nerve was harvested from a male beagle dog, divided into fascicules of Sry and β-actin to investigate whether cells of donor origin remained in the allogeneic nerve segments. FK506 concentration was measured in blood samples taken before the animals were killed. Results The total myelinated axon numbers and amplitudes of the muscle action potentials correlated significantly with the blood FK506 concentration. Few axons were observed in the allogeneic-transplanted nerve segments in the PA0.025 group. PCR showed clear Sry-specific bands in specimens from the PA0.1 and PA0.05 groups but not from the PA0.025 group. Conclusions Successful nerve regeneration was observed in the polyphenol-treated nerve allografts when transplanted in association with a therapeutic dose of FK506. The data indicate that polyphenols can protect nerve tissue from ischemic damage for one month; however, the effects of immune suppression seem insufficient to permit allogeneic transplantation of peripheral nerves in a canine model.

  8. Longitudinal quantification of the gingival crevicular fluid proteome during progression from gingivitis to periodontitis in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ian J; Jones, Andrew W; Creese, Andrew J; Staunton, Ruth; Atwal, Jujhar; Chapple, Iain L C; Harris, Stephen; Grant, Melissa M

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is widespread in dogs. This study evaluated site-specific changes in the canine gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) proteome during longitudinal progression from very mild gingivitis to mild periodontitis. Periodontitis diagnosis in dogs requires general anaesthesia with associated risks and costs; our ultimate aim was to develop a periodontitis diagnostic for application in conscious dogs. The objective of this work was to identify potential biomarkers of periodontal disease progression in dogs. Gingival crevicular fluid was sampled from a total of 10 teeth in eight dogs at three different stages of health/disease and samples prepared for quantitative mass spectrometry (data available via ProteomeXchange; identifier PXD003337). A univariate mixed model analysis determined significantly altered proteins between health states and six were evaluated by ELISA. Four hundred and six proteins were identified with 84 present in all samples. The prevalence of 40 proteins was found to be significantly changed in periodontitis relative to gingivitis. ELISA measurements confirmed that haptoglobin was significantly increased. This study demonstrates for the first time that proteins detected by mass spectrometry have potential to identify novel biomarkers for canine periodontal disease. Further work is required to validate additional biomarkers for a periodontitis diagnostic. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost–effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL. PMID:22566950

  10. Vaccines for canine leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa B

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global warming, coinfection with immunosuppressive diseases, and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL) in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China, and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases, and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost-effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine VL. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans and dogs against VL.

  11. Vaccines for canine leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisa B. Palatnik-De-Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global-warming, co-infection with immunosuppressive diseases and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost-effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans

  12. Effects of intracavitary blood flow and electrode-target distance on radiofrequency power required for transient conduction block in a Langendorff-perfused canine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmers, T. A.; de Bakker, J. M.; Coronel, R.; Wittkampf, F. H.; van Capelle, F. J.; Janse, M. J.; Hauer, R. N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to quantify the effects of electrode-target distance and intracavitary blood flow on radiofrequency (RF) power required to induce transient conduction block, using a Langendorff-perfused canine ablation model. BACKGROUND: Given the thermally mediated nature of RF catheter

  13. The short and long term effects of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IORT) on thoracic organs after pneumonectomy an experimental study in the canine model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Willem; Mehta, DM; Timens, W; Hoekstra, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The tolerance of mediastinal structures and thoracic organs to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in the canine model. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two adult beagles divided into three groups were subjected to a left pneumonectomy and IORT (10 MeV electrons) at doses of 20

  14. Radiation/hyperthermia in canine hemangiopericytomas: A large animal model for therapeutic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, R.C.; Anderson, V.L.; Voorhees, W.D. III; Blevins, W.E.; Inskeep, T.K.; Janas, W.; Shupe, R.E.; Babbs, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    X-irradiation followed by microwave induced hyperthermia resulted in a 91% objective response rate in 11 dogs with naturally occurring hemangiopericytomas. The authors used a novel statistical procedure to quantitatively evaluate the clinical behavior of locally invasive, non-metastatic tumors undergoing therapy for control of local disease. Utilizing a small sample size, the procedure demonstrated distribution of the data and classical parametric and non-parametric statistical methods, including setting confidence limits on the population mean and placing tolerance limits on a population percentage. Similarities of canine and human hemangiopericytomas were observed. Application of the statistical methods to human and animal trials were apparent

  15. Biphasic pulses enhance bleomycin efficacy in a spontaneous canine genital tumor model of chemoresistance: Sticker sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citro Gennaro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sticker's sarcoma (also known as transmissible venereal tumor is a horizontally transmitted neoplasm of the dog, that is passed with coitus. It is a locally aggressive tumor with a low tendency to metastatic spread. The most common locations are the genitals, the nose, the perianal area. Standard treatment consists with chemotherapy with vincristine, however other therapies such as, cryotherapy, immunotherapy or, in selected cases, radiation therapy, have been reported. In this article we describe the outcome of a small cohort of canine patients, with chemotherapy resistant transmissible venereal tumor (TVT, treated with bleomycin selectively driven by trains of biphasic pulses (electrochemotherapy. Three canine patients, with refractory TVT, entered the study and received two sessions of ECT under sedation. The pets had local injection of bleomycin at the concentration of 1.5 mg/ml and five minutes after the chemotherapy, trains of 8 biphasic electric pulses lasting 50 + 50 μs each, with 1 ms interpulse intervals, were delivered by means of modified caliper or, for difficult districts, through paired needle electrode. All the patients responded to the treatment and are still in remission at different times. Electrochemotherapy appears as a safe and efficacious modality for the treatment of TVT and warrants further investigations.

  16. An exploration of the ability of tepoxalin to ameliorate the degradation of articular cartilage in a canine in vitro model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clegg Peter D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the ability of tepoxalin, a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX and lipoxygenase (LOX and its active metabolite to reduce the catabolic response of cartilage to cytokine stimulation in an in vitro model of canine osteoarthritis (OA. Grossly normal cartilage was collected post-mortem from seven dogs that had no evidence of joint disease. Cartilage explants were cultured in media containing the recombinant canine interleukin-1β (IL-1β at 100 ng/ml and recombinant human oncostatin-M (OSM at 50 ng/ml. The effects of tepoxalin and its metabolite were studied at three concentrations (1 × 10-5, 1 × 10-6 and 1 × 10-7 M. Total glycosaminoglycan (GAG and collagen (hydroxyproline release from cartilage explants were used as outcome measures of proteoglycan and collagen depletion respectively. PGE2 and LTB4 assays were performed to study the effects of the drug on COX and LOX activity. Results Treatment with IL-1β and OSM significantly upregulated both collagen (p = 0.004 and proteoglycan (p = 0.001 release from the explants. Tepoxalin at 10-5 M and 10-6 M caused a decrease in collagen release from the explants (p = 0.047 and p = 0.075. Drug treatment showed no effect on GAG release. PGE2 concentration in culture media at day 7 was significantly increased by IL-1β and OSM and treatment with both tepoxalin and its metabolite showed a trend towards dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 production. LTB4 concentrations were too low to be quantified. Cytotoxicity assays suggested that neither tepoxalin nor its metabolite had a toxic effect on the cartilage chondrocytes at the concentrations and used in this study. Conclusion This study provides evidence that tepoxalin exerts inhibition of COX and can reduce in vitro collagen loss from canine cartilage explants at a concentration of 10-5 M. We can conclude that, in this model, tepoxalin can partially inhibit the development of cartilage degeneration when it is available locally to

  17. Biological efficacy of two mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-based materials in a canine model of pulpotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeongyeon; Kang, Chung-Min; Song, Je Seon; Shin, Yooseok; Kim, Seunghye; Kim, Seong-Oh; Choi, Hyung-Jun

    2017-01-31

    The aim of this study was to compare the biocompatibility of Endocem Zr ® and ProRoot MTA ® by histopathologic analysis in a canine model of pulpotomy. This study utilized 39 teeth of two beagle dogs. The exposed pulp tissues were treated by pulpotomy using ProRoot MTA (n=19) or Endocem Zr (n=20). After 8 weeks, the teeth were extracted and processed with hematoxylin-eosin staining for histologic evaluation. Most of the specimens in both groups developed a calcific barrier at the pulp amputation site and formed an odontoblast layer. However, some of the Endocem Zr specimens showed less calcific barrier formation with a greater inflammatory response and less odontoblast layer formation when compared with the ProRoot MTA specimens. ProRoot MTA and Endocem Zr specimens developed a calcific barrier; however, ProRoot MTA was more biocompatible than Endocem Zr.

  18. The Effect of Osteopontin and an Osteopontin-Derived Synthetic Peptide Coating on Osseointegration of Implants in a Canine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorellini, Joseph P; Glindmann, Sven; Salcedo, Jairo; Weber, Hans-Peter; Park, Chang-Joo; Sarmiento, Hector L

    Osteopontin (OPN) and an OPN-derived synthetic peptide, OC-1016, have demonstrated their potential to enhance osseointegration in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and surrounding bone density (BD) of implants coated with either recombinant human OPN (rhOPN) or OC-1016 as compared with noncoated titanium plasma sprayed (TPS) surface in a canine model. Histomorphometric analysis revealed that at 4 weeks, %BIC and %BD of coated implants were significantly higher than those of noncoated TPS implants. At 12 weeks, %BIC of coated implants was also significantly higher than that of noncoated implants; however, there was no statistically significant difference in %BD. The rhOPN and OC-1016 were concluded to be capable of significantly accelerating the early stage of osseointegration and bone healing around implants.

  19. A genetic predictive model for canine hip dysplasia: integration of Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS and candidate gene approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Bartolomé

    Full Text Available Canine hip dysplasia is one of the most prevalent developmental orthopedic diseases in dogs worldwide. Unfortunately, the success of eradication programs against this disease based on radiographic diagnosis is low. Adding the use of diagnostic genetic tools to the current phenotype-based approach might be beneficial. The aim of this study was to develop a genetic prognostic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. To develop our DNA test, 775 Labrador Retrievers were recruited. For each dog, a blood sample and a ventrodorsal hip radiograph were taken. Dogs were divided into two groups according to their FCI hip score: control (A/B and case (D/E. C dogs were not included in the sample. Genetic characterization combining a GWAS and a candidate gene strategy using SNPs allowed a case-control population association study. A mathematical model which included 7 SNPs was developed using logistic regression. The model showed a good accuracy (Area under the ROC curve = 0.85 and was validated in an independent population of 114 dogs. This prognostic genetic test represents a useful tool for choosing the most appropriate therapeutic approach once genetic predisposition to hip dysplasia is known. Therefore, it allows a more individualized management of the disease. It is also applicable during genetic selection processes, since breeders can benefit from the information given by this test as soon as a blood sample can be collected, and act accordingly. In the authors' opinion, a shift towards genomic screening might importantly contribute to reducing canine hip dysplasia in the future. In conclusion, based on genetic and radiographic information from Labrador Retrievers with hip dysplasia, we developed an accurate predictive genetic test for early diagnosis of hip dysplasia in Labrador Retrievers. However, further research is warranted in order to evaluate the validity of this genetic test in other dog breeds.

  20. Bioeffects of albumin-encapsulated microbubbles and real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography in an experimental canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.M. Dourado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial contrast echocardiography has been used for assessing myocardial perfusion. Some concerns regarding its safety still remain, mainly regarding the induction of microvascular alterations. We sought to determine the bioeffects of microbubbles and real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (RTMCE in a closed-chest canine model. Eighteen mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups. Nine were submitted to continuous intravenous infusion of perfluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin (PESDA plus continuous imaging using power pulse inversion RTMCE for 180 min, associated with manually deflagrated high-mechanical index impulses. The control group consisted of 3 dogs submitted to continuous imaging using RTMCE without PESDA, 3 dogs received PESDA alone, and 3 dogs were sham-operated. Hemodynamics and cardiac rhythm were monitored continuously. Histological analysis was performed on cardiac and pulmonary tissues. No hemodynamic changes or cardiac arrhythmias were observed in any group. Normal left ventricular ejection fraction and myocardial perfusion were maintained throughout the protocol. Frequency of mild and focal microhemorrhage areas in myocardial and pulmonary tissue was similar in PESDA plus RTMCE and control groups. The percentages of positive microscopical fields in the myocardium were 0.4 and 0.7% (P = NS in the PESDA plus RTMCE and control groups, respectively, and in the lungs they were 2.1 and 1.1%, respectively (P = NS. In this canine model, myocardial perfusion imaging obtained with PESDA and RTMCE was safe, with no alteration in cardiac rhythm or left ventricular function. Mild and focal myocardial and pulmonary microhemorrhages were observed in both groups, and may be attributed to surgical tissue manipulation.

  1. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 overexpression improves atrial remodeling and function in a canine model of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingquan; Wang, Zhenglong; Fan, Jinqi; Chen, Shaojie; Tan, Zhen; Yang, Hanxuan; Yin, Yuehui

    2015-03-19

    Atrial fibrosis is an important factor in initiating and maintaining atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that atrial angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2) overexpression might inhibit atrial collagen accumulation and improve atrial remodeling in a canine atrial pacing model. Thirty-two mongrel dogs of both genders were divided randomly into 4 groups: sham-operated, control, gene therapy with adenovirus-enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad-EGFP), and gene therapy with Ad-ACE2. All of the dogs in the control, Ad-EGFP, and Ad-ACE2 groups were paced at 450 bpm for a period of 14 days. The dogs in the sham group were instrumented without pacing. After 2 weeks, all of the dogs underwent a thoracotomy operation and received epicardial gene painting. On post-gene transfer day 21, the animals underwent electrophysiology, histology, and molecular studies. The percentage of fibrosis in the Ad-ACE2 group was markedly lower than the percentage in the control and Ad-EGFP groups. Compared with the other groups, ACE2 expression was increased significantly in the Ad-ACE2 group. Compared with the sham and Ad-ACE2 groups, the expression levels of transforming growth factor-β1 and Smad3 were significantly higher in the Ad-EGFP and control groups; however, the expression levels of Smad7 were lower in the atrial tissue as detected by Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our results demonstrate that the overexpression of ACE2 inhibits atrial collagen accumulation and improves left atrial remodeling and function in a canine model of atrial fibrillation. Thus, targeted gene ACE2 therapy provides a promising approach for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  2. Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Correction of a Canine Model of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David A.; Correia, Catherine E.; Conlon, Thomas; Specht, Andrew; Verstegen, John; Onclin-Verstegen, Karine; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet; Mirian, Layla; Cossette, Holly; Falk, Darin J.; Germain, Sean; Clement, Nathalie; Porvasnik, Stacy; Fiske, Laurie; Struck, Maggie; Ramirez, Harvey E.; Jordan, Juan; Andrutis, Karl; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa; von Gierke disease; MIM 232200) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Patients with GSDIa are unable to maintain glucose homeostasis and suffer from severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidosis. The canine model of GSDIa is naturally occurring and recapitulates almost all aspects of the human form of disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based therapy to treat the canine model of GSDIa. After delivery of a therapeutic rAAV2/8 vector to a 1-day-old GSDIa dog, improvement was noted as early as 2 weeks posttreatment. Correction was transient, however, and by 2 months posttreatment the rAAV2/8-treated dog could no longer sustain normal blood glucose levels after 1 hr of fasting. The same animal was then dosed with a therapeutic rAAV2/1 vector delivered via the portal vein. Two months after rAAV2/1 dosing, both blood glucose and lactate levels were normal at 4 hr postfasting. With more prolonged fasting, the dog still maintained near-normal glucose concentrations, but lactate levels were elevated by 9 hr, indicating that partial correction was achieved. Dietary glucose supplementation was discontinued starting 1 month after rAAV2/1 delivery and the dog continues to thrive with minimal laboratory abnormalities at 23 months of age (18 months after rAAV2/1 treatment). These results demonstrate that delivery of rAAV vectors can mediate significant correction of the GSDIa phenotype and that gene transfer may be a promising alternative therapy for this disease and other genetic diseases of the liver. PMID:20163245

  3. Adeno-associated virus-mediated correction of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David A; Correia, Catherine E; Conlon, Thomas; Specht, Andrew; Verstegen, John; Onclin-Verstegen, Karine; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet; Mirian, Layla; Cossette, Holly; Falk, Darin J; Germain, Sean; Clement, Nathalie; Porvasnik, Stacy; Fiske, Laurie; Struck, Maggie; Ramirez, Harvey E; Jordan, Juan; Andrutis, Karl; Chou, Janice Y; Byrne, Barry J; Mah, Cathryn S

    2010-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa; von Gierke disease; MIM 232200) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-alpha. Patients with GSDIa are unable to maintain glucose homeostasis and suffer from severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidosis. The canine model of GSDIa is naturally occurring and recapitulates almost all aspects of the human form of disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based therapy to treat the canine model of GSDIa. After delivery of a therapeutic rAAV2/8 vector to a 1-day-old GSDIa dog, improvement was noted as early as 2 weeks posttreatment. Correction was transient, however, and by 2 months posttreatment the rAAV2/8-treated dog could no longer sustain normal blood glucose levels after 1 hr of fasting. The same animal was then dosed with a therapeutic rAAV2/1 vector delivered via the portal vein. Two months after rAAV2/1 dosing, both blood glucose and lactate levels were normal at 4 hr postfasting. With more prolonged fasting, the dog still maintained near-normal glucose concentrations, but lactate levels were elevated by 9 hr, indicating that partial correction was achieved. Dietary glucose supplementation was discontinued starting 1 month after rAAV2/1 delivery and the dog continues to thrive with minimal laboratory abnormalities at 23 months of age (18 months after rAAV2/1 treatment). These results demonstrate that delivery of rAAV vectors can mediate significant correction of the GSDIa phenotype and that gene transfer may be a promising alternative therapy for this disease and other genetic diseases of the liver.

  4. Assessment of Canine Pancreas‐Specific Lipase and Outcomes in Dogs with Hemodialysis‐Dependent Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, K.; Epstein, S.E.; Cowgill, L.D.

    2018-01-01

    Background Renal replacement therapies can be life‐saving for dogs with severe acute kidney injury (AKI), however, comorbidities including pancreatitis might affect outcome. Hypothesis/Objectives To investigate the prevalence of pancreas‐specific lipase (Spec cPL) measurements consistent with pancreatitis (≥400 μg/L) in dogs undergoing intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) for treatment of AKI and to determine whether there were associations between 30‐days outcomes and Spec cPL measurements. Animals Fifty‐three client‐owned dogs presented to teaching hospitals between November 2008 and September 2016 that underwent IHD. Methods Retrospective medical record review from dogs that received IHD for management of AKI and also had a Spec cPL measurement. Association between survival, dialysis‐dependency, and Spec cPL measurements was assessed. Results Forty of 53 (76%) dogs were alive at 30‐days and 33/53(62%) had a Spec cPL result ≥400 μg/L. Spec cPL was not significantly different either between surviving (635.5 μg/L, range 29–1,001) and nonsurviving dogs (860 μg/L, range 56–1,001; P = 0.75) or between dialysis‐dependent (1,001 μg/L, range 177–1,001) and nondialysis‐dependent dogs (520 μg/L, range 29–1,001; P = 0.08). Spec cPL ≥400 μg/L was not significantly associated either with survival (P = 0.74) or dialysis‐dependency (P = 0.33). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Results revealed a high prevalence of Spec cPL ≥400 μg/L in dogs with AKI treated with IHD. No significant associations between Spec cPL and survival or dialysis‐dependency in dogs with AKI at 30 days were identified in the current study, however, the latter could be due to lack of power in this study. PMID:29469974

  5. Mutation identification in a canine model of X-linked ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Margret L; Scheidt, Jennifer L; Rhodes, James L; Henthorn, Paula S; Werner, Petra

    2005-07-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHED), an inherited disease recognized in humans, mice, and cattle, is characterized by hypotrichosis, a reduced number or absence of sweat glands, and missing or malformed teeth. In a subset of affected individuals and animals, mutations in the EDA gene (formerly EDI), coding for ectodysplasin, have been found to cause this phenotype. Ectodysplasin is a homotrimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like domain, which has been shown to be involved in the morphogenesis of hair follicles and tooth buds during fetal development. Some human XHED patients also have concurrent immunodeficiency, due to mutations in the NF-kappaB essential modulator protein (IKBKG; formerly NEMO), which is also encoded on the X chromosome. In a breeding colony of dogs with XHED, immune system defects had been suspected because of frequent pulmonary infections and unexpected deaths resulting from pneumonia. To determine if defects in EDA or IKBKG cause XHED in the dogs, linkage analysis and sequencing experiments were performed. A polymorphic marker near the canine EDA gene showed significant linkage to XHED. The canine EDA gene was sequenced and a nucleotide substitution (G to A) in the splice acceptor site of intron 8 was detected in affected dogs. In the presence of the A residue, a cryptic acceptor site within exon 9 is used, leading to a frame shift and use of a premature stop codon that truncates the translation of both isoforms, EDA-A1 and EDA-A2, resulting in the absence of the TNF-like homology domain, the receptor-binding site of ectodysplasin.

  6. Evaluation of vegetable protein in canine diets: Assessment of performance and apparent ileal amino acid digestibility using a broiler model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiacco, D C; Lowe, J A; Wiseman, J; White, G A

    2018-02-01

    Recent technological advances in the human food industry with respect to meat processing have decreased the availability of animal proteins to the pet food industry which typically formulates diets with an excess of animal protein. In the long term, this is not sustainable; thus, alternative protein sources need to be investigated. This study examined three canine diets, comparing a typical animal protein-based diet (control) with two experimental diets where the animal protein was substituted in part with vegetable protein (formulated based either on total protein or amino acid content) using a broiler model. Each diet was fed to six cages each containing two birds from day 15, 18 cages in total (36 birds). Excreta were collected from days 19 to 21. On day 23, birds were euthanized and weighed, and their ileal digesta were collected and pooled for each cage. In addition, one leg per cage was collected for evaluation of muscle mass. Results showed no significant difference in animal performance (feed intake or live weight gain) or muscle to leg proportion across the diets. Birds fed the control diet and the diet balanced for amino acid content exhibited the greatest coefficients of apparent metabolizability for nitrogen (p animal with vegetable protein generally had greater ileal digestibility of amino acids compared to birds fed the control (animal protein) diet. Analysis of excreta showed no dietary difference in terms of dry matter content; however, birds fed the diet balanced for total protein and the diet balanced for amino acid content had significantly greater excreta nitrogen than the control (p = .038). Overall, the study suggests vegetable proteins when formulated based on amino acid content are a viable alternative to animal proteins in canine diets. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Neuromuscular blocking effects of cisatracurium and its antagonism with neostigmine in a canine model of autosomal-recessive centronuclear myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Flores, M; Paré, M D; Campoy, L; Gleed, R D

    2015-12-01

    Centronuclear myopathy (CNM) is a rare congenital condition associated with skeletal muscle weakness. Patients with CNM may have decreased acetylcholine receptor expression and a reduced number of releasable quanta. Such perturbations could affect the time-course of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) and their antagonism with cholinesterase inhibitors. As a result of the rarity of CNM, prospective data regarding NMBA use in this subpopulation is scarce. We evaluated the neuromuscular blocking effects of cisatracurium and its antagonism with neostigmine in a canine model of CNM. Six dogs with congenital autosomal-recessive CNM and six controls received cisatracurium 0.15 mg kg(-1) i.v. under general anaesthesia and intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Neuromuscular function was monitored with acceleromyography.When the second response (T2) to train-of-four (TOF) stimulation returned, neostigmine 0.04 mg kg(-1) (with glycopyrrolate) were administered i.v. The onset time, time to spontaneous return of T2, and the time to reach a TOF ratio ≥0.9 after neostigmine administration were recorded. Onset time was no different between groups. Median (interquartile range) time to return of T2 was 27 (24-31) min for control dogs and 26 (22-31) min for CNM dogs (P=0.93).After neostigmine administration, a TOF ratio ≥0.9 was reached in 12 (10-15) min and 17 (16-19) min in control and CNM, respectively (P=0.005). The spontaneous return of T2 was not different between groups. However, neostigmine-facilitated recovery was significantly slower in dogs with CNM. Canine autosomal-recessive CNM does not preclude the use of cisatracurium or its antagonism with neostigmine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Mandibular canine: A tool for sex identification in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Ramniwas M; Dindgire, Sarika L; Gadhari, Mangesh; Khobragade, Pratima G; Kadoo, Priyanka S; Yadav, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of mandibular canine index (MCI) and mandibular mesiodistal odontometrics in sex identification in the age group of 17-25 years in central Indian population. The study sample comprised total 300 individuals (150 males and 150 females) of an age group ranging from 17 to 25 years of central Indian population. The maximum mesiodistal diameter of mandibular canines, the linear distance between the tips of mandibular canines, was measured using digital vernier caliper on the study models. Overall sex could be predicted accurately in 79.66% (81.33% males and 78% females) of the population by MCI. Whereas, considering the mandibular canine width for sex identification, the overall accuracy was 75% for the right mandibular canine and 73% for the left mandibular canine observed. Sexual dimorphism of canine is population specific, and among the Indian population, MCI and mesiodistal dimension of mandibular canine can aid in sex determination.

  9. Canine tricuspid valve malformation, a model of human Ebstein anomaly, maps to dog chromosome 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andelfinger, G; Wright, K N; Lee, H S; Siemens, L M; Benson, D W

    2003-05-01

    Ebstein anomaly of the tricuspid valve is a congenital cardiac malformation characterised by downward displacement of the attachment of the septal and posterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve. Canine tricuspid valve malformation (CTVM) is morphologically similar to Ebstein anomaly; familial occurrence of CTVM has been described. Several observations suggest a genetic cause but most cases appear to be sporadic. Three purebred Labrador Retriever kindreds enriched for CTVM underwent clinical examination and echocardiography. DNA was extracted from whole blood. Genotyping was carried out using polymorphic repeat markers with an average spacing of 15 cM and polymorphic information content of 0.74. Pedigree analysis identified CTVM segregating as an autosomal dominant trait with reduced penetrance. Genome wide linkage analysis in one kindred identified a CTVM susceptibility locus on dog chromosome 9 (CFA9) with a maximum multipoint lod score of 3.33. The two additional kindreds showed a conserved disease haplotype. This study identifies a CTVM susceptibility locus on CFA9 and a founder effect in apparently unrelated Labrador Retriever kindreds. These results provide the basis for a positional candidate cloning effort to identify the CTVM disease gene. Identification of the CTVM gene will permit mutation screening of patients with Ebstein anomaly, which should provide additional insights into the genetic programmes of valve development.

  10. Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand-Induced Local Osteoporotic Canine Mandible Model for the Evaluation of Peri-Implant Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ah Ryum; Cho, Tae Hyung; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2017-11-01

    The canine mandible is useful for studying bone regeneration after dental implant placement. However, it is limited in investigations of peri-implant osteogenesis under osteoporotic conditions due to the insignificant osteoporotic effect of ovariectomy. This study aimed at establishing a local osteoporotic model without ovariectomy by using receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) in a canine mandible model. This new model was used to evaluate the effects of injectable β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) microsphere bone grafts on peri-implant bone regeneration under osteoporotic conditions with combinations of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). A local osteoporotic canine mandible model was designed by creating a hole in the mandibular alveolar bone, then implanting a collagen sponge soaked with 20, 40, or 60 μg RANKL into the hole, and leaving it for 2 weeks. After the establishment of the dose for maximum osteoporotic bone loss at 40 μg of RANKL, the main surgery was performed. RANKL-soaked collagen sponges were removed, and dental implants were placed with bone grafts in five groups: implant only, TCP, and TCP + rhBMP-2 at 5, 15, and 45 μg. Peri-implant bone generation was determined by radiologic and histologic evaluations at 6 weeks after dental implant placement. On performing micro-computed tomography analysis, the group with TCP + 5 μg rhBMP-2 showed the highest bone volume than the other groups and a 22% increase (p osteoporotic canine mandible model was useful for peri-implant bone regeneration under osteoporotic conditions such as those found in geriatric patients. The injectable β-TCP bone grafts used in this study were effective in peri-implant bone generation under osteoporotic conditions, and their efficiency was enhanced at 5 μg BMP-2 compared with higher concentrations of BMP-2.

  11. Effects of Multi-Electrode Renal Denervation on Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Metabolism in a Canine Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tao; Guo, Jin-He; Ling, Long; Qian, Yue; Dong, Yong-Hua; Yin, Hua-Qing; Zhu, Hai-Dong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2018-03-21

    To evaluate the effects of multi-electrode catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in a type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) canine model. Thirty-three dogs were divided equally into 3 groups: bilateral renal denervation (BRDN) group, left renal denervation (LRDN) group, and sham operation (SHAM) group. Body weight and blood biochemistry were measured at baseline, 20 weeks, and 32 weeks, and renal angiography and computerized tomographic (CT) angiography were determined before the procedure and 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months after the procedure. Western blot was used to identify the activities of gluconeogenic enzymes and insulin-signaling proteins. Fasting plasma glucose (9.64 ± 1.57 mmol/L vs 5.12 ± 1.08 mmol/L; P glycogenolysis, resulting in improvements in insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in a T2DM canine model. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety of intradiscal injection and biocompatibility of polyester amide microspheres in a canine model predisposed to intervertebral disc degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Nicole; Mihov, George; Grinwis, Guy C M; van Dijk, Maarten; Schumann, Detlef; Bos, Clemens; Strijkers, Gustav J; Dhert, Wouter J A; Meij, Björn P; Creemers, Laura B.; Tryfonidou, Marianna A

    Repair of degenerated intervertebral discs (IVD) might be established via intradiscal delivery of biologic therapies. Polyester amide polymers (PEA) were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility, and thereafter intradiscal application of PEA microspheres (PEAMs) in a canine

  13. Biochemical and histological evaluation of the synovial-like tissue around failed (loose) total joint replacement prostheses in human subjects and a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, T S; Ozuna, R M; Shortkroff, S; Keller, K; Sledge, C B; Spector, M

    1990-07-01

    The tissue around loose total joint replacement prostheses displays a synovial-like lining comprised of cells that produce IL-1 and PGE2, mediators of inflammation that stimulate bone resorption. Particles of titanium alloy, as well as cobalt-chromium alloy and polyethylene, were found to aggravate the histiocytic response and production of IL-1 and PGE2. Tissue with similar histological and biochemical features was produced in a canine model of the aseptic loose cemented femoral stem.

  14. Quantitative comparison of mathematical models to measure surface area of canine teeth prepared to receive full veneer crowns in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn eCollins

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was performed in order to determine if mathematical modeling of the canine teeth in dogs could be utilized to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of crown surface area that could be used in both a research and clinical setting.Materials and methods: Actual surface area (aSA calculations for 32 stone dies of clinical crown preparations were acquired utilizing a tridimensional (3D laser scanner and 3D computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM software applications. These calculations were used as a control. Seventeen unique mathematical models from 8 geometric shapes were used to calculate estimated surface area (eSA of each stone die. Linear association and agreement between eSA and aSA calculations were assessed with multiple statistical methods. Results: All methods of eSA showed a significant linear association with aSA. Five of the mathematical models [right elliptical frustum (H3, right elliptical cone (G3, right pyramidal cone (A3, right circular frustum (F2 and right circular cone (E1] were superior to the other 12 models.Conclusions: The H3 mathematical model based on the right elliptical frustum provided the most accurate estimate of crown surface area of dog teeth. However, H3 requires the use of laser scans and a 3D CAD software program. As a result, this model would be recommended for research applications. The E1 mathematical model was similar in accuracy to H3 and, given it requires only two measurements and a comparatively simple equation for calculation, this method would be recommended for clinical chair-side use.

  15. Influence of a dexamethasone-eluting covered stent on tissue reaction: an experimental study in a canine bronchial model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Choi, Gi Bok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Seo, Tae-Seok; Yuk, Soon Hong; Kim, Young-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Mee

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a dexamethasone (DXM)-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent to reduce tissue reaction following stent placement in a canine bronchial model. We placed a DXM-eluting, polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (drug stent, DS) and a polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (control stent, CS) alternately in each left main bronchus and left lower lobe bronchus in 12 dogs. The stents were 20 mm in diameter and length when fully expanded. The dose of DXM was approximately 36.7 mg in each DS, but was absent in the CS. The dogs were euthanased 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=4) or 4 weeks (n=4) after stent placement. Histologic findings, such as epithelial erosion/ulcer or granulation tissue thickness, were obtained from the mid-portion of the bronchus, where the stent had been placed, and evaluated between DS and CS. There were no procedure-related complications or malpositioning of any of the bronchial stents. Stent migration was detected in one dog just before euthanasia 1 week following stent placement. Stent patency was maintained until euthanasia in all dogs. Epithelial erosion/ulcer (%) was significantly less in the DS (mean±standard deviation, 46.88±23.75) than in the CS (73.75±14.08) (P=0.026) for all time-points. There was a decrease in epithelial erosion/ulcer as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. The granulation tissue thickness (mm) was less in DS (2.63±2.05) than in CS (3.49±2.95), although the difference was not significant (P=0.751) for all time-points. There was a tendency toward an increase in granulation tissue thickness and chronic lymphocytic infiltration as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. In conclusion, DXM-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent seems to be effective in reducing tissue reaction secondary to stent placement in a canine bronchial model. (orig.)

  16. Influence of a dexamethasone-eluting covered stent on tissue reaction: an experimental study in a canine bronchial model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Choi, Gi Bok; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Suh, Ji-Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Tae-Seok [Gachon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Gil Medical Center, Inchon (Korea); Yuk, Soon Hong [Hannam University, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Daejeon (Korea); Kim, Young-Hwa [Soonchunhyang University Chonan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chonan (Korea); Cho, Yong-Mee [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2005-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a dexamethasone (DXM)-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent to reduce tissue reaction following stent placement in a canine bronchial model. We placed a DXM-eluting, polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (drug stent, DS) and a polyurethane-covered, self-expanding metallic stent (control stent, CS) alternately in each left main bronchus and left lower lobe bronchus in 12 dogs. The stents were 20 mm in diameter and length when fully expanded. The dose of DXM was approximately 36.7 mg in each DS, but was absent in the CS. The dogs were euthanased 1 week (n=4), 2 weeks (n=4) or 4 weeks (n=4) after stent placement. Histologic findings, such as epithelial erosion/ulcer or granulation tissue thickness, were obtained from the mid-portion of the bronchus, where the stent had been placed, and evaluated between DS and CS. There were no procedure-related complications or malpositioning of any of the bronchial stents. Stent migration was detected in one dog just before euthanasia 1 week following stent placement. Stent patency was maintained until euthanasia in all dogs. Epithelial erosion/ulcer (%) was significantly less in the DS (mean{+-}standard deviation, 46.88{+-}23.75) than in the CS (73.75{+-}14.08) (P=0.026) for all time-points. There was a decrease in epithelial erosion/ulcer as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. The granulation tissue thickness (mm) was less in DS (2.63{+-}2.05) than in CS (3.49{+-}2.95), although the difference was not significant (P=0.751) for all time-points. There was a tendency toward an increase in granulation tissue thickness and chronic lymphocytic infiltration as the follow-up period increased in both DS and CS. In conclusion, DXM-eluting, covered, self-expanding metallic stent seems to be effective in reducing tissue reaction secondary to stent placement in a canine bronchial model. (orig.)

  17. Constructive remodeling of biologic scaffolds is dependent on early exposure to physiologic bladder filling in a canine partial cystectomy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruch, Alan V; Nieponice, Alejandro; Qureshi, Irfan R; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2010-06-15

    Biologic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used to facilitate the constructive remodeling of several tissue types. Previous studies suggest that the ECM scaffold remodeling process is dependent on microenvironmental factors, including tissue-specific biomechanical loading. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of long-term catheterization (LTC), with its associated inhibition of bladder filling and physiologic biomechanical loading, on ECM scaffold remodeling following partial cystectomy in a canine model. Reconstruction of the partial cystectomy site was performed using ECM scaffolds prepared from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) or porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM). Animals were randomly assigned to either a long-term catheterization (LTC) group (n=5, catheterized 28 d) or a short-term catheterization group (STC, n=5, catheterized 24 h), and scaffold remodeling was assessed by histologic methods at 4 and 12 wk postoperatively. By 4 wk, animals in the STC group showed a well-developed and highly differentiated urothelium, a robust vascularization network, abundant smooth muscle actin (SMA), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) expressing spindle-shaped cells, and many neuronal processes associated with newly formed arterioles. In contrast, at 4 wk the scaffolds in LTC animals were not epithelialized, and did not express neuronal markers. The scaffolds in the LTC group developed a dense granulation tissue containing SMA+, smMHC-, spindle-shaped cells that were morphologically and phenotypically consistent with myofibroblasts, but not smooth muscle cells. By 12 wk postoperatively, the ECM scaffolds in the STC animals showed a constructive remodeling response, with a differentiated urothelium and islands of smooth muscle cells within the remodeled scaffold. In contrast, at 12 wk the scaffolds in LTC animals had a remodeling response more consistent with fibrosis even though catheters had been

  18. Intrathecal Transplantation of Autologous Adherent Bone Marrow Cells Induces Functional Neurological Recovery in a Canine Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Hala; El-Kheir, Wael Abo; Farghali, Haithem A M A; Ismail, Zeinab M K; Zickri, Maha B; El Maadawi, Zeinab M; Kishk, Nirmeen A; Sabaawy, Hatem E

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in demyelination of surviving axons, loss of oligodendrocytes, and impairment of motor and sensory functions. We have developed a clinical strategy of cell therapy for SCI through the use of autologous bone marrow cells for transplantation to augment remyelination and enhance neurological repair. In a preclinical large mammalian model of SCI, experimental dogs were subjected to a clipping contusion of the spinal cord. Two weeks after the injury, GFP-labeled autologous minimally manipulated adherent bone marrow cells (ABMCs) were transplanted intrathecally to investigate the safety and efficacy of autologous ABMC therapy. The effects of ABMC transplantation in dogs with SCI were determined using functional neurological scoring, and the integration of ABMCs into the injured cords was determined using histopathological and immunohistochemical investigations and electron microscopic analyses of sections from control and transplanted spinal cords. Our data demonstrate the presence of GFP-labeled cells in the injured spinal cord for up to 16 weeks after transplantation in the subacute SCI stage. GFP-labeled cells homed to the site of injury and were detected around white matter tracts and surviving axons. ABMC therapy in the canine SCI model enhanced remyelination and augmented neural regeneration, resulting in improved neurological functions. Therefore, autologous ABMC therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for spinal cord injuries.

  19. A mini review: proteoglycan aggregate profiles in the Pond-Nuki dog model of osteoarthritis and in canine disuse atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, D S; Muller, F; Manicourt, D H

    1992-01-01

    The Pond-Nuki dog model of osteoarthritis has characteristics which seem to mimic the human disease in early stages, particularly with respect to progressive changes in the cartilage matrix. Aggregating proteoglycans were studied using novel extraction and ultracentrifugation methods designed to separate very large macromolecules. With these methods two large peaks of proteoglycan (PG) aggregates (PGA-1 and PGA-2) were separated in preparative amounts and were shown to have unequivocal differences in composition in many respects. The profiles of these peaks have been studied as a function of joint location, topographic site, cartilage layer, presence of cartilage atrophy versus osteoarthritis, as well as treatment of the animals with various agents. Both link protein (essential for forming link-protein stabilized aggregates) and hyaluronate are required to regenerate normal aggregate profiles from the deficient aggregate fractions obtained from osteoarthritic cartilage. Canine proteoglycan link-stabilized aggregates (PGA-2) are confined to the middle and deep zone of cartilage. We believe that their reduction or elimination in the Pond-Nuki model results from a disturbance or loss of functional link protein (and hyaluronate), thereby weakening the middle and deep cartilage layers.

  20. Dystrophin deficiency compromises force production of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle in the canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao T Yang

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle force is a salient feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a fatal disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Assessment of force production from a single intact muscle has been considered as the gold standard for studying physiological consequences in murine models of DMD. Unfortunately, equivalent assays have not been established in dystrophic dogs. To fill the gap, we developed a novel in situ protocol to measure force generated by the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU muscle of a dog. We also determined the muscle length to fiber length ratio and the pennation angle of the ECU muscle. Muscle pathology and contractility were compared between normal and affected dogs. Absence of dystrophin resulted in marked histological damage in the ECU muscle of affected dogs. Central nucleation was significantly increased and myofiber size distribution was altered in the dystrophic ECU muscle. Muscle weight and physiological cross sectional area (PCSA showed a trend of reduction in affected dogs although the difference did not reach statistical significance. Force measurement revealed a significant decrease of absolute force, and the PCSA or muscle weight normalized specific forces. To further characterize the physiological defect in affected dog muscle, we conducted eccentric contraction. Dystrophin-null dogs showed a significantly greater force loss following eccentric contraction damage. To our knowledge, this is the first convincing demonstration of force deficit in a single intact muscle in the canine DMD model. The method described here will be of great value to study physiological outcomes following innovative gene and/or cell therapies.

  1. Rat Models of Ventricular Fibrillation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Laura A.; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Jespersen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A number of animal models have been designed in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms of acute ischemia-induced arrhythmias and to test compounds and interventions for antiarrhythmic therapy. This is important as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) continues to be the major cause of sudden car...... for ventricular arrhythmias occurring during the acute phase of AMI. It provides a description of models developed, advantages and disadvantages of rats, as well as an overview of the most important interventions investigated and the relevance for human pathophysiology....

  2. Preclinical Multimodal Molecular Imaging Using 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI in a Phase I Study of a Knee Osteoarthritis in In Vivo Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I. Menendez DVM, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use a multimodal molecular imaging approach to serially assess regional metabolic changes in the knee in an in vivo anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT canine model of osteoarthritis (OA. Five canine underwent ACLT in one knee and the contralateral knee served as uninjured control. Prior, 3, 6, and 12 weeks post-ACLT, the dogs underwent 18F-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The MRI was coregistered with the PET/CT, and 3-dimensional regions of interest (ROIs were traced manually and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax were evaluated. 18F-fluoro-d-glucose SUVmax in the ACLT knee ROIs was significantly higher compared to the uninjured contralateral knees at 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Higher 18F-FDG uptake observed in ACLT knees compared to the uninjured knees reflects greater metabolic changes in the injured knees over time. Knee 18F-FDG uptake in an in vivo ACLT canine model using combined PET/CT and MRI demonstrated to be highly sensitive in the detection of metabolic alterations in osseous and nonosteochondral structures comprising the knee joint. 18F-fluoro-d-glucose appeared to be a capable potential imaging biomarker for early human knee OA diagnosis, prognosis, and management.

  3. Treatment of a canine carotid artery aneurysm model with a biodegradable nanofiber-covered stent: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhou, Bin; Gu, Xiu-Ling; Li, Ming-Hua; Gu, Bin-Xian; Wang, Wu; Li, Yong-Dong

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a biodegradable nanofiber-covered stent (BDNCS) in the treatment of a canine carotid artery aneurysm. Seventeen beagle dogs, each with one lateral saccular aneurysm created using a venous pouch, were selected to test the BDNCS. The BDNCS consists of three parts: A bare stent, a biodegradable nanofiber membrane, and a balloon catheter. The bare stent was sculpted by a laser from a cobalt chromium superalloy, and the biodegradable nanofiber membrane was constructed from polylactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone [PCL, P (LLA-CL)] by the electro-spinning method. The biodegradable nanofiber stent was premounted on a balloon catheter to form a BDNCS. Angiographic assessments were categorized as complete or incomplete occlusion. Data regarding technical success, initial and final angiographic results, mortality and morbidity were collected, and follow-up was performed at 1 and 3 months after the procedure. BDNCS placement was successful in 17 canines with 17 aneurysms. The initial angiographies showed that a complete occlusion was achieved in 13 canines (76.5%) and an incomplete occlusion in 4 (23.5%). One canine died 1 week later. The angiographies obtained at 3-month follow-up exhibited complete occlusion in 14 canines (87.5%) and an incomplete occlusion in 2 canines, with mild in-stent stenosis in 5 canines. Our results suggest that BDNCS may be a feasible approach for aneurysm occlusion, although the occurrence of mild in-stent stenosis was relatively high. Longer-term follow-up investigations are needed to validate these findings.

  4. Canine thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsohn, M.

    1985-01-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog

  5. Experimental study of a closed-chest pulmonary embolism-reperfusion injury canine model by means of Swan-Ganz catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Na; Zhai Renyou Jiang Tao; Wang Yajie; Zheng Juan; Wang Chen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish a closed-chest pulmonary embolism-reperfusion animal model by Swan-Ganz catheter and to explore the mechanisms of pulmonary embolism (PE)-reperfusion injury (RI). Methods: Experiments were made on 14 mongrel dogs, ranging in weight from 15 to 18 kg, anesthetized with 3% pentobarbital sodium. The dogs were intubated with I. D. 7 endotracheal tubes. Under sterile conditions, a 7 F Swan-Ganz catheter via the external jugular vein was positioned in the unilateral pulmonary diaphragmatic lobe (DL) artery. Occlusion/reperfusion of the DL artery was controlled with 1.2 ml diluted contrast agent filled into/drawn from the balloon. After the 24 h PE, the balloon was deflated to result in 4 h reperfusion of the DL. Measurements of blood gases and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)were made at normal condition, at 24 h PE and at 4 h reperfusion. Thin-section CT scans were performed at normal condition, 24 h PE, 30 rain, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h reperfusion, respectively. At the end of each experiment, tissue specimens of bilateral diaphragmatic lobes were obtained for both wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio and for pathological study. Results: Reperfusion pulmonary edema (RPE) was an acute, mixed, noncardiogenic edema that was observed in all 14 dogs who had been successfully established as PE/RI animal models. RPE demonstrated heterogeneous ground-glass opacifications that predominated in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. It manifested pathologically as an edematous lung infihrated by inflammatory cells. The mean of PaO 2 and TNF-α of 4 h reperfusion was (81 ± 4) mm Hg( 1 mm Hg =0.133 kPa) and (16.0 ± 2.5)pg/ml, which were significantly different (P<0.05) from normal value [(96 ± 6)mm Hg and (13.9 ± 2.0) pg/ml]. The W/D of the injured lung (6.3 ± 1.2) was significantly greater (P<0.01) than that of the contralateral lung (4.5 ± 1.2), suggesting that the increase in the lung water was due to reperfusion injury. Conclusion: The closed-chest canine model

  6. Development of a urinary lithiasis localizer mechanism to couple ultrasound and extracorporeal lithotripsy equipment in canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Andrade

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Due to the evolution of extracorporeal lithotripsy equipment (ESWL and presently, the fact that most part of the equipment does not present ultrasound to localize urinary calculi, a system that allows adapting ultrasound equipment to ESWL equipment was developed, disposing only of fluoroscopy. Thus, this equipment was developed and was tested in urinary stones in canine models, to check its precision in relation to fluoroscopy. METHOD: Seven male dogs were utilized with the introduction, in the bladder through the ureteral route, of chalkstones, with initial localization by fluoroscopy, with a further ultrasound coincidence check localization of the vesical stones, being submitted to ESWL with a 3-hour, 21 days and 60 days follow-up after the procedure. RESULTS: Success of localization in all animals was verified presenting elimination of stones in the first micturitions, after ESWL. No complications were verified in those animals for 60 days. CONCLUSION: We verified that this equipment can lead to an update of the equipment that use only fluoroscopy, increasing in this way, their technical capacity in the treatment of urinary calculi, mainly in cases of non-radiopaque stones.

  7. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on late-phase osteotomy gap healing in a canine tibial model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Nozomu; Ohnishi, Isao; Chen, Dongan; Deitz, Luke W; Schwardt, Jeffrey D; Chao, Edmund Y S

    2002-09-01

    The effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on late bone healing phases using an osteotomy gap model in the canine mid-tibia were investigated. A transverse mid-diaphyseal tibial osteotomy with a 2-mm gap was performed unilaterally in 12 adult mixed-breed dogs and stabilized with external fixation. Animals in the variable group (n = 6) were treated with PEMF for 1 h daily starting 4 weeks after surgery for a total of 8 weeks, whereas no stimulation signal was generated in the control group (n = 6). Functional load-bearing and radiographic assessments were conducted time-sequentially until euthanasia 12 weeks after surgery. Torsional tests and an analysis of undecalcified histology were performed on the retrieved mid-tibial diaphysis containing the osteotomy site. In the PEMF group, load-bearing of the operated limb recovered earlier when compared to the control group (p PEMF group at 8 weeks was greater than in the control group (p PEMF group, while a significant increase was observed at 8 and 10 weeks after surgery (p PEMF group were significantly greater than those of the control group (p PEMF group. PEMF stimulation of 1 h per day for 8 weeks provided faster recovery of load-bearing, a significant increase in new bone formation, and a higher mechanical strength of the healing mid-tibial osteotomy. This study revealed enhancing effects of PEMF on callus formation and maturation in the late-phase of bone healing.

  8. Clinical outcome and vertical transmission variability among canine Neospora caninum isolates in a pregnant mouse model of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellarupe, Andrea; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Schares, Gereon; Unzaga, Juan Manuel; Venturini, María Cecilia; Ortega-Mora, Luis M

    2014-03-01

    We compared the clinical outcome and vertical transmission of six canine Neospora caninum isolates using a pregnant BALB/c model. Four of the isolates were obtained from oocysts of naturally infected dogs (Nc-Ger2, Nc-Ger3, Nc-Ger6 and Nc-6Arg) and two were from diseased dogs with neurological signs (Nc-Bahia and Nc-Liv). The dams were inoculated with 2×106 tachyzoites of each isolate at day 7 of pregnancy. Morbidity, mortality and the antibody responses were evaluated in both the dams and the offspring, as was parasite transmission to the progeny. The mortality rates varied from 100% in Nc-Bahia and Nc-Liv-infected pups to 19% or less for those infected with the isolates from oocysts. The vertical transmission rates varied from 9 to 53% for N. caninum from oocysts, compared with 100% for the Nc-Liv and Nc-Bahia isolates. All dams showed specific IgG responses against tachyzoite and rNc-GRA7 antigens, confirming Neospora infection. The highest IgG levels were detected in mice inoculated with the Nc-Liv and Nc-Bahia isolates. These results demonstrate marked differences in virulence between the N. caninum isolates obtained from oocysts and neurologically affected dogs. This variability could help us to explain the differences in the outcome of the infection in definitive and intermediate hosts.

  9. Animal Model of Acute Deep Vein Thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sumit; Laerum, Frode; Brosstad, Frank; Kvernebo, Knut; Sakariassen, Kjell S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an animal model of acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods: In part I of the study nine juvenile domestic pigs were used. Each external iliac vein was transluminally occluded with a balloon catheter. Thrombin was infused through a microcatheter in one leg according to one of the following protocols: (1) intraarterial (IA): 1250 U at 25 U/min in the common femoral artery (n= 3); (2) intravenous (IV): 5000 U in the popliteal vein at 500 U/min (n= 3), or at 100 U/min (n= 3). Saline was administered in the opposite leg. After the animals were killed, the mass of thrombus in the iliofemoral veins was measured. The pudendoepiploic (PEV), profunda femoris (PF), and popliteal veins (PV) were examined. Thrombosis in the tributaries of the superficial femoral vein (SFVt) was graded according to a three-point scale (0, +, ++). In part II of the study IV administration was further investigated in nine pigs using the following three regimens with 1000 U at 25 U/min serving as the control: (1) 1000 U at 100 U/min, (2) 250 U at 25 U/min, (3) 250 U at 6.25 U/min. Results: All animals survived. In part I median thrombus mass in the test limbs was 1.40 g as compared with 0.25 g in the controls (p= 0.01). PEV, PFV and PV were thrombosed in all limbs infused with thrombin. IV infusion was more effective in inducing thrombosis in both the parent veins (mass 1.32-1.78 g) and SVFt (++ in 4 of 6 legs), as compared with IA infusion (mass 0.0-1.16 g; SFVt ++ in 1 of 3 legs). In part II thrombus mass in axial veins ranged from 1.23 to 2.86 g, and showed no relationship with the dose of thrombin or the rate of infusion. Tributary thrombosis was less extensive with 250 U at 25 U/min than with the other regimens. Conclusion: Slow distal intravenous thrombin infusion in the hind legs of pigs combined with proximal venous occlusion induces thrombosis in the leg veins that closely resembles clinical DVT in distribution

  10. Mechanical analysis of congestive heart failure caused by bundle branch block based on an electromechanical canine heart model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou Jianhong; Xia Ling; Zhang Yu; Shou Guofa [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wei Qing; Liu Feng; Crozier, Stuart [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: xialing@zju.edu.cn

    2009-01-21

    Asynchronous electrical activation, induced by bundle branch block (BBB), can cause reduced ventricular function. However, the effects of BBB on the mechanical function of heart are difficult to assess experimentally. Many heart models have been developed to investigate cardiac properties during BBB but have mainly focused on the electrophysiological properties. To date, the mechanical function of BBB has not been well investigated. Based on a three-dimensional electromechanical canine heart model, the mechanical properties of complete left and right bundle branch block (LBBB and RBBB) were simulated. The anatomical model as well as the fiber orientations of a dog heart was reconstructed from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI). Using the solutions of reaction-diffusion equations and with a strategy of parallel computation, the asynchronous excitation propagation and intraventricular conduction in BBB was simulated. The mechanics of myocardial tissues were computed with time-, sarcomere length-dependent uniaxial active stress initiated at the time of depolarization. The quantification of mechanical intra- and interventricular asynchrony of BBB was then investigated using the finite-element method with an eight-node isoparametric element. The simulation results show that (1) there exists inter- and intraventricular systolic dyssynchrony during BBB; (2) RBBB may have more mechanical synchrony and better systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) than LBBB; (3) the ventricles always move toward the early-activated ventricle; and (4) the septum experiences higher stress than left and right ventricular free walls in BBB. The simulation results validate clinical and experimental recordings of heart deformation and provide regional quantitative estimates of ventricular wall strain and stress. The present work suggests that an electromechanical heart model, incorporating real geometry and fiber orientations, may be helpful for better

  11. Effects of low-dose cyclophosphamide with piroxicam on tumour neovascularization in a canine oral malignant melanoma-xenografted mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choisunirachon, N; Jaroensong, T; Yoshida, K; Saeki, K; Mochizuki, M; Nishimura, R; Sasaki, N; Nakagawa, T

    2015-12-01

    Low-dose cyclophosphamide (CyLD) has shown promise in the treatment of several cancers; however, the effect of CyLD on canine oral malignant melanoma has never been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of CyLD with or without piroxicam (Px) on tumour neovascularization and vascular normalization in a canine oral malignant melanoma-xenografted mice model. After treatment with CyLD, Px or a combination of both (CyPx), the growth of the tumour in the treatment groups was significantly suppressed compared to the control group at 30 days of treatment. Proliferation index was also significantly reduced by all treatments, only CyPx significantly lowered microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Additionally, CyLD significantly reduced the proportion of normal vessels and caused an imbalance between VEGF and thrombospondin-1. These results suggested that CyPx has potent anti-angiogenic effects in terms of both the number and quality of blood vessels in xenografted canine oral malignant melanoma. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Canine epidermal neural crest stem cells: characterization and potential as therapy candidate for a large animal model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericota, Barbara; Anderson, Joseph S; Mitchell, Gaela; Borjesson, Dori L; Sturges, Beverly K; Nolta, Jan A; Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of multipotent neural crest-derived stem cells, named epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSC), that persist postnatally in an easy-to-access location-the bulge of hair follicles-opens a spectrum of novel opportunities for patient-specific therapies. We present a detailed characterization of canine EPI-NCSC (cEPI-NCSC) from multiple dog breeds and protocols for their isolation and ex vivo expansion. Furthermore, we provide novel tools for research in canines, which currently are still scarce. In analogy to human and mouse EPI-NCSC, the neural crest origin of cEPI-NCSC is shown by their expression of the neural crest stem cell molecular signature and other neural crest-characteristic genes. Similar to human EPI-NCSC, cEPI-NCSC also expressed pluripotency genes. We demonstrated that cEPI-NCSC can generate all major neural crest derivatives. In vitro clonal analyses established multipotency and self-renewal ability of cEPI-NCSC, establishing cEPI-NCSC as multipotent somatic stem cells. A critical analysis of the literature on canine spinal cord injury (SCI) showed the need for novel treatments and suggested that cEPI-NCSC represent viable candidates for cell-based therapies in dog SCI, particularly for chondrodystrophic dogs. This notion is supported by the close ontological relationship between neural crest stem cells and spinal cord stem cells. Thus, cEPI-NCSC promise to offer not only a potential treatment for canines but also an attractive and realistic large animal model for human SCI. Taken together, we provide the groundwork for the development of a novel cell-based therapy for a condition with extremely poor prognosis and no available effective treatment.

  13. A Point Mutation in a lincRNA Upstream of GDNF Is Associated to a Canine Insensitivity to Pain: A Spontaneous Model for Human Sensory Neuropathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Plassais

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Human Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathies (HSANs are characterized by insensitivity to pain, sometimes combined with self-mutilation. Strikingly, several sporting dog breeds are particularly affected by such neuropathies. Clinical signs appear in young puppies and consist of acral analgesia, with or without sudden intense licking, biting and severe self-mutilation of the feet, whereas proprioception, motor abilities and spinal reflexes remain intact. Through a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS with 24 affected and 30 unaffected sporting dogs using the Canine HD 170K SNP array (Illumina, we identified a 1.8 Mb homozygous locus on canine chromosome 4 (adj. p-val = 2.5x10-6. Targeted high-throughput sequencing of this locus in 4 affected and 4 unaffected dogs identified 478 variants. Only one variant perfectly segregated with the expected recessive inheritance in 300 sporting dogs of known clinical status, while it was never present in 900 unaffected dogs from 130 other breeds. This variant, located 90 kb upstream of the GDNF gene, a highly relevant neurotrophic factor candidate gene, lies in a long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA, GDNF-AS. Using human comparative genomic analysis, we observed that the canine variant maps onto an enhancer element. Quantitative RT-PCR of dorsal root ganglia RNAs of affected dogs showed a significant decrease of both GDNF mRNA and GDNF-AS expression levels (respectively 60% and 80%, as compared to unaffected dogs. We thus performed gel shift assays (EMSA that reveal that the canine variant significantly alters the binding of regulatory elements. Altogether, these results allowed the identification in dogs of GDNF as a relevant candidate for human HSAN and insensitivity to pain, but also shed light on the regulation of GDNF transcription. Finally, such results allow proposing these sporting dog breeds as natural models for clinical trials with a double benefit for human and veterinary medicine.

  14. Lack of hepatic "interregulation" during inhibition of glycogenolysis in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosgerau, K; Mittelman, S D; Sunehag, A; Dea, M K; Lundgren, K; Bergman, R N

    2001-08-01

    It has been proposed that the glycogenolytic and gluconeogenic pathways contributing to endogenous glucose production are interrelated. Thus a change in one source of glucose 6-phosphate might be compensated for by an inverse change in the other pathway. We therefore investigated the effects of 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB), a potent glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor, on glucose production in fasted conscious dogs. When dogs were treated acutely with high glucagon, glucose production rose from 1.93 +/- 0.14 to 3.07 +/- 0.37 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P dogs were treated acutely with DAB in addition to high glucagon infusion, the stimulation of the glycogenolytic rate was completely suppressed. Glucose production rose from 1.85 +/- 0.20 to 2.41 +/- 0.17 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P gluconeogenesis from 0.93 +/- 0.09 to 1.54 +/- 0.08 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P gluconeogenesis to glucose production was not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of glycogenolysis could be an effective antidiabetic treatment.

  15. Ventilação mecânica volume-controlada versus pressão controlada em modelo canino de lesão pulmonar aguda: efeitos cardiorrespiratórios e sobre o custo de oxigênio da respiração Volume controlled ventilation versus pressure controlled ventilation in a canine acute lung injury model: effects on cardiorespiratory parameters and oxygen cost of breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO DO VALLE PINHEIRO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: Persiste a questão sobre se há vantagens mecânicas ou de trocas gasosas no uso da ventilação pressão-controlada (VPC sobre a ciclada a volume (VCV. Objetivos: Comparar, de forma randômica, a VPC com a VCV com fluxo desacelerado nos modos assistido e controlado em modelo experimental de lesão pulmonar aguda. Métodos: Sete cães com lesão pulmonar aguda grave (PaO2/FIO2 Background: It is questionable whether pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV has advantages over volume-cycled ventilation (VCV. Objectives: To compare PCV to VCV with decelerating flow profile during assisted and controlled modes in an acute lung injury experimental model. Methods: Severe acute lung injury (PaO2/FIO2 < 100 mmHg was induced by oleic acid IV infusion (0.05 mg/kg in seven dogs. The animals were submitted to PCV and VCV in a randomized sequence. After 40 minutes in the assisted mode, ventilation was changed to the controlled mode after neuromuscular blockade. The tidal volume and the inspiratory time were kept constant throughout the experiment. Results: There were no differences in gas exchange (PaO2 and PaCO2, cardiac output or oxygen delivery (DO2 between VCV and PCV. The same was observed regarding maximum airway and plateau pressures, and also to the static compliance. Oxygen consumption (VO2 after neuromuscular blockade was 124 ± 48 in VCV versus 143 ± 50 ml/min in PCV, p = 0.42. In the assisted mode, there was a statistical trend of a higher VO2 in PCV (219 ± 72 versus 154 ± 67 ml/min in VCV, p = 0.06, that was associated with a statistical trend of a higher oxygen cost of breathing (OCB during assisted PCV, although without statistical significance (31 ± 77 in VCV versus 75 ± 96 ml/min in PCV, p = 0.23, and also in a lower PvO2 (34 ± 7 in PCV versus 42 ± 6 ml/min in VCV, p = 0.02. These occurred despite a higher maximum inspiratory flow in the assisted mode in PCV (58 ± 9 versus 48 ± 4 L/min in VCV, p = 0.01. In both VCV and

  16. The difference of canine, first and second premolar tooth size resulted from cone beam computed tomography imaging with Moyers Prediction Table on the working study model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julies Hariani Sugiaman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Model study is one of the standard orthodontic components which is important for diagnosis and treatment plan, but in some patients with the high gag reflex, it will be difficult to get this kind of study models. The existence of a new device which is able to show the condition of patients' mouth in three space areas (axial, sagittal, and coronal is expected to be an alternative when a study model is difficult to get. The purpose of this study is to find out whether or not there are any differences on the size of canine's mesiodistal, first and second premolar resulted from CBCT imaging with Moyers analysis on the study models. The method of the research is comparative descriptive. Measurements are made on 10 CBCT imaging results and 10 study models. The mesiodistal size, the result of CBCT imaging is measured by the available computer program and also the mesiodistal size of the study models is measured using a sliding compass, and then the size of canines, first and second premolar teeth resulted from CBCT imaging are compared to the result of Moyers method analysis on the study models. The t-test is used to find out if there is a difference between teeth size value between the CBCT imaging with the study models. The significance is determined based on the p-value t table.

  17. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  18. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Gabriele; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Stolorz, Martin; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Nolte, Ingo

    2009-11-23

    Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS-) model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT-) and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI-) data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction) calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in silico development and testing of hip prostheses.

  19. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wefstaedt Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS- model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. Methods The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT- and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI- data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. Results and Discussion As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. Conclusion In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in

  20. Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications (incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain) and result in a more popular procedure. This study builds upon previously reported ex vivo tissue studies by exploring acute and short-term chronic in vivo canine studies. Isolation of the canine vas was achieved using a conventional vas ring clamp method. No perforation of the scrotal skin was necessary to occlude the vas. Laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface in a total of 8 dogs (n = 16 vasa) for a treatment time of 60 s. Burst pressure measurements were conducted at Days 0 and 21 (n = 8 vasa each day) to quantify the strength of vas closure. The vas was successfully thermally occluded in 15/16 (94%) procedures with 14/15 (93%) vas recording burst pressures above ejaculation pressure. One vas was not present, and another vas recorded a bursting pressure below ejaculation pressure. The coagulated vas bursting pressure averaged 283 +/- 34 mm Hg at Day 0 and 260 +/- 77 mm Hg at Day 21, significantly higher than reported vas ejaculation pressures of 136 +/- 29 mm Hg. Minor scrotal skin burns were observed during the recovery period. Noninvasive thermal occlusion of the vas is feasible in an in vivo canine model. Elimination of minor skin burns and longer term chronic in vivo canine studies are needed to confirm azospermia after vas occlusion without recanalization.

  1. CVS-1123, a direct thrombin inhibitor, prevents occlusive arterial and venous thrombosis in a canine model of vascular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, S S; Miller, B V; Basler, G C; Lucchesi, B R

    1997-02-01

    CVS-1123, low-molecular-weight, direct thrombin inhibitor was studied in an anesthetized canine model of arterial and venous thrombosis to determine whether thrombin inhibition could reduce the incidence of occlusive thrombosis in response to vessel-wall injury. The left carotid artery (LCA) and right jugular vein (RJV) were instrumented with a flow probe, intraluminal electrode, and critical stenosis. Either saline (n = 9), or CVS-1123 (n = 12) was administered in a loading dose of 2 mg/kg i.v., followed by an infusion (2.46 mg/kg/h for 180 min). Vessel-wall injury was initiated by applying a 300-microA anodal current to the intimal surface of the LCA and RJV. Platelet aggregation in response to gamma-thrombin remained inhibited by CVS-1123 for 8 h. The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) was increased and remained elevated for the duration of the protocol. The prothrombin time (PT) showed an initial increase and then a rapid decrease after the infusion was discontinued. There was a twofold increase in the bleeding time (BT) at 2 h. The time to occlusion of the LCA was prolonged (380 +/- 22 min in the CVS-1123 group vs. 152 +/- 18 min in the saline group) with seven of 12 patent arteries at 8 h. Similarly, the time to occlusion for RJV was prolonged (415 +/- 16 min in the CVS-1123 group vs. 99 +/- 8 min in the saline group) with eight of 12 veins remaining patent at 8 h. CVS-1123 administration was associated with a decrease in the thrombus weights in both the LCA and RJV as compared with the saline-treated animals. In summary, CVS-1123 modifies the thrombogenic response to deep vessel-wall injury in both the arterial and venous circulations. The results suggest that CVS-1123 is an effective antithrombin and may offer a therapeutic alternative to current antithrombins in the management of arterial and venous thrombosis.

  2. Jaw Function in Smilodon fatalis: A Reevaluation of the Canine Shear-Bite and a Proposal for a New Forelimb-Powered Class 1 Lever Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    The jaw function of Smilodon fatalis has long been a source of debate. Although modern-day lions subdue large prey through the use of a suffocating throat bite, the dramatically elongated maxillary canines of S. fatalis suggest an alternative bite mechanism. The current literature favors a “canine shear-bite,” in which the depression of the cranium by the ventral neck flexors assists the mandibular adductors in closing the jaws. Although the model makes intuitive sense and appears to be supported by scientific data, the mechanical feasibility of “neck-powered” biting has not been experimentally demonstrated. In the present study, the computer-assisted manipulation of digitized images of a high-quality replica of an S. fatalis neck and skull shows that a rotation of the cranium by the ventral neck flexors will not result in jaw closure. Instead, the cranium and mandible rotate ventrally together (at the atlantooccipital joint), and the jaws remain in an open configuration. The only manner by which rotation of the cranium can simultaneously result in jaw closure is by an anterior rotation at the temporomandibular joint. Based on this finding, the author proposes a new Class 1 lever mechanism for S. fatalis jaw function. In this model, the mandible is immobilized against the neck of the prey and a dorsally directed force from the extension of the forelimbs rotates the cranium anteriorly at the temporomandibular joint. The maxillary canines pierce the prey’s neck and assist in clamping the ventral neck structures. The model is based on a maximum gape angle of approximately 90° and incorporates a secondary virtual point of rotation located slightly anteroventral to the temporomandibular joint. The Class 1 Lever Model is mechanically feasible, consistent with current data on S. fatalis anatomy and ecology, and may provide a basis for similar studies on other fossil taxa. PMID:25272032

  3. Jaw function in Smilodon fatalis: a reevaluation of the canine shear-bite and a proposal for a new forelimb-powered Class 1 Lever Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G Brown

    Full Text Available The jaw function of Smilodon fatalis has long been a source of debate. Although modern-day lions subdue large prey through the use of a suffocating throat bite, the dramatically elongated maxillary canines of S. fatalis suggest an alternative bite mechanism. The current literature favors a "canine shear-bite," in which the depression of the cranium by the ventral neck flexors assists the mandibular adductors in closing the jaws. Although the model makes intuitive sense and appears to be supported by scientific data, the mechanical feasibility of "neck-powered" biting has not been experimentally demonstrated. In the present study, the computer-assisted manipulation of digitized images of a high-quality replica of an S. fatalis neck and skull shows that a rotation of the cranium by the ventral neck flexors will not result in jaw closure. Instead, the cranium and mandible rotate ventrally together (at the atlantooccipital joint, and the jaws remain in an open configuration. The only manner by which rotation of the cranium can simultaneously result in jaw closure is by an anterior rotation at the temporomandibular joint. Based on this finding, the author proposes a new Class 1 lever mechanism for S. fatalis jaw function. In this model, the mandible is immobilized against the neck of the prey and a dorsally directed force from the extension of the forelimbs rotates the cranium anteriorly at the temporomandibular joint. The maxillary canines pierce the prey's neck and assist in clamping the ventral neck structures. The model is based on a maximum gape angle of approximately 90° and incorporates a secondary virtual point of rotation located slightly anteroventral to the temporomandibular joint. The Class 1 Lever Model is mechanically feasible, consistent with current data on S. fatalis anatomy and ecology, and may provide a basis for similar studies on other fossil taxa.

  4. The establishment of atrial septal defect model with interventional management canine: its applied anatomy and technical points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yufeng; Huang Xinmiao; Bei Yuan; Wang Wei; Hu Jianqiang; Qin Yongwen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide the relevant applied anatomic information for the preparation of atrial septal defect (ASD) model with transcatheter management in canine,and to discuss the technical points in making ASD model under DSA guidance. Methods: Anatomical measurements of the heart specimens,which were obtained from 15 healthy adult hybrid dogs (9 males and 6 females), were performed, from which the relevant anatomic parameters of the atrial septum were calculated. Cardiac 3D reconstruction with 64-sliced spiral CT scan was carried out in 5 dogs and the results were analyzed. According to the trans-illuminated position and angle obtained from 3D reconstruction images both the puncturing of the atrial septum with Brokenbrough needle and the balloon dilatation under fluoroscopic guidance were conducted in 20 dogs (body weight 17 -22 kg) to prepare ASD model. Results: The length and the width of the interauricular septum were (17.8 ± 4.3) mm and (14.5 ± 3.8) mm, respectively. The oval fossa was (11.2 ± 2.7) mm long and (8.7±1.9) mm wide. The distance from the central point of oval fossa to the central point of the orifice of coronary sinus was (7.2 ± 1.3) mm, which was (9.9 ± 1.5) mm to the center of the membranous atrial septum, (13.6 ± 3.1) mm to the middle point of septal tricuspid valve, (12.1 ± 2.3) mm to the central point of the bottom of aortic eminence and (11.3 ± 1.9) mm to the middle point of anterior bicuspid valve. The angle between atrial septal plane and sagittal plane was 15 degree ± 5 degree, and the angle between atrial septal plane and coronal plane was 75 degree ± 5 degree. Thus, the puncture of the interauricular septum was carried out with the dog in right anterior oblique position at 75 degree ± 5 degree. Of the total 20 dogs, ASD model was successfully established in 18, failure of the puncturing occurred in the remaining two, of which one died of cardiac tamponade after the procedure and the other one died of mistakenly puncturing

  5. A Posteriori Comparison of Natural and Surgical Destabilization Models of Canine Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Moreau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years Canis familiaris, the domestic dog, has drawn particular interest as a model of osteoarthritis (OA. Here, we optimized the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament sectioning. The usefulness of noninvasive complementary outcome measures, such as gait analysis for the limb function and magnetic resonance imaging for structural changes, was demonstrated in this model. Relationships were established between the functional impairment and the severity of structural changes including the measurement of cartilage thinning. In the dog model of naturally occurring OA, excellent test-retest reliability was denoted for the measurement of the limb function. A criterion to identify clinically meaningful responders to therapy was determined for privately owned dogs undergoing clinical trials. In addition, the recording of accelerometer-based duration of locomotor activity showed strong and complementary agreement with the biomechanical limb function. The translation potential of these models to the human OA condition is underlined. A preclinical testing protocol which combines the dog model of experimental OA induced by cranial cruciate ligament transection and the Dog model of naturally occurring OA offers the opportunity to further investigate the structural and functional benefits of disease-modifying strategies. Ultimately, a better prediction of outcomes for human clinical trials would be brought.

  6. Canine adenoviruses and herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Martella, Vito; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2008-07-01

    Canine adenoviruses (CAVs) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) are pathogens of dogs that have been known for several decades. The two distinct types of CAVs, type 1 and type 2, are responsible for infectious canine hepatitis and infectious tracheobronchitis, respectively. In the present article, the currently available literature on CAVs and CHV is reviewed, providing a meaningful update on the epidemiologic, pathogenetic, clinical, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the infections caused by these important pathogens.

  7. A biomechanical comparison of conventional dynamic compression plates and string-of-pearls™ locking plates using cantilever bending in a canine Ilial fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzig, Allison R; Butler, James R; Priddy, Lauren B; Lacy, Kristen R; Elder, Steven H

    2017-07-13

    Fracture of the ilium is common orthopedic injury that often requires surgical stabilization in canine patients. Of the various methods of surgical stabilization available, application of a lateral bone plate to the ilium is the most common method of fixation. Many plating options are available, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a 3.5 mm String-of-Pearls™ plate and a 3.5 mm dynamic compression plate in a cadaveric canine ilial fracture model. Hemipelves were tested in cantilever bending to failure and construct stiffness, yield load, displacement at yield, ultimate load, and mode of failure were compared. The mean stiffness of dynamic compression plate (116 ± 47 N/mm) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (107 ± 18 N/mm) constructs, mean yield load of dynamic compression plate (793 ± 333 N) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (860 ± 207 N) constructs, mean displacement at yield of dynamic compression plate (8.6 ± 3.0 mm) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (10.2 ± 2.8 mm) constructs, and ultimate load at failure of dynamic compression plate (936 ± 320 N) and String-of-Pearls™ plate (939 ± 191 N) constructs were not significantly different. No differences were found between constructs with respect to mode of failure. No significant biomechanical differences were found between String-of-Pearls™ plate and dynamic compression plate constructs in this simplified cadaveric canine ilial fracture model.

  8. A comparative analysis of 7.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging and histology measurements of knee articular cartilage in a canine posterolateral knee injury model: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Scott R; Griffith, Chad J; Wijdicks, Coen A; Goerke, Ute; McNulty, Margaret A; Parker, Josh B; Carlson, Cathy S; Ellermann, Jutta; LaPrade, Robert F

    2009-11-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the use of 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating articular cartilage degeneration and quantifying the progression of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate articular cartilage cross-sectional area and maximum thickness in the medial compartment of intact and destabilized canine knees using 7.0-T magnetic resonance images and compare these results with those obtained from the corresponding histologic sections. Controlled laboratory study. Five canines had a surgically created unilateral grade III posterolateral knee injury that was followed for 6 months before euthanasia. The opposite, noninjured knee was used as a control. At necropsy, 3-dimensional gradient echo images of the medial tibial plateau of both knees were obtained using a 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Articular cartilage area and maximum thickness in this site were digitally measured on the magnetic resonance images. The proximal tibias were processed for routine histologic analysis with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Articular cartilage area and maximum thickness were measured in histologic sections corresponding to the sites of the magnetic resonance slices. The magnetic resonance imaging results revealed an increase in articular cartilage area and maximum thickness in surgical knees compared with control knees in all specimens; these changes were significant for both parameters (P .1). These results demonstrate that 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging provides an alternative method to histology to evaluate early osteoarthritic changes in articular cartilage in a canine model by detecting increases in articular cartilage area. The noninvasive nature of 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging will allow for in vivo monitoring of osteoarthritis progression and intervention in animal models and humans for osteoarthritis.

  9. Diagnosis of canine pulmonary thromboembolism by computed tomography and mathematical modelling using haemostatic and inflammatory variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschner, C. B.; Kristensen, A. T.; Rozanski, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    ) to investigate if diseased dogs with PTE, diagnosed by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA), had evidence of hypercoagulability by TEG; (2) to characterise haemostatic and inflammatory changes in dogs with PTE; (3) to construct models for prediction of PTE based on combinations of haemostatic...

  10. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Spee, Bart; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S.; Chen, Chen; Geijsen, Niels; Oosterhoff, Loes A.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Pelaez, Nicolas; Fieten, Hille; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Grinwis, Guy C.; Chan, Jefferson; Huch, Meritxell; Vries, Robert R. G.; Clevers, Hans; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C.; Schotanus, Baukje A.

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids) opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease

  11. Assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in left bundle branch block canine model: Comparison between cine and tagged MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saporito, Salvatore; van Assen, Hans C; Houthuizen, Patrick; Aben, Jean-Paul M M; Strik, Marc; van Middendorp, Lars B; Prinzen, Frits W; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    To compare cine and tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for left ventricular dyssynchrony assessment in left bundle branch block (LBBB), using the time-to-peak contraction timing, and a novel approach based on cross-correlation. We evaluated a canine model dataset (n = 10) before (pre-LBBB) and after induction of isolated LBBB (post-LBBB). Multislice short-axis tagged and cine MRI images were acquired using a 1.5 T scanner. We computed contraction time maps by cross-correlation, based on the timing of radial wall motion and of circumferential strain. Finally, we estimated dyssynchrony as the standard deviation of the contraction time over the different regions of the myocardium. Induction of LBBB resulted in a significant increase in dyssynchrony (cine: 13.0 ± 3.9 msec for pre-LBBB, and 26.4 ± 5.0 msec for post-LBBB, P = 0.005; tagged: 17.1 ± 5.0 msec at for pre-LBBB, and 27.9 ± 9.8 msec for post-LBBB, P = 0.007). Dyssynchrony assessed by cine and tagged MRI were in agreement (r = 0.73, P = 0.0003); differences were in the order of time difference between successive frames of 20 msec (bias: -2.9 msec; limit of agreement: 10.1 msec). Contraction time maps were derived; agreement was found in the contraction patterns derived from cine and tagged MRI (mean difference in contraction time per segment: 3.6 ± 13.7 msec). This study shows that the proposed method is able to quantify dyssynchrony after induced LBBB in an animal model. Cine-assessed dyssynchrony agreed with tagged-derived dyssynchrony, in terms of magnitude and spatial direction. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:956-963. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Maxillary growth in a congenital cleft palate canine model for surgical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradas-Lara, Irene; Casado-Gómez, Inmaculada; Martín, Conchita; Martínez-Sanz, Elena; López-Gordillo, Yamila; González, Pablo; Rodríguez-Bobada, Cruz; Chamorro, Manuel; Arias, Pablo; Maldonado, Estela; Ortega, Ricardo; Berenguer, Beatriz; Martínez-Álvarez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    We have recently presented the Old Spanish Pointer dog, with a 15-20% spontaneous congenital cleft palate rate, as a unique experimental model of this disease. This study aimed to describe the cleft palate of these dogs for surgical research purposes and to determine whether congenital cleft palate influences maxillofacial growth. Seven newborn Old Spanish Pointer dogs of both sexes, comprising a cleft palate group (n = 4) and a normal palate group (n = 3), were fed using the same technique. Macroscopic photographs and plaster casts from the palate, lateral radiographs and computer tomograms of the skull were taken sequentially over 41 weeks, starting at week 5. The cleft morphology, the size and the tissue characteristics in these dogs resembled the human cleft better than current available animal models. During growth, the cleft width varies. Most of the transverse and longitudinal measures of the palate were statistically lower in the cleft palate group. The cleft palate group showed hypoplasia of the naso-maxillary complex. This model of congenital cleft palate seems suitable for surgical research purposes. A reduced maxillofacial pre- and post-natal development is associated to the congenital cleft palate in the Old Spanish Pointer dog. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute ingestion dosimetry using the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the gastrointestinal (GI) tract model used for dosimetry as outlined in ICRP30, to allow quick calculations of effective dose equivalents for acute radionuclide ingestion. A computer program has been developed to emulate the GI tract model. The program and associated data files are structured so that the GI tract model parameters can be varied, while the file structure and algorithm for the GI tract model should require minimal modification to allow the same theories that apply in this model to be used for other dosimetric models

  14. The SimSpay-Student Perceptions of a Low-Cost Build-It-Yourself Model for Novice Training of Surgical Skills in Canine Ovariohysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langebæk, Rikke; Toft, Nils; Eriksen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Practical and ethical considerations have led to an increased use of artificial substitutes for live animals in veterinary surgical skills training. However, commercially produced models are expensive and homemade models often require full-time staff to produce enough models for training large...... groups of students. In the Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences of the University of Copenhagen, a low-cost build-it-yourself model, the SimSpay, was developed for novice training of surgical skills in canine ovariohysterectomy. The model did not require the use of trained technical...... staff or costly, hard-to-source supplies. The SimSpay was developed and implemented in the clinical veterinary curriculum in 2013. In 2014, 54 students participated in a questionnaire study to investigate their perception of the usefulness of the SimSpay as a learning tool. On a five-point Likert...

  15. Canine Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Use in Therapeutic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Janet R.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Childers, Martin K.; Li, Juan; Nghiem, Peter; Detwiler, David A.; Larsen, C. Aaron; Grange, Robert W.; Bhavaraju-Sanka, Ratna K.; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce P.; Howard, James F.; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Schatzberg, Scott J.; Styner, Martin A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Xiao, Xiao; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder in which the loss of dystrophin causes progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Potential therapies that carry substantial risk, such as gene and cell-based approaches, must first be tested in animal models, notably the mdx mouse and several dystrophin-deficient breeds of dogs, including golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). Affected dogs have a more severe phenotype, in keeping with that of DMD, so may better predict disease pathogenesis and treatment efficacy. We and others have developed various phenotypic tests to characterize disease progression in the GRMD model. These biomarkers range from measures of strength and joint contractures to magnetic resonance imaging. Some of these tests are routinely used in clinical veterinary practice, while others require specialized equipment and expertise. By comparing serial measurements from treated and untreated groups, one can document improvement or delayed progression of disease. Potential treatments for DMD may be broadly categorized as molecular, cellular, or pharmacologic. The GRMD model has increasingly been used to assess efficacy of a range of these therapies. While some of these studies have largely provided general proof-of-concept for the treatment under study, others have demonstrated efficacy using the biomarkers discussed. Importantly, just as symptoms in DMD vary among patients, GRMD dogs display remarkable phenotypic variation. While confounding statistical analysis in preclinical trials, this variation offers insight regarding the role that modifier genes play in disease pathogenesis. By correlating functional and mRNA profiling results, gene targets for therapy development can be identified. PMID:22218699

  16. Primary Culture of Canine Growth Plate Chondrocytes as a Model of Biomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Ryuji, HOSOKAWA; Kenji, KIKUZAKI; Daisuke, CHIBA; Yasumasa, AKAGAWA; Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry; Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry; Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry; Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the mineralization process in primary cultures of dog growth plate chondrocytes as a model of biomineralization. Chondrocytes were isolated from the growth plates of ribs of 1-week-old dogs. The chondrocytes were maintained at extremely high density (5x10^4 cells/well) in collagen-coated 96-well dishes in a-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 50 μg/ml ascorbic acid. Mineralization was initiated between days 20 and 24; however, the addition of fibroblast gr...

  17. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing Yi

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR. The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions.

  18. Computed tomographic evaluation of elbow congruity during arthroscopy in a canine cadaveric model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, O T; Warren-Smith, C M R; Burton, N J; Parsons, K J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effect of arthroscope insertion, using a carbon-fibre rod model, on humero-radial, humero-ulnar and radio-ulnar congruity, as assessed by computed tomography (CT). Cadaveric Greyhound elbow joints were assessed at a flexion angle of 135 ± 5° using CT. For condition 1, a 36 mm fulcrum induced cubital valgus, as used to aid arthroscope insertion. For conditions 2 and 3, a single 1.8 or 2.5 mm diameter rod was inserted under arthroscopic guidance to simulate arthroscope position for assessment of the medial coronoid process. Repeat CT scans were obtained for all conditions and parasagittal sections were reconstructed to evaluate medial, axial and lateral positions within the elbow. Humero-radial, humero-ulnar, and radio-ulnar congruity measurements were obtained. Differences between groups were assessed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Mean (±SD) change in radio-ulnar step between conditions 1 and 3 was 0.6 ± 0.3 mm (axial), 0.8 ± 0.6 mm (medial), and 0.5 ± 0.1 mm (lateral). Insertion of rods induced a significant decrease in radio-ulnar step in all planes. Significant differences were also identified between groups for humero-radial, humero-ulnar, and radio-ulnar congruity. Insertion of carbon-fibre rods as a model for elbow arthroscope insertion induces elbow incongruity. Changes in radio-ulnar congruity are small but the effect of arthroscope diameter should be considered when assessing elbow congruity.

  19. EW-7197 eluting nano-fiber covered self-expandable metallic stent to prevent granulation tissue formation in a canine urethral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Geun; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Kun Yung; Kim, Min Tae; Gang, Sung Gwon; Kim, Dae-Kee; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Song, Ho-Young

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate an EW-7197-eluting nanofiber-covered stent (NFCS) for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model. Materials and methods All experiments were approved by the committee of animal research. A total of 12 NFCSs were placed in the proximal and distal urethras of six dogs. Dogs were divided into two groups with 3 dogs each. The control stent (CS) group received NFCSs and the drug stent (DS) group received EW-7197 (1000 μg)-eluting NFCSs. All dogs were sacrificed 8 weeks after stent placement Histologic findings of the stented urethra were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results Stent placement was technically successful in all dogs without procedure-related complications. On urethrographic analysis, the mean luminal diameter was significantly larger in the DS group than in the CS group at 4 and 8 weeks after stent placement (all p 0.05). Conclusion The EW-7197-eluting NFCS is effective and safe for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model. PMID:29447198

  20. Characterization of 65 Epitope-Specific Dystrophin Monoclonal Antibodies in Canine and Murine Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy by Immunostaining and Western Blot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Yue, Yongping; Morris, Glenn E.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Epitope-specific monoclonal antibodies can provide unique insights for studying cellular proteins. Dystrophin is one of the largest cytoskeleton proteins encoded by 79 exons. The absence of dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last two decades, dozens of exon-specific human dystrophin monoclonal antibodies have been developed and successfully used for DMD diagnosis. Unfortunately, the majority of these antibodies have not been thoroughly characterized in dystrophin-deficient dogs, an outstanding large animal model for translational research. To fill the gap, we performed a comprehensive study on 65 dystrophin monoclonal antibodies in normal and dystrophic dogs (heart and skeletal muscle) by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. For comparison, we also included striated muscles from normal BL10 and dystrophin-null mdx mice. Our analysis revealed distinctive species, tissue and assay-dependent recognition patterns of different antibodies. Importantly, we identified 15 antibodies that can consistently detect full-length canine dystrophin in both immunostaining and western blot. Our results will serve as an important reference for studying DMD in the canine model. PMID:24516626

  1. Hyperosmolar irrigation compared with a standard solution in a canine shoulder arthroscopy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capito, Nicholas M; Smith, Matthew J; Stoker, Aaron M; Werner, Nikki; Cook, James L

    2015-08-01

    A hyperosmolar irrigation solution may decrease fluid extravasation during arthroscopic procedures. Demonstrating the safety of a hyperosmolar irrigation solution with respect to chondrocyte viability and cartilage water content was deemed necessary before designing a clinical efficacy study. We designed a translational animal model study in which hyperosmolar arthroscopy irrigation fluid (1.8%, 600 mOsm/L) was compared with normal saline (0.9%, 300 mOsm/L). Purpose-bred research dogs (n = 5) underwent bilateral shoulder arthroscopy. Irrigation fluid was delivered to each shoulder joint (n = 10) at 40 mm Hg for 120 minutes using standard ingress and egress portals. The percentage change in shoulder girth was documented at the completion of 120 minutes. Articular cartilage sections from the glenoid and humeral head were harvested from both shoulders. Chondrocyte viability and tissue water content were evaluated. Differences between groups and compared with time 0 controls were determined, with significance set at P irrigation solution used for arthroscopy was not associated with any detrimental effects on chondrocyte viability or tissue water content after 2 hours of arthroscopic irrigation. On the basis of potential benefits in conjunction with the safety demonstrated in these data, clinical evaluation of a hyperosmolar solution for irrigation during shoulder arthroscopy appears warranted. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of tumor motion effect in canine model for diagnostic and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sangkeun; Nam, Taewon; Kim, Kyeongmin [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seungwoo; Han, Suchul; Ji, Younghoon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Nohwon; Eom, Kidong [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The internal organs move up to 35mm maximum and it provides information and uncertainty that has been distorted in the diagnosis and treatment. Previous most studies for the effect of respiration have been performed with external monitoring systems but it cannot represent internal organ motion such as liver, pancreas, and lung. Positron emission tomography (PET) is more influenced by motion than computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since measurement time for image acquisition is longer than CT and MRI. Thus, count of tumor is to be underestimated and region of tumor is to be overestimated. The first aim of this study was developing the artificial pulmonary nodule which can be performed non-invasive transplant into thorax of dogs and second is to assess the effect of respiratory motion on PET image with evaluating the applicability of the artificial model using dogs for diagnosis and treatment. The developed artificial pulmonary nodule showed reproducibility and motion effect as respiratory cycle and it was verified in PET images. Radiation dose estimated was not changed and was reduced slightly of 10 rpm and 15 rpm, respectively, in both of glass dosimeter and ion chamber. The developed artificial pulmonary nodule will be useful tool for evaluating respiratory motion and better research performance for diagnosis and treatment will be expected with performing simulated experiment using the nodule conducted in this study.

  3. Influence of Overt Diabetes Mellitus on Cyclosporine Pharmacokinetics in a Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid M. Alkharfy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Diabetic patients usually require more medications than their nondiabetic counterparts. This work examined the effect of hyperglycemia on the pharmacokinetic properties of cyclosporine in a diabetic dog model. Main Methods. Diabetes was induced using a streptozotocin/alloxan combination and verified by measuring the serum glucose level. Cyclosporine was administered as a bolus intravenous dose of 5 mg/kg, and blood samples were collected at different time points for determining drug concentrations and biochemical analyses. Results. Diabetic dogs showed a significant increase in total body clearance of cyclosporine compared to healthy controls (0.457 L hr−1Kg−1 versus 0.201 L hr−1Kg−1, =.0019 and a decrease in its biological half-life (9.32 hours versus 22.56 hours, =.0125. In addition, diabetic animals exhibited a higher total cholesterol (7.20±0.62 mmol/L and 5.28±0.36 mmol/L; <.05 as well as more serum low density lipoproteins (4.45±0.72 mmol/L versus 1.06±0.10 mmol/L; <.05. Conclusion. Overt diabetes alters cyclosporine disposition by modulating its clearance. Abnormalities in the lipid profile, among other factors, may contribute to the accelerated metabolic degradation of cyclosporine under hyperglycemic conditions.

  4. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, A F; Petrov, M; Malik, A S; Mitchell, M A; Childers, M K; Bogan, J R; Seidner, G; Kornegay, J N; Stedman, H H

    2014-04-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼ 60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼ 900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD.

  5. Drilling dimension effects in early stages of osseointegration and implant stability in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baires-Campos, Felipe-Eduardo; Jimbo, Ryo; Fonseca-Oliveira, Maiolino-Thomaz; Moura, Camila; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny; Coelho, Paulo-Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Background This study histologically evaluated two implant designs: a classic thread design versus another specifically designed for healing chamber formation placed with two drilling protocols. Material and Methods Forty dental implants (4.1 mm diameter) with two different macrogeometries were inserted in the tibia of 10 Beagle dogs, and maximum insertion torque was recorded. Drilling techniques were: until 3.75 mm (regular-group); and until 4.0 mm diameter (overdrilling-group) for both implant designs. At 2 and 4 weeks, samples were retrieved and processed for histomorphometric analysis. For torque and BIC (bone-to-implant contact) and BAFO (bone area fraction occupied), a general-linear model was employed including instrumentation technique and time in vivo as independent. Results The insertion torque recorded for each implant design and drilling group significantly decreased as a function of increasing drilling diameter for both implant designs (pimplant designs for each drilling technique (p>0.18). A significant increase in BIC was observed from 2 to 4 weeks for both implants placed with the overdrilling technique (p0.32). Conclusions Despite the differences between implant designs and drilling technique an intramembranous-like healing mode with newly formed woven bone prevailed. Key words: Histomorphometry, biomechanical, in vivo, initial stability, insertion torque, osseointegration. PMID:25858087

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a rabbit model using canine small intestinal submucosa and autologous platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A-Jin; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Pil; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee; Kim, Hwi-Yool

    2012-11-01

    The bone-ligament interface is the main point of failure after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Synthetic ligament materials have problems such as a greater failure rate of the bone-ligament insertion than autografts. Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a biologic scaffold that has been used to repair musculoskeletal tissue and has been shown to promote cell migration and enhance collagen fiber regeneration. Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has also been investigated as a potential promoter of tendon healing. We investigated SIS and PRP as biomaterials that might strengthen the bone-tunnel interface and improve tendon structure formation. Anterior cruciate ligament grafts were formed of braid-twist canine SIS. These canine SIS ligament grafts were used for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in 20 New Zealand white rabbits. The rabbits were divided into 2 treatment groups. In 1 group (SIS group; n = 10), we only implanted the canine SIS grafts. In the second group (PRP group; n = 10), we applied autologous PRP to the surgical area after implantation of canine SIS grafts. We determined the cytokine level of the autologous PRP using a transforming growth factor-β1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. At 1 and 4 wk after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate the grafts. The femur-graft-tibia complex was assessed histologically and biomechanically at 8 wk after surgery. At 1 wk after surgery, the magnetic resonance imaging scans of the PRP group showed high signal-intensity lesions. In biomechanical tests, the SIS group had a significantly greater maximum load, maximum stress, and ultimate load and strain than the PRP group. The histologic findings of the PRP group revealed a greater cellular response, fibrotic tissue regeneration around the graft, broad chondrocyte cell infiltration, and collagen fibers that were loosely attached to the bone. The PRP group had significantly lower tension load values than the SIS group

  7. Alveolar bone preservation subsequent to miniscrew implant placement in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsen, B; Huja, S S; Chien, H-H; Dalstra, M

    2015-05-01

    To assess the effects of transcortical screws on alveolar (bone) ridge preservation following extraction. Four adult beagle dogs had mandibular premolars extracted bilaterally. After 6 weeks, using a split-mouth design, two transcortical screws were inserted unilaterally below the alveolar crest on the experimental side in the region of the extraction. The dogs were killed after 12 weeks. The bone at the extraction sites was analyzed using μCT and 3D analysis. A cylindrical core was placed around the actual and a virtual screw placed in the identical location on the control side. The bone volume within the cylinders was quantified. An insertion of a dental implant was simulated bilaterally at the insertion site. The height of the clinical crown and the alveolar crest were determined on both sides. The bone turnover was assessed histomorphometrically on un-decalcified bucco-lingual sections stained with basic fuchsine and toluidine blue. Comparison of the two sides revealed a significant difference both with regard to the bone volume and morphology. The transcortical screw caused an increase in bone density and less ridge atrophy. When simulating a dental implant placement on both sides, the bone preservation on the experimental side led to a need for a shorter clinical crown compared to the control side. A higher activity level of the bone in the experimental side was demonstrated histologically. In this dog model the insertion of a mini-implant across the healing alveolar process results in increased density not only adjacent to the screws, but also in the region where a potential dental implant would be inserted. In humans, the insertion of transcortical screws may maintain bone when for various reasons insertion of a permanent dental implant has to be postponed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Histopathologic Evolution of Cardiomyopathy in a Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia M.M. Malvestio

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized for mutation in dystrophin gene and manifested by progressive degeneration and necrosis of skeletal and cardiac muscle with replacement leading to generalized muscular weakness and atrophy. The dog Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD is the best experimental model for DMD, with genotypic and phenotypic manifestations closely of human disease. Similar to patients with DMD, heart failure is a major cause of death in GRMD animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pathological progression of myocardial lesions from GRMD dogs in different ages in order to clarify the pathogenesis of Duchenne´s cardiomyopathy. Fragments of left and right ventricle and interventricular septum, from 18 GRMD dogs between 6 to 51 months were collected, fixed, dehydrated, clarified, and finally embedded in paraffin. Five micrometer thick serial sections were obtained and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE, Picrosirius red, and Von Kossa. Histological analyses were performed at the light microscopy. Myocardial lesions were observed in all GRMD dogs and the sequence of cardiac lesion classified according to according to the age included: abnormal calcium accumulation, myofibrillar necrosis, proliferation of granulation tissue, endomysial and perimysial fibrosis, and finally myocardial fatty infiltration. Interestingly, several Anitschkow cells, the hallmark of rheumatic carditis, were detected in inflammatory infiltrate present at granulation tissue. Our results demonstrate the sequence of cardiac lesions that determine the cardiomyopathy in Golden Retriever dogs affected by DMD and exhibit, for the first time, the Anitschkow cells in the histological findings of this cardiomyopathy. These results are relevant for to clarify the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in dogs and humans affected by DMD.

  9. Contribution of Schwann Cells to Remyelination in a Naturally Occurring Canine Model of CNS Neuroinflammation.

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    Kristel Kegler

    Full Text Available Gliogenesis under pathophysiological conditions is of particular clinical relevance since it may provide evidence for regeneration promoting cells recruitable for therapeutic purposes. There is evidence that neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR-expressing cells emerge in the lesioned CNS. However, the phenotype and identity of these cells, and signals triggering their in situ generation under normal conditions and certain pathological situations has remained enigmatic. In the present study, we used a spontaneous, idiopathic and inflammatory CNS condition in dogs with prominent lympho-histiocytic infiltration as a model to study the phenotype of Schwann cells and their relation to Schwann cell remyelination within the CNS. Furthermore, the phenotype of p75NTR-expressing cells within the injured CNS was compared to their counter-part in control sciatic nerve and after peripheral nerve injury. In addition, organotypic slice cultures were used to further elucidate the origin of p75NTR-positive cells. In cerebral and cerebellar white and grey matter lesions as well as in the brain stem, p75NTR-positive cells co-expressed the transcription factor Sox2, but not GAP-43, GFAP, Egr2/Krox20, periaxin and PDGFR-α. Interestingly, and contrary to the findings in control sciatic nerves, p75NTR-expressing cells only co-localized with Sox2 in degenerative neuropathy, thus suggesting that such cells might represent dedifferentiated Schwann cells both in the injured CNS and PNS. Moreover, effective Schwann cell remyelination represented by periaxin- and P0-positive mature myelinating Schwann cells, was strikingly associated with the presence of p75NTR/Sox2-expressing Schwann cells. Intriguingly, the emergence of dedifferentiated Schwann cells was not affected by astrocytes, and a macrophage-dominated inflammatory response provided an adequate environment for Schwann cells plasticity within the injured CNS. Furthermore, axonal damage was reduced in brain stem areas

  10. Mortality Probability Model III and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dudley, R. Adams

    2009-01-01

    Background: To develop and compare ICU length-of-stay (LOS) risk-adjustment models using three commonly used mortality or LOS prediction models. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, we performed a retrospective, observational study of 11,295 ICU patients from 35 hospitals in the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project. We compared the accuracy of the following three LOS models: a recalibrated acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) IV-LOS model; and models developed using risk factors in the mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0) and the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II mortality prediction model. We evaluated models by calculating the following: (1) grouped coefficients of determination; (2) differences between observed and predicted LOS across subgroups; and (3) intraclass correlations of observed/expected LOS ratios between models. Results: The grouped coefficients of determination were APACHE IV with coefficients recalibrated to the LOS values of the study cohort (APACHE IVrecal) [R2 = 0.422], mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0 III) [R2 = 0.279], and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) [R2 = 0.008]. For each decile of predicted ICU LOS, the mean predicted LOS vs the observed LOS was significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) for three, two, and six deciles using APACHE IVrecal, MPM0 III, and SAPS II, respectively. Plots of the predicted vs the observed LOS ratios of the hospitals revealed a threefold variation in LOS among hospitals with high model correlations. Conclusions: APACHE IV and MPM0 III were more accurate than SAPS II for the prediction of ICU LOS. APACHE IV is the most accurate and best calibrated model. Although it is less accurate, MPM0 III may be a reasonable option if the data collection burden or the treatment effect bias is a consideration. PMID:19363210

  11. Experimental models of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  13. Computational modeling of acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, P; Kuhl, E

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction, commonly known as heart attack, is caused by reduced blood supply and damages the heart muscle because of a lack of oxygen. Myocardial infarction initiates a cascade of biochemical and mechanical events. In the early stages, cardiomyocytes death, wall thinning, collagen degradation, and ventricular dilation are the immediate consequences of myocardial infarction. In the later stages, collagenous scar formation in the infarcted zone and hypertrophy of the non-infarcted zone are auto-regulatory mechanisms to partly correct for these events. Here we propose a computational model for the short-term adaptation after myocardial infarction using the continuum theory of multiplicative growth. Our model captures the effects of cell death initiating wall thinning, and collagen degradation initiating ventricular dilation. Our simulations agree well with clinical observations in early myocardial infarction. They represent a first step toward simulating the progression of myocardial infarction with the ultimate goal to predict the propensity toward heart failure as a function of infarct intensity, location, and size.

  14. Genome-wide association identifies a deletion in the 3' untranslated region of striatin in a canine model of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, Kathryn M; Mauceli, Evan; Lahmers, Sunshine; Acland, Gregory M; White, Stephen N; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2010-09-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a familial cardiac disease characterized by ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. It is most frequently inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete and age-related penetrance and variable clinical expression. The human disease is most commonly associated with a causative mutation in one of several genes encoding desmosomal proteins. We have previously described a spontaneous canine model of ARVC in the boxer dog. We phenotyped adult boxer dogs for ARVC by performing physical examination, echocardiogram and ambulatory electrocardiogram. Genome-wide association using the canine 50k SNP array identified several regions of association, of which the strongest resided on chromosome 17. Fine mapping and direct DNA sequencing identified an 8-bp deletion in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the Striatin gene on chromosome 17 in association with ARVC in the boxer dog. Evaluation of the secondary structure of the 3' UTR demonstrated that the deletion affects a stem loop structure of the mRNA and expression analysis identified a reduction in Striatin mRNA. Dogs that were homozygous for the deletion had a more severe form of disease based on a significantly higher number of ventricular premature complexes. Immunofluorescence studies localized Striatin to the intercalated disc region of the cardiac myocyte and co-localized it to three desmosomal proteins, Plakophilin-2, Plakoglobin and Desmoplakin, all involved in the pathogenesis of ARVC in human beings. We suggest that Striatin may serve as a novel candidate gene for human ARVC.

  15. Sequencing and G-quadruplex folding of the canine proto-oncogene KIT promoter region: might dog be used as a model for human disease?

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    Silvia Da Ros

    Full Text Available Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2 were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations.

  16. Porous Alpha-Tricalcium Phosphate with Immobilized Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Enhances Bone Regeneration in a Canine Mandibular Bone Defect Model

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    Nobuhiro Kobayashi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porous alpha-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP with immobilized basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF on bone regeneration was evaluated in a canine mandibular bone defect model. Identical bone defects were made in the canine mandible; six defects in each animal were filled with porous α-TCP with bFGF bound via heparin (bFGF group, whereas the other was filled with unmodified porous α-TCP (control group. Micro-computed tomography and histological evaluation were performed two, four and eight weeks after implantation. The bone mineral density of the bFGF group was higher than that of the control group at each time point (p < 0.05, and the bone mineral content of the bFGF group was higher than that of the control group at four and eight weeks (p < 0.05. Histological evaluation two weeks after implantation revealed that the porous α-TCP had degraded and bone had formed on the surface of α-TCP particles in the bFGF group. At eight weeks, continuous cortical bone with a Haversian structure covered the top of bone defects in the bFGF group. These findings demonstrate that porous α-TCP with immobilized bFGF can promote bone regeneration.

  17. Receptor for advanced glycation end products involved in lung ischemia reperfusion injury in cardiopulmonary bypass attenuated by controlled oxygen reperfusion in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Jian; Ye, Sheng; Liang, Meng-ya; Chen, Guang-xian; Liu, Hai; Zhang, Jin-Xin; Wu, Zhong-kai

    2013-01-01

    Controlled oxygen reperfusion could protect the lung against ischemia-reperfusion injury in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) by downregulating high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a high affinity receptor of HMGB1. This study investigated the effect of controlled oxygen reperfusion on receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression and its downstream effects on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury. Fourteen canines received CPB with 60 minutes of aortic clamping and cardioplegic arrest followed by 90 minutes of reperfusion. Animals were randomized to receive 80% FiO2 during the entire procedure (control group) or to a test group receiving a controlled oxygen reperfusion protocol. Pathologic changes in lung tissues, RAGE expression, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated. The lung pathologic scores after 25 and 90 minutes of reperfusion were significantly lower in the test group compared with the control group (p RAGE expression, TNF-α, and IL-6 were downregulated by controlled oxygen treatment (p RAGE might be involved in the lung ischemia-reperfusion injury in canine model of CPB, which was downregulated by controlled oxygen reperfusion.

  18. Ex vivo evaluation of the biomechanical effect of varying monocortical screw numbers on a plate-rod canine femoral gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisser, P J; McCombe, G P; Trask, R S; Etches, J A; German, A J; Holden, S L; Wallace, A M; Burton, N J

    2013-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical behaviour of plate-rod constructs with varying numbers of monocortical screws applied to an ex vivo canine femoral-gap ostectomy model. Twenty Greyhound dog cadaveric femurs. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed with dual x-ray absorptiometry. Bones were assigned to four groups. Bones had a 12-hole 3.5 mm locking compression plate with one bicortical non-locking cortical screw in the most proximal and distal plate holes and an intramedullary Steinmann pin applied across a 20 mm mid-diaphyseal ostectomy. Additionally, one to four monocortical non-locking cortical screws were then placed (Groups 1-4 respectively) in the proximal and distal fragments. Stiffness and axial collapse were determined before and after cyclic axial loading (6000 cycles at 20%, 40%, and 60% of mean bodyweight [total: 18000 cycles]). Constructs subsequently underwent an additional 45000 cycles at 60% of bodyweight (total: 63000 cycles). Loading to failure was then performed and ultimate load and mode of failure recorded. The BMD did not differ significantly between groups. Construct stiffness for group 1 was significantly less than group 4 (p = 0.008). Stiffness showed a linear increase with an increasing number of monocortical screws (p = 0.001). All constructs survived fatigue loading. Load-to-failure was not significantly different between groups. Mean load- to-failure of all groups was >1350N. Ex vivo canine large-breed femurs showed adequate stability biomechanically and gradually increasing stiffness with increasing monocortical screw numbers.

  19. Cryo-Induced Thermal Wounds: A Human Acute Wound Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Alejandra; Fox, Joshua D; Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Maderal, Andrea D; Badiavas, Evangelos; Cargill, D Innes; Slade, Herbert B; Feldman, Steven R; Kirsner, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    Clinical models are invaluable in studying wound healing. Challenges in studying human wounds include heterogeneity of patients and wounds, as well as prolonged study time, resulting in high costs. Animal models are an efficient method to study wound healing, but often lack correlation with human acute wound healing. Human wound models can be created using sharp instruments, suction, acids, heat and cold. In this observational study, we propose a practical human acute wound model where partial thickness wounds are induced by cryosurgery to create wounds that could facilitate wound healing research and development. On forearms of 8 healthy adult volunteers, freeze injuries were induced using liquid nitrogen spray delivered onto a target area of a 1 cm circular opening at a distance from the cryo-device to the skin of 0.5-1 cm. Several freeze-thaw time cycles were implemented by administering pulses ranging from 3 to 12 seconds. Clinical evaluation was performed at a 24-hour follow-up period. Blister roofs were histologically analyzed by a blinded dermatophathologist. Clinical assessment of time to heal was determined. Freeze-times greater than 5 seconds caused a majority of subjects to develop blisters, and freeze-times greater than 8 seconds resulted in uniform blister formation. Consistent histology of full thickness necrotic epidermis with intact detached basement membrane with minimal acute neutrophilic inflammatory infiltrate was observed in all blister specimens examined. The 8-second freeze-time group had a time to heal of 13-14 days, while the 12-second freeze-time group required 3 weeks to heal. After healing, an area of hypopigmented skin and slightly hypertrophic scarring remained. This novel cryo-induced wound model is a potential simple, efficient and reliable model for studying the dynamic processes involved in acute wound healing and to aid in the development of new wound healing therapies. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01253135.

  20. Low Radiation Dose and Low Cell Dose Increase the Risk of Graft Rejection in a Canine Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sandra; Steder, Anne; Glass, Änne; Killian, Doreen; Wittmann, Susanne; Machka, Christoph; Werner, Juliane; Schäfer, Stephanie; Roolf, Catrin; Junghanss, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The canine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) model has become accepted in recent decades as a good preclinical model for the development of new transplantation strategies. Information on factors associated with outcome after allogeneic HSCT are a prerequisite for designing new risk-adapted transplantation protocols. Here we report a retrospective analysis aimed at identifying risk factors for allograft rejection in the canine HSCT model. A total of 75 dog leukocyte antigen-identical sibling HSCTs were performed since 2003 on 10 different protocols. Conditioning consisted of total body irradiation at 1.0 Gy (n = 20), 2.0 Gy (n = 40), or 4.5 Gy (n = 15). Bone marrow was infused either intravenously (n = 54) or intraosseously (n = 21). Cyclosporin A alone or different combinations of cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, and everolimus were used for immunosuppression. A median cell dose of 3.5 (range, 1.0 to 11.8) total nucleated cells (TNCs)/kg was infused. Cox analyses were used to assess the influence of age, weight, radiation dose, donor/recipient sex, type of immunosuppression, and cell dose (TNCs, CD34(+) cells) on allograft rejection. Initial engraftment occurred in all dogs. Forty-two dogs (56%) experienced graft rejection at median of 11 weeks (range, 6 to 56 weeks) after HSCT. Univariate analyses revealed radiation dose, type of immunosuppression, TNC dose, recipient weight, and recipient age as factors influencing long-term engraftment. In multivariate analysis, low radiation dose (P rejection. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell chimerism ≥30% (P = .008) and granulocyte chimerism ≥70% (P = .023) at 4 weeks after HSCT were independent predictors of stable engraftment. In summary, these data indicate that even in low-dose total body irradiation-based regimens, the irradiation dose is important for engraftment. The level of blood chimerism at 4 weeks post-HSCT was predictive of long-term engraftment in the canine HSCT

  1. Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Jørgen; Willesen, Jakob Lundgren

    2009-01-01

    Canine pulmonary angiostrongylosis is an emerging snail-borne disease causing verminous pnemonia and coagulopathy in dogs. The parasite is fund in Europe, North and South America and Africa, covering tropical, subtropical and temperate regions. Its distribution has been characterised by isolated...... larvae may not reflect what happens under field conditions. There is insufficient understanding of the spread of infection and the dynamic consequences of this parasite in the canine population. This review discusses the biology, epidemiology, clinical aspects and management of canine pulmonary...

  2. The establishment of animal model of acute massive pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Junliang; Yang Ning; Yang Jianping; Ma Junshan; Zhao Shijun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To find a way of establishing the model of acute massive pulmonary embolism in dog. Methods: Seven dogs were selected with self-clots made outside the body transferring through a 10 F guiding catheter into the central branch of pulmonary artery via the femoral vein approach on one side and then under pressure monitor of pulmonary artery until the very branch of pulmonary artery was occluded. Blood gas and pulmonary arterial pressure were tested before and after the embolization, Pulmonary artery pressure was continuously monitored together with the examinations of angiography. The bilateral lung specimens were resected for histological examination 12 hours in average after the embolization for comparative study. Results: One animal died of cardiogenic shock after clots injection; the other one presented with tachycardia and premature ventricular beat causing partial recanalization 12 h later. The others were occluded successfully in central branch of pulmonary artery and the pulmonary arterial pressure reached above 50 mmHg after occlusion. Pathologic examination showed the formation of red and mix thrombi within the vascular lumens. Conclusions: This method for making acute massive pulmonary embolism animal model was reliable, feasible and reproducible, and could provide an animal model of acute massive pulmonary embolism for other correlative experiments. (authors)

  3. Neuroprotective effect of intracarotid cold saline infusion following cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a hypothermic cardiac arrest canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-zheng SHUAI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effect of intracarotid cold saline infusion (ICSI on neurological outcomes in canines with cardiac arrest (CA introduced by severe hypothermia. Methods Restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC after hypothermic CA was induced in 10 Beagle dogs. These 10 dogs were randomly divided into 2 groups (5 each. Dogs in control group were rewarmed using warn water bath, and dogs in experimental group received the bath rewarming plus ICSI for 6 hours to maintain the brain temperature <36℃. In both groups, the Neurologic Disability Scores (NDS were recorded at 24h after the ROSC, and their brains were removed for pathologic analysis using hematoxylin and eosin stain. The brain water content and s100β of serum level were also measured. Results The water content (79.43%±0.72% vs. 80.79%±1.06%, P<0.05 and serum level of s100β (119.83±42.93pg/ml vs. 329.82±190.39pg/ml, P<0.05 were significantly lower in experimental group than in the control group. Control group presented obvious pathological damage of the hippocampal pyramidal cells. There was no significant difference in NDS between the two groups. Conclusion ICSI could reduce the production of s100β and pathological brain damage in post-arrest hypothermic canines. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.10.08

  4. An experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saruc M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature indicates that acute pancreatitis is a complication of massive hemolysis with a prevalence of about 20%. We describe an experimental model of hemolysis-induced acute pancreatitis. Hemolytic anemia was induced in rats by a single ip injection of 60 mg/kg of 20 mg/ml acetylphenylhydrazine (APH in 20% (v/v ethanol on the first experimental day (day 0. One hundred and fifty Wistar albino rats weighing 180-200 g were divided into three groups of 50 animals each: groups 1, 2 and 3 were injected ip with APH, 20% ethanol, and physiological saline, respectively. Ten rats from each group were sacrificed on study days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Serum amylase, lipase levels and pancreatic tissue tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and platelet-activating factor (PAF contents were determined and a histological examination of the pancreas was performed. No hemolysis or pancreatitis was observed in any of the rats in groups 2 and 3. In group 1, massive hemolysis was observed in 35 (70% of 50 rats, moderate hemolysis in seven (14%, and no hemolysis in eight (16%. Thirty-three of 35 (94.2% rats with massive hemolysis had hyperamylasemia, and 29 of these rats (82.8% had histologically proven pancreatitis. The most severe pancreatitis occurred on day 3, as demonstrated by histology. Tissue TNF-alpha and PAF levels were statistically higher in group 1 than in groups 2 and 3. Acute massive hemolysis induced acute pancreatitis, as indicated by histology, in almost 80% of cases. Hemolysis may induce acute pancreatitis by triggering the release of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines.

  5. Collateral ventilation quantification using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT: Differences between canine and swine models of bronchial occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ah; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chng Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 +/- 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 +/- 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 +/- 1.8% vs. -5.4 +/- 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction.

  6. Collateral ventilation quantification using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT: Differences between canine and swine models of bronchial occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ah; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Sang Joon; Lee, Chang Hyun; Park, Chng Min

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the difference in the degree of collateral ventilation between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction could be detected by using xenon-enhanced dynamic dual-energy CT. Eight mongrel dogs and six pigs underwent dynamic dual-energy scanning of 64-slice dual-source CT at 12-second interval for 2-minute wash-in period (60% xenon) and at 24-second interval for 3-minute wash-out period with segmental bronchus occluded. Ventilation parameters of magnitude (A value), maximal slope, velocity (K value), and time-to-peak (TTP) enhancement were calculated from dynamic xenon maps using exponential function of Kety model. A larger difference in A value between parenchyma was observed in pigs than in dogs (absolute difference, -33.0 +/- 5.0 Hounsfield units [HU] vs. -2.8 +/- 7.1 HU, p = 0.001; normalized percentage difference, -79.8 +/- 1.8% vs. -5.4 +/- 16.4%, p = 0.0007). Mean maximal slopes in both periods in the occluded parenchyma only decreased in pigs (all p < 0.05). K values of both periods were not different (p = 0.892) in dogs. However, a significant (p = 0.027) difference was found in pigs in the wash-in period. TTP was delayed in the occluded parenchyma in pigs (p = 0.013) but not in dogs (p = 0.892). Xenon-ventilation CT allows the quantification of collateral ventilation and detection of differences between canine and swine models of bronchial obstruction.

  7. Effects of Erdosteine on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Banu; Karapolat, Sami; Gurleyik, Emin; Yasar, Mehmet

    2017-10-01

    To create acute pancreatitis condition experimentally in rats using cerulein, and to reveal histopathological effects in pancreatic tissue with erdosteine. An experimental study. Department of General Surgery, Duzce University, Turkey, from June to October 2014. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. No procedures were applied to Group 1. The rats in Group 2 and Group 3 were injected cerulein, to establish an experimental pancreatitis model and the blood amylase and lipase values were examined. The rats in Group 3 were given 10 mg/kg erdosteine. This treatment was continued for another 2 days and the rats were sacrificed. The pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically for edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization. The lipase and amylase values and the histopathological examination of pancreatic tissues evidenced that the experimental acute pancreatitis model was established and edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis, and vacuolization were observed in the pancreatic tissues. The statistical results suggest that erdosteine can decrease the edema, inflammation, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and vacuolization scores in the tissues. The severity of acute pancreatitis, induced by cerulein in rats, is reduced with the use of erdosteine.

  8. Development of a model based scoring system for diagnosis of canine disseminated intravascular coagulation with independent assessment of sensitivity and specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Bo; Jensen, Asger Lundorff; Johansson, Per Ingemar

    2010-01-01

    coagulation tests for the diagnosis of DIC in dogs. To develop the scoring system, 100 dogs consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) with diseases predisposing for DIC were enrolled prospectively (group A). The validation involved 50 dogs consecutively diagnosed with diseases predisposing......A template for a scoring system for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in humans has been proposed by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). The objective of this study was to develop and validate a similar objective scoring system based on generally available...... of the model was sustained by prospective evaluation in group B (sensitivity 83.3%, specificity 77.3%). Based on commonly used, plasma-based coagulation assays, it was possible to design an objective diagnostic scoring system for canine DIC with a high sensitivity and specificity....

  9. Acute liver failure: a critical appraisal of available animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Mireille; Butterworth, Roger F

    2005-12-01

    The availability of adequate experimental models of acute liver failure (ALF) is of prime importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and allow the development and testing of new therapeutic approaches for patients with ALF. However, the numerous etiologies and complications of ALF contribute to the complexity of this condition and render the development of an ideal experimental model of ALF more difficult than expected. Instead, a number of different models that may be used for the study of specific aspects of ALF have been developed. The most common approaches used to induce ALFin experimental animals are surgical procedures, toxic liver injury,or a combination of both. Despite the high prevalence of viral hepatitis worldwide, very few satisfactory viral models of ALF are available. Established and newly developed models of ALF are reviewed.

  10. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  11. A LINE-1 insertion in DLX6 is responsible for cleft palate and mandibular abnormalities in a canine model of Pierre Robin sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena T Wolf

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cleft palate (CP is one of the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. In order to study cleft palate in a naturally occurring model system, we utilized the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR dog breed. Micro-computed tomography analysis of CP NSDTR craniofacial structures revealed that these dogs exhibit defects similar to those observed in a recognizable subgroup of humans with CP: Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS. We refer to this phenotype in NSDTRs as CP1. Individuals with PRS have a triad of birth defects: shortened mandible, posteriorly placed tongue, and cleft palate. A genome-wide association study in 14 CP NSDTRs and 72 unaffected NSDTRs identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 14 (24.2 Mb-29.3 Mb; p(raw = 4.64 × 10(-15. Sequencing of two regional candidate homeobox genes in NSDTRs, distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5 and distal-less homeobox 6 (DLX6, identified a 2.1 kb LINE-1 insertion within DLX6 in CP1 NSDTRs. The LINE-1 insertion is predicted to insert a premature stop codon within the homeodomain of DLX6. This prompted the sequencing of DLX5 and DLX6 in a human cohort with CP, where a missense mutation within the highly conserved DLX5 homeobox of a patient with PRS was identified. This suggests the involvement of DLX5 in the development of PRS. These results demonstrate the power of the canine animal model as a genetically tractable approach to understanding naturally occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans.

  12. A LINE-1 Insertion in DLX6 Is Responsible for Cleft Palate and Mandibular Abnormalities in a Canine Model of Pierre Robin Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Zena T.; Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Arzi, Boaz; Jayashankar, Kartika; Karmi, Nili; Jia, Zhonglin; Rowland, Douglas J.; Young, Amy; Safra, Noa; Sliskovic, Saundra; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Wade, Claire M.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2014-01-01

    Cleft palate (CP) is one of the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. In order to study cleft palate in a naturally occurring model system, we utilized the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR) dog breed. Micro-computed tomography analysis of CP NSDTR craniofacial structures revealed that these dogs exhibit defects similar to those observed in a recognizable subgroup of humans with CP: Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS). We refer to this phenotype in NSDTRs as CP1. Individuals with PRS have a triad of birth defects: shortened mandible, posteriorly placed tongue, and cleft palate. A genome-wide association study in 14 CP NSDTRs and 72 unaffected NSDTRs identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 14 (24.2 Mb–29.3 Mb; praw = 4.64×10−15). Sequencing of two regional candidate homeobox genes in NSDTRs, distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5) and distal-less homeobox 6 (DLX6), identified a 2.1 kb LINE-1 insertion within DLX6 in CP1 NSDTRs. The LINE-1 insertion is predicted to insert a premature stop codon within the homeodomain of DLX6. This prompted the sequencing of DLX5 and DLX6 in a human cohort with CP, where a missense mutation within the highly conserved DLX5 homeobox of a patient with PRS was identified. This suggests the involvement of DLX5 in the development of PRS. These results demonstrate the power of the canine animal model as a genetically tractable approach to understanding naturally occurring craniofacial birth defects in humans. PMID:24699068

  13. Toll-like receptors 4 and 9 are responsible for the maintenance of the inflammatory reaction in canine steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis, a large animal model for neutrophilic meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiolini Arianna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting young adult dogs and a potential large animal model for neutrophilic meningitis. Similarities between SRMA and infectious central nervous system (CNS diseases in lymphocyte subsets suggest an infectious origin. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors playing an important role in innate immunity. Due to their ability to recognize both self and non-self antigens, we hypothesize that TLRs are among the key factors for the induction of the inflammatory process in SRMA and provide an indirect hint on the etiology of the disease. Methods The expression profile of cell surface TLRs (TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 and intracellular TLRs (TLR3 and TLR9 of canine leukocytes was analyzed by immunophenotyping and subsequent flow cytometric measurements. Experiments were performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and peripheral blood (PB samples of dogs affected with SRMA during the acute phase (n = 14 as well as during treatment (n = 23 and compared with those of dogs with bacterial meningitis (n = 3, meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology (n = 6, neoplasia of the central nervous system (n = 6 and a group of dogs with miscellaneous neurological diseases (n = 9. Two additional control groups consisted of dogs with pyogenic infections (n = 13 and of healthy dogs (n = 6. Results All examined groups showed a high percentage of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR5 positive PB polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs in comparison to healthy dogs. Very high values of TLR9 positive PB PMNs were detected in acute SRMA. Only a few similarities were found between SRMA patients and dogs with pyogenic infections, both groups were characterized by high expression of TLR4 positive PB monocytes. Glucocorticosteroid therapy reduced TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 expression in PB monocytes. Conclusions A relatively high expression of TLR4 and TLR9 in acute SRMA

  14. Pulse-mediated chemotherapy enhances local control and survival in a spontaneous canine model of primary mucosal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Dragonetti, Emanuele; Vincenzi, Bruno; Onori, Nicoletta; Citro, Gennaro; Baldi, Alfonso

    2006-02-01

    Mucosal melanomas account for 1% of all malignant melanomas in humans. Treatment options include surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and radiation therapy; however, local recurrence and distant dissemination are still frequent. We treated locally aggressive spontaneous canine oral melanomas that, because of their advanced stage, were not treatable with conventional strategies. A cohort of 10 dogs with oral melanoma was enrolled over a 4-year period. The dogs received two sessions of local bleomycin, followed by the application of trains of biphasic pulses. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in an overall response rate of 80% with 50% long-term control. Of interest, only one of the dogs died of metastatic disease, and four of the long-term survivors showed a vitiligo-like discoloration at the site of treatment, potentially suggesting a recruitment of the immune system by the therapy. Further studies are needed to characterize this approach and to determine its suitability for head and neck mucosal melanoma.

  15. A New MRI-Based Model of Heart Function with Coupled Hemodynamics and Application to Normal and Diseased Canine Left Ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Joon; Constantino, Jason; Vedula, Vijay; Trayanova, Natalia; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    A methodology for the simulation of heart function that combines an MRI-based model of cardiac electromechanics (CE) with a Navier–Stokes-based hemodynamics model is presented. The CE model consists of two coupled components that simulate the electrical and the mechanical functions of the heart. Accurate representations of ventricular geometry and fiber orientations are constructed from the structural magnetic resonance and the diffusion tensor MR images, respectively. The deformation of the ventricle obtained from the electromechanical model serves as input to the hemodynamics model in this one-way coupled approach via imposed kinematic wall velocity boundary conditions and at the same time, governs the blood flow into and out of the ventricular volume. The time-dependent endocardial surfaces are registered using a diffeomorphic mapping algorithm, while the intraventricular blood flow patterns are simulated using a sharp-interface immersed boundary method-based flow solver. The utility of the combined heart-function model is demonstrated by comparing the hemodynamic characteristics of a normal canine heart beating in sinus rhythm against that of the dyssynchronously beating failing heart. We also discuss the potential of coupled CE and hemodynamics models for various clinical applications. PMID:26442254

  16. Patency of heart blood vessels under photosensitization reaction shortly after intravenous injection of talaporfin sodium in canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Risa; Matsuzaki, Ryota; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2016-03-01

    In order to investigate patency of heart blood vessels by photosensitization reaction shortly after intravenous injection of talaporfin sodium, we performed in vitro endothelial cell lethality study and in vivo study of heart blood vessel patency in canine one week after photosensitization reaction. Cell lethality of human umbilical vein endothelial cells under different albumin concentrations corresponding with blood and interstice concentrations were employed and their lethality 2 hours after the reaction was measured by WST assay in vitro. Almost all cells survived by 40 J/cm2 photosensitization reaction with blood albumin concentration. Laser diffuser made of plastic optical fiber with 70 mm in length was used in vivo. Red diode laser of 664nm wavelength was emitted from this diffuser with 17.1-42.9 mW/cm in 10 minutes. We estimated the fluence rate distribution by a ray-trace simulator using pre-measured optical coefficients of myocardium tissue, μa 0.12 mm-1 and μs' 0.36 mm-1. Almost all blood vessels were patent in every irradiation conditions in canine heart. Coronary artery and vein up to 1 mm diameter were patent in typical myocardium sample with 25.7 mW/cm. We estimated fluence rate distribution of this sample and found that blood vessels were patent even fluence rate over 40 J/cm2. This in vivo study could be explained by the result of in vitro study. We suggest that this blood vessel patency after our particular photosensitization reaction might be because of few photosensitizer uptake in the blood endothelial cells and/or reduced oxidation damage by thick albumin concentration in blood.

  17. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jacquelyn M; Noorai, Rooksana E; Tsai, Kate L; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Hill, Cody M; Anderson, Kendall J; Famula, Thomas R; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2017-02-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS). As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01), particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001). However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12) and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8). Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys) and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT) on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction.

  18. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn M Evans

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS. As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01, particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001. However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12 and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8. Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction.

  19. Empowering international canine inherited disorder management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bethany J; Wade, Claire M

    2012-02-01

    The mapping of the canine genome and the study of canine breed genomic architecture has revolutionized the discovery of genetic tests for inherited disorders in dogs. As the genetics underlying complex disorders are revealed, canine breeders and their registering organisations will be required to understand genetics in a much more sophisticated way. To facilitate the management of genetic disorders in the era of new complex information, we consider how best to apply the results of new research and analytical techniques to benefit the wider canine breeding community with the aims of improving canine health and maintaining benevolent genetic diversity. If this is not done, there is a serious risk that expensive and valuable genetic research will remain unused or be misused to the detriment of breeds. In this review, we make a case for the formation of an international organisation that will exist as a central repository for breed-based genetic analysis and information sharing. This organisation ("Inter-Dog") could be modelled on a similar organisation that is monitoring genetic improvement of dairy cattle. The formation of such an organisation will require the collaboration of international kennel management organisations, researchers, and agencies offering genetic testing services.

  20. Experimental model of intracranial arteriovenous shunting in the acute stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Shinichi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Sato, Sonomi; Watanabe, Yoichi; Watanabe, Zenichiro; Kodama, Namio

    2005-06-01

    A model of intracranial arteriovenous (AV) shunting must incorporate local hypoperfusion and simulate the hemodynamics of arteriovenous malformations. In this study, the hemodynamics of an intracranial AV shunt model in the acute stage were clarified. End-to-side anastomoses with a femoral vein graft were performed between a cortical branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the superior sagittal sinus in anesthetized dogs. Local cerebral blood flow (l-CBF) was measured by laser Doppler blood flowmetry. l-CBF decreased suddenly by 34.2% when the shunt was opened in the ipsilateral MCA territory. Upon re-occlusion, l-CBF immediately equaled or exceeded the pre-opening value and returned to the pre-opening value within the next 15 minutes. Opening the shunt produced little change in l-CBF in the territory of the ipsilateral or contralateral anterior cerebral artery. The decrease in l-CBF was correlated with shunt volume only in the MCA territory. l-CBF manifested a PaCO(2)-dependent increase before shunt opening, but CO(2) reactivity was impaired after opening the shunt only in the MCA territory. This dog model features local hypoperfusion due to intracranial AV shunting and disturbance of CO(2) reactivity in the acute stage. The hemodynamics of this model will be confirmed in the chronic stage.

  1. Evaluation of the biological differences of canine and human factor VIII in gene delivery: Implications in human hemophilia treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The canine is the most important large animal model for testing novel hemophilia A(HA) treatment. It is often necessary to use canine factor VIII (cFIII) gene or protein for the evaluation of HA treatment in the canine model. However, the different biological properties between cFVIII and human FVII...

  2. Evaluation of Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction with Early Systolic Dysfunction Using Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Echocardiography in Canine Heart Failure Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Chun; Ma, Hong; Xie, Rong-Ai; Gao, Li-Jian; Tang, Yue; Wang, Hao

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the role of two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) for predicting left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction in pacing-induced canine heart failure. Pacing systems were implanted in 8 adult mongrel dogs, and continuous rapid right ventricular pacing (RVP, 240 beats/min) was maintained for 2 weeks. The obtained measurements from 2DSTE included global strain rate during early diastole (SRe) and during late diastole (SRa) in the longitudinal (L-SRe, L-SRa), circumferential (C-SRe, C-SRa), and radial directions (R-SRe, R-SRa). Changes in heart morphology were observed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy at 2 weeks. The onset of LV diastolic dysfunction with early systolic dysfunction occurred 3 days after RVP initiation. Most of the strain rate imaging indices were altered at 1 or 3 days after RVP onset and continued to worsen until heart failure developed. Light and transmission electron microscopy showed myocardial vacuolar degeneration and mitochondrial swelling in the left ventricular at 2 weeks after RVP onset. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that parameters of conventional echocardiography and 2DSTE showed moderate correlation with LV pressure parameters, including E/Esep' (r = 0.58, P echocardiography and strain rate imaging could effectively predict LV diastolic dysfunction (area under the curve: E/Esep' 0.78; L-SRe 0.84; E/L-SRe 0.80; R-SRe 0.80). 2DSTE was a sensitive and accurate technique that could be used for predicting LV diastolic dysfunction in canine heart failure model. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Paediatric community home nursing: a model of acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Sze May; Mariguddi, Shyam; Coward, Shirley; Middleton, Holly

    The aim of this pilot service development was to determine if the community children's nursing outreach team(CCNOT) service, as a model of care, was effective and efficient in its delivery of reducing unscheduled care and admissions to hospital, and improving patient satisfaction. CCNOT was developed to manage acutely ill children at home and to reduce the demand for unscheduled care. This is a pilot prospective study within a dual-site integrated care organisation. The CCNOT service was developed with the aim of determining the effectiveness of the CCNOT model of care and service delivery inthe following outcomes: 1) reducing length of hospital stay (LOS)2) reducing A&E admissions 3) reducing non-elective admissions 4) reducing readmissions and 5) improving patient satisfaction. Data were obtained from hospital episode statistics (HES) and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The data indicate that, after the implementation of the CCNOT service, A&E attendances fell by 5%per month, non-elective admissions by 15.8% and readmissions by 17.3%. Overall, LOS rose by 2.3%-0.88 days compared with 0.9 days-but the difference was not significant. The results of the patient satisfaction survey show high overall satisfaction with the service. A paediatric CCNOT as a model of service delivery in acute paediatric care is effective in reducing hospital admissions. It also increases patient and carer satisfaction with care provision for sick children in the home environment.

  4. Military Working Dogs and Canine Ehrlichiosis (Tropical Canine Pancytopenia) in the Vietnam War

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-05

    their scent with garlic -like herbs (44). However, these efforts were largely fruitless. Between July 1965 and 4 December 1966, no known...acute disease was symptomatic and largely unsuccessful. Treatment included the use of a full range of antibiotics , sulfonamides, vitamin B...mji—w^p^^wil ,. .,■■^’𔃻 I*" 48 suggested that the tetracycline group of antibiotics might be useful in treating canine ehrlichiosis

  5. Naturally Occurring Canine Invasive Urinary Bladder Cancer: A Complementary Animal Model to Improve the Success Rate in Human Clinical Trials of New Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Fulkerson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic analyses are defining numerous new targets for cancer therapy. Therapies aimed at specific genetic and epigenetic targets in cancer cells as well as expanded development of immunotherapies are placing increased demands on animal models. Traditional experimental models do not possess the collective features (cancer heterogeneity, molecular complexity, invasion, metastasis, and immune cell response critical to predict success or failure of emerging therapies in humans. There is growing evidence, however, that dogs with specific forms of naturally occurring cancer can serve as highly relevant animal models to complement traditional models. Invasive urinary bladder cancer (invasive urothelial carcinoma (InvUC in dogs, for example, closely mimics the cancer in humans in pathology, molecular features, biological behavior including sites and frequency of distant metastasis, and response to chemotherapy. Genomic analyses are defining further intriguing similarities between InvUC in dogs and that in humans. Multiple canine clinical trials have been completed, and others are in progress with the aim of translating important findings into humans to increase the success rate of human trials, as well as helping pet dogs. Examples of successful targeted therapy studies and the challenges to be met to fully utilize naturally occurring dog models of cancer will be reviewed.

  6. Manipulation of nitric oxide in an animal model of acute liver injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the impact of altering nitric oxide release on acute liver injury, the associated gut injury and bacterial translocation, at different time intervals. Methods: An acute rat liver injury model induced by D-galactosamine was used. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four main groups: normal control, acute liver ...

  7. Overexpression of vimentin in canine prostatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, M M P; Rema, A; Gärtner, F

    2011-01-01

    Canine prostatic tumours exhibit similarities to those of man and may represent a useful model system to explore the mechanisms of cancer progression. Tumour progression to malignancy requires a change from an epithelial phenotype to a fibroblastic or mesenchymal phenotype. Vimentin expression is...

  8. Predictive models for acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Sevag; Schold, Jesse D; Navia, Jose; Mastracci, Tara M; Paganini, Emil P; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Bashour, Charles A

    2012-03-01

    Accurate prediction of cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (AKI) would improve clinical decision making and facilitate timely diagnosis and treatment. The aim of the study was to develop predictive models for cardiac surgery-associated AKI using presurgical and combined pre- and intrasurgical variables. Prospective observational cohort. 25,898 patients who underwent cardiac surgery at Cleveland Clinic in 2000-2008. Presurgical and combined pre- and intrasurgical variables were used to develop predictive models. Dialysis therapy and a composite of doubling of serum creatinine level or dialysis therapy within 2 weeks (or discharge if sooner) after cardiac surgery. Incidences of dialysis therapy and the composite of doubling of serum creatinine level or dialysis therapy were 1.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Kidney function parameters were strong independent predictors in all 4 models. Surgical complexity reflected by type and history of previous cardiac surgery were robust predictors in models based on presurgical variables. However, the inclusion of intrasurgical variables accounted for all explained variance by procedure-related information. Models predictive of dialysis therapy showed good calibration and superb discrimination; a combined (pre- and intrasurgical) model performed better than the presurgical model alone (C statistics, 0.910 and 0.875, respectively). Models predictive of the composite end point also had excellent discrimination with both presurgical and combined (pre- and intrasurgical) variables (C statistics, 0.797 and 0.825, respectively). However, the presurgical model predictive of the composite end point showed suboptimal calibration (P predictive models in other cohorts is required before wide-scale application. We developed and internally validated 4 new models that accurately predict cardiac surgery-associated AKI. These models are based on readily available clinical information and can be used for patient counseling, clinical

  9. [Discussion of Chinese syndrome typing in acute hepatic failure model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-liang; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Xian-bo

    2011-05-01

    To study Chinese syndrome typing of acute hepatic failure (AHF) mice model by screening effective formulae. Lipoplysaccharides (LPS)/D-galactosamine (D-GaIN) was intraperitoneally injected to mice to establish the AHF mice model. Yinchenhao Decoction, Huanglian Jiedu Decoction, Buzhong Yiqi Decoction, and Xijiao Dihuang Decoction were administered to model mice respectively by gastrogavage. The behavior and the survival rate were monitored. The liver function and pathological changes of liver tissues were detected. In all the tested classic recipes, the survival rate was elevated from 10% to 60% by administration of Xijiao Dihuang Decoction. Five h after modeling, the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level was (183.95 +/- 52.00) U/L, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (235.70 +/- 34.03) U/L in Xijiao Di-huang Decoction Group, lower than those of the model control group, but with insignificant difference (ALT: 213.32 +/- 71.93 U/L; AST: 299.48 +/- 70.56 U/L, both P > 0.05). Xijiao Dihuang Decoction could obviously alleviate the liver injury. Xijiao Dihuang Decoction was an effective formula for LPS/D-GaIN induced AHF model. According to syndrome typing through formula effect, heat toxin and blood stasis syndrome dominated in the LPS/D-GalN induced AHF mice model.

  10. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Foroughi-Parvar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL. The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now.

  11. Experimental Model of Gene Transfection in Healthy Canine Myocardium: Perspectives of Gene Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato A. K. Kalil

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the transfection of the gene that encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP through direct intramyocardial injection. METHODS: The pREGFP plasmid vector was used. The EGFP gene was inserted downstream from the constitutive promoter of the Rous sarcoma virus. Five male dogs were used (mean weight 13.5 kg, in which 0.5 mL of saline solution (n=1 or 0.5 mL of plasmid solution containing 0.5 µg of pREGFP/dog (n=4 were injected into the myocardium of the left ventricular lateral wall. The dogs were euthanized 1 week later, and cardiac biopsies were obtained. RESULTS: Fluorescence microscopy showed differences between the cells transfected and not transfected with pREGFP plasmid. Mild fluorescence was observed in the cardiac fibers that received saline solution; however, the myocardial cells transfected with pREGFP had overt EGFP expression. CONCLUSION: Transfection with the EGFP gene in healthy canine myocardium was effective. The reproduction of this efficacy using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF instead of EGFP aims at developing gene therapy for ischemic heart disease.

  12. Exploring Canine-Human Differences in Product Performance. Part II: Use of Modeling and Simulation to Explore the Impact of Formulation on Ciprofloxacin In Vivo Absorption and Dissolution in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M N; Mistry, B; Lukacova, V; Lentz, K A; Polli, J E; Hoag, S W; Dowling, T; Kona, R; Fahmy, R M

    2017-05-01

    This study explored the in vivo performance of three oral ciprofloxacin formulations (oral solution, fast, or slow dissolving tablets) in beagle dogs. The in vivo absorption and dissolution behaviors, estimated with in silico mechanistic models, were compared to the results previously published in human volunteers. Six normal healthy male beagle dogs (five to completion) received three oral formulations and an intravenous infusion in a randomized crossover design. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentrations were estimated by tandem mass spectrometry detection. A mechanistic absorption model was used to predict the in vivo dissolution and absorption characteristics of the oral formulations. Canine ciprofloxacin absorption was constrained to the duodenum/jejunum. This absorption window was far narrower than that seen in humans. Furthermore, while substantial within-individual variability in drug absorption was seen in human subjects, a greater magnitude of variability was observed in dogs. For three sets of data, a lag time in gastric emptying was necessary to improve the accuracy of model-generated in vivo blood level profile predictions. In addition to species-associated dissimilarities in drug solubilization due to human versus canine differences in gastrointestinal fluid compositions, the far more rapid intestinal transit time and potential segmental differences in drug absorption needed to be considered during human-canine extrapolation of oral drug and drug product performance. Through the use of mechanistic models, the data generated in the human and canine studies contributed insights into some aspects of the interspecies differences to be considered when extrapolating oral bioavailability/formulation effect data between dogs and humans.

  13. A Biomechanical Comparison of 3.5 Locking Compression Plate Fixation to 3.5 Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Fixation in a Canine Cadaveric Distal Humeral Metaphyseal Gap Model

    OpenAIRE

    Filipowicz, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Objective- To compare the biomechanical properties of 3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model in static axial compression and cyclic axial compression and torsion. Study Design- Biomechanical in vitro study. Sample Population- 30 paired humeri from adult, medium to large breed dogs. Methods- Testing was performed monotonically to failure in axial compres...

  14. High dose teriparatide (rPTH1-34 therapy increases callus volume and enhances radiographic healing at 8-weeks in a massive canine femoral allograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Nishitani

    Full Text Available Small animal studies have demonstrated significant high-dose recombinant parathyroid hormone1-34 (rPTH1-34 effects on intercalary allograft healing. Towards a human adjuvant therapy to decrease non-unions, we evaluated rPTH1-34 safety and efficacy in a clinically relevant canine femoral allograft model. Adult female mongrel hounds (n = 20 received a 5cm mid-diaphyseal osteotomy reconstructed with a plated allograft, and were randomized to: 1 Placebo (n = 5; daily saline, 2 Continuous rPTH1-34 (n = 7; 5 μg/kg/day s.c. from day 1-55 post-op, or 3 Delayed rPTH1-34 (n = 8; 5 μg/kg/day s.c. from day 14-28 post-op. Safety was assessed by physical behavior and blood calcium monitoring. Cone beam CT (CB-CT was performed on days 14, 28 and 56 post-op to assess 2D cortical healing, 3D bone volume, and Union Ratio. Biomechanical testing and dynamic histomorphometry were also performed. The high drug dose was poorly tolerated, as most dogs receiving rPTH1-34 had to be given intravenous saline, and one dog died from hypercalcemia. Continuous rPTH1-34 significantly increased 2D healing and callus volumes at 4-weeks versus Placebo, and sustained the significant increase in cortical union at 8-week (p<0.05. These rPTH1-34 effects were confirmed by histomorphometry, revealing significant increases in mineral apposition rates (MAR on host bone and graft-host junctions (p<0.05. Delayed rPTH1-34 significantly increased callus volume and MAR at 8 weeks (p<0.05. Although no biomechanical differences were observed, as expected for early healing, the results demonstrated that 2D RUST scoring significantly correlated with torsional biomechanics (p<0.01. In conclusion, 8-weeks of intermittent high-dose rPTH1-34 treatment significantly increases callus formation and accelerates bony union of intercalary massive allografts in a clinically relevant canine model, but with serious side-effects from hypercalcemia.

  15. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasani, F.; Javanbakht, J.; Samani, R.; Shirani, D.

    2014-01-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammato...

  16. The Effect of Surface Modification on Gliding Ability of Decellularized Flexor Tendon in a Canine Model In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Amadio, Peter C.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the gliding ability and mechanical properties of decellularized intrasynovial tendons without and with surface modification designed to reduce gliding resistance. Methods Thirty-three canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups: untreated fresh tendons, to serve as a control; tendons decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100; and tendons decellularized as in group 2 with surface modification using carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd- HA-gelatin). Tendons were subjected to cyclic friction testing for 1000 cycles with subsequent tensile stiffness testing. The surface roughness after 1000 cycles was qualitatively evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Results The gliding resistance of the decellularized group was significantly higher than that of both the control and cd-HA-gelatin tendons (0.20N, 0.09N and 0.11N after the first cycle, 0.41N, 0.09N and 0.14N after 1000 cycles, respectively).Gliding resistance between the control and cd-HA-gelatin groups was not significantly different. The Young modulus was not significantly different between the 3 groups. The surfaces of the control and cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons appeared smooth after 1000 cycles, while those of the decellularized tendons appeared rougher under scanning electron microscopy observation. Conclusions Decellularization with trypsin and Triton X-100 did not change tendon stiffness. However, this treatment, while effective in removing cells, adversely altered the tendon surface, both in appearance and gliding resistance. Surface modification with cd- HA-gelatin improved the tendon surface smoothness and significantly decreased the gliding resistance. Clinical Relevance The combination of decellularization and surface modification may improve the function of tendon allografts when used clinically. PMID:23849733

  17. Biomechanical comparison of a locking compression plate combined with an intramedullary pin or a polyetheretherketone rod in a cadaveric canine tibia gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beierer, Lucas H; Glyde, Mark; Day, Robert E; Hosgood, Giselle L

    2014-11-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of a 10-hole 3.5 mm locking compression plate (LCP) with 2 proximal and 2 distal bicortical locked screws reinforced with either a Steinmann pin of 30-40% the medullary diameter or a poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) rod of ∼75% the medullary diameter in a cadaveric tibia gap model. Ex vivo study. Cadaveric canine tibias (n = 8 pair). Each construct had a 10-hole 3.5 mm LCP with 2 screws per fracture fragment using a comminuted tibia gap model. The Steinmann pin constructs had a 2.4 mm intramedullary pin whereas the PEEK-rod constructs had a 6 mm intramedullary PEEK rod placed. Biomechanical testing included non-destructive bi-planar 4 point bending, torsion testing, and destructive axial compression. Testing produced the responses of failure load (N) in axial compression, stiffness (N/mm or N/°) in axial compression, torsion, lateral-medial, and caudal-cranial 4 point bending. Screw position within the PEEK-rods was determined after explantation. The PEEK-rod constructs were significantly stiffer in axial compression (P bending (P torsional loading (P bending (P = .32). The PEEK-rod constructs failed at a significantly higher load than the Steinmann pin constructs (P bending, axial compression, and torsion when compared with Steinmann pin constructs. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Effect of the Plasmid-DNA Vaccination on Macroscopic and Microscopic Damage Caused by the Experimental Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in the Canine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Rodríguez-Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dog is considered the main domestic reservoir for Trypanosoma cruzi infection and a suitable experimental animal model to study the pathological changes during the course of Chagas disease (CD. Vaccine development is one of CD prevention methods to protect people at risk. Two plasmids containing genes encoding a trans-sialidase protein (TcSP and an amastigote-specific glycoprotein (TcSSP4 were used as DNA vaccines in a canine model. Splenomegaly was not found in either of the recombinant plasmid-immunized groups; however, cardiomegaly was absent in animals immunized only with the plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene. The inflammation of subendocardial and myocardial tissues was prevented only with the immunization with TcSSP4 gene. In conclusion, the vaccination with these genes has a partial protective effect on the enlargement of splenic and cardiac tissues during the chronic CD and on microscopic hearth damage, since both plasmids prevented splenomegaly but only one avoided cardiomegaly, and the lesions in heart tissue of dog immunized with plasmid containing the TcSSP4 gene covered only subepicardial tissue.

  19. Analysis of six candidate genes as potential modifiers of disease expression in canine XLPRA1, a model for human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyon, Richard; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Zeiss, Caroline J; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2007-07-11

    Canine X-linked progressive retinal atrophy (XLPRA) is caused by mutations in RPGR exon ORF15, which is also a mutation hotspot in human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 3 (RP3). The XLPRA1 form of disease has shown extensive phenotypic variability in a colony of dogs that all inherited the same mutant X-chromosome. This variability in onset and severity makes XLPRA1 a valuable model to use to identify genes influencing photoreceptors degeneration in dog and to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying RP in its human homolog. In this study, RPGRIP1, RANBP2, NPM1, PDE6D, NPHP5, and ABCA4 genes were selected on the basis of interaction with RPGR or RPGRIP1 or their implication in related retinal diseases, and were investigated as candidate genetic modifiers of XLPRA1. A pedigree derived from an affected male dog outcrossed to unrelated normal mix bred or purebred females was used. Morphologic examination revealed phenotypic variability in the affected dogs characterized as mild, moderate, or severe. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indel-containing markers spanning the entire genes were designed, based on the canine sequence and the Broad Institute SNP library, and genotyped on the pedigree. For each candidate gene, haplotypes were identified and their frequencies in severely and moderately affected dogs were compared to detect a putative correlation between a gene-specific haplotype(s), and severity level of the disease. Primers were derived from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and predicted transcripts to assess the relative retinal expression of the six genes of interest in normal and affected retinas of different ages. Four to seven haplotypes per gene were identified. None of the haplotypes of RPGRIP1, NPM1, PDE6D, NPHP5, RANBP2, and ABCA4 were found to co-segregate with the moderate or severe phenotype. No significant difference in the retinal expression levels of the candidate genes was observed between normal and affected dogs. The haplotype

  20. TU-CD-BRA-08: Single-Energy Computed Tomography-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging: Proof-Of-Principle in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T; Boone, J [University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Kent, M; Wisner, E [University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Fujita, Y [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary perfusion imaging has provided significant insights into pulmonary diseases, and can be useful in radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively establish proof-of-principle in a canine model for single-energy CT-based perfusion imaging, which has the potential for widespread clinical implementation. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on: (1) acquisition of inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) of the two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the pre-contrast image from post-contrast image, yielding a map of Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement. These subtraction image data sets hypothetically represent perfused blood volume, a surrogate for perfusion. In an IACUC-approved clinical trial, we acquired pre- and post-contrast CT scans in the prone posture for six anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated dogs. The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The registration accuracy was quantified using the target registration errors (TREs) for 50 pulmonary landmarks in each dog. The gradient of HU enhancement between gravity-dependent (ventral) and non-dependent (dorsal) regions was evaluated to quantify the known effect of gravity, i.e., greater perfusion in ventral regions. Results: The lung volume difference between the two scans was 4.3±3.5% on average (range 0.3%–10.1%). DIR demonstrated an average TRE of 0.7±1.0 mm. HU enhancement in lung parenchyma was 34±10 HU on average and varied considerably between individual dogs, indicating the need for improvement of the contrast injection protocol. HU enhancement in ventral (gravity-dependent) regions was found to be greater than in dorsal regions. A population average ventral-to-dorsal gradient of HU enhancement was strong (R{sup 2}=0.94) and statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: This canine study demonstrated relatively accurate DIR and a strong ventral

  1. Biomechanical Comparison of Locking Compression Plate and Limited Contact Dynamic Compression Plate Combined with an Intramedullary Rod in a Canine Femoral Fracture-Gap Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matres-Lorenzo, Luis; Diop, Amadou; Maurel, Nathalie; Boucton, Marie-Charlotte; Bernard, Fabrice; Bernardé, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of locking compression plate (LCP) and a limited contact dynamic compression plate combined with an intramedullary rod (LC-DCP-R) in a cadaveric, canine, femoral fracture-gap model. In vitro biomechanical study; nonrandomized, complete block (dog). Paired cadaveric canine femora (n = 10 dogs). Paired femurs with a mid-diaphyseal 20 mm gap were stabilized with either LCP or LC-DCP-R. Nondestructive testing up to 60% of body weight (BW) was followed by a continuous destructive test. Comparative structural properties, 3-dimensional (3D) interfragmentary motion, and plate linear strain were evaluated. Paired comparisons were made between LCP and LC-DCP-R. Stiffness after nondestructive testing was significantly lower for LCP with a mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) of 61 N/mm (46-76) versus 89 N/mm (67-110) for LC-DCP-R (P = .0072). Ultimate load to failure was significantly lower for LCP with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 270 N (247-286) versus 371.5 (353-385) for LC-DCP-R (P = .002). Axial motion at 60% BW was significantly higher for LCP with a median (IQR) of 1.01 mm (0.71-1.26) versus 0.36 mm (0.20-0.49) for LC-DCP-R (P = .002). Shear motion was significantly higher for LCP with a median (IQR) of 1.18 (0.78-1.58) versus 0.72 mm (0.45-1.00) for LC-DCP-R (P = .018). Strain was significantly higher for mid-LCP surface with a mean (95%CI) at 60% BW of 979 μdef (579-1378) versus 583 μdef (365-801) at mid-LC-DCP-R surface (P = .0153). The elastic limit strain of the plates was not different and was reached at a mean (95%CI) load of 241 N (190-292) for LCP versus 290 N (245-336) for LC-DCP-R (P = .12). The LC-DCP-R showed higher stiffness and resistance to failure, lower interfragmentary motion, and lower plate strain and stress compared to LCP. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Chronic administration of a leupeptin-derived calpain inhibitor fails to ameliorate severe muscle pathology in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Childers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calpains likely play a role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Accordingly, calpain inhibition may provide therapeutic benefit to DMD patients. In the present study, we sought to measure benefit from administration of a novel calpain inhibitor, C101, in a canine muscular dystrophy model. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that treatment with C101 mitigates progressive weakness and severe muscle pathology observed in young dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD. Young (6 week-old GRMD dogs were treated daily with either C101 (17mg/kg twice daily oral dose, n=9 or placebo (vehicle only, n=7 for 8 weeks. A battery of functional tests, including tibiotarsal joint angle, muscle/fat composition, and pelvic limb muscle strength were performed at baseline and every two weeks during the 8-week study. Results indicate that C101-treated GRMD dogs maintained strength in their cranial pelvic limb muscles (tibiotarsal flexors while placebo-treated dogs progressively lost strength. However, concomitant improvement was not observed in posterior pelvic limb muscles (tibiotarsal extensors. C101 treatment did not mitigate force drop following repeated eccentric contractions and no improvement was seen in the development of joint contractures, lean muscle mass or muscle histopathology. Taken together, these data do not support the hypothesis that treatment with C101 mitigates progressive weakness or ameliorates severe muscle pathology observed in young dogs with GRMD.

  3. Arginase-1 expressing microglia in close proximity to motor neurons were increased early in disease progression in canine degenerative myelopathy, a model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toedebusch, Christine M; Snyder, John C; Jones, Maria R; Garcia, Virginia B; Johnson, Gayle C; Villalón, Eric L; Coates, Joan R; Garcia, Michael L

    2018-02-07

    Toxicity within superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1)-associated familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is non-cell autonomous with direct contribution from microglia. Microglia exhibit variable expression of neuroprotective and neurotoxic molecules throughout disease progression. The mechanisms regulating microglial phenotype within ALS are not well understood. This work presents a first study to examine the specific microglial phenotypic response in close association to motor neurons in a naturally occurring disease model of ALS, canine degenerative myelopathy (DM). Microglia closely associated with motor neurons were increased in all stages of DM progression, although only DM Late reached statistical significance. Furthermore, the number of arginase-1 expressing microglia per motor neuron were significantly increased in early stages of DM, whereas the number of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-expressing microglia per motor neuron was indistinguishable from aged controls at all stages of disease. Fractalkine, a chemotactic molecule for microglia, was expressed in motor neurons, and the fractalkine receptor was specifically localized to microglia. However, we found no correlation between microglial response and lumbar spinal cord fractalkine levels. Taken together, these data suggest that arginase-1-expressing microglia are recruited to the motor neuron early in DM disease through a fractalkine-independent mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Caspase-3 may be employed as an early predictor for fracture‑induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, You-Shui; Guo, Shang-Chun; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the local expression of caspase-3 following femoral neck fractures in a canine model and to investigate its effect on the occurrence of fracture-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Eight dogs had surgically-induced femoral neck fractures on the left side which remained untreated. Radiological and histological examinations were employed to detect morphological changes of the femoral head. Immunohistochemical staining of caspase-3 was used to evaluate cell apoptosis, which may play an important role in ONFH. The results were compared to the normal side for statistical analysis. As a result, all eight dogs had ONFH, with non-union in five and malunion in three on radiological examination. Histologically, the untreated femoral heads developed osteonecrosis with an accumulation of bone marrow cell debris, empty lacunae and/or ghost nuclei in the lacunae, and an increase in the number of fat cells. Immunohistochemical staining of caspase-3 indicated that it was upregulated in fracture-induced ONFH two weeks postoperatively, which showed a statistical difference when compared to the normal side. In conclusion, the local expression of caspase-3 was upregulated in fracture-induced ONFH, suggesting that cell apoptosis is crucial in traumatic ONFH. Caspase-3 may therefore be employed as an effective and early predictor for fracture-induced ONFH.

  5. Absolute quantitation of myocardial blood flow with {sup 201}Tl and dynamic SPECT in canine: optimisation and validation of kinetic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Hidehiro; Kim, Kyeong-Min; Nakazawa, Mayumi; Sohlberg, Antti; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Takuya; Watabe, Hiroshi [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Department of Investigative Radiology, Suita City, Osaka (Japan); Eberl, Stefan [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Department of Investigative Radiology, Suita City, Osaka (Japan); Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, PET and Nuclear Medicine Department, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Tamura, Yoshikazu [Akita Kumiai General Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Akita City (Japan); Ono, Yukihiko [Akita Research Institute of Brain, Akita City (Japan)

    2008-05-15

    {sup 201}Tl has been extensively used for myocardial perfusion and viability assessment. Unlike {sup 99m}Tc-labelled agents, such as {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmine, the regional concentration of {sup 201}Tl varies with time. This study is intended to validate a kinetic modelling approach for in vivo quantitative estimation of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and volume of distribution of {sup 201}Tl using dynamic SPECT. Dynamic SPECT was carried out on 20 normal canines after the intravenous administration of {sup 201}Tl using a commercial SPECT system. Seven animals were studied at rest, nine during adenosine infusion, and four after beta-blocker administration. Quantitative images were reconstructed with a previously validated technique, employing OS-EM with attenuation-correction, and transmission-dependent convolution subtraction scatter correction. Measured regional time-activity curves in myocardial segments were fitted to two- and three-compartment models. Regional MBF was defined as the influx rate constant (K{sub 1}) with corrections for the partial volume effect, haematocrit and limited first-pass extraction fraction, and was compared with that determined from radio-labelled microspheres experiments. Regional time-activity curves responded well to pharmacological stress. Quantitative MBF values were higher with adenosine and decreased after beta-blocker compared to a resting condition. MBFs obtained with SPECT (MBF{sub SPECT}) correlated well with the MBF values obtained by the radio-labelled microspheres (MBF{sub MS}) (MBF{sub SPECT} = -0.067 + 1.042 x MBF{sub MS}, p < 0.001). The three-compartment model provided better fit than the two-compartment model, but the difference in MBF values between the two methods was small and could be accounted for with a simple linear regression. Absolute quantitation of regional MBF, for a wide physiological flow range, appears to be feasible using {sup 201}Tl and dynamic SPECT. (orig.)

  6. Novel swine model of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Osamu; Iijima, Takehiko; Kohira, Takahiro; Teranishi, Mai; Kawasaki, Shin; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Sugiura, Asuka; Hashimoto, Shiho; Shimada, Eiko; Uchikawa, Makoto; Matsuhashi, Mika; Tsuno, Nelson H; Tanaka, Minoru; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Nagase, Takahide; Tadokoro, Kenji; Takahashi, Koki

    2014-12-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening complication of blood transfusion. Antibodies against human leukocyte antigens in donors' plasma are the major causes of TRALI. Several animal models of TRALI have been developed, and the mechanism underlying TRALI development has been extensively investigated using rodent models. Although sheep models of nonimmune TRALI have been developed, large-animal models of antibody-mediated TRALI are not yet available. To develop a swine model of TRALI, male Clawn strain miniature pigs were used. A monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) Class I (4G8, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg body weight [BW]) and a control antibody (1.0 mg/kg BW) were injected into the peripheral vein after priming with or without 1 μg/kg BW lipopolysaccharide (LPS; n = 3 each). Lung injury was assessed using PaO2 /FiO2 (P/F) ratio and by chest X-ray imaging. Histopathologic analysis was also conducted. Lung injury could be induced by injecting 4G8 at an amount of 1.0 mg/kg BW, after LPS. The P/F ratio 90 minutes after the administration of 4G8 significantly decreased (p Lung injury was confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Lung injury in pigs was successfully induced by anti-SLA MoAb. Priming with LPS is a prerequisite for inducing lung injury and the amount of the antibody is a critical condition. © 2014 AABB.

  7. Histopathologic evaluation of the canine prostate following electrovaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, D S; Oberg, K C; Saukel, G W; Ruckle, H C; Stewart, S C

    1997-03-01

    Transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate (TVP) for symptomatic benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) has proven to be efficacious with minimal patient morbidity. When compared to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), TVP demonstrates comparable postoperative flow rates, American Urologic Association (AUA) symptom score indices, and a potential cost savings. However, in the human studies it has not been possible to correlate these clinical parameters with procedure-related histopathologic changes in the prostate immediately postoperative or during wound healing. The following study was done using a canine model in an effort to evaluate these histopathologic changes. Fifteen hounds (25-35 kg.) underwent antegrade electrovaporization of the prostate, via an open cystotomy, using a Circon ACMI USA series resectoscope and video equipment. The dogs were sacrificed and the prostates harvested at various intervals postoperatively (0-11 weeks). The prostates were evaluated grossly as well as histologically for cavitary defects, depth of necrosis, and cellular response. Prostates examined immediately following the procedure demonstrated superficial necrosis (less than 2 mm.) in the region of vaporized tissue. One week postoperatively, the vaporized regions demonstrated an intense acute inflammation amidst superficial necrosis with focal hemorrhage and dystrophic calcification. Transient glandular cystic changes developed, but were resolving by seven weeks postoperatively. Re-epithelialization was underway by the third postoperative week and epithelial stratification underway by the fifth week. There was no extension of the initial two millimeter zone of necrosis at any time point examined. TVP in the canine model vaporizes prostatic tissue at the site of contact. Only a shallow remnant of necrosis remains at the site of vaporization, indicating the highly localized effect of this technique. Healing at the site of vaporization occurs in a rapid and expected

  8. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adi, Y. A., E-mail: yudi.adi@math.uad.ac.id [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Ahmad Dahlan (Indonesia); Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L. [Department of Mathematic Faculty of MIPA Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia); Hardianti, M. S. [Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Gadjah Mada (Indonesia)

    2016-04-06

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  9. Azithromycin reduces inflammation in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Robredo, Patricia; Recalde, Sergio; Moreno-Orduña, Maite; García-García, Laura; Zarranz-Ventura, Javier; García-Layana, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Macrolide antibiotics are known to have various anti-inflammatory effects in addition to their antimicrobial activity, but the mechanisms are still unclear. The effect of azithromycin on inflammatory molecules in the lipopolysaccharide-induced rat conjunctivitis model was investigated. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats were divided into two groups receiving topical ocular azithromycin (15 mg/g) or vehicle. In total, six doses (25 µl) were administered as one dose twice a day for three days before subconjunctival lipopolysaccharide injection (3 mg/ml). Before the rats were euthanized, mucus secretion, conjunctival and palpebral edema and redness were evaluated. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to determine gene expression for interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Interleukin-6 was determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, nuclear factor-kappa B with western blot, and MMP-2 activity with gelatin zymogram. Four eyes per group were processed for histology and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff staining and CD68 for immunofluorescence. The Student t test or the Wilcoxon test for independent samples was applied (SPSS v.15.0). Results Azithromycin-treated animals showed a significant reduction in all clinical signs (pazithromycin group (p=0.063). Mucus secretion by goblet cells and the macrophage count in conjunctival tissue were also decreased in the azithromycin group (pazithromycin administration ameliorates induced inflammation effects in a rat model of acute conjunctivitis. PMID:23378729

  10. A mathematical model of phosphorylation AKT in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi, Y. A.; Kusumo, F. A.; Aryati, L.; Hardianti, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we consider a mathematical model of PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in phosphorylation AKT. PI3K/AKT pathway is an important mediator of cytokine signaling implicated in regulation of hematopoiesis. Constitutive activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway has been observed in Acute Meyloid Leukemia (AML) it caused by the mutation of Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 in internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD), the most common molecular abnormality associated with AML. Depending upon its phosphorylation status, protein interaction, substrate availability, and localization, AKT can phosphorylate or inhibite numerous substrates in its downstream pathways that promote protein synthesis, survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Firstly, we present a mass action ordinary differential equation model describing AKT double phosphorylation (AKTpp) in a system with 11 equations. Finally, under the asumtion enzyme catalyst constant and steady state equilibrium, we reduce the system in 4 equation included Michaelis Menten constant. Simulation result suggested that a high concentration of PI3K and/or a low concentration of phospatase increased AKTpp activation. This result also indicates that PI3K is a potential target theraphy in AML.

  11. Diode laser prostatectomy (VLAP): initial canine evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopchok, George E.; Verbin, Chris; Ayres, Bruce; Peng, Shi-Kaung; White, Rodney A.

    1995-05-01

    This study evaluated the acute and chronic effects of diode laser (960 nm) prostatectomy using a Prolase II fiber in a canine model (n equals 5). The laser fiber consists of a 1000 um quartz fiber which reflects a cone of laser energy, at 45 degree(s) to the axis of the fiber, into the prostatic urethra (Visual Laser Ablation of Prostate). Perineal access was used to guide a 15.5 Fr cystoscope to the level of the prostate. Under visual guidance and continual saline irrigation, 60 watts of laser power was delivered for 60 seconds at 3, 9, and 12 o'clock and 30 seconds at the 6 o'clock (posterior) positions for a total energy fluence of 12,600 J. One prostate received an additional 60 second exposure at 3 and 9 o'clock for a total fluence of 19,800 J. The prostates were evaluated at one day (n equals 1) and 8 weeks (n equals 4). The histopathology of laser effects at one day show areas of necrosis with loss of glandular structures and stromal edema. Surrounding this area was a zone of degenerative glandular structures extending up to 17.5 mm (cross sectional diameter). The histopathology of the 8 week laser treated animals demonstrated dilated prostatic urethras with maximum cross- sectional diameter of 23.4 mm (mean equals 18.5 +/- 3.9 mm). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of diode laser energy for prostatic tissue coagulation and eventual sloughing. The results also demonstrate the safety of diode laser energy, with similar tissue response as seen with Nd:YAG laser, for laser prostatectomy.

  12. Percentiles relative to maxillary permanent canine inclination by age: a radiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri Bonetti, Giulio; Zanarini, Matteo; Danesi, Margherita; Parenti, Serena Incerti; Gatto, Maria Rosaria

    2009-10-01

    Few studies have investigated developmental norms for maxillary permanent canine eruption. In this observational cross-sectional study, we aimed to provide an age-related description of the percentiles relative to canine inclination in a large sample of nonorthodontic patients. Associations between inclination and sector were also analyzed. Canine inclination and sector location were measured on 1020 panoramic radiographs obtained from subjects of white ancestry aged between 8 and 11 years not seeking orthodontic treatment. The total sample comprised 2037 canines. Canine inclination increases between 8 and 9 years and decreases between 9 and 11 years. The greatest value for each percentile is at 9 years. A linear model should be hypothesized for differences in canine inclination between 2 successive ages in correspondence to each percentile. The proportion of sector 2 canines decreases and that of sector 1 increases with age. In the same age group, the inclination generally decreases as the sector decreases. Percentiles by age show the average canine inclination in a certain population. Further studies are required to verify whether percentiles can be a diagnostic aid for determining normal canine inclination at a given age and for quantifying the risk of canine impaction or adjacent root resorption.

  13. Evaluation of rhBMP-2/collagen/TCP-HA bone graft with and without bone marrow cells in the canine femoral multi defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangphakdy, V; Shinohara, K; Pan, H; Boehm, C; Samaranska, A; Muschler, G F

    2015-01-12

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, when applied to an absorbable type 1 bovine collagen sponge (rhBMP-2/ACS) is an effective therapy in many bone grafting settings. Bone marrow aspirate (BMA) has also been used as a source of transplantable osteogenic connective tissue progenitors. This study was designed to characterize the performance of a scaffold comprising rhBMP-2/ACS in which the sponge wraps around tri-calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite granules (rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA) and to test the hypothesis that addition of BMA will improve the performance of this construct in the Canine Femoral Multi Defect Model. In each subject, two sites were grafted with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA scaffold loaded with BMA clot and two other sites with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA scaffold loaded with wound blood (WB). After correction for unresorbed TCP-HA granules, sites grafted with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA+BMA and rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA+WB were similar, with mean percent bone volumes of 10.9 %±1.2 and 11.2 %±1.2, respectively. No differences were seen in quantitative histomorphometry. While bone formation using both constructs was robust, this study did not support the hypothesis that the addition of unprocessed bone marrow aspirate clot improved bone regeneration in a site engrafted with rhBMP-2/ACS/TCP-HA+BMA. In contrast to prior studies using this model, new bone formation was greater at the center of the defect where TCP-HA was distributed. This finding suggests a potential synergy between rhBMP-2 and the centrally placed ceramic and cellular components of the graft construct. Further optimization may also require more uniform distribution of TCP-HA, alternative cell delivery strategies, and a more rigorous large animal segmental defect model.

  14. American canine hepatozoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A

    2003-06-01

    American canine hepatozoonosis is an emerging, tick-transmitted infection of domestic dogs caused by a recently recognized species of apicomplexan parasite, Hepatozoon americanum. The known definitive host of the protozoan is the Gulf Coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum. Presently recognized intermediate hosts include the domestic dog and the coyote, Canis latrans. Laboratory-reared larval or nymphal A. maculatum can be infected readily by feeding to repletion on a parasitemic intermediate host; sporogony requires 35-40 days. Transmission of infection to the dog has been produced experimentally by oral administration of mature oocysts or oocyst-containing ticks. Canine disease follows experimental exposure in 4-6 weeks and is characterized by systemic illness, extreme neutrophilic leukocytosis, muscle and bone pain, and proliferation of periosteal bone. Histopathological findings include multifocal skeletal and cardiac myositis associated with escape of mature merozoites from within the host-cell environment. There is also rapid onset of periosteal activation and osteogenesis and, less frequently, glomerulopathy and amyloidosis. Sequential stages of development of H. americanum in both the dog and the tick have been elucidated. Gamonts potentially infectious to ticks have been observed in peripheral blood leukocytes of the dog in as few as 28 days after exposure to oocysts. Young coyotes experimentally exposed to a canine strain of H. americanum acquired disease indistinguishable from that of similarly exposed young dogs.

  15. The Comparative Diagnostic Features of Canine and Human Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Davis M; Avery, Anne C; Ehrhart, E J; Linden, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous family of lymphoid malignancies that are among the most common neoplasms of both dogs and humans. Owing to shared molecular, signaling, incidence, and pathologic features, there is a strong framework supporting the utilization of canine lymphoma as a comparative, large animal model of human NHL. In alignment with the biologic similarities, the current approach towards the diagnosis and classification of canine lymphoma is based upon the human World Health Organization guidelines. While this approach has contributed to an increasing appreciation of the potential biological scope of canine lymphoma, it has also become apparent that the most appropriate diagnostic philosophy must be multimodal, namely by requiring knowledge of microscopic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features before establishing a final disease diagnosis. This review seeks to illustrate the comparative similarities and differences in the diagnosis of canine lymphoma through the presentation of the microscopic and immunophenotypic features of its most common forms.

  16. The Comparative Diagnostic Features of Canine and Human Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis M. Seelig

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs are a heterogeneous family of lymphoid malignancies that are among the most common neoplasms of both dogs and humans. Owing to shared molecular, signaling, incidence, and pathologic features, there is a strong framework supporting the utilization of canine lymphoma as a comparative, large animal model of human NHL. In alignment with the biologic similarities, the current approach towards the diagnosis and classification of canine lymphoma is based upon the human World Health Organization guidelines. While this approach has contributed to an increasing appreciation of the potential biological scope of canine lymphoma, it has also become apparent that the most appropriate diagnostic philosophy must be multimodal, namely by requiring knowledge of microscopic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features before establishing a final disease diagnosis. This review seeks to illustrate the comparative similarities and differences in the diagnosis of canine lymphoma through the presentation of the microscopic and immunophenotypic features of its most common forms.

  17. Ultrasonographic description of canine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasch, Katja; Wehrend, Axel; Bostedt, Hartwig

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasonographic images were acquired of the mammary glands of 40 bitches with physiologically lactating (n = 20) or inflamed glands (n = 20). Echogenicity, structure, homogeneity, thickness, and distinguishability of each tissue layer were assessed. Additionally, overall echogenicity was noted. In the normal lactating gland, different tissues could be differentiated easily. The parenchyma was, without exception, separated from adjacent tissues and was visible as medium echogenic tissue with a coarse-grained structure. The tissue always had some echogenic lines and anechoic areas and was slightly heterogeneous. The loss of distinct layering of the tissue was characteristic of an inflamed mammary gland and inflamed regions had reduced echogenicity. Additionally in five bitches with mastitis, the ultrasound examination was repeated five times for documentation of the progress of the illness and associated changes, supplemented with a color Doppler sonogram to assess changes in blood vessel density. Information from the examinations carried out via B-mode did not allow treatment success to be predicted. Two bitches with reduced blood vessel density centrally had a poor outcome whereas three bitches with increased blood vessel density had a good outcome. Thus, Doppler sonography might be a useful tool to obtain information of the prognosis in acute canine mastitis.

  18. Evaluation of 99Tcm nonspecific polyclonal IgG in the detection of rejection in a single lung transplant canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larcos, G.; McLarty, A.J.; McGregor, C.G.A.; Brown, M.L.; Hung, J.C.; O'Connor, M.K.; Tazelaar, H.D.

    1993-01-01

    Acute rejection is an important cause of graft failure in single lung transplantation, however, current noninvasive tests are neither sensitive nor specific for this diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether 99 Tc m -labelled human nonspecific polyclonal IgG ( 99 Tc m -IgG) may serve as a marker for acute pulmonary rejection following allotransplantation in a dog model. Seventeen mongrel dogs were studied, including four controls and thirteen dogs which underwent surgery [right autotransplant recipient right unmodified allotransplant recipient, and right immunosuppressed allotransplant recipient]. At 6 days following surgery, all dogs received 67 Ga-citrate and 99 Tc m -IgG. Two days later all dogs were sacrified. Post-mortem examination revealed acute lung rejection in nine animals. No significant difference was found in the percentage uptake of both 99 Tc m -IgG and 67 Ga-citrate per gram of tissue between rejecting and nonrejecting transplanted lungs. In cases of moderate to severe rejection, only 67 Ga-citrate showed a significant difference in uptake between rejecting and contralateral native lungs, respectively. We conclude that 99 Tc m -IgG does not accurately identify acute lung rejection in the early postoperative period. (author)

  19. Bone regeneration using a bone morphogenetic protein-2 saturated slow-release gelatin hydrogel sheet: evaluation in a canine orbital floor fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamura, Shinichi; Mochizuki, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Isogai, Noritaka

    2010-04-01

    Bone regeneration methods using bone inductive cytokines show promise, however, due to early diffusion and absorption of single applications of these cytokines, the bone inductive effects are limited. In this study, such a system was applied, using gelatin hydrogel as a carrier to slowly release (bone morphogenetic proteins) BMP-2 over a relatively long period in vivo. By coupling this slow-release system with a biodegradable copolymer, this composite was evaluated by grafting into bone defect sites of a canine orbital floor fracture model. Radio-iodinated BMP-2 incorporated into the gelatin hydrogel carrier and subcutaneously implanted into nude mice showed a similar slow release (approximately, 60% at 3 days and 80% at 14 days) as the radiolabeled hydrogel carrier alone. In contrast, greater than 90% of fluid-injected BMP-2 was lost in the injection site within the first 8 hours. Using a dog model of orbital floor fracture, a complex of BMP-2-saturated gelatin hydrogel and a polylactide-based biodegradable copolymer was implanted into the orbital bone defect. Bone structural analysis, using radiography, histologic examination, and microfocus CT, showed greatly enhanced new bone formation and defect healing at 5 weeks in comparison to implanted biodegradable copolymer directly saturated with the same amount of BMP-2 (no slow-release hydrogel carrier). A trabecular structure resembling that normal bone tissue was restored in the new bone tissue generated by the slow-release constructs. Thus study demonstrates the potential of slow-release BMP-2 for bone healing of difficult defects.

  20. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of canine histiocytic sarcoma: A spontaneous model for human histiocytic cancer identifies deletion of tumor suppressor genes and highlights influence of genetic background on tumor behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abadie Jerome

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histiocytic malignancies in both humans and dogs are rare and poorly understood. While canine histiocytic sarcoma (HS is uncommon in the general domestic dog population, there is a strikingly high incidence in a subset of breeds, suggesting heritable predisposition. Molecular cytogenetic profiling of canine HS in these breeds would serve to reveal recurrent DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs that are breed and/or tumor associated, as well as defining those shared with human HS. This process would identify evolutionarily conserved cytogenetic changes to highlight regions of particular importance to HS biology. Methods Using genome wide array comparative genomic hybridization we assessed CNAs in 104 spontaneously occurring HS from two breeds of dog exhibiting a particularly elevated incidence of this tumor, the Bernese Mountain Dog and Flat-Coated Retriever. Recurrent CNAs were evaluated further by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity analyses. Statistical analyses were performed to identify CNAs associated with tumor location and breed. Results Almost all recurrent CNAs identified in this study were shared between the two breeds, suggesting that they are associated more with the cancer phenotype than with breed. A subset of recurrent genomic imbalances suggested involvement of known cancer associated genes in HS pathogenesis, including deletions of the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/B, RB1 and PTEN. A small number of aberrations were unique to each breed, implying that they may contribute to the major differences in tumor location evident in these two breeds. The most highly recurrent canine CNAs revealed in this study are evolutionarily conserved with those reported in human histiocytic proliferations, suggesting that human and dog HS share a conserved pathogenesis. Conclusions The breed associated clinical features and DNA copy number aberrations exhibited by canine HS offer a valuable model

  1. Bilateral supernumerary primary maxillary canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Mukhopadhyay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Supernumerary teeth are more common in the permanent than in primary dentition. In the primary dentition, the anomaly is most frequently observed in the maxillary lateral incisor region, followed by the maxillary midline where they are termed as mesiodens. Supernumerary teeth in the primary canine region are rare. This paper describes a rare case of nonsyndromic supernumerary primary maxillary canine distributed bilaterally in a 4-year-old boy. Both the supernumeraries resembled size and shape of normal primary canine. The right supplemental canine is high labially placed, whereas the left one is seen normally aligned in the dental arch distal to lateral incisor. One of the most significant sequelae of primary supernumerary teeth is their duplication in the permanent series. Radiographic examination of supernumerary primary canine did not indicate any such anomaly in the permanent dentition. The patient was kept under observation.

  2. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P 3 H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM. These findings suggest that LAT1 could be a new therapeutic target for MM

  3. In a Canine Pneumonia Model of Exchange-Transfusion, Altering the Age but Not the Volume of Older Red Blood Cells Markedly Alters Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Puch, Irene; Remy, Kenneth E.; Solomon, Steven B.; Sun, Junfeng; Wang, Dong; Al-Hamad, Mariam; Kelly, Seth M.; Sinchar, Derek; Bellavia, Landon; Kanias, Tamir; Popovsky, Mark A.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Klein, Harvey G.; Natanson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background Massive exchange-transfusion of 42-day-old red blood cells (RBCs) in a canine model of S. aureus pneumonia resulted in in vivo hemolysis with increases in cell-free hemoglobin (CFH), transferrin bound iron (TBI), non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI), and mortality. We have previously shown that washing 42-day-old RBCs before transfusion significantly decreased NTBI levels and mortality, but washing 7-day-old RBCs increased mortality and CFH levels. We now report the results of altering volume, washing, and age of RBCs. Study Design and Methods Two-year-old purpose-bred infected beagles were transfused with increasing volumes (5-10, 20-40, or 60-80 mL/kg) of either 42- or 7-day-old RBCs (n=36) or 80 mL/kg of either unwashed or washed RBCs with increasing storage age (14, 21, 28, or 35 days) (n=40). Results All volumes transfused (5-80 mL/kg) of 42-day-old RBCs, resulted in alike (i.e., not significantly different) increases in TBI during transfusion as well as in CFH, lung injury, and mortality rates after transfusion. Transfusion of 80 mL/kg of RBCs stored for 14, 21, 28 and 35 days resulted in increased CFH and NTBI in between levels found at 7 and 42 days of storage. However, washing RBCs of intermediate ages (14-35 days) does not alter NTBI and CFH levels or mortality rates. Conclusions Preclinical data suggest that any volume of 42-day-old blood potentially increases risks during established infection. In contrast, even massive volumes of 7-day-old blood result in minimal CFH and NTBI levels and risks. In contrast to the extremes of storage, washing blood stored for intermediate ages does not alter risks of transfusion or NTBI and CFH clearance. PMID:26469998

  4. Detection of viable myocardium in canine model with myocardial ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion by 125I-BMIPP: relation to regional blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Gang; Zhao Huiyang; Shen Xuedong; Li Qing; Yuan Jimin; Zhu Cuiying

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The effects of BMIPP (β-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) on detecting viable myocardium and the relation between regional blood flow and the uptake of BMIPP were evaluated in canine model of myocardial ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: 12 open-chest dogs under anesthesia were divided into two groups. Group I (ischemia group) had left circumflex coronary arterial occlusion for 2 h and group II (ischemia-reperfusion group) was occluded for 1 h and followed by 2 h reperfusion. Myocardial blood flow was measured with 99 Tc m -microspheres. 30 min after intravenous injection of 125 I-BMIPP and 99 Tc m -microspheres, the heart was excised rapidly and stained with Evans blue and NBT. Tissue samples (divided into approximately 1 g) of left ventricle were obtained, weighed and counted for 125 I and 99 Tc m . Regional blood flow and the uptake of BMIPP were expressed as percentages of average values in non-ischemic myocardium (two to three tissue samples) from the normal myocardium. Results: In ischemic myocardium (NBT positive samples), the uptake of BMIPP was relatively higher compared with regional blood flow [(67 +- 23)% vs (42 +- 19)%, P 0.05]. In ischemia-reperfusion group, regional blood flow was increased in ischemic and necrotic tissues, but the uptake of BMIPP was not enhanced with the increasing blood flow. Conclusions: BMIPP uptake seems to provide metabolic information independent of regional blood flow. The mismatching between regional blood flow and BMIPP uptake may indicate myocardial viability in the regions of hypoperfusion and the uptake of BMIPP in ischemic myocardium was related to existence of cellular metabolism

  5. Enhancement of abdominal wall defect repair using allogenic platelet-rich plasma with commercial polyester/cotton fabric (Damour) in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABOUELNASR, Khaled; HAMED, Mohamed; LASHEN, Samah; EL-ADL, Mohamed; ELTAYSH, Rasha; TAGAWA, Michihito

    2017-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has an important role in musculoskeletal surgery; however, it has been underutilized for accelerating the healing of abdominal wall defects in veterinary practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the use of commercial polyester/cotton fabric (Damour) as a new composite mesh for the repair of experimentally induced abdominal wall defects in canine models, and to investigate the possible role of PRP for improving such repair and reducing allied complications. For this purpose, abdominal wall defects were created in 24 healthy mongrel dogs and then repaired with mesh alone (control group) or mesh and allogenic PRP (PRP group). Dogs were euthanized after 2 or 4 months for gross examination of implantation site, detection of adhesion score and hernia recurrence. Moreover, tissue samples were collected for histological and gene expression analyses for neovascularization, collagen formation and tissue incorporation. Hernia recurrence was not recorded in PRP-treated dogs that also displayed significantly more neovascularization and less severe adhesion to the underlings (1.08 ± 0.51) in comparison to control group (2.08 ± 0.99). Histological and molecular evaluation confirmed the gross findings that collagen deposition, new vessel formation, and overexpression of angiogenic and myofibroplastic genes (COL1α1, COL3α1, VEGF and TGFβ1) were observed more frequently in the PRP group, at both time points. In conclusion, we found that addition of allogenic PRP to Damour mesh enhanced neovessel formation, and increased tissue deposition and incorporation, with subsequent reduction of peritoneal adhesion and recurrence rate. PMID:28603214

  6. Comparison of diamond-like carbon-coated nitinol stents with or without polyethylene glycol grafting and uncoated nitinol stents in a canine iliac artery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Shin, J H; Shin, D H; Moon, M-W; Park, K; Kim, T-H; Shin, K M; Won, Y H; Han, D K; Lee, K-R

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neointimal hyperplasia is a major complication of endovascular stent placement with consequent in-stent restenosis or occlusion. Improvements in the biocompatibility of stent designs could reduce stent-associated thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. We hypothesised that the use of a diamond-like carbon (DLC)-coated nitinol stent or a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-DLC-coated nitinol stent could reduce the formation of neointimal hyperplasia, thereby improving stent patency with improved biocompatibility. Methods A total of 24 stents were implanted, under general anaesthesia, into the iliac arteries of six dogs (four stents in each dog) using the carotid artery approach. The experimental study dogs were divided into three groups: the uncoated nitinol stent group (n = 8), the DLC-nitinol stent group (n = 8) and the PEG-DLC-nitinol stent group (n = 8). Results The mean percentage of neointimal hyperplasia was significantly less in the DLC-nitinol stent group (26.7±7.6%) than in the nitinol stent group (40.0±20.3%) (p = 0.021). However, the mean percentage of neointimal hyperplasia was significantly greater in the PEG-DLC-nitinol stent group (58.7±24.7%) than in the nitinol stent group (40.0±20.3%) (p = 0.01). Conclusion Our findings indicate that DLC-coated nitinol stents might induce less neointimal hyperplasia than conventional nitinol stents following implantation in a canine iliac artery model; however, the DLC-coated nitinol stent surface when reformed with PEG induces more neointimal hyperplasia than either a conventional or DLC-coated nitinol stent. PMID:21325363

  7. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on prostate volume and vascularity in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a pilot study in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoci, Raffaella; Aiudi, Giulio; Silvestre, Fabio; Lissner, Elaine; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

    2014-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a result of urogenital aging. Recent studies suggest that an age-related impairment of the blood supply to the lower urinary tract plays a role in the development of BPH and thus may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of BPH. The canine prostate is a model for understanding abnormal growth of the human prostate gland. We studied the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF) in dogs to modify prostate blood flow and evaluated its effect on BPH. PEMF (5 min, twice a day for 3 weeks) was performed on 20 dogs affected by BPH. Prostatic volume, Doppler assessment by ultrasonography, libido, semen quality, testosterone levels, and seminal plasma volume, composition and pH were evaluated before and after treatment. The 3 weeks of PEMF produced a significant reduction in prostatic volume (average 57%) without any interference with semen quality, testosterone levels or libido. Doppler parameters showed a reduction of peripheral resistances and a progressive reduction throughout the trial of the systolic peak velocity, end-diastolic velocity, mean velocity, mean, and peak gradient of the blood flow in the dorsal branch of the prostatic artery. The pulsatility index and the resistance index did not vary significantly over time. The efficacy of PEMF on BPH in dogs, with no side effects, suggests the suitability of this treatment in humans and supports the hypothesis that impairment of blood supply to the lower urinary tract may be a causative factor in the development of BPH. © 2014 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Intimatan (dermatan 4,6-O-disulfate) prevents rethrombosis after successful thrombolysis in the canine model of deep vessel wall injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ting-Ting; Van Gorp, Cornelius L; Cardin, Alan D; Lucchesi, Benedict R

    2006-01-01

    Intimatan (dermatan 4,6-O-disulfate), a heparin cofactor II (HCII) agonist, inhibits both the fluid phase and thrombus bound thrombin. The efficacy of Intimatan as an adjunctive anticoagulant during thrombolysis was evaluated in the canine model of arterial injury. After forming an occlusive thrombus in the right carotid artery (RCA), twenty-one dogs were administered recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) intra-arterially to achieve thrombolysis in the presence of either 0.9% NaCl or Intimatan (9 mg/kg bolus+300 mug/kg/min i.v. infusion). Next, the left carotid arteries (LCA) of the same animals were injured in the presence of either Intimatan or 0.9% NaCl. The incidence of RCA rethrombosis between the Intimatan and control groups was 2/9 and 8/12, respectively. The quality of RCA blood flow, i.e., patency score (Scale of 0-3, i.e., no flow to high flow, respectively), was 2.3+/-0.4 (Intimatan) versus 0.9+/-0.4 (0.9% NaCl). The incidence of primary thrombosis was determined among the groups as 0/9 (Intimatan) versus 7/12 (0.9% NaCl); the patency score was 2.8+/-0.1 (Intimatan) versus 0.9+/-0.4 (0.9% NaCl). Intimatan resulted in a >90% ex vivo inhibition of gamma-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation whereas 0.9% NaCl had no inhibitory effect. Clot-bound thrombin activity was reduced significantly by Intimatan. Intimatan induced <2-fold change in aPTT and bleeding time (BT) when corrected for the 0.9% NaCl group. Intimatan significantly reduces the incidence of both primary and secondary arterial thrombosis while maintaining a high-grade vessel patency score with only moderate increases in BT and aPTT.

  9. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclo...

  10. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    spinal cord impactor and sustained balloon compression. 2. Keywords Spinal cord injury, spine trauma , burst fracture, large animal model 3...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT

  11. Cloning and characterization of canine prostate-specific membrane antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sonja; Fracasso, Giulio; Colombatti, Marco; Naim, Hassan Y

    2013-05-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising biomarker in the diagnosis of prostate cancer and a potential target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies. We isolated the canine PSMA cDNA and investigated the cellular and biochemical characteristics of the recombinant protein as a potential target for animal preclinical studies of antibody based-therapies. Canine PSMA cDNA was isolated by PCR, cloned into expression vectors and transfected into COS-1 and MDCK cells. The biosynthesis and glycosylation of the recombinant protein were investigated in pulse-chase experiments, the cellular localization by confocal laser microscopy, the mode of association of PSMA with the membrane with solubilization in different detergents and its quaternary structure in sucrose-density gradients. Canine PSMA shows 91% amino acid homology to human PSMA, whereby the major difference is a longer cytoplasmic tail of canine PSMA compared to its human counterpart. Canine PSMA is trafficked efficiently along the secretory pathway, undergoes homodimerization when it acquires complex glycosylated mature form. It associates with detergent-resistant membranes, which act as platforms along its intracellular trafficking. Confocal analysis revealed canine PSMA at the cell surface, Golgi, and the endoplasmic reticulum. A similar distribution is revealed for human PSMA, yet with reduced cell surface levels. The cloning, expression, biosynthesis, processing and localization of canine PSMA in mammalian cells is described. We demonstrate that canine PSMA reveals similar characteristics to human PSMA rendering this protein useful as a translational model for investigations of prostate cancer as well as a suitable antigen for targeted therapy studies in dogs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evaluation of a canine small intestinal submucosal xenograft and polypropylene mesh as bioscaffolds in an abdominal full-thickness resection model of growing rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biological scaffold properties of canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compared to a those of polypropylene mesh in growing rats with full-thickness abdominal defects. SIS is used to repair musculoskeletal tissue while promoting cell migration and supporting tissue regeneration. Polypropylene mesh is a non-resorbable synthetic material that can endure mechanical tension. Canine SIS was obtained from donor German shepherds, and its porous collagen fiber structure was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A 2.50-cm2 section of canine SIS (SIS group) or mesh (mesh group) was implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 1, 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, the implants were histopathologically examined and tensile load was tested. One month after surgery, CD68+ macrophage numbers in the SIS group were increased, but the number of CD8+ T cells in this group declined more rapidly than that in rats treated with the mesh. In the SIS group, few adhesions and well-developed autologous abdominal muscle infiltration into the SIS collagen fibers were observed. No significant differences in the tensile load test results were found between the SIS and mesh groups at 24 weeks. Canine SIS may therefore be a suitable replacement for artificial biological scaffolds in small animals. PMID:23628657

  13. Efficient adenovector CD40 ligand immunotherapy of canine malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Euler, Henrik; Sadeghi, Arian; Carlsson, Björn; Rivera, Patricio; Loskog, Angelica; Segall, Thomas; Korsgren, Olle; Tötterman, Thomas H

    2008-05-01

    Cutaneous canine melanomas are usually benign in contrast to human malignant melanoma. However, the canine oropharyngeal, uveal, and mucocutaneous neoplasms are aggressive and have metastatic potential. Surgery and to a lesser extent radiotherapy and chemotherapy are widely adopted treatments but are seldom curative in advanced stages. The similarities between human and canine melanoma make spontaneous canine melanoma an excellent disease model for exploring novel therapies. Herein, we report the first 2 adenovector CD40L immunogene (AdCD40L) treatments of aggressive canine malignant melanoma. Case no. 1 was an advanced stage III oral melanoma that was cured from malignant melanoma with 2 intratumor AdCD40L injections before cytoreductive surgery. After treatment, the tumor tissue was infiltrated with T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes suggesting immune activation. This dog survived 401 days after the first round of gene therapy and was free of melanoma at autopsy. Case no. 2 had a conjunctival malignant melanoma with a rapid progression. This case was treated with 6 AdCD40L injections over 60 days. One hundred and twenty days after start of gene therapy and 60 days after the last injection, the tumor had regressed dramatically, and the dog had a minimal tumor mass and no signs of progression or metastasis. Our results indicate that AdCD40L immunogene therapy is beneficial in canine malignant melanoma and could be considered for human malignant melanoma as well.

  14. Correlation between intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging derived metrics and serum soluble CD40 ligand level in an embolic canine stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Wu, Chen Jiang; Lu, Shan Shan; Gao, Qian Qian; Zu, Qing Quan; Liu, Xing Long; Shi, Hai Bin; Liu, Sheng [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the relationship between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging derived quantitative metrics and serum soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) level in an embolic canine stroke model. A middle cerebral artery occlusion model was established in 24 beagle dogs. Experimental dogs were divided into low- and high-sCD40L group according to serum sCD40L level at 4.5 hours after establishing the model. IVIM imaging was scanned at 4.5 hours after model establishment using 10 b values ranging from 0 to 900 s/mm{sup 2}. Quantitative metrics diffusion coefficient (D), pseudodiffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) of ischemic lesions were calculated. Quantitative metrics of ischemic lesions were normalized by contralateral hemisphere using the following formula: normalized D = D{sub stroke} / D{sub contralateral}. Differences in IVIM metrics between the low- and high-sCD40L groups were compared using t test. Pearson's correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship between IVIM metrics and serum sCD40L level. The high-sCD40L group showed significantly lower f and normalized f values than the low-sCD40L group (f, p < 0.001; normalized f, p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in D{sup *}, normalized D{sup *}, D, or normalized D value between the two groups (All p > 0.05). Both f and normalized f values were negatively correlated with serum sCD40L level (f, r = −0.789, p < 0.001; normalized f, r = −0.823, p < 0.001). However, serum sCD40L level had no significant correlation with D{sup *}, normalized D{sup *}, D, or normalized D (All p > 0.05). The f value derived from IVIM imaging was negatively correlated with serum sCD40L level. f value might serve as a potential imaging biomarker to assess the formation of microvascular thrombosis in hyperacute period of ischemic stroke.

  15. Mouse model for acute Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Tristan; Weber, Timm; Kracker, Sven; Sommermann, Thomas; Rajewsky, Klaus; Yasuda, Tomoharu

    2016-11-29

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infects human B cells and drives them into continuous proliferation. Two key viral factors in this process are the latent membrane proteins LMP1 and LMP2A, which mimic constitutively activated CD40 receptor and B-cell receptor signaling, respectively. EBV-infected B cells elicit a powerful T-cell response that clears the infected B cells and leads to life-long immunity. Insufficient immune surveillance of EBV-infected B cells causes life-threatening lymphoproliferative disorders, including mostly germinal center (GC)-derived B-cell lymphomas. We have modeled acute EBV infection of naive and GC B cells in mice through timed expression of LMP1 and LMP2A. Although lethal when induced in all B cells, induction of LMP1 and LMP2A in just a small fraction of naive B cells initiated a phase of rapid B-cell expansion followed by a proliferative T-cell response, clearing the LMP-expressing B cells. Interfering with T-cell activity prevented clearance of LMP-expressing B cells. This was also true for perforin deficiency, which in the human causes a life-threatening EBV-related immunoproliferative syndrome. LMP expression in GC B cells impeded the GC reaction but, upon loss of T-cell surveillance, led to fatal B-cell expansion. Thus, timed expression of LMP1 together with LMP2A in subsets of mouse B cells allows one to study major clinically relevant features of human EBV infection in vivo, opening the way to new therapeutic approaches.

  16. Molecular characterization of the canine HMGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murua Escobar, H; Meyer, B; Richter, A; Becker, K; Flohr, A M; Bullerdiek, J; Nolte, I

    2003-01-01

    Due to the close similarities of numerous canine diseases to their human counterparts, the dog could join the mouse as the species of choice to unravel the genetic background of complex diseases as e.g. cancer and metabolic diseases. Accordingly, the role of the dog as a model for therapeutic approaches is strongly increasing. However, prerequisite for such studies is the characterization of the corresponding canine genes. Recently, the human high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) has attracted considerable interest of oncologists because of what is called its "double life". Besides its function as an architectural transcription factor HMGB1 can also be secreted by certain cells and then acts as a ligand for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The binding of HMGB1 to RAGE can activate key cell signaling pathways, such as p38(MAPK), JNK, and p42/p44(MAPK) emphasizing the important role of HMGB1 in inflammation and tumor metastasis. These results make HMGB1 a very interesting target for therapeutic studies done in model organisms like the dog. In this study we characterized the molecular structure of the canine HMGB1 gene on genomic and cDNA levels, its predicted protein, the gene locus and a basic expression pattern. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Astrocytic infection in canine distemper virus-induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinelli, F; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C; Richard, A

    1989-01-01

    Acute canine distemper virus (CDV)-induced demyelinating lesions were examined with double-labelling immunocytochemistry simultaneously demonstrating CDV antigen and glial fibrillary acidid protein (GFAP) as marker for astrocytes. It was shown that 64% of all astrocytes within the demyelinating lesions were infected and that 95% of all infected cells counted in the lesions were astrocytes. These results suggest that the astrocyte is the main target for CDV and that astroglial infection may play an important role in the mechanism of demyelination.

  18. Utilization and cost of a new model of care for managing acute knee injuries: the Calgary acute knee injury clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Breda HF

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs affect a large proportion of the Canadian population and present a huge problem that continues to strain primary healthcare resources. Currently, the Canadian healthcare system depicts a clinical care pathway for MSDs that is inefficient and ineffective. Therefore, a new inter-disciplinary team-based model of care for managing acute knee injuries was developed in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: the Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic (C-AKIC. The goal of this paper is to evaluate and report on the appropriateness, efficiency, and effectiveness of the C-AKIC through healthcare utilization and costs associated with acute knee injuries. Methods This quasi-experimental study measured and evaluated cost and utilization associated with specific healthcare services for patients presenting with acute knee injuries. The goal was to compare patients receiving care from two clinical care pathways: the existing pathway (i.e. comparison group and a new model, the C-AKIC (i.e. experimental group. This was accomplished through the use of a Healthcare Access and Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (HAPSQ. Results Data from 138 questionnaires were analyzed in the experimental group and 136 in the comparison group. A post-hoc analysis determined that both groups were statistically similar in socio-demographic characteristics. With respect to utilization, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC used significantly less resources. Overall, patients receiving care through the C-AKIC incurred 37% of the cost of patients with knee injuries in the comparison group and significantly incurred less costs when compared to the comparison group. The total aggregate average cost for the C-AKIC group was $2,549.59 compared to $6,954.33 for the comparison group (p Conclusions The Calgary Acute Knee Injury Clinic was able to manage and treat knee injured patients for less cost than the existing state of healthcare delivery. The

  19. Changes in gene expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 in a canine model of caerulein-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruhui; Yu, Dohyeon; Park, Jinho

    2016-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process that frequently involves peripancreatic tissues and remote organ systems. It has high morbidity and mortality rates in both human and veterinary patients. The severity of pancreatitis is generally determined by events that occur after acinar cell injury in the pancreas, resulting in elevated levels of various proinflammatory mediators, such as interleukin (IL) 1β and 6, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). When these mediators are excessively released into the systemic circulation, severe pancreatitis occurs with systemic complications. This pathophysiological process is similar to that of sepsis; thus, there are many striking clinical similarities between patients with septic shock and those with severe acute pancreatitis. We induced acute pancreatitis using caerulein in dogs and measured the change in the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines. The levels of TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA peaked at 3 h, at twice the baseline levels, and the serum concentrations of amylase and lipase also increased. Histopathological examination revealed severe hyperemia of the pancreas and hyperemia in the duodenal villi and the hepatic sinusoid. Thus, pancreatitis can be considered an appropriate model to better understand the development of naturally occurring sepsis and to assist in the effective treatment and management of septic patients.

  20. The Acute Toxicity of Major Ion Salts to Ceriodaphnia dubia. III. Mathematical models for mixture toxicity

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset concerns the development of models for describing the acute toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia using data from single salt tests and binary...

  1. A retrospective investigation on canine papillomavirus 1 (CPV1 in oral oncogenesis reveals dogs are not a suitable animal model for high-risk HPV-induced oral cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Porcellato

    Full Text Available CPV1 (also called COPV is a papillomavirus responsible for oral papillomatosis in young dogs. The involvement of this viral type in oral oncogenesis has been hypothesized in oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs, but has never been investigated in other neoplastic and hyperplastic oral lesions of dogs. Aim of this study was to investigate the presence of CPV1 in different neoplastic and hyperplastic lesions in order to assess its role in canine oral oncogenesis; according to the results obtained, a second aim of the study was to define if the dog can be considered a valid animal model for oral high risk HPV-induced tumors. Eighty-eight formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE canine oral lesions including 78 oral tumors (papillomas, SCCs, melanomas, ameloblastomas, oral adenocarcinomas and 10 hyperplastic lesions (gingival hyperplasia were investigated with immunohistochemistry for the presence of papillomavirus L1 protein and with Real-Time PCR for CPV1 DNA. RT-PCR for RNA was performed on selected samples. All viral papillomas tested were positive for immunohistochemistry and Real-time PCR. In 3/33 (10% SCCs, viral DNA was demonstrated but no viral RNA could be found. No positivity was observed both with immunohistochemistry and Real-Time PCR in the other hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity of dogs. Even though the finding of CPV1 DNA in few SCCs in face of a negative immunohistochemistry could support the hypothesis of an abortive infection in the development of these lesions, the absence of viral RNA points out that CPV1 more likely represents an innocent bystander in SCC oncogenesis. The study demonstrates a strong association between CPV1 and oral viral papillomas whereas viral contribution to the pathogenesis of other oral lesions seems unlikely. Moreover, it suggests that a canine model of CPV1 infection for HPV-induced oncogenesis could be inappropriate.

  2. A retrospective investigation on canine papillomavirus 1 (CPV1) in oral oncogenesis reveals dogs are not a suitable animal model for high-risk HPV-induced oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcellato, Ilaria; Brachelente, Chiara; Guelfi, Gabriella; Reginato, Alice; Sforna, Monica; Bongiovanni, Laura; Mechelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    CPV1 (also called COPV) is a papillomavirus responsible for oral papillomatosis in young dogs. The involvement of this viral type in oral oncogenesis has been hypothesized in oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), but has never been investigated in other neoplastic and hyperplastic oral lesions of dogs. Aim of this study was to investigate the presence of CPV1 in different neoplastic and hyperplastic lesions in order to assess its role in canine oral oncogenesis; according to the results obtained, a second aim of the study was to define if the dog can be considered a valid animal model for oral high risk HPV-induced tumors. Eighty-eight formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) canine oral lesions including 78 oral tumors (papillomas, SCCs, melanomas, ameloblastomas, oral adenocarcinomas) and 10 hyperplastic lesions (gingival hyperplasia) were investigated with immunohistochemistry for the presence of papillomavirus L1 protein and with Real-Time PCR for CPV1 DNA. RT-PCR for RNA was performed on selected samples. All viral papillomas tested were positive for immunohistochemistry and Real-time PCR. In 3/33 (10%) SCCs, viral DNA was demonstrated but no viral RNA could be found. No positivity was observed both with immunohistochemistry and Real-Time PCR in the other hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity of dogs. Even though the finding of CPV1 DNA in few SCCs in face of a negative immunohistochemistry could support the hypothesis of an abortive infection in the development of these lesions, the absence of viral RNA points out that CPV1 more likely represents an innocent bystander in SCC oncogenesis. The study demonstrates a strong association between CPV1 and oral viral papillomas whereas viral contribution to the pathogenesis of other oral lesions seems unlikely. Moreover, it suggests that a canine model of CPV1 infection for HPV-induced oncogenesis could be inappropriate.

  3. THE REDUCED CANINE PANCREAS TO STUDY THE EFFECTS OF INTRAOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HEIJMANS, HJ; MEHTA, D; KLEIBEUKER, JH; SLUITER, WJ; HOEKSTRA, HJ

    1993-01-01

    A canine model is described to study the tolerance of the pancreas to intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT). The canine pancreas is a horseshoe-shaped organ. To create a homogeneous delivery of IORT to the whole pancreas surgical manipulation is necessary which may induce pancreatitis. A resection of

  4. Canine hereditary nephropathies : Molecular genetic studies in Norwegian Elkhounds and English Cocker Spaniels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary nephropathies have been described in a variety of dog breeds. The causative mutation has been identified in a minority of canine renal diseases, and these provide useful animal models to study in order to gain knowledge on human nephropathies. In this thesis, canine hereditary

  5. The Effects of Orthodontic Forces during Canine Retraction Using Self-ligating Brackets on Gingival Crevicular Fluid Enzyme Activity, Canine Movement and Root Resorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohaya Megat Abdul Wahab; Albira Sintian; Zaidah Zainal Arifin; Zaidah Zainal Ariffin; Shahrul Hisham Zainal Ariffin

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were studied as bio markers of canine movement. Root resorption was also evaluated in canines subjected to the orthodontic forces. Nineteen subjects randomly received 100 and 150 g force using self-ligating brackets (SLB) either on the right or left site of maxillary arch. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected at distal sites of canines for five consecutive weeks. The activities of ALP, TRAP and AST were assayed and measured spectrophotometrically. Canine movement was measured for five consecutive weeks while root resorption was monitored at baseline, week 0 and week 5 using periapical radiographs. In 100 g group, TRAP activity significantly increased in week 3-5 when compared to TRAP baseline activity. However, ALP and AST activities slightly increased. In 150 g group, ALP and TRAP activities slightly increased when compared with their baseline activities. However, AST significantly increased in week 5. Canine movement and root resorption were not significantly different (p<0.05) in both groups. A force of 100 and 150 g slightly increased the bone modeling process and resulted in similar canine movement and root resorption. Therefore, 100 g force could be an optimum force for canine retraction and is preferable (compared with 150 g force) in canine retraction using SLB. (author)

  6. CORR® ORS Richard A. Brand Award for Outstanding Orthopaedic Research: Engineering flexor tendon repair with lubricant, cells, and cytokines in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory D; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-09-01

    Adhesions and poor healing are complications of flexor tendon repair. The purpose of this study was to investigate a tissue engineering approach to improve functional outcomes after flexor tendon repair in a canine model. Flexor digitorum profundus tendons were lacerated and repaired in 60 dogs that were followed for 10, 21, or 42 days. One randomly selected repair from either the second or fifth digit in one paw in each dog was treated with carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid, gelatin, and lubricin plus autologous bone marrow stromal cells stimulated with growth and differentiation factor 5; control repair tendons were not treated. Digits were analyzed by adhesion score, work of flexion, tendon-pulley friction, failure force, and histology. In the control group, 35 of 52 control tendons had adhesions, whereas 19 of 49 treated tendons had adhesions. The number of repaired tendons with adhesions in the control group was greater than the number in the treated group at all three times (p = 0.005). The normalized work of flexion in treated tendons was 0.28 (± 0.08), 0.29 (± 0.19), and 0.32 (± 0.22) N/mm/° at Day 10, Day 21, and Day 42 respectively, compared with the untreated tendons of 0.46 (± 0.19) at Day 10 (effect size, 1.5; p = 0.01), 0.77 (± 0.49) at Day 21 (effect size, 1.4; p < 0.001), and 1.17 (± 0.82) N/mm/° at Day 42 (effect size, 1.6; p < 0.001). The friction data were comparable to the work of flexion data at all times. The repaired tendon failure force in the untreated group at 42 days was 70.2 N (± 8.77), which was greater than the treated tendons 44.7 N (± 8.53) (effect size, 1.9; p < 0.001). Histologically, treated repairs had a smooth surface with intrinsic healing, whereas control repairs had surface adhesions and extrinsic healing. Our study provides evidence that tissue engineering coupled with restoration of tendon gliding can improve the quality of tendon healing in a large animal in vivo model. Tissue engineering may enhance

  7. Assessment of Methods for Rapid Intraoperative Concentration and Selection of Marrow-Derived Connective Tissue Progenitors for Bone Regeneration Using the Canine Femoral Multidefect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangphakdy, Viviane; Boehm, Cynthia; Pan, Hui; Herrick, James; Zaveri, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of large bone defects remains an unsolved clinical challenge, despite a wide array of existing bone graft materials and strategies. Local deficiency in osteogenic connective tissue progenitors (CTP-Os) due to tissue loss is one of the central biological barriers to bone regeneration. Density separation (DS) and selective retention (SR) represent two promising methods that can be used intraoperatively to rapidly concentrate cells and potentially select CTP-Os. This project was designed to compare DS and SR using the canine femoral multidefect (CFMD) model. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as a standardized scaffold for cell transplantation. Two experiments were performed using a cohort of six animals in each comparison. In Cohort I, unprocessed bone marrow aspirate (BMA) clot was compared to DS processing. MCA combined with raw BMA or DS processed cells produced a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration throughout the defect in 4 weeks with reconstitution of hematopoietic marrow. However, the retention of DS processed cells and CTP-Os in the MCA matrix was low compared to BMA clot. In Cohort II, MCA with DS-T cells (addition of calcium chloride thrombin to induce clotting and enhance cell and CTP-O retention) was compared to MCA with SR cells. A mean of 276 ± 86 million nucleated cells and 29,030 ± 10,510 CTP-Os were implanted per defect in the DS-T group. A mean of 76 ± 42 million nucleated cells and 30,266 ± 15,850 CTP-Os were implanted in the SR group. Bone formation was robust and not different between treatments. Histologically, both groups demonstrated regeneration of hematopoietic marrow tissue. However, SR sites contained more hematopoietic vascular tissues, less fibrosis, and less residual allograft, particularly in the intramedullary cavity, suggesting a more advanced stage of remodeling (p = 0.04). These data demonstrate excellent overall performance of DS and SR processing methods. Both methods

  8. The Menkes and Wilson disease genes counteract in copper toxicosis in Labrador retrievers: a new canine model for copper-metabolism disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, Hille; Gill, Yadvinder; Martin, Alan J.; Concilli, Mafalda; Dirksen, Karen; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Spee, Bart; van den Ingh, Ted S. G. A. M.; Martens, Ellen C. C. P.; Festa, Paola; Chesi, Giancarlo; van de Sluis, Bart; Houwen, Roderick H. J. H.; Watson, Adrian L.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Hodgkinson, Victoria L.; Zhu, Sha; Petris, Michael J.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Rothuizen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The deleterious effects of a disrupted copper metabolism are illustrated by hereditary diseases caused by mutations in the genes coding for the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B. Menkes disease, involving ATP7A, is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper deficiency. Mutations in ATP7B lead to Wilson disease, which is characterized by a predominantly hepatic copper accumulation. The low incidence and the phenotypic variability of human copper toxicosis hamper identification of causal genes or modifier genes involved in the disease pathogenesis. The Labrador retriever was recently characterized as a new canine model for copper toxicosis. Purebred dogs have reduced genetic variability, which facilitates identification of genes involved in complex heritable traits that might influence phenotype in both humans and dogs. We performed a genome-wide association study in 235 Labrador retrievers and identified two chromosome regions containing ATP7A and ATP7B that were associated with variation in hepatic copper levels. DNA sequence analysis identified missense mutations in each gene. The amino acid substitution ATP7B:p.Arg1453Gln was associated with copper accumulation, whereas the amino acid substitution ATP7A:p.Thr327Ile partly protected against copper accumulation. Confocal microscopy indicated that aberrant copper metabolism upon expression of the ATP7B variant occurred because of mis-localization of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Dermal fibroblasts derived from ATP7A:p.Thr327Ile dogs showed copper accumulation and delayed excretion. We identified the Labrador retriever as the first natural, non-rodent model for ATP7B-associated copper toxicosis. Attenuation of copper accumulation by the ATP7A mutation sheds an interesting light on the interplay of copper transporters in body copper homeostasis and warrants a thorough investigation of ATP7A as a modifier gene in copper-metabolism disorders. The identification of two new functional variants in

  9. The Menkes and Wilson disease genes counteract in copper toxicosis in Labrador retrievers: a new canine model for copper-metabolism disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hille Fieten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious effects of a disrupted copper metabolism are illustrated by hereditary diseases caused by mutations in the genes coding for the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B. Menkes disease, involving ATP7A, is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of copper deficiency. Mutations in ATP7B lead to Wilson disease, which is characterized by a predominantly hepatic copper accumulation. The low incidence and the phenotypic variability of human copper toxicosis hamper identification of causal genes or modifier genes involved in the disease pathogenesis. The Labrador retriever was recently characterized as a new canine model for copper toxicosis. Purebred dogs have reduced genetic variability, which facilitates identification of genes involved in complex heritable traits that might influence phenotype in both humans and dogs. We performed a genome-wide association study in 235 Labrador retrievers and identified two chromosome regions containing ATP7A and ATP7B that were associated with variation in hepatic copper levels. DNA sequence analysis identified missense mutations in each gene. The amino acid substitution ATP7B:p.Arg1453Gln was associated with copper accumulation, whereas the amino acid substitution ATP7A:p.Thr327Ile partly protected against copper accumulation. Confocal microscopy indicated that aberrant copper metabolism upon expression of the ATP7B variant occurred because of mis-localization of the protein in the endoplasmic reticulum. Dermal fibroblasts derived from ATP7A:p.Thr327Ile dogs showed copper accumulation and delayed excretion. We identified the Labrador retriever as the first natural, non-rodent model for ATP7B-associated copper toxicosis. Attenuation of copper accumulation by the ATP7A mutation sheds an interesting light on the interplay of copper transporters in body copper homeostasis and warrants a thorough investigation of ATP7A as a modifier gene in copper-metabolism disorders. The identification of two new functional

  10. 20180311 - Variability of LD50 Values from Rat Oral Acute Toxicity Studies: Implications for Alternative Model Development (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative models developed for estimating acute systemic toxicity are generally evaluated using in vivo LD50 values. However, in vivo acute systemic toxicity studies can produce variable results, even when conducted according to accepted test guidelines. This variability can ma...

  11. Dynamic In Vivo Profiling of DNA Damage and Repair after Radiotherapy Using Canine Patients as a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schulz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved data of DNA damage and repair after radiotherapy elucidates the relation between damage, repair, and cell survival. While well characterized in vitro, little is known about the time-course of DNA damage response in tumors sampled from individual patients. Kinetics of DNA damage after radiotherapy was assessed in eight dogs using repeated in vivo samples of tumor and co-irradiated normal tissue analyzed with comet assay and phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX immunohistochemistry. In vivo results were then compared (in silico with a dynamic mathematical model for DNA damage formation and repair. Maximum %DNA in tail was observed at 15–60 min after irradiation, with a rapid decrease. Time-courses of γH2AX-foci paralleled these findings with a small time delay and were not influenced by covariates. The evolutionary parameter search based on %DNA in tail revealed a good fit of the DNA repair model to in vivo data for pooled sarcoma time-courses, but fits for individual sarcoma time-courses suffer from the heterogeneous nature of the in vivo data. It was possible to follow dynamics of comet tail intensity and γH2AX-foci during a course of radiation using a minimally invasive approach. DNA repair can be quantitatively investigated as time-courses of individual patients by integrating this resulting data into a dynamic mathematical model.

  12. A compendium of canine normal tissue gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Briggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our understanding of disease is increasingly informed by changes in gene expression between normal and abnormal tissues. The release of the canine genome sequence in 2005 provided an opportunity to better understand human health and disease using the dog as clinically relevant model. Accordingly, we now present the first genome-wide, canine normal tissue gene expression compendium with corresponding human cross-species analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Affymetrix platform was utilized to catalogue gene expression signatures of 10 normal canine tissues including: liver, kidney, heart, lung, cerebrum, lymph node, spleen, jejunum, pancreas and skeletal muscle. The quality of the database was assessed in several ways. Organ defining gene sets were identified for each tissue and functional enrichment analysis revealed themes consistent with known physio-anatomic functions for each organ. In addition, a comparison of orthologous gene expression between matched canine and human normal tissues uncovered remarkable similarity. To demonstrate the utility of this dataset, novel canine gene annotations were established based on comparative analysis of dog and human tissue selective gene expression and manual curation of canine probeset mapping. Public access, using infrastructure identical to that currently in use for human normal tissues, has been established and allows for additional comparisons across species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data advance our understanding of the canine genome through a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in a diverse set of tissues, contributing to improved functional annotation that has been lacking. Importantly, it will be used to inform future studies of disease in the dog as a model for human translational research and provides a novel resource to the community at large.

  13. Quantitative assessment of hyperacute cerebral infarction with intravoxel incoherent motion MR imaging: Initial experience in a canine stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian-Qian; Lu, Shan-Shan; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Wu, Cheng-Jiang; Liu, Xing-Long; Liu, Sheng; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for the measurement of diffusion and perfusion parameters in hyperacute strokes. An embolic ischemic model was established with an autologous thrombus in 20 beagles. IVIM imaging was performed on a 3.0 Tesla platform at 4.5 h and 6 h after embolization. Ten b values from 0 to 900 s/mm 2 were fitted with a bi-exponential model to extract perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D, and pseudo-diffusion coefficient D*. Additionally, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated using the mono-exponential model with all the b values. Statistical analysis was performed using the pairwise Student's t test and Pearson's correlation test. A significant decrease in f and D was observed in the ischemic area when compared with those in the contralateral side at 4.5 h and 6 h after embolization (P < 0.01 for all). No significant difference was observed in D* between the two sides at either time point (P = 0.086 and 0.336, respectively). In the stroke area, f at 6 h was significantly lower than that at 4.5 h (P = 0.016). A significantly positive correlation was detected between ADC and D in both stroke and contralateral sides at 4.5 h and 6 h (P < 0.001 for both). Significant correlation between ADC and f was only observed in the contralateral side at 4.5 h and 6 h (P = 0.019 and 0.021, respectively). IVIM imaging could simultaneously evaluate the diffusion and microvascular perfusion characteristics in hyperacute strokes. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:550-556. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. [The agent Latrodectus and canine paecilomycotic eclampsia as a laboratory model in the survey of treatment for mycoses and parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparian, E R; Streliaeva, A V; Chebyshev, N V; Sagieva, A T; Polzikov, V V; Lazareva, N B; Kurilov, D V; Zuev, S S; Shcheglova, T A; Sadykov, V M

    2012-01-01

    The extragent used to prepare a Latrodectus mactans hydrocarbon extract is a multicomponent system composed of alkanes, alkenes, and arenes. More than 100 compounds were identified in the hydrocarbon extract (petroleum). The petroleum matrix of Latrodectus mactans was first obtained to manufacture homeopathic remedies. The authors could prepare the first Russian homeopathic medicine from Latrodectus mactans, which proved to be effective in treating canine eclampsia. Canine experiments provide a rationale for the authors' choice as the only homeopathic remedy among thousand known drugs to treat female eclampsia. It is Latrodectus mactans that is in the list of homeopathic medicines permitted for use in accordance with Order No. 335 (Supplement 2) of the Ministry of Health and Medical Industry of Russia, issued on November 29, 1995. It is manufactured from Latrodectus mactans living in the USA.

  15. Experimental canine model for sentinel lymph node biopsy in the vulva using technetium and patent blue dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, José Ulcijara; Pinheiro, Luiz Gonzaga Porto; Vasques, Paulo Henrique Diógenes; Rocha, João Ivo Xavier; Cruz, Diego Alves; Beserra, Hugo Enrique Orsini; Cavalcante, Raissa Vasconcelos

    2012-02-01

    This paper aims to study and define the experimental model of sentinel lymph node biopsy of the vulva in bitches. 0.2 ml of 99mTc phytate was injected intradermally, using a fine gauge insulin needle in the anterior commissure of the vulva. Thirty minutes after 99mTc injection, the inguinal mapping was performed using a gamma probe. After this, 0.5 ml of blue dye (bleu patenté V Guerbet 2.5%) was injected in the same place. After 15 minutes, a 3 cm long inguinal incision was made at point maximum uptake followed by careful dissection, guided by visualization of a bluish afferent lymphatic system that points to the sentinel lymph node (SLN). It was observed that 88% of SLN were identified. It wasn't found a significant difference among the presence or not of sentinel lymph node in the sides, which is an indication of a good consistency. It was observed a high (88%) and significant (χ2=12.89 and p=0.0003) intercession between both methods (blue dye and radiation). The experimental model adopted is feasible, becoming advantageous in applying the association of Patent blue and 99mTc.

  16. Feasibility of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) conductivity imaging to evaluate brain abscess lesion: in vivo canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tong In; Jeong, Woo Chul; McEwan, Alistair; Park, Hee Myung; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-07-01

    To show the feasibility of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) conductivity imaging in terms of its capability to provide new contrast information of abscess lesion and characterize time-course variations before and after the induction of brain abscess. Brain abscess was induced in healthy beagles by a direct inoculation method using Staphylococcus pseudintermedius. After the induction, four electrodes were attached on the head and the dog was placed inside the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) bore. Using a current source, we injected a current of amplitude 5 mA and a pulse width of 81 msec. A multi-echo ICNE pulse sequence was used to obtain the magnetic flux density (Bz ) data. The relative conductivity contrast ratios (rCCR, %) of abscess lesion were significantly changed by the postinduction time (P model animal experiments to validate the MREIT technique providing conductivity information of tissues in situ to be utilized in clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biphasic calcium phosphate nano-composite scaffolds reinforced with bioglass provide a synthetic alternative to autografts in a canine tibiofibula defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dezhi; Xu, Guohua; Yang, Zhou; Holz, Jonathan; Ye, Xiaojian; Cai, Shu; Yuan, Wen; Wang, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    Bone grafting is commonly used to repair bone defects. As the porosity of the graft scaffold increases, bone formation increases, but the strength decreases. Early attempts to engineer materials were not able to resolve this problem. In recent years, nanomaterials have demonstrated the unique ability to improve the material strength and toughness while stimulating new bone formation. In our previous studies, we synthesized a nano-scale material by reinforcing a porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramic scaffold with Na2O-MgO-P2O5-CaO bioglass (β-TCP/BG). However, the in vivo effects of the β-TCP/BG scaffold on bone repair remain unknown. We investigated the efficacy of β-TCP/BG scaffolds compared to autografts in a canine tibiofibula defect model. The tibiofibula defects were created in the right legs of 12 dogs, which were randomly assigned to either the scaffold group or the autograft group (six dogs per group). Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-surgery. The involved tibias were extracted at 12 weeks and were tested to failure via a three-point bending. After the biomechanical analysis, specimens were subsequently processed for scanning electron microscopy analysis and histological evaluations. Radiographic evaluation at 12 weeks post-operation revealed many newly formed osseous calluses and bony unions in both groups. Both the maximum force and break force in the scaffold group (n = 6) were comparable to those in the autograft group (n = 6, P > 0.05), suggesting that the tissue-engineered bone repair achieved similar biomechanical properties to autograft bone repair. At 12 weeks post-operation, obvious new bone and blood vessel formations were observed in the artificial bone of the experimental group. The results demonstrated that new bone formation and high bone strength were achieved in the β-TCP/BG scaffold group, and suggested that the β-TCP/BG scaffold could be used as a synthetic alternative to autografts for

  18. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu [Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi [Veterinary Oncology, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Iwano, Hidetomo [Veterinary Biochemistry, Department of Basic Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Uchide, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: uchide@rakuno.ac.jp [Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than in normal tissues. Additionally, MM with distant metastasis showed a higher expression than those without distant metastasis. Functional analysis of LAT1 was performed on one of the five cell lines, CMeC-1. [{sup 3}H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM

  19. Evaluation of Low-Dose Ultraviolet Light C for Reduction of Select ESKAPE Pathogens in a Canine Skin and Muscle Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dujowich, Mauricio; Case, J Brad; Ellison, Gary; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at comparing the ability of low-dose UVC, 0.05% chlorhexidine, and combined UVC with 0.05% chlorhexidine to reduce colony-forming units (CFUs) on select ESKAPE pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterococcus faecium) in a canine skin and muscle model. Surgical site infections (SSIs) result in increased morbidity and cost. UVC damages DNA, rendering bacteria nonviable and does not discriminate between drug-sensitive and multi-drug-resistant organisms. Specimens were inoculated with one of three pathogens. Samples were treated with a 254 nm UVC mercury lamp or a 270 nm UVC LED light at 0.015, 0.03, or 0.04 J/cm(2) doses; 0.05% and 2% chlorhexidine were used as positive controls. To evaluate synergism, 0.05% chlorhexidine was used with 0.015 J/cm(2) of UVC. CFUs were counted and compared against the negative control. There were no significant differences in CFU counts between samples of the same tissue type treated with different light sources of the same UVC dose. UVC significantly decreased CFUs when compared against all negative controls in both skin and muscle. There was no consistently superior bactericidal UVC dose identified for individual bacteria or for tissue type. The bactericidal activity of UVC at 0.015 J/cm(2) versus 0.05% chlorhexidine was not different in muscle for any bacteria. The bactericidal activity of UVC at 0.015 J/cm(2) was superior to 0.05% chlorhexidine in skin for S. aureus and K. pneumonia, but not E. faecium. Combination of UVC and 0.05% chlorhexidine showed synergy against E. faecium when evaluated on skin. Low-dose UVC shows promise as a rapid, effective, and synergistic means of reducing bacterial burdens, which may decrease the incidence of SSIs. It should be further evaluated for use when 2% chlorhexidine would be contraindicated or impractical, such as open wounds or surgical sites.

  20. Dissecting the regulatory microenvironment of a large animal model of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: evidence of a negative prognostic impact of FOXP3+ T cells in canine B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Dammy; Chang, Yu-Mei; Bryant, Hannah; Szladovits, Balazs; Dalessandri, Tim; Davison, Lucy J; Yallop, Elizabeth; Mills, Emily; Leo, Chiara; Lara, Ana; Stell, Anneliese; Polton, Gerry; Garden, Oliver A

    2014-01-01

    The cancer microenvironment plays a pivotal role in oncogenesis, containing a number of regulatory cells that attenuate the anti-neoplastic immune response. While the negative prognostic impact of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the context of most solid tissue tumors is well established, their role in lymphoid malignancies remains unclear. T cells expressing FOXP3 and Helios were documented in the fine needle aspirates of affected lymph nodes of dogs with spontaneous multicentric B cell lymphoma (BCL), proposed to be a model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Multivariable analysis revealed that the frequency of lymph node FOXP3(+) T cells was an independent negative prognostic factor, impacting both progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.10; p = 0.01) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.61; p = 0.01) when comparing dogs showing higher than the median FOXP3 expression with those showing the median value of FOXP3 expression or less. Taken together, these data suggest the existence of a population of Tregs operational in canine multicentric BCL that resembles thymic Tregs, which we speculate are co-opted by the tumor from the periphery. We suggest that canine multicentric BCL represents a robust large animal model of human diffuse large BCL, showing clinical, cytological and immunophenotypic similarities with the disease in man, allowing comparative studies of immunoregulatory mechanisms.

  1. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K.; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-01-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistr...

  2. Root Length and Anatomy of Impacted Maxillary Canines in Patients with Unilateral Maxillary Canine Impaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostfa Shahabi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Canine impaction is a common occurrence. In this study, we sought to investigate the root anatomy and length of impacted canines and lateral incisor adjacent to impacted maxillary canine. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, three-dimensional tomographic imaging was performed on 26 patients with unilateral maxillary canine impaction. In this study, we evaluated root length and anatomy of impacted canines, in terms of resorption intensity and curvature, with Planmeca Romexis Viewer 4.0. Furthermore, crown shape as well as root length and anatomy of the lateral incisors adjacent to impacted canines were investigated and compared with the other side on the dental arch, where canine eruption was normal. Results: Root length of impacted canines was significantly lower than that of normal canines (P=0.011. There were no significant differences between root length of lateral incisors adjacent to impacted canines and root length of lateral incisors adjacent to normal canines (P=0.221. Moreover, the resorption intensity of the adjacent lateral incisors was higher than that of the impacted canines. No significant differences were noted in root resorption intensity between the lateral incisors adjacent to the imacted canines and the lateral incisors adjacent to normal canines (P=0.36. In addition, resorption intensity was significantly higher in impacted canines than in normal canines (P=0.024. Root anatomy of impacted canines was not significantly different from that of normal canines (P=0.055. The crown shape of the lateral incisors adjacent to impacted canines was not significantly different from that of the lateral incisors adjacent to normal canines (P=0.052. Conclusion: Impaction can probably affect root length and canine resorption severity. However, root and crown shape of lateral incisors cannot always be associated with canine impaction.

  3. Heat dissipation by blood circulation and airway tissue heat absorption in a canine model of inhalational thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiangbo; Zhang, Guoan; Qiu, Yuxuan; Wen, Chunquan; Fu, Tairan

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to further explore heat dissipation by blood circulation and airway tissue heat absorption in an inhalational thermal injury model. Twelve adult male Beagle dogs were divided into four groups to inhale heated air for 10min: the control group, group I (100.5°C), group II (161.5°C), and group III (218°C). The relative humidity and temperature of the inhaled heated air were measured in the heating tube and trachea, as were blood temperatures and flow velocities in both common jugular veins. Formulas were used to calculate the total heat quantity reduction of the heated air, heat dissipation by the blood, and airway tissue heat absorption. The blood temperatures of both the common jugular veins increased by 0.29°C±0.07°C to 2.96°C±0.24°C and the mean blood flow volume after injury induction was about 1.30-1.74 times greater than before injury induction. The proportions of heat dissipated by the blood and airway tissue heat absorption were 68.92%±14.88% and 31.13%±14.87%, respectively. The heat dissipating ability of the blood circulation was demonstrated and improved upon along with tissue heat absorption owing to increased regional blood flow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Citizen science: a new direction in canine behavior research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Julie; Spicer Rice, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Researchers increasingly rely on members of the public to contribute to scientific projects-from collecting or identifying, to analyzing and disseminating data. The "citizen science" model proves useful to many thematically distinctive fields, like ornithology, astronomy, and phenology. The recent formalization of citizen science projects addresses technical issues related to volunteer participation--like data quality--so that citizen scientists can make longstanding, meaningful contributions to scientific projects. Since the late 1990s, canine science research has relied with greater frequency on the participation of the general public, particularly dog owners. These researchers do not typically consider the methods and technical issues that those conducting citizen science projects embrace and continue to investigate. As more canine science studies rely on public input, an in-depth knowledge of the benefits and challenges of citizen science can help produce relevant, high-quality data while increasing the general public's understanding of canine behavior and cognition as well as the scientific process. We examine the benefits and challenges of current citizen science models in an effort to enhance canine citizen science project preparation, execution, and dissemination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. IQGAP1 is an oncogenic target in canine melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky H Lee

    Full Text Available Canine oral mucosal melanoma is an aggressive malignant neoplasm and is characterized by local infiltration and a high metastatic potential. The disease progression is similar to that of human oral melanomas. Whereas human cutaneous melanoma is primarily driven by activating mutations in Braf (60% or Nras (20%, human mucosal melanoma harbors these mutations much less frequently. This makes therapeutic targeting and research modeling of the oral form potentially different from that of the cutaneous form in humans. Similarly, research has found only rare Nras mutations and no activating Braf mutations in canine oral melanomas, but they are still reliant on MAPK signaling. IQGAP1 is a signaling scaffold that regulates oncogenic ERK1/2 MAPK signaling in human Ras- and Raf- driven cancers, including melanomas. To investigate whether IQGAP1 is a potential target in canine melanoma, we examined the expression and localization of IQGAP1 in primary canine melanomas and canine oral melanoma cell lines obtained from the University of California-Davis. Using CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of IQGAP1, we examined effects on downstream ERK1/2 pathway activity and assayed proliferation of cell lines when treated with a peptide that blocks the interaction between IQGAP1 and ERK1/2. We observed that canine IQGAP1 is expressed and localizes to a similar extent in both human and canine melanoma by qPCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. Deletion of IQGAP1 reduces MAPK pathway activation in cell lines, similar to effects seen in human BrafV600E cell lines. Additionally, we demonstrated reduced proliferation when these cells are treated with a blocking peptide in vitro.

  6. Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasani, F; Javanbakht, J; Samani, R; Shirani, D

    2016-03-01

    Canine cutaneous leishmaniasis (CCL) is a significant veterinary problem. Infected dogs also serve as parasite reservoirs and contribute to human transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Histologically, the lesions were nodular to diffuse interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with histiocytic pseudorosettes together with numerous amastigotes within macrophages and occasionally within the interstitium. Organisms were often contained within clear and intracellular vacuoles. The other inflammatory cells, which were present in the biopsies of the Leishmania-infected dog, were lymphocytes and plasma cells. The histopathology results emphasized the role of dog, particularly asymptomatic dog, as reservoirs for CCL because of the high cutaneous parasite loads. These results may help to explain the maintenance of high transmission rates and numbers of CCL cases in endemic urban regions.

  7. Transoral endoscopic surgery versus conventional thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic intervention: safety and efficacy in a canine survival model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Ying; Chu, Yen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Yuan, Hsu-Chia; Ko, Po-Jen; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Transoral endoscopic surgery has been shown to be feasible and safe in both humans and animal models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of transoral and conventional thoracoscopy for thoracic exploration, surgical lung biopsy, and pericardial window creation. The animals (n = 20) were randomly assigned to the transoral endoscopic approach group (n = 10) or conventional thoracoscopic approach group (n = 10). Transoral thoracoscopy was performed with a flexible bronchoscope via an incision over the vestibulum oris. In conventional thoracoscopy, access to the thoracic cavity was obtained through a thoracic incision. Surgical outcomes (body weight, operating time, operative complications, and time to resumption of normal diet), physiologic parameters (respiratory rate, body temperature), inflammatory parameters [white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP)], and pulmonary parameters (arterial blood gases) were compared for both procedures. The surgical lung biopsy and pericardial window creation were successfully performed in all animals except one animal in the transoral group. There was no significant difference in operating times between the groups. The increase in WBC in the transoral thoracoscopy group was significantly smaller on postoperative day 1 than in the conventional thoracoscopy group (p = 0.0029). The transoral group had an earlier return to preoperative body temperature (p = 0.041) and respiratory rate (p = 0.045) on day 7. With respect to pulmonary parameters, there was no significant difference in blood pH, pCO2, or PaCO2 between the transoral and transthoracic groups. All animals survived without complications 14 days after surgery. This study demonstrated that the transoral approach was comparable to conventional thoracoscopic surgery for lung biopsy and pericardial window creation in terms of safety and efficacy.

  8. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minmin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  9. Oral Administration of Escin Inhibits Acute Inflammation and Reduces Intestinal Mucosal Injury in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minmin; Lu, Chengwen; Zhang, Leiming; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Duan, Sijin; Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of oral administration of escin on acute inflammation and intestinal mucosal injury in animal models. The effects of escin on carrageenan-induced paw edema in a rat model of acute inflammation, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) induced intestinal mucosal injury in a mouse model, were observed. It was shown that oral administration of escin inhibits carrageenan-induced paw edema and decreases the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2. In CLP model, low dose of escin ameliorates endotoxin induced liver injury and intestinal mucosal injury and increases the expression of tight junction protein claudin-5 in mice. These findings suggest that escin effectively inhibits acute inflammation and reduces intestinal mucosal injury in animal models.

  10. Acute and chronic exposure to Tyrophagus putrescentiae induces allergic pulmonary response in a murine model

    OpenAIRE

    Nu?ez, Nail? Karine; da Cunha, Aline Andrea; dos Santos Dutra, Mois?s; Barbosa, Gustavo Leivas; Morassutti, Alessandra Loureiro; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Antunes, G?ssica Luana; Silveira, Josiane Silva; da Silva, Guilherme Liberato; Pitrez, Paulo M?rcio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Tp) is a source of aeroallergen that causes allergic diseases. Objective To describe an acute and chronic murine model of allergic asthma with Tp extract with no systemic sensitization and no use of adjuvant. Methods Mites from dust sample were cultured and a raw extract was produced. Female BALB/c mice (6-8 weeks) were challenged intranasally with Tp extract or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline, for 10 consecutive days (acute protocol) or for 6 weeks (...

  11. Cloning of the canine ABCA4 gene and evaluation in canine cone-rod dystrophies and progressive retinal atrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, James W; Zangerl, Barbara; Miller, Brian; Nelson, Jacque; Kirkness, Ewen F; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2004-03-29

    To characterize a novel early onset canine retinal disease, and evaluate the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene ABCA4 as a potential candidate gene in this and other canine retinal degenerations. Retinal disease was characterized ophthalmoscopically and electroretinographically in two pit bull terrier dogs and their purpose-bred descendants. All 50 exons of the canine ABCA4 gene were amplified, cloned and sequenced from retinal mRNA of a normal, a carrier and an affected animal, and polymorphisms identified. The latter were used to search for association between ABCA4 and retinal disease both within the study pedigrees and in additional canine breeds segregating retinal degenerations. The disease derived from either founder is distinguished by early, severe, and rapidly progressive loss of cone function accompanied by progressive rod loss that is only relatively slower. Cloning and comparative sequencing of ABCA4 identified six point mutations, none of which were obviously pathogenic. Crossbreeding studies revealed that the diseases in the two founders, although similar, are nonallelic. Pedigree analysis of segregating polymorphisms revealed dissociation between ABCA4 and both retinal phenotypes. The early, severe cone dysfunction in these diseases distinguish them from other forms of canine Progressive Retinal Atrophy. The development of a research population segregating these diseases presents two large animal models for the heterogenous human diseases termed cone-rod dystrophies. Analysis of the canine ABCA4 homolog gene documented its sequence and identified a set of point mutations that were used to exclude this gene as causal to these canine cone-rod dystrophies.

  12. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, A.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Katsaros, C.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  13. Long-term effectiveness of canine-to-canine bonded flexible spiral wire lingual retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Anne-Marie; Renkema, Alianne; Bronkhorst, Ewald; Katsaros, Christos

    Introduction: The flexible spiral wire (FSW) canine-to-canine lingual retainer bonded to all 6 anterior teeth is a frequently used type of mandibular fixed retainer. This study aimed to assess the long-term effectiveness of FSW canine-to-canine lingual retainers in maintaining the alignment of the

  14. 9 CFR 113.305 - Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Type 2 Vaccine. 113.305 Section 113.305 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.305 Canine Hepatitis and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine. Canine Hepatitis Vaccine and Canine Adenovirus Type 2 Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing cell...

  15. Construction of protein profile classification model and screening of proteomic signature of acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Zhuo, Jiacai; Duan, Yonggang; Shi, Benhang; Chen, Xuhong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Liang; Lou, Jin; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Qiongli; Du, Xin; Li, Ming; Wang, Daping; Shi, Dunyun

    2014-01-01

    The French-American-British (FAB) and WHO classifications provide important guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic prediction of acute leukemia, but are incapable of accurately differentiating all subtypes, and not well correlated with the clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed the protein profiling of the bone marrow mononuclear cells from the patients with acute leukemia and the health volunteers (control) by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI_TOF_MS). The patients with acute leukemia were analyzed as unitary by the profiling that were grouped into acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), acute myeloid leukemia-granulocytic (AML-Gran), acute myeloid leukemia-monocytic (AML-Mon) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and control. Based on 109 proteomic signatures, the classification models of acute leukemia were constructed to screen the predictors by the improvement of the proteomic signatures and to detect their expression characteristics. According to the improvement and the expression characteristics of the predictors, the proteomic signatures (M3829, M1593, M2121, M2536, M1016) characterized successively each group (CON, APL, AML-Gra, AML-Mon, ALL) were screened as target molecules for identification. Meanwhile, the proteomic-based class of determinant samples could be made by the classification models. The credibility of the proteomic-based classification passed the evaluation of Biomarker Patterns Software 5.0 (BPS 5.0) scoring and validated application in clinical practice. The results suggested that the proteomic signatures characterized by different blasts were potential for developing new treatment and monitoring approaches of leukemia blasts. Moreover, the classification model was potential in serving as new diagnose approach of leukemia.

  16. Hemorheology index changes in a rat acute blood stasis model: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hemorheology index changes in a rat acute blood stasis model: a systematic review and meta-analysis. ... Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database (CNKI), Chinese Medical Journal Database (CMJD), Chinese Biology Medicine disc (CBM), Wanfang database, and PubMed for studies of rat blood stasis models; ...

  17. Development of Hamster Models for Acute and Chronic Infections with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Golden Syrian hamster is frequently used as a small animal model to study acute leptospirosis. However, use of this small animal model to study Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo infections has not been well documented. Cattle are the normal maintenance hosts of L. borgpetersenii serovar...

  18. Internal gallbladder drainage prevents development of acute cholecystitis in a pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Daniel W; Mortensen, Frank V; Møller, Jens K

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute cholecystitis can be the result of retention of bile in the gallbladder with possible secondary infection and ischaemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether internal drainage of the gallbladder could protect against the development of acute cholecystitis...... in a pig model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty pigs were randomized to either internal drainage (drained) or not (undrained). Day 0 acute cholecystitis was induced by ligation of the cystic artery and duct together with inoculation of bacteria. Four days later the pigs were killed and the gallbladders were...... removed and histologically scored for the presence of cholecystitis. Bile and blood samples were collected for bacterial culturing and biochemical analyses. RESULTS: The histological examination demonstrated statistical significant differences in acute cholecystitis development between groups, the degree...

  19. Root Length and Anatomy of Impacted Maxillary Canines in Patients with Unilateral Maxillary Canine Impaction

    OpenAIRE

    Mostfa Shahabi; Maryam Omidkhoda; Seyedeh Haniyeh Omidi; Seyed Hosein Hoseini Zarch

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Canine impaction is a common occurrence. In this study, we sought to investigate the root anatomy and length of impacted canines and lateral incisor adjacent to impacted maxillary canine. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, three-dimensional tomographic imaging was performed on 26 patients with unilateral maxillary canine impaction. In this study, we evaluated root length and anatomy of impacted canines, in terms of resorption intensity and curvature, with Planme...

  20. Long-term restoration of rod and cone vision by single dose rAAV-mediated gene transfer to the retina in a canine model of childhood blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Bennett, Jean; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Bennicelli, Jeannette; Dejneka, Nadine S; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-12-01

    The short- and long-term effects of gene therapy using AAV-mediated RPE65 transfer to canine retinal pigment epithelium were investigated in dogs affected with disease caused by RPE65 deficiency. Results with AAV 2/2, 2/1, and 2/5 vector pseudotypes, human or canine RPE65 cDNA, and constitutive or tissue-specific promoters were similar. Subretinally administered vectors restored retinal function in 23 of 26 eyes, but intravitreal injections consistently did not. Photoreceptoral and postreceptoral function in both rod and cone systems improved with therapy. In dogs followed electroretinographically for 3 years, responses remained stable. Biochemical analysis of retinal retinoids indicates that mutant dogs have no detectable 11-cis-retinal, but markedly elevated retinyl esters. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 treatment resulted in detectable 11-cis-retinal expression, limited to treated areas. RPE65 protein expression was limited to retinal pigment epithelium of treated areas. Subretinal AAV-RPE65 vector is well tolerated and does not elicit high antibody levels to the vector or the protein in ocular fluids or serum. In long-term studies, wild-type cDNA is expressed only in target cells. Successful, stable restoration of rod and cone photoreceptor function in these dogs has important implications for treatment of human patients affected with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by RPE65 mutations.

  1. Keratinocyte antiviral response to Poly(dA:dT stimulation and papillomavirus infection in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Luff

    Full Text Available X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc, an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2 upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG on poly(dA:dT stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients.

  2. Keratinocyte antiviral response to Poly(dA:dT) stimulation and papillomavirus infection in a canine model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Jennifer A; Yuan, Hang; Kennedy, Douglas; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter; Moore, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is caused by a genetic mutation within the common gamma chain (γc), an essential component of the cytokine receptors for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. XSCID patients are most commonly treated with bone marrow transplants (BMT) to restore systemic immune function. However, BMT-XSCID humans and dogs remain at an increased risk for development of cutaneous papillomavirus (PV) infections and their associated neoplasms, most typically cutaneous papillomas. Since basal keratinocytes are the target cell for the initial PV infection, we wanted to determine if canine XSCID keratinocytes have a diminished antiviral cytokine response to poly(dA:dT) and canine papillomavirus-2 (CPV-2) upon initial infection. We performed quantitative RT-PCR for antiviral cytokines and downstream interferon stimulated genes (ISG) on poly(dA:dT) stimulated and CPV-2 infected monolayer keratinocyte cultures derived from XSCID and normal control dogs. We found that XSCID keratinocytes responded similarly to poly(dA:dT) as normal keratinocytes by upregulating antiviral cytokines and ISGs. CPV-2 infection of both XSCID and normal keratinocytes did not result in upregulation of antiviral cytokines or ISGs at 2, 4, or 6 days post infection. These data suggest that the antiviral response to initial PV infection of basal keratinocytes is similar between XSCID and normal patients, and is not the likely source for the remaining immunodeficiency in XSCID patients.

  3. Mapping of the disease locus and identification of ADAMTS10 as a candidate gene in a canine model of primary open angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kuchtey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, with elevated intraocular pressure as an important risk factor. Increased resistance to outflow of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork causes elevated intraocular pressure, but the specific mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we used genome-wide SNP arrays to map the disease gene in a colony of Beagle dogs with inherited POAG to within a single 4 Mb locus on canine chromosome 20. The Beagle POAG locus is syntenic to a previously mapped human quantitative trait locus for intraocular pressure on human chromosome 19. Sequence capture and next-generation sequencing of the entire canine POAG locus revealed a total of 2,692 SNPs segregating with disease. Of the disease-segregating SNPs, 54 were within exons, 8 of which result in amino acid substitutions. The strongest candidate variant causes a glycine to arginine substitution in a highly conserved region of the metalloproteinase ADAMTS10. Western blotting revealed ADAMTS10 protein is preferentially expressed in the trabecular meshwork, supporting an effect of the variant specific to aqueous humor outflow. The Gly661Arg variant in ADAMTS10 found in the POAG Beagles suggests that altered processing of extracellular matrix and/or defects in microfibril structure or function may be involved in raising intraocular pressure, offering specific biochemical targets for future research and treatment strategies.

  4. Maxillary canine teeth as supplement tool in sex determination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maxillary impressions for all subjects were taken in alginate impression material. Study models were prepared immediately in dental stone to prevent dimensional change. Apart from the inter-canine distance and the left mesio-distal crown width which exhibited statistically significant differences, other parameters as ...

  5. Canine cancer patients are included in translational research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Betina; Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2014-01-01

    Cancer bearing dogs represent a unique clinical cancer model with a direct potential for accelerating translation into human patients. A research collaboration between the veterinary and human medical facilities at Copenhagen University and Rigshospitalet has taken offset in this. Canine cancer...

  6. Podoplanin Expression in Canine Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Honma, Ryusuke; Kaneko, Mika K; Fujii, Yuki; Kagawa, Yumiko; Konnai, Satoru; Kato, Yukinari

    2016-12-01

    A type I transmembrane protein, podoplanin (PDPN), is expressed in several normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells or pulmonary type I alveolar cells. We recently demonstrated that anticanine PDPN monoclonal antibody (mAb), PMab-38, recognizes canine PDPN of squamous cell carcinomas, but does not react with lymphatic endothelial cells. Herein, we investigated whether PMab-38 reacts with canine melanoma. PMab-38 reacted with 90% of melanoma cells (9/10 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Of interest, PMab-38 stained the lymphatic endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts in melanoma tissues, although it did not stain any lymphatic endothelial cells in normal tissues. PMab-38 could be useful for uncovering the function of PDPN in canine melanomas.

  7. Canine Food Preference Assessment of Animal and Vegetable Ingredient-Based Diets Using Single-Pan Tests and Behavioral Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callon, Meghan C; Cargo-Froom, Cara; DeVries, Trevor J; Shoveller, Anna K

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of canine food selection is critical for both the pet food industry and dog owners, since owners want quality foods that are palatable, while fulfilling their pet's nutritional requirements. There are two common methods for assessing canine food preference: the two-pan test and the one-pan test. Neither test fully accounts for the complexity of the canine feeding experience nor do they provide applicable representations of canine feeding behavior in the home. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine whether dogs display a preference for animal ingredient-based diets when compared with vegetable ingredient-based diets and (2) examine whether dogs experience neophobia when presented with a novel diet. Eight adult Beagles (average age = 24 months, weighing 8-12 kg) were individually fed each of four novel diets in a 4 × 4 replicated Latin square design, with 10-d treatment periods and four dietary treatments. Data were analyzed using a mixed model with repeated measures and significance was declared when p  animal and vegetable ingredient-based diets, and animal- and vegetable-based ingredients diluted with anhydrous α-d-glucose. The diluted diets were used for a larger study to determine true mineral digestibility. Dogs were fed twice per day (0800 and 1300 h). Behavioral observations were made by video on the first, and last 2 days of each 10-day treatment period of both a.m. and p.m. feedings. Time to consume feed, distraction, hesitation, level of anticipation pre-consumption, and interest post-consumption were recorded. Dogs experienced initial disruptive (neophobic) effects of a novel diet. Neophobia was demonstrated by a decreased (slower) rate of consumption, increased distraction during consumption of the diet, and increased hesitation on the first day of each new diet ( p  animal-based ingredients diet ( p  < 0.05). This study presents insights into canine food preference assessment methods that may more

  8. Canine Food Preference Assessment of Animal and Vegetable Ingredient-Based Diets Using Single-Pan Tests and Behavioral Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan C. Callon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of canine food selection is critical for both the pet food industry and dog owners, since owners want quality foods that are palatable, while fulfilling their pet’s nutritional requirements. There are two common methods for assessing canine food preference: the two-pan test and the one-pan test. Neither test fully accounts for the complexity of the canine feeding experience nor do they provide applicable representations of canine feeding behavior in the home. The objectives of this study were to (1 determine whether dogs display a preference for animal ingredient-based diets when compared with vegetable ingredient-based diets and (2 examine whether dogs experience neophobia when presented with a novel diet. Eight adult Beagles (average age = 24 months, weighing 8–12 kg were individually fed each of four novel diets in a 4 × 4 replicated Latin square design, with 10-d treatment periods and four dietary treatments. Data were analyzed using a mixed model with repeated measures and significance was declared when p < 0.05. The diets were: animal and vegetable ingredient-based diets, and animal- and vegetable-based ingredients diluted with anhydrous α-d-glucose. The diluted diets were used for a larger study to determine true mineral digestibility. Dogs were fed twice per day (0800 and 1300 h. Behavioral observations were made by video on the first, and last 2 days of each 10-day treatment period of both a.m. and p.m. feedings. Time to consume feed, distraction, hesitation, level of anticipation pre-consumption, and interest post-consumption were recorded. Dogs experienced initial disruptive (neophobic effects of a novel diet. Neophobia was demonstrated by a decreased (slower rate of consumption, increased distraction during consumption of the diet, and increased hesitation on the first day of each new diet (p < 0.05. The level of interest post-consumption was highest when dogs consumed the animal

  9. Approaches to canine health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Dan G; Church, David B; McGreevy, Paul D; Thomson, Peter C; Brodbelt, Dave C

    2014-01-01

    Effective canine health surveillance systems can be used to monitor disease in the general population, prioritise disorders for strategic control and focus clinical research, and to evaluate the success of these measures. The key attributes for optimal data collection systems that support canine disease surveillance are representativeness of the general population, validity of disorder data and sustainability. Limitations in these areas present as selection bias, misclassification bias and discontinuation of the system respectively. Canine health data sources are reviewed to identify their strengths and weaknesses for supporting effective canine health surveillance. Insurance data benefit from large and well-defined denominator populations but are limited by selection bias relating to the clinical events claimed and animals covered. Veterinary referral clinical data offer good reliability for diagnoses but are limited by referral bias for the disorders and animals included. Primary-care practice data have the advantage of excellent representation of the general dog population and recording at the point of care by veterinary professionals but may encounter misclassification problems and technical difficulties related to management and analysis of large datasets. Questionnaire surveys offer speed and low cost but may suffer from low response rates, poor data validation, recall bias and ill-defined denominator population information. Canine health scheme data benefit from well-characterised disorder and animal data but reflect selection bias during the voluntary submissions process. Formal UK passive surveillance systems are limited by chronic under-reporting and selection bias. It is concluded that active collection systems using secondary health data provide the optimal resource for canine health surveillance.

  10. Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Xu, Min-Jun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Song, Hui-Qun; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-07-28

    Canine and feline parasitic zoonoses have not been given high priority in China, although the role of companion animals as reservoirs for zoonotic parasitic diseases has been recognized worldwide. With an increasing number of dogs and cats under unregulated conditions in China, the canine and feline parasitic zoonoses are showing a trend towards being gradually uncontrolled. Currently, canine and feline parasitic zoonoses threaten human health, and cause death and serious diseases in China. This article comprehensively reviews the current status of major canine and feline parasitic zoonoses in mainland China, discusses the risks dogs and cats pose with regard to zoonotic transmission of canine and feline parasites, and proposes control strategies and measures.

  11. Modeling the Dynamics of Acute Phase Protein Expression in Human Hepatoma Cells Stimulated by IL-6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaobin Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a systemic inflammatory mediator that triggers the human body’s acute phase response to trauma or inflammation. Although mathematical models for IL-6 signaling pathways have previously been developed, reactions that describe the expression of acute phase proteins were not included. To address this deficiency, a recent model of IL-6 signaling was extended to predict the dynamics of acute phase protein expression in IL-6-stimulated HepG2 cells (a human hepatoma cell line. This included reactions that describe the regulation of haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and albumin secretion by nuclear transcription factors STAT3 dimer and C/EBPβ. This new extended model was validated against two different sets of experimental data. Using the validated model, a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify seven potential drug targets to regulate the secretion of haptoglobin, fibrinogen, and albumin. The drug-target binding kinetics for these seven targets was then integrated with the IL-6 kinetic model to rank them based upon the influence of their pairing with drugs on acute phase protein dynamics. It was found that gp80, JAK, and gp130 were the three most promising drug targets and that it was possible to reduce the therapeutic dosage by combining drugs aimed at the top three targets in a cocktail. These findings suggest hypotheses for further experimental investigation.

  12. Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failure in Trauma and Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0376 TITLE: Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failgure in Trauma...COVERED 22 Sep 2016 - 21 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Trauma, extensive burns, bacterial infections, and acute pancreatitis (AP) are common

  13. Electroacupuncture Alleviates Pain Responses and Inflammation in a Rat Model of Acute Gout Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Chai

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute gout arthritis is one of the most painful inflammatory conditions. Treatments for gout pain are limited to colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroids, which oftentimes result in severe adverse effects. Electroacupuncture (EA has been proved to be effective in relieving many inflammatory pain conditions with few side effects. Here, we aim to investigate the therapeutic potentials of EA on pain and inflammation of a rat model of acute gout arthritis and underlying mechanisms. We found that 2/100 Hz EA produced the most robust analgesic effect on mechanical hyperalgesia of acute gout arthritis rat model compared with 2 and 100 Hz. EA produced similar analgesic effect compared with indomethacin. 2/100 Hz EA also significantly alleviates the ongoing pain behavior, thermal hyperalgesia, and ankle edema. Locally applied μ and κ-opioid receptor antagonists but not adenosine A1 receptor antagonist significantly abolished the analgesic effect of EA. Locally applied μ and κ-opioid receptor agonists produced significant antiallodynia on acute gout arthritis rats, mimicking EA. Furthermore, 2/100 Hz EA upregulated β-endorphin expression in inflamed ankle skin tissue. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that EA can be used for relieving acute gout arthritis with effect dependent on peripheral opioid system and comparable with the one obtained with indomethacin.

  14. Canine and feline colostrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Aggouni, C; Albaret, A; Fournier, A; Mila, H

    2017-04-01

    Puppy and kitten survival over the first weeks is particularly dependent on colostrum, a specific secretion of the mammary gland produced during the first 2 days post-partum. Colostrum is a source of nutrients and immunoglobulins. It also contributes to the digestive tract maturation. Colostrum differentiates from milk mainly based on its concentration in immunoglobulins G: 20-30 g/L in dog colostrum, 40-50 g/L in cats' vs <1 g/L in milk. IgG concentration rapidly drops after parturition (-50% in 24 hr). Immune quality of colostrum is highly variable between bitches, with no relationship with maternal blood IgG level, dam's age, breed size or litter size. In addition to systemic immune protection, colostrum also plays a major role for local digestive protection, due to IgA, lysozyme, lactoferrin, white blood cells and various cytokines. Energetic concentration of canine and feline colostrum is not superior to that of mature milk. It depends on colostrum fat concentration and is affected by breed size (higher in breeds <10 kg adult body weight). As puppies and kittens are almost agammaglobulinemic at birth, transfer of IgG from their digestive tract into their bloodstream is crucial for their survival, IgG absorption ending at 12-16 hr after birth. Energetic supply over the two first days of life, as evidenced by growth rate over the two first days of life, also affects risk of neonatal mortality. Early and sufficient suckling of colostrum is thus the very first care to be provided to newborns for their later health and survival. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Morning Surge of Ventricular Arrhythmias in a New Arrhythmogenic Canine Model of Chronic Heart Failure Is Associated with Attenuation of Time-Of-Day Dependence of Heart Rate and Autonomic Adaptation, and Reduced Cardiac Chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yujie; Hanafy, Mohamed A.; Killingsworth, Cheryl R.; Walcott, Gregory P.; Young, Martin E.; Pogwizd, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) exhibit a morning surge in ventricular arrhythmias, but the underlying cause remains unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate dynamics, autonomic input (assessed by heart rate variability (HRV)) and nonlinear dynamics as well as their abnormal time-of-day-dependent oscillations in a newly developed arrhythmogenic canine heart failure model are associated with a morning surge in ventricular arrhythmias. CHF was induced in dogs by aortic insufficiency & aortic constriction, and assessed by echocardiography. Holter monitoring was performed to study time-of-day-dependent variation in ventricular arrhythmias (PVCs, VT), traditional HRV measures, and nonlinear dynamics (including detrended fluctuations analysis α1 and α2 (DFAα1 & DFAα2), correlation dimension (CD), and Shannon entropy (SE)) at baseline, as well as 240 days (240d) and 720 days (720d) following CHF induction. LV fractional shortening was decreased at both 240d and 720d. Both PVCs and VT increased with CHF duration and showed a morning rise (2.5-fold & 1.8-fold increase at 6 AM-noon vs midnight-6 AM) during CHF. The morning rise in HR at baseline was significantly attenuated by 52% with development of CHF (at both 240d & 720d). Morning rise in the ratio of low frequency to high frequency (LF/HF) HRV at baseline was markedly attenuated with CHF. DFAα1, DFAα2, CD and SE all decreased with CHF by 31, 17, 34 and 7%, respectively. Time-of-day-dependent variations in LF/HF, CD, DFA α1 and SE, observed at baseline, were lost during CHF. Thus in this new arrhythmogenic canine CHF model, attenuated morning HR rise, blunted autonomic oscillation, decreased cardiac chaos and complexity of heart rate, as well as aberrant time-of-day-dependent variations in many of these parameters were associated with a morning surge of ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25140699

  16. Management outcome of acute urinary retention: model of prediction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Padraig

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVES: To assess for predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute urinary retention (AUR). METHODS: A study was performed in our unit to evaluate trial without catheter (TWOC) and successive management. We assessed for predictors of surgical or medical management, which included: age, volume drained at time of catheterisation, cause of retention, serum creatinine, success of trial of voiding, co-morbidities, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate size on digital rectal examination (DRE). RESULTS: 72 men were entered into the study over an 18-month period: 27 had a successful first TWOC, 20 patients had a second TWOC, and 6 were successful. In total, 31 of the 33 patients with a successful TWOC remained on alpha-blockers without a further episode of AUR within a minimum of 6 months\\' follow-up. Patients failing TWOC were managed by transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 22), long-term catheterisation (n = 15) or prostatic stents (n = 3), and 1 patient died prior to intervention. Three predictors were significant on multivariate analysis: PSA (>2.9 ng\\/ml), prostate size on DRE (large) and volume drained at time of catheterisation (>or=1,000 ml). CONCLUSION: Patients with elevated PSA (>2.9 ng\\/ml), a large prostate size on DRE and a volume drained at time of catheterisation >1,000 ml are best managed by surgical intervention, while those with volumes drained at time of catheterisation of <1,000 ml, a PSA

  17. Expression and clinical significance of rhubarb on serum amylase and TNF-alpha of rat model of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W F; Li, Z T; Fang, J J; Wang, G B; Yu, Y; Liu, Z Q; Wu, Y N; Zheng, S S; Cai, L

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of rhubarb extract on acute pancreatitis. Ninety-six healthy Sprague Dawley rats, weighing 301±5.12 g were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham surgery (group A), acute pancreatitis model (group B), acute pancreatitis with normal saline (group C), and acute pancreatitis model with rhubarb (group D). The levels of serum amylase (AMY) and TNF-α were measured at 1st, 6th, 12th and 24th hour after modeling, and the pancreatic tissue were used to observe the pathologic changes. Compared to the sham group, the serum AMY and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels were significantly increased in the other groups (p acute pancreatitis. The rhubarb reduced the serum AMY and TNF-α level in rats with acute pancreatitis and reduced the pathological changes of pancreas and other tissues.

  18. Hemodynamic support with the pulsatile catheter pump in a sheep model of acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Zhicheng; Gu, Y. John; Ye, Qing; Cheng, Shaofei; Wang, Weijun; Tang, Min; Zhao, Xiaogang; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Chen, Changzhi

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed to mimic clinical heart failure (HF) conditions and to assess the effect of pulsatilecatheter (PUCA) pump support on hemodynamics and tissue perfusion in a sheep model of acute HF. In 14 sheep, HF was induced by partial occluding the middle left circumflex coronary artery

  19. Large Dataset of Acute Oral Toxicity Data Created for Testing in Silico Models (ASCCT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute toxicity data is a common requirement for substance registration in the US. Currently only data derived from animal tests are accepted by regulatory agencies, and the standard in vivo tests use lethality as the endpoint. Non-animal alternatives such as in silico models are ...

  20. A porcine model of acute, haematogenous, localized osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Louise Kruse; Frees, Dorte; Aalbæk, Bent

    2011-01-01

    A porcine model of acute, haematogenous, localized osteomyelitis was established. Serial dilutions of Staphylococcus aureus [5–50–500–5000–50 000 CFU/kg body weight (BW) suspended in saline or saline alone] were inoculated into the right brachial artery of pigs (BW 15 kg) separated into six groups...

  1. A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    intestinal lumen Cell Migration Radiation damages proliferating crypt cells, causing mitotic arrest and delaying regeneration Burns can...04-08-2016 Technical Report A Mathematical Model of the Human Small Intestine Following Acute Radiation and Burn Exposures HDTRA1...the small intestine , reducing the density of the gut barrier. A reduced epithelial lining can result in suppressed nutrient absorption, bacterial

  2. Development of Chronic and Acute Golden Syrian Hamster Infection Models with Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo

    Science.gov (United States)

    The golden Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is frequently used as a model to study virulence for several species of Leptospira. Onset of an acute, lethal infection following infection with several pathogenic Leptospira species has been widely adopted for vaccine testing. An important exceptio...

  3. Preliminary early evaluation of radiation acute syndrome severity in an animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, J.C.; Nasazzi, N.B.; Taja, M.R.; Nagle, C.; Dubner, D.; Di Rizzio, C.

    1992-01-01

    To improve the knowledge of Radiation Acute Syndrome radiopathological picture, whole body x-rays irradiation at 2Gy of a primate (Cebus apella paraguayanus) used as model has been performed. Early evaluations of clinical symptoms and dose and damage biological indicators have shown that this primate has given out similar responses to those of man. (author)

  4. [Characteristics of antiischemic and nootropic properties of ademol in a rat model of acute brain ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakivs'kyĭ, O A

    2013-01-01

    In experiments with the rat model of acute disorder of encephalic circulation (bilateral carotid occlusion) it was found that introduction of derivate of adamantan 1-adamantiloxy-3-morfolino-2 propanol (under conventional name ademol) in the dose 2 mg/kg intraabdominal in treatment regimen (in an hour after reconstruction of insult and further 1 time every 24 hours during 21 days) was accompanied by a recovery of mnemotropic properties and is more effective than cytikolin, resulting in a decreased lethality and neurological deficiency in acute and recovery periods of insults. The data received proved the usefulness of development of ademol based cerebroprotective remedy.

  5. The Development of a Machine Learning Inpatient Acute Kidney Injury Prediction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyner, Jay L; Carey, Kyle A; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2018-03-28

    To develop an acute kidney injury risk prediction model using electronic health record data for longitudinal use in hospitalized patients. Observational cohort study. Tertiary, urban, academic medical center from November 2008 to January 2016. All adult inpatients without pre-existing renal failure at admission, defined as first serum creatinine greater than or equal to 3.0 mg/dL, International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, code for chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher or having received renal replacement therapy within 48 hours of first serum creatinine measurement. None. Demographics, vital signs, diagnostics, and interventions were used in a Gradient Boosting Machine algorithm to predict serum creatinine-based Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes stage 2 acute kidney injury, with 60% of the data used for derivation and 40% for validation. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated in the validation cohort, and subgroup analyses were conducted across admission serum creatinine, acute kidney injury severity, and hospital location. Among the 121,158 included patients, 17,482 (14.4%) developed any Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes acute kidney injury, with 4,251 (3.5%) developing stage 2. The AUC (95% CI) was 0.90 (0.90-0.90) for predicting stage 2 acute kidney injury within 24 hours and 0.87 (0.87-0.87) within 48 hours. The AUC was 0.96 (0.96-0.96) for receipt of renal replacement therapy (n = 821) in the next 48 hours. Accuracy was similar across hospital settings (ICU, wards, and emergency department) and admitting serum creatinine groupings. At a probability threshold of greater than or equal to 0.022, the algorithm had a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 85% for stage 2 acute kidney injury and predicted the development of stage 2 a median of 41 hours (interquartile range, 12-141 hr) prior to the development of stage 2 acute kidney injury. Readily available electronic health record data can be used

  6. Surgical innovations in canine gonadectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Bart

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis some recent technological developments in human surgery are evaluated for their potential use in veterinary medicine by introducing them as surgical innovations for canine gonadectomy. Barbed sutures achieve wound apposition without surgical knot tying and thus avoid knot-associated

  7. Prognostic markers of canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    M.C. Sant'Anna; L.G.P. Giordano; K.K.M.C. Flaiban; E.E. Muller; M.I.M. Martins

    2014-01-01

    The pyometra is a disease that affects middle age and elderly female dogs during diestrus. Hormonal, microbiological, biochemical and hematological aspects are well described. However, few studies have evaluated the role of each in the prognosis of canine pyometra. The aim of this study was to identify markers associated with clinical worsening of dogs with pyometra. We prospectively evaluated 80 dogs with pyometra tre...

  8. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana CORA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphomas occur by clonal expansion of lymphoid cells and have distinctive morphological and immunophenotypic features. Determination of canine lymphoma immunophenotype is useful for accurate prognosis and further therapy. In the suggested study, we performed an immunohistochemical evaluation of some cases with canine lymphoma diagnosed in the Department of Pathology (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, in order to characterize them. The investigation included 39 dogs diagnosed with different anatomical forms of lymphoma, following necropsy analysis or assessment of biopsies. The diagnosis of lymphoma was confirmed by necropsy and histopathology (Hematoxylin-eosin stain examinations. The collected specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry technique (automatic method using the following antibodies: CD3, CD20, CD21 and CD79a. The analyzed neoplasms were characterized as follows: about 64.10% of cases were diagnosed as B-cell lymphomas, 33.34% of cases as T-cell lymphomas, whereas 2.56% of cases were null cell type lymphomas (neither B nor T. Most of multicentric (80%, mediastinal (60% and primary central nervous system lymphomas (100% had B immunophenotype, while the majority of cutaneous (80% and digestive (100% lymphomas had T immunophenotype. Immunohistochemical description of canine lymphomas can deliver some major details concerning their behavior and malignancy. Additionally, vital prognosis and efficacy of some therapeutic protocols are relying on the immunohistochemical features of canine lymphoma.

  9. Acute metabolic decompensation due to influenza in a mouse model of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. McGuire

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The urea cycle functions to incorporate ammonia, generated by normal metabolism, into urea. Urea cycle disorders (UCDs are caused by loss of function in any of the enzymes responsible for ureagenesis, and are characterized by life-threatening episodes of acute metabolic decompensation with hyperammonemia (HA. A prospective analysis of interim HA events in a cohort of individuals with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC deficiency, the most common UCD, revealed that intercurrent infection was the most common precipitant of acute HA and was associated with markers of increased morbidity when compared with other precipitants. To further understand these clinical observations, we developed a model system of metabolic decompensation with HA triggered by viral infection (PR8 influenza using spf-ash mice, a model of OTC deficiency. Both wild-type (WT and spf-ash mice displayed similar cytokine profiles and lung viral titers in response to PR8 influenza infection. During infection, spf-ash mice displayed an increase in liver transaminases, suggesting a hepatic sensitivity to the inflammatory response and an altered hepatic immune response. Despite having no visible pathological changes by histology, WT and spf-ash mice had reduced CPS1 and OTC enzyme activities, and, unlike WT, spf-ash mice failed to increase ureagenesis. Depression of urea cycle function was seen in liver amino acid analysis, with reductions seen in aspartate, ornithine and arginine during infection. In conclusion, we developed a model system of acute metabolic decompensation due to infection in a mouse model of a UCD. In addition, we have identified metabolic perturbations during infection in the spf-ash mice, including a reduction of urea cycle intermediates. This model of acute metabolic decompensation with HA due to infection in UCD serves as a platform for exploring biochemical perturbations and the efficacy of treatments, and could be adapted to explore acute decompensation in other

  10. Electrophysiological properties of computational human ventricular cell action potential models under acute ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sara; Mincholé, Ana; Quinn, T Alexander; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-10-01

    Acute myocardial ischemia is one of the main causes of sudden cardiac death. The mechanisms have been investigated primarily in experimental and computational studies using different animal species, but human studies remain scarce. In this study, we assess the ability of four human ventricular action potential models (ten Tusscher and Panfilov, 2006; Grandi et al., 2010; Carro et al., 2011; O'Hara et al., 2011) to simulate key electrophysiological consequences of acute myocardial ischemia in single cell and tissue simulations. We specifically focus on evaluating the effect of extracellular potassium concentration and activation of the ATP-sensitive inward-rectifying potassium current on action potential duration, post-repolarization refractoriness, and conduction velocity, as the most critical factors in determining reentry vulnerability during ischemia. Our results show that the Grandi and O'Hara models required modifications to reproduce expected ischemic changes, specifically modifying the intracellular potassium concentration in the Grandi model and the sodium current in the O'Hara model. With these modifications, the four human ventricular cell AP models analyzed in this study reproduce the electrophysiological alterations in repolarization, refractoriness, and conduction velocity caused by acute myocardial ischemia. However, quantitative differences are observed between the models and overall, the ten Tusscher and modified O'Hara models show closest agreement to experimental data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Automation of gender determination in human canines using artificial intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fidya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender determination is an important aspect of the identification process. The tooth represents a part of the human body that indicates the nature of sexual dimorphism. Artificial intelligence enables computers to perform to the same standard the same tasks as those carried out by humans. Several methods of classification exist within an artificial intelligence approach to identifying sexual dimorphism in canines. Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the respective accuracy of the Naive Bayes, decision tree, and multi-layer perceptron (MLP methods in identifying sexual dimorphism in canines. Methods: A sample of results derived from 100 measurements of the diameter of mesiodistal, buccolingual, and diagonal upper and lower canine jaw models of both genders were entered into an application computer program that implements the algorithm (MLP. The analytical process was conducted by the program to obtain a classification model with testing being subsequently carried out in order to obtain 50 new measurement results, 25 each for males and females. A comparative analysis was conducted on the program-generated information. Results: The accuracy rate of the Naive Bayes method was 82%, while that of the decision tree and MLP amounted to 84%. The MLP method had an absolute error value lower than that of its decision tree counterpart. Conclusion: The use of artificial intelligence methods produced a highly accurate identification process relating to the gender determination of canine teeth. The most appropriate method was the MLP with an accuracy rate of 84%.

  12. Mouse models of acute and chronic hepacivirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billerbeck, Eva; Wolfisberg, Raphael; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 71 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of small-animal models has impeded studies of antiviral immune mechanisms. Here we show that an HCV-related hepacivirus discovered in Norway rats can establish high-titer hepatotropic infections in labora......An estimated 71 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of small-animal models has impeded studies of antiviral immune mechanisms. Here we show that an HCV-related hepacivirus discovered in Norway rats can establish high-titer hepatotropic infections...... provide mechanistic insights into hepatic antiviral immunity, a prerequisite for the development of HCV vaccines....

  13. Scintigraphic and Endoscopic Evaluation of Radiation-induced Acute Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Micro-pig Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Sook; Kim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Jin; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Jung-Eun; Kim, Noo-Ri; Lee, Sun-Joo; Kim, Mi-Sook; Ji, Young-Hoon; Cheon, Gi-Jeong; Lim, Sang-Moo

    2007-01-01

    Micro-pig model can be served as a proper substitute for humans in studying acute radiation syndrome following radiation-exposure accidents, especially showing similar clinico-pathologic response of hematopoietic and gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome to human. Among acute GI syndrome induced by radiation, GI motility disturbance has not been studied, however, it would be important in a viewpoint of affecting infectious progression from GI tract. Here, we employed scintigraphy of GI transit time and sequential endoscopic examination and tissue sampling in micropigs followed by abdominal radiation exposure. The specific aims of this study are to evaluate objective evidence of GI motility disturbance by scintigraphic evaluation and to find corresponding clinicoapthologic changes in radiation-induced acute GI syndrome

  14. A Model of Acute Antibody-Mediated Renal Allograft Rejection in the Sensitized Rata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Sharmila Ramessur; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Ma, Frank Y

    2017-07-31

    Antibody-mediated rejection in transplant recipients with preexisting donor-specific antibodies is a challenging clinical situation. However, we lack suitable animal models to study this scenario. The aim of this study was to develop an animal model of acute antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts in sensitized recipients. We used major histocompatibility complex class I and II incompatible rat strains (Dark Agouti RT1av1 and Lewis RT1l), which develop aggressive rejection. Recipient Lewis rats were immunized with donor strain spleen cells 5 days before surgery to induce donor-specific antibodies. Rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and orthotopic transplant of the donor kidney. To minimize T-cell-mediated rejection while allowing the development of donor-specific antibodies, recipient animals were given tacrolimus starting the day before surgery. Hyperacute rejection was not seen, but acute graft dysfunction was evident on day 1 with a rapid deterioration of graft function by day 3. Histologic damage featured glomerulopathy, capillaritis, capillary thrombosis, and acute tubular injury. Recipients exhibited high serum levels of donor-specific antibodies and deposition of immunoglobulin G and C4d on graft endothelium. Immunostaining showed substantial endothelial damage, fibrin deposition in glomerular and peritubular capillaries, and infiltrates of macrophages, neutrophils, and natural killer cells. T-cell activation was efficiently suppressed by tacrolimus. We have developed a clinically relevant model of acute antibody-mediated rejection in recipients with preexisting donor-specific antibodies, which is suitable for testing novel therapies.

  15. Cloning, localization and focus formation at DNA damage sites of canine XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2017-01-10

    Various chemotherapies and radiation therapies are useful for killing cancer cells mainly by inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Uncovering the molecular mechanisms of DSB repair processes is crucial for developing next-generation radiotherapies and chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. XRCC4 plays a critical role in Ku-dependent nonhomologous DNA-end joining (NHEJ) in human cells, and is one of the core NHEJ factors. The localization of core NHEJ factors, such as human Ku70 and Ku80, might play a crucial role in regulating NHEJ activity. Recently, companion animals, such as canines, have been proposed to be a good model in many aspects of cancer research. However, the localization and regulation mechanisms of core NHEJ factors in canine cells have not been elucidated. Here, we show that the expression and subcellular localization of canine XRCC4 changes dynamically during the cell cycle. Furthermore, EYFP-canine XRCC4 accumulates quickly at laser-microirradiated DSB sites. The structure of a putative human XRCC4 nuclear localization signal (NLS) is highly conserved in canine, chimpanzee and mouse XRCC4. However, the amino acid residue corresponding to the human XRCC4 K210, thought to be important for nuclear localization, is not conserved in canine XRCC4. Our findings might be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms of Ku-dependent NHEJ in canine cells and the development of new radiosensitizers that target XRCC4.

  16. Ontogeny of canine dimorphism in extant hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, G T; Dean, C

    2001-07-01

    Many behavioral and ecological factors influence the degree of expression of canine dimorphism for different reasons. Regardless of its socioecological importance, we know virtually nothing about the processes responsible for the development of canine dimorphism. Our aim here is to describe the developmental process(es) regulating canine dimorphism in extant hominoids, using histological markers of tooth growth. Teeth preserve a permanent record of their ontogeny in the form of short- and long-period incremental markings in both enamel and dentine. We selected 52 histological sections of sexed hominoid canine teeth from a total sample of 115, from which we calculated the time and rate of cuspal enamel formation and the rate at which ameloblasts differentiate along the future enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) to the end of crown formation. Thus, we were able to reconstruct longitudinal growth curves for height attainment in male and female hominoid canines. Male hominoids consistently take longer to form canine crowns than do females (although not significantly so for our sample of Homo). Male orangutans and gorillas occasionally take up to twice as long as females to complete enamel formation. The mean ranges of female canine crown formation times are similar in Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo. Interspecific differences between female Pan canine crown heights and those of Gorilla and Pongo, which are taller, result from differences in rates of growth. Differences in canine crown heights between male Pan and the taller, more dimorphic male Gorilla and Pongo canines result both from differences in total time taken to form enamel and from faster rates of growth in Gorilla and Pongo. Although modern human canines do not emerge as significantly dimorphic in this study, it is well-known that sexual dimorphism in canine crown height exists. Larger samples of sexed modern human canines are therefore needed to identify clearly what underlies this. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Canine faecal contamination and parasitic risk in the city of Naples (southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneziano Vincenzo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs are associated with more than 60 zoonotic diseases among which, parasitosis and, in particular, helminthosis, can pose serious public-health concerns worldwide. Many canine gastrointestinal parasites eliminate their dispersion elements (eggs, larvae, oocysts by the faecal route. The quantity of canine faeces deposited on public and private property in cities worldwide is both a perennial nuisance and an important health issue. Public sites such as playgrounds, parks, gardens, public squares and sandpits may be an important source of human infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of both canine faecal contamination in the city of Naples (southern Italy, and presence of canine parasitic elements, with particular regard to those which are potential agents of zoonosis. A regular grid of sub-areas (1 km × 700 m was overlaid on the city map using a Geographical Information System (GIS. In each sub-area the straightest 1 km transect was drawn and digitalized on-screen in the GIS. Between February and May 2005 canine faeces were counted along the 1 km transects in 143 sub-areas, and 415 canine faecal samples were collected and submitted to coprological examinations. Negative binomial regression models and Gaussian random effects models were used to analyze the association between faeces count and human population density taking into account for extraPoisson variability. Logistic regression model was used to evaluate the association between positivity to parasitic elements and number of canine faeces. Results Out of the 143 studied sub-areas, 141 (98.6% contained canine faeces. There was a strong spatial gradient with 48% of the total variability accounted by between neighbourhood variability; a positive association between the number of faeces and the human population density was found. Seventy (over 415, 16.9% canine faecal samples were positive for parasitic elements. There was no association between

  18. Development of Toxicological Risk Assessment Models for Acute and Chronic Exposure to Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke S. Reichwaldt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Alert level frameworks advise agencies on a sequence of monitoring and management actions, and are implemented so as to reduce the risk of the public coming into contact with hazardous substances. Their effectiveness relies on the detection of the hazard, but with many systems not receiving any regular monitoring, pollution events often go undetected. We developed toxicological risk assessment models for acute and chronic exposure to pollutants that incorporate the probabilities that the public will come into contact with undetected pollution events, to identify the level of risk a system poses in regards to the pollutant. As a proof of concept, we successfully demonstrated that the models could be applied to determine probabilities of acute and chronic illness types related to recreational activities in waterbodies containing cyanotoxins. Using the acute model, we identified lakes that present a ‘high’ risk to develop Day Away From Work illness, and lakes that present a ‘low’ or ‘medium’ risk to develop First Aid Cases when used for swimming. The developed risk models succeeded in categorising lakes according to their risk level to the public in an objective way. Modelling by how much the probability of public exposure has to decrease to lower the risks to acceptable levels will enable authorities to identify suitable control measures and monitoring strategies. We suggest broadening the application of these models to other contaminants.

  19. Mathematical Models of Human Hematopoiesis Following Acute Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    mediator to the action of known hematopoietic stimulators such as thrombopoietin ( TPO ) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Thus, in our...significant stimulatory role of TPO in thrombopoiesis (Kaushansky 2005), it is assumed to represent a large portion of the generic mediator. Thus, known...biological mechanisms involving TPO are used to justify the effects of the generic mediator in our model. TPO concentration is regulated by platelets

  20. Development and validation of a dynamic outcome prediction model for paracetamol-induced acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, William; Wang, Yanzhong; Maggs, James

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early, accurate prediction of survival is central to management of patients with paracetamol-induced acute liver failure to identify those needing emergency liver transplantation. Current prognostic tools are confounded by recent improvements in outcome independent of emergency liver...... transplantation, and constrained by static binary outcome prediction. We aimed to develop a simple prognostic tool to reflect current outcomes and generate a dynamic updated estimation of risk of death. METHODS: Patients with paracetamol-induced acute liver failure managed at intensive care units in the UK...... normalised ratio (INR), and cardiovascular failure were used to derive an initial predictive model, with a second (day 2) model including additional changes in INR and lactate. FINDINGS: We developed and validated new high-performance statistical models to support decision making in patients with paracetamol...

  1. Molecular biological aspects on canine and human mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, P; von Euler, H

    2011-01-01

    The high incidence of mammary tumor disease reported in certain canine breeds suggests a significant genetic component, as has already been described in human familial breast cancer-in BRCA1- and BRCA2-associated breast cancer in particular. The identification of genetic risk factors is critical to improvements in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of these tumors. In recent years, there has been significant progress in developing the tools and reagents necessary to analyze the canine genome. This work has culminated in a high-quality draft genome sequence, as well as a single-nucleotide polymorphism map and single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays for genomewide association analysis. These tools provide an unprecedented opportunity to characterize the genetic influences in canine diseases such as cancer, eventually allowing for exploration of more effective therapies. Given the high homology between the canine genome sequence and its human counterpart--as well as the many similarities regarding the morphology, biological behavior, and clinical course of mammary tumors in both species--the dog has proven to be an excellent comparative model. This review highlights the comparative aspects regarding certain areas within molecular biology, and it discusses future perspectives. The findings in larger genomewide association analyses and cDNA expression arrays are described, and the BRCA1/BRCA2 complex is compared in detail between the 2 species.

  2. Compensatory canine angulation in angle Class II and III patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carlos Agner Busato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of compensation in mesiodistal axial inclinations of canines in skeletal malocclusions patients. The sample consisted of 25 Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion (group 1 and 19 Angle Class III malocclusion patients (group 2. After measurement of dental angulations through a method that associates plaster model photography and AutoCad software, comparisons between the groups were performed by T-test for independent samples. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, when maxillary canine angulations were compared. Regarding the mandibular canines, there was a statistically significant difference in dental angulation, expressed by 3.2° for group 1 and 0.15° for group 2. An upright position tendency for mandibular canines was observed in the Angle Class III sample. This configures a pattern of compensatory coronary positioning, since the angulation of these teeth makes them occupy less space in the dental arch and consequently mandibular incisors can be in a more retracted position in the sagittal plane.

  3. Epidemiology of canine gastrointestinal helminths in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidumayo, Nozyechi Ngulube

    2018-02-20

    Dogs have a close association with humans providing companionship, security and a source of dietary protein. However, dogs are also potential carriers of zoonotic pathogens. Dogs, therefore, pose a public health risk and a good understanding of canine diseases is important for planning and implementing control measures. The aim of this study was to characterise canine helminthiasis in sub-Saharan Africa using a systematic approach. Pubmed and Google Scholar were searched for relevant primary studies published from 2000. Forty-one eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled prevalences were estimated using the quality effects model. Twenty-six genera of enteric helminths were reported and the pooled estimate of canine helminthiasis was 71% (95% CI: 63-79%). Species of Ancylostoma and Toxocara, causative agents of larva migrans in humans, were the most frequently reported helminths with pooled estimated prevalences of 41% (95% CI: 32-50%) and 22% (95% CI: 16-29%), respectively. Dipylidium caninum and Taenia spp. were the most frequently reported cestodes with pooled estimated prevalences of 20% (95% CI: 12-29%) and 9% (95% CI: 5-15%), respectively. Trematodes were rarely reported. There was a high level of heterogeneity in most pooled estimates (I 2 ˃ 80%). The results of this study show that canine helminthiasis is highly prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa and there is need for regular deworming programmes to improve the health status of the dogs and minimise the potential health risk to humans.

  4. Early immunopathological events in acute model of mycobacterial hypersensitivity pneumonitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Elisabet; Boivin, Gregory P; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2017-12-01

    Prolonged exposure to antigens of non-tuberculous mycobacteria species colonizing industrial metalworking fluid (MWF), particularly Mycobacterium immunogenum (MI), has been implicated in chronic forms of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) in machinists based on epidemiology studies and long-term exposure of mouse models. However, a role of short-term acute exposure to these antigens has not been described in the context of acute forms of HP. This study investigated short-term acute exposure of mice to MI cell lysate (or live cell suspension) via oropharyngeal aspiration. The results showed there was a dose- and time-dependent increase (peaking at 2 h post-instillation) in lung immunological responses in terms of the pro- (TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines. Bronchoalveolar lavage and histology showed neutrophils as the predominant infiltrating cell type, with lymphocytes mice led to a transient early immunopathologic response, with little adaptive immunity, which is consistent with events associated with human acute forms of HP. Screening of MWF-originated mycobacterial genotypes/variants (six of MI, four of M. chelonae, two of M. abscessus) showed both inter- and intra-species differences, with MI genotype MJY10 being the most immunogenic. In conclusion, this study characterized the first short-term mycobacterial exposure mouse model that mimics acute HP in machinists; this could serve as a potentially useful model for rapid screening of field MWF-associated mycobacteria for routine and timely occupational risk assessment and for investigating early biomarkers and mechanisms of this understudied immune lung disease.

  5. One-step triplex PCR/RT-PCR to detect canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus, and canine kobuvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dafei; Liu, Fei; Guo, Dongchun; Hu, Xiaoliang; Li, Zhijie; Li, Zhigang; Ma, Jianzhang; Liu, Chunguo

    2018-01-23

    To rapidly distinguish Canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), and canine kobuvirus (CaKoV) in practice, a one-step multiplex PCR/RT-PCR assay was developed, with detection limits of 10 2.1 TCID 50 for CDV, 10 1.9 TCID 50 for CPV and 10 3 copies for CaKoV. This method did not amplify nonspecific DNA or RNA from other canine viruses. Therefore, the assay provides a sensitive tool for the rapid clinical detection and epidemiological surveillance of CDV, CPV and CaKoV in dogs.

  6. [Canine teeth impacted in the palate--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovcencu, Loredana; Costan, V V

    2011-01-01

    Maxillary canines have the longest period of development, the deepest area of formation and the most difficult path of all teeth. The maxillary canines are the most likely to remain unerupted or impacted. The maxillary permanent canine is considered important by virtue of its place in the scheme of functional occlusion and its contribution to facial appearance. We successfully orthodontically treated two cases with palatally impacted canines. Although both cases had palatally impacted canines, they were different due to canine position and angulation.

  7. Acute inflammatory responses of nanoparticles in an intra-tracheal instillation rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, Andrea L; Minarchick, Valerie C; Porter, Dale W; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) "dusts" in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs.

  8. Acute Inflammatory Responses of Nanoparticles in an Intra-Tracheal Instillation Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, Andrea L.; Minarchick, Valerie C.; Porter, Dale W.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.; Li, Bingyun

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to hard metal tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) “dusts” in enclosed industrial environments is known to contribute to the development of hard metal lung disease and an increased risk for lung cancer. Currently, the influence of local and systemic inflammation on disease progression following WC-Co exposure remains unclear. To better understand the relationship between WC-Co nanoparticle (NP) exposure and its resultant effects, the acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses caused by WC-Co NPs were explored using an intra-tracheal instillation (IT) model and compared to those of CeO2 (another occupational hazard) NP exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats were given an IT dose (0-500 μg per rat) of WC-Co or CeO2 NPs. Following 24-hr exposure, broncho-alveolar lavage fluid and whole blood were collected and analyzed. A consistent lack of acute local pulmonary inflammation was observed in terms of the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid parameters examined (i.e. LDH, albumin, and macrophage activation) in animals exposed to WC-Co NP; however, significant acute pulmonary inflammation was observed in the CeO2 NP group. The lack of acute inflammation following WC-Co NP exposure contrasts with earlier in vivo reports regarding WC-Co toxicity in rats, illuminating the critical role of NP dose and exposure time and bringing into question the potential role of impurities in particle samples. Further, we demonstrated that WC-Co NP exposure does not induce acute systemic effects since no significant increase in circulating inflammatory cytokines were observed. Taken together, the results of this in vivo study illustrate the distinct differences in acute local pulmonary and systemic inflammatory responses to NPs composed of WC-Co and CeO2; therefore, it is important that the outcomes of pulmonary exposure to one type of NPs may not be implicitly extrapolated to other types of NPs. PMID:25738830

  9. Emerging perspectives on hereditary glomerulopathies in canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littman MP

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Meryl P LittmanDepartment of Clinical Studies – Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Familial glomerulopathies have been described in more than two dozen dog breeds. These canine spontaneous cases of glomerular disease are good models for their human counterparts. The dogs present clinically with protein-losing nephropathy and variable signs of hypertension, thromboembolic events, edema/effusions/nephrotic syndrome, or eventually with signs of renal disease such as anorexia, vomiting, weight loss, and/or polyuria/polydipsia. Laboratory changes include proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hypercholesterolemia, and eventually azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, anemia, and isosthenuria. Renal biopsies examined with transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and thin section light microscopy may show ultrastructural glomerular basement membrane abnormalities, glomerulosclerosis, amyloidosis, non-amyloid fibrillary deposition, or breed-associated predispositions for immune-complex glomerulonephritis. Genome-wide association studies and fine sequencing of candidate genes have led to the discovery of variant alleles associated with disease in some breeds; eg, 1 glomerular basement membrane ultrastructural abnormalities due to defective collagen type IV, caused by different premature stop codons in each of four breeds; ie, in COL4A5 in Samoyeds and Navasota mix breed dogs (X-linked, and in COL4A4 in English Cocker Spaniels and English Springer Spaniels (autosomal recessive; and 2 glomerulosclerosis-related podocytopathy with slit diaphragm protein anomalies of both nephrin and Neph3/filtrin due to non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in conserved regions of their encoding genes, NPHS1 and KIRREL2, in Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers and Airedale Terriers, with a complex mode of inheritance. Age at onset and progression to end-stage renal disease vary depending on the model. Genetic

  10. Optical coherence tomography vs. high-frequency ultrasound during noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    A noninvasive approach to vasectomy may eliminate male fear of complications related to surgery and increase its acceptance. Noninvasive laser thermal occlusion of the canine vas deferens has recently been reported. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) are compared for monitoring laser thermal coagulation of the vas in an acute canine model. Bilateral noninvasive laser coagulation of the vas was performed in 6 dogs (n=12 vasa) using a Ytterbium fiber laser wavelength of 1075 nm, incident power of 9.0 W, pulse duration of 500 ms, pulse rate of 1 Hz, and 3-mm-diameter spot. Cryogen spray cooling was used to prevent skin burns during the procedure. An OCT system with endoscopic probe and a HFUS system with 20-MHz transducer were used to image the vas immediately before and after the procedure. Vasa were then excised and processed for gross and histologic analysis for comparison with OCT and HFUS images. OCT provided high-resolution, superficial imaging of the compressed vas within the vas ring clamp, while HFUS provided deeper imaging of the vas held manually in the scrotal fold. Both OCT and high HFUS are promising imaging modalities for real-time confirmation of vas occlusion during noninvasive laser vasectomy.

  11. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) in the rat kidney and application to acute renal failure models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Isao; Saito, Tadashi; Ishii, Hirofumi; Bansho, Junichi; Koyama, Yukinori; Tobita, Akira

    1995-01-01

    Renal dynamic CT scanning is suitable for determining the excretion of contrast medium in the cortex and medulla of the kidney, which is valuable for understanding the pathogenesis of disease processes in various conditions. This form of scanning would be convenient for use, if a method of application to the rat kidney were available. Therefore, we developed a method of applying renal dynamic CT to rats and evaluated the cortical and medullary curves, e.g., the corticomedullary junction time which is correlated to creatinine clearance, in various rat models of acute renal failure. The rat was placed in a 10deg oblique position and a bilateral hilar slice was obtained before and 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160 and 180 sec after administering 0.5 ml of contrast medium using Somatom DR. The width of the slice was 4 mm and the scan time was 3 sec. The corticomedullary junction time in normal rats was 23.0±10.5 sec, the peak value of the cortical curve was 286.3±76.7 Hounsfield Unit (HU) and the peak value of the medullary curve was 390.1±66.2 HU. Corticomedullary junction time after exposure of the kidney was prolonged compared to that of the unexposed kidney. In rats with acute renal failure, the excretion pattern of contrast medium was similar in both the glycerol- and HgCl2-induced acute renal failure models. The peak values of the cortical curve were maintained three hours after a clamp was placed at the hilar region of the kidney for one hour, and the peak values of the medullary curve were maintained during the administration of 10μg/kg/min of angiotensin II. Dynamic CT curves in the acute renal failure models examined were slightly different from those in human acute renal failure. These results suggest that rats do not provide an ideal model for human acute renal failure. However, the application of dynamic CT to the rat kidney models was valuable for estimating the pathogenesis of various human kidney diseases. (author)

  12. Anticonvulsant activity of Aloe vera leaf extract in acute and chronic models of epilepsy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathor, Naveen; Arora, Tarun; Manocha, Sachin; Patil, Amol N; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-03-01

    The effect of Aloe vera in epilepsy has not yet been explored. This study was done to explore the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaf powder on three acute and one chronic model of epilepsy. In acute study, aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder was administered in doses 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. Dose of 400 mg/kg of Aloe vera leaf extract was chosen for chronic administration. Oxidative stress parameters viz. malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were also estimated in brain of kindled animals. In acute study, Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder in a dose-dependent manner significantly decreased duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximal electroshock seizure model, increased seizure threshold current in increasing current electroshock seizure model, and increased latency to onset and decreased duration of clonic convulsion in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model as compared with control group. In chronic study, Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder prevented progression of kindling in PTZ-kindled mice. Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder 400 mg/kg p.o. also reduced brain levels of MDA and increased GSH levels as compared to the PTZ-kindled non-treated group. The results of study showed that Aloe vera leaf (extract) powder possessed significant anticonvulsant and anti-oxidant activity. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Hypermagnesemia does not prevent intracranial hypertension and aggravates cerebral hyperperfusion in a rat model of acute hyperammonemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Eefsen, Martin; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2011-01-01

    . These factors are also thought to be involved in the development of brain edema in acute liver failure. We wanted to study whether hypermagnesemia prevented development of intracranial hypertension and hyperperfusion in a rat model of portacaval anastomosis (PCA) and acute hyperammonemia. We also studied...

  14. Serosurvey of veterinary conference participants for evidence of zoonotic exposure to canine norovirus – study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesquita João

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses have emerged as the leading cause of outbreaks and sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. Person-to-person contact and consumption of contaminated food are considered the most important ways of transmission of noroviruses however zoonotic transmission has been suggested. Recently, noroviruses have been found in dogs which, unlike bovine and swine noroviruses, may present a higher risk of zoonotic transfer, given to the often close contacts between humans and pet dogs in many societies across the world. The present paper describes a seroepidemiologic study aiming to provide information on the exposure level of humans to canine norovirus. Methods/Design A case–control study was designed to address the potential exposure to canine norovirus based on the presence of antibodies against canine norovirus. Sera from veterinarians (a population repeatedly in close contact with dogs will be collected in an annual Veterinary Sciences Congress in Portugal. In addition, sera from general population will be obtained and used as controls for comparative purposes. All sera will be tested for the presence of canine norovirus antibodies using a virus-like particle-based enzyme immune assay. Risk factors for canine norovirus antibodies presence in veterinarians will be investigated through the delivery of an anonymized questionnaire to the participants. Discussion The present study aims to identify seropositive individuals to canine norovirus and to assess risk profiles among veterinary professionals with occupational exposure to dogs. To our knowledge this is the first study providing information on the potential zoonotic risk of canine norovirus, thus allowing the development of preventive measures and ascertaining potential risks for Public Health resulting from contact to dogs.

  15. Agenesis of permanent canines: Rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agenesis of permanent canines is a rare condition, and that of both maxillary and mandibular permanent canines is extremely rare. It may occur either isolated or in association with other dental anomalies. Reports of such cases are very scarce in the literature. Need for early diagnosis of such conditions should be emphasized because of functional, esthetic, and psychological problems which should be evaluated and treated appropriately. The present paper presents a report of bilaterally missing permanent maxillary and mandibular canines. This case might contribute in the future studies of incidence of agenesis of permanent canines.

  16. Agenesis of permanent canines: Rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sumit Kumar; Yadav, Achla Bharti; Kedia, Neal Bharat; Singh, Abhinav Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Agenesis of permanent canines is a rare condition, and that of both maxillary and mandibular permanent canines is extremely rare. It may occur either isolated or in association with other dental anomalies. Reports of such cases are very scarce in the literature. Need for early diagnosis of such conditions should be emphasized because of functional, esthetic, and psychological problems which should be evaluated and treated appropriately. The present paper presents a report of bilaterally missing permanent maxillary and mandibular canines. This case might contribute in the future studies of incidence of agenesis of permanent canines.

  17. Computational modeling to predict nitrogen balance during acute metabolic decompensation in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Erin L; Hall, Kevin D; McGuire, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional management of acute metabolic decompensation in amino acid inborn errors of metabolism (AA IEM) aims to restore nitrogen balance. While nutritional recommendations have been published, they have never been rigorously evaluated. Furthermore, despite these recommendations, there is a wide variation in the nutritional strategies employed amongst providers, particularly regarding the inclusion of parenteral lipids for protein-free caloric support. Since randomized clinical trials during acute metabolic decompensation are difficult and potentially dangerous, mathematical modeling of metabolism can serve as a surrogate for the preclinical evaluation of nutritional interventions aimed at restoring nitrogen balance during acute decompensation in AA IEM. A validated computational model of human macronutrient metabolism was adapted to predict nitrogen balance in response to various nutritional interventions in a simulated patient with a urea cycle disorder (UCD) during acute metabolic decompensation due to dietary non-adherence or infection. The nutritional interventions were constructed from published recommendations as well as clinical anecdotes. Overall, dextrose alone (DEX) was predicted to be better at restoring nitrogen balance and limiting nitrogen excretion during dietary non-adherence and infection scenarios, suggesting that the published recommended nutritional strategy involving dextrose and parenteral lipids (ISO) may be suboptimal. The implications for patients with AA IEM are that the medical course during acute metabolic decompensation may be influenced by the choice of protein-free caloric support. These results are also applicable to intensive care patients undergoing catabolism (postoperative phase or sepsis), where parenteral nutritional support aimed at restoring nitrogen balance may be more tailored regarding metabolic fuel selection.

  18. Hyperalgesia in a human model of acute inflammatory pain: a methodological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    sensitive to heat pain on their left side (P ... measurements themselves evoked hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli on the arm, but only to mechanical stimuli on the legs. including secondary hyperalgesia. Hyperalgesia evoked by the measurements was significantly less intense than that induced by injury. Habituation to the painful stimuli...... was demonstrated by significantly higher pain thresholds and lower pain responses on the second and third day of the study. The burn model is a sensitive psychophysical model of acute inflammatory pain, when cross-over designs and within-day comparisons are used, and the model is suitable for double-blind, placebo...

  19. Effects of Tempol on Experimental Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbıs, Halil; Aykota, Muhammed Rasid; Ozturk, Bunyamin; Kabay, Burhan; Sungurtekin, Ugur; Ozden, Akın; Yenisey, Cigdem; Turk, Nilay Sen; Erdem, Ergun

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of Tempol on local organ damage in an experimental acute pancreatitis model. This experimental study was conducted on 40 male Wistar- albino rats. The animals were randomly allocated into four groups: (i) Sham-operated group, laparotomies and cannulations of the pancreatic duct without acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) (n=10); (ii) Sham + Tempol group, identical to group 1 except for intravenous tempol treatment for 4 hours (n = 10); (iii) ANP group, glycodeoxycholic acid was infused into the pancreatic duct and cerulein was infused intravenously for 6 hours for development of ANP (n=10); and (iv) ANP + Tempol treated group, in addition to the procedure in group 3, rats were administered tempol intravenously for 4 hours (n = 10). Injury of the pancreas was evaluated histopathologically. Malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels of the pancreatic tissue, blood gas analysis, leukocyte and hematocrit levels were measured. Wet/dry weight of pancreatic tissue was also measured. Serum amylase levels, pancreatic tissue malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase levels, wet/dry weight ratio, pancreatic edema, acinar necrosis, fat necrosis and hemorrhage, inflammation and perivascular infiltration were significantly lower in the ANP + Tempol group compared with the ANP group. Tempol infusion reduced local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in this experimental study. These findings demonstrate that tempol has protective effects on local organ damage due to acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats.

  20. Serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter imaging in the canine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peremans, Kathelijne [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Goethals, Ingeborg [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Vos, Filip [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Dobbeleir, A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ham, Hamphrey [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Bree, Henri [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Heeringen, Cees van [Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Kurt [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium) and Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000, Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: kurt.audenaert@ugent.be

    2006-10-15

    The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in a wide range of emotional and behavioral aspects of animals and humans and are involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to block the 5-HT transporter (SERT), thereby increasing the available 5-HT in the brain. Functional imaging with specific SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT) ligands contributes to the study of the SSRI-transporter interaction. First, we evaluated the feasibility of a canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT with the radioligands [{sup 123}I]-{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT as well as single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Second, we studied the effect of SSRIs (sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram) on the SERT and DAT in two dogs. The position of the canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT is discussed and compared with other animal models.

  1. Serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter imaging in the canine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Goethals, Ingeborg; De Vos, Filip; Dobbeleir, A.; Ham, Hamphrey; Van Bree, Henri; Heeringen, Cees van; Audenaert, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in a wide range of emotional and behavioral aspects of animals and humans and are involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to block the 5-HT transporter (SERT), thereby increasing the available 5-HT in the brain. Functional imaging with specific SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT) ligands contributes to the study of the SSRI-transporter interaction. First, we evaluated the feasibility of a canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT with the radioligands [ 123 I]-β-CIT and [ 123 I]-FP-CIT as well as single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Second, we studied the effect of SSRIs (sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram) on the SERT and DAT in two dogs. The position of the canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT is discussed and compared with other animal models

  2. Cryopreservation of microencapsulated canine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shambhu; Otsuki, Tsubasa; Fujimura, Chika; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamashita, Yasuhisa; Higaki, Shogo; Hishinuma, Mitsugu

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to develop a method for cryopreserving microencapsulated canine sperm. Pooled ejaculates from three beagle dogs were extended in egg yolk tris extender and encapsulated using alginate and poly-L-lysine at room temperature. The microcapsules were cooled at 4 °C, immersed in pre-cooled extender (equivalent in volume to the microcapsules) to reach final concentration of 7% (v/v) glycerol and 0.75% (v/v) Equex STM paste, and equilibrated for 5, 30 and 60 min at 4 °C. Thereafter, microcapsules were loaded into 0.5 mL plastic straws and frozen in liquid nitrogen. In Experiment 1, characteristics of microencapsulated canine sperm were evaluated after glycerol addition at 4 °C. Glycerol exposure for 5, 30 and 60 min did not significantly affect progressive motility, viability, or acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm compared with pre-cooled unencapsulated sperm (control). In Experiment 2, characteristics of frozen-thawed canine microencapsulated sperm were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 9 h of culture at 38.5 °C. Pre-freeze glycerol exposure for 5, 30, and 60 min at 4 °C did not influence post-thaw quality in unencapsulated sperm. Post-thaw motility and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm decreased more than those of unencapsulated sperm (P < 0.05) following glycerol exposure for 5 min. However, motility, viability and acrosomal integrity of microencapsulated sperm after 30 and 60 min glycerol exposure were higher than unencapsulated sperm cultured for 6 or 9 h (P < 0.05). In conclusion, since microencapsulated canine sperm were successfully cryopreserved, this could be a viable alternative to convention sperm cryopreservation in this species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterisation of Leukocytes in a Human Skin Blister Model of Acute Inflammation and Resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jenner, William; Motwani, Madhur; Veighey, Kristin; Newson, Justine; Audzevich, Tatsiana; Nicolaou, Anna; Murphy, Sharon; MacAllister, Raymond; Gilroy, Derek W.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing need to understand the leukocytes and soluble mediators that drive acute inflammation and bring about its resolution in humans. We therefore carried out an extensive characterisation of the cantharidin skin blister model in healthy male volunteers. A novel fluorescence staining protocol was designed and implemented, which facilitated the identification of cell populations by flow cytometry. We observed that at the onset phase, 24 h after blister formation, the predomina...

  4. A New Model of Delirium Care in the Acute Geriatric Setting: Geriatric Monitoring Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Mei

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delirium is a common and serious condition, which affects many of our older hospitalised patients. It is an indicator of severe underlying illness and requires early diagnosis and prompt treatment, associated with poor survival, functional outcomes with increased risk of institutionalisation following the delirium episode in the acute care setting. We describe a new model of delirium care in the acute care setting, titled Geriatric Monitoring Unit (GMU where the important concepts of delirium prevention and management are integrated. We hypothesize that patients with delirium admitted to the GMU would have better clinical outcomes with less need for physical and psychotropic restraints compared to usual care. Methods/Design GMU models after the Delirium Room with adoption of core interventions from Hospital Elder Life Program and use of evening bright light therapy to consolidate circadian rhythm and improve sleep in the elderly patients. The novelty of this approach lies in the amalgamation of these interventions in a multi-faceted approach in acute delirium management. GMU development thus consists of key considerations for room design and resource planning, program specific interventions and daily core interventions. Assessments undertaken include baseline demographics, comorbidity scoring, duration and severity of delirium, cognitive, functional measures at baseline, 6 months and 12 months later. Additionally we also analysed the pre and post-GMU implementation knowledge and attitude on delirium care among staff members in the geriatric wards (nurses, doctors and undertook satisfaction surveys for caregivers of patients treated in GMU. Discussion This study protocol describes the conceptualization and implementation of a specialized unit for delirium management. We hypothesize that such a model of care will not only result in better clinical outcomes for the elderly patient with delirium compared to usual geriatric care

  5. A biomechanical comparison of 3.5 locking compression plate fixation to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate fixation in a canine cadaveric distal humeral metaphyseal gap model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipowicz, D; Lanz, O; McLaughlin, R; Elder, S; Werre, S

    2009-01-01

    3.5 locking compression plate (LCP) fixation was compared to 3.5 limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP) fixation in a canine cadaveric, distal humeral metaphyseal gap model. Thirty paired humeri from adult, large breed dogs were separated into equal groups based on testing: static compression, cyclic compression, and cyclic torsion. Humeral constructs stabilised with LCP were significantly stiffer than those plated with LC-DCP when loaded in static axial compression (P = 0.0004). When cyclically loaded in axial compression, the LCP constructs were significantly less stiff than the LC-DCP constructs (P = 0.0029). Constructs plated with LCP were significantly less resistant to torsion over 500 cycles than those plated with LC-DCP (Plocking plates may be attributed to the stability afforded by the plate-screw interface of locking plates. The LCP constructs demonstrated less stiffness in dynamic testing in this model, likely due to plate-bone offset secondary to non-anatomic contouring and occasional incomplete seating of the locking screws when using the torque-limiting screw driver. Resolution of these aspects of LCP application may help improve the stiffness of fixation in fractures modeled by the experimental set-up of this investigation.

  6. Fractal pattern of canine trichoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vico, Gionata; Cataldi, Marielda; Maiolino, Paola; Carella, Francesca; Beltraminelli, Stefano; Losa, Gabriele A

    2011-06-01

    To assess by fractal analysis the specific architecture, growth pattern, and tissue distribution that characterize subtypes of canine trichoblastoma, a benign tumor derived from or reduplicating the primitive hair germ of embryonic follicular development. Tumor masks and outlines obtained from immunohistologic images by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components were analyzed by fractal and conventional morphometry. The fractal dimension [FD] of each investigated case was determined from the slope of the regression line describing the fractal region within a bi-asymptotic curve experimentally established. All tumor masks and outlines obtained by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components showed fractal self-similar properties that were evaluated by peculiar FDs. However, only masks revealed significantly different FD values, ranging from 1.75 to 1.85, enabling the discrimination of canine trichoblastoma subtypes. The FD data suggest that an iterative morphogenetic process, involving both the air germ and associated dermal papilla, may be responsible of the peculiar tissue architecture of trichoblastoma. The present study emphasized the reliability of fractal analysis in achieving the objective characterization of canine trichoblastoma.

  7. Comparison of the canine and human acid {beta}-galactosidase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahern-Rindell, A.J. [Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT (United States); Kretz, K.A. [Recombinant BioCatalysis, Inc., La Jolla, CA (United States); O`Brien, J.S. [Univ. of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1996-05-17

    Several canine cDNA libraries were screened with human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA as probe. Seven positive clones were isolated and sequenced yielding a partial (2060 bp) canine {beta}-galactosidase cDNA with 86% identity to the human {beta}-galactosidase cDNA. Preliminary analysis of a canine genomic library indicated conservation of exon number and size. Analysis by Northern blotting disclosed a single mRNA of 2.4 kb in fibroblasts and liver from normal dogs and dogs affected with GM1 gangliosidosis. Although incomplete, these results indicate canine GM1 gangliosidosis is a suitable animal model of the human disease and should further efforts to devise a gene therapy strategy for its treatment. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Regional Validation and Recalibration of Clinical Predictive Models for Patients With Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Ruthazer, Robin; Udelson, James E; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Zannad, Faiez; Maggioni, Aldo; Konstam, Marvin A; Kent, David M

    2017-11-18

    Heart failure clinical practice guidelines recommend applying validated clinical predictive models (CPMs) to support decision making. While CPMs are now widely available, the generalizability of heart failure CPMs is largely unknown. We identified CPMs derived in North America that predict mortality for patients with acute heart failure and validated these models in different world regions to assess performance in a contemporary international clinical trial (N=4133) of patients with acute heart failure treated with guideline-directed medical therapy. We performed independent external validations of 3 CPMs predicting in-hospital mortality, 60-day mortality, and 1-year mortality, respectively. CPM discrimination decreased in all regional validation cohorts. The median change in area under the receiver operating curve was -0.09 (range -0.05 to -0.23). Regional calibration was highly variable (90th percentile of absolute difference between smoothed observed and predicted values range 50%). Calibration remained poor after global recalibrations; however, region-specific recalibration procedures significantly improved regional performance (recalibrated 90th percentile of absolute difference range models). Acute heart failure CPM discrimination and calibration vary substantially across different world regions; region-specific (as opposed to global) recalibration techniques are needed to improve CPM calibration. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  9. Functional Characterization of the Canine Heme-Regulated eIF2α Kinase: Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimon C. Kanelakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI negatively regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α thereby inhibiting protein translation. The importance of HRI in regulating hemoglobin synthesis in erythroid cells makes it an attractive molecular target in need of further characterization. In this work, we have cloned and expressed the canine form of the HRI kinase. The canine nucleotide sequence has 86%, 82%, and 81% identity to the human, mouse, and rat HRI, respectively. It was noted that an isoleucine residue in the ATP binding site of human, rat, and mouse HRI is replaced by a valine in the canine kinase. The expression of canine HRI protein by in vitro translation using wheat germ lysate or in Sf9 cells using a baculovirus expression system was increased by the addition of hemin. Following purification, the canine protein was found to be 72 kD and showed kinase activity determined by its ability to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide substrate. Quercetin, a kinase inhibitor known to inhibit mouse and human HRI, inhibits canine HRI in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, quercetin is able to increase de novo protein synthesis in canine reticulocytes. We conclude that the canine is a suitable model species for studying the role of HRI in erythropoiesis.

  10. Novel assessment of haemodynamic kinetics with acute exercise in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary Beth; Chingombe, Tsungai J; Zinn, Abigail B; Reddy, Jagadeshwar G; Novack, Rachel A; Cooney, Sean A; Fisher, Amanda J; Presson, Robert G; Lahm, Tim; Petrache, Irina

    2015-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? The acute effect of exercise at moderately high intensity on already-elevated pulmonary arterial pressures and right ventricular wall stress in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? We show, for the first time, that in a rat model of PAH, exercise induces an acute reduction in pulmonary artery pressure associated with lung endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation, without evidence of acute right ventricular inflammation or myocyte apoptosis. Haemodynamic measures obtained with traditional invasive methodology as well as novel implantable telemetry reveal an exercise-induced 'window' of pulmonary hypertension alleviation, supporting future investigations of individualized exercise as therapy in PAH. Exercise improves outcomes of multiple chronic conditions, but controversial results, including increased pulmonary artery (PA) pressure, have prevented its routine implementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), an incurable disease that drastically reduces exercise tolerance. Individualized, optimized exercise prescription for PAH requires a better understanding of disease-specific exercise responses. We investigated the acute impact of exercise on already-elevated PA pressure and right ventricular (RV) wall stress and inflammation in a rat model of PAH (PAH group, n = 12) induced once by monocrotaline (50 mg kg(-1) , i.p.; 2 weeks), compared with healthy control animals (n = 8). Single bouts of exercise consisted of a 45 min treadmill run at 75% of individually determined aerobic capacity (V̇O2max). Immediately after exercise, measurements of RV systolic pressure and systemic pressure were made via jugular and carotid cannulation, and were followed by tissue collection. Monocrotaline induced moderate PAH, evidenced by RV hypertrophy, decreased V̇O2max, PA muscularization, and RV and skeletal muscle cytoplasmic glycolysis detected by

  11. A comparative study between mixed-type tumours from human salivary and canine mammary glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genelhu, Marisa CLS; Cardoso, Sérgio V; Gobbi, Helenice; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2007-01-01

    In comparative pathology, canine mammary tumours have special interest because of their similarities with human breast cancer. Mixed tumours are uncommon lesions in the human breast, but they are found most frequently in the mammary gland of the female dogs and in the human salivary glands. The aim of the study was to compare clinical, morphological and immunohistochemical features of human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours, in order to evaluate the latter as an experimental model for salivary gland tumours. Ten examples of each mixed tumour type (human pleomorphic adenoma and carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas and canine mixed tumour and metaplastic carcinoma) were evaluated. First, clinical and morphologic aspects of benign and malignant variants were compared between the species. Then, streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression of cytokeratins, vimentin, p63 protein, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. After standardization, similar age and site distributions were observed in human and canine tumours. Histological similarities were identified in the comparison of the benign lesions as well. Metaplastic carcinomas also resembled general aspects of carcinomas ex-pleomorphic adenomas in morphological evaluation. Additionally, immunohistochemical staining further presented similar antigenic expression between lesions. There are many similar features between human salivary and canine mammary gland mixed tumours. This observation is of great relevance for those interested in the study and management of salivary gland tumours, since canine lesions may constitute useful comparative models for their investigations

  12. Hepatic perfusion changes in an experimental model of acute pancreatitis: Evaluation by perfusion CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutcu, Semra [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Serter, Selim, E-mail: serterselim@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Kaya, Yavuz; Kara, Eray [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Nese, Nalan [Department of Pathology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey); Coskun, Teoman [Department of Surgery, Celal Bayar University, School of Medicine, Manisa (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: It is known that acute pancreatitis may cause secondary changes in several organs. Liver is one of these involved organs. In different experimental studies hepatic damages were shown histopathologically in acute pancreatitis but there are a few studies about perfusion disorders that accompany these histopathologic changes. Perfusion CT (pCT) provides the ability to detect regional and global alterations in organ blood flow. The purpose of the study was to describe hepatic perfusion changes in experimental acute pancreatitis model with pCT. Materials and methods: Forty Sprague-Dawley rats of both genders with average weights of 250 g were used. Rats were randomized into two groups. Twenty rats were in control group and 20 in acute pancreatitis group. pCT was performed. Perfusion maps were formed by processing the obtained images with perfusion CT software. Blood flow (BF) and blood volume (BV) values were obtained from these maps. All pancreatic and liver tissues were taken off with laparotomy and histopathologic investigation was performed. Student's t test was used for statistical analyses. Results: In pCT we found statistically significant increase in blood volume in both lobes of liver and in blood flow in right lobe of the liver (p < 0.01). Although blood flow in left lobe of the liver increased, it did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The quantitative analysis of liver parenchyma with pCT showed that acute pancreatitis causes a significant perfusion changes in the hepatic tissue. Systemic mediators seem to be effective as well as local inflammatory changes in perfusion changes.

  13. Serum canine pancreatic-specific lipase concentrations in dogs with naturally occurring Babesia rossi infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza S. Köster

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Babesia rossi is the cause of a highly virulent multisystemic disease with a variable outcome, which is a reliable model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS. The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of canine pancreatic-specific lipase (cPL in a population of dogs with naturally acquired B. rossi infection. In addition, the associations between serum cPL and death and SIRS status were examined. An observational study recruited 87 dogs diagnosed with B. rossi infection and serum cPL concentrations were measured daily until discharge or death. The median concentration of serum cPL was 124.0 µg/L (interquartile range: 51.0 µg/L – 475.5 µg/L on admission (n = 87 and 145.5 µg/L (62.3 µg/L – 434.0 µg/L on day two of hospitalisation (n = 40. Twenty-four dogs (28% had a serum cPL concentration within the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (> 400 µg/L at admission with 13 dogs (32.5% presenting as such on the second day of hospitalisation. The median concentration of serum cPL in dogs with SIRS was 158 µg/L (interquartile range: 52.5 µg/L – 571.5 µg/L; n = 53, which was significantly higher than in those without SIRS (75 µg/L; 50.3 µg/L – 131.8 µg/L; n = 32 (P = 0.018. This study demonstrated that an unexpectedly high number of dogs diagnosed with naturally acquired canine babesiosis had a serum cPL concentration within the diagnostic range for acute pancreatitis and a significantly higher serum cPL concentration was found in dogs that were classified as having SIRS.

  14. Serum canine pancreatic-specific lipase concentrations in dogs with naturally occurring Babesia rossi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, Liza S; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Schoeman, Johan P

    2015-08-13

    Babesia rossi is the cause of a highly virulent multisystemic disease with a variable outcome, which is a reliable model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of canine pancreatic-specific lipase (cPL) in a population of dogs with naturally acquired B. rossi infection. In addition, the associations between serum cPL and death and SIRS status were examined. An observational study recruited 87 dogs diagnosed with B. rossi infection and serum cPL concentrations were measured daily until discharge or death. The median concentration of serum cPL was 124.0 µg/L (interquartile range: 51.0 µg/L - 475.5 µg/L) on admission (n = 87) and 145.5 µg/L (62.3 µg/L - 434.0 µg/L) on day two of hospitalisation (n = 40). Twenty-four dogs (28%) had a serum cPL concentration within the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (> 400 µg/L) at admission with 13 dogs (32.5%) presenting as such on the second day of hospitalisation. The median concentration of serum cPL in dogs with SIRS was 158 µg/L (interquartile range: 52.5 µg/L - 571.5 µg/L; n = 53), which was significantly higher than in those without SIRS (75 µg/L; 50.3 µg/L - 131.8 µg/L; n = 32) (P = 0.018). This study demonstrated that an unexpectedly high number of dogs diagnosed with naturally acquired canine babesiosis had a serum cPL concentration within the diagnostic range for acute pancreatitis and a significantly higher serum cPL concentration was found in dogs that were classified as having SIRS.

  15. A Comparative Oncology Study of Iniparib Defines Its Pharmacokinetic Profile and Biological Activity in a Naturally-Occurring Canine Cancer Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Saba

    Full Text Available Development of iniparib as an anti-cancer agent was hindered in part by lingering questions regarding its mechanism of action, the activity of its metabolites, and their potential accumulation in tumors. Due to strong similarities in metabolism of iniparib between humans and dogs, a veterinary clinical trial in pet dogs with spontaneous cancers was designed to answer specific questions pertaining to pharmacokinetic exposures and tolerability of iniparib. Dogs were treated with iniparib alone and in combination with carboplatin chemotherapy. Iniparib doses ranged between 10-70 mg/kg intravenously (IV. Plasma, tumor and normal tissue samples were collected before and at various time points scheduled after exposure for pharmacokinetic and biologic analysis. The primary endpoints included characterization of dose-limiting toxicities (DLT and determination of the drug exposures that could be achieved in both normal and tumor tissues. Nineteen dogs were treated. DLT included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia; most effects were attributable to carboplatin based on the timing of adverse event onset. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD of iniparib was not identified. Moderate to high variability in plasma exposure was noted for iniparib and all metabolites between animals. When quantifiable, iniparib and metabolite plasma:tumor ratios were < 0.088 and <1.7, respectively. In this study, iniparib was well tolerated as a single agent and in combination with carboplatin over a range of doses. However, clinically relevant concentrations of the parent drug and selected metabolites were not detectable in canine tumor tissues at any studied dose, thus eliminating expectations for clinical responses in dogs or humans. Negative clinical trials in humans, and the uncertainties of its mechanism of action, ultimately led to the decision to stop clinical development of the drug. Nevertheless, the questions that can be asked and answered within

  16. Evaluation of the Effects of Temporary Covered Nitinol Stent Placement in the Prostatic Urethra: Short-Term Study in the Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisostomo, Veronica; Song, Ho Young; Maynar, Manuel; Sun, Fei; Soria, Federico; Lima, Juan Rafael; Yoon, Chang Jin; Uson-Gargallo, Jesus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of temporary stent placement on the canine prostatic urethra. Methods. Retrievable PTFE-covered nitinol stents were placed in the prostatic urethras of 8 beagle dogs under fluoroscopic guidance. Retrograde urethrography was obtained before and after stenting. Retrograde urethrography and endoscopy were performed 1 and 2 months after deployment. The endoscopic degree of hyperplasia was rated on a scale of 0 to 4 (0 absence, 4 = occlusion). On day 60, stents were removed and urethrography was performed immediately before euthanasia. Pathologic analysis was performed to determine the degree of glandular atrophy, periurethral fibrosis, and urethral dilation. Results. Stent deployment was technically successful in 7 animals, and failed in 1 dog due to a narrow urethral lumen. Complete migration was seen in 2 animals at 1 month, and an additional stent was deployed. On day 30, endoscopy showed slight hyperplasia (grade 1) in 3 animals. On day 60, moderate hyperplasia (grade 2) was evidenced in 4 cases. No impairment of urinary flow was seen during follow-up. Retrieval was technically easy to perform, and was successful in all dogs. The major histologic findings were chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates; prostate glandular atrophy, with a mean value of 1.86 (SD 0.90); periurethral fibrosis, with a mean ratio of 29.37 (SD 10.41); and dilatation of the prostatic urethra, with a mean ratio of 6.75 (SD 3.22). Conclusion. Temporary prostatic stent placement in dogs is safe and feasible, causing marked enlargement of the prostatic urethral lumen. Retrievable covered stents may therefore be an option for bladder outlet obstruction management in men

  17. Biomechanical comparison of pin and tension-band wire fixation with a prototype locking plate fixation in a transverse canine patellar fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Sophie; Kowaleski, Michael P; Matthys, Romano; Nützi, Reto; Serck, Boris; Boudrieau, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    To compare a locking plate (LP) with pin and tension-band wire (pin/TBW) for fixation of mid-patellar transverse fractures. Cadaveric canine stifle joints from 10 adult mixed breed dogs (23-36 kg) were used. Mid-patellar transverse osteotomies were randomly stabilized (in pairs) with either pin/TBW or a prototype LP. Cyclic loads (1 Hz, 500 cycles) at 100% body weight (90°-135° stifle joint extension), were applied. Survival or failure of constructs was defined as <2 mm fracture gap distraction at 500 cycles, or ≥2 mm fracture gap distraction at the number of cycles sustained, respectively. Number of cycles at failure and distraction gap were compared with a paired Student's t-test, and a survival analysis performed with a Mantel-Cox test. All constructs that survived cyclic testing were tested in single cycle load to failure (1.0 mm/sec; 110° stifle joint extension); yield strength was compared with a Wilcoxon rank sum test. Significance was set at p <0.05. All 10/10 LP and three out of 10 pin/TBW fixations survived cyclic testing. Survival analysis, number of cycles at failure, and distraction gap all were significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.0011, p = 0.0013, and p <0.0001, respectively). Construct yield strength was not significantly different (p = 0.1273). The failure mode with pin/TBW was consistently similar to failures observed clinically. The LP demonstrated consistent, reliable and stable fixation.

  18. A mouse model of alcoholic liver fibrosis-associated acute kidney injury identifies key molecular pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Shinji; Chappell, Grace A.; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Takeki; Kato, Yuki; Kono, Hiroshi; Bataller, Ramon; Rusyn, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data strongly indicate that acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis, an acute-on-chronic form of liver failure in patients with advanced alcoholic fibrosis. Development of targeted therapies for AKI in this setting is hampered by the lack of an animal model. To enable research into molecular drivers and novel therapies for fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI, we aimed to combine carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 )-induced fibrosis with chronic intra-gastric alcohol feeding. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered a low dose of CCl 4 (0.2 ml/kg 2 × week/6 weeks) followed by alcohol intragastrically (up to 25 g/kg/day for 3 weeks) and with continued CCl 4 . We observed that combined treatment with CCl 4 and alcohol resulted in severe liver injury, more pronounced than using each treatment alone. Importantly, severe kidney injury was evident only in the combined treatment group. This mouse model reproduced distinct pathological features consistent with AKI in human alcoholic hepatitis. Transcriptomic analysis of kidneys revealed profound effects in the combined treatment group, with enrichment for damage-associated pathways, such as apoptosis, inflammation, immune-response and hypoxia. Interestingly, Havcr1 and Lcn2, biomarkers of AKI, were markedly up-regulated. Overall, this study established a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI and identified key mechanistic pathways. - Highlights: • Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a critical complication in alcoholic hepatitis • We developed a novel mouse model of fibrosis- and alcohol-associated AKI • This model reproduces key molecular and pathological features of human AKI • This animal model can help identify new targeted therapies for alcoholic hepatitis

  19. Models of partnership within family-centred care in the acute paediatric setting: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Christine; Baxter, Pamela; Ploeg, Jenny; Blatz, Susan

    2017-02-01

    A discussion of partnership in the context of family-centred care in the acute paediatric setting, through a critical analysis of partnership models. Paediatric healthcare practitioners understand the importance of family-centred care, but struggle with how to translate the core tenets into action and are confused by several rival terms. Partnering relationships are included in definitions of family-centred care, yet less is known about strategies to fully engage or support parents in these partnerships. A rigorous examination of concepts embedded in family-centred care such as partnership may provide a better understanding of how to implement the broader concept and support exemplary care in today's clinical practice environment. Discussion paper. Electronic search (January 2000 - December 2014) performed on CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts and PsychINFO using keywords partnership, family-centred care and conceptual framework. Eligible references were drawn from the databases, reference lists and expert sources. Eight models met inclusion criteria and had currency and relevance to the acute paediatric setting. Nurses should continue exploring partnership in various paediatric contexts given the wide-ranging definitions, lack of operational indicators and need for stronger relational statements in current models. An examination of key strategies, barriers and facilitators of partnership is recommended. One partnership model had both high overall maturity and best fit with family-centred care principles. All models originate from Western and developed countries, indicating that future partnership models should be more geographically, culturally and economically diverse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effect of peripheral morphine in a human model of acute inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, J; Hammer, N A; Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, th......Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled, three-way crossover design in a human model of acute inflammatory pain (heat injury). We studied 18 healthy volunteers who each received morphine locally (2 mg), morphine systemically (2 mg), or placebo on three separate study days. The subjects received morphine infiltration subcutaneously (s.c.). 1 h......, but local morphine infiltration neither reduced pain during the burn, nor primary or secondary hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli after the burn. In conclusion, peripherally applied morphine had no acute antinociceptive effects in this human model of acute inflammatory pain....

  1. EFFECTS OF LUDARTIN AND LEUKOMISIN ON THE ACUTE HYPERLIPIDEMIA MODEL INDUCED BY ETHANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ratkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: study sesquiterpene lactones ludartin and leukomisin lipid-lowering properties on the model of acute hyperlipidemia induced by ethanol in rats.Material and methods. Rats during 7 days injected into the stomach ludartin and leukomisin in a dose 10 mg/kg or reference drug nicotinic acid in a dose 25 mg/kg. Hyperlipidemia caused by single introduc-tion of ethanol into the stomach in a dose 5 g/kg. In blood serum of tail vein measured the triacylgly-cerols, total cholesterol, high density and low density lipoproteins cholesterol, also the level of free fatty acids. Calculated the ratio of high density lipoproteins cholesterol to the amount of low density lipopro-teins cholesterol and the index of atherogenicity.Results. A single dose of ethanol increased serum level of triacylglycerols in 1.9 times, free fatty acids – in 3.2 times, low density lipoproteins – on 44% in comparison with the intact animals indices. It shows the development of acute hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins cholesterol and the index of atherogenicity were not changed. Course introduction of sesquiterpene lactones ludartin and leukomisin against the background of acute hyperlipidemia was accompanied by a decrease in the serum of triacylglycerols levels respectively by 37.5% and 49.5%. Nicotinic acid lowered the content of triacylglycerols by 42.4%. Ludartin, leukomisin and nicotinic acid reduced the increased level of free fatty acids in the blood serum by 63.4%, 41.6% and 67.9%. Ludartin, leukomisin and nicotinic acid de-creased by 15.8%, 20.3% and 17.2% of total cholesterol in the blood serum. In acute hyperlipidemia ludartin and leukomisin reduced low density lipoproteins cholesterol by 23.8% and 14.8%, respectively, nicotinic acid – by 15.7%. Both of sesquiterpene lactone and nicotinic acid did not modify the content of high density lipoproteins cholesterol. When introduction ludartin and nicotinic acid ratio of high density

  2. EFFECTS OF GROSSHEMIN AND GROSSMISIN ON THE ACUTE HYPERLIPIDEMIA MODEL INDUCED BY ETHANOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Ratkin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: study sesquiterpene lactones grosshemin and grossmisin lipid-lowering properties on the model of acute hyperlipidemia induced by ethanol in rats.Materials and methods. Rats during 7 days injected into the stomach grosshemin and grossmisin in a dose 10 mg/kg or reference drug nicotinic acid in a dose 25 mg/kg. Hyperlipidemia caused by single introduction of ethanol into the stomach in a dose 5 g/kg. In blood serum of tail vein measured the triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, high density and low density lipoproteins cholesterol, also the level of free fatty acids. Calculated the ratio of high density lipoproteins cholesterol to the amount of low density lipoproteins cholesterol and the index of atherogenicity.Results. A single dose of ethanol increased serum level of triacylglycerols in 1.9 times, free fatty acids – in 3.2 times, low density lipoproteins – on 44% in comparison with the intact animals indices. It shows the development of acute hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins cholesterol and the index of atherogenicity were not changed. Course sesquiterpene lactones grosshemin and grossmisin introduction against the background of acute hyperlipidemia was accompanied by a decrease in the serum of triacylglycerols levels respectively by 19.8% and 34.1%. Nicotinic acid lowered the content of triacylglycerols by 42.4%. Grosshemin and nicotinic acid reduced the increased level of free fatty acids in the blood serum by 60.7–67.9%. Grossmisin and nicotinic acid decreased by 14.6–17.2% of total cholesterol in the blood serum. In acute hyperlipidemia grosshemin and grossmisin reduced low density lipoproteins cholesterol by 17.6% and 20%, respectively, nicotinic acid – by 15.7%. Both of sesquiterpene lactone and nicotinic acid did not modify the content of high density lipoproteins cholesterol. When introduction grosshemin, grossmisin and nicotinic acid ratio of high density lipoproteins cholesterol to

  3. The influence of a fentanyl and dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay G. Vengerovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl is widely used for prophylaxis and therapy of traumatic shock associated with massive bleeding. Its side effects – skeletal muscle rigidity and respiratory center depression – are especially pronounced with repeated administration. It is rational to apply fentanyl in diminished doses in combination with non-opioid analgesics in order to reduce respiratory disturbances risk.Aim. The aim of the work is to justify the influence of opioid analgesic fentanyl and α2 -adrenomimetic dexmedetomidine combination on external respiratory functions in acute hemorrhage model.Materials and methods. Acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume was modeled in experiments on 75 white mongrel male rats. The external respiratory functions (respiratory rate, respiratory volume, breath volume per minute were estimated in animals of 5 groups: 1 – rats without analgesic help (controls; 2–3 – rats receiving a single fentanyl intramuscular injection (ED99 98,96 mcg/kg or fentanyl together with dexme detomidine (ED99 of combination 67,94 mcg/kg 15 min after acute blood loss; 4–5 – rats receiving the same drugs 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min later.Results. In experimental acute loss of 35–40% of circulating blood volume, 15 min later a secondary acute respiratory failure developed with a drop of respiratory rate, respiratory volume and volume of breath per minute by 30%, 21 and 47% (p < 0,05. The external respiratory functions recoverеd after 4 h mainly due to the increase of respiratory volume. A single intramuscular injection of fentanyl caused respiratory depression 15 min after experimental blood loss which resulted in the decrease of breath volume per minute to 30–61% (p < 0,05 for 90 min. Four intramuscular injections of fentanyl 15 min, 30, 45 and 60 min after hemorrhage caused a severe respiratory dysfunction, accompanied by apnea periods and Biot’s respiration. Respiratory rate was reduced

  4. Experimentally derived acute and chronic copper Biotic Ligand Models for rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémazy, Anne; Wood, Chris M; Ng, Tania Y-T; Smith, D Scott; Chowdhury, M Jasim

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of varying water chemistry ([Ca 2+ ]=0.2-3mM, [Mg 2+ ]=0.05-3mM, dissolved organic matter (DOM, natural, from maple leaves)=0.3-10mg of CL -1 , pH=5.0-8.5) on the acute (96-h, unfed fish) and chronic (30-d, fed fish) toxicity of waterborne Cu to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed in flow-through conditions. Acute and chronic Biotic Ligand Models (BLMs) were developed from the obtained toxicity data-sets, using the Visual MINTEQ software. Our results indicate that Cu is predominantly an acute toxicant to rainbow trout, as there were no observable growth effects and the 96-h and 30-d LC50 values were similar, with mortality mostly occurring within the first few days of exposure. Calcium and DOM were greatly protective against both acute and chronic Cu toxicity, but Mg seemed to only protect against chronic toxicity. Additional protection by pH 5.0 in acute exposure and by pH 8.5 in chronic exposure occurred. In the range of conditions tested, the observed 96-h LC50 and 30-d LC20 values varied by a factor of 39 and 27 respectively. The newly developed acute and chronic BLMs explained these variations reasonably well (i.e. within a 2-fold error), except at pH≥8 where the high observed acute toxicity could not be explained, even by considering an equal contribution of CuOH + and Cu 2+ to the overall Cu toxicity. The 96-h LC50 values of 59% of 90 toxicity tests from 19 independent studies in the literature were reasonably well predicted by the new acute BLM. The LC20 predictions from the new chronic BLM were reasonable for 7 out of 14 toxicity tests from 6 independent chronic studies (with variable exposure durations). The observed deviations from BLM predictions may be due to uncertainties in the water chemistry in these literature studies and/or to differences in fish sensitivity. A residual pH effect was also observed for both the acute and the chronic data-sets, as the ratio of predicted vs. observed LC values generally

  5. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  6. Light-induced depigmentation in planarians models the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenhaus, Bradford M; Dustin, John P; Neverett, Emily R; Beaudry, Megan S; Nadeau, Leanna E; Burk-McCoy, Ethan; He, Xinwen; Pearson, Bret J; Pellettieri, Jason

    2016-05-31

    Porphyrias are disorders of heme metabolism frequently characterized by extreme photosensitivity. This symptom results from accumulation of porphyrins, tetrapyrrole intermediates in heme biosynthesis that generate reactive oxygen species when exposed to light, in the skin of affected individuals. Here we report that in addition to producing an ommochrome body pigment, the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea generates porphyrins in its subepithelial pigment cells under physiological conditions, and that this leads to pigment cell loss when animals are exposed to intense visible light. Remarkably, porphyrin biosynthesis and light-induced depigmentation are enhanced by starvation, recapitulating a common feature of some porphyrias - decreased nutrient intake precipitates an acute manifestation of the disease. Our results establish planarians as an experimentally tractable animal model for research into the pathophysiology of acute porphyrias, and potentially for the identification of novel pharmacological interventions capable of alleviating porphyrin-mediated photosensitivity or decoupling dieting and fasting from disease pathogenesis.

  7. Efficacy of voriconazole in a murine model of acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, J E N; Eagleson, M A; Postan, M; Cutrullis, R A; Freilij, H; Bournissen, F Garcia; Petray, P B; Altcheh, J

    2013-04-01

    Antifungal triazole derivatives have been studied as possible alternatives for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Voriconazole has demonstrated in vitro activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, but its efficacy in vivo has not yet been tested. We aimed to determine the effect of voriconazole in a murine model of acute T. cruzi infection. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by comparing parasitaemia, mortality and organ involvement (by histological examination) of infected mice. Treatment with voriconazole significantly lowered parasitaemia and mortality compared with controls, reduced the percentage of mice with amastigote nests in heart and skeletal muscle and moderately decreased myocardial inflammation. Our findings support the potential of voriconazole for the treatment of acute Chagas' disease and motivate future animal studies using varying doses and treatment schemes. Further evaluation of voriconazole for clinical use in human Chagas' patients is warranted.

  8. Occurrence, clinical features and outcome of canine pancreatitis (80 cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pápa, Kinga; Máthé, Akos; Abonyi-Tóth, Zsolt; Sterczer, Agnes; Psáder, Roland; Hetyey, Csaba; Vajdovich, Péter; Vörös, Károly

    2011-03-01

    Medical records of 80 dogs diagnosed with acute pancreatitis during a 4-year period were evaluated regarding history, breed predilection, clinical signs and additional examination findings. Cases were selected if compatible clinical symptoms, increased serum activity of amylase or lipase and morphologic evidence of pancreatitis by ultrasonography, laparotomy or necropsy were all present. Like in other studies, neutered dogs had an increased risk of developing acute pancreatitis. Although breed predilection was consistent with earlier reports, some notable differences were also observed. Apart from Dachshunds, Poodles, Cocker Spaniels and Fox Terriers, the sled dogs (Laikas, Alaskan Malamutes) also demonstrated a higher risk for pancreatitis according to our results. Concurrent diseases occurred in 56 dogs (70%), diabetes mellitus (n = 29, 36%) being the most common. Clinical signs of acute pancreatitis were similar to those observed in other studies. The study group represented a dog population with severe acute pancreatitis, having a relatively high mortality rate (40%) compared to data of the literature. Breed, age, gender, neutering and body condition had no significant association with the outcome. Hypothermia (p = 0.0413) and metabolic acidosis (p = 0.0063) correlated significantly with poor prognosis and may serve as valuable markers for severity assessment in canine acute pancreatitis.

  9. Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    prevention programs, including pressure relief regimes and selection of support surfaces , to optimize tissue heath during initial rehabilitation. Study...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0618 TITLE: Development of a Personalized Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury...Model for Pressure Ulcer Prevention Acutely Following Spinal Cord Injury: Biomarkers of Muscle Composition and Resilience 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  10. Prognostic models for predicting posttraumatic seizures during acute hospitalization, and at 1 and 2 years following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Anne C; Wagner, Amy K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Brooks, Maria M; Zafonte, Ross D; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Fabio, Anthony; Hammond, Flora M; Dreer, Laura E; Bushnik, Tamara; Walker, William C; Brown, Allen W; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Shea, Timothy; Krellman, Jason W; Rosenthal, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures (PTS) are well-recognized acute and chronic complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk factors have been identified, but considerable variability in who develops PTS remains. Existing PTS prognostic models are not widely adopted for clinical use and do not reflect current trends in injury, diagnosis, or care. We aimed to develop and internally validate preliminary prognostic regression models to predict PTS during acute care hospitalization, and at year 1 and year 2 postinjury. Prognostic models predicting PTS during acute care hospitalization and year 1 and year 2 post-injury were developed using a recent (2011-2014) cohort from the TBI Model Systems National Database. Potential PTS predictors were selected based on previous literature and biologic plausibility. Bivariable logistic regression identified variables with a p-value load, and pre-injury limitation in learning/remembering/concentrating as significant PTS predictors during acute hospitalization. Significant predictors of PTS at year 1 were subdural hematoma (SDH), contusion load, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, preinjury mental health treatment/psychiatric hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Year 2 significant predictors were similar to those of year 1: SDH, intraparenchymal fragment, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Corrected concordance (C) statistics were 0.599, 0.747, and 0.716 for acute hospitalization, year 1, and year 2 models, respectively. The prognostic model for PTS during acute hospitalization did not discriminate well. Year 1 and year 2 models showed fair to good predictive validity for PTS. Cranial surgery, although medically necessary, requires ongoing research regarding potential benefits of increased monitoring for signs of epileptogenesis, PTS prophylaxis, and/or rehabilitation/social support. Future studies should

  11. Canine Research to Benefit Humans and Dogs Alike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-13

    The Jackson Laboratory recently launched the Tallwood Canine Cancer Research Initiative, in which tumor samples from dogs will be collected to create patient-derived xenografts in mice. These models, and their accompanying genome sequences, can then be shared with researchers around the world. The initiative's goal is to learn more about the biology of human cancers through comparative genomic analyses. ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Canine scent detection of canine cancer: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorman DC

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available David C Dorman,1 Melanie L Foster,2 Katherine E Fernhoff,1 Paul R Hess2 1Department of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: The scent detection prowess of dogs has prompted interest in their ability to detect cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dogs could use olfactory cues to discriminate urine samples collected from dogs that did or did not have urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC, at a rate greater than chance. Dogs with previous scent training (n=4 were initially trained to distinguish between a single control and a single TCC-positive urine sample. All dogs acquired this task (mean =15±7.9 sessions; 20 trials/session. The next training phase used four additional control urine samples (n=5 while maintaining the one original TCC-positive urine sample. All dogs quickly acquired this task (mean =5.3±1.5 sessions. The last training phase used multiple control (n=4 and TCC-positive (n=6 urine samples to promote categorical training by the dogs. Only one dog was able to correctly distinguish multiple combinations of TCC-positive and control urine samples suggesting that it mastered categorical learning. The final study phase evaluated whether this dog would generalize this behavior to novel urine samples. However, during double-blind tests using two novel TCC-positive and six novel TCC-negative urine samples, this dog did not indicate canine TCC-positive cancer samples more frequently than expected by chance. Our study illustrates the need to consider canine olfactory memory and the use of double-blind methods to avoid erroneous conclusions regarding the ability of dogs to alert on specimens from canine cancer patients. Our results also suggest that sample storage, confounding odors, and other factors need to be considered in the design of future studies that evaluate the detection of

  13. Cloning, localization and focus formation at DNA damage sites of canine XLF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2017-01-20

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair processes, especially nonhomologous DNA-end joining (NHEJ), is critical for developing next-generation radiotherapies and chemotherapeutics for human and animal cancers. The localization, protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications of core NHEJ factors, such as human Ku70 and Ku80, might play critical roles in controlling NHEJ activity. XRCC4-like factor (XLF) is a core NHEJ factor and plays a key role in the Ku-dependent NHEJ repair process in human cells. Recently, companion animals, such as canines, have been proposed to be a good model for many aspects of cancer research, including the development of chemotherapeutics. However, the localization and regulation of core NHEJ factors in canine cells have not been elucidated. Here, we show that the localization of canine XLF changes dynamically during the cell cycle. EYFP-canine XLF localizes in the nuclei of interphase cells and accumulates immediately at microirradiated DSB sites. The structure of a putative human XLF nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a putative 14-3-3 binding motif are evolutionarily conserved in canine, chimpanzee and mouse XLF. However, the putative β-TRCP-recognizable degron of human XLF is not conserved in canine and mouse. Additionally, some vital human XLF phosphorylation sites, including the ATM major phosphorylation site (S251), are not conserved in canine XLF. Our findings might be useful for the study of the molecular mechanisms of NHEJ in canine cells and for the development of new radiosensitizers that target XLF.

  14. Inflammatory Processes Associated with Canine Intervertebral Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monchaux, Marie; Forterre, Simone; Spreng, David; Karol, Agnieszka; Forterre, Franck; Wuertz-Kozak, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) is an important pathology in humans and also in dogs. While the molecular disease mechanisms are well investigated in humans, little is known about the inflammatory mediators in naturally occurring canine IVDH. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the involved proinflammatory cytokines in human IVDH are also key cytokines in canine IVDH and thus to elucidate the suitability of the dog as a model for human trials. 59 samples from 25 dogs with surgically confirmed thoracolumbar IVDH were collected and classified in three subgroups: herniated (H), affected non-herniated (NH) disc, and adjacent non-affected (NA) disc. Discs from 11 healthy dogs acted as controls (C). Samples were analyzed for IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression (qPCR/ELISA) as well as cell infiltration and activation of the MAP kinase pathways (immunohistochemistry). Gene and protein expression of all key cytokines could be detected in IVDH affected dogs. Canine IVDH was significantly associated with a higher gene expression of IL-6 (H > C, NH > C) and TNF-α (H > C, NH > C, NA > C) and a significant down-regulation of IL-1β (H  NA, NH > NA). IL-8 (H > C, NA > C) and TNF-α (NH > C) protein levels were significantly increased in diseased dogs while inversely, IL-6 protein levels were significantly higher in patients with better clinical outcome. Aside from resident IVD cells, mostly monocytes and macrophages were found in extruded material, with concomitant activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase p38 in the majority of samples. Dogs with spontaneous IVDH might provide a useful model for human disc diseases. Although the expression of key cytokines found in human IVDH was also demonstrated in canine tissue, the inflammatory mechanisms accompanying canine IVDH diverges partially from humans, which will require further investigations in the future. In dogs, IL-6 seems to play an important

  15. Canine spontaneous head and neck squamous cell carcinomas represent their human counterparts at the molecular level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deli Liu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous canine head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC represents an excellent model of human HNSCC but is greatly understudied. To better understand and utilize this valuable resource, we performed a pilot study that represents its first genome-wide characterization by investigating 12 canine HNSCC cases, of which 9 are oral, via high density array comparative genomic hybridization and RNA-seq. The analyses reveal that these canine cancers recapitulate many molecular features of human HNSCC. These include analogous genomic copy number abnormality landscapes and sequence mutation patterns, recurrent alteration of known HNSCC genes and pathways (e.g., cell cycle, PI3K/AKT signaling, and comparably extensive heterogeneity. Amplification or overexpression of protein kinase genes, matrix metalloproteinase genes, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition genes TWIST1 and SNAI1 are also prominent in these canine tumors. This pilot study, along with a rapidly growing body of literature on canine cancer, reemphasizes the potential value of spontaneous canine cancers in HNSCC basic and translational research.

  16. Pharmacologic inhibition of MEK signaling prevents growth of canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)